Science.gov

Sample records for gathering pace driven

  1. Modeling of gas-driven magmatic overturn: Tracking of phenocryst dispersal and gathering during magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht, Philipp; Bergantz, George W.; Dufek, Josef

    2008-07-01

    We present a combined multiphase numerical and crystal-tracking approach that provides a framework to investigate the transport and zoning of crystals associated with a gas-driven mixing event. Mixing in compositionally intermediate to silicic magmatic systems is often initiated by gas exsolution in the recharging magma, causing a density inversion and subsequent overturn. The overturn is simulated for a range of bubble volume fractions ɛbubbles and therefore indirectly for a range of Reynolds numbers Re. All simulations show chaotic flow dynamics with fast overturn timescales of minutes to hours. The large-scale mixing is inefficient during a single overturn, resulting in a continuously stratified system with respect to bubble volume fraction. The crystal-tracking algorithm provides us with information on the small scales, i.e., 10 cm. On this length scale we observe gathering of different crystals during the overturn that typically ranges on the order of tens of meters. Thus, a complex crystal population may arise within a single overturn. This gathering and dispersal of crystals is strongest and most uniform for high Re. For low Re, crystal populations are characterized by less gathering of crystals that originated from distal portions of the magma body. During the overturn the crystals pass through environments of changing chemical potential. We apply the Damköhler number Da, which compares the crystallization or dissolution to the advection timescale. Results show an asymmetry between crystallization and dissolution. Crystallization times are too slow during gas-driven overturn to record transient changes in chemical potential. Crystals most likely only record their initial as well as their final chemical environment. In contrast, dissolution and advection rates are of similar order, suggesting potential dissolution during the overturn. On the basis of the results for gas-driven overturn we expect that slower physical mixing processes may be continuously

  2. Integrating behaviour into the pace-of-life continuum: Divergent levels of activity and information gathering in fast- and slow-living snakes.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Eric J; Chow, Melinda; Leos-Barajas, Vianey; Hynes, Stephanie; Hobbs, Brooke; Sparkman, Amanda M

    2017-09-01

    An animal's life history, physiology, and behaviour can be shaped by selection in a manner that favours strong associations among these aspects of an integrated phenotype. Recent work combining animal personality and life-history theory proposes that animals with faster life-history strategies (i.e., fast growth, high annual reproductive rate, short lifespan) should exhibit higher general activity levels relative to those with slower life-history strategies, but empirical tests of within-species variation in these traits are lacking. In garter snakes from ecotypes which are known to differ in ecology, life-history strategy, and physiology, we tested for differences in tongue-flick rate as a measure of information gathering and movement patterns as a measure of general activity. Tongue flicks and movement were strongly positively correlated and both behaviours were repeatable across trials. Snakes from the fast-living ecotype were more active and showed evidence of habituation. The slow-living ecotype maintained low levels of activity throughout the trials. We propose that environmental factors, such as high predation, experienced by the fast-living ecotype select for both increased information-gathering and activity levels to facilitate efficient responses to repeated challenges. Thus, we offer evidence that behaviour is an important component of co-evolved suites of traits forming a general pace-of-life continuum in this system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Marcello A.; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; Di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell’Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future. PMID:26573384

  4. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Marcello A.; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell’Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

  5. Climate-driven environmental changes around 8,200 years ago favoured increases in cetacean strandings and Mediterranean hunter-gatherers exploited them.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Marcello A; Talamo, Sahra; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Fiore, Ivana; Nehlich, Olaf; Piperno, Marcello; Tusa, Sebastiano; Collina, Carmine; Di Salvo, Rosaria; Schimmenti, Vittoria; Richards, Michael P

    2015-11-17

    Cetacean mass strandings occur regularly worldwide, yet the compounded effects of natural and anthropogenic factors often complicate our understanding of these phenomena. Evidence of past stranding episodes may, thus, be essential to establish the potential influence of climate change. Investigations on bones from the site of Grotta dell'Uzzo in North West Sicily (Italy) show that the rapid climate change around 8,200 years ago coincided with increased strandings in the Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope analyses on collagen from a large sample of remains recovered at this cave indicate that Mesolithic hunter-gatherers relied little on marine resources. A human and a red fox dating to the 8.2-kyr-BP climatic event, however, acquired at least one third of their protein from cetaceans. Numerous carcasses should have been available annually, for at least a decade, to obtain these proportions of meat. Our findings imply that climate-driven environmental changes, caused by global warming, may represent a serious threat to cetaceans in the near future.

  6. Keeping Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  7. Keeping Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  8. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly.

  9. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  10. Dual chamber rate responsive pacing system driven by contractility: final assessment after 1-year follow-up. The European PEA Clinical Investigation Group.

    PubMed

    Clémenty, J

    1998-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the long-term performance of a new dual chamber rate responsive pacing system based on the dynamic measurement of the peak endocardial acceleration (PEA) index of cardiac contractility. Seventy patients who participated in the Multicenter European Clinical Evaluation were studied 1 year after implantation by continuously recording the PEA and the heart rate (HR) during exercise stress testing and during 24 hours of usual activities. A complete examination of standard parameters was also performed to assess the pacing/sensing lead characteristics. Statistical comparisons were performed with the data recorded with the same protocol at 1 month after implant for each patient. A linear correlation coefficient was calculated between PEA and sinus rate when the patient showed predominant atrial tracked rhythm. There were no significant differences between PEA values measured at 1 month and 1 year (PEA = 0.41 +/- 0.26 g vs 0.45 +/- 0.29 g at rest and PEA = 1.63 +/- 0.77 g vs 1.72 +/- 0.83 g during peak exercise). The correlation coefficient remained stable (0.67 +/- 0.15 vs 0.65 +/- 0.14 during daily life and 0.74 +/- 0.14 vs 0.77 +/- 0.11 during exercise). The PEA signal detected by the sensor was reliable and stable. No long-term complications or adverse effects were observed, and the lead performance was comparable to that of a standard lead.

  11. Pollution Abatement and Control Expenditures Survey (PACE)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pollution Abatement Costs and Expenditures (PACE) survey is the most comprehensive national source of pollution abatement costs and expenditures related to environmental protection for the manufacturing sector of the United States. The PACE survey collects facility-level data on pollution abatement capital expenditures and operating costs associated with compliance to local, state, and federal regulations and voluntary or market-driven pollution abatement activities.

  12. Selective pacing sites.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; La Greca, C; Corrado, E; Ajello, L; Nogara, A; Ciaramitaro, G; Augugliaro, S; Novo, G; Novo, S; Assennato, P

    2015-04-01

    he right ventricular apex (RVA) has always been the most used pacing site, because it is easily accessible and provides a stable lead position with a low dislodgment rate. However, it is well-known that long-term right ventricular apical pacing may have deleterious effects on left ventricular function by inducing a iatrogenic left bundle branch block, which can have strong influences on the left ventricle hemodynamic performances. More specifically, RVA pacing causes abnormal contraction patterns and the consequent dyssynchrony may cause myocardial perfusion defects, histopathological alterations, left ventricular dilation and both systolic and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction. All these long-term changes could account for the higher morbidity and mortality rates observe in patients with chronic RVA pacing compared with atrial pacing. This observation led to the reassessment of traditional approaches and to the research of alternative pacing sites, in order to get to more physiological pattern of ventricular activation and to avoid deleterious effects. Then, attempts were made with: right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) pacing, direct His bundle pacing (DHBP), parahisian pacing (PHP) and bifocal (RVA + RVOT) pacing. For example, RVOT pacing, especially in its septal portion, is superior to the RVA pacing and it would determine a contraction pattern very similar to the spontaneous one, not only because the septal portions are the first parts to became depolarized, but also for the proximity to the normal conduction system. RVOT is preferable in terms of safety too. DHBP is an attractive alternative to RVA pacing because it leads to a synchronous depolarization of myocardial cells and, therefore, to an efficient ventricular contraction. So it would be the best technique, however the procedure requires longer average implant times and dedicated instruments and it cannot be carried out in patients affected by His bundle pathologies; furthermore, due to the His

  13. Gatherings as Patchworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhail, Clark

    2008-01-01

    Erving Goffman's concept of the gathering: the co-presence of two or more individuals in a common location in space and time. Research has shown that most gathering members assemble, remain and ultimately disperse together with one or more companions. "Singles" assemble and act alone but may intermittently interact with other "singles: or "withs"…

  14. The Way We Gather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Marta

    2010-01-01

    "The way you make your bed is the way your day will go." The way in which people gather is an extension of the making-the-bed analogy: "The way we gather is the way our school days go." The mindfulness people bring to the little ways they behave with one another sets the tone for the entire organization. When Montessori speaks of allowing the…

  15. Instruments for Gathering Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canals, Laia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter sets out various methods for gathering important data on the language uses of participants in a research project. These methods imply interaction between students, teachers and researchers. They are used in the design of research projects based on action research, ethnography or conversational analysis, this being the case with the…

  16. A gathering for Gardner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-07-01

    Martin Gardner, who turns 94 this autumn, seems to have pulled off an astounding trick. Every other year hundreds of people gather to honour Gardner, who is the author of over 70 books and wrote the popular "Mathematical Games" column that appeared in Scientific American for a quarter of a century from 1956. What is astonishing is that the people come from a bewildering variety of professions and include jugglers, magicians, artists, puzzle-makers, logicians, computer scientists, pseudoscience debunkers and mathematicians.

  17. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007417 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station?s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  18. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007419 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  19. Burbank conducts PACE Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-01

    ISS030-E-007418 (1 Dec. 2011) --- In the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory, NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, conducts a session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) at the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack / Fluids Combustion Facility (FIR/FCF). PACE is designed to investigate the capability of conducting high magnification colloid experiments with the LMM for determining the minimum size particles which can be resolved with it.

  20. Pacing stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Gligorova, Suzana; Agrusta, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Background High-rate pacing is a valid stress test to be used in conjunction with echocardiography; it is independent of physical exercise and does not require drug administration. There are two main applications of pacing stress in the echo lab: the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease through induction of a regional transient dysfunction; and the assessment of contractile reserve through peak systolic pressure/ end-systolic volume relationship at increasing heart rates to assess global left ventricular contractility. Methods The pathophysiologic rationale of pacing stress for noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease is obvious, with the stress determined by a controlled increase in heart rate, which is a major determinant of myocardial oxygen demand, and thereby tachycardia may exceed a fixed coronary flow reserve in the presence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. The use of pacing stress echo to assess left ventricular contractile reserve is less established, but promising. Positive inotropic interventions are mirrored by smaller end-systolic volumes and higher end-systolic pressures. An increased heart rate progressively increases the force of ventricular contraction (Bowditch treppe or staircase phenomenon). To build the force-frequency relationship, the force is determined at different heart rate steps as the ratio of the systolic pressure (cuff sphygmomanometer)/end-systolic volume index (biplane Simpson rule). The heart rate is determined from ECG. Conclusion Two-dimensional echocardiography during pacing is a useful tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Because of its safety and ease of repeatability noninvasive pacing stress echo can be the first-line stress test in patients with permanent pacemaker. The force-frequency can be defined as up- sloping (normal) when the peak stress pacing systolic pressure/end-systolic volume index is higher than baseline and intermediate stress values, biphasic with an

  1. PACE Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  2. Self-Paced Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Norma Jean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of self-paced units. Development suggestions include determining the form of the units, including goals, responsibilities, and definitions of terms; keeping them short; including a variety of activities; and requiring that all lessons be completed at school. Contains sample units on climatology and meteorology, the sun, and…

  3. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    PubMed

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. EuroPACE 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Branden, Jef; Van der Perre, Georges

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Professional and Academic Channel for Europe (EuroPACE) 2000, a network of 44 traditional universities, 1 open university, and 15 partners in industry and society that supports telematics-based education and training. Looks at the network's organization, model of learning, and how it approaches virtual classrooms/campuses and…

  5. Self-Paced Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Norma Jean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of self-paced units. Development suggestions include determining the form of the units, including goals, responsibilities, and definitions of terms; keeping them short; including a variety of activities; and requiring that all lessons be completed at school. Contains sample units on climatology and meteorology, the sun, and…

  6. TCP Pacing Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission control protocol (TCP) was conceived and designed to run over a variety of communication links, including wireless and high-bandwidth links. However, with recent technological advances in satellite and fiber-optic networks, researchers are reevaluating the flexibility of TCP. The TCP pacing and packet pair probing implementation may help overcome two of the major obstacles identified for efficient bandwidth utilization over communication links with large delay-bandwidth products.

  7. Public Assistance Comprehensive Education (PACE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shirley

    The Public Assistance Comprehensive Education (PACE) Program at Bronx Community College provides programs and services to assist students on welfare to successfully overcome barriers they meet while becoming productive members of the workforce. Each semester, PACE will recruit 200 students from the COPE program and work intensively in addressing…

  8. [Percussion pacing of symptomatic bradycardia].

    PubMed

    Olesen, Mette Dam; Barnung, Steen Krøyer; Berlac, Peter Anthony

    2008-05-26

    Transvenous, transthoracic, and percussion pacing are well recognised treatments of bradycardia and asystole with residual p wave activity. We report two cases of severe bradycardia in which percussion pacing was applied and the procedure was found to be effective. This technique can be life-saving and it should be well-known by all doctors.

  9. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  10. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sam Sx; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon.

  11. Biventricular pacing in paced patients with normal hearts.

    PubMed

    Simantirakis, Emmanuel N; Arkolaki, Eva G; Chrysostomakis, Stavros I; Vardas, Panos E

    2009-11-01

    Right ventricular apical (RVA) stimulation, although beneficial in the treatment of symptomatic bradycardia, has proven detrimental in a substantial percentage of pacemaker recipients, leading to iatrogenic deterioration of left ventricular structure and function. Alternative right ventricular pacing sites appeared advantageous but their superiority has not been proven. Biventricular stimulation is effective in reducing ventricular dyssynchrony in subgroups of heart failure patients, improving their functional capacity, morbidity, and mortality. Therefore, it seems logical that this pacing strategy, by eliminating ventricular dyssynchrony, could play an important role in preventing the deleterious effects of chronic RVA stimulation in patients with normal hearts who undergo cardiac pacing for bradycardia indications. Preliminary investigations have yielded encouraging results, but further studies with harder endpoints such as quality of life, morbidity, and mortality are necessary to clarify the potentially advantageous effect of biventricular stimulation in paced patients with normal hearts.

  12. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  13. Gathering and Preparing Wild Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, A. Dudley; Williams, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Discussed are the applications of gathering and preparing wild foods to environmental, survival, career, and community education programs. It recommends wild foods activities be used to stimulate social and historical studies of "return-to-nature" life styles. Wild food study also emphasizes man as part of the environment. (MR)

  14. Gathering Design References from Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debs, Luciana; Kelley, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teaching design to middle and high school students can be challenging. One of the first procedures in teaching design is to help students gather information that will be useful in the design phase. An early stage of engineering design as described by Lewis (2005), calls for the designer to establish the state of the art of the problem. During this…

  15. Gathering Design References from Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debs, Luciana; Kelley, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teaching design to middle and high school students can be challenging. One of the first procedures in teaching design is to help students gather information that will be useful in the design phase. An early stage of engineering design as described by Lewis (2005), calls for the designer to establish the state of the art of the problem. During this…

  16. Gathering Client Data: What Works?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Christine; Zabel, Diane

    Most libraries involved to any extent with total quality management (TQM) realize that successfully gathering information from their customers is the key to improving services. To do this libraries must employ a variety of methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative research. Quantitative primary data is usually collected in libraries by…

  17. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  18. Information gathering for CLP classification.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Ida; Giordano, Felice; Costamagna, Francesca Marina

    2011-01-01

    Regulation 1272/2008 includes provisions for two types of classification: harmonised classification and self-classification. The harmonised classification of substances is decided at Community level and a list of harmonised classifications is included in the Annex VI of the classification, labelling and packaging Regulation (CLP). If a chemical substance is not included in the harmonised classification list it must be self-classified, based on available information, according to the requirements of Annex I of the CLP Regulation. CLP appoints that the harmonised classification will be performed for carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction substances (CMR substances) and for respiratory sensitisers category 1 and for other hazard classes on a case-by-case basis. The first step of classification is the gathering of available and relevant information. This paper presents the procedure for gathering information and to obtain data. The data quality is also discussed.

  19. Self-stabilizing Deterministic Gathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonné, Yoann; Petit, Franck

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility to deterministically solve the gathering problem (GP) with weak robots (anonymous, autonomous, disoriented, oblivious, deaf, and dumb). We introduce strong multiplicity detection as the ability for the robots to detect the exact number of robots located at a given position. We show that with strong multiplicity detection, there exists a deterministic self-stabilizing algorithm solving GP for n robots if, and only if, n is odd.

  20. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  1. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  2. Pacing a chaotic plasma with a music signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, W. B.; Rosa, E.; Ticos, C. M.; Walkenstein, J. A.; Monti, M.

    2001-06-01

    An experimental plasma system is driven with a music signal output from a cd player. With the plasma in the periodic regime, optical detection of the light discharge allows the music to be heard from a loudspeaker. That does not happen when the plasma is chaotic, in which case we hear a noise-like hiss typical of chaos. Modulation is observed in the periodic paced plasma, but is not so obvious when the plasma is chaotic.

  3. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  4. Pacing in Children's Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, James F., Jr.; Bryant, Jennings

    Following a content analysis, 85 children's programs were assigned a pacing index derived from the following criteria: (1) frequency of camera cuts; (2) frequency of related scene changes; (3) frequency of unrelated scene changes; (4) frequency of auditory changes; (5) percentage of active motion; (6) percentage of active talking; and (7)…

  5. Mathematics Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.; Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Algebra 1, Geometry, Math for Technology, Mathematical Problem Solving, and Pre-Algebra developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace…

  6. Robins gather in a tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In a wooded area of Kennedy Space Center, robins gather on a tree branch just beginning to show new Spring growth. A member of the thrush family, robins inhabit towns, gardens, open woodlands and agricultural lands. They range through most of North America, spending winters in large roosts mostly in the United States but also Newfoundland, southern Ontario and British Columbia. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  7. Robins gather in a tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In a wooded area of Kennedy Space Center, robins gather on a tree branch just beginning to show new Spring growth. A member of the thrush family, robins inhabit towns, gardens, open woodlands and agricultural lands. They range through most of North America, spending winters in large roosts mostly in the United States but also Newfoundland, southern Ontario and British Columbia. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  8. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    PubMed

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  9. Pacing in Distance Education: Something for Everyone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shale, Doug G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the concept of pacing as it relates to distance education. Highlights include the relationship of pacing to academic standards, activity scheduling, student independence, student interaction, effective utilization of media, course materials, learning methods, student motivation, drop-out rate, and the cost effectiveness of pacing. (LRW)

  10. An Unconventional Route of Left Ventricular Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Varm, Chandra Mohan; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Goel, Amit; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Mishra, Vikas; Singh Syal, Karandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a rare complication of transvenous right ventricular pacing by temporary pacing wire causing iatrogenic interventricular septal perforation and left ventricular pacing in a 69-year-old man who was referred for recurrent syncope with sinus arrest. PMID:28197251

  11. Pacing in Distance Education: Something for Everyone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shale, Doug G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the concept of pacing as it relates to distance education. Highlights include the relationship of pacing to academic standards, activity scheduling, student independence, student interaction, effective utilization of media, course materials, learning methods, student motivation, drop-out rate, and the cost effectiveness of pacing. (LRW)

  12. From Traditional Accountability to Shared Responsibility: The Benefits and Challenges of Student Consultants Gathering Midcourse Feedback in College Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The explicit purpose of gathering feedback in college classes is to improve those courses, usually along the lines of structure, organisation, pace, or some other aspect of the course over which the professor typically has control. A potential outcome that is less immediately obvious is the shift that can take place regarding who is responsible…

  13. Modeling Medicare Costs of PACE Populations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Karon, Sarita L.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, Medicare has paid PACE providers a monthly capitated rate equal to 95 percent of the site's county AAPCC multiplied by a PACE-specific frailty adjuster of 2.39. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 makes PACE a permanent provider category and mandates that future Medicare payments be based upon the rate structure of the Medicare+Choice payment system, adjusted for the comparative frailty of PACE enrollees and other factors deemed to be appropriate by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This study revisits the calculation of the PACE frailty adjuster and explores the effect of risk adjustment on that frailty adjuster. PMID:11481753

  14. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  15. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  16. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  17. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  18. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  19. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  20. Optical pacing of the adult rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Wang, Y. T.; Doughman, Y. Q.; Watanabe, M.; Cheng, Y.; Rollins, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Optical pacing has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative to electrical pacing in embryonic hearts. In this study, the feasibility of optically pacing an adult rabbit heart was explored. Hearts from adult New Zealand White rabbits (n = 9) were excised, cannulated and perfused on a modified Langendorff apparatus. Pulsed laser light (λ = 1851 nm) was directed to either the left or right atrium through a multimode optical fiber. An ECG signal from the left ventricle and a trigger pulse from the laser were recorded simultaneously to determine when capture was achieved. Successful optical pacing was demonstrated by obtaining pacing capture, stopping, then recapturing as well as by varying the pacing frequency. Stimulation thresholds measured at various pulse durations suggested that longer pulses (8 ms) had a lower energy capture threshold. To determine whether optical pacing caused damage, two hearts were perfused with 30 µM of propidium iodide and analyzed histologically. A small number of cells near the stimulation site had compromised cell membranes, which probably limited the time duration over which pacing was maintained. Here, short-term optical pacing (few minutes duration) is demonstrated in the adult rabbit heart for the first time. Future studies will be directed to optimize optical pacing parameters to decrease stimulation thresholds and may enable longer-term pacing. PMID:24049683

  1. Keeping pace with Capitol Hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, C.

    2007-01-01

    At the Capitol Hill, the legislative branch of the United States government, the work is always at pace. Working with Congress is a tough job yet, rewarding. The Congress worked hard together to serve the public interest but many big issues are one small part of what Congress does. However, many US news media do not report what the government does instead, the media report what the government argues about. The media reports the conflicts but story is always incomplete. In order for the people know what is happening to the government, contact the congressional representative to know the complete story.

  2. Biventricular Pacing (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Issue In 2002, (before the establishment of the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee), the Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a health technology policy assessment on biventricular (BiV) pacing, also called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The goal of treatment with BiV pacing is to improve cardiac output for people in heart failure (HF) with conduction defect on ECG (wide QRS interval) by synchronizing ventricular contraction. The Medical Advisory Secretariat concluded that there was evidence of short (6 months) and longer-term (12 months) effectiveness in terms of cardiac function and quality of life (QoL). More recently, a hospital submitted an application to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee to review CRT, and the Medical Advisory Secretariat subsequently updated its health technology assessment. Background Chronic HF results from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to act as a pump. It is estimated that 1% to 5% of the general population (all ages) in Europe have chronic HF. (1;2) About one-half of the patients with HF are women, and about 40% of men and 60% of women with this condition are aged older than 75 years. The incidence (i.e., the number of new cases in a specified period) of chronic HF is age dependent: from 1 to 5 per 1,000 people each year in the total population, to as high as 30 to 40 per 1,000 people each year in those aged 75 years and older. Hence, in an aging society, the prevalence (i.e., the number of people with a given disease or condition at any time) of HF is increasing, despite a reduction in cardiovascular mortality. A recent study revealed 28,702 patients were hospitalized for first-time HF in Ontario between April 1994 and March 1997. (3) Women comprised 51% of the cohort. Eighty-five percent were aged 65 years or older, and 58% were aged 75 years or older. Patients with chronic HF experience shortness of breath, a limited capacity

  3. Adaptation of naturally paced saccades

    PubMed Central

    Blangero, Annabelle; Herman, James P.; Wallman, Josh; Harwood, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    In the natural environment, humans make saccades almost continuously. In many eye movement experiments, however, observers are required to fixate for unnaturally long periods of time. The resulting long and monotonous experimental sessions can become especially problematic when collecting data in a clinical setting, where time can be scarce and subjects easily fatigued. With this in mind, we tested whether the well-studied motor learning process of saccade adaptation could be induced with a dramatically shortened intertrial interval. Observers made saccades to targets that stepped left or right either ∼250 ms or ∼1,600 ms after the saccade landed. In experiment I, we tested baseline saccade parameters to four different target amplitudes (5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) in the two timing settings. In experiments II and III, we adapted 10° saccades via 2° intrasaccadic steps either backwards or forwards, respectively. Seven subjects performed eight separate adaptation sessions (2 intertrial timings × 2 adaptation direction × 2 session trial lengths). Adaptation proceeded remarkably similarly in both timing conditions across the multiple sessions. In the faster-paced sessions, robust adaptation was achieved in under 2 min, demonstrating the efficacy of our approach to streamlining saccade adaptation experiments. Although saccade amplitudes were similar between conditions, the faster-paced condition unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher peak velocities in all subjects. This surprising finding demonstrates that the stereotyped “main sequence” relationship between saccade amplitude and peak velocity is not as fixed as originally thought. PMID:24623511

  4. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  5. PACE: Proactively Secure Accumulo with Cryptographic Enforcement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-27

    Microbenchmark Harness (JMH).2 We measured the performance of PACE’s encryption and signature functionality, both for reading and writing records...the run, including the time to setup PACE and to read or write the records. Instead of reporting on total time, we report on throughput—the number of...reads or writes per second. The purpose of this evaluation is to compare the performance of PACE-enabled versus non-PACE-enabled clients. Specifi

  6. Intelligence Gathering Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2011-01-01

    The gathering of information for intelligence purposes often comes from interviewing a variety of individuals. Some, like suspects and captured prisoners, are individuals for whom the stakes are especially high and who might not be particularly cooperative. But information is also gathered from myriad individuals who have relevant facts to…

  7. Intelligence Gathering Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2011-01-01

    The gathering of information for intelligence purposes often comes from interviewing a variety of individuals. Some, like suspects and captured prisoners, are individuals for whom the stakes are especially high and who might not be particularly cooperative. But information is also gathered from myriad individuals who have relevant facts to…

  8. A decade of nuclear pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonnet, V.; Gilbert, L.; Zucker, I.R.; Werres, R.; Atherley, T.; Manhardt, M.; Cort, J.

    1984-01-01

    In April, 1973, a decade-long study was begun on nuclear-powered pacemakers. The first 15 of these were designed by the Numec Corporation under a contract from the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Altogether 151 units powered by the isotope plutonium 238 were implanted in 131 patients; the pacemakers of 4 different manufacturers were used. The last nuclear pacemaker was implanted in January, 1983. The actuarial survival at 10 years was 92%, meeting the original performance goal of the Commission of 90%. Ninety pulse generators are still in service today; 25 patients have died and 36 pulse generators have been replaced with non-nuclear units. The most common indication for replacement was an inappropriate pacing mode. This high reliability and superior performance suggest that continued use of a radioisotopic power source is justified, particularly if combined with the electronic circuits of today's dual-chambered, multiprogrammable, and multifunctional pacemakers.

  9. Self-Paced Training: Perceptions and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfeck, Wallace H., II; And Others

    Currently, there is concern about the quality of Navy training. This concern is best exemplified by the present debate over the adequacy of "self-pacing" in Navy training courses. This paper illuminates some perceptions surrounding self-pacing in Navy training, explores some realities of Navy training, and presents a recommendation about…

  10. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  11. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  12. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  13. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  14. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  15. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  16. How to Perform Permanent His Bundle Pacing: Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraman, Pugazhendhi; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2016-12-01

    Right ventricular pacing can cause ventricular dyssynchrony and result in reduced left ventricular systolic function and heart failure. Permanent His bundle pacing is a more physiologic form of pacing, but can be technically challenging. In this article, we describe our technique for permanent His bundle pacing including special considerations and limitations associated with His bundle pacing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PACE organizational structure. 460.60 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A PACE... planning a change in organizational structure must notify CMS and the State administering agency, in...

  18. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PACE organizational structure. 460.60 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A PACE... planning a change in organizational structure must notify CMS and the State administering agency, in...

  19. Structured sanitary preparation to mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Andrzej; Gładysz, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    Structured sanitary preparation to mass gatherings is based on the set of instructions and legal requirements which are different for different jurisdictions. In many countries special checklists are used for itemized scrutiny of the sanitary preparation to the event. Those checklists are present in two forms. One is relatively short list of legal requirements necessary for obtaining permit to organize mass gathering event. Another is much larger set of questions which contains itemized comprehensive review of activities advisable for effective organization of the event. It includes safety measures as well as logistic structure of effective organization. Polish legal bill on mass gatherings deals extensively with security measures, but sanitary supervision is left to Sanitary Inspection without any specifications of points to be checked and without clearly stated norms for sanitary infrastructure at the venues. The Authors stress the need for uniform instruction and checklist for use in scrutiny of sanitary preparation to mass gathering by State Sanitary Inspectors.

  20. An information theory of image gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1991-01-01

    Shannon's mathematical theory of communication is extended to image gathering. Expressions are obtained for the total information that is received with a single image-gathering channel and with parallel channels. It is concluded that the aliased signal components carry information even though these components interfere with the within-passband components in conventional image gathering and restoration, thereby degrading the fidelity and visual quality of the restored image. An examination of the expression for minimum mean-square-error, or Wiener-matrix, restoration from parallel image-gathering channels reveals a method for unscrambling the within-passband and aliased signal components to restore spatial frequencies beyond the sampling passband out to the spatial frequency response cutoff of the optical aperture.

  1. Significance of pacing cycle lengths in manifest entrainment of orthodromic circus movement tachycardia by ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Zaman, L; Castellanos, A; Saoudi, N C; Stafford, W J; Trohman, R G; Interian, A; Myerburg, R J

    1987-06-01

    The physiology of entrainment of orthodromic circus movement tachycardia (CMT) was studied using ventricular pacing during 18 episodes of induced CMT in 7 patients with atrioventricular (AV) accessory pathways. The first paced impulse was delivered as late as possible in the tachycardia cycle (mean 88 +/- 5% of the spontaneous cycle length [CL]). Entrainment was demonstrated by the following criteria: 1:1 retrograde conduction via the accessory pathway; capture of atrial, ventricular and His bundle electrograms at the pacing rate; and resumption of tachycardia at its previous rate after cessation of pacing. The number of ventricular paced impulses ranged from 5 to 14 (mean 8 +/- 3), and entrainment occurred in 2 to 7 paced cycles (mean 4 +/- 2). Orthodromic activation of a major part of the reentry circuit (manifest entrainment) was demonstrated during 9 episodes by the occurrence of His bundle electrogram preceding the first CMT QRS at the time anticipated from the last paced beat. In the 9 other episodes, persistent retrograde His bundle activation and AV nodal penetration by each paced impulse caused a delay (mean 79 +/- 25 ms) in activation of the His bundle preceding the first CMT QRS after the last paced beat. The mean pacing CL achieving manifest entrainment was 92 +/- 3% of the tachycardia CL, compared with 84 +/- 3% for retrograde AV nodal penetration (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, manifest entrainment of orthodromic CMT can be demonstrated by ventricular pacing at very long CLs; shorter CLs may cause CMT termination due to retrograde AV nodal penetration.

  2. Simulating PACE Global Ocean Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA PACE mission is a hyper-spectral radiometer planned for launch in the next decade. It is intended to provide new information on ocean biogeochemical constituents by parsing the details of high resolution spectral absorption and scattering. It is the first of its kind for global applications and as such, poses challenges for design and operation. To support pre-launch mission development and assess on-orbit capabilities, the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has developed a dynamic simulation of global water-leaving radiances, using an ocean model containing multiple ocean phytoplankton groups, particulate detritus, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and chromophoric dissolved organic carbon (CDOC) along with optical absorption and scattering processes at 1 nm spectral resolution. The purpose here is to assess the skill of the dynamic model and derived global radiances. Global bias, uncertainty, and correlation are derived using available modern satellite radiances at moderate spectral resolution. Total chlorophyll, PIC, and the absorption coefficient of CDOC (aCDOC), are simultaneously assimilated to improve the fidelity of the optical constituent fields. A 5-year simulation showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) comparisons of chlorophyll (r = 0.869), PIC (r = 0.868), and a CDOC (r =0.890) with satellite data. Additionally, diatoms (r = 0.890), cyanobacteria (r = 0.732), and coccolithophores (r = 0.716) were significantly correlated with in situ data. Global assimilated distributions of optical constituents were coupled with a radiative transfer model (Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model, OASIM) to estimate normalized water-leaving radiances at 1 nm for the spectral range 250-800 nm. These unassimilated radiances were within 0.074 mW/sq cm/micron/sr of MODIS-Aqua radiances at 412, 443, 488, 531, 547, and 667 nm. This difference represented a bias of 10.4% (model low). A mean correlation of 0.706 (P < 0.05) was found with global

  3. Bachmann's Bundle Pacing not Only Improves Interatrial Conduction but Also Reduces the Need for Ventricular Pacing.

    PubMed

    Sławuta, Agnieszka; Kliś, Magdalena; Skoczyński, Przemysław; Bańkowski, Tomasz; Moszczyńska-Stulin, Joanna; Gajek, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Patients treated for sick sinus syndrome may have interatrial conduction disorder leading to atrial fibrillation. This study was aimed to assess the influence of the atrial pacing site on interatrial and atrioventricular conduction as well as the percentage of ventricular pacing in patients with sick sinus syndrome implanted with atrioventricular pacemaker. The study population: 96 patients (58 females, 38 males) aged 74.1 ± 11.8 years were divided in two groups: Group 1 (n = 44) with right atrial appendage pacing and group 2 (n = 52) with Bachmann's area pacing. We assessed the differences in atrioventricular conduction in sinus rhythm and atrial 60 and 90 bpm pacing, P-wave duration and percentage of ventricular pacing. No differences in baseline P-wave duration in sinus rhythm between the groups (102.4 ± 17 ms vs. 104.1 ± 26 ms, p = ns.) were noted. Atrial pacing 60 bpm resulted in longer P-wave in group 1 vs. group 2 (138.3 ± 21 vs. 106.1 ± 15 ms, p < 0.01). The differences between atrioventricular conduction time during sinus rhythm and atrial pacing at 60 and 90 bpm were significantly longer in patients with right atrial appendage vs. Bachmann's pacing (44.1 ± 17 vs. 9.2 ± 7 ms p < 0.01 and 69.2 ± 31 vs. 21.4 ± 12 ms p < 0.05, respectively). The percentage of ventricular pacing was higher in group 1 (21 vs. 4%, p < 0.01). Bachmann's bundle pacing decreases interatrial and atrioventricular conduction delay. Moreover, the frequency-dependent atrioventricular conduction lengthening is much less pronounced during Bachmann's bundle pacing. Right atrial appendage pacing in sick sinus syndrome patients promotes a higher percentage of ventricular pacing.

  4. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  5. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  6. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  7. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  8. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  9. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  10. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  11. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  12. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  13. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  14. The Pace of Cultural Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world’s terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history. PMID:23024804

  15. The pace of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world's terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history.

  16. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Soomaroo, Lee; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reviews of mass gathering events have traditionally concentrated on crowd variables that affect the level and type of medical care needed. Weather and environmental hazards at mass gathering events have not been fully researched. This review examines these events and aims to provide future suggestions for event organisers, medical resource planners, and emergency services, including local hospital emergency departments. Methods A review was conducted using computerised data bases: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, HMIC and EMBASE, with Google used to widen the search beyond peer-reviewed publications, to identify grey literature. All peer-review literature articles found containing information pertaining to lessons identified from mass gathering disasters due to weather or environmental hazards leading to participant death, injury or illness were analysed and reviewed. Disasters occurring due to crowd variables were not included. These articles were read, analysed, abstracted and summarised. Results 20 articles from literature search were found detailing mass gathering disasters relating directly to weather or environmental hazards from 1988 – 2011, with only 17 cases found within peer-review literature. Two events grey literature from 2011 are due to undergo further inquiry while one article reviews an event originally occurring in 1922. Analysis of cases were categorised in to heat and cold-related events, lightning and storms and disease outbreak. Conclusions Mass gathering events have an enormous potential to place a severe strain on the local health care system, Prior health resource and environmental planning for heat & cold-related illness, lightning & storms, and disease outbreak can advance emergency preparedness and response to potential disasters. Citation: Soomaroo L, Murray V. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings. PLoS Currents Disasters. 2012 Jul 31 Keywords: Mass Gatherings, Disasters, Sporting Events, Festivals, Concerts

  17. Risk perception influences athletic pacing strategy.

    PubMed

    Micklewright, Dominic; Parry, David; Robinson, Tracy; Deacon, Greg; Renfree, Andrew; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Matthews, William J

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to examine risk taking and risk perception associations with perceived exertion, pacing, and performance in athletes. Two experiments were conducted in which risk perception was assessed using the domain-specific risk taking (DOSPERT) scale in 20 novice cyclists (experiment 1) and 32 experienced ultramarathon runners (experiment 2). In experiment 1, participants predicted their pace and then performed a 5-km maximum effort cycling time trial on a calibrated Kingcycle mounted bicycle. Split times and perceived exertion were recorded every kilometer. In experiment 2, each participant predicted their split times before running a 100-km ultramarathon. Split times and perceived exertion were recorded at seven checkpoints. In both experiments, higher and lower risk perception groups were created using median split of DOSPERT scores. In experiment 1, pace during the first kilometer was faster among lower risk perceivers compared with higher risk perceivers (t(18) = 2.0, P = 0.03) and faster among higher risk takers compared with lower risk takers (t(18) = 2.2, P = 0.02). Actual pace was slower than predicted pace during the first kilometer in both the higher risk perceivers (t(9) = -4.2, P = 0.001) and lower risk perceivers (t(9) = -1.8, P = 0.049). In experiment 2, pace during the first 36 km was faster among lower risk perceivers compared with higher risk perceivers (t(16) = 2.0, P = 0.03). Irrespective of risk perception group, actual pace was slower than predicted pace during the first 18 km (t(16) = 8.9, P < 0.001) and from 18 to 36 km (t(16) = 4.0, P < 0.001). In both experiments, there was no difference in performance between higher and lower risk perception groups. Initial pace is associated with an individual's perception of risk, with low perceptions of risk being associated with a faster starting pace. Large differences between predicted and actual pace suggest that the performance template lacks accuracy, perhaps indicating

  18. Disasters at Mass Gatherings: Lessons from History

    PubMed Central

    Soomaroo, Lee; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reviews of mass gathering events have traditionally concentrated on crowd variables that affect the level and type of medical care needed. Crowd disasters at mass gathering events have not been fully researched and this review examines these aiming to provide future suggestions for event organisers, medical resource planners, and emergency services, including local hospital emergency departments. Methods A review was conducted using computerised data bases: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, HMIC and EMBASE, with Google used to widen the search beyond peer-reviewed publications, to identify grey literature. All peer-review literature articles found containing information pertaining to lessons identified from mass gathering crowd disasters were analysed and reviewed. Disasters occurring in extreme weather events, and environmental leading to participant illness were not included. These articles were read, analysed, abstracted and summarised. Results 156 articles from literature search were found detailing mass gathering disasters identified from 1971 – 2011. With only 21 cases found within peer-review literature. Twelve events were further documented as a case reports. Five events were examined as review articles while four events underwent commissioned inquiries. Analysis of cases were categorised in to crowd control, event access, fire safety, medical preparedness and emergency response. Conclusions Mass gathering events have an enormous potential to place a severe strain on the local health care system, and a mixture of high crowd density, restricted points of access, poor fire safety, minimum crowd control and lack of on-site medical care can lead to problems that end in disaster. PMID:22453897

  19. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15–39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7–37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering. PMID:26176306

  20. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  1. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this

  2. Conservation law for self-paced movements

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal control models of biological movements introduce external task factors to specify the pace of movements. Here, we present the dual to the principle of optimality based on a conserved quantity, called “drive,” that represents the influence of internal motivation level on movement pace. Optimal control and drive conservation provide equivalent descriptions for the regularities observed within individual movements. For regularities across movements, drive conservation predicts a previously unidentified scaling law between the overall size and speed of various self-paced hand movements in the absence of any external tasks, which we confirmed with psychophysical experiments. Drive can be interpreted as a high-level control variable that sets the overall pace of movements and may be represented in the brain as the tonic levels of neuromodulators that control the level of internal motivation, thus providing insights into how internal states affect biological motor control. PMID:27418602

  3. Determinants of Enrollment Among Applicants to PACE

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Carol V.; Massey, Susan; Dorsey, Turahn

    1997-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, a new approach to the integration of acute and long-term care(LTC) services was conceived and refined at On Lok, an organization in the Chinese community of San Francisco. Since then, On Lok and 10 Federal demonstration sites have tested this model which is today called the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). This program has gained considerable political support and as a result, the 1997 Balanced Budget Agreement establishes PACE as a permanent provider under Medicare. The Federal demonstration of PACE was designed as a voluntary program. By exploiting its voluntary enrollment design, this study analyzes the determinants of program participation within a group of screened applicants. Findings of this study support the theory that the capitated payment structure of PACE creates incentives for program staff to avoid costly individuals. However, home ownership and provider attachment also act as important and significant barriers to enrollment. PMID:10345402

  4. Dopamine effects on evidence gathering and integration

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Christina; Schneider, Brooke C.; Braun, Vivien; Kolbeck, Katharina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background Disturbances in evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration have been associated with the presence of or propensity for delusions. Previous evidence suggests that these 2 types of reasoning bias might be differentially affected by antipsychotic medication. We aimed to investigate the effects of a dopaminergic agonist (L-dopa) and a dopaminergic antagonist (haloperidol) on evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration after single-dose administration in healthy individuals. Methods The study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover design. Participants were healthy individuals aged 18–40 years. We administered a new data-gathering task designed to increase sensitivity to change compared with traditional tasks. The Bias Against Disconfirmatory Evidence (BADE) task was used as a measure of disconfirmatory evidence integration. Results We included 30 individuals in our study. In the data-gathering task, dopaminergic modulation had no significant effect on the amount of evidence gathered before reaching a decision. In contrast, the ability of participants to integrate disconfirmatory evidence showed a significant linear dopaminergic modulation pattern (highest with haloperidol, intermediate with placebo, lowest with L-dopa), with the difference between haloperidol and L-dopa marginally reaching significance. Limitations Although the doses used for haloperidol and L-dopa were similar to those used in previous studies, drug plasma level measurements would have added to the validity of findings. Conclusion Evidence gathering and disconfirmatory evidence integration might be differentially influenced by dopaminergic agents. Our findings are in support of a dual-disturbance account of delusions and provide a plausible neurobiological basis for the use of interventions targeted at improving reasoning biases as an adjunctive treatment in patients with psychotic disorders. PMID:26197302

  5. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope.

