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Sample records for gauss precise time

  1. The time delay in strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Jingyun; Cheng, Hongbo E-mail: hbcheng@ecust.edu.cn

    2014-11-01

    The time delay between two relativistic images in the strong gravitational lensing governed by Gauss-Bonnet gravity is studied. We make a complete analytical derivation of the expression of time delay in presence of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. With respect to Schwarzschild, the time delay decreases as a consequence of the shrinking of the photon sphere. As the coupling increases, the second term in the time delay expansion becomes more relevant. Thus time delay in strong limit encodes some new information about geometry in five-dimensional spacetime with Gauss-Bonnet correction.

  2. The Generation of Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss Optical Beams for High-precision Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Ludovico; Fulda, Paul; Bond, Charlotte; Brueckner, Frank; Brown, Daniel; Wang, Mengyao; Lodhia, Deepali; Palmer, Rebecca; Freise, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thermal noise in high-reflectivity mirrors is a major impediment for several types of high-precision interferometric experiments that aim to reach the standard quantum limit or to cool mechanical systems to their quantum ground state. This is for example the case of future gravitational wave observatories, whose sensitivity to gravitational wave signals is expected to be limited in the most sensitive frequency band, by atomic vibration of their mirror masses. One promising approach being pursued to overcome this limitation is to employ higher-order Laguerre-Gauss (LG) optical beams in place of the conventionally used fundamental mode. Owing to their more homogeneous light intensity distribution these beams average more effectively over the thermally driven fluctuations of the mirror surface, which in turn reduces the uncertainty in the mirror position sensed by the laser light. We demonstrate a promising method to generate higher-order LG beams by shaping a fundamental Gaussian beam with the help of diffractive optical elements. We show that with conventional sensing and control techniques that are known for stabilizing fundamental laser beams, higher-order LG modes can be purified and stabilized just as well at a comparably high level. A set of diagnostic tools allows us to control and tailor the properties of generated LG beams. This enabled us to produce an LG beam with the highest purity reported to date. The demonstrated compatibility of higher-order LG modes with standard interferometry techniques and with the use of standard spherical optics makes them an ideal candidate for application in a future generation of high-precision interferometry. PMID:23962813

  3. Precision Timed Infrastructure: Design Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-19

    recognized the need to precisely model and control time. Mod- elica [30], Simulink [28], and Ptolemy II [12] can precisely model time in both physical and...languages have different ways of expressing computations and timing constraints [5]. For instance, Mod- elica [30], Simulink [28], Giotto [17], Ptolemy ...Languages Intermediate Languages Assembly Languages Modelica Ptolemy IIGiotto and E machine Modelyze PRET Compilation Hide machine dependent details

  4. Early-time cosmological solutions in Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanti, Panagiota; Gannouji, Radouane; Dadhich, Naresh

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we consider a generalized gravitational theory that contains the Einstein term, a scalar field, and the quadratic Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term. We focus on the early-universe dynamics, and demonstrate that a simple choice of the coupling function between the scalar field and the Gauss-Bonnet term and a simplifying assumption regarding the role of the Ricci scalar can lead to new, analytical, elegant solutions with interesting characteristics. We first argue, and demonstrate in the context of two different models, that the presence of the Ricci scalar in the theory at early times (when the curvature is strong) does not affect the actual cosmological solutions. By considering therefore a pure scalar-GB theory with a quadratic coupling function we derive a plethora of interesting, analytic solutions: for a negative coupling parameter, we obtain inflationary, de Sitter-type solutions or expanding solutions with a de Sitter phase in their past and a natural exit mechanism at later times; for a positive coupling function, we find instead singularity-free solutions with no big bang singularity. We show that the aforementioned solutions arise only for this particular choice of coupling function, a result that may hint at some fundamental role that this coupling function may hold in the context of an ultimate theory.

  5. PRECISION TIME-DELAY GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Carr, B.J.; Peckham, V.D.

    1959-06-16

    A precision time-delay generator circuit with low jitter is described. The first thyratron has a series resonant circuit and a diode which is connected to the second thyratron. The first thyratron is triggered at the begin-ning of a time delay and a capacitor is discharged through the first thyratron and the diode, thereby, triggering the second thyratron. (T.R.H.) l6l9O The instrument described can measure pressures between sea level and 300,000 ft. The pressure- sensing transducer of the instrument is a small cylindrical tube with a thin foil of titanium-tritium fastened around the inside of the tube. Output is a digital signal which can be used for storage or telemetering more conveniently than an analog signal. (W.D.M.) l6l9l An experimental study was made on rolling contacts in the temperature range of 550 to 1000 deg F. Variables such as material composition, hardness, and operating conditions were investigated in a rolling test stand. Ball bearing tests were run to determine the effect of design parameters, bearing materials, lubricants, and operating conditions. (auth)

  6. New observations regarding deterministic, time-reversible thermostats and Gauss's principle of least constraint.

    PubMed

    Bright, Joanne N; Evans, Denis J; Searles, Debra J

    2005-05-15

    Deterministic thermostats are frequently employed in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in order to remove the heat produced irreversibly over the course of such simulations. The simplest thermostat is the Gaussian thermostat, which satisfies Gauss's principle of least constraint and fixes the peculiar kinetic energy. There are of course infinitely many ways to thermostat systems, e.g., by fixing sigma(i)/p(i)/mu+l. In the present paper we provide, for the first time, convincing arguments as to why the conventional Gaussian isokinetic thermostat (mu = 1) is unique in this class. We show that this thermostat minimizes the phase space compression and is the only thermostat for which the conjugate pairing rule holds. Moreover, it is shown that for finite sized systems in the absence of an applied dissipative field, all other thermostats (mu not = 1) perform work on the system in the same manner as a dissipative field while simultaneously removing the dissipative heat so generated. All other thermostats (mu not = 1) are thus autodissipative. Among all mu, thermostats, only the mu = 1 Gaussian thermostat permits an equilibrium state.

  7. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  8. Stability of Gauss-Bonnet black holes in anti-de Sitter space-time against scalar field condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2011-10-15

    We study the stability of static, hyperbolic Gauss-Bonnet black holes in (4+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-time against the formation of scalar hair. Close to extremality the black holes possess a near-horizon topology of AdS{sub 2}xH{sup 3} such that within a certain range of the scalar field mass one would expect that they become unstable to the condensation of an uncharged scalar field. We confirm this numerically and observe that there exists a family of hairy black hole solutions labeled by the number of nodes of the scalar field function. We construct explicit examples of solutions with a scalar field that possesses zero nodes, one node, and two nodes, respectively, and show that the solutions with nodes persist in the limit of Einstein gravity, i.e. for vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling. We observe that the interval of the mass for which scalar field condensation appears decreases with increasing Gauss-Bonnet coupling and/or with increasing node number.

  9. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  10. The role of precise time in IFF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridge, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The application of precise time to the identification of friend or foe (IFF) problem is discussed. The simple concept of knowing when to expect each signal is exploited in a variety of ways to achieve an IFF system which is hard to detect, minimally exploitable and difficult to jam. Precise clocks are the backbone of the concept and the various candidates for this role are discussed. The compact rubidium-controlled oscillator is the only practical candidate.

  11. Graviton time delay and a speed limit for small black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papallo, Giuseppe; Reall, Harvey S.

    2015-11-01

    Camanho, Edelstein, Maldacena and Zhiboedov have shown that gravitons can experience a negative Shapiro time delay, i.e. a time advance, in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory. They studied gravitons propagating in singular "shock-wave" geometries. We study this effect for gravitons propagating in smooth black hole spacetimes. For a small enough black hole, we find that gravitons of appropriate polarisation, and small impact parameter, can experience time advance. Such gravitons can also exhibit a deflection angle less than π, characteristic of a repulsive short-distance gravitational interaction. We discuss problems with the suggestion that the time advance can be used to build a "time machine". In particular, we argue that a small black hole cannot be boosted to a speed arbitrarily close to the speed of light, as would be required in such a construction.

  12. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  13. Precisely Timing Dissipative Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastoryano, M. J.; Wolf, M. M.; Eisert, J.

    2013-03-01

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource and, consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that the protocols are typically independent of the initial state of the system. However, the time independent nature of this scheme makes it difficult to imagine precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements, or error correction. In this work, we provide a path around these challenges, by introducing basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger, and time dissipative operations while keeping the system Liouvillian time independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how measurement-based computation can be simulated in the dissipative setting.

  14. Precisely timing dissipative quantum information processing.

    PubMed

    Kastoryano, M J; Wolf, M M; Eisert, J

    2013-03-15

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource and, consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that the protocols are typically independent of the initial state of the system. However, the time independent nature of this scheme makes it difficult to imagine precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements, or error correction. In this work, we provide a path around these challenges, by introducing basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger, and time dissipative operations while keeping the system Liouvillian time independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how measurement-based computation can be simulated in the dissipative setting.

  15. Low cost automated precise time measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, A.; Liposchak, P.

    1973-01-01

    The Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC) has the responsibility for the dissemination of Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) to Air Force timing systems requiring microsecond time. In order to maintain traceability to the USNO Master Clock in Washington D.C., and accomplish efficient logging of time and frequency data on individual precision clocks, a simple automatic means of acquiring precise time has been devised. The Automatic Time Interval Measurement System (ATIMS) consists of a minicomputer (8K Memory), teletype terminal, electronic counter, Loran C receiver, time base generator and locally-manufactured relay matrix panel. During the measurement process, the computer controls the relay matrix which selects for comparison 13 atomic clocks against a reference clock and the reference versus Loran C. Through use of the system teletype, the operator is able to set the system clock (hours, minutes and seconds), examine and/or modify all clock data and constants, and set measurement intervals. This is done in a conversational manner. A logic flow diagram, system schematic, source listing and software components are included in the presentation.

  16. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  17. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  18. Carl Friedrich Gauss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kathryn; Scott, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss. Gauss was born on April 30, 1777, in the German city of Braunschweig (Brunswick). He was the only child of Gebhard Dietrich Gauss and Dorothea Benze. Neither of Gauss's parents had much education, his father could read and write, but earned his living doing menial jobs such as…

  19. Precise time transfer using MKIII VLBI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.; Buisson, J. A.; Lister, M. J.; Oaks, O. J.; Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, W. B.; Elgered, G.; Lundqvist, G.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is well known that Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of precise time synchronization at subnanosecond levels. This paper deals with a demonstration of clock synchronization using the MKIII VBLI system. The results are compared with clock synchronization by traveling cesium clocks and GPS. The comparison agrees within the errors of the portable clocks (+ 5 ns) and GPS(+ or - 30 ns) systems. The MKIII technology appears to be capable of clock synchronization at subnanosecond levels and appears to be very good benchmark system against which future time synchronization systems can be evaluated.

  20. Two-boundary first exit time of Gauss-Markov processes for stochastic modeling of acto-myosin dynamics.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Giuseppe; Pirozzi, Enrica

    2016-09-26

    We consider a stochastic differential equation in a strip, with coefficients suitably chosen to describe the acto-myosin interaction subject to time-varying forces. By simulating trajectories of the stochastic dynamics via an Euler discretization-based algorithm, we fit experimental data and determine the values of involved parameters. The steps of the myosin are represented by the exit events from the strip. Motivated by these results, we propose a specific stochastic model based on the corresponding time-inhomogeneous Gauss-Markov and diffusion process evolving between two absorbing boundaries. We specify the mean and covariance functions of the stochastic modeling process taking into account time-dependent forces including the effect of an external load. We accurately determine the probability density function (pdf) of the first exit time (FET) from the strip by solving a system of two non singular second-type Volterra integral equations via a numerical quadrature. We provide numerical estimations of the mean of FET as approximations of the dwell-time of the proteins dynamics. The percentage of backward steps is given in agreement to experimental data. Numerical and simulation results are compared and discussed.

  1. Precise time and time interval applications to electric power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    There are many applications of precise time and time interval (frequency) in operating modern electric power systems. Many generators and customer loads are operated in parallel. The reliable transfer of electrical power to the consumer partly depends on measuring power system frequency consistently in many locations. The internal oscillators in the widely dispersed frequency measuring units must be syntonized. Elaborate protection and control systems guard the high voltage equipment from short and open circuits. For the highest reliability of electric service, engineers need to study all control system operations. Precise timekeeping networks aid in the analysis of power system operations by synchronizing the clocks on recording instruments. Utility engineers want to reproduce events that caused loss of service to customers. Precise timekeeping networks can synchronize protective relay test-sets. For dependable electrical service, all generators and large motors must remain close to speed synchronism. The stable response of a power system to perturbations is critical to continuity of electrical service. Research shows that measurement of the power system state vector can aid in the monitoring and control of system stability. If power system operators know that a lightning storm is approaching a critical transmission line or transformer, they can modify operating strategies. Knowledge of the location of a short circuit fault can speed the re-energizing of a transmission line. One fault location technique requires clocks synchronized to one microsecond. Current research seeks to find out if one microsecond timekeeping can aid and improve power system control and operation.

  2. Neural timing signal for precise tactile timing judgments

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Junji; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2016-01-01

    The brain can precisely encode the temporal relationship between tactile inputs. While behavioural studies have demonstrated precise interfinger temporal judgments, the underlying neural mechanism remains unknown. Computationally, two kinds of neural responses can act as the information source. One is the phase-locked response to the phase of relatively slow inputs, and the other is the response to the amplitude change of relatively fast inputs. To isolate the contributions of these components, we measured performance of a synchrony judgment task for sine wave and amplitude-modulation (AM) wave stimuli. The sine wave stimulus was a low-frequency sinusoid, with the phase shifted in the asynchronous stimulus. The AM wave stimulus was a low-frequency sinusoidal AM of a 250-Hz carrier, with only the envelope shifted in the asynchronous stimulus. In the experiment, three stimulus pairs, two synchronous ones and one asynchronous one, were sequentially presented to neighboring fingers, and participants were asked to report which one was the asynchronous pair. We found that the asynchrony of AM waves could be detected as precisely as single impulse pair, with the threshold asynchrony being ∼20 ms. On the other hand, the asynchrony of sine waves could not be detected at all in the range from 5 to 30 Hz. Our results suggest that the timing signal for tactile judgments is provided not by the stimulus phase information but by the envelope of the response of the high-frequency-sensitive Pacini channel (PC), although they do not exclude a possible contribution of the envelope of non-PCs. PMID:26843600

  3. Inertial navigation/calibration/precise time and frequency capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, L. M.; Barnaba, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center was conceived in 1959 to be the US Air Force Inertial Navigation and Metrology Center. This paper will show the mission capabilities of the Inertial Navigation Maintenance Center and the Air Force Measurement and Standards Laboratory. Highlighted will be the precise time and frequency program developed by AGMC to support Air Force precise time and frequency requirements worldwide. A description of the past, present, and future precise time and frequency activities will be presented.