  6. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  7. Synchronization of ventricular fibrillation with electrical pacing guided by optical signals: comparison of pacing locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Heidy; Hwang, Gyo-Seung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-02-01

    Wavefront synchronization is an important aspect preceding the termination of ventricular fibrillation (VF). We designed a novel approach using multi-electrode pacing that could reduce the energy consumption of successful defibrillation by more than 100-fold. We compared the efficacy of a synchronized pacing algorithm using optical recording-guided pacing at the right ventricle and the posterior left ventricle in isolated rabbit hearts. Two modes of pacing were used in the study. The electrodes were individually controlled (independent mode, ISyncP) or fired together (simultaneous mode, SSyncP) when triggered by tissue polarization at a reference site separate from the pacing sites. The hearts were stained with voltage-sensitive dye and illuminated with laser for epifluorescence imaging during pacing. The number of phase singularities of VF propagation was used to estimate the complexity of VF. A decrease in the number of PS signified a higher degree of VF organization. We found that the pacing algorithm was more effective if the pacing was applied to the posterior left ventricle than to the right ventricle. Pacing in the posterior left ventricle resulted in a 25.3% decrease in the number of PS for ISyncP and a 31% decrease for SSyncP. Pacing in the right ventricle resulted in a 29.0% decrease for ISyncP and a 2.3% increase for SSyncP. The 5mA current reflected a 27.8% decrease for ISyncP and a 32.2% decrease for SSyncP, whereas the 10mA current reflected a 27.2% decrease for ISyncP and a 5.2% increase for SSyncP. We conclude that synchronized pacing can induce VF organization, and the efficacy is higher when pacing in the left ventricle with 5 mA.

  8. The Manipulation of Pace within Endurance Sport

    PubMed Central

    Skorski, Sabrina; Abbiss, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    In any athletic event, the ability to appropriately distribute energy is essential to prevent premature fatigue prior to the completion of the event. In sport science literature this is termed “pacing.” Within the past decade, research aiming to better understand the underlying mechanisms influencing the selection of an athlete's pacing during exercise has dramatically increased. It is suggested that pacing is a combination of anticipation, knowledge of the end-point, prior experience and sensory feedback. In order to better understand the role each of these factors have in the regulation of pace, studies have often manipulated various conditions known to influence performance such as the feedback provided to participants, the starting strategy or environmental conditions. As with all research there are several factors that should be considered in the interpretation of results from these studies. Thus, this review aims at discussing the pacing literature examining the manipulation of: (i) energy expenditure and pacing strategies, (ii) kinematics or biomechanics, (iii) exercise environment, and (iv) fatigue development. PMID:28289392

  9. Reversal of Pacing-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Normal QRS Axis Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ju Youn; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Right ventricular apical pacing has been a commonly used method for placement of permanent pacemaker, but it is known to be associated with ventricular dyssynchrony and may lead to heart failure. Septal pacing could be an alternative method to improve this complication but the results have been conflicting; hence, other strategies are needed. This case is about a patient with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy who showed much improvement after repositioning the leads to a site different from that of normally paced QRS axis. PMID:27275181

  10. Right atrial pacing impairs cardiac function during resynchronization therapy: acute effects of DDD pacing compared to VDD pacing.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Alain; Ammann, Peter; Sticherling, Christian; Burger, Peter; Schaer, Beat; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans Peter; Eckstein, Jens; Kiencke, Stephanie; Kaiser, Christoph; Linka, Andre; Buser, Peter; Pfisterer, Matthias; Osswald, Stefan

    2005-05-03

    We aimed to compare the hemodynamic effects of right-atrial-paced (DDD) and right-atrial-sensed (VDD) biventricular paced rhythm on cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Cardiac resynchronization therapy improves hemodynamics in patients with severe heart failure and left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony. However, the impact of active right atrial pacing on resynchronization therapy is unknown. Seventeen CRT patients were studied 10 months (range: 1 to 46 months) after implantation. At baseline, the programmed atrioventricular delay was optimized by timing LV contraction properly at the end of atrial contraction. In both modes the acute hemodynamic effects were assessed by multiple Doppler echocardiographic parameters. Compared to DDD pacing, VDD pacing resulted in much better improvement of intraventricular dyssynchrony assessed by the septal-to-posterior wall motion delay (VDD 106 +/- 83 ms vs. DDD 145 +/- 95 ms; p = 0.001), whereas the interventricular mechanical delay (difference between onset of pulmonary and aortic outflow) did not differ (VDD 20 +/- 21 ms vs. DDD 18 +/- 17 ms; p = NS). Furthermore, VDD pacing significantly prolonged the rate-corrected LV filling period (VDD 458 +/- 123 ms vs. DDD 371 +/- 94 ms; p = 0.0001) and improved the myocardial performance index (VDD 0.60 +/- 0.18 vs. DDD 0.71 +/- 0.23; p < 0.01). Our findings suggest that avoidance of right atrial pacing results in a higher degree of LV resynchronization, in a substantial prolongation of the LV filling period, and in an improved myocardial performance. Thus, the VDD mode seems to be superior to the DDD mode in CRT patients.

  11. Effect of atrial antitachycardia pacing treatments in patients with an atrial defibrillator: randomised study comparing subthreshold and nominal pacing outputs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A R J; Spurrell, P A R; Cheatle, L; Sulke, N

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the true efficacy of antitachycardia pacing on spontaneous persistent atrial fibrillation in patients with an implanted atrial defibrillator, by comparing the effects of nominal pacing treatment with subthreshold pacing treatment. Design: The effects of antitachycardia pacing and burst 50 Hz atrial pacing on spontaneous atrial arrhythmias were evaluated six months after implantation of a Medtronic Jewel AF® atrial defibrillator. Setting: Cardiology department in a district general hospital. Patients: 15 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Interventions: Patients were randomised to either “nominal” output pacing treatment or surface ECG and endocardial electrogram proven subthreshold “sham” pacing treatment for three months, and then crossed over to the alternative treatment for a further three months. Results: During the nominal output phase, 31 episodes of atrial fibrillation were treated with 53 bursts of 50 Hz pacing, 98 sequences of ramp atrial pacing, and 61 sequences of burst atrial pacing. Atrial fibrillation was not pace terminated during any episode. Thirty one episodes of atrial tachycardia were treated with 19 bursts of 50 Hz atrial pacing, 103 sequences of ramp atrial pacing, and 38 sequences of burst atrial pacing. Termination of atrial tachycardia was observed in 17 episodes. During the “sham” pacing period, no episodes were terminated by any pacing treatment. Conclusion: Atrial antitachycardia pacing treatments are ineffective at terminating persistent atrial fibrillation but may be useful in terminating episodes of atrial tachycardia or flutter, thus reducing the burden of arrhythmia. PMID:11997413

  12. Hunter-Gatherers and Human Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitton, Thad

    1980-01-01

    Presents an approach to the study of humans in an ecosystem, where several hunter-gatherer societies presently in equilibrium with their environment are studied. The ethnographies of the Netsilik Eskimos of Arctic Canada and the Kunt Bushmen of Southwest Africa are described. (CS)

  13. What Happened to Woman the Gatherer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zihlman, Adrienne L.

    Reactions to the "woman the gatherer" theory, introduced in the 1970's as an alternative to the "man the hunter" thesis in anthropology, have been to accept, ignore it, or combine it with the hunting theory. The "man the hunter" model stresses that primitive males hunted for meat and provided food and protection for their mates and children who…

  14. Reflections on the Gathering: Participatory Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briccetti, Lee; Zeitlin, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Offers a mediation on the 2003 People's Poetry Gathering. Includes two writers' thoughts on epics and ballads. Contends that the themes of epics remain relevant, yet there must always be a gap between the modern reader and the ancient epic singer. Proposes that studying folklore and finding ways to preserve and present older forms in innovative…

  15. Gathering cows using virtual fencing methodologies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Free-ranging livestock are classically controlled by herders. Holding, moving, or gathering free-ranging cattle requires flexible husbandry practices for efficient and effective low-stress animal management. Behavioral theory and practical experience indicates cattle can be taught to respond to audi...

  16. What Happened to Woman the Gatherer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zihlman, Adrienne L.

    Reactions to the "woman the gatherer" theory, introduced in the 1970's as an alternative to the "man the hunter" thesis in anthropology, have been to accept, ignore it, or combine it with the hunting theory. The "man the hunter" model stresses that primitive males hunted for meat and provided food and protection for their mates and children who…

  17. Left ventricular guidewire pacing for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Guérios, Enio E; Wenaweser, Peter; Meier, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Previous reports prove the safety and efficacy of cardiac pacing employing a guidewire in the left ventricle as unipolar pacing electrode. We describe the use of left ventricular guidewire pacing as an alternative to conventional transvenous temporary right ventricular pacing in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  18. A Simulation Study of Paced TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulik, Joanna; Coulter, Robert; Rockwell, Dennis; Partridge, Craig

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of paced TCP, a modified version of TCP designed especially for high delay- bandwidth networks. In typical networks, TCP optimizes its send-rate by transmitting increasingly large bursts, or windows, of packets, one burst per round-trip time, until it reaches a maximum window-size, which corresponds to the full capacity of the network. In a network with a high delay-bandwidth product, however, Transmission Control Protocol's (TCPs) maximum window-size may be larger than the queue size of the intermediate routers, and routers will begin to drop packets as soon as the windows become too large for the router queues. The TCP sender then concludes that the bottleneck capacity of the network has been reached, and it limits its send-rate accordingly. Partridge proposed paced TCP as a means of solving the problem of queueing bottlenecks. A sender using paced TCP would release packets in multiple, small bursts during a round-trip time in which ordinary TCP would release a single, large burst of packets. This approach allows the sender to increase its send-rate to the maximum window size without encountering queueing bottlenecks. This paper describes the performance of paced TCP in a simulated network and discusses implementation details that can affect the performance of paced TCP.

  19. Leadless pacing using induction technology: impact of pulse shape and geometric factors on pacing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Rickers, Sebastian; Velleuer, Jonathan; Bruck, Guido; Bai, Zijian; Kocks, Christian; Grandjean, Pierre-Andre; Lenihan, Tim; Jung, Peter; Erbel, Raimund; Prinzen, Frits W; Kisker, Erhard

    2013-03-01

    Leadless pacing can be done by transmitting energy by an alternating magnetic field from a subcutaneous transmitter unit (TU) to an endocardial receiver unit (RU). Safety and energy consumption are key issues that determine the clinical feasibility of this new technique. The aims of the study were (i) to evaluate the stimulation characteristics of the non-rectangular pacing pulses induced by the alternating magnetic field, (ii) to determine the extent and impact of RU movement caused by the beating heart, and (iii) to evaluate the influence of the relative position between TU and RU on pacing efficiency and energy consumption. In the first step pacing efficiency and energy consumption for predefined positions were determined by bench testing. Subsequently, in a goat at five different ventricular sites (three in the right ventricle, two in the left ventricle) pacing thresholds using non-rectangular induction pulses were compared with conventional pulses. Relative position, defined by parallel distance, radial distance, and angulation between TU and RU, were determined in vivo by X-ray and an inclination angle measurement system. Bench testing showed that by magnetic induction for every alignment between TU and RU appropriate pulses can be produced up to a distance of 100 mm. In the animal experiment pacing thresholds were similar for non-rectangular pulses as compared with conventional pulse shapes. In all five positions with distances between 62 and 102 mm effective pacing was obtained in vivo. Variations in distance, displacement and angle caused by the beating heart did not cause loss of capture. At pacing threshold energy consumptions between 0.28 and 5.36 mJ were measured. Major determinants of energy consumption were distance and pacing threshold. For any given RU position up to a distance of 100 mm reliable pacing using induction can be obtained. In anatomically crucial distances, up to 60 mm energy consumption is within a reasonable range.

  20. Teaching in hunter–gatherer infancy

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Barry S.; Roulette, Casey J.

    2016-01-01

    A debate exists as to whether teaching is part of human nature and central to understanding culture or whether it is a recent invention of Western, Educated, Industrial, Rich, Democratic cultures. Some social–cultural anthropologists and cultural psychologists indicate teaching is rare in small-scale cultures while cognitive psychologists and evolutionary biologists indicate it is universal and key to understanding human culture. This study addresses the following questions: Does teaching of infants exist in hunter–gatherers? If teaching occurs in infancy, what skills or knowledge is transmitted by this process, how often does it occur and who is teaching? The study focuses on late infancy because cognitive psychologists indicate that one form of teaching, called natural pedagogy, emerges at this age. Videotapes of Aka hunter–gatherer infants were used to evaluate whether or not teaching exists among Aka hunter–gatherers of central Africa. The study finds evidence of multiple forms of teaching, including natural pedagogy, that are used to enhance learning of a variety of skills and knowledge. PMID:26909166

  1. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2010-04-06

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  2. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E [Oak Ridge, TN; Elmore, Mark Thomas [Oak Ridge, TN; Reed, Joel Wesley [Knoxville, TN; Treadwell, Jim N; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-01-01

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  3. System for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E.; Elmore, Mark Thomas; Reed, Joel Wesley; Treadwell, Jim N.; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna

    2006-07-04

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  4. Method for gathering and summarizing internet information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E [Oak Ridge, TN; Elmore, Mark Thomas [Oak Ridge, TN; Reed, Joel Wesley [Knoxville, TN; Treadwell, Jim N [Louisville, TN; Samatova, Nagiza Faridovna [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-01-01

    A computer method of gathering and summarizing large amounts of information comprises collecting information from a plurality of information sources (14, 51) according to respective maps (52) of the information sources (14), converting the collected information from a storage format to XML-language documents (26, 53) and storing the XML-language documents in a storage medium, searching for documents (55) according to a search query (13) having at least one term and identifying the documents (26) found in the search, and displaying the documents as nodes (33) of a tree structure (32) having links (34) and nodes (33) so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  5. PACE Yourself: A Handbook for ESL Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalle, Teresa S.; Young, Laurel L.

    2003-01-01

    "PACE Yourself" is for inexperienced or volunteer tutors of ESL. This handbook does not aim to make overnight experts of novices. Rather, the authors provide an easy-to-follow guide for people who want to tutor small groups of nonnative speakers of English but do not know how. Reproducible forms, appendixes of resources, terminology, ESL…

  6. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  7. Developmental Math, Flipped and Self-Paced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pangyen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a developmental math course design that uses flipped instruction and self-paced learning. The design was created and taught at Metropolitan State University, where most students are returning adult students with little preparation in mathematics. The author argues that this design suits the students well: the learning…

  8. Suggested References. PACE I.D. Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergson, Rita

    During the course of the PACE I.D. Center Project, 1966-1969, staff members recorded references that they felt contributed to the general knowledge of the prevention of learning and behavior problems. More specifically, those references that implied concern for the child in his total environment were considered most relevant. The references are…

  9. Biventricular pacing: current trends and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmeet P; Gras, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The role of biventricular pacing is expanding beyond the New York Heart Association classes III and IV heart failure (HF) patient to include less symptomatic patients, earlier in the course of their disease process. This multisite pacing strategy has substantially altered the natural course of ventricular failure, exerting its physiological impact through favourable cardiac remodelling and improving the ejection fraction. This has in turn resulted in long-term clinical benefits such as improved quality of life and functional capacity with a concomitant reduction in hospitalization for HF and overall mortality. Despite the successes of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and the recent expansion of its role in the treatment of HF patients, there remain some inherent limitations to the technology and its delivery. A significant minority of patients continue to remain non-responsive to this pacing strategy. This review will highlight biventricular pacing in its present form, will elaborate on strategies to enhance response to CRT, and outline future trends and synergies towards maximizing the potential benefit of this therapeutic modality.

  10. Setting the Pace: Experiments with Keller's PSI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purao, Sandeep; Sein, Maung; Nilsen, Hallgeir; Larsen, Even Åby

    2017-01-01

    The ideal of self-paced learning, which was introduced nearly 50 years ago by Keller in his Personalized System of Instruction (PSI), has not yet been widely adopted. In spite of its perceived promise of helping students to learn at the speed aligned to their individual backgrounds, motivation, and skills, PSI has been challenging to implement.…

  11. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  12. Self-Paced Physics, Course Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Samples of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this collection for dissemination purposes. Descriptions are included of course objectives, characteristics, structures, and content. As a two-semester course of study for science and engineering sophomores, most topics are on a level comparable to that of classical physics by…

  13. Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants: measurement results.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Austin L; Tkacik, Daniel S; Roscioli, Joseph R; Herndon, Scott C; Yacovitch, Tara I; Martinez, David M; Vaughn, Timothy L; Williams, Laurie L; Sullivan, Melissa R; Floerchinger, Cody; Omara, Mark; Subramanian, R; Zimmerle, Daniel; Marchese, Anthony J; Robinson, Allen L

    2015-03-03

    Facility-level methane emissions were measured at 114 gathering facilities and 16 processing plants in the United States natural gas system. At gathering facilities, the measured methane emission rates ranged from 0.7 to 700 kg per hour (kg/h) (0.6 to 600 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm)). Normalized emissions (as a % of total methane throughput) were less than 1% for 85 gathering facilities and 19 had normalized emissions less than 0.1%. The range of methane emissions rates for processing plants was 3 to 600 kg/h (3 to 524 scfm), corresponding to normalized methane emissions rates <1% in all cases. The distributions of methane emissions, particularly for gathering facilities, are skewed. For example, 30% of gathering facilities contribute 80% of the total emissions. Normalized emissions rates are negatively correlated with facility throughput. The variation in methane emissions also appears driven by differences between inlet and outlet pressure, as well as venting and leaking equipment. Substantial venting from liquids storage tanks was observed at 20% of gathering facilities. Emissions rates at these facilities were, on average, around four times the rates observed at similar facilities without substantial venting.

  14. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effect of biventricular pacing during a ventricular sensed event.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Mehmet Kemal; Jeevanantham, Vinodh; Sherazi, Saadia; Flynn, Dennis; Hall, Burr; Huang, David T; Rosero, Spencer; Daubert, James P; Shah, Abrar H

    2009-06-15

    Loss of biventricular (BiV) pacing occurs during ventricular sensed events such as frequent ventricular ectopy, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, and intrinsic atrioventricular nodal conduction, such as in atrial fibrillation. Ventricular sense response (VSR) pacing, a novel cardiac resynchronization therapy pacing strategy, maintains BiV pacing during these sensed ventricular events. Patients who underwent echocardiographic optimization after BiV pacemaker implantation were enrolled, and aortic velocity-time integrals (VTIs) were recorded and compared during intrinsic conduction without pacing, optimized BiV pacing, and intrinsic conduction with VSR pacing alone. Thirty-two patients were enrolled (mean age 68 +/- 11 years, 78% men), with a mean baseline QRS duration of 164 +/- 24 ms and a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 23 +/- 10%. The mean aortic VTI during intrinsic conduction with VSR pacing was 16.5 +/- 3.6 cm, compared with 15.3 +/- 3.4 cm during intrinsic conduction without pacing (p <0.001). The mean aortic VTI with optimized BiV pacing was 17.3 +/- 3.6 cm, significantly better (p <0.001) compared with intrinsic conduction without pacing. Improvements in aortic VTI were higher with optimized BiV pacing compared with VSR pacing alone (p = 0.02). In the subgroup of patients with left bundle branch block-type activation, the hemodynamic improvements realized with VSR pacing were similar to optimized BiV pacing. Mean aortic VTI improvements with VSR were similar in patients with ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, a cardiac resynchronization therapy algorithm that maintains BiV pacing during a ventricular sensed event appears to have an aortic VTI response that is significantly better compared with intrinsic conduction without pacing.

  16. Optimal pacing for symptomatic AV block: a comparison of VDD and DDD pacing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Max; Krahn, Andrew D; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Skanes, Allan C

    2004-01-01

    VDD pacing provides the physiological benefits of atrioventricular synchronous pacing with the convenience of a single lead system, but is hampered by uncertainty regarding long term atrial sensing and potential development of sinus node disease. To examine the long-term reliability and complication rates of VDD pacing, we compared the outcome of 112 consecutive patients (age 70 +/- 13 years, 59% men) with symptomatic AV block who received a single pass bipolar VDD system, to 80 patients (age 63 +/- 16 years, 70% men) who received DDD pacing for the same indication. All patients were judged to have intact sinus node function based on submitted ECGs and monitoring results at the time of implant. Implant time was reduced in VDD patients compared to DDD patients (63 +/- 20 vs 97 +/- 36 minutes, P < 0.0001). Implant complications occurred in 5 (6%) DDD patients compared to 3 (3%) VDD patients (P = 0.15). The implant P wave was lower with VDD pacing compared to DDD patients (2.91 +/- 1.48 vs 4.0 +/- 1.7 mv, P < 0.0001), but remained stable during long-term follow-up in both groups. During 17.7 +/- 10.0 months of follow-up in the VDD group, only two VDD patients were reprogrammed to VVIR mode, compared to three DDD patients. Physiological atrioventricular activation was maintained in 94%-99% of beats throughout the follow-up period in the VDD group. VDD pacing is an excellent strategy for treatment of patients with symptomatic AV block. The lower cost, high reliability, and abbreviated implantation time suggest that VDD pacing is a viable alternative to DDD pacing in patients with high degree AV block and normal sinus node function.

  17. Optimal pacing for symptomatic AV block: a comparison of VDD and DDD pacing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Max; Krahn, Andrew D; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Skanes, Allan C

    2003-12-01

    VDD pacing provides the physiological benefits of atrioventricular synchronous pacing with the convenience of a single lead system, but is hampered by uncertainty regarding long-term atrial sensing and potential development of sinus node disease. To examine the long-term reliability and complication rates of VDD pacing, we compared the outcome of 112 consecutive patients (age 70 +/- 13 years, 59% male) with symptomatic AV block who received a single pass bipolar VDD system to 80 patients (age 63 +/- 16 years, 70% male) who received DDD pacing for the same indication. All patients were judged to have intact sinus node function based on submitted ECGs and monitoring results at the time of implant. Implant time was reduced in VDD patients compared to DDD patients (63 +/- 20 vs 97 +/- 36 minutes, P < 0.0001). Implant complications occurred in 5 (6%) DDD patients compared to 3 (3%) VDD patients (P = 0.15). The implant P wave was lower with VDD pacing compared to DDD patients (2.91 +/- 1.48 vs 4.0 +/- 1.7 mV, P < 0.0001), but remained stable during long-term follow-up in both groups. During 17.7 +/- 10.0 months of follow-up in the VDD group, only 2 VDD patients were reprogrammed to VVIR mode, compared to 3 DDD patients. Physiological atrioventricular activation was maintained in 94%-99% of beats throughout the follow-up period in the VDD group. VDD pacing is an excellent strategy for treatment of patients with symptomatic AV block. The lower cost, high reliability, and abbreviated implantation time suggest that VDD pacing is a viable alternative to DDD pacing in patients with high-degree AV block and normal sinus node function.

  18. Protecting Privacy and Securing the Gathering of Location Proofs - The Secure Location Verification Proof Gathering Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michelle; Gray, David

    As wireless networks become increasingly ubiquitous, the demand for a method of locating a device has increased dramatically. Location Based Services are now commonplace but there are few methods of verifying or guaranteeing a location provided by a user without some specialised hardware, especially in larger scale networks. We propose a system for the verification of location claims, using proof gathered from neighbouring devices. In this paper we introduce a protocol to protect this proof gathering process, protecting the privacy of all involved parties and securing it from intruders and malicious claiming devices. We present the protocol in stages, extending the security of this protocol to allow for flexibility within its application. The Secure Location Verification Proof Gathering Protocol (SLVPGP) has been designed to function within the area of Vehicular Networks, although its application could be extended to any device with wireless & cryptographic capabilities.

  19. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  20. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  1. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  2. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  3. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  4. The STS-98 crew gathers at pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Looking relaxed and happy one day before launch, the STS-98 crew gather at Launch Pad 39A. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them is Space Shuttle Atlantis, poised for launch. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the first Shuttle mission of the year. On the mission, the crew will deliver the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to the growing Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node using the Shuttle's robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work. The 11-day STS-98 mission is scheduled to launch Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST, with a planned KSC landing about 1:39 p.m. on Feb. 18.

  5. Crowd and environmental management during mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders; Batty, Michael; Hayashi, Konrad; Al Bar, Osama; Marcozzi, David; Memish, Ziad A

    2012-02-01

    Crowds are a feature of large cities, occurring not only at mass gatherings but also at routine events such as the journey to work. To address extreme crowding, various computer models for crowd movement have been developed in the past decade, and we review these and show how they can be used to identify health and safety issues. State-of-the-art models that simulate the spread of epidemics operate on a population level, but the collection of fine-scale data might enable the development of models for epidemics that operate on a microscopic scale, similar to models for crowd movement. We provide an example of such simulations, showing how an individual-based crowd model can mirror aggregate susceptible-infected-recovered models that have been the main models for epidemics so far.

  6. Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, Benjamin J.; Castano, Rebecca; Estlin, Tara A.; Gaines, Daniel M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Thompson, David R.; DeGranville, Charles K.; Chien, Steve A.; Tang, Benyang; Burl, Michael C.; Judd, Michele A.

    2010-01-01

    The Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science System (AEGIS) provides automated targeting for remote sensing instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, which at the time of this reporting has had two rovers exploring the surface of Mars (see figure). Currently, targets for rover remote-sensing instruments must be selected manually based on imagery already on the ground with the operations team. AEGIS enables the rover flight software to analyze imagery onboard in order to autonomously select and sequence targeted remote-sensing observations in an opportunistic fashion. In particular, this technology will be used to automatically acquire sub-framed, high-resolution, targeted images taken with the MER panoramic cameras. This software provides: 1) Automatic detection of terrain features in rover camera images, 2) Feature extraction for detected terrain targets, 3) Prioritization of terrain targets based on a scientist target feature set, and 4) Automated re-targeting of rover remote-sensing instruments at the highest priority target.

  7. Pacing, Pixels, and Paper: Flexibility in Learning Words from Flashcards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara; Rausch, Joseph; Quirk, Abigail; Halladay, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on how self-control over pace might help learners successfully extract information from digital learning aids. Past research has indicated that too much control over pace can be overwhelming, but too little control over pace can be ineffective. Within the popular self-testing domain of flashcards, we sought to elucidate…

  8. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... improvement program. (d) Organizational chart. (1) The PACE organization must have a current organizational chart showing officials in the PACE organization and relationships to any other organizational entities. (2) The chart for a corporate entity must indicate the PACE organization's relationship to the...

  9. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... improvement program. (d) Organizational chart. (1) The PACE organization must have a current organizational chart showing officials in the PACE organization and relationships to any other organizational entities. (2) The chart for a corporate entity must indicate the PACE organization's relationship to the...

  10. Pacing, Pixels, and Paper: Flexibility in Learning Words from Flashcards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara; Rausch, Joseph; Quirk, Abigail; Halladay, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on how self-control over pace might help learners successfully extract information from digital learning aids. Past research has indicated that too much control over pace can be overwhelming, but too little control over pace can be ineffective. Within the popular self-testing domain of flashcards, we sought to elucidate…

  11. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PACE organization's appeals process. 460.122 Section 460.122 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For purposes...

  12. Applying 20/20 Hindsight to Self-Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleberger, Gary E.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are several suggestions for the maintenance of a science self-paced classroom. Topics include the use of computers for student self-assessment, teachers and students roles in the self-paced classroom, and laboratory setup and packaging in the self-paced science laboratory. (Author/DS)

  13. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For purposes... which the participant believes that his or her life, health, or ability to regain or maintain maximum...

  14. Applying 20/20 Hindsight to Self-Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleberger, Gary E.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are several suggestions for the maintenance of a science self-paced classroom. Topics include the use of computers for student self-assessment, teachers and students roles in the self-paced classroom, and laboratory setup and packaging in the self-paced science laboratory. (Author/DS)

  15. Multi-Leu PACE4 Inhibitor Retention within Cells Is PACE4 Dependent and a Prerequisite for Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Couture, Frédéric; Ly, Kévin; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Desjardins, Roxane; Guérin, Brigitte; Day, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression as well as the critical implication of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer progression has been previously reported and supported the development of peptide inhibitors. The multi-Leu peptide, a PACE4-specific inhibitor, was further generated and its capability to be uptaken by tumor xenograft was demonstrated with regard to its PACE4 expression status. To investigate whether the uptake of this inhibitor was directly dependent of PACE4 levels, uptake and efflux from cancer cells were evaluated and correlations were established with PACE4 contents on both wild type and PACE4-knockdown cell lines. PACE4-knockdown associated growth deficiencies were established on the knockdown HepG2, Huh7, and HT1080 cells as well as the antiproliferative effects of the multi-Leu peptide supporting the growth capabilities of PACE4 in cancer cells.

  16. Multi-Leu PACE4 Inhibitor Retention within Cells Is PACE4 Dependent and a Prerequisite for Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kévin; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Desjardins, Roxane; Guérin, Brigitte; Day, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression as well as the critical implication of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer progression has been previously reported and supported the development of peptide inhibitors. The multi-Leu peptide, a PACE4-specific inhibitor, was further generated and its capability to be uptaken by tumor xenograft was demonstrated with regard to its PACE4 expression status. To investigate whether the uptake of this inhibitor was directly dependent of PACE4 levels, uptake and efflux from cancer cells were evaluated and correlations were established with PACE4 contents on both wild type and PACE4-knockdown cell lines. PACE4-knockdown associated growth deficiencies were established on the knockdown HepG2, Huh7, and HT1080 cells as well as the antiproliferative effects of the multi-Leu peptide supporting the growth capabilities of PACE4 in cancer cells. PMID:26114115

  17. State of the art of leadless pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V.Y.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  18. Cardiac pacing in heart failure patients with left bundle branch block: impact of pacing site for optimizing left ventricular resynchronization.

    PubMed

    Pappone, C; Rosanio, S; Oreto, G; Tocchi, M; Gulletta, S; Salvati, A; Dicandia, C; Santinelli, V; Mazzone, P; Veglia, F; Ding, J; Sallusti, L; Spinelli, J; Vicedomini, G

    2000-07-01

    Acute left ventricular pacing has been associated with hemodynamic improvement in patients with congestive heart failure and wide QRS complex. We hypothesized that pacing two left ventricular sites simultaneously would produce faster activation and better systolic function than single-site pacing. We selected 14 heart failure patients (NYHA functional class III or IV) in normal sinus rhythm with left bundle branch block and QRS > 150 ms. An 8F dual micromanometer catheter was placed in the aorta for measuring +dP/dt (mmHg/s), aortic pulse pressure (mmHg), and end-diastolic pressure (mmHg). Pacing leads were positioned via coronary veins at the posterior base and lateral wall. Patients were acutely paced VDD at the posterior base, lateral wall, and both sites (dual-site) with 5 atrioventricular delays (from 8 ms to PR -30 ms). Pacing sequences were executed in randomized order using a custom external computer (FlexStim, Guidant CRM). Dual-site pacing increased peak +dP/dt significantly more than posterior base and lateral wall pacing. Dual-site and posterior base pacing raised aortic pulse pressure significantly more than lateral wall pacing. Dual-site pacing shortened QRS duration by 22 %, whereas posterior base and lateral wall pacing increased it by 2 and 12%, respectively (p = 0.006). In heart failure patients with left bundle branch block, dual-site pacing improves systolic function more than single-site stimulation. Improved ventricular activation synchrony, expressed by paced QRS narrowing, may account for the additional benefit of dual- vs single-site pacing in enhancing contractility. This novel approach deserves consideration for future heart failure pacing studies.

  19. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY... onshore pipeline (or part of a connected series of pipelines) is an onshore gathering line. The...

  20. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY... onshore pipeline (or part of a connected series of pipelines) is an onshore gathering line. The...

  1. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY... onshore pipeline (or part of a connected series of pipelines) is an onshore gathering line. The...

  2. 49 CFR 192.8 - How are onshore gathering lines and regulated onshore gathering lines determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...? (a) An operator must use API RP 80 (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7), to determine if an... section. (1) The beginning of gathering, under section 2.2(a)(1) of API RP 80, may not extend beyond the furthermost downstream point in a production operation as defined in section 2.3 of API RP 80. This...

  3. Special forest products in context: gatherers and gathering in the Eastern United States

    Treesearch

    Marla R. Emery; Clare Ginger; Siri Newman; Michael R.B. Giammusso

    2003-01-01

    This report provides an introduction to the people who gather special forest products (SFPs) in the eastern United States, the role these resources play in their lives, and implications for management on national forest lands, particularly in relation to the Pilot Program on Forest Botanicals (P. L. 106-113, ? 339(a)). SFPs encompass a wide variety of products and...

  4. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  5. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  6. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  7. Pre-Packaged Commercial PACE Financing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallander, Michael

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate a more streamlined method for facilitating commercial property assessed clean energy (PACE) retrofits. The Recipient aimed to prove that energy efficiency performance of simple, pre-packaged technologies (e.g., lighting and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC)) can be accurately estimated without the need for a detailed energy audit. A successful project would inspire consumer confidence in undertaking cost-effective retrofits.

  8. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  9. An Exploratory Study of Student-Paced versus Teacher-Paced Accommodations for Large-Scale Math Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Keith; Rozek-Tedesco, Marick A.; Tindal, Gerald; Glasgow, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether a teacher-paced video (TPV) accommodation or a student-paced computer (SPC) accommodation provided differential access for student with disabilities versus their general education peers on a large-scale math test. It found that although both pacing accommodations significantly influenced mean scores, the SPC…

  10. Optical stimulation enables paced electrophysiological studies in embryonic hearts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Ma, Pei; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology plays a critical role in the development and function of the heart. Studies of early embryonic electrical activity have lacked a viable point stimulation technique to pace in vitro samples. Here, optical pacing by high-precision infrared stimulation is used to pace excised embryonic hearts, allowing electrophysiological parameters to be quantified during pacing at varying rates with optical mapping. Combined optical pacing and optical mapping enables electrophysiological studies in embryos under more physiological conditions and at varying heart rates, allowing detection of abnormal conduction and comparisons between normal and pathological electrical activity during development in various models. PMID:24761284

  11. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  12. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  13. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  14. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  15. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  16. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  17. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  18. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades, and other events without a permit issued pursuant to subpart D of...

  19. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades, and other events without a permit issued pursuant to subpart D of...

  20. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades, and other events without a permit issued pursuant to subpart D of...

  1. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades, and other events without a permit issued pursuant to subpart D of...

  2. 43 CFR 423.26 - Public events and gatherings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Public events and gatherings. 423.26... of Conduct § 423.26 Public events and gatherings. You must not conduct public assemblies, meetings, gatherings, demonstrations, parades, and other events without a permit issued pursuant to subpart D of...

  3. Gathering in Thoreau's backyard: nontimber forest product harvesting as practice

    Treesearch

    Paul Robbins; Marla Emery; Jennifer L. Rice

    2008-01-01

    Understanding of the gathering of nontimber forest products (NTFPs) in woodlands has focused heavily on politics surrounding public lands and harvester communities. Yet forest gathering may be far more universal. This paper reports the results of a survey of residents in New England, querying whether people gather wild things and for what purposes. The results suggest...

  4. Evidence for a Border-Collision Bifurcation in Paced Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Carolyn

    2005-11-01

    Bifurcations in the electrical response of cardiac tissue can destabilize spatial-temporal waves of electrical activity in the heart, leading to tachycardia or even fibrillation. Therefore, it is important to characterize the types of bifurcations occurring in cardiac tissue. Our goal is to classify the bifurcation that occurs in cardiac cells when a change in pacing rate induces a transition from 1:1 to 2:2 phase-locked behavior. Current mathematical models predict that the bifurcation mediating the transition is a supercritical pitchfork type. For such a bifurcation, small random noise is predicted to be amplified by greater amounts as the bifurcation is approached (Weisenfeld). However, our experimental observations of paced bullfrog myocardium driven by small beat-to-beat alternations in the pacing rate (rather than driven by noise) displays de-amplification as the bifurcation is approached. To explain this surprising result, we hypothesize that the transition to 2:2 behavior is mediated by border-collision bifurcation, which is predicted to show little noise amplification. Wiesenfeld, K. Phys. Rev. A 32, 1744 (1985).

  5. [Mass gatherings - health risks and preventive strategies].

    PubMed

    Steffen, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Experience from mass gatherings - usually attended by at least 25'000 persons - shows that approximately one in a thousand participants will consult with an on-site medical emergency service. Communicable diseases usually play a minor role. Historically outbreaks of meningococcal disease were recorded after the hajj, but this has been well controlled in the past few years subsequent to vaccinations and other measures required by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia health authorities. Major stress of the regional public health system is associated with accidents and non-communicable diseases, the majority being trivial. Host and environmental risk factors can result in a dramatic increase in the rate of consultations: Age and pre-existing illness play a decisive role particularly in pilgrims, be that in Mecca or Lourdes. Emotional factors may influence behavior; aggressions can develop. Alcohol and drugs, also the duration of an event may play a decisive role. Extreme climatic conditions, both heat and cold, also exhaustion result in a dramatic increase of emergency consultations. Infrastructure must be adapted for the crowd size, particularly stampede associated disasters can be avoided. The World Health Organization and other interested expert groups have in the past few years formulated interdisciplinary programs for prevention.

  6. Distinguishing mechanisms for alternans in cardiac cells using constant-diastolic-interval pacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2017-09-01

    Alternans, a proarrhythmic dynamical state in which cardiac action potentials alternate between long and short durations despite a constant pacing period, traditionally has been explained at the cellular level using nonlinear dynamics principles under the assumption that the action potential duration (APD) is determined solely by the time elapsed since the end of the previous action potential, called the diastolic interval (DI). In this scenario, APDs at a steady state should be the same provided that the preceding DIs are the same. Nevertheless, experiments attempting to eliminate alternans by dynamically adjusting the timing of pacing stimuli to keep the DI constant showed that alternans persisted, contradicting the traditional theory. It is now widely known that alternans also can arise from a different mechanism associated with intracellular calcium cycling. Our goal is to determine whether intracellular calcium dynamics can explain the experimental findings regarding the persistence of alternans despite a constant DI. For this, we use mathematical models capable of producing alternans through both voltage- and calcium-mediated mechanisms. We show that for voltage-driven alternans, action potentials elicited from a constant-DI protocol are always the same. However, in the case of calcium-driven alternans, the constant-DI protocol can result in alternans. Reducing the strength of the calcium instability progressively reduces and finally eliminates constant-DI alternans. Our findings suggest that screening for the presence of alternans using a constant-DI protocol has the potential for differentiating between voltage-driven and calcium-driven alternans.

  7. Dual chamber cardiac pacing in children: Single chamber pacing dual chamber sensing cardiac pacemaker or dual chamber pacing and sensing cardiac pacemaker?

    PubMed

    Bostan, Ozlem M; Celiker, Alpay; Karagöz, Tevfik; Ozer, Sema; Ozme, Sencan

    2002-12-01

    Dual chamber pacemakers (single chamber pacing dual chamber sensing cardiac pacemaker (VDD) and dual chamber pacing and sensing cardiac pacemaker (DDD)) are being used frequently in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to verify the safety and performance of the VDD and DDD pacing systems, and to evaluate the differences between two pacing modes with regard to atrial sensing and tracking functions. In this study, we evaluated 14 patients with VDD pacing and 15 patients with DDD pacing between 1994 and 2000. In the patient group with VDD pacing, all had congenital or acquired atrioventricular (AV) block. In the patient group with DDD pacing, 11 had congenital or acquired AV block, three had sinus node dysfunction with AV conduction disturbance and one had idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Twenty-eight devices were implanted in the subpectoral area using the transvenous route. After implantation the atrial tracking capabilities of the pacing systems were analyzed by telemetry, Holter monitoring, and treadmill exercise testing. The mean age of patients in the VDD pacing group was younger. The percentage of congenital heart disease was higher in the DDD pacing group. There was no significant difference regarding fluoroscopy time during implantation and follow-up time between the two groups. During implantation, in the VDD pacing group the mean sensed atrial signal was 3.1 +/- 1.3 mV and this decreased to 1.37 +/- 0.68 mV (P < 0.05) during follow-up. This pattern was also observed in DDD group (3 +/- 2 mV vs 1.9 +/- 1.5 mV, P < 0.05). Although the P wave measurement at implantation did not differ between the two groups, it was significantly higher in the DDD pacing group at the last control. Three patients with VDD pacing were reprogrammed to VVI or single chamber pacing and sensing, rate adaptive cardiac pacemaker because of complete loss of AV synchrony. There was no atrial sensing problem in the DDD pacing group. During the follow-up, one

  8. Pacing failure due to microdislodgement of ventricular pacing lead detected by home monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Loricchio, Maria Luisa; Castro, Antonio; Ciolli, Andrea; Sasdelli, Massimo; Ferraiuolo, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    A 68-year-old woman affected by sick sinus syndrome was implanted with a dual-chamber pacemaker provided by home monitoring technology. After discharge, an increase in ventricular threshold and a high variability of R wave measurements were detected early by the home monitoring system. Manual tests confirmed the presence of pacing and sensing failure and a normal ventricular impedance. The pacing lead integrity and a stable position of the lead tip in right ventricular apex were assessed by chest X-ray. A diagnosis of microdislodgement was made. After a second procedure for ventricular lead repositioning, no further malfunctions were detected.

  9. Receivers Gather Data for Climate, Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    Signals from global positioning system (GPS) satellites are now being used for more than just location and navigation information. By looking at the radio waves from GPS satellites, a technology developed at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) not only precisely calculates its position, but can also use a technique known as radio occultation to help scientists study the Earth s atmosphere and gravity field to improve weather forecasts, monitor climate change, and enhance space weather research. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), a nonprofit group of universities in Boulder, Colorado, compares radio occultation to the appearance of a pencil when viewed though a glass of water. The water molecules change the path of visible light waves so that the pencil appears bent, just like molecules in the air bend GPS radio signals as they pass through (or are occulted by) the atmosphere. Through measurements of the amount of bending in the signals, scientists can construct detailed images of the ionosphere (the energetic upper part of the atmosphere) and also gather information about atmospheric density, pressure, temperature, and moisture. Once collected, this data can be input into weather forecasting and climate models for weather prediction and climate studies. Traditionally, such information is obtained through the use of weather balloons. In 1998, JPL started developing a new class of GPS space science receivers, called Black Jack, that could take precise measurements of how GPS signals are distorted or delayed along their way to the receiver. By 2006, the first demonstration of a GPS radio occultation constellation was launched through a collaboration among Taiwan s National Science Council and National Space Organization, the U.S. National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other Federal entities. Called the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC

  10. Comparison of the acute effects of right ventricular apical pacing and biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hideaki; Satomi, Kazuhiro; Noda, Takashi; Shimizu, Wataru; Kamakura, Shiro; Kitaura, Yasushi; Ishizaka, Nobukazu; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Upgrading to biventricular (BiV) pacing benefits heart failure patients with right ventricular (RV) apical pacing. However, the impact of switching from RV apical pacing to BiV pacing on the left ventricular (LV) function accompanied by changes in the QRS duration remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the effects of BiV pacing in heart failure patients under RV apical pacing. In 37 patients with heart failure (LV ejection fraction: 22±9%), the maximum rate of LV pressure rise (LV dP/dtmax) and time constant of LV relaxation (tau) were determined in order to assess LV contractility and diastolic relaxation, respectively, under RV apical pacing and BiV pacing. Switching from RV pacing to BiV pacing, the QRS duration was shortened from 209±42 to 162±28 ms (p<0.001) and the LV dP/dtmax values were increased in all patients (+18.4±11.3%, p<0.001), whereas the LV tau values varied (-1.5±13.0%, p=0.723). Shortening of the QRS duration correlated with the increase in LV dP/dtmax (r=-0.689, p<0.001); however, it was not closely associated with the changes in LV tau. Switching from RV apical pacing to BiV pacing improves the LV contractile function in proportion to the degree of QRS shortening. BiV pacing is recommended in patients with systolic heart failure and a prolonged RV-paced QRS duration.

  11. Reducing risks to health and wellbeing at mass gatherings: the role of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.

    PubMed

    Aitsi-Selmi, Amina; Murray, Virginia; Heymann, David; McCloskey, Brian; Azhar, Esam I; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin; Dar, Osman

    2016-06-01

    Mass gatherings of people at religious pilgrimages and sporting events are linked to numerous health hazards, including the transmission of infectious diseases, physical injuries, and an impact on local and global health systems and services. As with other forms of disaster, mass gathering-related disasters are the product of the management of different hazards, levels of exposure, and vulnerability of the population and environment, and require comprehensive risk management that looks beyond single hazards and response. Incorporating an all-hazard, prevention-driven, evidence-based approach that is multisectoral and multidisciplinary is strongly advocated by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. This paper reviews some of the broader impacts of mass gatherings, the opportunity for concerted action across policy sectors and scientific disciplines offered by the year 2015 (including through the Sendai Framework), and the elements of a 21(st) century approach to mass gatherings.

  12. Comparison of results with different left ventricular pacing leads.

    PubMed

    Nof, Eyal; Gurevitz, Osnat; Carraso, Shemy; Bar-Lev, David; Luria, David; Bachar, Sharona; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To compare different coronary sinus (CS) leads and delivery systems (DSs) for left ventricular pacing. Delivery systems-related (including CS dissection and dislocations during sheath/stylet removal) and lead-related (including failure to accomplish implantations and long-term malfunctions resulting in abandonment or repositioning/replacing of the lead) complications between systems and leads were compared. We used Medtronic (MDT) attain DS (n = 123) with over-the-wire (OTW) (4193, 4194) and stylet-driven (2187) leads, and Guidant (GDT) DS (n = 126) with Easytrak OTW leads (4513, 4518, and 4525). Coronory sinus dissection occurred in 6/123 (5%) cases using the MDT DS vs. 7/126 (6%) with GDT DS (P= NS). Dislocations during sheath/stylet removal occurred in 8/123 cases (6%) with MDT DS, and in 8/126 (6%) with GDT DS (P= NS). Failure to achieve successful implantation occurred in 6/32 (19%) of the 2187 leads, in 11/87(13%) of the 4193/4194 leads, in 7/94(7%) of the 4513/4518 leads, and in 4/29 (14%) of the 4525 leads (P= NS). Long-term lead-related complications occurred in 5/32 (15%) of the 2187 leads, 19/80 (23%) of the 4193/4194 leads, 19/93 (20%) of the 4513/4518 leads, and 2/28 (7%) of the 4525 leads (P= NS). No significant differences in complication rates between systems and leads were observed.

  13. Interatrial septum pacing decreases atrial dyssynchrony on strain rate imaging compared with right atrial appendage pacing.

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Yoshinori; Abe, Haruhiko; Umekawa, Seiko; Katsuki, Keiko; Tanaka, Norio; Araki, Ryo; Imanaka, Takahiro; Matsutera, Ryo; Morisawa, Daisuke; Kitada, Hirokazu; Hattori, Susumu; Noda, Yoshiki; Adachi, Hidenori; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Miyatake, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Interatrial septum pacing (IAS-P) decreases atrial conduction delay compared with right atrial appendage pacing (RAA-P). We evaluate the atrial contraction with strain rate of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) during sinus activation or with IAS-P or RAA-P. Fifty-two patients with permanent pacemaker for sinus node disease were enrolled in the study. Twenty-three subjects were with IAS-P and 29 with RAA-P. The time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate was measured and corrected with RR interval on electrocardiogram. It was defined as the time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate (TSRc), and the balance between maximum and minimum TSRc at three sites (ΔTSRc) was compared during sinus activation and with pacing rhythm in each group. There were no significant differences observed in general characteristics and standard echocardiographic parameters except the duration of pacing P wave between the two groups. The duration was significantly shorter in the IAS-P group compared with the RAA-P group (95 ± 34 vs 138 ± 41; P = 0.001). TSRc was significantly different between sinus activation and pacing rhythm (36.3 ± 35.7 vs 61.6 ± 36.3; P = 0.003) in the RAA-P group, whereas no significant differences were observed in the IAS-P group (25.4 ± 12.1 vs 27.7 ± 14.7; NS). During the follow-up (mean 2.4 ± 0.7 years), the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) conversion to permanent AF was not significantly different between the two groups. IAS-P decreased the contraction delay on atrial TDI compared to RAA-P; however, it did not contribute to the reduction of AF incidence in the present study. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The next step in cardiac pacing: the view from 1958.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, K

    1992-06-01

    At a 1-day conference sponsored by the Rockefeller Institute in September 1958, physicians and engineers held a confused debate over future directions for the young field of cardiac pacing. Many of the existing impediments to long-term pacing for chronic illness received little attention; the participants focused instead on whether atrial synchrony would be a requirement for long-term pacing. The Rockefeller conference illustrates the observation that cardiac pacing has undergone several major redefinitions. This process is rarely a smooth one but involves uncertainty, intense debate, and explicit choice.

  15. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  16. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Silverman, K.J.; Kolodny, G.M.; Zoll, P.M.; McKay, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort.

  17. Tight Analysis of a Collisionless Robot Gathering Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    Collisionless Robot Gathering Algorithm We consider the fundamental problem of gath- ering a set of n robots in the Euclidean plane which have a...physical extent and hence they cannot share their positions with other robots . The objective is to determine a minimum time schedule to gather the robots ...27709-2211 Robot Visibility; Gathering REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8

  18. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written submissions...

  19. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written submissions...

  20. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written submissions...

  1. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written submissions...

  2. 50 CFR 453.04 - Committee information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.04 Committee information gathering. (a) Written submissions...

  3. A New Model of Orbital Pacing for Pliocene Glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, T.; Dowsett, H. J.; Caballero-Gill, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's climate system has gone through major changes over time that serve as natural experiments to test our understanding of linkages and feedbacks that may come into play if the Earth continues to warm, as expected from greenhouse gas forcing. Our project investigates patterns of climate change between the northern and southern hemispheres during the mid-Pliocene epoch (~3-4 Myr ago) when the overall climate state was warmer than today. Critically, evidence suggests that the amount of ice on Antarctica was similar to today, but that there was little or no permanent ice on land in the northern hemisphere. Most climate scientists have therefore supposed that orbitally-paced climate change would initiate in the region around the Antarctic, and be driven primarily by the 41,000 year obliquity cycle. Using distributed data sets on both sea surface temperature and the combination of deep sea temperature and global ice volume recorded by ð18O, we find a pervasive influence of eccentricity/precession on Pliocene paleoclimate that has been under-appreciated. We tentatively constrain the phase of the climate response by calibrating temperature patterns to the precessional "clock" of the Mediterranean sapropel sequence. Large Pliocene glacial events were paced by precession, and coincide with minimum northern hemisphere summer insolation. This mode is in many ways the opposite of the late Pleistocene, where climate positively follows the envelope of northern hemisphere precession. In the Pliocene case, glacial periods instead followed the lower envelope of precession and nodes of low precessional variance supported peak interglacial conditions. The observations can be explained by positing that during the warmer Pliocene, the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere could only support cryosphere expansion during times of minimal summer insolation. While the presence of ice-rafted debris in the North Atlantic and North Pacific unambiguously confirm a northern

  4. Relationship between left atrium catheter contact force and pacing threshold.

    PubMed

    Barrio-López, Teresa; Ortiz, Mercedes; Castellanos, Eduardo; Lázaro, Carla; Salas, Jefferson; Madero, Sergio; Almendral, Jesús

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between contact force (CF) and pacing threshold in left atrium (LA). Six to ten LA sites were studied in 28 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing pulmonary vein isolation. Median CF, bipolar and unipolar electrogram voltage, impedance, and bipolar and unipolar thresholds for consistent constant capture and for consistent intermittent capture were measured at each site. Pacing threshold measurements were performed at 188 LA sites. Both unipolar and bipolar pacing thresholds correlated significantly with median CF; however, unipolar pacing threshold correlated better (unipolar: Pearson R -0.45; p < 0.001; Spearman Rho -0.62; p < 0.001, bipolar: Pearson R -0.39; p < 0.001; Spearman Rho -0.52; p < 0.001). Consistent constant capture threshold had better correlation with median CF than consistent intermittent capture threshold for both unipolar and bipolar pacing (Pearson R -0.45; p < 0.001 and Spearman Rho -0.62; p < 0.001 vs. Pearson R -0.35; p < 0.001; Spearman Rho -0.52; p < 0.001). The best pacing threshold cutoff point to detect a good CF (>10 g) was 3.25 mA for unipolar pacing with 69% specificity and 73% sensitivity. Both increased to 80% specificity and 74% sensitivity for sites with normal bipolar voltage and a pacing threshold cutoff value of 2.85 mA. Pacing thresholds correlate with CF in human not previously ablated LA. Since the combination of a normal bipolar voltage and a unipolar pacing threshold <2.85 mA provide reasonable parameters of validity, pacing threshold could be of interest as a surrogate for CF in LA.

  5. Cardiac Pacing - Is Telemonitoring Now Essential?

    PubMed

    Burri, Haran

    2013-11-01

    Modern pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are able to automatically perform tests executed manually during in-office visits; such as measurement of sensing and pacing thresholds. In addition, the devices also record a wealth of diagnostic data that are of clinical relevance. The advent of wireless technology in these devices allows automatic transmission of these data that can be consulted remotely by the physician. There is now solid evidence indicating that remote device follow-up can safely reduce the number of in-office visits, thereby improving convenience for patients and caregivers alike. Remote monitoring with automatic alerts for arrhythmias, heart failure and technical issues, has been shown to dramatically reduce delay to diagnosis of these events compared with standard follow-up; potentially improving patient safety and outcome. For these reasons, remote device management is becoming the standard of care.

  6. Continued obliquity pacing of East Asian summer precipitation after the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Fei; Abels, Hemmo A.; You, Chen-Feng; Zhang, Zeke; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng; Li, Le; Liu, Hou-Chun; Ren, Chao; Xia, Renyuan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Wenfang; Li, Gaojun

    2017-01-01

    Records from natural archives show that the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strongly depends on the orbital configuration of the Earth. However, the dominant orbital cycles driving EASM have been found to be spatially different. Speleothem stable oxygen isotopic records from southern China, which are believed to reflect large-scale changes in the Asian monsoon system, are dominated by climatic precession cycles. Further north, on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), loess-and-paleosol sequences, which are argued to be controlled by monsoon intensity, are in pace with global ice volume changes dominated by obliquity, and after the mid-Pleistocene transition by 100-kyr cycles. To understand these critical discrepancies, here we apply a novel proxy based on the trace metal compositions of pedogenic carbonate in the eolian deposits on the CLP to reconstruct summer precipitation over the last 1.5 million years. Our reconstructions show that summer precipitation on the CLP is dominantly forced by obliquity not in pace with the ice-volume-imprinted loess-paleosol sequences before and after the mid-Pleistocene transition or with the precession-paced speleothem oxygen isotopic records. Coupled with climate model results, we suggest that the obliquity-driven variations of summer precipitation may originate from the gradient of boreal insolation that modulates the thermal contrast between the Asian continent and surrounding oceans.

  7. Making time for soil: Technoscientific futurity and the pace of care.

    PubMed

    de la Bellacasa, Maria Puig

    2015-10-01

    The dominant drive for understanding soil has been to pace its fertility with human demand. Today, warnings about soil's exhaustion and endangered ecology raise concerns marked by fears of gloomy environmental futures, prompting scientists and soil practitioners urgently to develop better ways of taking care of soils. Yet the pace required by ecological soil care could be at odds with the predominant temporal orientation of technoscientific intervention, which is driven by an inherently progressivist, productionist and restless mode of futurity. Through a conceptual and historical approach to the soil sciences and other domains of soil knowledge, this article looks for soil ontologies and relations to soil care that are obscured by the predominant timescape. Contemporary discussions of the future of the soil sciences expose tensions between 'progress as usual'--by intensifying productivity--and the need to protect the pace of soil renewal. The intimate relation of soil science with productionism is being interrogated, as ecology attempts to engage with soil as a living community rather than a receptacle for crops. In this context, and beyond science, the 'foodweb' model of soil ecology has become a figure of alternative human-soil relations that involve environmental practitioners in the soil community. Reading these ways of making time for soil as a form of 'care time' helps to reveal a diversity of more-than-human interdependent temporalities, disrupting the anthropocentric appeal of predominant timescales of technoscientific futurity and their reductive notion of innovation.

  8. Far field pacing supersedes anti-tachycardia pacing in a generic model of excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittihn, Philip; Luther, Gisela; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Krinsky, Valentin; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2008-10-01

    Removing anchored spirals from obstacles is an important step in terminating cardiac arrhythmia. Conventional anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) has this ability, but only under very restrictive conditions. In a generic model of excitable media, we demonstrate that for unpinning spiral waves from obstacles this profound limitation of ATP can be overcome by far field pacing (FFP). More specifically, an argument is presented for why FFP includes and thus can only extend the capabilities of ATP in the configurations considered. By numerical simulations, we show that in the model there exists a parameter region in which unpinning is possible by FFP but not by ATP. The relevance of this result regarding clinical applications is discussed.

  9. Mass-gathering health research foundational theory: part 2 - event modeling for mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Turris, Sheila A; Lund, Adam; Hutton, Alison; Bowles, Ron; Ellerson, Elizabeth; Steenkamp, Malinda; Ranse, Jamie; Arbon, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Current knowledge about mass-gathering health (MGH) fails to adequately inform the understanding of mass gatherings (MGs) because of a relative lack of theory development and adequate conceptual analysis. This report describes the development of a series of event lenses that serve as a beginning "MG event model," complimenting the "MG population model" reported elsewhere. Existing descriptions of "MGs" were considered. Analyzing gaps in current knowledge, the authors sought to delineate the population of events being reported. Employing a consensus approach, the authors strove to capture the diversity, range, and scope of MG events, identifying common variables that might assist researchers in determining when events are similar and might be compared. Through face-to-face group meetings, structured breakout sessions, asynchronous collaboration, and virtual international meetings, a conceptual approach to classifying and describing events evolved in an iterative fashion. Findings Embedded within existing literature are a variety of approaches to event classification and description. Arising from these approaches, the authors discuss the interplay between event demographics, event dynamics, and event design. Specifically, the report details current understandings about event types, geography, scale, temporality, crowd dynamics, medical support, protective factors, and special hazards. A series of tables are presented to model the different analytic lenses that might be employed in understanding the context of MG events. Interpretation The development of an event model addresses a gap in the current body of knowledge vis a vis understanding and reporting the full scope of the health effects related to MGs. Consistent use of a consensus-based event model will support more rigorous data collection. This in turn will support meta-analysis, create a foundation for risk assessment, allow for the pooling of data for illness and injury prediction, and support methodology for

  10. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  11. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  12. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  13. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  14. 32 CFR 651.52 - Aids to information gathering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Aids to information gathering. 651.52 Section 651.52 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Process § 651.52 Aids to information gathering. The proponent may use or develop graphic or...

  15. 49 CFR 510.5 - Information gathering hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information gathering hearings. 510.5 Section 510.5 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION GATHERING POWERS § 510.5...

  16. 18 CFR 290.102 - Information gathering and filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information gathering and filing. 290.102 Section 290.102 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... POLICIES ACT OF 1978 Coverage, Compliance and Definitions § 290.102 Information gathering and filing. All...

  17. 18 CFR 290.102 - Information gathering and filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information gathering and filing. 290.102 Section 290.102 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... POLICIES ACT OF 1978 Coverage, Compliance and Definitions § 290.102 Information gathering and filing. All...

  18. Play as a Foundation for Hunter-Gatherer Social Existence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author offers the thesis that hunter-gatherers promoted, through cultural means, the playful side of their human nature and this made possible their egalitarian, nonautocratic, intensely cooperative ways of living. Hunter-gatherer bands, with their fluid membership, are likened to social-play groups, which people could freely join or leave.…

  19. Accelerating the "Pace" against Illiteracy: Parent and Child Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Roger

    1989-01-01

    In 1980, Kentucky reported the nation's lowest percentage of adults, aged 25 and older, who had graduated from high school. Legislators were inundated with recommendations for reform. The result was the enactment of the Parent and Child Education (PACE) pilot program (1986). In the PACE program, parents without high school diplomas attend classes…

  20. Self-Paced Learning in Civil E.T.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, Kent

    1977-01-01

    Briefly reports on the structure and evaluation of an individually-paced, two year civil engineering technology curriculum sponsored by a National Science Foundation grant. The written modules progress linearly with support media presentations. Students in the self-paced program generally outperformed lecture-based students on cognitive…

  1. Social Interaction in Self-Paced Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; Upton, Lorne; Dron, Jon; Malone, Judi; Poelhuber, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a case study of a self-paced university course that was originally designed to support independent, self-paced study at distance. We developed a social media intervention, in design-based research terms, that allows these independent students to contribute archived content to enhance the course, to engage in discussions…

  2. Achievement Monitoring of Individually Paced Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Paul D.

    A study was made to monitor achievement of individually paced instruction. The project concentrated on designing testing procedures in group paced instructional programs to provide information to student, teachers, parents and administrators which could be used in both a formative and summative evaluation. The three objectives of the project were:…

  3. Prediction of Procrastination in a Self-Pacing Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald D.; Hampton, John D.

    The objective of the study was to predict potential procrastinators in a self-pacing instructional system. Seventy-five entering college freshmen were randomly selected to participate in a large scale individually-paced program. Those students (25) who procrastinated were classified as "no-start-procrastinators" (NSP); the remainder (52) were…

  4. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  5. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  6. Torsion of the left ventricle during pacing with MRI tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Jonathan M.; Wyman, Bradley T.; Faris, Owen P.; Hunter, William R.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2000-04-01

    In this study the effects of different pacing protocols on left ventricular (LV) torsion was evaluated over the full cardiac cycle. A systolic and diastolic series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were combined and used to calculate the torsion of the LV. The asynchronous contraction resulting from ventricular pacing interferes with the temporal evolution of LV torsion. From these experiments we have shown that measuring torsion is an extremely sensitive indicator of the existence of ectopic excitation. The torsion of the left ventricle was investigated under three different protocols: (1) Right atrial pacing, (2) Right ventricular pacing and (3) Simultaneous pacing from the right ventricular apex and left ventricular base. The temporal evolution of torsion was determined from tagged magnetic resonance images and was evaluated over the full cardiac cycle. The peak twist Tmax for the RA paced heart was 11.09 (+/- 3.54) degrees compared to 6.06 (+/- 1.65) degrees and 6.09 (+/- 0.68) degrees for the RV and Bi-V paced hearts respectively. While biventricular pacing has been shown to increase the synchrony of contraction, it does not preserve the normal physiological twist patterns of the heart.

  7. Medical care at mass gatherings: considerations for physician involvement.

    PubMed

    Parrillo, S J

    1995-01-01

    Although many authorities define a "mass gathering" as a group exceeding 1,000 persons, several times that number likely are to be present. The event for which the group will gather may be anything from a rock concert to an Olympic competition. Preparations for the event can be minor or major. This article reviews the issues that a physician should consider if he or she chooses to become involved in the delivery of medical care to such populations, as well as the evidence suggesting that a physician should be involved in most such gatherings. Emergency medical care at public gatherings is haphazard at best and dangerous at worst. There are surprisingly few data from which to plan the emergency medical needs for public events and no recognized standards or guidelines for providing emergency medical services at mass public gatherings.

  8. Characteristics associated with sexual assaults at mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Sampsel, Kari; Godbout, Justin; Leach, Tara; Taljaard, Monica; Calder, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexual assault is disturbingly common, yet little is known about those occurring at mass gatherings, defined as a group of people congregated for a common purpose. Our objectives were to examine patterns of variation in sexual assault associated with mass gatherings and to determine factors associated with assaults occurring at mass gatherings. Methods We performed a case series analysis from January to December, 2013. We included all patients >16 years presenting within 30 days of their sexual assault to the Ottawa Hospital Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program (SAPACP). Cases were stratified by whether or not they occurred at mass gatherings. We abstracted from the SAPACP records: patient and sexual assault characteristics, alcohol or drug consumption and medical and forensic care accepted. We performed descriptive analyses and multiple logistical regression to identify factors associated with mass gathering assaults. Results We found 204 cases of sexual assault, of which 53 (26%) occurred at mass gatherings. Relative frequencies of mass gathering sexual assaults peaked during New Year's Eve, Canada Day, university frosh week and Halloween. We found the following factors were statistically significantly associated with sexual assault at mass gatherings: younger age (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99); voluntary consumption of drugs and alcohol (3.88, 95% CI 1.34 to 11.23); assault occurring on a holiday (2.37, 95% CI 1.00 to 5.64) and the assailant unknown to the victim (2.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 5). Interpretation This study is the first to describe patterns of variation in sexual assault incidents associated with occurrence of mass gatherings as well as factors associated with such assaults. We will disseminate these results to key stakeholders in order to develop prevention-minded policies for future mass gatherings. PMID:26315648

  9. Pacing and lapping movements among institutionalized patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Akiko; Suto, Shunji; Makimoto, Kiyoko; Yamakawa, Miyae; Shigenobu, Kazue; Tabushi, Kaoru

    2010-03-01

    Wandering is a complex behavior, and defining wandering has been challenging. The current study used the integrated circuit (IC) tag monitoring system to describe the distance moved per day and the spatial movements of patients with dementia. The study was conducted in a 60-bed semiacute dementia care unit in a general hospital in Japan over a 3-month period in 2006. The distance moved per day, the numbers of pacing and lapping movements, and the proportions of the distance moved that was paced or lapped were tabulated in 23 patients diagnosed with dementia. The distance moved per day and the numbers of pacing and lapping movements varied greatly within and among study participants. The median distance moved per day was inversely correlated with participants' age and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores (adjusted r(2) = .34, P = .01). Consecutive lapping and pacing movements were rare patients with in Alzheimer's disease (AD), while 2 patients with frontotemporal dementia paced or lapped repeatedly.

  10. Computer-Paced versus Experimenter-Paced Working Memory Span Tasks: Are They Equally Reliable and Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Working memory span tasks are popular measures, in part, because performance on these tasks predicts performance on other measures of cognitive ability. The traditional method of span-task administration is the experimenter-paced version, whose reliability and validity have been repeatedly demonstrated. However, computer-paced span tasks are…

  11. An Undergraduate Intern Program at PACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) established the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in 1995 to conduct basic and applied research that contributes to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Specifically, PACES provides a repository of remote sensing and other information that supports investigations into an improved understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes occurring in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Approximately 85% of UTEP's students come from El Paso County, a fast growing urban region representative of many large cities in the Southwest that have, or will soon have, a majority of their population composed of groups currently underrepresented in the scientific and technical workforce. UTEP's student population has an ethnic distribution (63% Hispanic, 32% Anglo, 3% African American, 1.5 % Asian American, and less than 1% Native American) that closely matches the demographics of the region it serves. Thus, UTEP has a mission to serve a multicultural population where minority students comprise the majority. Most Hispanic students at UTEP are primarily of Mexican origin. A large number are first or second-generation U.S. citizens. Characteristics that unite Hispanic students, in particular those of Mexican-origin, are a strong sense of family loyalty and a belief that all family members are responsible for contributing to the economic stability and well-being of the family. Most of their families are larger in number than the national average, and a variety of generations live together or share considerable resources. Thus, many young people feel an obligation and a desire to go to work at a young age and to continue working while in college, thereby assisting their parents and other family members. Older siblings understand that they have responsibilities to do household chores, to aid their younger siblings economically, and to assist elderly family members. This "work ethic" within the

  12. Methane Emissions from United States Natural Gas Gathering and Processing.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Anthony J; Vaughn, Timothy L; Zimmerle, Daniel J; Martinez, David M; Williams, Laurie L; Robinson, Allen L; Mitchell, Austin L; Subramanian, R; Tkacik, Daniel S; Roscioli, Joseph R; Herndon, Scott C

    2015-09-01

    New facility-level methane (CH4) emissions measurements obtained from 114 natural gas gathering facilities and 16 processing plants in 13 U.S. states were combined with facility counts obtained from state and national databases in a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate CH4 emissions from U.S. natural gas gathering and processing operations. Total annual CH4 emissions of 2421 (+245/-237) Gg were estimated for all U.S. gathering and processing operations, which represents a CH4 loss rate of 0.47% (±0.05%) when normalized by 2012 CH4 production. Over 90% of those emissions were attributed to normal operation of gathering facilities (1697 +189/-185 Gg) and processing plants (506 +55/-52 Gg), with the balance attributed to gathering pipelines and processing plant routine maintenance and upsets. The median CH4 emissions estimate for processing plants is a factor of 1.7 lower than the 2012 EPA Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHGI) estimate, with the difference due largely to fewer reciprocating compressors, and a factor of 3.0 higher than that reported under the EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program. Since gathering operations are currently embedded within the production segment of the EPA GHGI, direct comparison to our results is complicated. However, the study results suggest that CH4 emissions from gathering are substantially higher than the current EPA GHGI estimate and are equivalent to 30% of the total net CH4 emissions in the natural gas systems GHGI. Because CH4 emissions from most gathering facilities are not reported under the current rule and not all source categories are reported for processing plants, the total CH4 emissions from gathering and processing reported under the EPA GHGRP (180 Gg) represents only 14% of that tabulated in the EPA GHGI and 7% of that predicted from this study.

  13. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  14. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  15. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  16. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  17. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Lobo, José; Helbing, Dirk; Kühnert, Christian; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    Humanity has just crossed a major landmark in its history with the majority of people now living in cities. Cities have long been known to be society's predominant engine of innovation and wealth creation, yet they are also its main source of crime, pollution, and disease. The inexorable trend toward urbanization worldwide presents an urgent challenge for developing a predictive, quantitative theory of urban organization and sustainable development. Here we present empirical evidence indicating that the processes relating urbanization to economic development and knowledge creation are very general, being shared by all cities belonging to the same urban system and sustained across different nations and times. Many diverse properties of cities from patent production and personal income to electrical cable length are shown to be power law functions of population size with scaling exponents, β, that fall into distinct universality classes. Quantities reflecting wealth creation and innovation have β ≈1.2 >1 (increasing returns), whereas those accounting for infrastructure display β ≈0.8 <1 (economies of scale). We predict that the pace of social life in the city increases with population size, in quantitative agreement with data, and we discuss how cities are similar to, and differ from, biological organisms, for which β<1. Finally, we explore possible consequences of these scaling relations by deriving growth equations, which quantify the dramatic difference between growth fueled by innovation versus that driven by economies of scale. This difference suggests that, as population grows, major innovation cycles must be generated at a continually accelerating rate to sustain growth and avoid stagnation or collapse. PMID:17438298

  18. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Luís M A; Lobo, José; Helbing, Dirk; Kühnert, Christian; West, Geoffrey B

    2007-04-24

    Humanity has just crossed a major landmark in its history with the majority of people now living in cities. Cities have long been known to be society's predominant engine of innovation and wealth creation, yet they are also its main source of crime, pollution, and disease. The inexorable trend toward urbanization worldwide presents an urgent challenge for developing a predictive, quantitative theory of urban organization and sustainable development. Here we present empirical evidence indicating that the processes relating urbanization to economic development and knowledge creation are very general, being shared by all cities belonging to the same urban system and sustained across different nations and times. Many diverse properties of cities from patent production and personal income to electrical cable length are shown to be power law functions of population size with scaling exponents, beta, that fall into distinct universality classes. Quantities reflecting wealth creation and innovation have beta approximately 1.2 >1 (increasing returns), whereas those accounting for infrastructure display beta approximately 0.8 <1 (economies of scale). We predict that the pace of social life in the city increases with population size, in quantitative agreement with data, and we discuss how cities are similar to, and differ from, biological organisms, for which beta<1. Finally, we explore possible consequences of these scaling relations by deriving growth equations, which quantify the dramatic difference between growth fueled by innovation versus that driven by economies of scale. This difference suggests that, as population grows, major innovation cycles must be generated at a continually accelerating rate to sustain growth and avoid stagnation or collapse.

  19. Altering embryonic cardiac dynamics with optical pacing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L M; McPheeters, M; Barwick, L; Gu, S; Rollins, A M; Jenkins, M W

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that altering blood flow early in development leads to congenital heart defects. In these studies the perturbations to hemodynamics were very gross manipulations (vessel ligation, conotruncal banding, etc.) that would be inappropriate for probing the delicate mechanisms responsible for mechanically-transduced signaling. Also, these perturbations lacked feedback from a monitoring system to determine the exact degree of alteration and the location of its effect. Here, we employed optical pacing (OP) to alter the heart rate in quail embryos and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the resultant shear forces on the endocardium. OP is a new technique utilizing pulsed 1.851 µm infrared laser light to noninvasively capture the heart rate to the pulse frequency of the laser without the use of exogenous agents. To measure shear stress on the endocardium, we extended our previous OCT algorithms to enable the production of 4-D shear maps. 4-D shear maps allowed observation of the spatial and temporal distribution of shear stress. Employing both OCT and OP, we were able to develop perturbation protocols that increase regurgitant flow and greatly modify the oscillatory shear index (OSI) in a region of the heart tube where future valves will develop. Regurgitant flow has been linked with valve development and precise perturbations may allow one to determine the role of hemodynamics in valvulogenesis.

  20. Pushing the Pace of Tree Species Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; McGill, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  1. The evolution of pace in popular movies.