  4. Efficient modelling of gravity effects due to topographic masses using the Gauss-FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Leyuan

    2016-04-01

    We present efficient Fourier-domain algorithms for modelling gravity effects due to topographic masses. The well-known Parker's formula originally based on the standard fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is modified by applying the Gauss-FFT method instead. Numerical precision of the forward and inverse Fourier transforms embedded in Parker's formula and its extended forms are significantly improved by the Gauss-FFT method. The topographic model is composed of two major aspects, the geometry and the density. Versatile geometric representations, including the mass line model, the mass prism model, the polyhedron model and smoother topographic models interpolated from discrete data sets using high-order splines or pre-defined by analytical functions, in combination with density distributions that vary both laterally and vertically in rather arbitrary ways following exponential or general polynomial functions, now can be treated in a consistent framework by applying the Gauss-FFT method. The method presented has been numerically checked by space-domain analytical and hybrid analytical/numerical solutions already established in the literature. Synthetic and real model tests show that both the Gauss-FFT method and the standard FFT method run much faster than space-domain solutions, with the Gauss-FFT method being superior in numerical accuracy. When truncation errors are negligible, the Gauss-FFT method can provide forward results almost identical to space-domain analytical or semi-numerical solutions in much less time.

  5. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; ...

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. MINOS Timing and GPS Precise Point Positioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Minos Timing Spec • Neutrinos created in bunches separated by 19 ns • ~ 1 neutrino /day detected in Soudan Mine – 2 milliseconds travel time...Must know which bunch created the observed neutrino • Bunches are about 6 ns wide – To become 3.5 ns wide after planned upgrade in 2013

  7. Precision time-domain dielectric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mopsik, F. I.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given for an automated method for determining dielectric constant and loss by the measurement of the time response of the dielectric to a step voltage. Attention is paid to the circuits necessary to achieve high accuracy (0.1%) and high sensitivity (tan δ=10-5) over audio and subaudio frequencies (104 to 10-4 Hz). These include a 100-V step generator accurate to 5 ppm, a charge detector with a time-independent bias current of 30 fA, and a clock that can control sampling time from 5 μs to 10 s. In addition, a numerical Laplace transform, based on a cubic spline, is described that preserves the accuracy of the time data when they are transformed into the frequency domain.

  8. Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kyle H; Holmes, Caroline M; Vellema, Michiel; Pack, Andrea R; Elemans, Coen P H; Nemenman, Ilya; Sober, Samuel J

    2017-01-31

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time interval (spike rate), recent studies have shown that additional information is carried by the millisecond-scale timing patterns of action potentials (spike timing). However, it is unknown whether or how subtle differences in spike timing drive differences in perception or behavior, leaving it unclear whether the information in spike timing actually plays a role in brain function. By examining the activity of individual motor units (the muscle fibers innervated by a single motor neuron) and manipulating patterns of activation of these neurons, we provide both correlative and causal evidence that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior-namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision.

  9. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  10. Millisecond precision spike timing shapes tactile perception.

    PubMed

    Mackevicius, Emily L; Best, Matthew D; Saal, Hannes P; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2012-10-31

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequency composition of vibrations shapes the evoked percept. Mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin exhibit temporal patterning in their responses, but the importance and behavioral relevance of spike timing, particularly for naturalistic stimuli, remains to be elucidated. Based on neurophysiological recordings from Rhesus macaques, we show that spike timing conveys information about the frequency composition of skin vibrations, both for individual afferents and for afferent populations, and that the temporal fidelity varies across afferent class. Furthermore, the perception of skin vibrations, measured in human subjects, is better predicted when spike timing is taken into account, and the resolution that predicts perception best matches the optimal resolution of the respective afferent classes. In light of these results, the peripheral representation of complex skin vibrations draws a powerful analogy with the auditory and vibrissal systems.

  11. Millisecond Precision Spike Timing Shapes Tactile Perception

    PubMed Central

    Mackevicius, Emily L.; Best, Matthew D.; Saal, Hannes P.

    2012-01-01

    In primates, the sense of touch has traditionally been considered to be a spatial modality, drawing an analogy to the visual system. In this view, stimuli are encoded in spatial patterns of activity over the sheet of receptors embedded in the skin. We propose that the spatial processing mode is complemented by a temporal one. Indeed, the transduction and processing of complex, high-frequency skin vibrations have been shown to play an important role in tactile texture perception, and the frequency composition of vibrations shapes the evoked percept. Mechanoreceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin exhibit temporal patterning in their responses, but the importance and behavioral relevance of spike timing, particularly for naturalistic stimuli, remains to be elucidated. Based on neurophysiological recordings from Rhesus macaques, we show that spike timing conveys information about the frequency composition of skin vibrations, both for individual afferents and for afferent populations, and that the temporal fidelity varies across afferent class. Furthermore, the perception of skin vibrations, measured in human subjects, is better predicted when spike timing is taken into account, and the resolution that predicts perception best matches the optimal resolution of the respective afferent classes. In light of these results, the peripheral representation of complex skin vibrations draws a powerful analogy with the auditory and vibrissal systems. PMID:23115169

  12. The Tortured History of Gauss's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Ross

    2009-10-01

    American physics textbooks contain the following equation, which is called Gauss's law: E .d S = qenclosed ɛ0 It is odd, however, that biographies of Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855) contain no mention of this law. A brief history of this important result will be presented in which it will be shown that what we call Gauss's law today was originally guessed at by Joseph Priestly (1733-1804) after he read a letter from Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), then was derived, forgotten, and re-derived several times in two different contexts by many of the luminaries of physics in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

  13. Precision Position, Navigation, and Timing without the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    timing] in GPS - denied environments” as one of the top 12 (in terms of priority) re- search areas that we should emphasize in the near future.6...Navigation Techniques for Position, Navigation, and Timing in GPS - Denied Environments Navigation Using Beacons Beacons (i.e., sources of man-made...wishes to succeed in maintaining precision navigation in GPS - denied environments.  Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio Platform Dynamics Precise Navigation

  14. Scalar field evolution in Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, E.; Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-10-15

    It is presented a thorough analysis of scalar perturbations in the background of Gauss-Bonnet, Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter and Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole spacetimes. The perturbations are considered both in frequency and time domain. The dependence of the scalar field evolution on the values of the cosmological constant {lambda} and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling {alpha} is investigated. For Gauss-Bonnet and Gauss-Bonnet-de Sitter black holes, at asymptotically late times either power-law or exponential tails dominate, while for Gauss-Bonnet-anti-de Sitter black hole, the quasinormal modes govern the scalar field decay at all times. The power-law tails at asymptotically late times for odd-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet black holes does not depend on {alpha}, even though the black hole metric contains {alpha} as a new parameter. The corrections to quasinormal spectrum due to Gauss-Bonnet coupling is not small and should not be neglected. For the limit of near extremal value of the (positive) cosmological constant and pure de Sitter and anti-de Sitter modes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity we have found analytical expressions.

  15. A monolithic time stretcher for precision time recording

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.

    2007-04-20

    Identifying light mesons which contain only up/down quarks (pions) from those containing a strange quark (kaons) over the typical meter length scales of a particle physics detector requires instrumentation capable of measuring flight times with a resolution on the order of 20ps. In the last few years a large number of inexpensive, multi-channel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) chips have become available. These devices typically have timing resolution performance in the hundreds of ps regime. A technique is presented that is a monolithic version of ``time stretcher'' solution adopted for the Belle Time-Of-Flight system to address this gap between resolution need and intrinsic multi-hit TDC performance.

  16. A precise GPS-based time and frequency system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnabb, Jack; Fossler, Earl

    1993-01-01

    An approach to implementing a compact, highly reliable and precise Master Time and Frequency subsystem usable in a variety of applications is described. These applications include, among others, Satellite Ground Terminals, Range Timing Stations, Communications Terminals, and Power Station Timing subsystems. All time and frequency output signals are locked to Universal Time via the GPS Satellite system. The system provides for continued output of precise signals in the event of GPS signal interruption from antenna or lead-in breakage or other causes. Cost/performance tradeoffs affecting system accuracy over the short, medium, and long term are discussed. A unique approach to redundant system design provides an architecture with the reliability advantage of triple-redundant majority voting and the cost advantages of dual-redundant elements. The system can be configured to output a variety of precise time and frequency signals and the design can be tailored to output as few, or as many, types and quantities of signals as are required by the application.

  17. Precision Time Protocol-Based Trilateration for Planetary Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Progeny Systems Corporation has developed a high-fidelity, field-scalable, non-Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation system that offers precision localization over communications channels. The system is bidirectional, providing position information to both base and mobile units. It is the first-ever wireless use of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Precision Time Protocol (PTP) in a bidirectional trilateration navigation system. The innovation provides a precise and reliable navigation capability to support traverse-path planning systems and other mapping applications, and it establishes a core infrastructure for long-term lunar and planetary occupation. Mature technologies are integrated to provide navigation capability and to support data and voice communications on the same network. On Earth, the innovation is particularly well suited for use in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), as it offers a non-GPS precision navigation and location service for use in GPS-denied environments. Its bidirectional capability provides real-time location data to the UAV operator and to the UAV. This approach optimizes assisted GPS techniques and can be used to determine the presence of GPS degradation, spoofing, or jamming.

  18. Department of Defense Precise Time and Time Interval program improvement plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowser, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory is responsible for ensuring uniformity in precise time and time interval operations including measurements, the establishment of overall DOD requirements for time and time interval, and the accomplishment of objectives requiring precise time and time interval with minimum cost. An overview of the objectives, the approach to the problem, the schedule, and a status report, including significant findings relative to organizational relationships, current directives, principal PTTI users, and future requirements as currently identified by the users are presented.

  19. Proceedings of the Fourth Precise Time and Time Interval Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acrivos, H. N. (Compiler); Wardrip, S. C. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on Precise Time and Time Interval Planning are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) satellite timing techniques, precision frequency sources, and very long baseline interferometry, (2) frequency stabilities and communications, and (3) very low frequency and ultrahigh frequency propagation and use. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy of time discrimination obtained with time measuring equipment and specific applications of time measurement to military operations and civilian research projects.

  20. Precision pulse-timing instrumentation for ultrasonic nondestructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.G.

    1990-08-31

    A new, pulse-timing discriminator and B-scan time-to-pulse-height converter have been developed for the inspection of production parts. The discriminator is easy to operate and features automatic echo gating and automatic pulse polarity discrimination. This instrument combines the noise-blanking advantages of threshold discrimination with the echo-timing precision of zero-crossing discrimination to improve measurement accuracy by a factor of two over the best precious techniques. When used with the discriminator, the B-scan unit allows detection of flaws at depths less than one-fourth those obtainable with commercially available instruments. 3 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Precise time synchronization data acquisition with remote systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Robertson, P.J.

    1998-08-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center have identified a need to acquire data on the rotor of an operating wind turbine at precisely the same time as other data is acquired on the ground or on a non-rotating part of the wind turbine. The researchers will analyze that combined data with statistical and correlation techniques to clearly establish phase information and loading paths and insights into the structural loading of wind turbines. A data acquisition unit has been developed to acquire the data from the rotating system at precise universal times specified by the user. The unit utilizes commercial data acquisition hardware, spread-spectrum radio modems, and a Global Positioning Satellite receiver as well as a custom-built programmable logic device. A prototype of the system is now operational, and initial field deployment is anticipated this summer.

  2. Enhanced precision time synchronization for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyuntae; Kim, Jongdeok; Baek, Yunju

    2011-01-01

    Time synchronization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is a fundamental issue for the coordination of distributed entities and events. Nondeterministic latency, which may decrease the accuracy and precision of time synchronization can occur at any point in the network layers. Specially, random back-off by channel contention leads to a large uncertainty. In order to reduce the large nondeterministic uncertainty from channel contention, we propose an enhanced precision time synchronization protocol in this paper. The proposed method reduces the traffic needed for the synchronization procedure by selectively forwarding the packet. Furthermore, the time difference between sensor nodes increases as time advances because of the use of a clock source with a cheap crystal oscillator. In addition, we provide a means to maintain accurate time by adopting hardware-assisted time stamp and drift correction. Experiments are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, for which sensor nodes are designed and implemented. According to the evaluation results, the performance of the proposed method is better than that of a traditional time synchronization protocol.

  3. Algorithm for precision subsample timing between Gaussian-like pulses.

    PubMed

    Lerche, R A; Golick, B P; Holder, J P; Kalantar, D H

    2010-10-01

    Moderately priced oscilloscopes available for the NIF power sensors and target diagnostics have 6 GHz bandwidths at 20-25 Gsamples/s (40 ps sample spacing). Some NIF experiments require cross timing between instruments be determined with accuracy better than 30 ps. A simple analysis algorithm for Gaussian-like pulses such as the 100-ps-wide NIF timing fiducial can achieve single-event cross-timing precision of 1 ps (1/50 of the sample spacing). The midpoint-timing algorithm is presented along with simulations that show why the technique produces good timing results. Optimum pulse width is found to be ∼2.5 times the sample spacing. Experimental measurements demonstrate use of the technique and highlight the conditions needed to obtain optimum timing performance.

  4. Vector Helmholtz-Gauss and vector Laplace-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrate the existence of vector Helmholtz-Gauss (vHzG) and vector Laplace-Gauss beams that constitute two general families of localized vector beam solutions of the Maxwell equations in the paraxial approximation. The electromagnetic components are determined starting from the scalar solutions of the two-dimensional Helmholtz and Laplace equations, respectively. Special cases of the vHzG beams are TE and TM Gaussian vector beams, nondiffracting vector Bessel beams, polarized Bessel-Gauss beams, modes in cylindrical waveguides and cavities, and scalar Helmholtz-Gauss beams. The general expression of the vHzG beams can be used straightforwardly to obtain vector Mathieu-Gauss and vector parabolic-Gauss beams, which to our knowledge have not yet been reported.

  5. AIV Platform for the Galileo Precise Timing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oving, B. A.; Kroon, E.

    2008-08-01

    The Precise Timing Facility (PTF) is an element of the Galileo Ground Mission Segment (GMS) and is responsible for maintaining and distributing the Galileo System Time (GST). The PTF is based on a set of Caesium clocks and Active Hydrogen Maser clocks, the combination of which should be able to provide the required precision and stability of the GST. As the PTF is a critical element within the GMS, diversity is applied in that two PTFs are made by two different companies. The subject of this paper is the PTF that is being developed by Kayser-Threde. To perform the Assembly, Integration and Verification (AIV) activities of the PTF, a dedicated test platform, PTF-AIVP, is developed by the National Aerospace Laboratory, NLR (the Netherlands) and the Nederlands Meetinstituut (NMi). The PTF-AIVP will be used to measure and analyse the (physical) output of the PTF, so that the stringent precision and stability requirements can be verified. Furthermore, it will simulate other Elements in the GMS that are connected to the PTF.

  6. Upgrades for the Precision Proton Spectrometer at the LHC: Precision timing and tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallinaro, Michele

    2017-03-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) is an approved project to add tracking and timing information at approximately ±210 m from the interaction point around the CMS detector. It is designed to operate at high luminosity with up to 50 interactions per 25 ns bunch crossing to perform measurements of e.g. the quartic gauge couplings and search for rare exclusive processes. During 2016, CT-PPS took data in normal high-luminosity proton-proton LHC collisions. In the coming years, high radiation doses and large multiple-vertex interactions will represent difficult challenges that resemble those of the high-luminosity LHC program. A coordinated effort of detector upgrades with the goal of reaching the physics goals while mitigating the degradation effects is under way. Upgrades to the tracking and timing detectors are discussed.

  7. On the precision of automated activation time estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Smith, J. M.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    We examined how the assignment of local activation times in epicardial and endocardial electrograms is affected by sampling rate, ambient signal-to-noise ratio, and sinx/x waveform interpolation. Algorithms used for the estimation of fiducial point locations included dV/dtmax, and a matched filter detection algorithm. Test signals included epicardial and endocardial electrograms overlying both normal and infarcted regions of dog myocardium. Signal-to-noise levels were adjusted by combining known data sets with white noise "colored" to match the spectral characteristics of experimentally recorded noise. For typical signal-to-noise ratios and sampling rates, the template-matching algorithm provided the greatest precision in reproducibly estimating fiducial point location, and sinx/x interpolation allowed for an additional significant improvement. With few restrictions, combining these two techniques may allow for use of digitization rates below the Nyquist rate without significant loss of precision.

  8. Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Application and Planning Meeting. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Thirty eight papers are presented addressing various aspects of precise time and time interval applications. Areas discussed include: past accomplishments; state of the art systems; new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; and fruitful directions for research efforts.

  9. Proceedings of the 7th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Seventh Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting and the edited record of the discussion period following each paper. This meeting provided a forum to promote more effective, efficient, economical and skillful applications of PTTI technology to the many problem areas to which PTTI offers solutions. Specifically the purpose of the meeting is to: disseminate, coordinate, and exchange practical information associated with precise time and frequency; acquaint systems engineers, technicians and managers with precise time and frequency technology and its applications; and review present and future requirements for PTTI.

  10. Precise Time Synchronisation and Ranging in Nano-Satellite Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, Martin; Plettemeier, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Precise time synchronization and ranging is very important for a variety of scientific experiments with more than two nano-satellites: For synthetic aperture radar (SAR) applications, for example, the radar signal phase (which corresponds to a synchronized time) as well as the location must be known on each satellite forming synthetic antenna. Also multi-static radar systems, MIMO radar systems or radio tomography applications will take advantage from highly accurate synchronization and position determination. We propose a method for synchronizing the time as well as measuring the distance between nano-satellites very precisely by utilizing mm-wave radio links. This approach can also be used for time synchronization of more than two satellites and accordingly determinating the precise relative location of nano-satellites in space. The time synchronization signal is modulated onto a mm-wave carrier. In the simplest form it is a harmonic sinusoidal signal with a frequency in the MHz range. The distance is measured with a frequency sweep or short pulse modulated onto a different carrier frequency. The sweep or pulse transmission start is synchronized to the received time synchronization. The time synchronization transmitter receives the pulse/sweep signal and can calculate the (double) time of flight for both signals. This measurement can be easily converted to the distance. The use of a mm-wave carrier leads to small antennas and the free space loss linked to the high frequency reduces non line of sight echoes. It also allows a high sweep/pulse bandwidth enabling superior ranging accuracy. Additionally, there is also less electromagnetic interference probability since telemetry and scientific applications typically do not use mm-wavefrequencies. Since the system is working full-duplex the time synchronization can be performed continuously and coherently. Up to now the required semiconductor processes did not achieve enough gain/bandwidth to realize this concept at

  11. Ionospheric corrections to precise time transfer using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Robert W.; Osborne, Allen W., III; Klobuchar, John A.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    1994-01-01

    The free electrons in the earth's ionosphere can retard the time of reception of GPS signals received at a ground station, compared to their time in free space, by many tens of nanoseconds, thus limiting the accuracy of time transfer by GPS. The amount of the ionospheric time delay is proportional to the total number of electrons encountered by the wave on its path from each GPS satellite to a receiver. This integrated number of electrons is called Total Electron Content, or TEC. Dual frequency GPS receivers designed by Allen Osborne Associates, Inc. (AOA) directly measure both the ionospheric differential group delay and the differential carrier phase advance for the two GPS frequencies and derive from this the TEC between the receiver and each GPS satellite in track. The group delay information is mainly used to provide an absolute calibration to the relative differential carrier phase, which is an extremely precise measure of relative TEC. The AOA Mini-Rogue ICS-4Z and the AOA TurboRogue ICS-4000Z receivers normally operate using the GPS P code, when available, and switch to cross-correlation signal processing when the GPS satellites are in the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) mode and the P code is encrypted. An AOA ICS-Z receiver has been operated continuously for over a year at Hanscom AFB, MA to determine the statistics of the variability of the TEC parameter using signals from up to four different directions simultaneously. The 4-channel ICS-4Z and the 8-channel ICS-4000Z, have proven capabilities to make precise, well calibrated, measurements of the ionosphere in several directions simultaneously. In addition to providing ionospheric corrections for precise time transfer via satellite, this dual frequency design allows full code and automatic codeless operation of both the differential group delay and differential carrier phase for numerous ionospheric experiments being conducted. Statistical results of the data collected from the ICS-4Z during the initial year of

  12. Precision Pulsar Timing and Gravity Waves: Recent Advances in Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demorest, P.; Ramachandran, R.; Backer, D.; Ferdman, R.; Stairs, I.; Nice, D.

    2004-12-01

    High-precision pulsar timing is a unique and useful tool for many different scientific applications, including studies of the interstellar medium, relativistic binary systems, and long period gravitational wave studies. Our group has designed and installed a new generation of pulsar instrumentation at several radio observatories over the past year: The Arecibo Signal Processor (ASP), the Green Bank Astronomical Signal Processor (GASP), and the Berkeley-Orleans-Nancay processor (BON). These machines perform real time coherent dedispersion of the pulsar signal on up to 64 MHz of bandwidth, and quasi-real time up to 128 MHz. They use high dynamic range voltage sampling (8 bits), which significantly reduces digitization artifacts. The processing is done in an array of personal computers, which makes the machines extremely flexible for future development. We present preliminary results from several different studies using this new instrumentation. At Green Bank, we have initiated a program of long-term precision timing of 15 pulsars using the 100m Green Bank Telescope. The data from this project will be used to study binary systems, and contribute to the ongoing multi-observatory effort to create a Pulsar Timing Array - a group of many pulsars distributed about the sky which can be used to detect gravitational radiation with a period of 1-10 years. We also have continuous use of a 85ft telescope at Green Bank which we have used to study dispersion measure fluctuations of PSR B1937+21 on timescales of 1 day to several years. These fluctuations are a potential systematic effect for the gravity wave study, and also help us learn more about the nature of interstellar weather.

  13. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  14. The 26th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 26th Annual PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. Papers are in the following categories: (1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) International and transnational applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; (3) Applications of Precise Time and Time Interval technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  15. The 25th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Papers in the following categories are presented: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunication; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; application of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  16. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1990-05-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MIL<550>STAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  17. The 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at the 22nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: Rb, Cs, and H-based frequency standards and cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communication satellites.

  18. Proceedings of the 8th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Proceedings contain the papers presented at the Eight Annual Precise Time and Tme Interval PTTI Applications and Planning Meeting. The edited record of the discussions following the papers and the panel discussions are also included. This meeting provided a forum for the exchange of information on precise time and frequency technology among members of the scientific community and persons with program applications. The 282 registered attendees came from various U.S. Government agencies, private industry, universities and a number of foreign countries were represented. In this meeting, papers were presented that emphasized: (1) definitions and international regulations of precise time sources and users, (2) the scientific foundations of Hydrogen Maser standards, the current developments in this field and the application experience, and (3) how to measure the stability performance properties of precise standards. As in the previous meetings, update and new papers were presented on system applications with past, present and future requirements identified.

  19. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ionospheric and tropospheric propagation on time and frequency transfer, advances in the generation of precise time and frequency, time transfer techniques and filtering and modeling were among the topics emphasized. Rubidium and cesium frequency standard, crystal oscillators, masers, Kalman filters, and atomic clocks were discussed.

  20. Noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaohong; Zheng, Yishu; Li, Hanqing

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a new family of noncoaxial Gauss-truncated Bessel beams through multiplying conventional symmetrical Bessel beams by a noncoaxial Gauss function. These beams can also be regarded as the exponential-truncated version of Bessel-Gauss beams since they can be transformed into the product of Bessel-Gauss beams and an exponential window function along a certain Cartesian axis. The closed-form solutions of the angular spectra and paraxial propagation of these beams were derived. These beams have asymmetrical intensity distributions and carry the same orbit angular momentum per photon as the corresponding Bessel-Gauss beams. While propagating along the z axis, the mth (m≠0) noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams rotate their intensity distributions and the mth-order vortex at the beam center has a transverse shift along the direction perpendicular to the offset axis. Depending on the product of the transverse scalar factor of the Bessel beams and the offset between the Gaussian window function and the center of the Bessel beams, the noncoaxial Bessel-Gauss beams can produce unit vortices with opposite signs in pairs during propagation.

  1. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: High resolution imaging requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiao -Lei; Treu, Tommaso; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W.; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-09-28

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ``Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρtot∝ r–γ' for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. Furthermore, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive Optics System, and TMT, will

  2. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Liao, Kai; Treu, Tommaso; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W.; Marshall, Philip J. E-mail: tt@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: mauger@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: dr.phil.marshall@gmail.com

    2015-09-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as ''Einstein Rings'' in high resolution images. The distortion of these arcs and counter-arcs, as measured over a large number of pixels, provides tight constraints on the difference between the gravitational potential between the quasar image positions, and thus on cosmology in combination with the measured time delay. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope γ' of the total mass density profile ρ{sub tot}∝ r{sup −γ'} for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on γ' be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. However, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive Optics System, and TMT, will

  3. Holographic isotropisation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Ficnar, Andrej

    2017-02-01

    We study holographic isotropisation of homogeneous, strongly coupled, non-Abelian plasmas in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a negative cosmological constant. We focus on small values of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter λ GB and linearise the equations of motion around a time-dependent background solution with λ GB = 0. We numerically solve the linearised equations and show that the entire time evolution of the pressure anisotropy can be well approximated by the linear in λ GB corrections to the quasinormal mode expansion, even in the cases of high anisotropy. We finally show that, quite generally, the time evolution of the pressure anisotropy with the Gauss-Bonnet term is approximately shifted with respect to the evolution without it, with the sign of the shift being directly related to the sign of the λ GB parameter. Combined with the observation that negative λ GB captures qualitative features of positive gauge coupling corrections, this suggests that the latter generically increase the isotropisation time of strongly coupled plasmas.

  4. Optical timing receiver for the NASA laser ranging system. Part 2: High precision time interval digitizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leskovar, B.; Turko, B.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a high precision time interval digitizer is described. The time digitizer is a 10 psec resolution stop watch covering a range of up to 340 msec. The measured time interval is determined as a separation between leading edges of a pair of pulses applied externally to the start input and the stop input of the digitizer. Employing an interpolation techniques and a 50 MHz high precision master oscillator, the equivalent of a 100 GHz clock frequency standard is achieved. Absolute accuracy and stability of the digitizer are determined by the external 50 MHz master oscillator, which serves as a standard time marker. The start and stop pulses are fast 1 nsec rise time signals, according to the Nuclear Instrument means of tunnel diode discriminators. Firing level of the discriminator define start and stop points between which the time interval is digitized.

  5. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  6. The 24th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of technical papers presented at the 24th Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting held in Dec. 1992 is presented. Papers are in the following categories: recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales, and international telecommunications; applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, and platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  7. Proceedings of the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 30th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting held 1-3 December 1998 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel at Reston Town Center, Reston, Virginia. Papers are in the following categories: 1) Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based atomic frequency standards, and in trapped-ion and space clock technology; 2) National and international applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on GPS and GLONASS timing, atomic time scales, and telecommunications; 3) Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military navigation and communication systems; geodesy; aviation; and pulsars; and 4) Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, geosynchronous communication satellites, computer networks, WAAS, and LORAN.

  8. 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, Richard L. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document is a compilation of technical papers presented at the 27th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, held November 29 - December 1, 1995 at San Diego, CA. Papers are in the following categories: Recent developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards; and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; International and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking, GLONASS timing, intercomparison of national time scales and international telecommunications; Applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; Applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and Dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Satellite Navigation System (GLONASS), MILSTAR, LORAN, and synchronous communications satellites.