    PubMed

    Cutting, James E

    2016-01-01

    Movies have changed dramatically over the last 100 years. Several of these changes in popular English-language filmmaking practice are reflected in patterns of film style as distributed over the length of movies. In particular, arrangements of shot durations, motion, and luminance have altered and come to reflect aspects of the narrative form. Narrative form, on the other hand, appears to have been relatively unchanged over that time and is often characterized as having four more or less equal duration parts, sometimes called acts - setup, complication, development, and climax. The altered patterns in film style found here affect a movie's pace: increasing shot durations and decreasing motion in the setup, darkening across the complication and development followed by brightening across the climax, decreasing shot durations and increasing motion during the first part of the climax followed by increasing shot durations and decreasing motion at the end of the climax. Decreasing shot durations mean more cuts; more cuts mean potentially more saccades that drive attention; more motion also captures attention; and brighter and darker images are associated with positive and negative emotions. Coupled with narrative form, all of these may serve to increase the engagement of the movie viewer.

  2. Interaction between spiral and paced waves in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Agladze, Konstantin; Kay, Matthew W; Krinsky, Valentin; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2007-07-01

    For prevention of lethal arrhythmias, patients at risk receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, which use high-frequency antitachycardia pacing (ATP) to convert tachycardias to a normal rhythm. One of the suggested ATP mechanisms involves paced-induced drift of rotating waves followed by their collision with the boundary of excitable tissue. This study provides direct experimental evidence of this mechanism. In monolayers of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in which rotating waves of activity were initiated by premature stimuli, we used the Ca(2+)-sensitive indicator fluo 4 to observe propagating wave patterns. The interaction of the spiral tip with a paced wave was then monitored at a high spatial resolution. In the course of the experiments, we observed spiral wave pinning to local heterogeneities within the myocyte layer. High-frequency pacing led, in a majority of cases, to successful termination of spiral activity. Our data show that 1) stable spiral waves in cardiac monolayers tend to be pinned to local heterogeneities or areas of altered conduction, 2) overdrive pacing can shift a rotating wave from its original site, and 3) the wave break, formed as a result of interaction between the spiral tip and a paced wave front, moves by a paced-induced drift mechanism to an area where it may become unstable or collide with a boundary. The data were complemented by numerical simulations, which was used to further analyze experimentally observed behavior.

  3. Voluntary wheel running and pacing-induced dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; MacDonnell, Scott M; Kendrick, Zebulon V; Houser, Steven R; Libonati, Joseph R

    2008-10-01

    We examined how voluntary wheel running in the female, spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) impacts myocardial tolerance to pacing stress and determined whether direct adenylyl cyclase agonism via forskolin infusion improved myocardial performance during pacing. Twenty-five 16-week-old female Wistar Kyoto (WKY, n = 8) and SHR (n = 17) were utilized. Animals within the SHR group were randomly assigned to a sedentary (SHR-SED, n = 8) or a voluntary wheel running (SHR-WHL, n = 9) group. The SHR-WHL had free access to a running wheel 24 h/day. Resting heart rates and blood pressures were collected immediately prior to sacrifice utilizing a tail cuff apparatus. Left ventricular (LV) function was measured in a Langendorff, isovolumic preparation during pacing stress (8.5 Hz) and during pacing stress + forskolin (5 micromol/L). SHR-WHL showed cardiac enlargement without alterations in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, or rate-pressure product. Pacing stress impaired inotropic and lusitropic performance to a similar extent in all groups (p < 0.05), while forskolin infusion improved LV function to a similar extent in all groups (p < 0.05). These data suggest that voluntary wheel running in SHR does not protect from pacing-induced myocardial dysfunction, and adenylyl cyclase agonism during pacing stress can functionally protect the heart. These data reiterate the importance of a competent myocardial beta-adrenergic signaling cascade.

  4. Interaction between spiral and paced waves in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Agladze, Konstantin; Kay, Matthew W.; Krinsky, Valentin; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of lethal arrhythmias, patients at risk receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, which use high-frequency antitachycardia pacing (ATP) to convert tachycardias to a normal rhythm. One of the suggested ATP mechanisms involves paced-induced drift of rotating waves followed by their collision with the boundary of excitable tissue. This study provides direct experimental evidence of this mechanism. In monolayers of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in which rotating waves of activity were initiated by premature stimuli, we used the Ca2+-sensitive indicator fluo 4 to observe propagating wave patterns. The interaction of the spiral tip with a paced wave was then monitored at a high spatial resolution. In the course of the experiments, we observed spiral wave pinning to local heterogeneities within the myocyte layer. High-frequency pacing led, in a majority of cases, to successful termination of spiral activity. Our data show that 1) stable spiral waves in cardiac monolayers tend to be pinned to local heterogeneities or areas of altered conduction, 2) overdrive pacing can shift a rotating wave from its original site, and 3) the wave break, formed as a result of interaction between the spiral tip and a paced wave front, moves by a paced-induced drift mechanism to an area where it may become unstable or collide with a boundary. The data were complemented by numerical simulations, which was used to further analyze experimentally observed behavior. PMID:17384124

  5. The road to right ventricular septal pacing: techniques and tools.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G

    2010-07-01

    Prolonged right ventricular (RV) apical pacing is associated with progressive left ventricular dysfunction due to dysynchronous ventricular activation and contraction. RV septal pacing allows a narrower QRS compared to RV apical pacing, which might reflect a more physiological and synchronous ventricular activation. Previous clinical studies, which did not consistently achieve RV septal pacing, were not confirmatory and need to be repeated. This review summarizes the anatomy of the RV septum, the radiographic appearances of pacing leads in the RV, the electrocardiograph correlates of RV septal lead positioning, and the techniques and tools required for implantation of an active-fixation lead onto the RV septum. Using the described techniques and tools, conventional active-fixation leads can now be reliably secured to either the RV outflow tract septum or mid-RV septum with very low complication rates and good long-term performance. Even though physiologic and hemodynamic studies on true RV septal pacing have not been completed, the detrimental effects of long-term RV apical pacing are significant enough to suggest that it is now time to leave the RV apex and secure all RV leads onto the septum.

  6. Pacing: a concept analysis of the chronic pain intervention.

    PubMed

    Jamieson-Lega, Kathryn; Berry, Robyn; Brown, Cary A

    2013-01-01

    The intervention of pacing is regularly recommended for chronic pain patients. However, pacing is poorly defined and appears to be interpreted in varying, potentially contradictory manners within the field of chronic pain. This conceptual lack of clarity has implications for effective service delivery and for researchers' ability to conduct rigorous study. An examination of the background literature demonstrates that while pacing is often one part of a multidisciplinary pain management program, outcome research is hindered by a lack of a clear and shared definition of this currently ill-defined construct. To conduct a formal concept analysis of the term 'pacing'. A standardized concept analysis process (including literature scoping to identify all uses of the concept, analysis to determine defining attributes of the concept and identification of model, borderline and contrary cases) was used to determine what the concept of pacing does and does not represent within the current evidence base. A conceptual model including the core attributes of action, time, balance, learning and self-management emerged. From these attributes, an evidence-based definition for pacing was composed and distributed to stakeholders for review. After consideration of stakeholder feedback, the emergent definition of pacing was finalized as follows: "Pacing is an active self-management strategy whereby individuals learn to balance time spent on activity and rest for the purpose of achieving increased function and participation in meaningful activities". The findings of the present concept analysis will help to standardize the use and definition of the term pacing across disciplines for the purposes of both pain management and research.

  7. The Effect of Diuresis on the Paced QRS Complexes in Pacing-Dependent Patients with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Bin; He, Maorong; Zhang, Meilin; Shen, Guoying; Zhao, Xiaowei

    2016-03-01

    Augmentation of the amplitude of QRS complexes with diuretic therapy for patients with congestive heart failure has been well documented. However, the effect of diuresis on the paced QRS complexes in pacing-dependent patients with heart failure is scarce. To investigate the effect of diuresis on the paced QRS complexes in pacing-dependent patients with heart failure. Thrity-two consecutive pacing-dependent patients with heart failure were enrolled in this study. Before and after diuresis, the sums of paced QRS amplitude of leads I+II (ΣpQRSI+II ), six limb leads (ΣpQRS6L ), leads V1 -V3 (ΣpQRSV1-V3 ), leads V4 -V6 (ΣpQRSV4-V6 ), leads V1 -V6 (ΣpQRSV1-V6 ), and lead aVR (pQRSaVR ), paced QRS duration (pQRSd ), paced QT intervals (pQT) and the body weight of each patient were measured, then the % changes (Δ%) in paced electrocardiogram (ECG) variables and the Δ% in body weight were evaluated. Compared with before diuresis, paced ECG variables significantly increased and body weight significantly decreased after diuresis, Δ% in paced QRS amplitude(s) in all ECG variables (ΣpQRSI+II, ΣpQRS6L, ΣpQRSV1-V3 , ΣpQRSV4-V6 , ΣpQRSV1-V6 , and pQRSaVR ) correlated well with Δ% in body weight (r = 0.416, r = 0.849, r = 0.901, r = 0.371, r = 0.837, r = 0.619, and P = 0.018, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.037, P < 0.001, P < 0.001), while there was no correlation between Δ% in pQRSd and pQT and Δ% in body weight. The changes in amplitude of paced QRS complexes may be useful for the monitoring of therapy of pacing-dependent patients with heart failure. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Environmental and Health Consideration for Mass Gatherings at Football Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fodero, Severio D.

    1976-01-01

    University health services along with local and state agencies have the responsibility through a coordinated effort to insure that acceptable environmental sanitation standards are maintained during mass gatherings at athletic events. (MB)

  9. 7. OFFICERS' CLUB INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, HALLWAY AND GATHERING ROOMS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OFFICERS' CLUB INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, HALLWAY AND GATHERING ROOMS, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Brick Officers' Quarters, Officers' Club, Area A, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  10. Forecasting to Consensus Gathering, Delphi Grows Up to College Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    What began as a hypothetical approach to educational forecasting is now gaining momentum as a workable consensus gathering technique for all phases of educational administration and planning. (Editor/HS)

  11. Federal Agencies Gather to Learn More about Workplace Charging Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, Nay; Olexsak, Sarah

    2016-10-20

    More than 150 leaders from 50 different federal organizations gathered in Washington, D.C. to learn more about the Energy Department’s Workplace Charging Challenge to help further the adoption of electric vehicles.

  12. Gradients of occlusal wear in hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists.

    PubMed

    Deter, Christina A

    2009-03-01

    Occlusal wear was recorded in maxillary teeth from three North American late Archaic (3385 +/- 365 cal BC) hunter-gatherer sites (n = 306) and late Anasazi-early Zuni agricultural sites ( approximately 1300 AD) (n = 87). Comparisons were undertaken using descriptive and inferential statistics to determine differences between these groups, and along the maxillary tooth row. The hunter-gatherers had a significantly greater percentage of occlusal wear than the agriculturalists. For both hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists, occlusal wear was greatest on the central incisors and first molars. The third molars had the least amount of wear. It was inferred from these results that the hunter-gatherers had a more abrasive diet, and different daily task activities compared to the agriculturalists. One further finding was that wear patterns on anterior and posterior teeth are influenced by the order that teeth erupt into the jaw, as well as diet and behavior.

  13. Federal Agencies Gather to Learn More about Workplace Charging Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    Chehab, Nay; Olexsak, Sarah

    2016-10-26

    More than 150 leaders from 50 different federal organizations gathered in Washington, D.C. to learn more about the Energy Department’s Workplace Charging Challenge to help further the adoption of electric vehicles.

  14. Health Service Impact from Mass Gatherings: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ranse, Jamie; Hutton, Alison; Keene, Toby; Lenson, Shane; Luther, Matt; Bost, Nerolie; Johnston, Amy N B; Crilly, Julia; Cannon, Matt; Jones, Nicole; Hayes, Courtney; Burke, Brandon

    2017-02-01

    During a mass gathering, some participants may receive health care for injuries or illnesses that occur during the event. In-event first responders provide initial assessment and management at the event. However, when further definitive care is required, municipal ambulance services provide additional assessment, treatment, and transport of participants to acute care settings, such as hospitals. The impact on both ambulance services and hospitals from mass-gathering events is the focus of this literature review. Aim This literature review aimed to develop an understanding of the impact of mass gatherings on local health services, specifically pertaining to in-event and external health services. This research used a systematic literature review methodology. Electronic databases were searched to find articles related to the aim of the review. Articles focused on mass-gathering health, provision of in-event health services, ambulance service transportation, and hospital utilization. Twenty-four studies were identified for inclusion in this review. These studies were all case-study-based and retrospective in design. The majority of studies (n=23) provided details of in-event first responder services. There was variation noted in reporting of the number and type of in-event health professional services at mass gatherings. All articles reported that patients were transported to hospital by the ambulance service. Only nine articles reported on patients presenting to hospital. However, details pertaining to the impact on ambulance and hospital services were not reported. There is minimal research focusing on the impact of mass gatherings on in-event and external health services, such as ambulance services and hospitals. A recommendation for future mass-gathering research and evaluation is to link patient-level data from in-event mass gatherings to external health services. This type of study design would provide information regarding the impact on health services from a

  15. Large-scale deep learning for robotically gathered imagery for science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, K.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Li, J.; Iscar, E.

    2016-12-01

    With the explosion of computing power, the intelligence and capability of mobile robotics has dramatically increased over the last two decades. Today, we can deploy autonomous robots to achieve observations in a variety of environments ripe for scientific exploration. These platforms are capable of gathering a volume of data previously unimaginable. Additionally, optical cameras, driven by mobile phones and consumer photography, have rapidly improved in size, power consumption, and quality making their deployment cheaper and easier. Finally, in parallel we have seen the rise of large-scale machine learning approaches, particularly deep neural networks (DNNs), increasing the quality of the semantic understanding that can be automatically extracted from optical imagery. In concert this enables new science using a combination of machine learning and robotics. This work will discuss the application of new low-cost high-performance computing approaches and the associated software frameworks to enable scientists to rapidly extract useful science data from millions of robotically gathered images. The automated analysis of imagery on this scale opens up new avenues of inquiry unavailable using more traditional manual or semi-automated approaches. We will use a large archive of millions of benthic images gathered with an autonomous underwater vehicle to demonstrate how these tools enable new scientific questions to be posed.

  16. Improving Data Quality in Mass-Gatherings Health Research.

    PubMed

    Guy, Andrew; Prager, Ross; Turris, Sheila; Lund, Adam

    2017-03-09

    Mass gatherings attract large crowds and can strain the planning and health resources of the community, city, or nation hosting an event. Mass-Gatherings Health (MGH) is an evolving niche of prehospital care rooted in emergency medicine, emergency management, public health, and disaster medicine. To explore front-line issues related to data quality in the context of mass gatherings, the authors draw on five years of management experience with an online, mass-gathering event and patient registry, as well as clinical and operational experience amassed over several decades. Here the authors propose underlying human, environmental, and logistical factors that may contribute to poor data quality at mass gatherings, and make specific recommendations for improvement through pre-event planning, on-site actions, and post-event follow-up. The advancement of MGH research will rely on addressing factors that influence data quality and developing strategies to mitigate or enhance those factors. This is an exciting time for MGH research as higher order questions are beginning to be addressed; however, quality research must start from the ground up to ensure optimal primary data capture and quality. Guy A , Prager R , Turris S , Lund A . Improving data quality in mass-gatherings health research. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(3):1-4.

  17. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    What does an orbiting microsatellite, a robotic lander and a ruggedized camera and telescope have in common? They are all fast paced, low cost projects managed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) teamed with successful industry partners. MSFC has long been synonymous with human space flight large propulsion programs, engineering acumen and risk intolerance. However, there is a growing portfolio/product line within MSFC that focuses on these smaller, fast paced projects. While launching anything into space is expensive, using a managed risk posture, holding to schedule and keeping costs low by stopping at egood enough f were key elements to their success. Risk is defined as the possibility of loss or failure per Merriam Webster. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines risk using procedural requirement 8705.4 and establishes eclasses f to discern the acceptable risk per a project. It states a Class D risk has a medium to significant risk of not achieving mission success. MSFC, along with industry partners, has created a niche in Class D efforts. How did the big, cautious MSFC succeed on these projects that embodied the antithesis of its heritage in human space flight? A key factor toward these successful projects was innovative industry partners such as Dynetics Corporation, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville), Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL), Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation (VCSI), SAIC, and Jacobs. Fast Affordable Satellite Technology (FastSat HSV01) is a low earth orbit microsatellite that houses six instruments with the primary scientific objective of earth observation and technology demonstration. The team was comprised of Dynetics, UAHuntsvile, SAIC, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and VCSI with the United States Air Force Space Test Program as the customer. The team completed design, development, manufacturing, environmental test and integration in

  18. Characteristics associated with sexual assaults at mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Sampsel, Kari; Godbout, Justin; Leach, Tara; Taljaard, Monica; Calder, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Sexual assault is disturbingly common, yet little is known about those occurring at mass gatherings, defined as a group of people congregated for a common purpose. Our objectives were to examine patterns of variation in sexual assault associated with mass gatherings and to determine factors associated with assaults occurring at mass gatherings. We performed a case series analysis from January to December, 2013. We included all patients >16 years presenting within 30 days of their sexual assault to the Ottawa Hospital Sexual Assault and Partner Abuse Care Program (SAPACP). Cases were stratified by whether or not they occurred at mass gatherings. We abstracted from the SAPACP records: patient and sexual assault characteristics, alcohol or drug consumption and medical and forensic care accepted. We performed descriptive analyses and multiple logistical regression to identify factors associated with mass gathering assaults. We found 204 cases of sexual assault, of which 53 (26%) occurred at mass gatherings. Relative frequencies of mass gathering sexual assaults peaked during New Year's Eve, Canada Day, university frosh week and Halloween. We found the following factors were statistically significantly associated with sexual assault at mass gatherings: younger age (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.99); voluntary consumption of drugs and alcohol (3.88, 95% CI 1.34 to 11.23); assault occurring on a holiday (2.37, 95% CI 1.00 to 5.64) and the assailant unknown to the victim (2.43, 95% CI 1.15 to 5). This study is the first to describe patterns of variation in sexual assault incidents associated with occurrence of mass gatherings as well as factors associated with such assaults. We will disseminate these results to key stakeholders in order to develop prevention-minded policies for future mass gatherings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  20. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  1. A Flexible Self-Paced Course in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Franklin G.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemical engineering course which has been taught by a self-paced instructional method at Howard University, Washington, D.C. The instructional method, course description, and students' grades are also discussed. (HM)

  2. Using Individualized Self-Paced Instruction When Teaching Elementary Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Glenna D.; Echord, Barbara S.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to see if junior college and high school students do as well in learning elementary accounting through an individualized self-paced approach as through the traditional teacher-led method. (CT)

  3. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE... risk adjustment model. (5) CMS may adjust the monthly capitation amount to take into account...

  4. The PACES Summer Science Trek: A Pre-College Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michelle B.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) received five-year funding to form the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in July 1995. PACES has as its goals to conduct research contributing to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and to develop skilled scientists and engineers. PACES seeks to gain a more comprehensive understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes and changes taking place in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico region. The PACES center has collaborative ties with two NASA field center (Goddard Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The original proposal contained no provision for outreach programs. However, at a meeting in the fall of 1995, Dan Goldin, NASA Administrator, issued the challenge that in order to accomplish NASA's goals to educate more of the citizenry in science and engineering, the Centers should take a broader perspective aimed at younger children.

  5. On the effectiveness of self-paced learning.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Jonathan G; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2011-02-01

    Metacognitive monitoring and control must be accurate and efficient in order to allow self-guided learners to improve their performance. Yet few examples exist in which allowing learners to control learning produces higher levels of performance than restricting learners' control. Here we investigate the consequences of allowing learners to self-pace study of a list of words on later recognition, and show that learners with control of study-time allocation significantly outperformed subjects with no control, even when the total study time was equated between groups (Experiments 1 and 2). The self-pacing group also outperformed a group for which study time was automatically allocated as a function of normative item difficulty (Experiment 2). The advantage of self-pacing was apparent only in subjects who utilized a discrepancy reduction strategy-that is, who allocated more study time to normatively difficult items. Self-pacing can improve memory performance, but only when appropriate allocation strategies are used.

  6. A Self-Paced Laboratory Section in Physiological Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Keith W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a one semester-hour self-paced laboratory section accompanying a physiological psychology course. Points out five disadvantages and three advantages, including more time and advance planning needed, active involvement of students, and increased learning and retention. (CK)

  7. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  8. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  9. Long-term Ventricular Pacing in Treatment of Sinoatrial Block

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Six patients with symptoms due to sinoatrial block are described in whom no relief or improvement in block occurred when they were treated with isoprenaline or ephedrine. All six patients were treated by ventricular cardiac pacing with complete relief of symptoms. Despite the theoretical disadvantages of parasystole and loss of accrochage in treating these patients by ventricular pacing they have survived for periods of 18 months to over five years. PMID:5567769

  10. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  11. Did recent world record marathon runners employ optimal pacing strategies?

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    We apply statistical analysis of high frequency (1 km) split data for the most recent two world-record marathon runs: Run 1 (2:03:59, 28 September 2008) and Run 2 (2:03:38, 25 September 2011). Based on studies in the endurance cycling literature, we develop two principles to approximate 'optimal' pacing in the field marathon. By utilising GPS and weather data, we test, and then de-trend, for each athlete's field response to gradient and headwind on course, recovering standardised proxies for power-based pacing traces. The resultant traces were analysed to ascertain if either runner followed optimal pacing principles; and characterise any deviations from optimality. Whereas gradient was insignificant, headwind was a significant factor in running speed variability for both runners, with Runner 2 targeting the (optimal) parallel variation principle, whilst Runner 1 did not. After adjusting for these responses, neither runner followed the (optimal) 'even' power pacing principle, with Runner 2's macro-pacing strategy fitting a sinusoidal oscillator with exponentially expanding envelope whilst Runner 1 followed a U-shaped, quadratic form. The study suggests that: (a) better pacing strategy could provide elite marathon runners with an economical pathway to significant performance improvements at world-record level; and (b) the data and analysis herein is consistent with a complex-adaptive model of power regulation.

  12. Impedance to transesophageal atrial pacing: significance regarding power sources.

    PubMed

    Kerr, C R; Chung, D C; Wickham, G; Jameson, M; Vorderbrugge, S

    1989-06-01

    Transesophageal stimulation is an expeditious method of atrial pacing. Using pulse widths of 10 msec results in reduction of current requirement to values that are usually less than 15 mA. An unknown variable in transesophageal atrial pacing has been impedance. In this study, we investigated the impedance to transesophageal atrial pacing in ten patients using a stimulator with a 63 V power source capable of delivering constant current to 20 mA against an impedance of 2,000 ohms. A bipolar electrode was used to deliver stimuli with a current of 15 mA. Voltage across a known resistance and current were measured on an oscilloscope and the impedance was calculated. Pacing thresholds were also performed and ranged from 6.2 to 16.5 mA (mean 9.4 +/- 2.9 mA, SD). Impedance varied between 720 and 2,670 ohms (mean 1,750 +/- 540 ohms). The stimulator used to measure impedance in man and two other commercially available stimulators were bench tested against known resistances of 500 to 2,000 ohms. The other stimulators with power sources of 12.5 and 15 V had attenuation of the delivered current at resistances of between 1,000 and 2,000 ohms. Thus, this study has demonstrated that transesophageal atrial pacing incurs impedances two to five times greater than incurred with intracardiac pacing leads. Therefore stimulators with high power sources are required to deliver the programmed current against these impedances.

  13. PACE and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2010-03-17

    The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On June 18, 2009, James B. Lockhart III, then Director of FHFA, released a letter expressing concern about the negative impact of energy loan tax assessment programs (ELTAPs) - also known as Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs - on both the housing finance system and homeowner program participants. Subsequently, a number of PACE proponents responded to the concerns laid out in the FHFA letter. In early Fall 2009, word circulated that FHFA was planning to follow its June letter with guidance to other agencies, possibly including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, discouraging them from buying loans on properties subject to PACE-type assessment liens. This triggered a second round of stakeholder letters, several of which were addressed to President Obama. On October 18, 2009, the White House, in what some believe was an attempt to obviate the need for FHFA guidance, released a Policy Framework for PACE Financing Programs that outlined best practices guidance for homeowner and lender protection. As of February 2010, FHFA and the GSEs have agreed to monitor PACE programs and work with stakeholders and the Administration to consider additional guidance beyond the Policy Framework and to collect more information on PACE program efficacy and risks. A summary of the communications timeline and highlights of the communications are provided.

  14. An analysis of medical care at mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A B; Criss, E; Steckl, P; Meislin, H W; Raife, J; Allen, D

    1986-05-01

    Emergency medical care at public gatherings is haphazard at best and dangerous at worst. The Arizona chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians, through the Chapter Grant Program, studied the level of medical care provided at public gatherings in order to develop guidelines for emergency medical care at mass gatherings. The study consisted of a survey of medical care at 15 facilities providing events for the public. The results of these surveys showed a wide variation of medical care provided at mass events. Of the 490 medical encounters reviewed, 52.2% were within the realm of care of paramedics, but not basic emergency medical technicians. The most common injuries/illnesses were lacerations, sprains, headaches, and syncope. Problems noted included poor documentation and record keeping of medical encounters, a tendency for prehospital care personnel to make medical evaluations without transport or medical control, and variability of care provided. Based on this survey and a literature review, guidelines for medical care at mass gatherings in Arizona were determined using an objective-oriented approach. It is our position that event organizers have the responsibility of ensuring the availability of emergency medical services for spectators and participants. We recommend that state chapters or National ACEP evaluate the role of emergency medical care at mass gatherings.

  15. Adaptive memory: fitness relevance and the hunter-gatherer mind.

    PubMed

    Nairne, James S; Pandeirada, Josefa N S; Gregory, Karie J; Van Arsdall, Joshua E

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that human memory systems are "tuned" to remember information that is processed in terms of its fitness value. When people are asked to rate the relevance of words to a survival scenario, performance on subsequent surprise memory tests exceeds that obtained after most other known encoding techniques. The present experiments explored this effect using survival scenarios designed to mimic the division of labor thought to characterize early hunter-gatherer societies. It has been suggested that males and females have different cognitive specializations due to the unique survival tasks (hunting and gathering, respectively) they typically performed during periods of human evolution; the present experiments tested whether such specializations might be apparent in memory for words rated for relevance to these activities. Males and females were asked to rate the relevance of random words to prototypical hunting and gathering scenarios or to matched, non-fitness-relevant control scenarios (gathering food on a scavenger hunt or in a hunting contest). Surprise retention tests revealed superior memory for the words when they were rated for relevance to hunting and gathering scenarios, compared with when they were rated for relevance to the control scenarios, but no sex differences were found in memory performance.

  16. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  17. Instructor-paced vs. self-paced skiing modes in older recreational alpine skiers.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Peter; Seifert, John G; Müller, Erich

    2011-04-01

    Parallel ski steering (PSS), carving in long radii (CLR), and individual technique (IT) skiing modes are mainly used throughout instructor-guided skiing of older recreational skiers. The aims of this study were (a) to determine differences in the physiologic response of older skiers to PSS, CLR, and IT skiing modes, (b) to quantify correlations between rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and the physiologic response, and (c) to analyze the relationship between aerobic capacity, skiing skills, and the blood lactate (LA) response during instructor-guided skiing. Twenty recreational skiers (61.1 ± 5.6 years) performed instructor-paced (PSS and CLR) and self-paced (IT) skiing modes. Heart rate (HR), LA, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and RPE were determined during skiing. Skiers skiing skills were judged by expert ski instructors. The aerobic capacity was tested by a physical work capacity test (PWC130) test. Heart rate was lower for PSS (106 ± 15 b · min(-1)), compared to CLR (118 ± 16 b · min(-1)) and IT (120 ± 15 b · min(-1)) skiing modes, both p < 0.001. Lactate levels were 1.45 ± 0.50 mmol · L(-1) for PSS, 1.67 ± 0.61 mmol · L(-1) for CLR, and 2.00 ± 0.74 mmol · L(-1) for IT skiing modes, all p < 0.004. Individual reductions in LA concentrations from 3.9 to 2.6 mmol · L were found, for IT and PSS skiing modes, respectively. No significant correlations were determined between any physiologic variable and RPE. Weak correlations were found between LA and PWC130 results (R2 < 0.114) and between LA and skiing skills (R2 < 0.132). In conclusion, significant reductions in the physiologic response were determined for PSS and CLR, compared with IT skiing modes. Instructor-paced skiing modes may minimize the risk of premature fatigue of skiers with high physiological responses. Those skiers may not perceive their disproportionate higher stress compared with skiers on the low end.

  18. Acute hemodynamic effects of right ventricular pacing site and pacing mode in patients with congestive heart failure secondary to either ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gold, M R; Brockman, R; Peters, R W; Olsovsky, M R; Shorofsky, S R

    2000-05-01

    The hemodynamic effects of pacing in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remain controversial. Early studies reported that pacing from the right ventricular (RV) apex improved acute hemodynamic parameters in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, but these findings were not confirmed in subsequent controlled studies. More recently, it has been proposed that pacing from the RV side of the ventricular septum improves hemodynamic function compared with intrinsic conduction or apical pacing. Either dual-chamber or ventricular pacing have been evaluated, again with inconsistent findings. To assess the effects of pacing site and mode on acute hemodynamic function, we evaluated 21 subjects with CHF and intrinsic conduction disease. Hemodynamics were compared in AAI, VVI, and DDD modes with pacing from the RV apex or high septum. The pacing rate was constant in each patient and the order of testing was randomized. In the absence of ventricular pacing (AAI mode), the mean systemic arterial pressure was 85 +/- 11 mm Hg, the right atrial pressure was 11 +/- 4 mm Hg, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 18 +/- 8 mm Hg and the cardiac index was 2.4 +/- 0.7 L/min/m(2). Compared with AAI pacing, there were no improvements in any hemodynamic parameter with DDD pacing from either RV site. Hemodynamic function worsened with VVI pacing from both RV sites. Subgroup analyses of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, with prolonged PR interval, or with significant mitral regurgitation also failed to demonstrate an improvement with pacing. We conclude that pacing mode but not RV pacing site affects acute hemodynamic function. Pacing in the DDD mode prevents the deleterious effects of VVI pacing in this patient population.

  19. Wealth Transmission and Inequality Among Hunter-Gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kim; Marlowe, Frank; Nolin, David; Wiessner, Polly; Gurven, Michael; Bowles, Samuel; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hertz, Tom; Bell, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    We report quantitative estimates of intergenerational transmission and population-wide inequality for wealth measures in a set of hunter-gatherer populations. Wealth is defined broadly as factors that contribute to individual or household well-being, ranging from embodied forms such as weight and hunting success to material forms such household goods, as well as relational wealth in exchange partners. Intergenerational wealth transmission is low to moderate in these populations, but is still expected to have measurable influence on an individual’s life chances. Wealth inequality (measured with Gini coefficients) is moderate for most wealth types, matching what qualitative ethnographic research has generally indicated (if not the stereotype of hunter-gatherers as extreme egalitarians). We discuss some plausible mechanisms for these patterns, and suggest ways in which future research could resolve questions about the role of wealth in hunter-gatherer social and economic life. PMID:21151711

  20. Social learning among Congo Basin hunter–gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Barry S.; Fouts, Hillary N.; Boyette, Adam H.; Hewlett, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores childhood social learning among Aka and Bofi hunter–gatherers in Central Africa. Existing literature suggests that hunter–gatherer social learning is primarily vertical (parent-to-child) and that teaching is rare. We use behavioural observations, open-ended and semi-structured interviews, and informal and anecdotal observations to examine the modes (e.g. vertical versus horizontal/oblique) and processes (e.g. teaching versus observation and imitation) of cultural transmission. Cultural and demographic contexts of social learning associated with the modes and processes of cultural transmission are described. Hunter–gatherer social learning occurred early, was relatively rapid, primarily vertical under age 5 and oblique and horizontal between the ages of 6 and 12. Pedagogy and other forms of teaching existed as early as 12 months of age, but were relatively infrequent by comparison to other processes of social learning such as observation and imitation. PMID:21357239

  1. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. 460.90 Section 460.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a Medicare...

  2. Mass gathering medical care: a twenty-five year review.

    PubMed

    Michael, J A; Barbera, J A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to critically review the provision of medical care at mass gatherings as described in 25 years of case reports. Specifically measured was the relationship between the size of a mass gathering and the frequency of patients seeking medical aid and the effects of certain event characteristics on this relationship. Data were obtained through a retrospective literature review. Medline and CINHAL computerized databases were searched for English language articles using several keywords: "mass gathering", "concert", "festival", "Olympics", "crowd"; "riot", "stadium", "sports", "games", "papal", and "football". Only articles containing complete information on the number of spectators, number of patients, type, location, and duration of the mass gathering were included in the primary analysis. As available, additional information was added including the described weather patterns, number of patients transported to a hospital, and number of patients suffering a cardiac arrest. Thirty-five of the approximately 100 articles reviewed, met these criteria. A Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficient was calculated for number of spectators and patients and a significant relationship was identified (p = 0.0001). Mann-Whitney U-tests indicated that papal masses (p = 0.04), rock concerts (p = 0.005), hot climatic conditions (p = 0.03), and events held in the British Commonwealth (p = 0.03) had a significantly higher frequency of patient visits. Significantly more cardiac arrests occurred at papal masses (p = 0.04) and sporting events (p = 0.0002). Type of event, country, weather, and the size of the mass gathering had a significant effect on the numbers of spectators seeking medical care. A uniform classification scheme is necessary for future prospective studies of mass gatherings.

  3. Gathering Information from Transport Systems for Processing in Supply Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodym, Oldřich; Unucka, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    Paper deals with complex system for processing information from means of transport acting as parts of train (rail or road). It focuses on automated information gathering using AutoID technology, information transmission via Internet of Things networks and information usage in information systems of logistic firms for support of selected processes on MES and ERP levels. Different kinds of gathered information from whole transport chain are discussed. Compliance with existing standards is mentioned. Security of information in full life cycle is integral part of presented system. Design of fully equipped system based on synthesized functional nodes is presented.

  4. Dual sensor VVIR mode pacing: is it worth it?

    PubMed

    Sulke, N; Tan, K; Kamalvand, K; Bostock, J; Bucknall, C

    1996-11-01

    Dual sensor ventricular demand rate responsive (VVIR mode) pacing was compared with single sensor rate responsive pacing to assess whether this new development should be more widely incorporated in modern pacemaker devices. A within patient randomized, double-blind crossover study involving ten patients, mean age 67.4 years (70% male), had Medtronic Legend Plus dual sensor VVIR pacemakers implanted for high grade AV block and chronic or persistent paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Performance values were compared to 20 healthy control subjects of a similar age and gender. Patients were both subjectively and objectively assessed after 2 weeks of out-of-hospital activity in VVIR mode (minute ventilation sensing), VVIR mode (activity sensing), VVIR mode (dual sensor), and VVI mode (no rate response). All patients were assessed for subjective preference for, and objective improvement in, any pacing modality as assessed by standardized daily activity protocols and graded exercise treadmill testing. Subjective perception of exercise capacity and functional status was significantly lower in VVI mode (P < 0.05) compared to any of the VVIR modes, which did not differ. After completion of the study 70% of patients chose VVIR as their preferred mode, with 30% expressing no preference. Forty percent preferred activity sensor VVIR mode pacing, 30% preferred dual sensor VVIR mode pacing, and 70% found either dual sensor VVIR mode, minute ventilation sensor VVIR mode, or both modalities least acceptable. No patient found activity sensing VVIR mode least acceptable. Graded treadmill testing revealed significantly lower exercise tolerance during VVI mode pacing (P < 0.01) compared to the VVIR modalities, which did not differ. Overall, chronotropic response was best with dual sensor pacing during standardized daily activity protocols and during the standard car journey. The data from this study suggest that there is no marked clinical advantage obtained from the use of dual sensor

  5. Previous experience influences pacing during 20 km time trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Micklewright, D; Papadopoulou, E; Swart, J; Noakes, T

    2010-10-01

    To investigate how experience and feedback influence pacing and performance during time trial cycling. Twenty-nine cyclists performed three 20 km cycling time trials using a Computrainer. The first two time trials (TT1 and TT2) were performed (1) without any performance feedback (n = 10), (2) with accurate performance feedback (n = 10) or (3) with false feedback showing the speed to be 5% greater than the actual speed (n = 9). All participants received full feedback during the third time trial (TT3), and their performance and pacing data were compared against TT2. Completion time, average power and average speed did not change among the false feedback group, but their pacing strategy did change as indicated by a lower average cadence, 89.2 (SD 5.2) vs 96.4 (6.8) rpm, p<0.05, and higher power during the first 5 km (SMD = 39, 36, 36, 27 and 27 W for 1-5 km respectively). Pacing changed among the blind feedback group indicated by a faster completion time, 35.9 (3.1) vs 36.8 (4.4) min, p<0.05, and power increases during the final 5 km (SMD = 14, 13, 18, 23 and 53 W for 16-20 km respectively). No performance or pacing changes were observed among the accurate feedback group. Pacing is influenced by an interaction between feedback and previous experience. Conscious cognitive processes that lead to ratings of perceived exertion and pacing appear to be influenced by previous experience.

  6. The revised NASPE/BPEG generic code for antibradycardia, adaptive-rate, and multisite pacing. North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology/British Pacing and Electrophysiology Group.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Alan D; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Fletcher, Ross D; Hayes, David L; Lüderitz, Berndt; Reynolds, Dwight W; Schoenfeld, Mark H; Sutton, Richard

    2002-02-01

    In light of evolving pacemaker technology and increasing interest in multisite pacing, the Committee on the Development of Position Statements (CDPS) of the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE) created an ad hoc Pacemaker Mode Code Task Force in April 2001 under the chairmanship of David L. Hayes, MD, for the purpose of bringing the NASPE/British Pacing and Electrophysiology Group (BPEG) Generic Pacemaker Code (NBG Code) up to date. The task force, whose members are the authors of this article, designed a revised NBG Code in which three major issues were taken into account. First, it was recognized that all modern pacemakerpulse generators are capable of extensive bidirectional communication with an external programming device, making them "communicating" pulse generators as defined by the current (1987) NBG Code. Second, it was decided that a means of providing basic information regarding the location of multisite pacing would be a useful ingredient of the NBG Code. Third, in view of the extensive antibradycardia pacing capabilities common in modern implantable cardioverter defibrillators and the availability of the NASPE/BPEG Defibrillator Code (NBD Code), it was considered unnecessary for the NBG Code to address the presence or absence of antitachycardia features. The resulting updated version of the NBG Code as described herein was endorsed by the BPEG on September 20, 2001 and adopted by the NASPE Board of Trustees on October 18, 2001. The structure of the revised NBG Code differs from that of the previous version in two respects alone: Position IV specifies only the presence or absence of rate modulation, and Position V specifies only the location or absence of multisite pacing (i.e., biatrial or biventricular pacing with at least two stimulation sites in each case) more than one stimulation site in any single cardiac chamber, or any combination of these. The revised NBG Code is deliberately configured to avoid confusion with earlier

  7. Responses to Achilles tendon vibration during self-paced, visually and auditory-guided periodic sway.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Saritha M; Hatzitaki, Vassilia; Patikas, Dimitrios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-09-01

    Achilles tendon vibration (ATV) alters proprioceptive input of the triceps surae muscles resulting in a posterior postural shift during standing. When this is applied in combination with a more dynamic proprioceptive perturbation, postural responses to ATV are attenuated. In this study, we applied ATV during self-paced, visually and auditory guided voluntary periodic sway in order to examine how the vibration-induced afferent input is processed and reweighted at the presence of inter-sensory guidance stimuli. Seventeen healthy adults (aged 26.7 ± 4.23 years) performed 15 cycles of periodic sway under three sensory guidance conditions: (a) self-paced, (b) auditory paced (0.25 Hz), and (c) visually driven by matching the resultant force vector to a target sine-wave (0.25 Hz). Bilateral ATV (80 Hz, 3 mm) was applied between the 5th and 10th sway cycles. ATV evoked an earlier burst onset and increased activity of the plantarflexors consistent with a reduction in the amplitude and duration of forward sway. This in turn resulted in an increase in dorsiflexors' activity in order to compensate for the greater backward sway. Postural responses to ATV were augmented when sway was auditory and visually guided. Forward sway variability increased with ATV and remained high while backward sway variability decreased in the post-vibration phase. Our results suggest that sensory context-dependent constraints that determine the degree of active control of posture and associated postural challenge involved in a particular task determine how the vibration-induced Ia afferent input will be registered and further processed by the central nervous system.