  9. Phase anomalies in Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Assafrao, Alberto da Costa; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Pereira, Silvania F; Urbach, H Paul; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-12-17

    Bessel-Gauss beams are known as non-diffracting beams. They can be obtained by focusing an annularly shaped collimated laser beam. Here, we report for the first time on the direct measurement of the phase evolution of such beams by relying on longitudinal-differential interferometry. We found that the characteristics of Bessel-Gauss beams cause a continuously increasing phase anomaly in the spatial domain where such beams do not diverge, i.e. there is a larger phase advance of the beam when compared to a referential plane wave. Simulations are in excellent agreement with measurements. We also provide an analytical treatment of the problem that matches both experimental and numerical results and provides an intuitive explanation.

  10. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Proceedings of an annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting are summarized. A transparent view of the state-of-the-art, an opportunity to express needs, a view of important future trends, and a review of relevant past accomplishments were considered for PTTI managers, systems engineers, and program planner. Specific aims were: to provide PTTI users with new and useful applications, procedures, and techniques; to allow the PTTI researcher to better assess fruitful directions for research efforts.

  11. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  12. Laguerre-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss beams propagation through turbulence: analysis of channel efficiency.

    PubMed

    Doster, Timothy; Watnik, Abbie T

    2016-12-20

    As a means of increasing the channel capacity in free-space optical communication systems, two types of orbital angular momentum carrying beams, Bessel-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss, are studied. In a series of numerical simulations, we show that Bessel-Gauss beams, pseudo-nondiffracting beams, outperform Laguerre-Gauss beams of various orders in channel efficiency and bit error rates.

  13. Self-similar propagation of Hermite-Gauss water-wave pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally propagation dynamics of surface gravity water-wave pulses, having Hermite-Gauss envelopes. We show that these waves propagate self-similarly along an 18-m wave tank, preserving their general Hermite-Gauss envelopes in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The measured surface elevation wave groups enable observing the envelope phase evolution of both nonchirped and linearly frequency chirped Hermite-Gauss pulses, hence allowing us to measure Gouy phase shifts of high-order Hermite-Gauss pulses for the first time. Finally, when increasing pulse amplitude, nonlinearity becomes essential and the second harmonic of Hermite-Gauss waves was observed. We further show that these generated second harmonic bound waves still exhibit self-similar Hermite-Gauss shapes along the tank.

  14. A COMPARISON OF COLLAPSING AND PRECISE ARRIVAL-TIME MAPPING OF MICROSEISMICITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTLEDGE, JAMES T.; JONES, ROB H.

    2007-01-05

    In this paper they compare the improvements in microseismic location images obtained using precise arrival times with that obtained by the collapsing technique. They first collapse the initial locations for a hydraulic-fracture data set from the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, they then use the precise-arrival-time locations as measure for the effectiveness of the collapsing. Finally, they examine the changes when applying collapsing to the precise-arrival-time locations.

  15. Precise GPS ephemerides from DMA and NGS tested by time transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz W.; Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine

    1992-01-01

    It was shown that the use of the Defense Mapping Agency's (DMA) precise ephemerides brings a significant improvement to the accuracy of GPS time transfer. At present a new set of precise ephemerides produced by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has been made available to the timing community. This study demonstrates that both types of precise ephemerides improve long-distance GPS time transfer and remove the effects of Selective Availability (SA) degradation of broadcast ephemerides. The issue of overcoming SA is also discussed in terms of the routine availability of precise ephemerides.

  16. GPS navigation experiment using high precision GPS timing receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Oaks, O. J.; Lister, M. J.; Wardrip, S. C.; Leschiutta, S.; Galliano, P. G.; Cordara, D.; Pettiti, V.; Detoma, E.; Dachel, P.

    1985-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) Time Transfer receivers were developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to provide synchronization for the NASA Global Laser Tracking Network (GLTN). The capabilities of the receiver are being expanded mainly through software modification to: Demonstrate the position location capabilities of a single channel receiver unsign the GPS C/A code; and Demonstrate the time/navigation capability of the receiver onboard a moving platform, by sequential tracking of GPS satellites.

  17. The AGS Ggamma Meter and Calibrating the Gauss Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, Leif

    2014-03-31

    During AGS Polarized Proton acceleration periods, one output from the AGS Ggamma Meter, namely the energy (or Ggamma) calculated from the magnetic field in the AGS main magnets and the beam radius- both measured in particular instant, is used to figure out the times in the AGS magnet acceleration cycle when the beam passes through a particular set of depolarizing resonances. The resonance set occur whenever a particle’s Ggamma (energy*(G/m) becomes nearly equal to n*Qx (i.e. any integer multiplied by the horizontal betatron tune). This deliverable is why the machinery is referred to as the ''Ggamma Meter'' rather than the AGS energy meter. The Ggamma Meter takes as inputs a set of measurements of frequency (F(t)), radius (r(t)), and gauss clock counts (GCC(t)). The other energy (GgammaBr) assumes the field when the gauss clock starts counting is known. The change in field to time t is given by the measured accumulated gauss clock counts multiplied by the gauss clock calibration (gauss/GCC). In order to deal with experimental data, this calibration factor gets an added ad hoc complication, namely a correction dependent on the rate of change the counting rate. The Ggamma meter takes GCC(t) and together with the past history for this cycle calculates B(t).

  18. Time Delay Embedding Increases Estimation Precision of Models of Intraindividual Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Oertzen, Timo; Boker, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the precision of parameters estimated from local samples of time dependent functions. We find that "time delay embedding," i.e., structuring data prior to analysis by constructing a data matrix of overlapping samples, increases the precision of parameter estimates and in turn statistical power compared to standard…

  19. Gauss-Bonnet gravitational baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter we study some variant forms of gravitational baryogenesis by using higher order terms containing the partial derivative of the Gauss-Bonnet scalar coupled to the baryonic current. This scenario extends the well known theory that uses a similar coupling between the Ricci scalar and the baryonic current. One appealing feature of the scenario we study is that the predicted baryon asymmetry during a radiation domination era is non-zero. We calculate the baryon to entropy ratio for the Gauss-Bonnet term and by using the observational constraints we investigate which are the allowed forms of the R + F (G) gravity controlling the evolution. Also we briefly discuss some alternative higher order terms that can generate a non-zero baryon asymmetry, even in the conformal invariance limit.

  20. Precision Timing of Two Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Kaspi; Chakrabarty; Steinberger

    1999-11-01

    We report on long-term X-ray timing of two anomalous X-ray pulsars, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 2259+586, using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. In monthly observations made over 1.4 and 2.6 yr for the two pulsars, respectively, we have obtained phase-coherent timing solutions which imply that these objects have been rotating with great stability throughout the course of our observations. For 1RXS J170849.0-400910, we find a rotation frequency of 0.0909169331(5) Hz and frequency derivative -15.687&parl0;4&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51215.931. For 1E 2259+586, we find a rotation frequency of 0.1432880613(2) Hz and frequency derivative -1.0026&parl0;7&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51195.583. The rms phase residuals from these simple models are only approximately 0.01 cycles for both sources. We show that the frequency derivative for 1E 2259+586 is inconsistent with that inferred from incoherent frequency observations made over the last 20 yr. Our observations are consistent with the magnetar hypothesis and make binary accretion scenarios appear unlikely.

  1. Asynchronous Laser Transponders for Precise Interplanetary Ranging and Time Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of a two-way asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder pair, capable of decimeter ranging and subnanosecond time transfer from Earth to a spacecraft anywhere within the inner Solar System, is discussed. In the Introduction, we briefly discuss the current state-of-the-art in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) which use single-ended range measurements to a passive optical reflector, and the limitations of this approach in ranging beyond the Moon to the planets. In Section 2 of this paper, we describe two types of transponders (echo and asynchronous), introduce the transponder link equation and the concept of "balanced" transponders, describe how range and time can be transferred between terminals, and preview the potential advantages of photon counting asynchronous transponders for interplanetary applications. In Section 3, we discuss and provide mathematical models for the various sources of noise in an interplanetary transponder link including planetary albedo, solar or lunar illumination of the local atmosphere, and laser backscatter off the local atmosphere. In Section 4, we introduce the key engineering elements of an interplanetary laser transponder and develop an operational scenario for the acquisition and tracking of the opposite terminal. In Section 5, we use the theoretical models of th previous sections to perform an Earth-Mars link analysis over a full synodic period of 780 days under the simplifying assumption of coaxial, coplanar, circular orbits. We demonstrate that, using slightly modified versions of existing space and ground based laser systems, an Earth-Mars transponder link is not only feasible but quite robust. We also demonstrate through analysis the advantages and feasibility of compact, low output power (<300 mW photon-counting transponders using NASA's developmental SLR2000 satellite laser ranging system as the Earth terminal. Section 6 provides a summary of the results

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  3. Reheating in Gauss-Bonnet-coupled inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of models of inflation with a large Gauss-Bonnet coupling at late times, which have been shown to modify and prevent the end of inflation. Despite the potential of Gauss-Bonnet models in predicting favorable power spectra, capable of greatly lowering the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared to now-disfavored models of standard chaotic inflation, it is important to also understand in what context it is possible for postinflationary (p)reheating to proceed and hence recover an acceptable late-time cosmology. We argue that in the previously studied inverse power law coupling case, reheating cannot happen due to a lack of oscillatory solutions for the inflaton, and that neither instant preheating nor gravitational particle production would avoid this problem due to the persistence of the inflaton's energy density, even if it were to partially decay. Hence we proceed to define a minimal generalization of the model which can permit perturbative reheating and study the consequences of this, including heavily modified dynamics during reheating and predictions of the power spectra.

  4. Framed 4-graphs: Euler tours, Gauss circuits and rotating circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yutko, Denis P

    2011-09-30

    We consider connected finite 4-valent graphs with the structure of opposite edges at each vertex (framed 4-graphs). For any of such graphs there exist Euler tours, in travelling along which at each vertex we turn from an edge to a nonopposite one (rotating circuits); and at the same time, it is not true that for any such graph there exists an Euler tour passing from an edge to the opposite one at each vertex (a Gauss circuit). The main result of the work is an explicit formula connecting the adjacency matrices of the Gauss circuit and an arbitrary Euler tour. This formula immediately gives us a criterion for the existence of a Gauss circuit on a given framed 4-graph. It turns out that the results are also valid for all symmetric matrices (not just for matrices realisable by a chord diagram). Bibliography: 24 titles.

  5. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  6. A real-time detector system for precise timing of audiovisual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Henelius, Andreas; Jagadeesan, Sharman; Huotilainen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    The successful recording of neurophysiologic signals, such as event-related potentials (ERPs) or event-related magnetic fields (ERFs), relies on precise information of stimulus presentation times. We have developed an accurate and flexible audiovisual sensor solution operating in real-time for on-line use in both auditory and visual ERP and ERF paradigms. The sensor functions independently of the used audio or video stimulus presentation tools or signal acquisition system. The sensor solution consists of two independent sensors; one for sound and one for light. The microcontroller-based audio sensor incorporates a novel approach to the detection of natural sounds such as multipart audio stimuli, using an adjustable dead time. This aids in producing exact markers for complex auditory stimuli and reduces the number of false detections. The analog photosensor circuit detects changes in light intensity on the screen and produces a marker for changes exceeding a threshold. The microcontroller software for the audio sensor is free and open source, allowing other researchers to customise the sensor for use in specific auditory ERP/ERF paradigms. The hardware schematics and software for the audiovisual sensor are freely available from the webpage of the authors' lab.

  7. High-precision timing of 42 millisecond pulsars with the European Pulsar Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desvignes, G.; Caballero, R. N.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Champion, D. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Janssen, G. H.; Lazarus, P.; Osłowski, S.; Babak, S.; Bassa, C. G.; Brem, P.; Burgay, M.; Cognard, I.; Gair, J. R.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lassus, A.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Perrodin, D.; Petiteau, A.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M. B.; Rosado, P. A.; Sanidas, S.; Sesana, A.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Taylor, S. R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; van Haasteren, R.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the high-precision timing of 42 radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). This EPTA Data Release 1.0 extends up to mid-2014 and baselines range from 7-18 yr. It forms the basis for the stochastic gravitational-wave background, anisotropic background, and continuous-wave limits recently presented by the EPTA elsewhere. The Bayesian timing analysis performed with TEMPONEST yields the detection of several new parameters: seven parallaxes, nine proper motions and, in the case of six binary pulsars, an apparent change of the semimajor axis. We find the NE2001 Galactic electron density model to be a better match to our parallax distances (after correction from the Lutz-Kelker bias) than the M2 and M3 models by Schnitzeler. However, we measure an average uncertainty of 80 per cent (fractional) for NE2001, three times larger than what is typically assumed in the literature. We revisit the transverse velocity distribution for a set of 19 isolated and 57 binary MSPs and find no statistical difference between these two populations. We detect Shapiro delay in the timing residuals of PSRs J1600-3053 and J1918-0642, implying pulsar and companion masses m_p=1.22_{-0.35}^{+0.5} M_{⊙}, m_c = 0.21_{-0.04}^{+0.06} M_{⊙} and m_p=1.25_{-0.4}^{+0.6} M_{⊙}, m_c = 0.23_{-0.05}^{+0.07} M_{⊙}, respectively. Finally, we use the measurement of the orbital period derivative to set a stringent constraint on the distance to PSRs J1012+5307 and J1909-3744, and set limits on the longitude of ascending node through the search of the annual-orbital parallax for PSRs J1600-3053 and J1909-3744.

  8. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s-1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  9. Crafting a Gauss Gun Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Matthew E.; Blodgett, E. D.

    2006-12-01

    A Gauss Gun launches a ferromagnetic projectile using a pulsed electromagnet. This demonstration provides a nice counterpoint to the popular Thompson's jumping ring demonstration, which launches a nonferromagnetic ring via repulsion of an induced current. The pulsed current must be short enough in duration so that the projectile is not retarded by lingering current in the launch solenoid, but also large enough to provide a suitably impressive velocity. This project involved an iterative design process, as we worked through balancing all the different design criteria. We recommend it as a very nice electronics design project which will produce a very portable and enjoyable demonstration. AAPT sponsor Earl Blodgett.