  8. Obliquity-paced SE Asian monsoon variability during the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, E. O.; Breecker, D.; Ji, S.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Middle Miocene climate had boundary conditions different from the Pleistocene but similar to those predicted for Earth's future including substantial Antarctic ice cover without permanent northern hemisphere ice sheets. Under these boundary conditions, comparatively little is known about monsoon variability. Here we show using terrestrial sediments in the Tianshui Basin, Gansu, China that East Asian monsoon variability during a portion of the Middle Miocene (~13.9 - 13.4 Ma) was obliquity-paced. The sediments, part of the Yanwan section, consist of siltstones strongly modified by pedogenesis, such that primary sedimentary structures are largely absent. 20 cm thick, well-cemented CaCO3 cliff-forming horizons containing root-pore cements and clay nodules are inter-bedded at regular ~1m intervals with slope-forming siltstones containing clay films, well-preserved roots up to 2 cm in diameter, and variable abundances of 0.1-2cm diameter CaCO3 nodules. Stronger pedogenesis in the well-cemented horizons typify soil K horizons that develop in seasonal climates when sedimentation is slower, whereas the weaker pedogenesis in the siltstones occurs when sedimentation is faster. Thus this cyclic stratigraphy was likely generated by changes in sedimentation rate, which governed the intensity of pedogenesis and was likely controlled by variability of the winter monsoon (if the sediments are aeolian) or the summer monsoon (if fluvial). Obliquity (41 kyr) pacing of the inferred monsoon variability is concluded from counting the cycles in a 12m subsection dated by magnetostratigraphy. Obliquity-paced (41kyr) monsoon variability was likely controlled by insolation-driven changes in the meridional temperature gradient and may relate to southern hemisphere ice volume.

  9. Effects of pacing, status and unbalance in time motion variables, heart rate and tactical behaviour when playing 5-a-side football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Jaime E; Lago, Carlos; Gonçalves, Bruno; Maçãs, Victor M; Leite, Nuno

    2014-03-01

    To compare time-motion variables, heart rate and players' tactical behaviour according to game pace (slow, normal or fast), status (winning and losing) and team unbalance (superiority and inferiority) in football 5-a-side small-sided games. To identify the most discriminating variables in classifying performances according to these constraints. Cross-sectional field study. The data were gathered using global positioning systems (5 Hz) in 5-a-side small-sided games (7 × 5 min) played by twenty-four footballers. The tactical performance was measured using dynamical positioning variables, processed by non-linear signal processing techniques (approximate entropy). ANOVA models were used to compare between constraints and discriminant analyses to identify the variables that best discriminate between pacing and status × unbalance constraints. The fast paced games had the highest mean speed value, followed by normal and slow paced games (8.2 ± 0.6 km h(-1), 7.8 ± 0.5 km h(-1) and 6.2 ± 0.4 km h(-1), respectively). The stronger predictor variables of pacing were the randomness in distance to team centroid and the distances covered above 13 km h(-1). The results also changed according to game status and team unbalance. The strongest predictor variables were the distance covered below 6.9 km h(-1), distance and randomness to team centroid, with higher values when winning in superiority conditions. Practice task design manipulating game pace, status and team unbalance significantly influenced the emergent behavioural dynamics. Collective positioning variables were more accurate in discriminating these constraints and, therefore, need to be considered when planning and monitoring performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiac resynchronization as therapy for congestive cardiac failure in children dependent on chronic cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Eugène; Backx, Ad; Singh, Sandeep

    2006-04-01

    Three patients with heart failure after chronic right ventricular apical pacing were treated with resynchronization. Biventricular pacing was used for two patients, and the other was treated with left univentricular pacing. In all patients, we observed a dramatic improvement of left ventricular dimension, function, and clinical state. We conclude that biventricular or left ventricular pacing is superior to right ventricular apical pacing in children who are pacemaker-dependent.

  11. Extraction of SelectSecure leads compared to conventional pacing leads in patients with congenital heart disease and congenital atrioventricular block.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Emma; Stuart, Graham; Martin, Rob; Walsh, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    SelectSecure™ pacing leads (Medtronic Inc) are increasingly being used in pediatric patients and adults with structural congenital heart disease. The 4Fr lead is ideal for patients who may require lifelong pacing and can be advantageous for patients with complex anatomy. The purpose of this study was to compare the extraction of SelectSecure leads with conventional (stylette-driven) pacing leads in patients with structural congenital heart disease and congenital atrioventricular block. The data on lead extractions from pediatric and adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients from August 2004 to July 2014 at Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the Bristol Heart Institute were reviewed. Multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether conventional pacing leads were associated with a more difficult extraction process. A total of 57 patients underwent pacemaker lead extractions (22 SelectSecure, 35 conventional). No deaths occurred. Mean age at the time of extraction was 17.6 ± 10.5 years, mean weight was 47 ± 18 kg, and mean lead age was 5.6 ± 2.6 years (range 1-11 years). Complex extraction (partial extraction/femoral extraction) was more common in patients with conventional pacing leads at univariate (P < .01) and multivariate (P = .04) levels. Lead age was also a significant predictor of complex extraction (P < .01). SelectSecure leads can be successfully extracted using techniques that are used for conventional pacing leads. They are less likely to be partially extracted and are less likely to require extraction using a femoral approach compared with conventional pacing leads. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interindividual comparison of different sensor principles for rate adaptive pacing.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K

    1998-11-01

    In recent years a multitude of rate adaptive sensor systems based on different sensor signals have been developed to adapt the pacing rate to the physical load of the patient. In contrast to those systems the closed loop stimulation (CLS) represents a new concept, which regards the pacemaker as part of the cardiocirculatory system. The pacemaker converts the regulating information of the circulatory center into a heart rate. This study compares the closed loop stimulation and the different sensor systems that evaluate external parameters for rate adaptive pacing with a control group. To this end, 27 patients and 15 patients with a healthy sinus node (control group) were subjected to physical and mental stress tests. The recorded results were analyzed with regard to the maximum rates reached during stress. The results show that none of the studied sensor-controlled systems was able to determine an adequate pacing rate under all of the various load states. The dual sensor systems experience problems in balancing the input of the two sensor signals when calculating the pacing rate. The evaluation of a single external parameter, such as the acceleration of the upper body with the accelerometer, also failed to provide an adequate pacing rate in many stress situations. In contrast to all sensor systems, CLS achieved a heart rate in agreement with those of the reference group in all physical and mental stress situations.

  13. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  14. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  15. The hemodynamic and metabolic response to pacing after aortocoronary bypass.

    PubMed

    Hilton, J D; Weisel, R D; Baird, R J; Goldman, B S; Jablonsky, G; Pym, J; Scully, H E; Ivanov, J; Mickle, D A; Feiglin, D H; Morch, J E; McLaughlin, P R

    1981-08-01

    Long-term follow-up of aortocoronary bypass has shown good preservation of ventricular function. However, myocardial reserve in the immediate postoperative period may not be optimal. Nineteen patients who underwent elective aortocoronary bypass protected with cold potassium cardioplegia were studied in the early postoperative period at rest and during the stress of atrial and ventricular pacing. Performance was assessed by hemodynamic, metabolic and nuclear angiographic measurements. In the first 2--6 hours after aortic cross clamping, myocardial performance was preserved at rest and there was no evidence of ischemic metabolism. Atrial pacing at a rate of 119 beats/min caused a significant increase in cardiac index (p less than 0.01) without deterioration in hemodynamics, ejection fraction or metabolic status. At the same rate, ventricular pacing did not change the cardiac index and there was a decrease in hemodynamic function. Ejection fraction decreased from 56% to 44% (p less than 0.05) without a change in end-diastolic volume. Lactate, pyruvate and beta hydroxybutyrate extractions were changed to net production. Ventricular performance was preserved at rest immediately after aortocoronary bypass done with multidose cold potassium cardioplegia, with adequate reserve to meet the stress of atrial but not ventricular pacing. We conclude that the therapeutic implications of the type of pacing selected in the immediate postoperative period may be important.

  16. [Analysis of fusion waves created with temporal pacing].

    PubMed

    Ueda, M; Shigemi, K; Hayashi, K; Kakihara, K; Nakajima, Y; Fukushima, H; Tanaka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Fifty-five beats of fusion waves were recorded continuously with an audio digital tape and the tape was re-played for analysis. A 45-year-old male (56 kg, 175 cm) with cervical spondylosis was scheduled to undergo laminoplasty of the cervical vertebral (C2-C6). A temporal ventricular (VVI mode) pacing lead was inserted from the right cubital vein to the right ventricular apex for preventing bradycardia while manipulating the medulla. The height of the R wave decreased gradually and the depth of S wave increased in the earlier period of fusion beats and it was reversed later. The narrow QRS width indicated that the electrode was placed near the cardiac conducting system. The gradually increasing intervals between P waves activated the pacing, and the P wave intervals recovered inhibiting the pacing. During the recovery phase, some beats were still activated by pacing instead of depressing the rate below the original rate. These beats suggest the importance of considering the atrial-ventricular conducting time. Arterial pressure fluctuated only slightly during the 'fusion beats, suggesting that despite the abnormality in the cardiac conduction system due to pacing, contraction of the ventricular muscles was only slightly affected in this case.

  17. Electrocardiographic identification of prior myocardial infarction during right ventricular pacing--effect of septal versus apical pacing.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Asbach, Stefan; Semmler, Verena; Lennerz, Carsten; Solzbach, Ulrich; Vrazic, Hrvoje; Kloppe, Axel; Klein, Norbert; Pastromas, Sokratis; Biermann, Jürgen; Kolb, Christof

    2014-12-20

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) identification of prior myocardial infarction (MI) during right ventricular (RV) pacing is of clinical importance. Proposed ECG criteria have been evaluated only during apical pacing. We evaluated the effect of pacing site on the predictive performance of ECG signs of prior MI. The present study is a secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter study which randomized recipients of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to an apical versus septal RV lead positioning. ECGs of patients with or without prior MI were analyzed for the presence of the following criteria: Cabrera sign, Chapman sign, QR pattern in leads I, aVL, V5 or V6, QR in inferior leads and notching in the descending slope of the QRS complex in inferior leads. The MI group included 89 patients (55.1% apically paced), while 99 patients had no prior MI (50.5% apically paced). In the total population, the Cabrera sign presented the highest specificity (97%) and diagnostic accuracy (62.2%), with a sensitivity of 23.6%. The Cabrera sign was the only significant predictor of a prior MI [OR=9.9, (95%CI:2.8-34.5), p<0.001], among all ECG markers. Pacing site did not significantly influence the sensitivity and specificity of the Cabrera sign for detection of prior MI. In our study, the Cabrera sign was the only ECG marker that predicted the presence of prior MI during ventricular paced rhythm. Septal RV lead positioning did not affect the predictive performance of the Cabrera sign. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Camp stability predicts patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Dyble, Mark; Thompson, James; Major, Katie; Page, Abigail E; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Mace, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Humans regularly cooperate with non-kin, which has been theorized to require reciprocity between repeatedly interacting and trusting individuals. However, the role of repeated interactions has not previously been demonstrated in explaining real-world patterns of hunter-gatherer cooperation. Here we explore cooperation among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter-gatherers, using data from both actual resource transfers and two experimental games across multiple camps. Patterns of cooperation vary greatly between camps and depend on socio-ecological context. Stable camps (with fewer changes in membership over time) were associated with greater reciprocal sharing, indicating that an increased likelihood of future interactions facilitates reciprocity. This is the first study reporting an association between reciprocal cooperation and hunter-gatherer band stability. Under conditions of low camp stability individuals still acquire resources from others, but do so via demand sharing (taking from others), rather than based on reciprocal considerations. Hunter-gatherer cooperation may either be characterized as reciprocity or demand sharing depending on socio-ecological conditions.

  19. Efficacy of Montessori Education in Attention Gathering Skill of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim Dogru, S. Sunay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Montessori education which is offered to upskill the attention gathering skill of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In total fifteen pre-schooler participants, six girls and nine boys who are diagnosed with ADHD (7 of the children with ADHD, 8 with only AD), joined to this…

  20. A Survey of Electronic News Gathering and Television News Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Vernon A.; DiCioccio, John P.

    A 1977 national survey of 216 television stations that use electronic news gathering (ENG) and of 224 stations that still use only film for camera reporting showed little difference in the types of news the two kinds of operations covered, although stations using ENG shot more stories than did those still using only film. The persons making…

  1. Camp stability predicts patterns of hunter–gatherer cooperation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Humans regularly cooperate with non-kin, which has been theorized to require reciprocity between repeatedly interacting and trusting individuals. However, the role of repeated interactions has not previously been demonstrated in explaining real-world patterns of hunter–gatherer cooperation. Here we explore cooperation among the Agta, a population of Filipino hunter–gatherers, using data from both actual resource transfers and two experimental games across multiple camps. Patterns of cooperation vary greatly between camps and depend on socio-ecological context. Stable camps (with fewer changes in membership over time) were associated with greater reciprocal sharing, indicating that an increased likelihood of future interactions facilitates reciprocity. This is the first study reporting an association between reciprocal cooperation and hunter–gatherer band stability. Under conditions of low camp stability individuals still acquire resources from others, but do so via demand sharing (taking from others), rather than based on reciprocal considerations. Hunter–gatherer cooperation may either be characterized as reciprocity or demand sharing depending on socio-ecological conditions. PMID:27493770

  2. Children's Strategies for Gathering Information in Three Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Patricia H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A developmental progression in 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children's use of strategies for gathering information was revealed in a study involving partial recall, total recall, and similarity/difference judgments. When subjects chose stimuli for exposure from an array, older children showed more ability to match strategy to task demands. Strategy…

  3. Efficacy of Montessori Education in Attention Gathering Skill of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim Dogru, S. Sunay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Montessori education which is offered to upskill the attention gathering skill of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In total fifteen pre-schooler participants, six girls and nine boys who are diagnosed with ADHD (7 of the children with ADHD, 8 with only AD), joined to this…

  4. Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the face of so many daunting near-term challenges, U.S. government and industry are letting the crucial strategic issues of U.S. competitiveness slip below the surface. Five years ago, the National Academies prepared "Rising Above the Gathering Storm," a book that cautioned: "Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of…

  5. STS 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast prior to leaving for the launch pad. From left to right Rhea Seddon, Donald E. Williams, Charles D. Walker, Karol J. Bobko, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, S. David Griggs and U.S. Senator E.J. (Jake) Garn discuss phases of the upcoming flight. Desert is a cake decorated with the 51-D logo.

  6. Rising above the Gathering Storm, Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the face of so many daunting near-term challenges, U.S. government and industry are letting the crucial strategic issues of U.S. competitiveness slip below the surface. Five years ago, the National Academies prepared "Rising Above the Gathering Storm," a book that cautioned: "Without a renewed effort to bolster the foundations of…

  7. 49 CFR 510.5 - Information gathering hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION GATHERING POWERS § 510.5 Information... otherwise, and the hearings are stenographically reported. (b) In addition to the presiding officer, one or...'s testimony, the presiding officer may order the hearing closed to the public at that point and...

  8. Using On-Line Bulletin Boards to Gather Preliminary Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Kathleen; Govindasamy, Ramu; Hyde, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Internet bulletin-board sessions can be used to collect preliminary, qualitative data. This method allows Extension personnel to gather responses from stakeholders about potential programming, consumer needs and desires, and preference for program delivery method without assembling participants in one location. Several other advantages exist,…

  9. Efficient Sensor Data Gathering and Resilient Communication for Rescue Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Daniele; An, Chunlei; Widmer, Joerg; Timm-Giel, Andreas

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have been used mainly to collect environmental data and send it to a base station. Routing protocols are needed to efficiently direct the information flows to the base station. Since sensor nodes have strict energy constraints, data gathering and communication schemes for WSNs need to be designed for an efficient utilization of the available resources. An emergency management scenario is investigated, where a sensor network is deployed as virtual lifeline when entering a building. In addition to navigation support, the virtual lifeline is also used for two purposes. Firstly, to exchange short voice messages between fire fighter and command post. For the communication between command post and fire fighter a fast and reliable routing protocol (EMRO) has been developed based on a broadcasting scheme. Secondly, for data gathering a network coding based algorithm has been designed. The feasibility of simultaneously using this virtual lifeline for data gathering and communications is investigated in this paper by means of simulation and real experiments. The resilience to packet loss and node failure, as well as the transmission delay are investigated by means of short voice messages for the communication part and temperature readings for data gathering.

  10. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  11. Image gathering and restoration - Information and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Judith A.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Huck, Friedrich O.

    1989-01-01

    A method is investigated for optimizing the end-to-end performance of image gathering and restoration for visual quality. To achieve this objective, one must inevitably confront the problems that the visual quality of restored images depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations and that these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The method adopted in this paper is to optimize image gathering informationally and to restore images interactively to obtain the visually preferred trade-off among fidelity resolution, sharpness, and clarity. The results demonstrate that this method leads to significant improvements in the visual quality obtained by the traditional digital processing methods. These traditional methods allow a significant loss of visual quality to occur because they treat the design of the image-gathering system and the formulation of the image-restoration algorithm as two separate tasks and fail to account for the transformations between the continuous and the discrete representations in image gathering and reconstruction.

  12. 18 CFR 290.102 - Information gathering and filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and filing. 290.102 Section 290.102 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF... POLICIES ACT OF 1978 Coverage, Compliance and Definitions § 290.102 Information gathering and filing. All...

  13. 18 CFR 290.102 - Information gathering and filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and filing. 290.102 Section 290.102 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF... POLICIES ACT OF 1978 Coverage, Compliance and Definitions § 290.102 Information gathering and filing. All...

  14. 18 CFR 290.102 - Information gathering and filing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and filing. 290.102 Section 290.102 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF... POLICIES ACT OF 1978 Coverage, Compliance and Definitions § 290.102 Information gathering and filing. All...

  15. Wild Food Summit: Anishinaabe Relearning Traditional Gathering Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Wild Food Summits is a program initiated by Steve Dahlberg, the White Earth Tribal & Community College Extension director. Dahlberg began Wild Food Summits to teach people about identifying and gathering wild greens, mushrooms, and other edible plant life. The whole community comes together to cook and eat the foods. The tribal college has…

  16. Adding a psychological dimension to mass gatherings medicine.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Nick; Reicher, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Mass gatherings pose distinctive challenges for medicine. One neglected aspect of this is that the behaviour of people participating in such events is different from the behaviour they exhibit in their everyday lives. This paper seeks to describe a social psychological perspective on the processes shaping people's behaviour at mass gatherings and to explore how these are relevant for an understanding of the processes impacting on the transmission of infection. It is inadequate to conceptualize mass gatherings as simply an aggregate of a large number of individuals. Rather, those present may conceptualize themselves in terms of a collective with a shared group identity. Thinking of oneself and others as members of a collective changes one's behaviour. First, one behaves in terms of one's understanding of the norms associated with the group. Second, the relationships between group members become more trusting and supportive. Understanding these two behavioural changes is key to understanding how and why mass gathering participants may behave in ways that make them more or less vulnerable to infection transmission. Implications for health education interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. An information gathering system for medical image inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Bajcsy, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We present an information gathering system for medical image inspection that consists of software tools for capturing computer-centric and human-centric information. Computer-centric information includes (1) static annotations, such as (a) image drawings enclosing any selected area, a set of areas with similar colors, a set of salient points, and (b) textual descriptions associated with either image drawings or links between pairs of image drawings, and (2) dynamic (or temporal) information, such as mouse movements, zoom level changes, image panning and frame selections from an image stack. Human-centric information is represented by video and audio signals that are acquired by computer-mounted cameras and microphones. The short-term goal of the presented system is to facilitate learning of medical novices from medical experts, while the long-term goal is to data mine all information about image inspection for assisting in making diagnoses. In this work, we built basic software functionality for gathering computer-centric and human-centric information of the aforementioned variables. Next, we developed the information playback capabilities of all gathered information for educational purposes. Finally, we prototyped text-based and image template-based search engines to retrieve information from recorded annotations, for example, (a) find all annotations containing the word "blood vessels", or (b) search for similar areas to a selected image area. The information gathering system for medical image inspection reported here has been tested with images from the Histology Atlas database.

  18. A systematic review of noncommunicable health issues in mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Alquthami, Ahmed H; Pines, Jesse M

    2014-04-01

    The review was conducted to evaluate if the field of mass-gathering medicine has evolved in addressing: (1) the lack of uniform standard measures; (2) the effectiveness of and needs for various interventions during a mass gathering; and (3) the various types of noncommunicable health issues (trauma and medical complaints) encountered and their severity during a gathering. A systematic review of papers published from 2003 through 2012 was conducted using databases of MEDLINE, Ovid, CINHAL, EBSCOHost, National Library of Medicine (NLM), Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Elsevier, Scopus, and Proquest databases. Of 37,762 articles, 17 articles were included in this review, covering 18 mass-gathering events; 14 were multiple-day events. Across all events, the patient presentation rate (PPR) ranged from 0.13 to 20.8 patients per 1,000 attendees and the transfer to hospital rate (TTHR) ranged from 0.01 to 10.2 ambulance transports per 1,000 attendees. In four out of the seven studies, having on-site providers was associated with a lower rate of ambulance transports. The highest frequencies of noncommunicable presentations were headaches, abdominal complaints, and abrasions/lacerations. Most presentations were minor. Emergent cases requiring hospitalization (such as acute myocardial infarction) were rare. The rate of noncommunicable health issues varies across events and very serious emergencies are rare.

  19. Librarians as Hunter-Gatherers: Lessons Learned from an Excursion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Mindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by the pressing need for electronic resource usage statistics, librarians are finding themselves being thrust into the role of hunter-gatherer. This article discusses the work done at University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to provide usage statistics for all its paid subscriptions for a 3-year period. The…

  20. Data and literature gathering in chemical cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, chemical cancer risk assessment has faced major challenges: the demand for cancer risk assessment has grown considerably with strict legislation regarding chemical safety, whereas cancer hazard identification has turned increasingly complex due to the rapid development and high publication rate in biomedical sciences. Thus, much of the scientific evidence required for hazard identification is hidden in large collections of biomedical literature. Extensive guidelines have been produced to support cancer risk assessment under these circumstances. We evaluated whether these guidelines support the first, critical step of this task--data and literature gathering--and found that the guidance is vague. We propose ways to improve data and literature gathering for cancer risk assessment and suggest developing a computational literature search and analysis tool dedicated to the task. We describe the first prototype tool we have developed and discuss how it could help to improve the quality, consistency, and effectiveness of cancer risk assessment when developed further. Fully reliable automatic data and literature gathering may not be realistic; the retrieved articles will always need to be examined further by risk assessors. However, our proposal offers a starting point for improved data and literature gathering that can benefit the whole cancer risk assessment process. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  1. Online Survey Checklist: Online Surveys Are a Time-and Cost-Efficient Way to Gather the Data You Need for Important Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Catherine; DeLucia, Jodi

    2005-01-01

    In the age of data-driven decision making, collecting data and using it efficiently is key to all aspects of the education process. Online surveys are a great way to gather information on everything from lunchroom procedures to program design. This information can impact solutions for student achievement, community relations, and district…

  2. Optogenetics for in vivo cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, Udi; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in the specialized cardiac conduction system may result in slow heart rate or mechanical dyssynchrony. Here we apply optogenetics, widely used to modulate neuronal excitability, for cardiac pacing and resynchronization. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 to express the Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) transgene at one or more ventricular sites in rats. This allowed optogenetic pacing of the hearts at different beating frequencies with blue-light illumination both in vivo and in isolated perfused hearts. Optical mapping confirmed that the source of the new pacemaker activity was the site of ChR2 transgene delivery. Notably, diffuse illumination of hearts where the ChR2 transgene was delivered to several ventricular sites resulted in electrical synchronization and significant shortening of ventricular activation times. These findings highlight the unique potential of optogenetics for cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

  3. Rising to the challenge: accelerated pace of discovery transforms marine virology.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2015-03-01

    Marine viruses have important roles in microbial mortality, gene transfer, metabolic reprogramming and biogeochemical cycling. In this Review, we discuss recent technological advances in marine virology including the use of near-quantitative, reproducible metagenomics for large-scale investigation of viral communities and the emergence of gene-based viral ecology. We also describe the reprogramming of microbially driven processes by viral metabolic genes, the identification of novel viruses using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent tools, and the potential for modelling studies to provide a framework for studying virus-host interactions. These transformative advances have set a rapid pace in exploring and predicting how marine viruses manipulate and respond to their environment.

  4. Pacing during an ultramarathon running event in hilly terrain

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Hunter, Tom; Wiegand, Aaron N.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The dynamics of speed selection as a function of distance, or pacing, are used in recreational, competitive, and scientific research situations as an indirect measure of the psycho-physiological status of an individual. The purpose of this study was to determine pacing on level, uphill and downhill sections of participants in a long (>80 km) ultramarathon performed on trails in hilly terrain. Methods Fifteen ultramarathon runners competed in a  173 km event (five finished at  103 km) carrying a Global-Positioning System (GPS) device. Using the GPS data, we determined the speed, relative to average total speed, in level (LEV), uphill (UH) and downhill (DH) gradient categories as a function of total distance, as well as the correlation between overall performance and speed variability, speed loss, and total time stopped. Results There were no significant differences in normality, variances or means in the relative speed in 173-km and 103-km participants. Relative speed decreased in LEV, UH and DH. The main component of speed loss occurred between 5% and 50% of the event distance in LEV, and between 5% and 95% in UH and DH. There were no significant correlations between overall performance and speed loss, the variability of speed, or total time stopped. Conclusions Positive pacing was observed at all gradients, with the main component of speed loss occurring earlier (mixed pacing) in LEV compared to UH and DH. A speed reserve (increased speed in the last section) was observed in LEV and UH. The decrease in speed and variability of speed were more important in LEV and DH than in UH. The absence of a significant correlation between overall performance and descriptors of pacing is novel and indicates that pacing in ultramarathons in trails and hilly terrain differs to other types of running events. PMID:27812406

  5. Paced effort and all-out 30-second power tests.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, B R; MacEachern, P

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mean power output in 30 seconds was greater in a paced effort test or an all-out effort under optimal loading conditions. Nine male athletes volunteered to participate. All testing was done on a Monark cycle ergometer with continuous measurement of velocity and resistance. Power output was calculated (Resistance x Velocity) and corrected for acceleration of the flywheel. For each subject, optimal resistance for peak power output was determined with 5 brief (7-second) tests. Subsequently, 3 all-out 30-second tests using 80, 90 and 100% of this estimated optimal resistance, then 3 paced effort 30-second tests were completed on separate days. Pacing was accomplished with velocity feedback at 80, 100 or 120% of optimal velocity calculated from the all-out tests. Subjects were encouraged to try to exceed the target velocity if possible during the final 10 seconds of the paced effort test. The best all-out test (772 +/- 35 W) was not different (paired t test, p = 0.31) from the best paced effort test (787 +/- 27 W). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between mean power output in the all-out tests at 90% (736 +/- 28 W) and 100% (766 +/- 36 W) of estimated optimal resistance for peak power output (1.16 +/- 0.05 N x kg[-1]), but mean power at 80% of the estimated optimal resistance was lower (722 +/- 31 W; ANOVA for repeated measures, p < 0.05). In conclusion, a paced effort test does not permit greater mean power output over 30 seconds than an all-out test, and there is considerable latitude in apparent optimal resistance for mean power output in a 30-second test.

  6. Direct His-bundle pacing: present and future.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pramod M; Romanyshyn, Mary

    2004-06-01

    Direct His-bundle pacing (DHBP) produces rapid sequential multisite synchronous ventricular activation and, therefore, would be an ideal alternative to right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing. In 54 patients with cardiomyopathy, ejection fraction (EF) 0.23 +/- 0.11, persistent atrial fibrillation, and normal QRS < 120 ms. DHBP was attempted. This was successful in 39 patients. In seven patients, the effect of increasing heart rate on contractility (Treppe effect) was investigated. Twelve patients who also received a RVA lead underwent cardiopulmonary testing. After a mean follow-up of 42 months, 29 patients are still alive with EF improving from 0.23 +/- 0.11 to 0.33 +/- 0.15. Functional class improved from 3.5 to 2.2. DP/dt increased at each pacing site (P < 0.05) as the heart rate increased to 60, 100, and 120 beats/min. Rise in dP/dt by DHBP pacing at 120 beats/min was at least 170 +/- mmHg/s, greater than any other site in the ventricle (P < 0.05). Cardiopulmonary testing revealed longer exercise time (RVA 255 +/- 110 s) (His 280 +/- 104 s) (P < 0.05), higher O2 uptake (RVA 15 +/- 4 mL/kg per minute) (His 16 +/- 4 mL/kg minute) (P < 0.05), and later anaerobic threshold (RVA 126 +/- 71 s) (His 145 +/- 74 s) (P < 0.05) with DHBP compared to RVA pacing. Long-term DHBP is safe and effective in humans. DHBP is associated with a superior Treppe effect and increased cardiopulmonary reserve when compared to RVA pacing.

  7. Effect of age and performance on pacing of marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Knechtle, Beat

    2017-01-01

    Pacing strategies in marathon runners have previously been examined, especially with regard to age and performance level separately. However, less information about the age × performance interaction on pacing in age-group runners exists. The aim of the present study was to examine whether runners with similar race time and at different age differ for pacing. Data (women, n=117,595; men, n=180,487) from the "New York City Marathon" between 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. A between-within subjects analysis of variance showed a large main effect of split on race speed (p<0.001, η(2)=0.538) with the fastest speed in the 5-10 km split and the slowest in the 35-40 km. A small sex × split interaction on race speed was found (p<0.001, η(2)=0.035) with men showing larger increase in speed at 5 km and women at 25 km and 40 km (end spurt). An age-group × performance group interaction on Δspeed was shown for both sexes at 5 km, 10 km, 15 km, 20 km, 25 km, 30 km, 35 km, and 40 km (p<0.001, 0.001≤η(2)≤0.004), where athletes in older age-groups presented a relatively more even pace compared with athletes in younger age-groups, a trend that was more remarkable in the relatively slow performance groups. So far, the present study is the first one to observe an age × performance interaction on pacing; ie, older runners pace differently (smaller changes) than younger runners with similar race time. These findings are of great practical interest for coaches working with marathon runners of different age, but similar race time.

  8. Pacing accuracy during an incremental step test in adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Scruton, Adrian; Baker, James; Roberts, Justin; Basevitch, Itay; Merzbach, Viviane; Gordon, Dan

    2015-01-01

    To assess pacing accuracy in a group of adolescent swimmers during an incremental step test. Fifteen well-trained swimmers (age 15±1.5 years; height 170.2±8.8 cm; mass 60.2±6.6 kg), completed two 7×200 m tests, separated by ~72 hours. They swam to a predetermined incrementally increasing pace per step and were instructed to swim at even pace. Upon completion of each step, rating of perceived exertion, heart rate and blood lactate were recorded. Significant differences observed for both trials between actual and predicted swim time (P<0.05). Significant differences also observed between the first and second 100 m of each step in trial 1 for step 1 (P=0.001, effect size [ES] =0.54), step 2 (P=0.0001, ES =0.57), step 4 (P=0.0001, ES =0.53), step 5 (P=0.005, ES =0.65), step 6 (P=0.0001, ES =0.50), and step 7 (P=0.0001, ES =0.70). Similar responses witnessed for trial 2 (P<0.05). Findings suggest that the finite anaerobic capacity was engaged sooner than would normally be anticipated, as a function of an inability to regulate pace. This is proposed to be a consequence of the volume of exposure to the biological and psychological sensations and cognitive developmental status. Given the apparent error in pacing judgment exhibited in this population group, caution should be applied when adopting such tests to monitor training responses with adolescent athletes, and alternate means of modulating pace be investigated.

  9. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p < 0.05) in 44 of the 45 online sessions. Significance. By using a data-driven machine learning approach to decode users’ KMI, this BCI-VRE system enabled intuitive and purposeful self-paced control of ambulation after only 10 minutes training. The ability to achieve such BCI control with minimal training indicates that the implementation of future BCI-lower extremity prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  10. The risk of atrial fibrillation during right ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Gianni; Zanon, Francesco; Baracca, Enrico; Aggio, Silvio; Corbucci, Giorgio; Boaretto, Graziano; Roncon, Loris; Noventa, Franco; Barold, S Serge

    2016-03-01

    Right ventricular pacing adversely affects left atrial (LA) structure and function that may trigger atrial fibrillation (AF). This study compares the occurrence of persistent/permanent AF during long-term Hisian area (HA), right ventricular septal (RVS), and right ventricular apex (RVA) pacing in patients with complete/advanced atrioventricular block (AVB). We collected retrospective data from 477 consecutive patients who underwent pacemaker implantation for complete/advanced AVB. Ventricular pacing leads were located in the HA, RVS, and RVA in 148, 140, and 189 patients, respectively. The occurrence of persistent/permanent AF was observed in 114 (23.9%) patients (follow-up 58.5 ± 26.5 months). Hisian area groups presented a lower rate of AF occurrence (16.9%) compared with RVS and RVA groups (25.7 and 28.0%, respectively), P = 0.049. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to estimate HR. The risk of persistent/permanent AF was significantly lower in the patients paced from HA compared with those paced from RVA, HR = 0.28 (95% CI 0.16-0.48, P = 0.0001). The RVS and RVA pacing groups showed a similar AF risk: HR 1.04 (95% CI 0.66-1.64, P = 0.856). Other independent predictors of persistent/permanent AF occurrence included previous (before device implantation) paroxysmal AF (HR = 4.08; 95% CI 3.15-7.31, P = 0.0001), LA diameter, and age, whereas baseline bundle-branch block was associated with a lower risk of AF occurrence (HR = 0.56; 95% CI 0.35-0.81, P = 0.003). HA pacing compared with RVA or RVS pacing seems to be associated with a lower risk of persistent/permanent AF occurrence. The risk of persistent/permanent AF was similar in the RVA vs. RVS groups. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Emergent precordial percussion revisited--pacing the heart in asystole.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Peter P; Alibertis, Kostas; Brady, William J

    2011-06-01

    Precordial percussion is a technique by which a manual force is applied repeatedly to the chest of a patient experiencing an unstable bradycardic or asystolic rhythm. The force is used not to defibrillate the myocardium as is the case with the "precordial thump" in pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation but rather to initiate a current through the myocardium in the form of an essentially mechanically paced beat. In this review, we discuss the physiology and utility of precordial percussion, or precordial thump, in the emergency setting as a very temporary bridge to more effective and permanent pacing techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Permanent pacemaker malfunction: diagnostic aspects of temporary pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, N D

    1980-01-01

    A temporary pacing electrode can function as a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic tool. This is illustrated in two patients whose permanent pacemakers unexpectedly failed. In the first patient a demand pacemaker was inhibited by a magnet rather than converting to the asynchronous mode. In the second the pacemaker appeared to be producing low-voltage potentials not detectable on the surface electrocardiogram. The presence of a temporary pacing electrode can be useful for defining the cause of pacemaker failure and the nature of any associated arrhythmias. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:7260759

  13. [Anesthesic management of thoracic aortic stent graft deployment using rapid ventricular pacing].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Akio; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Katsumi, Norifumi; Nagashima, Michio; Takahata, Osamu; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Controlled hypotension is useful for accurate deployment of an aortic endograft. We describe the use of rapid ventricular pacing during thoracic aortic stent graft deployment. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with intravenous propofol and remifentanil. A pulmonary artery catheter with pacing function was introduced, and rapid ventricular pacing was started before stent graft deployment. Pacing mode was VVI and pacing rate was 120-160 beats min(-1). Aortic pressure and flow decreased immediately and were maintained at low levels during surgical manipulation. After stopping rapid ventricular pacing, heart rate and aortic pressure recovered immediately. Rapid ventricular pacing was performed 4 times, and there were no complications such as entailed arrhythmia. With rapid ventricular pacing maneuver, which is thought to cause a rapid change in cardiac output, continuous cardiac output measurement can be a useful monitor. This procedure has advantages over pharmacologic or other methods of aortic pressure reduction. Rapid ventricular pacing is safe and effective during stent graft positioning and deployment.

  14. Perceptions of control over work: psychophysiological responses to self-paced and externally-paced tasks in an adult population sample.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Evans, O; Fieldman, G

    1997-04-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that perceptions of control over work pace would modulate cardiovascular reactions to mental stress tests. One hundred and thirty two adults aged 30-65 years (64 men and 68 women) were randomized to self-paced and externally-paced task conditions. The self-paced group carried out visual matrix problem solving and mirror tracing tasks at their own pace. Work pace requirements were imposed on the externally-paced group, with performance requirements being set to equate those in the self-paced condition. This was done to equate work demands. Blood pressure (assessed with the Finapres), heart rate, cardiac baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, skin conductance, respiration rate and tidal volume were monitored. Behavioural performance of the mirror tracing task was comparable in the two conditions, but the externally-paced group attempted more problems and made more errors on the visual matrix task. Systolic blood pressure reactions to mirror drawing were greater in the external than self-paced conditions (mean increases of 27.5 +/- 16.1 vs. 23.1 +/- 18.5 mmHg, P < 0.025), and electrodermal responsivity was also heightened in the externally-paced group (P < 0.05). No differences were recorded in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, baroreflex sensitivity or respiratory parameters. Results are discussed in relation to the literature on control and physiological stress responsivity, and their implications for understanding the health consequences of lack of control at work are considered.