  10. Laplace-Gauss and Helmholtz-Gauss paraxial modes in media with quadratic refraction index.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Aleksei P; Plachenov, Alexandr B

    2016-04-01

    The scalar theory of paraxial wave propagation in an axisymmetric medium where the refraction index quadratically depends on transverse variables is addressed. Exact solutions of the corresponding parabolic equation are presented, generalizing the Laplace-Gauss and Helmholtz-Gauss modes earlier known for homogeneous media. Also, a generalization of a zero-order asymmetric Bessel-Gauss beam is given.

  11. Sex differences in accuracy and precision when judging time to arrival: data from two Internet studies.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Geoff; Sinclair, Kamila

    2011-12-01

    We report two Internet studies that investigated sex differences in the accuracy and precision of judging time to arrival. We used accuracy to mean the ability to match the actual time to arrival and precision to mean the consistency with which each participant made their judgments. Our task was presented as a computer game in which a toy UFO moved obliquely towards the participant through a virtual three-dimensional space on route to a docking station. The UFO disappeared before docking and participants pressed their space bar at the precise moment they thought the UFO would have docked. Study 1 showed it was possible to conduct quantitative studies of spatiotemporal judgments in virtual reality via the Internet and confirmed reports that men are more accurate because women underestimate, but found no difference in precision measured as intra-participant variation. Study 2 repeated Study 1 with five additional presentations of one condition to provide a better measure of precision. Again, men were more accurate than women but there were no sex differences in precision. However, within the coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT) literature, of those studies that report sex differences, a majority found that males are both more accurate and more precise than females. Noting that many CAT studies report no sex differences, we discuss appropriate interpretations of such null findings. While acknowledging that CAT performance may be influenced by experience we suggest that the sex difference may have originated among our ancestors with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting and women for gathering.

  12. Self-motion evokes precise spike timing in the primate vestibular system

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Mohsen; Chacron, Maurice J.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate representation of self-motion requires the efficient processing of sensory input by the vestibular system. Conventional wisdom is that vestibular information is exclusively transmitted through changes in firing rate, yet under this assumption vestibular neurons display relatively poor detection and information transmission. Here, we carry out an analysis of the system's coding capabilities by recording neuronal responses to repeated presentations of naturalistic stimuli. We find that afferents with greater intrinsic variability reliably discriminate between different stimulus waveforms through differential patterns of precise (∼6 ms) spike timing, while those with minimal intrinsic variability do not. A simple mathematical model provides an explanation for this result. Postsynaptic central neurons also demonstrate precise spike timing, suggesting that higher brain areas also represent self-motion using temporally precise firing. These findings demonstrate that two distinct sensory channels represent vestibular information: one using rate coding and the other that takes advantage of precise spike timing. PMID:27786265

  13. Timing Precision in Population Coding of Natural Scenes in the Early Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Desbordes, Gaëlle; Jin, Jianzhong; Weng, Chong; Lesica, Nicholas A; Stanley, Garrett B; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The timing of spiking activity across neurons is a fundamental aspect of the neural population code. Individual neurons in the retina, thalamus, and cortex can have very precise and repeatable responses but exhibit degraded temporal precision in response to suboptimal stimuli. To investigate the functional implications for neural populations in natural conditions, we recorded in vivo the simultaneous responses, to movies of natural scenes, of multiple thalamic neurons likely converging to a common neuronal target in primary visual cortex. We show that the response of individual neurons is less precise at lower contrast, but that spike timing precision across neurons is relatively insensitive to global changes in visual contrast. Overall, spike timing precision within and across cells is on the order of 10 ms. Since closely timed spikes are more efficient in inducing a spike in downstream cortical neurons, and since fine temporal precision is necessary to represent the more slowly varying natural environment, we argue that preserving relative spike timing at a ∼10-ms resolution is a crucial property of the neural code entering cortex. PMID:19090624

  14. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Jentsch, Ch.; Schleich, W. P.

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  15. Stellar Astrophysics Using Ultra-High Precision CCD Time Series Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S.; Everett, M.; Huber, M.; Ciardi, D.; van Belle, G.

    2001-05-01

    Using time-series CCD photometry and a wide-field imager, we have extended the techniques of differential photometry to provide robust photometric precisions for each star over the entire field of view. Reaching photometric precisions of 2 milli-magnitudes, we produced high cadence light curves for over 12,000 stars at mid- and high galactic latitude. The fraction of stars seen to be variable is higher than the canonical wisdom, being 10-14 will present the details of our techniques, sample light curves, methods to access the data, and a summary of astrophysical uses of such high precision data.

  16. Precise Time-Tag Generator For A Local-Area-Network Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Tran, Khoa Duy

    1995-01-01

    Time-tag-generating circuit designed for use in LAN monitor, monitors frames of data transmitted among computers on local-area network (LAN). To each frame of data that LAN monitor receives from LAN, time-tag generator appends ancillary data on time of arrival of frame, precise to within 1 microsecond of centrally generated time signal. Inserts ancillary time data in place of already used frame-check data before frames of data stored in memory of LAN monitor.

  17. Bounce universe from string-inspired Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Makarenko, Andrey N.; Myagky, Alexandr N.; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: andre@tspu.edu.ru E-mail: odintsov@ieec.uab.es

    2015-04-01

    We explore cosmology with a bounce in Gauss-Bonnet gravity where the Gauss-Bonnet invariant couples to a dynamical scalar field. In particular, the potential and and Gauss-Bonnet coupling function of the scalar field are reconstructed so that the cosmological bounce can be realized in the case that the scale factor has hyperbolic and exponential forms. Furthermore, we examine the relation between the bounce in the string (Jordan) and Einstein frames by using the conformal transformation between these conformal frames. It is shown that in general, the property of the bounce point in the string frame changes after the frame is moved to the Einstein frame. Moreover, it is found that at the point in the Einstein frame corresponding to the point of the cosmological bounce in the string frame, the second derivative of the scale factor has an extreme value. In addition, it is demonstrated that at the time of the cosmological bounce in the Einstein frame, there is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling function of the scalar field, although it does not exist in the string frame.

  18. Low Somatic Sodium Conductance Enhances Action Potential Precision in Time-Coding Auditory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ramamurthy, Bina; Neef, Andreas; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A

    2016-11-23

    Auditory nerve fibers encode sounds in the precise timing of action potentials (APs), which is used for such computations as sound localization. Timing information is relayed through several cell types in the auditory brainstem that share an unusual property: their APs are not overshooting, suggesting that the cells have very low somatic sodium conductance (gNa). However, it is not clear how gNa influences temporal precision. We addressed this by comparing bushy cells (BCs) in the mouse cochlear nucleus with T-stellate cells (SCs), which do have normal overshooting APs. BCs play a central role in both relaying and refining precise timing information from the auditory nerve, whereas SCs discard precise timing information and encode the envelope of sound amplitude. Nucleated-patch recording at near-physiological temperature indicated that the Na current density was 62% lower in BCs, and the voltage dependence of gNa inactivation was 13 mV hyperpolarized compared with SCs. We endowed BCs with SC-like gNa using two-electrode dynamic clamp and found that synaptic activity at physiologically relevant rates elicited APs with significantly lower probability, through increased activation of delayed rectifier channels. In addition, for two near-simultaneous synaptic inputs, the window of coincidence detection widened significantly with increasing gNa, indicating that refinement of temporal information by BCs is degraded by gNa Thus, reduced somatic gNa appears to be an adaption for enhancing fidelity and precision in time-coding neurons.

  19. Asymmetric Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, V V; Kovalev, A A; Skidanov, R V; Soifer, V A

    2014-09-01

    We propose a three-parameter family of asymmetric Bessel-Gauss (aBG) beams with integer and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The aBG beams are described by the product of a Gaussian function by the nth-order Bessel function of the first kind of complex argument, having finite energy. The aBG beam's asymmetry degree depends on a real parameter c≥0: at c=0, the aBG beam is coincident with a conventional radially symmetric Bessel-Gauss (BG) beam; with increasing c, the aBG beam acquires a semicrescent shape, then becoming elongated along the y axis and shifting along the x axis for c≫1. In the initial plane, the intensity distribution of the aBG beams has a countable number of isolated optical nulls on the x axis, which result in optical vortices with unit topological charge and opposite signs on the different sides of the origin. As the aBG beam propagates, the vortex centers undergo a nonuniform rotation with the entire beam about the optical axis (c≫1), making a π/4 turn at the Rayleigh range and another π/4 turn after traveling the remaining distance. At different values of the c parameter, the optical nulls of the transverse intensity distribution change their position, thus changing the OAM that the beam carries. An isolated optical null on the optical axis generates an optical vortex with topological charge n. A vortex laser beam shaped as a rotating semicrescent has been generated using a spatial light modulator.

  20. Precise time technology for selected Air Force systems: Present status and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yannoni, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    Precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology is becoming increasingly significant to Air Force operations as digital techniques find expanded utility in military missions. Timing has a key role in the function as well as in navigation. A survey of the PTTI needs of several Air Force systems is presented. Current technology supporting these needs was reviewed and new requirements are emphasized for systems as they transfer from initial development to final operational deployment.

  1. The pre-states, the time precision and the response pattern of oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xing

    1998-03-01

    Rate and temporal codes are two main strategies for encoding neural information. The temporal code contains more information but requires substantial timing precision of the spike discharges. Cortical neurons can respond to stimulation with good time precision. However, action potential responses depend not only upon the stimulus but also upon the history of a neuron. We have studied this problem with an oscillatory system: the primary afferent cells that innervate the ampullary electroreceptors in the paddlefish. The endogenous discharges represent a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate how the pre-state of a neuron affects the response timing precision to an applied stimulus, by re-ordering the data according to the time between the last endogenous spike and the delivery of the stimulus. Raster plots of discharges show clear striped patterns for the re-ordered data. In contrast, plots of the original data show random distributions or broadened stripes. We confirm this phenomenon by numerical simulation using a noisy Hodgkin-Huxley model with and without an endogenous oscillator. This technique can also be applied to other systems, e.g. cortical neurons, where oscillations are thought to be important. Oscillatory neurons demonstrate that the pre-state of the system is crucial in determining the post stimulus spike timing and precision.

  2. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  3. TEE, an estimator for the precision of eclipse and transit minimum times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, H. J.; Tingley, B.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Transit or eclipse timing variations have proven to be a valuable tool in exoplanet research. However, no simple way to estimate the potential precision of such timing measures has been presented yet, nor are guidelines available regarding the relation between timing errors and sampling rate. Aims: A timing error estimator (TEE) equation is presented that requires only basic transit parameters as input. With the TEE, estimating timing precision for actual data and for future instruments, such as the TESS and PLATO space missions, is straightforward. Methods: A derivation of the timing error based on a trapezoidal transit shape is given. We also verify the TEE on realistically modelled transits using Monte Carlo simulations and determine its validity range, exploring in particular the interplay between ingress/egress times and sampling rates. Results: The simulations show that the TEE gives timing errors very close to the correct value, as long as the temporal sampling is faster than transit ingress/egress durations and transits with very low S/N are avoided. Conclusions: The TEE is a useful tool for estimating eclipse or transit timing errors in actual and future data sets. In combination with a previously published equation to estimate period-errors, predictions for the ephemeris precision of long-coverage observations are possible as well. The tests for the TEE's validity range also led to implications for instrumental design. Temporal sampling has to be faster than transit ingress or egress durations, or a loss in timing precision will occur. An application to the TESS mission shows that transits close to its detection limit will have timing uncertainties that exceed 1 h within a few months of their acquisition. Prompt follow-up observations will be needed to avoid "losing" their ephemerides.

  4. Usefulness of precise time stamping for exposing network characteristics on high-speed links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatsuji, Yoshinori; Tsuru, Masato; Katsuno, Satoshi; Oie, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    To expose network characteristics by active/passive measurements, measuring some timing issues such as one-way delay, one-way queuing delay, and inter-packet time is essential, and is conducted by time-stamping for packets passing through an observation point. However, emerging high-speed networks require very high precision of time-stamping, far beyond the precision of conventional software-based time-stamping systems such as 'tcpdump'. For example, the inter-packet time of two consecutive 64-byte length packets on a giga-bit link can be less than 0.001 msec. In this paper, to demonstrate the usefulness and strong necessity of precise time-stamping on high-speed links, experiments of network measurements over a nation-wide IPv6 testbed in Japan have been performed, using a hardware-based time-stamping system that can synchronize to GPS with a high resolution of 0.0001 msec and within a small error of 0.0003 msec. In our experiments, several interesting results are seen, e.g., i) the distribution of one-way queuing delay exhibits a considerable difference depending on the size and the type (UDP/ICMP) of packets; ii) the minimal one-way delays for various sizes of UDP/ICMP packets give an accurate estimate of the transmission delay and the propagation delay; iii) the correlation between interpacket times at the sender and the receiver sides in a sequence of TCP ACK packets clearly shows the degree of ACK compression; iv) the inter-packet time in a UDP stream generated by a DV streaming application shows three dominant sending rates and a very rare peak rate, which might provide crucial information to bandwidth dimensioning; all of which would indicate the usefulness of precise time-stamping.

  5. Complex source point theory of paraxial and nonparaxial cosine-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R

    2013-02-15

    It shown how cosine-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss beams can be generated using the complex source point theory. Paraxial beams are treated first. An analytic expression is derived for the nonparaxial cosine-Gaussian beam, based on the complex source point approach, and numerical results are presented to illustrate its behavior. A way to generate nonparaxial Bessel-Gauss beams is also indicated.

  6. An effective method to read out large scintillator areas with precise timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bähr, J.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Kantserov, V.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Nahnhauer, R.

    1998-11-01

    Using scintillator tile technology several square meters of plastic scintillator are read out by only two photomultipliers with a time precision of about 1.5 nsec. Two examples are discussed to build a detector based on this technology to search for cosmic muons and neutrinos.

  7. Delay times of a LiDAR-guided precision sprayer control system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate flow control systems in triggering sprays against detected targets are needed for precision variable-rate sprayer development. System delay times due to the laser-sensor data buffer, software operation, and hydraulic-mechanical component response were determined for a control system used fo...

  8. Gauss-Lobatto to Bernstein polynomials transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluccio, Loredana; Eisinberg, Alfredo; Fedele, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to transform a polynomial expressed as a weighted sum of discrete orthogonal polynomials on Gauss-Lobatto nodes into Bernstein form and vice versa. Explicit formulas and recursion expressions are derived. Moreover, an efficient algorithm for the transformation from Gauss-Lobatto to Bernstein is proposed. Finally, in order to show the robustness of the proposed algorithm, experimental results are reported.

  9. Time Delay Embedding Increases Estimation Precision of Models of Intraindividual Variability

    PubMed Central

    von Oertzen, Timo; Boker, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the precision of parameters estimated from local samples of time dependent functions. We find that time delay embedding, i.e. structuring data prior to analysis by constructing a data matrix of overlapping samples, increases the precision of parameter estimates and in turn statistical power compared to standard independent rows of panel data. We show that the reason for this effect is that the sign of estimation bias depends on the position of a misplaced data point if there is no a priori knowledge about initial conditions of the time dependent function. Hence, we reason that the advantage of time delayed embedding is likely to hold true for a wide variety of functions. We support these conclusions both by mathematical analysis and two simulations. PMID:23335820

  10. A 7.5 ps single-shot precision integrated time counter with segmented delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepacki, K.; Szplet, R.; Pelka, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of time interval counter featuring the single-shot precision of 7.5 ps root mean square (rms) and measurement range of 1 ms. These parameters have been achieved by combining direct counting method with a two-stage interpolation within a single clock period. Both stages of interpolation are based on the use of tapped delay lines stabilized by delay locked loop mechanism. In the first stage, a coarse resolution is obtained with the aid of high frequency multiphase clock, while in the second stage a sub-gate delay resolution is achieved with the use of differential delay line. To reduce the nonlinearities of conversion and to improve the precision of measurement, a novel segmented delay line is proposed. An important feature of this segmented delay line is partial overlapping of measurement range and resulting enhancement of both resolution and precision of time interval counter. The maximum integral nonlinearity error of the fine-stage interpolators does not exceed 16 ps and 14 ps in START and STOP interpolators, respectively. These errors have been identified by statistical calibration procedure and corrected to achieve single-shot precision better than 7.5 ps (rms). The time counter is integrated in a single ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip using a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process.

  11. A 7.5 ps single-shot precision integrated time counter with segmented delay line.

    PubMed

    Klepacki, K; Szplet, R; Pelka, R

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of time interval counter featuring the single-shot precision of 7.5 ps root mean square (rms) and measurement range of 1 ms. These parameters have been achieved by combining direct counting method with a two-stage interpolation within a single clock period. Both stages of interpolation are based on the use of tapped delay lines stabilized by delay locked loop mechanism. In the first stage, a coarse resolution is obtained with the aid of high frequency multiphase clock, while in the second stage a sub-gate delay resolution is achieved with the use of differential delay line. To reduce the nonlinearities of conversion and to improve the precision of measurement, a novel segmented delay line is proposed. An important feature of this segmented delay line is partial overlapping of measurement range and resulting enhancement of both resolution and precision of time interval counter. The maximum integral nonlinearity error of the fine-stage interpolators does not exceed 16 ps and 14 ps in START and STOP interpolators, respectively. These errors have been identified by statistical calibration procedure and corrected to achieve single-shot precision better than 7.5 ps (rms). The time counter is integrated in a single ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip using a standard cost-effective 0.35 μm CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) process.

  12. GPS Carrier-Phase Time and Frequency Transfer With Different Versions of Precise Point Positioning Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    standards at PTB. For this reason, a Dicom GTR50 time and frequency transfer receiver has been combined with a transportable passive hydrogen maser...comparisons described in this paper have been done with Dicom GTR50 time and frequency transfer receivers. The receiver is based on the Javad GGD...software. Figure 1. The Dicom GTR50 receiver and its mode of operation. In this setup, the precision of the results is limited by the

  13. Precision of estimating time of death by vitreous potassium--comparison of various equations.

    PubMed

    Gamero Lucas, J J; Romero, J L; Ramos, H M; Arufe, M I; Vizcaya, M A

    1992-10-01

    This paper is a study of the precision of estimating the time since death comparing the equations developed by different authors. Our aim is to determine with the maximum degree of accuracy the exact time of death of the individual. We consider that the study has been fully justified by the observed differences in the results obtained from the different equations under study when the concentration of potassium in the vitreous humour was identical.

  14. A Comparison of the Highest Precision Commonly Available Time Transfer Methods: TWSTT and GPS CV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    A COMPARISON OF THE HIGHEST PRECISION COMMONLY AVAILABLE TIME TRANSFER METHODS: TWSTT AND GPS CV James A. DeYoung, Francine Vannicola, and Angela...D. McKinley U.S. Naval Observatory, Time Service Department 3450 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20392, USA dey@herschel.usno.navy.mil, hv...view (CY) and the ’Auo-Way SoteUite Time Transfer (TWSTT) method. The GPS CV time transfer data are jonned from shict 13- minute common-view tracks

  15. Proceedings of the 14th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications Planning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardrip, S. C. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Developments and applications in the field of frequency and time are addressed. Specific topics include rubidium frequency standards, future timing requirements, noise and atomic standards, hydrogen maser technology, synchronization, and quartz technology.

  16. Time-of-flight measurement with femtosecond pulses for high precision ranging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kim, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    The time-of-flight of light pulses has long been used as a direct measure of distance, but the state-of-the-art measurement precision using conventional light pulses or microwaves reaches only several hundreds of micromeres. This is due to the bandwidth limit of the photodetectors available today, which is in the picosecond range at best. Here, we improve the time-of-flight precision to the nanometer regime by timing femtosecond pulses through phase-locking control of the pulse repetition rate using the optical cross-correlation technique that exploits a second-harmonic birefringence crystal and a balance photodetector. The enhanced capability is maintained at long range without periodic ambiguity, being well suited to terrestrial lidar applications such as geodetic surveying, range finders and absolute altimeters. This method could also be applied to future space missions of formation-flying satellites for synthetic aperture imaging and remote experiments related to the general relativity theory.

  17. Loran-C expansion: Impact on precise time/time interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, J. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    On 16 May 1974, it was announced that Loran-C was chosen as the navigation system to serve the U. S. Coastal Confluence Zone. At the present time, reliable CONUS Loran-C groundwave timing coverage extends westward only about as far as Boulder, CO. The groundwave hyperbolic and timing coverage which will result from the planned CONUS expansion are illustrated. Time frames are provided. A status report on the planned reduction in Loran-C PTTI tolerances is presented.

  18. The Effect of Neural Noise on Spike Time Precision in a Detailed CA3 Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuriscak, Eduard; Marsalek, Petr; Stroffek, Julius; Wünsch, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies emphasize the role of the millisecond precision of neuronal spike times as an important coding mechanism for transmitting and representing information in the central nervous system. We investigate the spike time precision of a multicompartmental pyramidal neuron model of the CA3 region of the hippocampus under the influence of various sources of neuronal noise. We describe differences in the contribution to noise originating from voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic vesicle release, and vesicle quantal size. We analyze the effect of interspike intervals and the voltage course preceding the firing of spikes on the spike-timing jitter. The main finding of this study is the ranking of different noise sources according to their contribution to spike time precision. The most influential is synaptic vesicle release noise, causing the spike jitter to vary from 1 ms to 7 ms of a mean value 2.5 ms. Of second importance was the noise incurred by vesicle quantal size variation causing the spike time jitter to vary from 0.03 ms to 0.6 ms. Least influential was the voltage-gated channel noise generating spike jitter from 0.02 ms to 0.15 ms. PMID:22778784

  19. Laguerre-Gauss beams versus Bessel beams showdown: peer comparison.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, Job; Arroyo-Carrasco, Maximino Luis; Iturbe-Castillo, Marcelo David; Chávez-Cerda, Sabino

    2015-08-15

    We present for the first time a comparison under similar circumstances between Laguerre-Gauss beams (LGBs) and Bessel beams (BB), and show that the former can be a better option for many applications in which BBs are currently used. By solving the Laguerre-Gauss differential equation in the asymptotic limit of a large radial index, we find the parameters to perform a peer comparison, showing that LGBs can propagate quasi-nondiffracting beams within the same region of space where the corresponding BBs do. We also demonstrate that LGBs, which have the property of self-healing, are more robust in the sense that they can propagate further than BBs under similar initial conditions.

  20. Precise terrestrial time: A means for improved ballistic missile guidance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrsam, E. E.; Cresswell, S. A.; Mckelvey, G. R.; Matthews, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach developed to improve the ground instrumentation time tagging accuracy and adapted to support the Minuteman ICBM program is desired. The Timing Insertion Unit (TIU) technique produces a telemetry data time tagging resolution of one tenth of a microsecond, with a relative intersite accuracy after corrections and velocity data (range, azimuth, elevation and range rate) also used in missile guidance system analysis can be correlated to within ten microseconds of the telemetry guidance data. This requires precise timing synchronization between the metric and telemetry instrumentation sites. The timing synchronization can be achieved by using the radar automatic phasing system time correlation methods. Other time correlation techniques such as Television (TV) Line-10 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GEOS) terrestial timing receivers are also considered.

  1. Re-creating Gauss's method for non-electrical absolute measurements of magnetic fields and moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Baak, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    In 1832, Gauss made the first absolute measurements of magnetic fields and of magnetic moments in experiments that are straightforward and instructive to replicate. We show, using rare-earth permanent magnets and a variation of Gauss's technique, that the horizontal component of the ambient geomagnetic field, as well as the size of the magnetic moments of such magnets, can be found. The method shows the connection between the SI and cgs emu unit systems for these quantities and permits an absolute realization of the Ampere with considerable precision.

  2. Real-Time Single Frequency Precise Point Positioning Using SBAS Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Jia, Chun; Zhao, Lin; Cheng, Jianhua; Liu, Jianxu; Ding, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Real-time single frequency precise point positioning (PPP) is a promising technique for high-precision navigation with sub-meter or even centimeter-level accuracy because of its convenience and low cost. The navigation performance of single frequency PPP heavily depends on the real-time availability and quality of correction products for satellite orbits and satellite clocks. Satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) provides the correction products in real-time, but they are intended to be used for wide area differential positioning at 1 meter level precision. By imposing the constraints for ionosphere error, we have developed a real-time single frequency PPP method by sufficiently utilizing SBAS correction products. The proposed PPP method are tested with static and kinematic data, respectively. The static experimental results show that the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can reach decimeter level, and achieve an improvement of at least 30% when compared with the traditional SBAS method. The positioning convergence of the proposed PPP method can be achieved in 636 epochs at most in static mode. In the kinematic experiment, the position accuracy of the proposed PPP method can be improved by at least 20 cm relative to the SBAS method. Furthermore, it has revealed that the proposed PPP method can achieve decimeter level convergence within 500 s in the kinematic mode. PMID:27517930

  3. The GFZ real-time GNSS precise positioning service system and its adaption for COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Zhang, Hongping; Nischan, Thomas; Wickert, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the IGS real-time Pilot Project, GFZ has been developing its own real-time precise positioning service for various applications. An operational system at GFZ is now broadcasting real-time orbits, clocks, global ionospheric model, uncalibrated phase delays and regional atmospheric corrections for standard PPP, PPP with ambiguity fixing, single-frequency PPP and regional augmented PPP. To avoid developing various algorithms for different applications, we proposed a uniform algorithm and implemented it into our real-time software. In the new processing scheme, we employed un-differenced raw observations with atmospheric delays as parameters, which are properly constrained by real-time derived global ionospheric model or regional atmospheric corrections and by the empirical characteristics of the atmospheric delay variation in time and space. The positioning performance in terms of convergence time and ambiguity fixing depends mainly on the quality of the received atmospheric information and the spatial and temporal constraints. The un-differenced raw observation model can not only integrate PPP and NRTK into a seamless positioning service, but also syncretize these two techniques into a unique model and algorithm. Furthermore, it is suitable for both dual-frequency and sing-frequency receivers. Based on the real-time data streams from IGS, EUREF and SAPOS reference networks, we can provide services of global precise point positioning (PPP) with 5-10 cm accuracy, PPP with ambiguity-fixing of 2-5 cm accuracy, PPP using single-frequency receiver with accuracy of better than 50 cm and PPP with regional augmentation for instantaneous ambiguity resolution of 1-3 cm accuracy. We adapted the system for current COMPASS to provide PPP service. COMPASS observations from a regional network of nine stations are used for precise orbit determination and clock estimation in simulated real-time mode, the orbit and clock products are applied for real-time precise point

  4. The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2015-08-15

    We study the time behavior of the Fokker–Planck equation in Zwanzig’s rule (the backward-Ito’s rule) based on the Langevin equation of Brownian motion with an anomalous diffusion in a complex medium. The diffusion coefficient is a function in momentum space and follows a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. We obtain the precise time-dependent analytical solution of the Fokker–Planck equation and at long time the solution approaches to a stationary power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. As a test, numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution. - Highlights: • The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion is found. • The anomalous diffusion satisfies a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. • At long time the time-dependent solution approaches to a power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. • Numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution.

  5. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  6. a Solution to Low Rfm Fitting Precision of Planetary Orbiter Images Caused by Exposure Time Changing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Xu, B.; Di, K.; Jia, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to the low RFM fitting precision caused by exposure time changing using sensor correction. First, we establish a new rigorous geometric model, with the same ephemerides, attitudes and sensor design parameters of Chang'E-2 and HRSC images, using an equal exposure time of each scan line. The original rigorous geometric model is also established. With a given height, we can establish the correspondence between the two rigorous models. Then we generate a sensor corrected image by resampling the original image using an average elevation or a digital elevation model. We found that the sensor corrected images can be used for topographic mapping which maintains almost the same precision of the original images under certain conditions. And RFM can fit rigorous geometric model of the sensor corrected image very well. Preliminary experimental results show that the RMS residual error of the RFM fitting can reach to 1/100 pixel level too. Using the proposed solution, sensors with changing exposure time can be precisely modelled by the generic RFM.