  15. Advanced technology development for image gathering, coding, and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1990-01-01

    Three overlapping areas of research activities are presented: (1) Information theory and optimal filtering are extended to visual information acquisition and processing. The goal is to provide a comprehensive methodology for quantitatively assessing the end-to-end performance of image gathering, coding, and processing. (2) Focal-plane processing techniques and technology are developed to combine effectively image gathering with coding. The emphasis is on low-level vision processing akin to the retinal processing in human vision. (3) A breadboard adaptive image-coding system is being assembled. This system will be used to develop and evaluate a number of advanced image-coding technologies and techniques as well as research the concept of adaptive image coding.

  16. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene at the World's Largest Mass Gathering.

    PubMed

    Vortmann, Michael; Balsari, Satchit; Holman, Susan R; Greenough, P Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 Kumbh Mela, a Hindu religious festival and the largest human gathering on earth, drew an estimated 120 million pilgrims to bathe at the holy confluence of the Ganga (Ganges) and Yamuna rivers. To accommodate the massive numbers, the Indian government constructed a temporary city on the flood plains of the two rivers and provided it with roads, electricity, water and sanitation facilities, police stations, and a tiered healthcare system. This phenomenal operation and its impacts have gone largely undocumented. To address this gap, the authors undertook an evaluation and systematic monitoring initiative to study preparedness and response to public health emergencies at the event. This paper describes the water, sanitation, and hygiene components, with particular emphasis on preventive and mitigation strategies; the capacity for surveillance and response to diarrheal disease outbreaks; and the implications of lessons learned for other mass gatherings.

  17. Mathematical determination of external defibrillators needed at mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Crocco, Todd J; Sayre, Michael R; Liu, Tiepu; Davis, Stephen M; Cannon, Christopher; Potluri, Jagadish

    2004-01-01

    To develop a mathematical formula that assists in determining the number of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) needed at sites of mass gatherings. Twenty (10 male, 10 female) healthy volunteers (equally divided between age groups 21-30 and 31-40 years) responded to mock cardiac arrests in a sports stadium. Seven different first-responder scenarios were simulated (ascending and descending three separate stairway slopes (22 degrees, 39 degrees, and 69 degrees ), as well as a response across a horizontal (0 degrees ) surface. To assess the impact of spectator congestion, the same volunteers conducted each scenario in an empty and full stadium. The quantitative relationship between time and distance was then plotted for each situation. Using the quantitative relationship, the area a first responder can cover in a specified time was calculated. The formula for the total number of AEDs needed in a stadium (or other mass gathering site) can be expressed as follows: Total AEDs=[A(1)/(Ds(1)xDh(1))]+[A(2)/(Ds(2)xDh(2))]+[A(3)/(Ds(3)xDh(3))] where A(1), A(2), and A(3) represent the total areas of a stadium with a slight, moderate, or steep stairway slope, respectively; Ds(1), Ds(2), and Ds(3) represent the stairway distance a first responder must ascend or descend for each slope; and Dh(1), Dh(2), and Dh(3) are the horizontal distances a responder can run in the time remaining. Given a medical director's targeted response times and goals, the optimal number of AEDs required at a mass gathering can be calculated using time versus distance relationships. Future studies should evaluate the impact of the mathematically derived optimal number of AEDs at mass gatherings.

  18. Reporting of health estimates prior to GATHER: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cokljat, Mia; Henderson, James; Paterson, Angus; Rudan, Igor; Stevens, Gretchen A

    2017-01-01

    Generating estimates of health indicators at the global, regional, and country levels is increasingly in demand in order to meet reporting requirements for global and country targets, such as the sustainable development goals (SDGs). However, such estimates are sensitive to availability of input data, underlying analytic assumptions, variability in statistical techniques, and often have important limitations. From a user perspective, there is often a lack of transparency and replicability. In order to define best practices in reporting data and methods used to calculate health estimates, the Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER) working group developed a minimum checklist of 18 items that must be reported within each study publishing health estimates, so that users may make an assessment of the quality of the estimate. We conducted a scoping review to assess the state of reporting amongst a cross-sectional sample of studies published prior to the publication of GATHER. We generated a sample of UN reports and journal articles through a combination of a Medline search and hand-searching published health estimates. From these studies we extracted the percentage of studies correctly reporting each item on the checklist, the proportion of items reported per study (the GATHER performance score), and how this score varied depending on study type. The average proportion of items reported per study was 0.47, and the poorest-performing items related to documentation and availability of input data, availability of the statistical code used and the subsequent output data, and a complete detailed description of all the steps of the data analysis. Methods for health estimates are not currently fully reported, and the implementation of the GATHER guidelines will improve the availability of information required to make an assessment of study quality.

  19. A Workshop on the Gathering of Information for Problem Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    screen would prcbably be much better. In contrast, asking zoo visitors to access information about individual animals by this same three-knob technology...8217C . , ’ - ARI Research Note 91-57 Iil ADWA238 713 A Workshop on the Gathering of Information for Problem Formulation Albert N. Badre Georgia Tech... Research Institute for Contracting Officer’s Representative Michael Drillings Office of Basic Research Michael Kaplan, Director June 1991 91-06064

  20. Hunter-Gatherers and the Origins of Religion.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Hervey C; Duda, Pavel; Marlowe, Frank W

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of the evolution of religion have revealed the cognitive underpinnings of belief in supernatural agents, the role of ritual in promoting cooperation, and the contribution of morally punishing high gods to the growth and stabilization of human society. The universality of religion across human society points to a deep evolutionary past. However, specific traits of nascent religiosity, and the sequence in which they emerged, have remained unknown. Here we reconstruct the evolution of religious beliefs and behaviors in early modern humans using a global sample of hunter-gatherers and seven traits describing hunter-gatherer religiosity: animism, belief in an afterlife, shamanism, ancestor worship, high gods, and worship of ancestors or high gods who are active in human affairs. We reconstruct ancestral character states using a time-calibrated supertree based on published phylogenetic trees and linguistic classification and then test for correlated evolution between the characters and for the direction of cultural change. Results indicate that the oldest trait of religion, present in the most recent common ancestor of present-day hunter-gatherers, was animism, in agreement with long-standing beliefs about the fundamental role of this trait. Belief in an afterlife emerged, followed by shamanism and ancestor worship. Ancestor spirits or high gods who are active in human affairs were absent in early humans, suggesting a deep history for the egalitarian nature of hunter-gatherer societies. There is a significant positive relationship between most characters investigated, but the trait "high gods" stands apart, suggesting that belief in a single creator deity can emerge in a society regardless of other aspects of its religion.

  1. Modelling mechanisms of social network maintenance in hunter-gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Eiluned

    2014-01-01

    Due to decreasing resource densities, higher latitude hunter-gatherers need to maintain their social networks over greater geographic distances than their equatorial counterparts. This suggests that as latitude increases, the frequency of face-to-face interaction decreases for ‘weak tie’ relationships in the outer mating pool (~500-strong) and tribal (~1500-strong) layers of a hunter-gatherer social network. A key question, then, is how a hunter-gatherer tribe sustains coherence as a single identifiable unit given that members are distributed across a large geographic area. The first step in answering this question is to establish whether the expectation that network maintenance raises a challenge for hunter-gatherers is correct, or whether sustaining inter-group contact is in fact trivial. Here I present a null model that represents mobile groups as randomly and independently moving gas particles. The aim of this model is to examine whether face-to-face contact can be maintained with every member of an individual’s tribe at all latitudes even under the baseline assumption of random movement. Contrary to baseline expectations, the number of encounters between groups predicted by the gas model cannot support tribal cohesion and is significantly negatively associated with absolute latitude. In addition, above ~40 degrees latitude random mobility no longer produces a sufficient number of encounters between groups to maintain contact across the 500-strong mating pool. These model predictions suggest that the outermost layers of hunter-gatherers’ social networks may require additional mechanisms of support in the form of strategies that either enhance encounter rates, such as coordinated mobility patterns, or lessen the need for face-to-face interaction, such as the use of symbolic artefacts to represent social affiliations. Given the predicted decline in encounters away from the equator, such additional supports might be most strongly expressed at high

  2. Honey, Hadza, hunter-gatherers, and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Frank W; Berbesque, J Colette; Wood, Brian; Crittenden, Alyssa; Porter, Claire; Mabulla, Audax

    2014-06-01

    Honey is the most energy dense food in nature. It is therefore not surprising that, where it exists, honey is an important food for almost all hunter-gatherers. Here we describe and analyze widespread honey collecting among foragers and show that where it is absent, in arctic and subarctic habitats, honey bees are also rare to absent. Second, we focus on one hunter-gatherer society, the Hadza of Tanzania. Hadza men and women both rank honey as their favorite food. Hadza acquire seven types of honey. Hadza women usually acquire honey that is close to the ground while men often climb tall baobab trees to raid the largest bee hives with stinging bees. Honey accounts for a substantial proportion of the kilocalories in the Hadza diet, especially that of Hadza men. Cross-cultural forager data reveal that in most hunter-gatherers, men acquire more honey than women but often, as with the Hadza, women do acquire some. Virtually all warm-climate foragers consume honey. Our closest living relatives, the great apes, take honey when they can. We suggest that honey has been part of the diet of our ancestors dating back to at least the earliest hominins. The earliest hominins, however, would have surely been less capable of acquiring as much honey as more recent, fully modern human hunter-gatherers. We discuss reasons for thinking our early ancestors would have acquired less honey than foragers ethnographically described, yet still significantly more than our great ape relatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Young Children's Help-Seeking as Active Information Gathering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vredenburgh, Christopher; Kushnir, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Young children's social learning is a topic of great interest. Here, we examined preschoolers' (M = 52.44 months, SD = 9.7 months) help-seeking as a social information gathering activity that may optimize and support children's opportunities for learning. In a toy assembly task, we assessed each child's competency at assembling toys and the…

  4. Psychosocial effects of perceived emotional synchrony in collective gatherings.

    PubMed

    Páez, Dario; Rimé, Bernard; Basabe, Nekane; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Zumeta, Larraitz

    2015-05-01

    In a classic theory, Durkheim (1912) predicted that because of the social sharing of emotion they generate, collective gatherings bring participants to a stage of collective effervescence in which they experience a sense of union with others and a feeling of empowerment accompanied by positive affect. This would lead them to leave the collective situation with a renewed sense of confidence in life and in social institutions. A century after Durkheim's predictions of these effects, though, they remained untested as a whole. This article reports 4 studies, 2 correlational, 1 semilongitudinal, and 1 experimental, assessing the positive effects of participation in either positively valenced (folkloric marches) or negatively valenced (protest demonstrations) collective gatherings. Results confirmed that collective gatherings consistently strengthened collective identity, identity fusion, and social integration, as well as enhancing personal and collective self-esteem and efficacy, positive affect, and positive social beliefs among participants. In line with a central tenet of the theory, emotional communion, or perceived emotional synchrony with others mediated these effects. Higher perceived emotional synchrony was associated with stronger emotional reactions, stronger social support, and higher endorsement of social beliefs and values. Participation in symbolic collective gatherings also particularly reinforced identity fusion when perceived emotional synchrony was high. The respective contributions of perceived emotional synchrony and flow, or optimal experience, were also assessed. Whereas perceived emotional synchrony emerged as strongly related to the various social outcomes, flow was observed to be related first to collective efficacy and self-esteem, and thus, to encompass mainly empowerment effects. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Evolutionary history of hunter-gatherer marriage practices.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim R; Flinn, Mark V; Ellsworth, Ryan M

    2011-04-27

    The universality of marriage in human societies around the world suggests a deep evolutionary history of institutionalized pair-bonding that stems back at least to early modern humans. However, marriage practices vary considerably from culture to culture, ranging from strict prescriptions and arranged marriages in some societies to mostly unregulated courtship in others, presence to absence of brideservice and brideprice, and polyandrous to polygynous unions. The ancestral state of early human marriage is not well known given the lack of conclusive archaeological evidence. Comparative phylogenetic analyses using data from contemporary hunter-gatherers around the world may allow for the reconstruction of ancestral human cultural traits. We attempt to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gatherer phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Arranged marriages are inferred to go back at least to first modern human migrations out of Africa. Reconstructions are equivocal on whether or not earlier human marriages were arranged because several African hunter-gatherers have courtship marriages. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that marriages in early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny (low reproductive skew) and reciprocal exchanges between the families of marital partners (i.e., brideservice or brideprice). Phylogenetic results suggest a deep history of regulated exchange of mates and resources among lineages that enhanced the complexity of human meta-group social structure with coalitions and alliances spanning across multiple residential communities.

  6. Evolutionary History of Hunter-Gatherer Marriage Practices

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert S.; Hill, Kim R.; Flinn, Mark V.; Ellsworth, Ryan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The universality of marriage in human societies around the world suggests a deep evolutionary history of institutionalized pair-bonding that stems back at least to early modern humans. However, marriage practices vary considerably from culture to culture, ranging from strict prescriptions and arranged marriages in some societies to mostly unregulated courtship in others, presence to absence of brideservice and brideprice, and polyandrous to polygynous unions. The ancestral state of early human marriage is not well known given the lack of conclusive archaeological evidence. Methodology Comparative phylogenetic analyses using data from contemporary hunter-gatherers around the world may allow for the reconstruction of ancestral human cultural traits. We attempt to reconstruct ancestral marriage practices using hunter-gatherer phylogenies based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Results Arranged marriages are inferred to go back at least to first modern human migrations out of Africa. Reconstructions are equivocal on whether or not earlier human marriages were arranged because several African hunter-gatherers have courtship marriages. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggest that marriages in early ancestral human societies probably had low levels of polygyny (low reproductive skew) and reciprocal exchanges between the families of marital partners (i.e., brideservice or brideprice). Discussion Phylogenetic results suggest a deep history of regulated exchange of mates and resources among lineages that enhanced the complexity of human meta-group social structure with coalitions and alliances spanning across multiple residential communities. PMID:21556360

  7. Mass-Gathering Medical Care in Electronic Dance Music Festivals.

    PubMed

    FitzGibbon, Kathleen M; Nable, Jose V; Ayd, Benjamin; Lawner, Benjamin J; Comer, Angela C; Lichenstein, Richard; Levy, Matthew J; Seaman, Kevin G; Bussey, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals represent a unique subset of mass-gathering events with limited guidance through literature or legislation to guide mass-gathering medical care at these events. Hypothesis/Problem Electronic dance music festivals pose unique challenges with increased patient encounters and heightened patient acuity under-estimated by current validated casualty predication models. This was a retrospective review of three separate EDM festivals with analysis of patient encounters and patient transport rates. Data obtained were inserted into the predictive Arbon and Hartman models to determine estimated patient presentation rate and patient transport rates. The Arbon model under-predicted the number of patient encounters and the number of patient transports for all three festivals, while the Hartman model under-predicted the number of patient encounters at one festival and over-predicted the number of encounters at the other two festivals. The Hartman model over-predicted patient transport rates for two of the three festivals. Electronic dance music festivals often involve distinct challenges and current predictive models are inaccurate for planning these events. The formation of a cohesive incident action plan will assist in addressing these challenges and lead to the collection of more uniform data metrics. FitzGibbon KM , Nable JV , Ayd B , Lawner BJ , Comer AC , Lichenstein R , Levy MJ , Seaman KG , Bussey I . Mass-gathering medical care in electronic dance music festivals. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):563-567.

  8. Library Skills for Teachers: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mech, Terrence

    Designed to introduce education students to the basic library resources in the field, this self-paced workbook assumes a basic knowledge of the library and its resources. Each section in the eight-chapter workbook discusses a particular type of reference material and sample entries are provided when appropriate. Eleven assignments (two multiple…

  9. Basic Library Skills: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Judith

    This self-paced workbook is designed to introduce college students to the resources and facilities of the library and to providing the knowledge and skills necessary to do basic library research. Two introductory chapters include a library-specific tour with floor plans (the D. Leonard Corgan Library, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and information…

  10. ET-1 levels in cardioischemic patients undergoing atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Borgia, M C; Tonnarini, G; Alessandri, N; Campana, E; Quaglione, R; Ciccaglioni, A; Giancaspro, G; Pantone, P; Giovanniello, T; Califano, F

    2001-01-01

    Atrial pacing (AP) procedure was carried out in 11 cardioischemic patients to reproduce tachycardia-induced myocardial ischemia. Six control subjects underwent the same procedure until the maximum pacing rate was reached. During the procedure, endothelin-1 (ET-1) and plasma lactate levels were measured in the coronary sinus and in the aortic root. In all the patients, atrial pacing provoked electrocardiographic signs and metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia and a significant decrease (p<0.001) in left ventricular ejection fraction. At AP-induced ischemia, coronary sinus (17.31 +/- 4.20 pg/mL) and arterial (9.60 +/- 3.31 pg/mL) ET-1 plasma levels were significantly different (p<0.001) in the patients. On the contrary, at maximum pacing rate, no significant difference (p=0.186) emerged between coronary sinus (9.72 +/- 1.09 pg/mL) and arterial (8.95 +/- 0.75 pg/mL) plasma ET-1 levels in the control group. These results suggest that, in cardioischemic patients, tachycardia can induce the coronary endothelium to release significant amounts of ET-1.

  11. Individualized Self-Pacing (ISP)--A Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Melvin R.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Fullerton College's individualized self-pacing (ISP) program. Reviews twelve ISP objectives including provision of enrollment/scheduling flexibility; lists twenty-two class offerings, including basic business math, business English, and business machines. Compares costs, learning, and course completion in ISP and traditional programs.…

  12. Evaluation of Self-Paced Instructional Materials in Pharmaceutics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, James W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The instructional effectiveness of two different presentation methods (lecture and self-paced or modularized) was examined using two groups of pharmacy students. Little or no difference was found in this study of junior and senior students at Oregon State University. (LBH)

  13. 77 FR 3958 - Mortgage Assets Affected by PACE Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... magnitude of changes in energy prices; and, The timing, direction, and magnitude of changes of property... timing, direction, and magnitude of changes in energy prices; and, The timing, direction, and magnitude... assets affected by Property Assessed Clean Energy (``PACE'') programs and Notice of Intent (``NOI'') to...

  14. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. Immediate emergency department external cardiac pacing for prehospital bradyasystolic arrest.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Nowak, R M; Martin, G B; Best, R; Carden, D L; Tomlanovich, M C

    1985-04-01

    Approximately 25% of patients in prehospital cardiac arrest present in bradyasystolic rhythms, and their long-term prognosis is very poor. Our study was undertaken to determine the utility of immediate emergency department (ED) external cardiac pacing in this situation. Twenty patients presenting with bradyasystolic prehospital cardiac arrest were entered in the study. All received the usual advanced cardiac life support therapy, but also were externally paced immediately using an automated external defibrillator and pacemaker (AEDP). Only two of 20 patients showed evidence of electrical capture, and none developed pulses with pacing. Four of the 20 patients developed a sinus rhythm and blood pressure during resuscitation. Three survived to leave the ED, but none survived to leave the hospital. An increase in the rate of bradycardia and pulseless idioventricular rhythms that was independent of electrical capture or pharmacologic therapy was noted occasionally. Although survival was not enhanced using the AEDP, the device was reliable, easy to use, and free of complications. External cardiac pacing warrants further investigation in the prehospital setting.

  17. Self-Paced Instruction in SPSS with Multitutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wides, Jeffrey W.

    More than a dozen CAI modules which teach the uninitiated user how to use the interactive Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) are described. The modules are based on the principle of incrementally increasing difficulty, self pacing, and student involvement. The first half of the set introduces the student to interactive computing,…

  18. Identification and reliability of pacing strategies in outrigger canoeing ergometry.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Rebecca M; Spinks, Warwick L; Leicht, Anthony S; Sinclair, Wade H

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the pacing strategies utilised; and the performance reproducibility during repeated outrigger canoeing ergometer time trials. Trained female outrigger canoeists (N=11) completed four 1000m outrigger canoe ergometer time trials. There was a significant 1.5% improvement in 1000m time in trial four compared to trial one. A fast start strategy was adopted in 36 of the 44 trials (82%) followed by a deceleration during the mid stages. As trials progressed there was an increased adoption of negative pacing (fast finish) between the last two splits, indicating a learning effect of pacing strategy across repeated trials. These results demonstrate that although some performance improvement was evident between the first and fourth time trials, the 1000m outrigger ergometer time trial is a reliable test that may be used as a tool to assist with crew selection and performance monitoring. Further, on account of the variation in pacing strategy noted in the fourth trial, the authors recommend utilising one familiarisation session and one test session when assessing performance such that learning or training adaptations resulting from multiple trials do not impact on results.

  19. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 6-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the second part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to circular motion, work, power, kinetic energy, potential energy, conservative forces, conservation of energy, spring problems, center of mass, and…

  20. A Self-Paced Program in Freshman Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William E.

    Developed in response to the heterogeneous student population of a two-year, open door college, a self-paced freshman English course at Brazosport College (Texas) still operates within the traditional contact hour and three semester hours credit requirements, but serves students in unique, individual ways. Students may enroll only if placed by…

  1. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  2. Self-Paced Physics, Segment 41A-41E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    The second review segment of the Self-Paced Physics Course is presented in this volume and arranged to match study segments 19 through 40. The segment is divided into five subsegments, each of which is composed of a set of problems and solutions. A study guide is provided for each subsegment. The problem set is designed in a back-referencing…

  3. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 15-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Three review segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are provided in this volume which is arranged to match study segments 1 through 14. Each of the three segments is composed of a set of problems and solutions, and accompanied by its own individual study guide. The problem set is designed as a back-referencing system, and the…

  4. The Print and Computer Enlargement System--PACE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Ronald A.

    The Print and Computer Enlargement (PACE) System is being designed as a portable computerized reading and writing system that enables a low-vision person to read regular print and then create and edit text using large-print computerized output. The design goal was to develop a system that: weighed no more than 12 pounds so it could be easily…

  5. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 19-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fourth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric charges, insulators, Coulomb's law, electric fields, lines of force, solid angles, conductors, motion of charged particles, dipoles, electric flux,…

  6. Self-Paced Physics [Talking Book Cassette Tapes].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As one of three audiovisual media in the U. S. Naval Academy Self-Paced Physics Course, 16 cassette tapes relating to lectures of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism are prepared for enriching and supplementary purposes. The material is designed to be used in combination with the talking book where illustrations, formulas, behavioral objectives,…

  7. The Effects of Self-Paced Blended Learning of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balentyne, Phoebe; Varga, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As online and blended learning gain more popularity in education, it becomes more important to understand their effects on student learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of self-paced blended learning of mathematics on the attitudes and achievement of 26 high ability middle school students, and investigate the relationship…

  8. Computers Help 2000 Students Self-Pace Their Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorber, Michael A.

    Illinois State University operates a self-paced, competency-based teacher education program known as the Professional Sequence. It is based on the General Model of Instruction used at other universities and is organized around a series of self-instructional packages. Student progress is charted by a set of computer programs called the Surveillance…

  9. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 32-36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this seventh problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The content is related to magnetic fields, magnetic moments, forces on charged particles in magnetic fields, electron volts, cyclotron, electronic charge to mass ratio, current-carrying…

  10. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  11. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  12. Optimizing Classroom Instruction through Self-Paced Learning Prototype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Romiro G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the learning impact of self-paced learning prototype in optimizing classroom instruction towards students' learning in Chemistry. Two sections of 64 Laboratory High School students in Chemistry were used as subjects of the study. The Quasi-Experimental and Correlation Research Design was used in the study: a pre-test was…

  13. Microcomputers in Education: A Self-Paced Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Doris; Carey, Regan

    Designed to serve as a self-paced computer course for education students with no experience using microcomputers, this manual contains instructions for operating an Apple IIe microcomputer, its introductory software, and Bank Street Writer, using the DOS 3.3 System Master. The lessons, which contain illustrations and sample screens, include…

  14. Pacing Adjustments Associated With Familiarization: Heat Versus Temperate Environments.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Cyril; Duffield, Rob; Hausswirth, Christophe; Coutts, Aaron J; Le Meur, Yann

    2016-10-01

    To describe the effect of the initial perceptual experience from heat familiarization on the pacing profile during a freepaced endurance time trial (TT) compared with temperate conditions. Two groups of well-trained triathletes performed two 20-km TTs in either hot (35°C and 50% relative humidity [RH], n = 12) or temperate (21°C and 50% RH, n = 22) conditions, after standardization of training for each group before both trials. To ensure no physiological acclimation differences between conditions, the TTs for both groups were separated by 11 ± 4 d. Performance improvement in the heat (11 ± 24 W) from the 1st to 2nd trial appeared comparable to that in temperate conditions (8 ± 14 W, P = .67). However, the specific alteration in pacing profile in the heat was markedly different than temperate conditions, with a change from "positive" to an "even" pacing strategy. Altered perceptions of heat during heat familiarization, rather than physiological acclimatization per se, may mediate initial changes in pacing and TT performance in the heat. These results highlight the need for athletes without time for sufficient heat acclimatization to familiarize themselves with hot conditions to reduce the uncertainty from behavior-based outcomes that may impede performance.

  15. Kentucky's Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Kevin M.

    A lack of education is a major cause of poverty among many Kentucky citizens. In 1986, Kentucky's dropout rate was the second highest of the 50 states. That same year, Kentucky established the Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program in an effort to combat the problems of insufficient education and poverty that tend to be perpetuated from…

  16. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 6-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the second part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to circular motion, work, power, kinetic energy, potential energy, conservative forces, conservation of energy, spring problems, center of mass, and…

  17. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  18. The Effects of Self-Paced Blended Learning of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balentyne, Phoebe; Varga, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As online and blended learning gain more popularity in education, it becomes more important to understand their effects on student learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of self-paced blended learning of mathematics on the attitudes and achievement of 26 high ability middle school students, and investigate the relationship…

  19. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 11-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the third part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to impulses, inelastic and elastic collisions, two-dimensional collision problems, universal constant of gravitation, gravitational acceleration and…

  20. Tools and Trends in Self-Paced Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the PLATO system of the 1960's, CALL (computer assisted language learning) has had a major focus on providing self-paced, auto-correcting exercises for language learners to practice their skills and improve their knowledge of discrete areas of language learning. The computer has been recognized from the beginning as a patient and…

  1. PACE Model Gives Advertising Campaign-Centered Curriculum (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Describes PACE (Portfolio, Assignments, Content, and Evaluation), an advertising curriculum model in which students work on real advertising campaigns. Explains that students form account groups which locate products needing promotional assistance. Identifies the goals of the curriculum to be competent writing and practical understanding of…

  2. Tools and Trends in Self-Paced Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the PLATO system of the 1960's, CALL (computer assisted language learning) has had a major focus on providing self-paced, auto-correcting exercises for language learners to practice their skills and improve their knowledge of discrete areas of language learning. The computer has been recognized from the beginning as a patient and…

  3. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the first part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to significant digits, vectors, dimensions, dot and cross products, speeds, velocities, problem solving procedures, projectiles, Newton's laws, and…

  4. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 24-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fifth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to work in electric fields, potential differences, parallel plates, electric potential energies, potential gradients, capacitances, and capacitor circuits.…

  5. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 37-40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this eighth problems and solutions book used as a part of course assignments. The content is related to magnetic induction, Faraday's law, induced currents, Lenz's law, induced electromotive forces, time-varying magnetic fields, self-inductance, inductors,…

  6. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  7. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 11-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the third part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to impulses, inelastic and elastic collisions, two-dimensional collision problems, universal constant of gravitation, gravitational acceleration and…

  8. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 28-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this sixth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric currents, current densities, resistances, Ohm's law, voltages, Joule heating, electromotive forces, single loop circuits, series and parallel…

  9. Attendance at Lectures and Films in Self-Paced Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, K. Anthony

    Attendance at guest lectures, instructor lectures, and films in self-paced introductory psychology courses was examined in two experiments with 180 students in an introductory psychology class at Utah State University. In the first experiment, students were given no points, one point credit toward interviews, or one point credit toward the final…

  10. PACES: A Model of Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark D.; Tarabochia, Dawn W.; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    School counselors design, deliver, and evaluate comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs that are focused on enhancing student development and success. A model of student well-being, known as PACES, is defined and described that consists of five distinct and interactive domains: physical, affective, cognitive, economic, and social.…

  11. Does Lateral Transmission Obscure Inheritance in Hunter-Gatherer Languages?

    PubMed Central

    Bowern, Claire; Epps, Patience; Gray, Russell; Hill, Jane; Hunley, Keith; McConvell, Patrick; Zentz, Jason

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, linguists have begun to increasingly rely on quantitative phylogenetic approaches to examine language evolution. Some linguists have questioned the suitability of phylogenetic approaches on the grounds that linguistic evolution is largely reticulate due to extensive lateral transmission, or borrowing, among languages. The problem may be particularly pronounced in hunter-gatherer languages, where the conventional wisdom among many linguists is that lexical borrowing rates are so high that tree building approaches cannot provide meaningful insights into evolutionary processes. However, this claim has never been systematically evaluated, in large part because suitable data were unavailable. In addition, little is known about the subsistence, demographic, ecological, and social factors that might mediate variation in rates of borrowing among languages. Here, we evaluate these claims with a large sample of hunter-gatherer languages from three regions around the world. In this study, a list of 204 basic vocabulary items was collected for 122 hunter-gatherer and small-scale cultivator languages from three ecologically diverse case study areas: northern Australia, northwest Amazonia, and California and the Great Basin. Words were rigorously coded for etymological (inheritance) status, and loan rates were calculated. Loan rate variability was examined with respect to language area, subsistence mode, and population size, density, and mobility; these results were then compared to the sample of 41 primarily agriculturalist languages in [1]. Though loan levels varied both within and among regions, they were generally low in all regions (mean 5.06%, median 2.49%, and SD 7.56), despite substantial demographic, ecological, and social variation. Amazonian levels were uniformly very low, with no language exhibiting more than 4%. Rates were low but more variable in the other two study regions, in part because of several outlier languages where rates of borrowing were

  12. Two-rate periodic protocol with dynamics driven through many cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyaki

    2017-02-01

    We study the long time dynamics in closed quantum systems periodically driven via time dependent parameters with two frequencies ω1 and ω2=r ω1 . Tuning of the ratio r there can unleash plenty of dynamical phenomena to occur. Our study includes integrable models like Ising and X Y models in d =1 and the Kitaev model in d =1 and 2 and can also be extended to Dirac fermions in graphene. We witness the wave-function overlap or dynamic freezing that occurs within some small/ intermediate frequency regimes in the (ω1,r ) plane (with r ≠0 ) when the ground state is evolved through a single cycle of driving. However, evolved states soon become steady with long driving, and the freezing scenario gets rarer. We extend the formalism of adiabatic-impulse approximation for many cycle driving within our two-rate protocol and show the near-exact comparisons at small frequencies. An extension of the rotating wave approximation is also developed to gather an analytical framework of the dynamics at high frequencies. Finally we compute the entanglement entropy in the stroboscopically evolved states within the gapped phases of the system and observe how it gets tuned with the ratio r in our protocol. The minimally entangled states are found to fall within the regime of dynamical freezing. In general, the results indicate that the entanglement entropy in our driven short-ranged integrable systems follow a genuine nonarea law of scaling and show a convergence (with a r dependent pace) towards volume scaling behavior as the driving is continued for a long time.

  13. Long pacing pulses reduce phrenic nerve stimulation in left ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Hjortshøj, Søren; Heath, Finn; Haugland, Morten; Eschen, Ole; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan

    2014-05-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a major obstacle in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Activation characteristics of the heart and phrenic nerve are different with higher chronaxie for the heart. Therefore, longer pulse durations could be beneficial in preventing phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT due to a decreased threshold for the heart compared with the phrenic nerve. We investigated if long pulse durations decreased left ventricular (LV) thresholds relatively to phrenic nerve thresholds in humans. Eleven patients, with indication for CRT and phrenic nerve stimulation at the intended pacing site, underwent determination of thresholds for the heart and phrenic nerve at different pulse durations (0.3-2.9 milliseconds). The resulting strength duration curves were analyzed by determining chronaxie and rheobase. Comparisons for those parameters were made between the heart and phrenic nerve, and between the models of Weiss and Lapicque as well. In 9 of 11 cases, the thresholds decreased faster for the LV than for the phrenic nerve with increasing pulse duration. In 3 cases, the thresholds changed from unfavorable for LV stimulation to more than a factor 2 in favor of the LV. The greatest change occurred for pulse durations up to 1.5 milliseconds. The chronaxie of the heart was significantly higher than the chronaxie of the phrenic nerve (0.47 milliseconds vs. 0.22 milliseconds [P = 0.029, Lapicque] and 0.79 milliseconds vs. 0.27 milliseconds [P = 0.033, Weiss]). Long pulse durations lead to a decreased threshold of the heart relatively to the phrenic nerve and may prevent stimulation of the phrenic nerve in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Alternate site right ventricular pacing: defining template scoring.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G; Feldman, Alexander; Kumar, Saurabh; Rosso, Raphael; Hung, Thuy To; Pang, Ben

    2011-09-01

     Prolonged right ventricular (RV) apical pacing produces dysynchronous ventricular contraction, which may result in left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, whereas septal pacing sites might reflect a more synchronous LV activation. This study examined a method of evaluating alternate RV pacing sites using a template scoring system based on measuring the angle of lead attachment in the 40° left anterior oblique (LAO) fluoroscopic view and its effect on altering the loop of lead in the RV.  Twenty-three consecutive patients for RV pacing were enrolled. Conventional active fixation leads were positioned in either the RV outflow tract (RVOT) or mid RV using a stylet designed for septal placement (Model 4140, St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA). Using LAO cine fluoroscopy, a generous loop of lead was inserted into the RV chamber and the change in angle of attachment determined.  Successful positioning of pacing leads at the RVOT septum (18 patients) and mid-RV septum (five patients) was achieved. With introduction of more lead into the RV chamber, the angle of attachment in the LAO projection altered over a range of 6°-32° for all patients with a mean of 14.6 ± 6.6°. In 87% of patients, the range was predominantly within the same template score with only minor overlap into another zone.  This study shows that the angle of lead attachment in the RV is altered by introducing more lead, but in most cases, the template score remains the same. Further studies are required to determine the accuracy and efficacy of the templates. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pacing control of sawtooth and ELM oscillations in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauret, M.; Lennholm, M.; de Baar, M. R.; Heemels, W. P. M. H.

    2016-12-01

    In tokamak plasmas, the sawtooth oscillation (ST) and the edge-localized-mode (ELM) are characterized by a phase of a slow evolution of the plasma conditions, followed by a crash-like instability that resets the plasma conditions when certain criteria of the plasma conditions are satisfied. Typically, the crashes induce losses of heat and energetic particles and may also trigger secondary instabilities. As the amplitude of the crash-like perturbation scales with the period between two crashes, period control of these oscillations is important for operations of large fusion facilities such as ITER and DEMO. In several present-day experimental facilities, a pacing control algorithm has been successfully applied for controlling the sawtooth period and the ELM period. However, a formal analysis has been lacking so far, which therefore forms the objective of the present paper. For this purpose, a reset model for the sawtooth period is introduced and, after a proper transformation a nonlinear discrete-time system is obtained, which is used for the formal analysis of pacing control. By representing the model in a Lur’e (or Lurie) form, we can derive conditions under which global asymptotic stability of the closed-loop (pacing) period control system is guaranteed. Moreover, we will show that the controller exhibits inherent robustness for model uncertainties. We envision that the analytical results in the area of pacing control of the sawtooth are also applicable to pacing period control of the ELM oscillation period. The presented reset model also explains why in recent experiments the sawtooth period locks with a periodically modulated power.

  16. Ventricular pacing in single ventricles-A bad combination.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Anica; Zimmerman, Frank J; Ceresnak, Scott R; Shetty, Ira; Motonaga, Kara S; Freter, Anne; Trela, Anthony V; Hanisch, Deb; Russo, Lisa; Avasarala, Kishor; Dubin, Anne M

    2017-06-01

    Chronic ventricular pacing (VP) is associated with systolic dysfunction in a subset of pediatric patients with heart block and structurally normal hearts. The effect of chronic VP in congenital heart disease is less well understood, specifically in the single-ventricle (SV) population. To determine the longitudinal effect of VP in SV patients. SV patients with heart block and dual-chamber pacemakers requiring >50% VP were compared with nonpaced (controls) SV patients matched for age, sex, and SV morphology. Patients were excluded if a prepacing echocardiogram was not available. Echocardiogram and clinical parameters were compared at baseline (prepacing) and at last follow-up in the paced group, and in controls when they were at ages similar to those of their paced-group matches. Twenty-two paced and 53 control patients from 2 institutions were followed for similar durations (6.6±5 years vs 7.6±7.6 years; P = .59). There was no difference between groups regarding baseline ventricular function or the presence of moderate-to-severe atrioventricular valvar regurgitation (AVVR). Paced patients were more likely to develop moderate-to-severe systolic dysfunction (68% vs 15%; P < .01) and AVVR (55% vs 8%; P < .001) and require heart failure medications (65% vs 21%; P < .001). Chronic VP was also associated with a higher risk of transplantation or death (odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-22.7; P = .04). SV patients requiring chronic VP are at higher risk of developing moderate-to-severe ventricular dysfunction and AVVR with an increased risk of death or transplantation compared with controls. New strategies to either limit VP or improve synchronization in this vulnerable population is imperative. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in paced patients with sick sinus syndrome. Relevance of clinical characteristics and pacing modalities.