  7. Mass spectrometry in Earth sciences: the precise and accurate measurement of time.

    PubMed

    Schaltegger, Urs; Wotzlaw, Jörn-Frederik; Ovtcharova, Maria; Chiaradia, Massimo; Spikings, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Precise determinations of the isotopic compositions of a variety of elements is a widely applied tool in Earth sciences. Isotope ratios are used to quantify rates of geological processes that occurred during the previous 4.5 billion years, and also at the present time. An outstanding application is geochronology, which utilizes the production of radiogenic daughter isotopes by the radioactive decay of parent isotopes. Geochronological tools, involving isotopic analysis of selected elements from smallest volumes of minerals by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, provide precise and accurate measurements of time throughout the geological history of our planet over nine orders of magnitude, from the accretion of the proto-planetary disk, to the timing of the last glaciation. This article summarizes the recent efforts of the Isotope Geochemistry, Geochronology and Thermochronology research group at the University of Geneva to advance the U-Pb geochronological tool to achieve unprecedented precision and accuracy, and presents two examples of its application to two significant open questions in Earth sciences: what are the triggers and timescales of volcanic supereruptions, and what were the causes of mass extinctions in the geological past, driven by global climatic and environmental deterioration?

  8. Long life of Gauss-Bonnet corrected black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2010-10-15

    Dictated by the string theory and various higher dimensional scenarios, black holes in D>4-dimensional space-times must have higher curvature corrections. The first and dominant term is quadratic in curvature, and called the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term. We shall show that although the Gauss-Bonnet correction changes black hole's geometry only softly, the emission of gravitons is suppressed by many orders even at quite small values of the GB coupling. The huge suppression of the graviton emission is due to the multiplication of the two effects: the quick cooling of the black hole when one turns on the GB coupling and the exponential decreasing of the gray-body factor of the tensor type of gravitons at small and moderate energies. At higher D the tensor gravitons emission is dominant, so that the overall lifetime of black holes with Gauss-Bonnet corrections is many orders larger than was expected. This effect should be relevant for the future experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  9. The LHCb Simulation Application, Gauss: Design, Evolution and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Corti, G.; Easo, S.; Jones, C. R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Pappagallo, M.; Robbe, P.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb simulation application, Gauss, is based on the Gaudi framework and on experiment basic components such as the Event Model and Detector Description. Gauss also depends on external libraries for the generation of the primary events (PYTHIA 6, EvtGen, etc.) and on GEANT4 for particle transport in the experimental setup. The application supports the production of different types of events from minimum bias to B physics signals and particle guns. It is used for purely generator-level studies as well as full simulations. Gauss is used both directly by users and in massive central productions on the grid. The design and implementation of the application and its evolution due to evolving requirements will be described as in the case of the recently adopted Python-based configuration or the possibility of taking into account detectors conditions via a Simulation Conditions database. The challenge of supporting at the same time the flexibililty needed for the different tasks for which it is used, from evaluation of physics reach to background modeling, together with the stability and reliabilty of the code will also be described.

  10. Auditory-motor entrainment and phonological skills: precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH)

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Phonological skills are enhanced by music training, but the mechanisms enabling this cross-domain enhancement remain unknown. To explain this cross-domain transfer, we propose a precise auditory timing hypothesis (PATH) whereby entrainment practice is the core mechanism underlying enhanced phonological abilities in musicians. Both rhythmic synchronization and language skills such as consonant discrimination, detection of word and phrase boundaries, and conversational turn-taking rely on the perception of extremely fine-grained timing details in sound. Auditory-motor timing is an acoustic feature which meets all five of the pre-conditions necessary for cross-domain enhancement to occur (Patel, 2011, 2012, 2014). There is overlap between the neural networks that process timing in the context of both music and language. Entrainment to music demands more precise timing sensitivity than does language processing. Moreover, auditory-motor timing integration captures the emotion of the trainee, is repeatedly practiced, and demands focused attention. The PATH predicts that musical training emphasizing entrainment will be particularly effective in enhancing phonological skills. PMID:25505879

  11. Abdicating power for control: a precision timing strategy to modulate function of flight power muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sponberg, S.; Daniel, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles driving rhythmic locomotion typically show strong dependence of power on the timing or phase of activation. This is particularly true in insects' main flight muscles, canonical examples of muscles thought to have a dedicated power function. However, in the moth (Manduca sexta), these muscles normally activate at a phase where the instantaneous slope of the power–phase curve is steep and well below maximum power. We provide four lines of evidence demonstrating that, contrary to the current paradigm, the moth's nervous system establishes significant control authority in these muscles through precise timing modulation: (i) left–right pairs of flight muscles normally fire precisely, within 0.5–0.6 ms of each other; (ii) during a yawing optomotor response, left—right muscle timing differences shift throughout a wider 8 ms timing window, enabling at least a 50 per cent left–right power differential; (iii) timing differences correlate with turning torque; and (iv) the downstroke power muscles alone causally account for 47 per cent of turning torque. To establish (iv), we altered muscle activation during intact behaviour by stimulating individual muscle potentials to impose left—right timing differences. Because many organisms also have muscles operating with high power–phase gains (Δpower/Δphase), this motor control strategy may be ubiquitous in locomotor systems. PMID:22833272

  12. Keystroke dynamics and timing: accuracy, precision and difference between hands in pianist's performance.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Alberto E; Ardigò, Luca P; McKee, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A commercially available acoustic grand piano, originally provided with keystroke speed sensors, is proposed as a standard instrument to quantitatively assess the technical side of pianist's performance, after the mechanical characteristics of the keyboard have been measured. We found a positional dependence of the relationship between the applied force and the resulting downstroke speed (i.e. treble keys descend fastest) due to the different hammer/hammer shaft mass to be accelerated. When this effect was removed by a custom software, the ability of 14 pianists was analysed in terms of variability in stroke intervals and keystroke speeds. C-major scales played by separate hands at different imposed tempos and at 5 subjectively chosen graded force levels were analysed to get insights into the achieved neuromuscular control. Accuracy and precision of time intervals and descent velocity of keystrokes were obtained by processing the generated MIDI files. The results quantitatively show: the difference between hands, the trade off between force range and tempo, and between time interval precision and tempo, the lower precision of descent speed associated to 'soft' playing, etc. Those results reflect well-established physiological and motor control characteristics of our movement system. Apart from revealing fundamental aspects of pianism, the proposed method could be used as a standard tool also for ergonomic (e.g. the mechanical work and power of playing), didactic and rehabilitation monitoring of pianists.

  13. Precision of Readout at the hunchback Gene: Analyzing Short Transcription Time Traces in Living Fly Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Huy; Ferraro, Teresa; Lucas, Tanguy; Guillou, Aurelien; Coppey, Mathieu; Dostatni, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous expression of the hunchback gene in the numerous nuclei of the developing fly embryo gives us a unique opportunity to study how transcription is regulated in living organisms. A recently developed MS2-MCP technique for imaging nascent messenger RNA in living Drosophila embryos allows us to quantify the dynamics of the developmental transcription process. The initial measurement of the morphogens by the hunchback promoter takes place during very short cell cycles, not only giving each nucleus little time for a precise readout, but also resulting in short time traces of transcription. Additionally, the relationship between the measured signal and the promoter state depends on the molecular design of the reporting probe. We develop an analysis approach based on tailor made autocorrelation functions that overcomes the short trace problems and quantifies the dynamics of transcription initiation. Based on live imaging data, we identify signatures of bursty transcription initiation from the hunchback promoter. We show that the precision of the expression of the hunchback gene to measure its position along the anterior-posterior axis is low both at the boundary and in the anterior even at cycle 13, suggesting additional post-transcriptional averaging mechanisms to provide the precision observed in fixed embryos. PMID:27942043

  14. High Precision Time Transfer in Space with a Hydrogen Maser on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1996-01-01

    An atomic hydrogen maser clock system designed for long term operation in space will be installed on the Russian space station Mir, in late 1997. The H-maser's frequency stability will be measured using pulsed laser time transfer techniques. Daily time comparisons made with a precision of better than 100 picoseconds will allow an assessment of the long term stability of the space maser at a level on the order of 1 part in 10(sup 15) or better. Laser pulse arrival times at the spacecraft will be recorded with a resolution of 10 picoseconds relative to the space clock's time scale. Cube corner reflectors will reflect the pulses back to the Earth laser station to determine the propagation delay and enable comparison with the Earth-based time scale. Data for relativistic and gravitational frequency corrections will be obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver.

  15. Anisotropic inflation in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2016-09-19

    We study anisotropic inflation with Gauss-Bonnet correction in presence of a massless vector field. In this scenario, exact anisotropic power-law inflation is realized when the inflaton potential, gauge coupling function and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling are exponential functions. We show that anisotropy becomes proportional to two slow-roll parameters of the theory and hence gets enhanced in presence of quadratic curvature corrections. The stability analysis reveals that anisotropic power-law solutions remain stable over a substantially large parameter region.

  16. Prospects for high-precision pulsar timing with the new Effelsberg PSRIX backend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.; Karuppusamy, R.; Graikou, E.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Lee, K. J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Kramer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PSRIX backend is the primary pulsar timing instrument of the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope since early 2011. This new ROACH-based system enables bandwidths up to 500 MHz to be recorded, significantly more than what was possible with its predecessor, the Effelsberg-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (EBPP). We review the first four years of PSRIX timing data for 33 pulsars collected as part of the monthly European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) observations. We describe the automated data analysis pipeline, COASTGUARD, that we developed to reduce these observations. We also introduce TOASTER, the EPTA timing data base, used to store timing results, processing information and observation metadata. Using these new tools, we measure the phase-averaged flux densities at 1.4 GHz of all 33 pulsars. For seven of these pulsars, our flux density measurements are the first values ever reported. For the other 26 pulsars, we compare our flux density measurements with previously published values. By comparing PSRIX data with EBPP data, we find an improvement of ˜2-5 times in signal-to-noise ratio, which translates to an increase of ˜2-5 times in pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) precision. We show that such an improvement in TOA precision will improve the sensitivity to the stochastic gravitational wave background. Finally, we showcase the flexibility of the new PSRIX backend by observing several millisecond-period pulsars (MSPs) at 5 and 9 GHz. Motivated by our detections, we discuss the potential for complementing existing pulsar timing array data sets with MSP monitoring campaigns at these higher frequencies.

  17. Precise pulsed time-of-flight laser range finder for industrial distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpelä, Ari; Pennala, Riku; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2001-04-01

    A pulsed time-of-flight laser range finder with a 1 GHz avalanche photo diode (APD) receiver and a laser pulser with ˜35 ps pulse width has been developed and tested. The receiver channel is constructed using a silicon ASIC chip and a commercially available silicon APD placed on a hybrid ceramic susbstrate. The laser pulser utilizes a single heterostructure laser operating in Q-switching mode. It is shown that the single-shot precision of the complete laser range finder is ˜2.1 mm (σ value) at best. The nonaccuracy in the distance range of 0.5-34.5 m was ˜±2 mm excluding errors caused by the statistical variations and long-term instability. The single-shot precision is clearly better than the single-shot precision of the earlier laser range finders with ˜100-200 MHz bandwidths. Also, two types of optics, coaxial and paraxial, were tested. The linearity of the coaxial optics was better, especially with a long (4 m) receiver fiber. Some possible applications of the laser range finder utilizing ps level pulses are, for example, fast three-dimensional vision in industrial environments and structure analysis of materials.

  18. CORRECTING FOR INTERSTELLAR SCATTERING DELAY IN HIGH-PRECISION PULSAR TIMING: SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; McLaughlin, Maura; Stinebring, Daniel; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn E-mail: maura.mclaughlin@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu

    2015-12-20

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse “jitter” is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  19. Precise time series photometry for the Kepler-2.0 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, J. R.; Roberts, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The recently approved NASA K2 mission has the potential to multiply by an order of magnitude the number of short-period transiting planets found by Kepler around bright and low-mass stars, and to revolutionize our understanding of stellar variability in open clusters. However, the data processing is made more challenging by the reduced pointing accuracy of the satellite, which has only two functioning reaction wheels. We present a new method to extract precise light curves from K2 data, combining list-driven, soft-edged aperture photometry with a star-by-star correction of systematic effects associated with the drift in the roll angle of the satellite about its boresight. The systematics are modelled simultaneously with the stars' intrinsic variability using a semiparametric Gaussian process model. We test this method on a week of data collected during an engineering test in 2014 January, perform checks to verify that our method does not alter intrinsic variability signals, and compute the precision as a function of magnitude on long-cadence (30 min) and planetary transit (2.5 h) time-scales. In both cases, we reach photometric precisions close to the precision reached during the nominal Kepler mission for stars fainter than 12th magnitude, and between 40 and 80 parts per million for brighter stars. These results confirm the bright prospects for planet detection and characterization, asteroseismology and stellar variability studies with K2. Finally, we perform a basic transit search on the light curves, detecting two bona fide transit-like events, seven detached eclipsing binaries and 13 classical variables.

  20. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  1. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-07-08

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms.

  2. Controllable light capsules employing modified Bessel-Gauss beams

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Weiwei; Zhao, Qian; Ren, Yuxuan; Qiu, Xingze; Zhong, Mincheng; Li, Yinmei

    2016-01-01

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a novel class of controlled light capsules with nearly perfect darkness, directly employing intrinsic properties of modified Bessel-Gauss beams. These beams are able to naturally create three-dimensional bottle-shaped region during propagation as long as the parameters are properly chosen. Remarkably, the optical bottle can be controlled to demonstrate various geometries through tuning the beam parameters, thereby leading to an adjustable light capsule. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of the light capsule derived from modified Bessel-Gauss beams. Moreover, a binary digital micromirror device (DMD) based scheme is first employed to shape the bottle beams by precise amplitude and phase manipulation. Further, we demonstrate their ability for optical trapping of core-shell magnetic microparticles, which play a particular role in biomedical research, with holographic optical tweezers. Therefore, our observations provide a new route for generating and controlling bottle beams and will widen the potentials for micromanipulation of absorbing particles, aerosols or even individual atoms. PMID:27388558

  3. Innovative enhancement of the design and precision of the capillary suction time testing device.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ola; Scholz, Miklas

    2009-11-01

    The capillary suction time (CST) test can be used as an alternative to predict the otherwise expensive, hard-to-run specific resistance to filtration test. One of the major drawbacks of the CST test, however, is relatively high variability of test results. The aim of this study was, therefore, to improve the product design by testing the effectiveness of using a funnel sealant to reduce variability. Use of a funnel sealant resulted in increased test precision. There was a reduction of up to 63% in the coefficient of variation and a substantial improvement in the predictability of the specific resistance to filtration test.