    PubMed

    Sgarbossa, E B; Pinski, S L; Maloney, J D; Simmons, T W; Wilkoff, B L; Castle, L W; Trohman, R G

    1993-09-01

    The goal of the report was to study the long-term incidence and the independent predictors for chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in 507 paced patients with sick sinus syndrome, adjusting for differences in baseline clinical variables with multivariate analysis. From 1980 to 1989, we implanted 376 dual-chamber, 19 atrial, and 112 ventricular pacemakers to treat patients with sick sinus syndrome. After a maximum follow-up of 134 months (mean: 59 +/- 38 months for chronic atrial fibrillation, 65 +/- 37 months for stroke), actuarial incidence of chronic atrial fibrillation was 7% at 1 year, 16% at 5 years, and 28% at 10 years. Independent predictors for this event, from Cox's proportional hazards model, were history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P < .001; hazard ratio [HR] = 16.84), use of antiarrhythmic drugs before pacemaker implant (P < .001; HR = 2.25), ventricular pacing mode (P = .003; HR = 1.98), age (P = .005; HR = 1.03), and valvular heart disease (P = .008; HR = 2.05). For patients with preimplant history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, independent predictors were prolonged episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P < .001; HR = 2.56), long history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P = .004; HR = 2.05), ventricular pacing mode (P = .025; HR = 1.69), use of antiarrhythmic drugs before pacemaker implant (P = .024; HR = 1.71), and age (P = .04; HR = 1.02). Actuarial incidence of stroke was 3% at 1 year, 5% at 5 years, and 13% at 10 years. Independent predictors for stroke were history of cerebrovascular disease (P < .001; HR = 5.22), ventricular pacing mode (P = .008; HR = 2.61), and history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P = .037; HR = 2.81). Development of chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in paced patients with sick sinus syndrome are strongly determined by clinical variables and secondarily by the pacing modality. Ventricular pacing mode predicts chronic atrial fibrillation in patients with preimplant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

  18. Reader Comment: A Realistic Appraisal of First Efforts at Self-Paced Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craver, W. Lionel, Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Examines a number of reasons for the apparent failure of self-paced instruction when it is first adopted by enthusiastic engineering instructors, and describes how and why the typical self-paced course improves during the second offering. (JR)

  19. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  20. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  1. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  2. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  3. Minimizing right ventricular pacing in sinus node disease: Sometimes the cure is worse than the disease

    PubMed Central

    De Maria, Elia; Olaru, Alina; Cappelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Traditional right ventricular (RV) apical pacing has been associated with heart failure, atrial fibrillation and increased mortality. To avoid the negative consequences of RV apical pacing different strategies have been developed, among these a series of pacing algorithms designed to minimize RV pacing. These functions are particularly useful when there is not the need for continuous RV pacing: intermittent atrio-ventricular blocks and, mainly, sinus node disease. However, in order to avoid RV pacing, the operational features of these algorithms may lead to adverse (often under-appreciated) consequences in some patients. We describe a case of a patient with sinus node disease, in whom right atrial only pacing involved long atrio-ventricular delay to allow intrinsic ventricular conduction, which led to symptomatic hypotension that could be overcome only by “forcing” also right ventricular apical pacing. We subsequently discuss this case in the context of current available literature. PMID:25789293

  4. Mass gathering medicine: event factors predicting patient presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Locoh-Donou, Samuel; Yan, Guofen; Berry, Thomas; O'Connor, Robert; Sochor, Mark; Charlton, Nathan; Brady, William

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the event characteristics of mass gatherings that predict patient presentation rates held in a southeastern US university community. We conducted a retrospective review of all event-based emergency medical services (EMS) records from mass gathering patient presentations over an approximate 23 month period, from October 24, 2009 to August 27, 2011. All patrons seen by EMS were included. Event characteristics included: crowd size, venue percentage filled seating, venue location (inside/outside), venue boundaries (bounded/unbounded), presence of free water (i.e., without cost), presence of alcohol, average heat index, presence of climate control (i.e., air conditioning), and event category (football, concerts, public exhibitions, non-football athletic events). We identified 79 mass gathering events, for a total of 670 patient presentations. The cumulative patron attendance was 917,307 persons. The patient presentation rate (PPR) for each event was calculated as the number of patient presentations per 10,000 patrons in attendance. Overdispersed Poisson regression was used to relate this rate to the event characteristics while controlling for crowd size. In univariate analyses, increased rates of patient presentations were strongly associated with outside venues [rate ratio (RR) = 3.002, p < 0.001], unbounded venues (RR = 2.839, p = 0.001), absence of free water (RR = 1.708, p = 0.036), absence of climate control (RR = 3.028, p < 0.001), and a higher heat index (RR = 1.211 per 10-unit heat index increase, p = 0.003). The presence of alcohol was not significantly associated with the PPR. Football events had the highest PPR, followed sequentially by public exhibitions, concerts, and non-football athletic events. In multivariate models, the strong predictors from the univariate analyses retained their predictive significance for the PPR, together with heat index and percent seating. In the setting of mass event

  5. STS-73 gathers in the O&C for breakfast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Gathering for a meal together in the Operations and Checkout Building are the STS-73 crew members. From left are Payload Commander Kathryn C. Thornton; Payload Specialist Albert Sacco Jr.; Pilot Kent V. Rominger; Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez- Alegria; Mission Commander Kenneth D. Bowersox; Payload Specialist Fred W. Leslie; and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman. Awaiting the crew at Launch Pad 39B is the Space Shuttle Columbia, set to lift off during a window opening at 9:50 a.m. EDT.

  6. STS 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-04-12

    51D-9089 (S23-9089) (12 April 1985) --- The Space Shuttle mission 51-D crewmembers gather to eat breakfast prior to leaving for the launch pad to climb aboard Discovery for liftoff. From left to right Rhea Seddon, Donald E. Williams, Charles D. Walker, Karol J. Bobko, Jeffrey A. Hoffman, S. David Griggs and U.S. Sen. E.J. (Jake) Garn discuss phases of the upcoming flight. Desert for the yet-to-be served breakfast is the pictured decorate 51-D cake.

  7. Information gathering for the Transportation Statistics Data Bank

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Mason, P.J.

    1981-10-01

    The Transportation Statistics Data Bank (TSDB) was developed in 1974 to collect information on the transport of Department of Energy (DOE) materials. This computer program may be used to provide the framework for collecting more detailed information on DOE shipments of radioactive materials. This report describes the type of information that is needed in this area and concludes that the existing system could be readily modified to collect and process it. The additional needed information, available from bills of lading and similar documents, could be gathered from DOE field offices and transferred in a standard format to the TSDB system. Costs of the system are also discussed briefly.

  8. Modeling rapidly disseminating infectious disease during mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Viboud, Cécile

    2012-12-07

    We discuss models for rapidly disseminating infectious diseases during mass gatherings (MGs), using influenza as a case study. Recent innovations in modeling and forecasting influenza transmission dynamics at local, regional, and global scales have made influenza a particularly attractive model scenario for MG. We discuss the behavioral, medical, and population factors for modeling MG disease transmission, review existing model formulations, and highlight key data and modeling gaps related to modeling MG disease transmission. We argue that the proposed improvements will help integrate infectious-disease models in MG health contingency plans in the near future, echoing modeling efforts that have helped shape influenza pandemic preparedness plans in recent years.

  9. A multi-agent system architecture for geographic information gathering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gang-Yi; Wang, Shen-Kang

    2004-11-01

    World Wide Web (WWW) is a vast repository of information, including a great deal of geographic information. But the location and retrieval of geographic information will require a significant amount of time and effort. In addition, different users usually have different views and interests in the same information. To resolve such problems, this paper first proposed a model of geographic information gathering based on multi-Agent (MA) architecture. Then based on this model, we construct a prototype system with GML (Geography Markup Language). This system consists of three tiers-Client, Web Server and Data Resource. Finally, we expatiate on the process of Web Server.

  10. Long-term follow-up of DDD pacing mode.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Mateusz; Dębski, Maciej; Ząbek, Andrzej; Haberka, Kazimierz; Lelakowski, Jacek; Małecka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the long-term survival of DDD pacing and identify the main reasons for its loss. The study group consisted of 496 patients in whom a DDD pacing system was implanted between October 1984 and March 2002 and who were followed up until July 2010. The follow-up period was 152.1 ± 35.5 months. The patients' mean age at the time of implantation was 59.5 ± 12.5 years, and 53.5% were male; 58% had sick sinus syndrome (SSS), 26% had atrioventricular block (AVB), 15% had both of these indications simultaneously, and 1% had other indications. The incidence of lead malfunction, progression to chronic atrial fibrillation (AF), and the rate of infective complications was analysed. During the follow-up, 369 patients remained in DDD mode stimulation. DDD mode survival rate at one, five, ten and 15 years was, respectively, 96%, 86%, 77% and 72%. The most common reason for reprogramming out of DDD mode was the development of permanent AF in 65 (13.1%) patients. The occurrence of chronic AF was associated with a prior history of paroxysmal AF (p = 0.0001), SSS (p = 0.0215), and older age at time of implantation (p = 0.0068) compared to patients who remained in sinus rhythm. Lead malfunction caused loss of DDD mode pacing in 56 (11.3%) patients. Atrial leads were damaged in 37 patients, ventricular in 12 patients, and both leads in seven patients. The subclavian vein puncture was correlated with the mechanical damage of the atrial lead (p = 0.02935) compared to cephalic vein access. At the moment of complication, the patients with a dysfunctional lead were significantly younger than those who progressed to chronic AF(p = 0.0019). Infective complications which caused temporary loss of DDD pacing were observed in six patients: five had pocket infection and one had lead-dependent infective endocarditis. 1. Effective DDD pacing from the originally implanted system was noted in a high percentage (72%) of patients in long-term observation (15 years

  11. Lunar plasma measurement by MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi

    Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. KAGUYA(SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that studies the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. KAGUYA was successfully launched on 14 September 2007 by HIIA launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. KAGUYA was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and started continuous observation in mid-December 2007. One of the fourteen science instruments MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) was developed for the comprehensive three-dimensional plasma measurement around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low energy electrons below 15keV. IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. PACE sensors have been measuring solar wind, plasmas in the wake region of the Moon and plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere. ESA sensors have discovered electron heating over magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. ESA sensors have also observed electrons accelerated from the lunar surface in the wake region. PACE ion sensors have discovered new features of low energy ions around the Moon. IMA has discovered the existence of alkali ions that are originated from the lunar surface or lunar atmosphere and are picked up by the solar wind. IEA and IMA sensors discovered solar wind reflection by the Moon. PACE

  12. Elevations in ventricular pacing threshold with the use of the Y adaptor: implications for biventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Rho, Robert W; Patel, Vickas V; Gerstenfeld, Edward P; Dixit, Sanjay; Poku, Joseph W; Ross, Heather M; Callans, David; Kocovic, Dusan Z

    2003-03-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new and promising therapeutic option for patients with severe heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay. Patients who are candidates for CRT and have a previously implanted device may utilize a "Y" IS 1 connector to accommodate the coronary sinus lead. This modification has the potential to alter biventricular pacing thresholds. During an 18 month period, successful biventricular pacemaker implantation was performed in 72 patients (age: 67 +/- 11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction: 20.5 +/- 5.6%). All of these patients had severe symptomatic congestive heart failure (NYHA Class III and IV). In 20 patients a special "Y" adaptor that bifurcates the ventricular IS 1 bipolar output to two bipolar outputs or one unipolar and one bipolar output was utilized. During initial implantation, LV thresholds obtained in a unipolar configuration prior to connecting to the "Y" adaptor were significantly lower than thresholds obtained after connecting to the "Y" adaptor (1.7 +/- 1.11 V at 0.5 ms pulse width versus 2.8 +/- 1.5 V at 0.5 ms pulse width [P = 0.01]). Two patients (10%) required left ventricular lead revisions due to unacceptably high left ventricular thresholds during device follow-up. The difference in measured left ventricular thresholds between the two configurations is best explained by a resistive element that is added to the circuit when performing threshold measurement of the LV lead through the "Y" adaptor (combined tip to RV ring configuration) versus measurement of the LV lead in a unipolar configuration. This resistive element represents multiple factors including anode surface area, resistive polarization at the tissue-electrode interface, and transmyocardial resistance. LV thresholds should be measured in an LV tip to RV ring configuration or ideally in a combined tip (LV and RV) to shared ring configuration in order to accurately assess LV thresholds. This observation has significant clinical

  13. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning environment…

  14. Time to Learn: Pacing and the External Framing of Teachers' Work 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Ursula

    2003-01-01

    The article reports research in two South African grade 3 classrooms, one located within a disadvantaged school and one in an affluent suburban school. The research examines the pacing rules of different transmission practices: weak pacing (a slower rate of transmission) is associated with pedagogy in the working-class school, and strong pacing (a…

  15. Psychometric Properties of the Parent Attitude toward Children's Expressiveness Scale (PACES).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Carolyn

    The Parent Attitude toward Children's Expressiveness Scale (PACES) provides a measure of the degree of acceptance-control the respondent allows toward a child's hypothetical emotional and expressive behavior. PACES is a 20-item scale with a multiple choice format for each item. Emotional and expressive behaviors represented in PACES include anger,…

  16. What Pace Is Best? Assessing Adults' Learning from Slideshows and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara

    2014-01-01

    When acquiring information from a 2D platform, self-control and/or optimal pacing may help reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. In the present research, adults viewed novel action sequences via one of four learning media: (1) self-paced slideshows, where viewers advanced through slides at their own pace by clicking a mouse, (2)…

  17. Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: U-Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) partnered to disseminate U-Pace, a technology-enabled instructional model that promotes student success through deeper learning. UWM developed U-Pace in 2006 for an Introduction to Psychology course and, over time, evidence indicates that U-Pace not only…

  18. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  19. What Pace Is Best? Assessing Adults' Learning from Slideshows and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara

    2014-01-01

    When acquiring information from a 2D platform, self-control and/or optimal pacing may help reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. In the present research, adults viewed novel action sequences via one of four learning media: (1) self-paced slideshows, where viewers advanced through slides at their own pace by clicking a mouse, (2)…

  20. Unintended Outcomes of University-Community Partnerships: Building Organizational Capacity with PACE International Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Kate; Clark, Lindie; Hammersley, Laura; Baker, Michaela; Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; D'ath, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University provides experiential opportunities for students and staff to contribute to more just, inclusive and sustainable societies by engaging in activities with partner organizations. PACE International offers a range of opportunities with partners overseas. Underpinning PACE is a…

  1. Helping Girls Get Back on Track: An Implementation Study of the PACE Center for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treskon, Louisa; Millenky, Megan; Freedman, Lily

    2017-01-01

    PACE Center for Girls is a unique program that provides academic and social services to girls ages 11 to 18. Girls eligible for PACE exhibit multiple health, safety, and delinquency risk factors, such as poor academic performance, exposure to abuse or violence, truancy, risky sexual behavior, and substance abuse. PACE seeks to help them onto a…

  2. A Study of Instructional Methods Used in Fast-Paced Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2006-01-01

    This study involved 15 secondary-level teachers who taught fast-paced classes at a university based summer program and similar regularly paced classes in their local schools in order to examine how teachers differentiate or modify instructional methods and content selections for fast-paced classes. Interviews were conducted with the teachers…

  3. Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: U-Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) partnered to disseminate U-Pace, a technology-enabled instructional model that promotes student success through deeper learning. UWM developed U-Pace in 2006 for an Introduction to Psychology course and, over time, evidence indicates that U-Pace not only…

  4. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  5. Image gathering and digital restoration for fidelity and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1991-01-01

    The fidelity and resolution of the traditional Wiener restorations given in the prevalent digital processing literature can be significantly improved when the transformations between the continuous and discrete representations in image gathering and display are accounted for. However, the visual quality of these improved restorations also is more sensitive to the defects caused by aliasing artifacts, colored noise, and ringing near sharp edges. In this paper, these visual defects are characterized, and methods for suppressing them are presented. It is demonstrated how the visual quality of fidelity-maximized images can be improved when (1) the image-gathering system is specifically designed to enhance the performance of the image-restoration algorithm, and (2) the Wiener filter is combined with interactive Gaussian smoothing, synthetic high edge enhancement, and nonlinear tone-scale transformation. The nonlinear transformation is used primarily to enhance the spatial details that are often obscurred when the normally wide dynamic range of natural radiance fields is compressed into the relatively narrow dynamic range of film and other displays.

  6. Energy expenditure and activity among Hadza hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A; Wood, Brian M; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Racette, Susan B; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Marlowe, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of total energy expenditure, (TEE; kcal/day) among traditional populations have challenged current models relating habitual physical activity to daily energy requirements. Here, we examine the relationship between physical activity and TEE among traditional Hadza hunter-gatherers living in northern Tanzania. Hadza adults were studied at two camps, with minimal intervention so as to monitor energy expenditure and activity during normal daily life. We measured daily walking distance and walking speed using wearable GPS units for 41 adults. For a subset of 30 adults, we measured TEE using doubly labeled water, three indices of work load (foraging return rate, maternal status, and number of dependent children), and urinary biomarkers of metabolic activity and stress (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, cortisol, and testosterone). Fat-free mass was the single strongest predictor of TEE among Hadza adults (r(2)  = 0.66, P < 0.001). Hadza men used greater daily walking distances and faster walking speeds compared with that of Hadza women, but neither sex nor any measure of physical activity or work load were correlated with TEE in analyses controlling for fat-free mass. Compared with developed, industrial populations, Hadza adults had similar TEE but elevated levels of metabolic stress as measured by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Our results indicate that daily physical activity may not predict TEE within traditional hunter-gatherer populations like the Hadza. Instead, adults with high levels of habitual physical activity may adapt by reducing energy allocation to other physiological activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Metagenome Sequencing of the Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rampelli, Simone; Schnorr, Stephanie L; Consolandi, Clarissa; Turroni, Silvia; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Crittenden, Alyssa N; Henry, Amanda G; Candela, Marco

    2015-06-29

    Through human microbiome sequencing, we can better understand how host evolutionary and ontogenetic history is reflected in the microbial function. However, there has been no information on the gut metagenome configuration in hunter-gatherer populations, posing a gap in our knowledge of gut microbiota (GM)-host mutualism arising from a lifestyle that describes over 90% of human evolutionary history. Here, we present the first metagenomic analysis of GM from Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania, showing a unique enrichment in metabolic pathways that aligns with the dietary and environmental factors characteristic of their foraging lifestyle. We found that the Hadza GM is adapted for broad-spectrum carbohydrate metabolism, reflecting the complex polysaccharides in their diet. Furthermore, the Hadza GM is equipped for branched-chain amino acid degradation and aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. Resistome functionality demonstrates the existence of antibiotic resistance genes in a population with little antibiotic exposure, indicating the ubiquitous presence of environmentally derived resistances. Our results demonstrate how the functional specificity of the GM correlates with certain environment and lifestyle factors and how complexity from the exogenous environment can be balanced by endogenous homeostasis. The Hadza gut metagenome structure allows us to appreciate the co-adaptive functional role of the GM in complementing the human physiology, providing a better understanding of the versatility of human life and subsistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating shellfish gathering ( Lucina pectinata) in a tropical mangrove system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinelli, S. F.; Barros, F.

    2010-10-01

    Fish resources are important sources of income and protein to traditional inhabitants of coastal zones. In Garapuá village, the shellfish Lucina pectinata is the main resource exploited in mangroves. This study tests whether if in less explored areas (far from the village) L. pectinata individuals have higher densities and greater lengths, and if there was a decrease in cpue's over the last years. Samples were taken monthly in two habitats (mangrove channels and mangrove roots) in six mangrove areas by random squares. The results indicated that closer areas showed significantly lower densities than areas far from the village. Densities were significantly higher in mangrove roots (quizangas) than at channels. There was a significant increase in monthly L. pectinata cpue, from 18.2 dz./shellfish gatherers/day in 2001 to 19.3 in 2007, showing that this stock does not seem to be overexploited. However, (i) a long-term monitoring of Garapuá shellfish gatherers to evaluate if the stock will support an increasing pressure and (ii) several manipulative experiments to better understand ecological processes are suggested.

  9. Executing a gather operation on a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN

    2012-03-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for executing a gather operation on a parallel computer according to embodiments of the present invention. Embodiments include configuring, by the logical root, a result buffer or the logical root, the result buffer having positions, each position corresponding to a ranked node in the operational group and for storing contribution data gathered from that ranked node. Embodiments also include repeatedly for each position in the result buffer: determining, by each compute node of an operational group, whether the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, if the current position in the result buffer corresponds with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, the compute node's contribution data, if the current position in the result buffer does not correspond with the rank of the compute node, contributing, by that compute node, a value of zero for the contribution data, and storing, by the logical root in the current position in the result buffer, results of a bitwise OR operation of all the contribution data by all compute nodes of the operational group for the current position, the results received through the global combining network.

  10. Image gathering and digital restoration for fidelity and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1991-01-01

    The fidelity and resolution of the traditional Wiener restorations given in the prevalent digital processing literature can be significantly improved when the transformations between the continuous and discrete representations in image gathering and display are accounted for. However, the visual quality of these improved restorations also is more sensitive to the defects caused by aliasing artifacts, colored noise, and ringing near sharp edges. In this paper, these visual defects are characterized, and methods for suppressing them are presented. It is demonstrated how the visual quality of fidelity-maximized images can be improved when (1) the image-gathering system is specifically designed to enhance the performance of the image-restoration algorithm, and (2) the Wiener filter is combined with interactive Gaussian smoothing, synthetic high edge enhancement, and nonlinear tone-scale transformation. The nonlinear transformation is used primarily to enhance the spatial details that are often obscurred when the normally wide dynamic range of natural radiance fields is compressed into the relatively narrow dynamic range of film and other displays.

  11. Cooperative breeding in South American hunter–gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A. Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary researchers have recently suggested that pre-modern human societies habitually practised cooperative breeding and that this feature helps explain human prosocial tendencies. Despite circumstantial evidence that post-reproductive females and extra-pair males both provide resources required for successful reproduction by mated pairs, no study has yet provided details about the flow of food resources by different age and sex categories to breeders and offspring, nor documented the ratio of helpers to breeders. Here, we show in two hunter–gatherer societies of South America that each breeding pair with dependent offspring on average obtained help from approximately 1.3 non-reproductive adults. Young married males and unmarried males of all ages were the main food providers, accounting for 93–100% of all excess food production available to breeding pairs and their offspring. Thus, each breeding pair with dependants was provisioned on average by 0.8 adult male helpers. The data provide no support for the hypothesis that post-reproductive females are the main provisioners of younger reproductive-aged kin in hunter–gatherer societies. Demographic and food acquisition data show that most breeding pairs can expect food deficits owing to foraging luck, health disabilities and accumulating dependency ratio of offspring in middle age, and that extra-pair provisioning may be essential to the evolved human life history. PMID:19692401

  12. Improvement in pump function with endocardial biventricular pacing increases with activation time at the left ventricular pacing site in failing canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Howard, Elliot J; Covell, James W; Mulligan, Lawrence J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Omens, Jeffrey H; Kerckhoffs, Roy C P

    2011-10-01

    Recently, attention has been focused on comparing left ventricular (LV) endocardial (ENDO) with epicardial (EPI) pacing for cardiac resynchronization therapy. However, the effects of ENDO and EPI lead placement at multiple sites have not been studied in failing hearts. We hypothesized that differences in the improvement of ventricular function due to ENDO vs. EPI pacing in dyssynchronous (DYSS) heart failure may depend on the position of the LV lead in relation to the original activation pattern. In six nonfailing and six failing dogs, electrical DYSS was created by atrioventricular sequential pacing of the right ventricular apex. ENDO was compared with EPI biventricular pacing at five LV sites. In failing hearts, increases in the maximum rate of LV pressure change (dP/dt; r = 0.64), ejection fraction (r = 0.49), and minimum dP/dt (r = 0.51), relative to DYSS, were positively correlated (P < 0.01) with activation time at the LV pacing site during ENDO but not EPI pacing. ENDO pacing at sites with longer activation delays led to greater improvements in hemodynamic parameters and was associated with an overall reduction in electrical DYSS compared with EPI pacing (P < 0.05). These findings were qualitatively similar for nonfailing hearts. Improvement in hemodynamic function increased with activation time at the LV pacing site during ENDO but not EPI pacing. At the anterolateral wall, end-systolic transmural function was greater with local ENDO compared with EPI pacing. ENDO pacing and intrinsic activation delay may have important implications for management of DYSS heart failure.

  13. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Meredith L; Raudenbush, Stephen W; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES], parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n = 62) and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low-SES backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness and may help identify children at risk for starting behind.

  14. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Alexis R

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed “exercise-induced pain”. Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. PMID:25228823

  15. Biventricular pacing as bridge to rapid recovery in infancy.

    PubMed

    Dragulescu, Andreea; Bilska, Karolina; Van Doorn, Catharina; Goldman, Allan; Marek, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The authors present the unique case of an 8-month-old baby diagnosed with severe left ventricular failure of unknown etiology. Due to a lack of organ availability for this age, a mechanical assist device and assessment for cardiac transplantation were not offered. Subsequent comprehensive echocardiographic dyssynchrony assessment and the presence of left bundle branch block were suggestive of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. Dual-chamber epicardial pacing was initiated, resulting in prompt marked clinical and echocardiographic improvement, which continued until complete normalization of cardiac function. The pacing system was safely turned off 6 months after its implantation. In conclusion, cardiac resynchronization therapy should be considered as a treatment option even in infancy, regardless of the etiology of disease and/or patient age. 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimal pacing for running 400- and 800-m track races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, James

    2013-06-01

    We present a toy model of anaerobic glycolysis that utilizes appropriate physiological and mathematical consideration while remaining useful to the athlete. The toy model produces an optimal pacing strategy for 400-m and 800-m races that is analytically calculated via the Euler-Lagrange equation. The calculation of the optimum v(t) is presented in detail, with an emphasis on intuitive arguments in order to serve as a bridge between the basic techniques presented in undergraduate physics textbooks and the more advanced techniques of control theory. Observed pacing strategies in 400-m and 800-m world-record races are found to be well-fit by the toy model, which allows us to draw a new physiological interpretation for the advantages of common weight-training practices.

  17. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  18. Endocardial left ventricular pacing after accidental aortic wall perforation.

    PubMed

    Şoşdean, Raluca; Enache, Bogdan; Macarie, Răzvan Ioan; Pescariu, Sorin

    2016-03-01

    Inadvertent endocardial placement of a pacing lead in the left ventricle through the aortic valve is a rare complication with an unknown incidence because of inadequate reporting. Reported cases are usually the result of lead insertion via the subclavian artery. A possible but very unusual situation is endocardial lead insertion in the left ventricle after aortic arch perforation. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman in whom a screw-in pacing lead accidentally perforated the aortic arch and continued its way through the ascending aorta, aortic valve and left ventricle, after insertion through the left subclavian vein. We describe how this complication was diagnosed, the predisposing factors, the risks it carries and the ways in which devastating consequences have so far been avoided, as the patient refused any surgical intervention including lead removal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier España.

  19. Systemic venous atrium stimulation in transvenous pacing after mustard procedure

    PubMed Central

    Puntrello, Calogero; Lucà, Fabiana; Rubino, Gaspare; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Gelsomino, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young woman corrected with a Mustard procedure undergoing successful transvenous double chamber pacemaker implantation with the atrial lead placed in the systemic venous channel. The case presented demonstrates that, when the systemic venous atrium is separate from the left atrial appendage, the lead can be easily and safely placed in the systemic venous left atrium gaining satisfactory sensing and pacing thresholds despite consisting partially of pericardial tissue. PMID:25276305

  20. Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Understanding the factors driving innovation in energy technologies is of critical importance to mitigating climate change and...addressing other energy-related global challenges. Low levels of innovation , measured in terms of energy patent filings, were noted in the 1980s and...release; distribution is unlimited. Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies The views, opinions and/or findings contained in

  1. What skills are tested in the new PACES examination?

    PubMed

    Elder, Andrew; McManus, Chris; McAlpine, Lawrence; Dacre, Jane

    2011-03-01

    The MRCP(UK) PACES examination has been sat by almost 40,000 candidates in 10 countries around the world since its introduction in 2001. The examination assesses skills of relevance to the practice and delivery of high quality clinical care and is the leading international postgraduate summative assessment of this kind. In 2009, the examination was revised, and this article describes those revisions, focussing on the clinical skills assessed.

  2. A new orthogonal lead for P synchronous pacing.

    PubMed

    Goldreyer, B N; Olive, A L; Leslie, J; Cannom, D S; Wyman, M G

    1981-11-01

    P synchronous pacing has long been identified as advantageous for patients with atrioventricular conduction defects and intact sinus node function. Prior endocavitary systems have been infrequently employed, because of unreliable P wave sensing from standard ring electrodes in the atrium or the requirement for a second atrial sensing lead. A single endocardial lead employing a unipolar ventricular stimulating electrode and an orthogonal P wave sensing design was developed and tested in 22 patients undergoing electrophysiologic study or pacemaker implantation. Thirteen centimeters from the stimulating tip of a standard permanent pacing lead, three or four electrodes with a surface area of one millimeter squared, equidistant from the tip, were placed circumferentially about the catheter. With the catheter tip normally placed in the right ventricular apex, atrial sensing electrodes were positioned in the mid-high lateral right atrium, adjacent to, but not affixed to, the right atrial wall. Bipolar orthogonal leads X and Y were obtained. In 22 patients, during sinus rhythm, atrial electrogram voltages in the X axis of 2.47 plus or minus 1.6 millivolts and 2.32 plus or minus 1.6 millivolts in the Y axis were recorded. QRS voltages of 0.078 millivolts and 0.073 millivolts, respectively, allowed dramatic ability to discriminate P from QRS complexes (P/QRS equals 32/1). There was no change in QRS or unipolar ventricular pacing. A single catheter designed for P synchronous pacing employing circumferentially placed atrial sensing electrodes has demonstrated unique atrial sensing voltages with excellent QRS signal rejection.

  3. Acute effect of DDD versus VVI pacing on arterial distensibility.

    PubMed

    Altun, Armagan; Erdogan, Okan; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a new technique and frequently used today to determine the elastic distensibility of great arteries. Increased arterial stiffness and PWV have been proposed as possible mechanisms in the initiation and/or progression and/or complications of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We evaluated the acute effect of two frequently used pacing modes (DDD vs. VVI) on arterial distensibility using PWV. Seventeen patients (age, 56 +/- 14 years) implanted with DDD pacemakers were included in the study. All patients were pacemaker dependent and continuously paced at the programmed rate. PWV was measured first in DDD mode, and then the mode was switched to VVI, and PWV was measured again at the same programmed heart rate as in the DDD mode. Although systolic blood pressure significantly decreased from 129 +/- 18 to 119 +/- 16 mm Hg (p = 0.001) after switching the mode from DDD to VVI, diastolic blood pressure (81 +/- 12 vs. 80 +/- 13 mm Hg; p = 0.38) did not change. In addition, PWV significantly increased from 11 +/- 2.46 m/s in DDD mode to 11.29 +/- 2.43 m/s (p = 0.01) after having been programmed to VVI mode. Our results suggest that VVI pacing increases PWV, and therefore decreases arterial distensibility, and thus may contribute to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Unilateral Laryngeal Pacing System and Its Functional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiping; Peng, Weiwei; Zhang, Fei; Shi, Baker Y.

    2017-01-01

    Goal. To establish a reliable instrumental system for synchronized reactivation of a unilaterally paralyzed vocal fold and evaluate its functional feasibility. Methods. Unilateral vocal fold paralysis model was induced by destruction of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in anesthetized dogs. With a micro controller-based electronic system, electromyography (EMG) signals from cricothyroid (CT) muscle on the ipsilateral side were recorded and used to trigger pacing of paralyzed vocalis muscles. The dynamic movement of vocal folds was continuously monitored using an endoscope, and the opening and closing of the glottis were quantified with customized imaging processing software. Results. The recorded video images showed that left side vocal fold was obviously paralyzed after destructing the RLN. Using the pacing system with feedback triggering EMG signals from the ipsilateral CT muscle, the paralyzed vocal fold was successfully reactivated, and its movement was shown to be synchronized with the healthy side. Significance. The developed unilateral laryngeal pacing system triggered by EMG from the ipsilateral side CT muscle could be successfully used in unilateral vocal fold paralysis with the advantage of avoiding disturbance to the healthy side muscles. PMID:28203464

  5. Tropical birds have a slow pace of life

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Popko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Walker, Amy; Williams, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Tropical birds are relatively long-lived and produce few offspring, which develop slowly and mature relatively late in life, the slow end of the life-history axis, whereas temperate birds lie at the opposite end of this continuum. We tested the hypothesis that tropical birds have evolved a reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR). We measured BMR of 69 species of tropical birds, the largest data set amassed on metabolic rates of tropical birds, and compared these measurements with 59 estimates of BMR for temperate birds. Our analyses included conventional least squares regression, regressions based on phylogenetic independent contrasts, and a comparison of BMR of 13 phylogenetically matched pairs, one species from the tropics and one from northerly temperate areas. Our triptych showed that tropical birds had a reduced BMR, compelling evidence for a connection between the life history of tropical birds and a slow pace of life. Further, tropical migrants breeding in temperate habitats had a lower BMR than did temperate residents, suggesting that these migrants have physiological traits consistent with a slow pace of life. In addition, we determined that tropical birds had a lower cold-induced peak metabolic rate and thermogenic metabolic scope than temperate species, a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis that their environment has not selected for high levels of thermogenesis, or alternatively, that a slow pace of life may be incompatible with high thermogenic capacity. We conclude that physiological function correlates with the suite of life-history traits. PMID:17517640

  6. Combined obliquity and precession pacing of late Pleistocene deglaciations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter

    2011-12-08

    Milankovitch proposed that Earth resides in an interglacial state when its spin axis both tilts to a high obliquity and precesses to align the Northern Hemisphere summer with Earth's nearest approach to the Sun. This general concept has been elaborated into hypotheses that precession, obliquity or combinations of both could pace deglaciations during the late Pleistocene. Earlier tests have shown that obliquity paces the late Pleistocene glacial cycles but have been inconclusive with regard to precession, whose shorter period of about 20,000 years makes phasing more sensitive to timing errors. No quantitative test has provided firm evidence for a dual effect. Here I show that both obliquity and precession pace late Pleistocene glacial cycles. Deficiencies in time control that have long stymied efforts to establish orbital effects on deglaciation are overcome using a new statistical test that focuses on maxima in orbital forcing. The results are fully consistent with Milankovitch's proposal but also admit the possibility that long Southern Hemisphere summers contribute to deglaciation.

  7. Pacing and awareness: brain regulation of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A M; Polman, R C J

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this current opinion article is to provide a contemporary perspective on the role of brain regulatory control of paced performances in response to exercise challenges. There has been considerable recent conjecture as to the role of the brain during exercise, and it is now broadly accepted that fatigue does not occur without brain involvement and that all voluntary activity is likely to be paced at some level by the brain according to individualised priorities and knowledge of personal capabilities. This article examines the role of pacing in managing and distributing effort to successfully accomplish physical tasks, while extending existing theories on the role of the brain as a central controller of performance. The opinion proposed in this article is that a central regulator operates to control exercise performance but achieves this without the requirement of an intelligent central governor located in the subconscious brain. It seems likely that brain regulation operates at different levels of awareness, such that minor homeostatic challenges are addressed automatically without conscious awareness, while larger metabolic disturbances attract conscious awareness and evoke a behavioural response. This supports the view that the brain regulates exercise performance but that the interpretation of the mechanisms underlying this effect have not yet been fully elucidated.

  8. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Andrew J.; Thurman, Andrew S.; Maher, Michael J.; Wilson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44 803 racehorses, once per second, in 3 357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9–292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s−1. The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their ‘front-running’ or ‘chaser’ personality traits. PMID:22399784

  9. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing.

    PubMed

    Spence, Andrew J; Thurman, Andrew S; Maher, Michael J; Wilson, Alan M

    2012-08-23

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44,803 racehorses, once per second, in 3,357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9-292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s(-1). The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their 'front-running' or 'chaser' personality traits.

  10. Detecting Disease Outbreaks in Mass Gatherings Using Internet Data

    PubMed Central

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Cox, Ingemar J; McKendry, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Background Mass gatherings, such as music festivals and religious events, pose a health care challenge because of the risk of transmission of communicable diseases. This is exacerbated by the fact that participants disperse soon after the gathering, potentially spreading disease within their communities. The dispersion of participants also poses a challenge for traditional surveillance methods. The ubiquitous use of the Internet may enable the detection of disease outbreaks through analysis of data generated by users during events and shortly thereafter. Objective The intent of the study was to develop algorithms that can alert to possible outbreaks of communicable diseases from Internet data, specifically Twitter and search engine queries. Methods We extracted all Twitter postings and queries made to the Bing search engine by users who repeatedly mentioned one of nine major music festivals held in the United Kingdom and one religious event (the Hajj in Mecca) during 2012, for a period of 30 days and after each festival. We analyzed these data using three methods, two of which compared words associated with disease symptoms before and after the time of the festival, and one that compared the frequency of these words with those of other users in the United Kingdom in the days following the festivals. Results The data comprised, on average, 7.5 million tweets made by 12,163 users, and 32,143 queries made by 1756 users from each festival. Our methods indicated the statistically significant appearance of a disease symptom in two of the nine festivals. For example, cough was detected at higher than expected levels following the Wakestock festival. Statistically significant agreement (chi-square test, P<.01) between methods and across data sources was found where a statistically significant symptom was detected. Anecdotal evidence suggests that symptoms detected are indeed indicative of a disease that some users attributed to being at the festival. Conclusions Our work

  11. The STS-98 crew gathers at the launch pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Looking relaxed and happy one day before launch, the STS-98 crew gather at Launch Pad 39A. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them can be seen the Fixed Service Structure, with its 80-foot lightning rod, where Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for launch. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the first Shuttle mission of the year. On the mission, the crew will deliver the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to the growing Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node using the Shuttle'''s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work. The 11-day STS-98 mission is scheduled to launch Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST, with a planned KSC landing about 1:39 p.m. on Feb. 18.

  12. Validation of a modified Medical Resource Model for mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wayne P; Tuffin, Heather; Stratton, Samuel J; Wallis, Lee A

    2013-02-01

    A modified Medical Resource Model to predict the medical resources required at mass gatherings based on the risk profile of events has been developed. This study was undertaken to validate this tool using data from events held in both a developed and a developing country. A retrospective study was conducted utilizing prospectively gathered data from individual events at Old Trafford Stadium in Manchester, United Kingdom, and Ellis Park Stadium, Johannesburg, South Africa. Both stadia are similar in design and spectator capacity. Data for Professional Football as well as Rugby League and Rugby Union (respectively) matches were used for the study. The medical resources predicted for the events were determined by entering the risk profile of each of the events into the Medical Resource Model. A recently developed South African tool was used to predetermine medical staffing for mass gatherings. For the study, the medical resources actually required to deal with the patient load for events within the control sample from the two stadia were compared with the number of needed resources predicted by the Medical Resource Model when that tool was applied retrospectively to the study events. The comparison was used to determine if the newly developed tool was either over- or under-predicting the resource requirements. In the case of Ellis Park, the model under-predicted the basic life support (BLS) requirement for 1.5% of the events in the data set. Mean over-prediction was 209.1 minutes for BLS availability. Old Trafford displayed no events for which the Medical Resource Model would have under-predicted. The mean over-prediction of BLS availability for Old Trafford was 671.6 minutes. The intermediate life support (ILS) requirement for Ellis Park was under-predicted for seven of the total 66 events (10.6% of the events), all of which had one factor in common, that being relatively low spectator attendance numbers. Modelling for ILS at Old Trafford did not under-predict for

  13. Gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers

    PubMed Central

    Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Basaglia, Giulia; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; De Bellis, Gianluca; Luiselli, Donata; Brigidi, Patrizia; Mabulla, Audax; Marlowe, Frank; Henry, Amanda G.; Crittenden, Alyssa N.

    2014-01-01

    Human gut microbiota directly influences health and provides an extra means of adaptive potential to different lifestyles. To explore variation in gut microbiota and to understand how these bacteria may have co-evolved with humans, here we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolite production of the gut microbiota from a community of human hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. We show that the Hadza have higher levels of microbial richness and biodiversity than Italian urban controls. Further comparisons with two rural farming African groups illustrate other features unique to Hadza that can be linked to a foraging lifestyle. These include absence of Bifidobacterium and differences in microbial composition between the sexes that probably reflect sexual division of labour. Furthermore, enrichment in Prevotella, Treponema and unclassified Bacteroidetes, as well as a peculiar arrangement of Clostridiales taxa, may enhance the Hadza’s ability to digest and extract valuable nutrition from fibrous plant foods. PMID:24736369

  14. Last hunter-gatherers and first farmers of Europe.

    PubMed

    Tresset, Anne; Vigne, Jean-Denis

    2011-03-01

    The Neolithisation of Europe has seen the transformation of hunting-gathering societies into farming communities. At least partly exogenous in its origins, this process led to major transformations in many aspects of life-styles, such as social structures, land use or diet. It involved the arrival of new human populations and gave way to the importation, intentional or unwanted of many non-European animal and plant species. It also provoked important changes in interactions between humans and natural environments. In many respects, it set the foundations of long-term European peasantry developments and prefigured later agropastoral colonizations. As such, it must be seen as a major turning point in the history of European populations. Copyright © 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. STS-93 crew gather for breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X- ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission.

  16. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  17. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-12-02

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby. 9 figs.

  18. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1989-01-24

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby. 9 figs.

  19. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing outgoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  20. Remote multi-position information gathering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for gathering specific information from various remote locations, especially fluorimetric information characteristic of particular materials at the various locations is disclosed herein. This technique uses a single source of light disposed at still a different, central location and an overall optical network including an arrangement of optical fibers cooperating with the light source for directing individual light beams into the different information bearing locations. The incoming light beams result in corresponding displays of light, e.g., fluorescent light, containing the information to be obtained. The optical network cooperates with these light displays at the various locations for directing ongoing light beams containing the same information as their cooperating displays from these locations to the central location. Each of these outgoing beams is applied to a detection arrangement, e.g., a fluorescence spectroscope, for retrieving the information contained thereby.

  1. Gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Stephanie L; Candela, Marco; Rampelli, Simone; Centanni, Manuela; Consolandi, Clarissa; Basaglia, Giulia; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; De Bellis, Gianluca; Luiselli, Donata; Brigidi, Patrizia; Mabulla, Audax; Marlowe, Frank; Henry, Amanda G; Crittenden, Alyssa N

    2014-04-15

    Human gut microbiota directly influences health and provides an extra means of adaptive potential to different lifestyles. To explore variation in gut microbiota and to understand how these bacteria may have co-evolved with humans, here we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and metabolite production of the gut microbiota from a community of human hunter-gatherers, the Hadza of Tanzania. We show that the Hadza have higher levels of microbial richness and biodiversity than Italian urban controls. Further comparisons with two rural farming African groups illustrate other features unique to Hadza that can be linked to a foraging lifestyle. These include absence of Bifidobacterium and differences in microbial composition between the sexes that probably reflect sexual division of labour. Furthermore, enrichment in Prevotella, Treponema and unclassified Bacteroidetes, as well as a peculiar arrangement of Clostridiales taxa, may enhance the Hadza's ability to digest and extract valuable nutrition from fibrous plant foods.

  2. Willets gather in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  3. Digital image gathering and minimum mean-square error restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    Most digital image restoration algorithms are inherently incomplete because they are conditioned on a discrete-input, discrete-output model which only accounts for blurring during image gathering and additive noise. For those restoration applications where sampling and reconstruction are important, the restoration algorithm should be based on a more comprehensive end-to-end model which also accounts for the potentially important noiselike effects of aliasing and the low-pass filtering effects of interpolative reconstruction. It is demonstrated that although the mathematics of this more comprehensive model is more complex, the increase in complexity is not so great as to prevent a complete development and analysis of the associated minimum mean-square error (Wiener) restoration filter.

  4. Costs and benefits in hunter-gatherer punishment.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Hunter-gatherer punishment involves costs and benefits to individuals and groups, but the costs do not necessarily fit with the assumptions made in models that consider punishment to be altruistic--which brings in the free-rider problem and the problem of second-order free-riders. In this commentary, I present foragers' capital punishment patterns ethnographically, in the interest of establishing whether such punishment is likely to be costly; and I suggest that in many cases abstentions from punishment that might be taken as defections by free-riders are actually caused by social-structural considerations rather than being an effect of free-rider genes. This presentation of data supplements the ethnographic analysis provided by Guala.

  5. Curation of Microscopic Astromaterials by NASA: "Gathering Dust Since 1981"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, D. R.; Bastien, R. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Employing the philosophy that "Small is Beautiful", NASA has been collecting and curating microscopic astromaterials since 1981. These active collections now include interplanetary dust collected in Earth's stratosphere by U-2, ER-2 and WB-57F aircraft (the Cosmic Dust Program - our motto is "Gathering dust since 1981"), comet Wild-2 coma dust (the Stardust Mission), modern interstellar dust (also the Stardust Mission), asteroid Itokawa regolith dust (the Hayabusa Mission - joint curation with JAXA-ISAS), and interplanetary dust impact features on recovered portions of the following spacecraft: Skylab, the Solar Maximum Satellite, the Palapa Satellite, the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), the MIR Space Station, the International Space Station, and the Hubble Space Telescope (all in the Space Exposed Hardware Laboratory).

  6. Food Sharing among Hadza Hunter-Gatherer Children.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Alyssa N; Zes, David A

    2015-01-01

    Human prosociality is one of the defining characteristics of our species, yet the ontogeny of altruistic behavior remains poorly understood. The evolution of widespread food sharing in humans helped shape cooperation, family formation, life history, language, and the development of economies of scale. While the behavioral and ecological correlates of food sharing among adults are widely studied, very little is known about food sharing among children. Here, in the first study to analyze the food sharing patterns of hunter-gatherer children, we show that while sharing may be biased towards kin, reciprocity characterizes the majority of all sharing dyads, both related and unrelated. These data lend support to the recent claim that discrimination among kin might be linked with reciprocal altruism theory. Furthermore, we show that age positively correlates with an increase in sharing, both in frequency and amount, supporting recent suggestions that prosocial behaviors and egalitarianism develop strongly in middle childhood when children acquire the normative rules of their society.

  7. Willets gather in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  8. Using the Web for Competitive Intelligence (CI) Gathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George

    2002-01-01

    Businesses use the Internet as a way to communicate company information as a way of engaging their customers. As the use of the Web for business transactions and advertising grows, so too, does the amount of useful information for practitioners of competitive intelligence (CI). CI is the legal and ethical practice of information gathering about competitors and the marketplace. Information sources like company webpages, online newspapers and news organizations, electronic journal articles and reports, and Internet search engines allow CI practitioners analyze company strengths and weaknesses for their customers. More company and marketplace information than ever is available on the Internet and a lot of it is free. Companies should view the Web not only as a business tool but also as a source of competitive intelligence. In a highly competitive marketplace can any organization afford to ignore information about the other players and customers in that same marketplace?

  9. Digital image gathering and minimum mean-square error restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    Most digital image restoration algorithms are inherently incomplete because they are conditioned on a discrete-input, discrete-output model which only accounts for blurring during image gathering and additive noise. For those restoration applications where sampling and reconstruction are important, the restoration algorithm should be based on a more comprehensive end-to-end model which also accounts for the potentially important noiselike effects of aliasing and the low-pass filtering effects of interpolative reconstruction. It is demonstrated that although the mathematics of this more comprehensive model is more complex, the increase in complexity is not so great as to prevent a complete development and analysis of the associated minimum mean-square error (Wiener) restoration filter.

  10. The benefits of biventricular pacing in heart failure patients with narrow QRS, NYHA class II and right ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth; Kedia, Navin; Martin, David; Tchou, Patrick; Natale, Andrea; Wilkoff, Bruce; Starling, Randall; Grimm, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    To identify subgroups of heart failure patients who might benefit from biventricular pacing. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves the quality of life, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, and exercise capacity and decreases hospitalizations for heart failure for patients who have severe heart failure and a wide QRS. It is unclear if other populations of heart failure patients would benefit from CRT. One hundred forty-four consecutive heart failure patients who underwent CRT and completed 3 months of follow-up were reviewed. Demographic, echocardiographic, electrocardiographic, and clinical outcome data were analyzed to assess the relationship of functional class and QRS duration before device implantation to postimplant outcomes. There were 20, 88, and 36 patients in NYHA functional class II, III, and IV, respectively. Thirty-four patients had right ventricular pacing and another 29 patients had a QRS duration < or = 150 ms. Patients who were in NYHA functional class II at baseline had significant improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction and indices of left ventricular remodeling after CRT. Similar significant findings were seen in the subgroup with right ventricular pacing at baseline after CRT. However, in the subgroup with a narrow QRS duration, there were no significant changes in the indices of left ventricular remodeling or in the NYHA functional class and there was a significant increase in the QRS duration. For the study cohort as a whole, an improvement in NYHA functional class after CRT correlated with a significant decrease in adverse clinical outcomes. Heart failure patients who were in NYHA functional class II and those with right ventricular pacing appeared to benefit from CRT.

  11. Prevention of influenza at Hajj: applications for mass gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Elizabeth; Barasheed, Osamah; Memish, Ziad A; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Summary Outbreaks of infectious diseases that spread via respiratory route, e.g. influenza, are common amongst Hajj congregation in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The Saudi Arabian authority successfully organized the Hajj 2009 amidst fear of pandemic influenza. While severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was rare, the true burden of pandemic influenza at Hajj that year remains speculative. In this article we review the latest evidence on influenza control and discuss our experience of influenza and its prevention at Hajj and possible application to other mass gatherings. Depending on study design the attack rate of seasonal influenza at Hajj has ranged from 6% in polymerase chain reaction or culture confirmed studies to 38% in serological surveillance. No significant effect of influenza vaccine or the use of personal protective measures against influenza has been established from observational studies, although the uptake of the vaccine and adherence to face masks and hand hygiene has been low. In all, there is a relatively poor evidence base for control of influenza. Until better evidence is obtained, vaccination coupled with rapid antiviral treatment of symptomatic individuals remains the mainstay of prevention at Hajj and other mass gatherings. Hajj pilgrimage provides a unique opportunity to test the effectiveness of various preventive measures that require a large sample size, such as testing the efficacy of plain surgical masks against laboratory-confirmed influenza. After successful completion of a pilot trial conducted among Australian pilgrims at the 2011 Hajj, a large multinational cluster randomized controlled trial is being planned. This will require effective international collaboration. PMID:23761581

  12. Method for determining automatic external defibrillator need at mass gatherings.

    PubMed

    Motyka, Tracy M; Winslow, James E; Newton, Kelly; Brice, Jane H

    2005-06-01

    A method for determining the number of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) required for a 3-min response at mass gatherings has been described previously. Our study sought to modify the method, replicate it, then validate the results. Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) were timed walking defined courses in a football stadium. Velocities were obtained for a horizontal distance and ascending/descending upper and lower decks. This was replicated in a basketball arena. To validate, actual response times were compared to predicted times for predetermined distances in each venue. Predicted response times were calculated using the second standard deviation velocities as the most pessimistic. Numbers of AEDs needed were calculated using predicted response times for each venue's longest distance. Average velocities in m/s (football) were horizontal 1.7, lower deck 1.6 ascending and 1.4 descending, upper deck 1.0 ascending and 1.1 descending. Average velocities (basketball) were horizontal 1.7, lower deck 1.2 ascending and descending, upper deck 0.9 ascending and descending. In the validation phase, every EMT completed the four predetermined courses within the predicted intervals. Predicted response times were 363 s for the longest football stadium distance, and 187 s for the basketball arena. For a 3-min (180 s) response, the number of AEDs required can be calculated. This method was easily replicated and appears to be useful for determining the number of AEDs at mass gatherings. The number of AEDs needed for any desired response interval can be calculated using the predicted response time for the longest distance within an arena.

  13. Closed-loop cardiac pacing vs. conventional dual-chamber pacing with specialized sensing and pacing algorithms for syncope prevention in patients with refractory vasovagal syncope: results of a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Pietro; Zaccaria, Maria; Luzzi, Giovanni; Nacci, Frida; Anaclerio, Matteo; Favale, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    Closed-loop stimulation (CLS) pacing has shown greater efficacy in preventing the recurrence of vasovagal syncope (VVS) in patients with a cardioinhibitory response to head-up tilt test (HUTT) compared with conventional pacing. Moreover, there is no conclusive evidence to support the superiority of CLS over the conventional algorithms for syncope prevention. This study retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of CLS pacing compared with dual-chamber pacing with conventional specialized sensing and pacing algorithms for syncope prevention in the prevention of syncope recurrence in patients with refractory VVS and a cardioinhibitory response to HUTT during a long-term follow-up. Forty-one patients (44% male, 53 ± 16 years) with recurrent, refractory VVS (26% with trauma) and a cardioinhibitory response to HUTT who had undergone pacemaker implantation were included in the analysis. Twenty-five patients received a dual-chamber CLS pacemaker (CLS group) and 16 patients received a dual-chamber pacemaker with conventional algorithms for syncope prevention (conventional pacing group): 9 patients with Medtronic rate drop response algorithm and 7 patients with Guidant-Boston Scientific sudden brady response algorithm. During the follow-up (mean 4.4 ± 3.0 years, interquartile range 2.2-7.4 years) one patient (4%) in the CLS group and six (38%) in the conventional pacing group had syncope recurrences (P= 0.016). The Kaplan-Meier actuarial estimate of first recurrence of syncope after 8 years was 4% in the CLS group and 40% in the conventional pacing group (P= 0.010). The results of this retrospective analysis show that, in order to prevent a recurrence of VVS in patients with a cardioinhibitory response to HUTT, dual-chamber CLS pacing was more effective than dual-chamber pacing with conventional algorithms for syncope prevention in preventing bradycardia-related syncope.

  14. Feasibility of dual-chamber (DDD) pacing via a single-pass (VDD) pacing lead employing a floating atrial ring (dipole): case series, future considerations, and refinements.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, John; Voigt, Louis; Mongwa, Mbu; Reddy, C V R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of DDD pacing from a standard single-pass VDD pacemaker system. Over the past 2 decades significant advances have been made in the development of single-pass VDD pacing systems. These have been shown in long-term prospective studies to effectively preserve atrioventricular (AV)synchrony in patients with AV block and normal sinus node function. What remains problematic is the development of a single-pass pacing system capable of DDD pacing. Such a lead configuration would be useful in those patients with peripheral venous anomalies and in younger patients with congenital anomalies, which may require lead revisions in the future. In addition, with the increased use of resynchronization (biventricular pacing) therapy, the availability of a reliable single-pass lead will minimize operative time, enhance patient safety, and minimize the amount of hardware within the heart. The feasibility of DDD pacing via a Medtronic Capsure VDD-2 (Model #5038) pacing lead was evaluated. Twenty patients who presented with AV block and normal sinus node function were recruited for this study. Atrial pacing thresholds and sensitivities were assessed intraoperatively in the supine position with various respiratory maneuvers. Five patients who agreed to participate in long-term follow-up received a dual-chamber generator and were evaluated periodically over a 12-month period. Mean atrial sensitivity was 2.35 +/- 0.83 mV at the time of implantation. Effective atrial stimulation was possible in all patients at the time of implantation (mean stimulation threshold 3.08 +/- 1.04 V at 0.5 ms [bipolar], 3.34 +/- 0.95 V at 0.5 ms [unipolar]). Five of the 20 patients received a Kappa KDR701 generator, and atrial electrical properties were followed up over a 1-year period. There was no significant change in atrial pacing threshold or incidence of phrenic nerve stimulation over the 1-year follow-up. A standard single-pass VDD pacing lead

  15. Finding the sweet spot for non-apical RV pacing - "love's labor's lost or much ado about nothing:" a new angiographic technique to accomplish accurate physiological RV septal pacing in under 5 minutes from venous cannulation (or bust).

    PubMed

    Srivatsa, Sanjay S

    2014-03-01

    Right ventricular septal pacing has been long touted as a more physiologic alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. This article reviews the physiologic and clinical evidence for right ventricular septal versus apical pacing, and presents a novel angiographic technique for efficient attainment of the optimal septal pacing site. The reasons for equivocal clinical findings in septal versus apical pacing studies are discussed, and a new strategy for non-apical pacing clinical trial design utilizing comparative anatomic assessment of septal pacing site versus clinical outcome is proposed.

  16. Gathering “tea” – from necessity to connectedness with nature. Local knowledge about wild plant gathering in the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wild plant gathering is an essential element in livelihood strategies all over the world. However due to changing circumstances in Europe, the reason for gathering has altered from one of necessity in the past to a pleasurable activity today. Wild plant gathering has therefore also received renewed attention as a form of intangible cultural heritage expressing local preferences, habits and man’s relationship with nature. In the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria), local people’s knowledge of the gathering of wild plants and their perception of their own gathering activities are being documented. The focus of this paper is on the uses of herbal teas and the informal guidelines for gathering plants that have been issued by the Bergtee (mountain tea) association. Methods Thirty-six free-list interviews were conducted with subsequent semi-structured interviews and three focus group meetings held with members of the Bergtee association. Participatory observation (gathering and processing plants, mixing and marketing tea) also allowed for greater understanding of what had been reported. Results In total, 140 different gathered plant species were listed by respondents. Herbal tea is the most frequently mentioned use. The Bergtee association, founded by a young man and two middle-aged women in the valley, is a good example of the link between biological and cultural diversity, with the aim of sharing the biosphere reserve’s natural treasures as well as local plant-related knowledge in the form of herbal tea products. The association’s informal guidelines for gathering reflect people’s attitude to nature: monetary income does not play a major role in gathering plants; instead people’s appreciation of the value of the nature around them is to the fore. Conclusions Gathering wild plants can be seen as an expression of people’s regional identity. The conscious appreciation of nature and related local knowledge is crucial for the sustainable

  17. Gathering "tea"--from necessity to connectedness with nature. Local knowledge about wild plant gathering in the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria).

    PubMed

    Grasser, Susanne; Schunko, Christoph; Vogl, Christian R

    2012-08-13

    Wild plant gathering is an essential element in livelihood strategies all over the world. However due to changing circumstances in Europe, the reason for gathering has altered from one of necessity in the past to a pleasurable activity today. Wild plant gathering has therefore also received renewed attention as a form of intangible cultural heritage expressing local preferences, habits and man's relationship with nature. In the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal (Austria), local people's knowledge of the gathering of wild plants and their perception of their own gathering activities are being documented. The focus of this paper is on the uses of herbal teas and the informal guidelines for gathering plants that have been issued by the Bergtee (mountain tea) association. Thirty-six free-list interviews were conducted with subsequent semi-structured interviews and three focus group meetings held with members of the Bergtee association. Participatory observation (gathering and processing plants, mixing and marketing tea) also allowed for greater understanding of what had been reported. In total, 140 different gathered plant species were listed by respondents. Herbal tea is the most frequently mentioned use. The Bergtee association, founded by a young man and two middle-aged women in the valley, is a good example of the link between biological and cultural diversity, with the aim of sharing the biosphere reserve's natural treasures as well as local plant-related knowledge in the form of herbal tea products. The association's informal guidelines for gathering reflect people's attitude to nature: monetary income does not play a major role in gathering plants; instead people's appreciation of the value of the nature around them is to the fore. Gathering wild plants can be seen as an expression of people's regional identity. The conscious appreciation of nature and related local knowledge is crucial for the sustainable conservation and use of the Biosphere Reserve

  18. Information gathering over time by breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Satterlund, Melisa J; McCaul, Kevin D; Sandgren, Ann K

    2003-01-01

    Unlike many patients of the past, today's health-care users want to become more informed about their illnesses, and they want the most current information. The Internet has become a popular way to access current information, and since its introduction more people are turning to it to find medical information. Studies report that anywhere from 36% to 55% of the American population that use the Internet is using the Internet to research medical information, and these percentages have been rising. Cancer is 1 of the top 2 diseases about which people seek information on the Internet. Some studies have specifically asked whether breast cancer patients access the Internet for medical information; estimates range from 10% to 43% of breast cancer patients who use the Internet, with higher usage being associated with more education, greater income, and younger age. To identify where breast cancer patients find medical information about their illness and to track changes over time, from active treatment to survivorship status. Participants were 224 women who had been recently diagnosed with Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III breast cancer. Each woman was contacted approximately 8 months and 16 months after diagnosis and was asked about 10 different information sources they could have used to obtain information or support about their breast cancer. Eight months after diagnosis, the top 3 information sources used by women were books (64%), the Internet (49%), and videos (41%). However, at follow-up (16 months after diagnosis), the most frequently cited information source was the Internet (40%), followed by books (33%), and the American Cancer Society (17%). We found that women continued to use the Internet as a means of gathering information even after their treatment ended. Significant unique predictors of Internet use were more years of formal education and younger ages. Cancer stage was not a significant predictor of Internet use. Previous research has been mixed about the

  19. An evaluation of 30-km cycling time trial (TT30) pacing strategy through time-to-exhaustion at average TT30 pace.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Knez, Wade L

    2009-05-01

    A paucity of research is available on the optimal pacing strategy for cycling events longer than 4 km. Anecdotal evidence suggests that an even pacing strategy is most suitable; however, controlled studies have only determined that a slow start is more suitable than a fast start pacing strategy. Currently, it is unclear which strategy is more effective for endurance cycling time trials. This study sought to identify differences in 30-km cycling time trial (TT30) performance related to pacing strategies by comparing individually chosen pacing strategy with time-to-exhaustion (TE) at the average power output achieved during TT30. Eight moderately trained male cyclists (Vo2max = 50.9 +/- 5.2 mlxkgxmin) performed 2 TT30 tests and 2 TE tests at the average power output of TT30 on a Velotron cycle ergometer at the same time of day, separated by at least 48 hours. During TT30, participants generally chose to use a 'fast start' pacing strategy, cycling at a speed relative to the TT average (TTAvg) of 103.1 +/- 2.2% during the first 5 km. There was no significant difference in performance time between the TE test and TT30. Starting pace (TT0-5) was significantly correlated with finishing pace (TT25-30) (r = -0.91; p < 0.01) and TE (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Subjects cycling at a relative starting speed (RS0-5) >105% had a significantly longer TE than subjects cycling at <105%, whereas TT30 performance time was not different between the two groups. The present investigation provided indirect evidence that a fast start pacing strategy decreases finishing speed and overall performance in TT30, and increased TT performance can be achieved by selecting a starting pace no more than 5% above TTAvg.

  20. Show & Tell: A Video Column / Don't Just Gather Data--Use It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Doug; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Schools are awash in data, and teachers are being asked to gather data in a myriad of high-tech and low-tech ways. But gathering is not analyzing, and without analysis there is little reason to gather the data in the first place. Teachers need data-collection systems that lend themselves to rapid analysis and action. This article presents several…

  1. Show & Tell: A Video Column / Don't Just Gather Data--Use It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Doug; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Schools are awash in data, and teachers are being asked to gather data in a myriad of high-tech and low-tech ways. But gathering is not analyzing, and without analysis there is little reason to gather the data in the first place. Teachers need data-collection systems that lend themselves to rapid analysis and action. This article presents several…

  2. A Description of Variability of Pacing in Marathon Distance Running

    PubMed Central

    HANEY, THOMAS A.; MERCER, JOHN A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to describe variability of pacing during a marathon and 2) to determine if there is a relationship between variability of pacing and marathon performance. Publically available personal global positioning system profiles from two marathons (Race 1 n = 116, Race 2 n = 169) were downloaded (http://connect.garmin.com) for analysis. The coefficient of variation of velocity (Velcov) was calculated for each profile. Each profile was categorized as finishing in under 3.9 hours, between 3.9 and 4.6 hours, or longer than 4.6 hours. Linear and quadratic lines of best fit were computed to describe the relationship between marathon finish time and Velcov. A 2 (Race) × 3 (bin) analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the dependent variable (Velcov) between races and the marathon bin finish times. Velcov was not influenced by the interaction of finish time bin and Race (p>0.05) and was not different between races (Race 1: 16.6 ± 6.4%, Race 2: 16.8 ± 6.6%, p>0.05). Velcov was different between finish time categories (p<0.05) for each race such that Velcov was lower for faster finish times. Using combined data from both races, linear (marathon finish time = marathon finish time = 0.09Velcov + 2.9, R^2 = 0.46) and quadratic (marathon finish time = −0.0006 Velcov 2 + 0.11 Velcov + 2.7, R^2 = 0.46) lines of best fit were significant (p<0.05). Slower marathon finishers had greater variability of pace compared to faster marathoner finishers. PMID:27182360

  3. Sequential biventricular pacing: evaluation of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Peter T; Sogaard, Peter; Mansour, Hassan; Ponsonaille, Jean; Gras, Daniel; Lazarus, Arnaud; Reiser, Wolfgang; Alonso, Christine; Linde, Cecilia M; Lunati, Maurizio; Kramm, Berthold; Harrison, E Mark

    2004-03-01

    The study evaluated the clinical safety, performance, and efficacy of sequential biventricular pacing in the InSync III (Model 8042) biventricular stimulator in a multicenter, prospective 3-month study and assessed the proper functioning of features aiming at improving biventricular AV therapy delivery. The system was successfully implanted in 189 (95.9%) of 198 patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure and a prolonged QRS complex duration. Patients significantly improved their 6-minute hall walk distance (baseline 339 +/- 92 vs 3-month 422 +/- 127 meter, P < 0.001) and NYHA class (baseline 3.1 +/- 0.5 vs 3-month 1.9 +/- 0.7, P < 0.001). Echocardiographic optimization of sequential biventricular pacing showed an improvement in stroke volume compared to simultaneous stimulation (sequential 68 +/- 24 mL vs simultaneous 56 +/- 23 mL, P < 0.001) at baseline and at 3 months. In 88% (30/34) of the patients these improvements were seen within a small range of V-V delays of +/-20 ms and in 94% (32/34) within V-V delays of +/-40 ms. In contrast, programming beyond this range reduced stroke volume below that during simultaneous biventricular pacing. The device functioned as expected. LV lead dislodgement was observed in 12 patients and phrenic nerve stimulation required lead repositioning in 2 patients. Eight patients died during the study. Patient survival at 3 and 6 months was 97 +/- 2% and 94 +/- 2%, respectively. Cause of death was cardiac (n = 7), heart failure related (n = 3), arrhythmia related (n = 2), and unknown (n = 2). In conclusion, this sequential biventricular pacemaker was safe and efficacious.

  4. Successful pacing using a batteryless sunlight-powered pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Schaerer, Jakob; Wagner, Joerg; Walpen, Sébastien; Huber, Christoph; Haeberlin, Heinrich; Fuhrer, Juerg; Vogel, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Today's cardiac pacemakers are powered by batteries with limited energy capacity. As the battery's lifetime ends, the pacemaker needs to be replaced. This surgical re-intervention is costly and bears the risk of complications. Thus, a pacemaker without primary batteries is desirable. The goal of this study was to test whether transcutaneous solar light could power a pacemaker. We used a three-step approach to investigate the feasibility of sunlight-powered cardiac pacing. First, the harvestable power was estimated. Theoretically, a subcutaneously implanted 1 cm(2) solar module may harvest ∼2500 µW from sunlight (3 mm implantation depth). Secondly, ex vivo measurements were performed with solar cells placed under pig skin flaps exposed to a solar simulator and real sunlight. Ex vivo measurements under real sunlight resulted in a median output power of 4941 µW/cm(2) [interquartile range (IQR) 3767-5598 µW/cm(2), median skin flap thickness 3.0 mm (IQR 2.7-3.3 mm)]. The output power strongly depended on implantation depth (ρSpearman = -0.86, P < 0.001). Finally, a batteryless single-chamber pacemaker powered by a 3.24 cm(2) solar module was implanted in vivo in a pig to measure output power and to pace. In vivo measurements showed a median output power of >3500 µW/cm(2) (skin flap thickness 2.8-3.84 mm). Successful batteryless VVI pacing using a subcutaneously implanted solar module was performed. Based on our results, we estimate that a few minutes of direct sunlight (irradiating an implanted solar module) allow powering a pacemaker for 24 h using a suitable energy storage. Thus, powering a pacemaker by sunlight is feasible and may be an alternative energy supply for tomorrow's pacemakers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effects of continuous low-frequency pacing on immature canine diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Brouillette, R T; Klemka-Walden, L M; Heller, S L; Weese-Mayer, D E; Brozanski, B S; Caliendo, J; Daood, M; Ilbawi, M N; Hunt, C E

    1990-09-01

    Although diaphragm pacing has been shown to be a practical method of supporting ventilation in children, its usefulness has been limited because of concern that continuous (24 h/day) diaphragm pacing would fatigue and damage the diaphragm. We examined the functional and structural effects of continuous low-frequency diaphragm pacing on the left hemidiaphragm of five immature dogs aged 65 +/- 2 (SD) days at onset of pacing. Stimulus parameters approximated those required to pace infants: frequency 11.1 Hz, inspiratory time 810 ms, and respiratory rate 20 breaths/min. Animals were paced 24 h/day for 24-28 days. Paced tidal volumes and airway occlusion pressures were unchanged at low (less than 15 Hz) stimulus frequencies but were reduced at high (greater than 20 Hz) stimulus frequencies. Although histologically the paced hemidiaphragms appeared normal, histochemical studies showed a conversion from a mixture of type I (54%) and type II (46%) fibers to a uniform population of type I fibers with high oxidative enzyme activity. Transformation of muscle type was also demonstrated by pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis; fast and slow isomyosin bands were noted in control specimens, whereas only slow isomyosin was identified in paced specimens. Thus, in immature dogs, continuous low-frequency pacing affects both function and structure of the diaphragm.

  6. Diastolic Function in Paced Children with Cardiac Defects: Septum vs Apex

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejon, Adel Eladio Gonzalez; Serrano, Giselle Ricardo; Ramos, Dunia Barbara Benitez

    2015-01-01

    In children with structural congenital heart disease (CHD), the effects of chronic ventricular pacing on diastolic function are not well known. On the other hand, the beneficial effect of septal pacing over apical pacing is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different right ventricular (RV) pacing site on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in children with cardiac defects. Twenty-nine pediatric patients with complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) and CHD undergoing permanent pacing were prospectively studied. Pacing sites were RV apex (n = 16) and RV septum (n = 13). Echocardiographic assessment was performed before pacemaker implantation and after it, during a mean follow‑up of 4.9 years. Compared to RV septum, transmitral E-wave was significantly affected in RV apical pacing (95.38 ± 9.19 vs 83 ± 18.75, p = 0.038). Likewise, parameters at the lateral annular tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) were significantly affected in children paced at the RV apex. The E´ wave correlated inversely with TDI lateral myocardial performance index (Tei index) (R2= 0.9849, p ≤ 0.001). RV apex pacing (Odds ratio, 0.648; confidence interval, 0.067-0.652; p = 0.003) and TDI lateral Tei index (Odds ratio, 31.21; confidence interval, 54.6-177.4; p = 0.025) predicted significantly decreased LV diastolic function. Of the two sites studied, RV septum prevents pacing-induced reduction of LV diastolic function. PMID:26352178

  7. Ischemic Stroke with Cardiac Pacemaker Implantation: Comparison of Physiological and Ventricular Pacing Modes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Hayashi, Takeshi; Kato, Ritsushi; Tanahashi, Norio; Takao, Masaki

    2017-09-01

    The clinical characteristics of ischemic stroke in patients with a pacemaker (PM) are not well understood. Forty-six ischemic stroke patients with a PM were investigated retrospectively, and the impact of different pacing modes was compared. The patients were divided into a physiological pacing group (n = 22) and a ventricular pacing group (n = 24). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) was significantly higher in the ventricular pacing group (36% versus 75%; P = .008). The mean left atrial dimension was relatively large in the ventricular pacing group than in the physiological pacing group (44.5 ± 6.7 mm versus 39.1 ± 8.5 mm, respectively; P = .071). Twenty-four percent of the patients were receiving anticoagulants, whereas 41% of the patients were receiving antiplatelet drugs. Cardioembolism was the most common stroke subtype in both groups. Although there was no statistically significant difference, neurological severity on admission was higher in the ventricular pacing group than in the physiological pacing group (P = .061). Functional outcomes, excluding patients with transient ischemic attack or prior stroke, significantly declined in the ventricular pacing group compared with the physiological pacing group (P = .044). The avoidance of the ventricular pacing mode may result in improved clinical outcomes. In patients without persistent AF, it may be important to select physiological pacing instead of ventricular pacing to decrease potential stroke severity. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  9. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  10. Constant DI pacing suppresses cardiac alternans formation in numerical cable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlochiver, S.; Johnson, C.; Tolkacheva, E. G.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans describe the sequential alternation of the action potential duration (APD) and can develop during rapid pacing. In the ventricles, such alternans may rapidly turn into life risking arrhythmias under conditions of spatial heterogeneity. Thus, suppression of alternans by artificial pacing protocols, or alternans control, has been the subject of numerous theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies. Yet, previous attempts that were inspired by chaos control theories were successful only for a short spatial extent (<2 cm) from the pacing electrode. Previously, we demonstrated in a single cell model that pacing with a constant diastolic interval (DI) can suppress the formation of alternans at high rates of activation. We attributed this effect to the elimination of feedback between the pacing cycle length and the last APD, effectively preventing restitution-dependent alternans from developing. Here, we extend this idea into cable models to study the extent by which constant DI pacing can control alternans during wave propagation conditions. Constant DI pacing was applied to ventricular cable models of up to 5 cm, using human kinetics. Our results show that constant DI pacing significantly shifts the onset of both cardiac alternans and conduction blocks to higher pacing rates in comparison to pacing with constant cycle length. We also demonstrate that constant DI pacing reduces the propensity of spatially discordant alternans, a precursor of wavebreaks. We finally found that the protective effect of constant DI pacing is stronger for increased electrotonic coupling along the fiber in the sense that the onset of alternans is further shifted to higher activation rates. Overall, these results support the potential clinical applicability of such type of pacing in improving protocols of implanted pacemakers, in order to reduce the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Future research should be conducted in order to experimentally validate

  11. Dual-demand pacing for reciprocating atrioventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, D; Curry, P; Buffet, J

    1976-01-01

    By using programmed electrical stimulation of the heart and studying the initiation and termination of reciprocating atrioventricular tachycardia two patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome were shown to respond rapidly and consistently to fixed-rate pacing. A demand pacemaker was implanted in each patient, having been modified so as to switch into the fixed-rate mode whenever the tachycardia began, thereby terminating the arrhythmia. This appears to be a promising form of treatment in patients with otherwise intractable paroxysmal tachycardia who have been shown by careful study to respond in this way. PMID:1268586

  12. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, Jennifer C.

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  13. Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory (LANL) worked on the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) intensive operational period (IOP). PACE’s primary goal was to demonstrate routine Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) field operations and improve instrumental and operational performance. LANL operated the instruments efficiently and effectively with remote guidance by the instrument mentors. This was the first time a complex suite of instruments had been operated under the ARM model and it proved to be a very successful and cost-effective model to build upon.

  14. Ecuador steps up pace of oil development activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports that oil companies operating in Ecuador plan to quicken the pace of oil development this year. After delays in 1991, companies plan a series of projects to develop reserves discovered the past 3 years estimated at more than 600 million bbl. Oil and Gas Journal estimated Ecuador's proved crude reserves at 1.55 billion bbl as of Jan. 1, 1992. The development push is part of a larger effort needed to ensure Ecuador's status as an oil exporter into the next century. Ecuador is the smallest crude oil producer and exporter in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

  15. Controllable Snail-Paced Light in Biological Bacteriorhodopsin Thin Film

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Pengfei; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2005-12-16

    We observe that the group velocity of light is reduced to an extremely low value of 0.091 mm/s in a biological thin film of bacteriorhodopsin at room temperature. By exploiting unique features of a flexible photoisomerization process for coherent population oscillation, the velocity is all-optically controlled over an enormous span, from snail-paced to normal light speed, with no need of modifying the characteristics of the incident pulse. Because of the large quantum yield for the photoreaction in this biochemical system, the ultraslow light is observed even at low light levels of microwatts, indicating high energy efficiency.

  16. Tunability in polyatomic molecule diffusion through tunneling versus pacing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhihai; Chu, Eric S; Sun, Dezheng; Kim, Daeho; Zhu, Yeming; Luo, MiaoMiao; Pawin, Greg; Wong, Kin L; Kwon, Ki-Young; Carp, Robert; Marsella, Michael; Bartels, Ludwig

    2010-10-06

    The diffusion temperature of molecular 'walkers', molecules that are capable of moving unidirectionally across a substrate violating its symmetry, can be tuned over a wide range utilizing extension of their aromatic backbone, insertion of a second set of substrate linkers (converting bipedal into quadrupedal species), and substitution on the ring. Density functional theory simulation of the molecular dynamics identifies the motion of the quadrupedal species as pacing (as opposed to trotting or gliding). Knowledge about the diffusion mode allows us to draw conclusions on the relevance of tunneling to the surface diffusion of polyatomic organic molecules.

  17. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P.; Yoshii, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue. PMID:27904119

  18. Toward a More Efficient Implementation of Antifibrillation Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We devise a methodology to determine an optimal pattern of inputs to synchronize firing patterns of cardiac cells which only requires the ability to measure action potential durations in individual cells. In numerical bidomain simulations, the resulting synchronizing inputs are shown to terminate spiral waves with a higher probability than comparable inputs that do not synchronize the cells as strongly. These results suggest that designing stimuli which promote synchronization in cardiac tissue could improve the success rate of defibrillation, and point towards novel strategies for optimizing antifibrillation pacing. PMID:27391010

  19. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P; Yoshii, Fumihito

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue.

  20. Social networks and cooperation in hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Apicella, Coren L; Marlowe, Frank W; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2012-01-25

    Social networks show striking structural regularities, and both theory and evidence suggest that networks may have facilitated the development of large-scale cooperation in humans. Here, we characterize the social networks of the Hadza, a population of hunter-gatherers in Tanzania. We show that Hadza networks have important properties also seen in modernized social networks, including a skewed degree distribution, degree assortativity, transitivity, reciprocity, geographic decay and homophily. We demonstrate that Hadza camps exhibit high between-group and low within-group variation in public goods game donations. Network ties are also more likely between people who give the same amount, and the similarity in cooperative behaviour extends up to two degrees of separation. Social distance appears to be as important as genetic relatedness and physical proximity in explaining assortativity in cooperation. Our results suggest that certain elements of social network structure may have been present at an early point in human history. Also, early humans may have formed ties with both kin and non-kin, based in part on their tendency to cooperate. Social networks may thus have contributed to the emergence of cooperation.