  4. Precision blood-leak detector with high long-time stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Kleuver, Wolfram

    1999-11-01

    With this publication a precision blood-leak-detector is presented. The blood-leak-detector is used for recognition of fractures in the dialyzer of a kidney-machine. It has to detect safely a blood flow of ml/min to exclude any risk for the patient. A lot of systems exist for blood-leak-detection. All of them use the same principle. They detect the light absorption in the dialyze fluid. The actual used detectors are inferior to the new developed sensor in resolution and long-time stability. Regular test of the existing systems and high failure rates are responsible for the high maintenance.

  5. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  6. Mining precise cause and effect rules in large time series data of socio-economic indicators.

    PubMed

    Hira, Swati; Deshpande, P S

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of cause-effect relationships, particularly in large databases of time-series is challenging because of continuous data of different characteristics and complex lagged relationships. In this paper, we have proposed a novel approach, to extract cause-effect relationships in large time series data set of socioeconomic indicators. The method enhances the scope of relationship discovery to cause-effect relationships by identifying multiple causal structures such as binary, transitive, many to one and cyclic. We use temporal association and temporal odds ratio to exclude noncausal association and to ensure the high reliability of discovered causal rules. We assess the method with both synthetic and real-world datasets. Our proposed method will help to build quantitative models to analyze socioeconomic processes by generating a precise cause-effect relationship between different economic indicators. The outcome shows that the proposed method can effectively discover existing causality structure in large time series databases.

  7. High precision laser ranging by time-of-flight measurement of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of femtosecond light pulses was investigated for laser ranging of long distances with sub-micrometer precision in the air. The bandwidth limitation of the photo-detection electronics used in timing femtosecond pulses was overcome by adopting a type-II nonlinear second-harmonic crystal that permits the production of a balanced optical cross-correlation signal between two overlapping light pulses. This method offered a sub-femtosecond timing resolution in determining the temporal offset between two pulses through lock-in control of the pulse repetition rate with reference to the atomic clock. The exceptional ranging capability was verified by measuring various distances of 1.5, 60 and 700 m. This method is found well suited for future space missions based on formation-flying satellites as well as large-scale industrial applications for land surveying, aircraft manufacturing and shipbuilding.

  8. Electron bunch timing with femtosecond precision in a superconducting free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Löhl, F; Arsov, V; Felber, M; Hacker, K; Jalmuzna, W; Lorbeer, B; Ludwig, F; Matthiesen, K-H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmüser, P; Schulz, S; Szewinski, J; Winter, A; Zemella, J

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  9. Nonextensive entropies derived from Gauss' principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Tatsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Gauss' principle in statistical mechanics is generalized for a q-exponential distribution in nonextensive statistical mechanics. It determines the associated stochastic and statistical nonextensive entropies which satisfy Greene-Callen principle concerning on the equivalence between microcanonical and canonical ensembles.

  10. Galileo, Gauss, and the Green Monster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Dan; Teague, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Galileo dropped cannonballs from the leaning tower of Pisa to demonstrate something about falling bodies. Gauss was a giant of mathematics and physics who made unparalleled contributions to both fields. More contemporary (and not a person), the Green Monster is the left-field wall at the home of the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park. Measuring 37 feet…

  11. On Gautschi's conjecture for generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulak, Hédi; Beckermann, Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Recently, Gautschi introduced so-called generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae which are quadrature formulae of Gaussian type involving not only the values but also the derivatives of the function at the endpoints. In the present note we show the positivity of the corresponding weights; this positivity has been conjectured already by Gautschi. As a consequence, we establish several convergence theorems for these quadrature formulae.

  12. PRECISE {gamma}-RAY TIMING AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF 17 FERMI {gamma}-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Kerr, M.; Parent, D.; Makeev, A.; Abdo, A. A.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Rea, N.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Camilo, F.; Dormody, M.; Harding, A. K.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    We present precise phase-connected pulse timing solutions for 16 {gamma}-ray-selected pulsars recently discovered using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope plus one very faint radio pulsar (PSR J1124-5916) that is more effectively timed with the LAT. We describe the analysis techniques including a maximum likelihood method for determining pulse times of arrival from unbinned photon data. A major result of this work is improved position determinations, which are crucial for multiwavelength follow-up. For most of the pulsars, we overlay the timing localizations on X-ray images from Swift and describe the status of X-ray counterpart associations. We report glitches measured in PSRs J0007+7303, J1124-5916, and J1813-1246. We analyze a new 20 ks Chandra ACIS observation of PSR J0633+0632 that reveals an arcminute-scale X-ray nebula extending to the south of the pulsar. We were also able to precisely localize the X-ray point source counterpart to the pulsar and find a spectrum that can be described by an absorbed blackbody or neutron star atmosphere with a hard power-law component. Another Chandra ACIS image of PSR J1732-3131 reveals a faint X-ray point source at a location consistent with the timing position of the pulsar. Finally, we present a compilation of new and archival searches for radio pulsations from each of the {gamma}-ray-selected pulsars as well as a new Parkes radio observation of PSR J1124-5916 to establish the {gamma}-ray to radio phase offset.

  13. The NANOGrav Eleven-Year Data Set: High-precision timing of 48 Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nice, David J.; NANOGrav

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves from sources such as supermassive black hole binary systems perturb times-of-flight of signals traveling from pulsars to the Earth. The NANOGrav collaboration aims to measure these perturbations in high precision millisecond pulsar timing data and thus to directly detect gravitational waves and characterize the gravitational wave sources. By observing pulsars over time spans of many years, we are most sensitive to gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. This work is complimentary to ground based detectors such as LIGO, which are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies 10 orders of magnitude higher.In this presentation we describe the NANOGrav eleven-year data set. This includes pulsar time-of-arrival measurements from 48 millisecond pulsars made with the Arecibo Observatory (for pulsars with declinations between -1 and 39 degrees) and the Green Bank Telescope (for other pulsars, with two pulsars overlapping with Arecibo). The data set consists of more than 300,000 pulse time-of-arrival measurements made in nearly 7000 unique observations (a given pulsar observed with a given telescope receiver on a given day). In the best cases, measurement precision is better than 100 nanoseconds, and in nearly all cases it is better than 1 microsecond.All pulsars in our program are observed at intervals of 3 to 4 weeks. Observations use wideband data acquisition systems and are made at two receivers at widely separated frequencies at each epoch, allowing for characterization and mitigation of the effects of interstellar medium on the signal propagation. Observation of a large number of pulsars allows for searches for correlated perturbations among the pulsar signals, which is crucial for achieving high-significance detection of gravitational waves in the face of uncorrelated noise (from gravitational waves and rotation noise) in the individual pulsars. In addition, seven pulsars are observed at weekly intervals. This increases our sensitivity

  14. Controlling the oscillation phase through precisely timed closed-loop optogenetic stimulation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Witt, Annette; Palmigiano, Agostina; Neef, Andreas; El Hady, Ahmed; Wolf, Fred; Battaglia, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic oscillatory coherence is believed to play a central role in flexible communication between brain circuits. To test this communication-through-coherence hypothesis, experimental protocols that allow a reliable control of phase-relations between neuronal populations are needed. In this modeling study, we explore the potential of closed-loop optogenetic stimulation for the control of functional interactions mediated by oscillatory coherence. The theory of non-linear oscillators predicts that the efficacy of local stimulation will depend not only on the stimulation intensity but also on its timing relative to the ongoing oscillation in the target area. Induced phase-shifts are expected to be stronger when the stimulation is applied within specific narrow phase intervals. Conversely, stimulations with the same or even stronger intensity are less effective when timed randomly. Stimulation should thus be properly phased with respect to ongoing oscillations (in order to optimally perturb them) and the timing of the stimulation onset must be determined by a real-time phase analysis of simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Here, we introduce an electrophysiologically calibrated model of Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)-induced photocurrents, based on fits holding over two decades of light intensity. Through simulations of a neural population which undergoes coherent gamma oscillations-either spontaneously or as an effect of continuous optogenetic driving-we show that precisely-timed photostimulation pulses can be used to shift the phase of oscillation, even at transduction rates smaller than 25%. We consider then a canonic circuit with two inter-connected neural populations oscillating with gamma frequency in a phase-locked manner. We demonstrate that photostimulation pulses applied locally to a single population can induce, if precisely phased, a lasting reorganization of the phase-locking pattern and hence modify functional interactions between the two

  15. Controlling the oscillation phase through precisely timed closed-loop optogenetic stimulation: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Annette; Palmigiano, Agostina; Neef, Andreas; El Hady, Ahmed; Wolf, Fred; Battaglia, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic oscillatory coherence is believed to play a central role in flexible communication between brain circuits. To test this communication-through-coherence hypothesis, experimental protocols that allow a reliable control of phase-relations between neuronal populations are needed. In this modeling study, we explore the potential of closed-loop optogenetic stimulation for the control of functional interactions mediated by oscillatory coherence. The theory of non-linear oscillators predicts that the efficacy of local stimulation will depend not only on the stimulation intensity but also on its timing relative to the ongoing oscillation in the target area. Induced phase-shifts are expected to be stronger when the stimulation is applied within specific narrow phase intervals. Conversely, stimulations with the same or even stronger intensity are less effective when timed randomly. Stimulation should thus be properly phased with respect to ongoing oscillations (in order to optimally perturb them) and the timing of the stimulation onset must be determined by a real-time phase analysis of simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Here, we introduce an electrophysiologically calibrated model of Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)-induced photocurrents, based on fits holding over two decades of light intensity. Through simulations of a neural population which undergoes coherent gamma oscillations—either spontaneously or as an effect of continuous optogenetic driving—we show that precisely-timed photostimulation pulses can be used to shift the phase of oscillation, even at transduction rates smaller than 25%. We consider then a canonic circuit with two inter-connected neural populations oscillating with gamma frequency in a phase-locked manner. We demonstrate that photostimulation pulses applied locally to a single population can induce, if precisely phased, a lasting reorganization of the phase-locking pattern and hence modify functional interactions between the

  16. Tendency for interlaboratory precision in the GMO analysis method based on real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Kitta, Kazumi; Naito, Shigehiro

    2010-01-01

    The Horwitz curve estimates interlaboratory precision as a function only of concentration, and is frequently used as a method performance criterion in food analysis with chemical methods. The quantitative biochemical methods based on real-time PCR require an analogous criterion to progressively promote method validation. We analyzed the tendency of precision using a simplex real-time PCR technique in 53 collaborative studies of seven genetically modified (GM) crops. Reproducibility standard deviation (SR) and repeatability standard deviation (Sr) of the genetically modified organism (GMO) amount (%) was more or less independent of GM crops (i.e., maize, soybean, cotton, oilseed rape, potato, sugar beet, and rice) and evaluation procedure steps. Some studies evaluated whole steps consisting of DNA extraction and PCR quantitation, whereas others focused only on the PCR quantitation step by using DNA extraction solutions. Therefore, SR and Sr for GMO amount (%) are functions only of concentration similar to the Horwitz curve. We proposed S(R) = 0.1971C 0.8685 and S(r) = 0.1478C 0.8424, where C is the GMO amount (%). We also proposed a method performance index in GMO quantitative methods that is analogous to the Horwitz Ratio.

  17. Delivery and application of precise timing for a traveling wave powerline fault locator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has successfully operated an in-house developed powerline fault locator system since 1986. The BPA fault locator system consists of remotes installed at cardinal power transmission line system nodes and a central master which polls the remotes for traveling wave time-of-arrival data. A power line fault produces a fast rise-time traveling wave which emanates from the fault point and propagates throughout the power grid. The remotes time-tag the traveling wave leading edge as it passes through the power system cardinal substation nodes. A synchronizing pulse transmitted via the BPA analog microwave system on a wideband channel sychronizes the time-tagging counters in the remote units to a different accuracy of better than one microsecond. The remote units correct the raw time tags for synchronizing pulse propagation delay and return these corrected values to the fault locator master. The master then calculates the power system disturbance source using the collected time tags. The system design objective is a fault location accuracy of 300 meters. BPA's fault locator system operation, error producing phenomena, and method of distributing precise timing are described.

  18. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionized interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly problematic for pulsars with larger dispersion measures.

  19. XpertTrack: Precision Autonomous Measuring Device Developed for Real Time Shipments Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Viman, Liviu; Daraban, Mihai; Fizesan, Raul; Iuonas, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a software and hardware solution for real time condition monitoring applications. The proposed device, called XpertTrack, exchanges data through the GPRS protocol over a GSM network and monitories temperature and vibrations of critical merchandise during commercial shipments anywhere on the globe. Another feature of this real time tracker is to provide GPS and GSM positioning with a precision of 10 m or less. In order to interpret the condition of the merchandise, the data acquisition, analysis and visualization are done with 0.1 °C accuracy for the temperature sensor, and 10 levels of shock sensitivity for the acceleration sensor. In addition to this, the architecture allows increasing the number and the types of sensors, so that companies can use this flexible solution to monitor a large percentage of their fleet. PMID:26978360

  20. Precise time dissemination and applications development on the Bonneville Power Administration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ken E.; Esztergalyos, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) uses IRIG-B transmitted over microwave as its primary system time dissemination. Problems with accuracy and reliability have led to ongoing research into better methods. BPA has also developed and deployed a unique fault locator which uses precise clocks synchronized by a pulse over microwaves. It automatically transmits the data to a central computer for analysis. A proposed system could combine fault location timing and time dissemination into a Global Position System (GPS) timing receiver and close the verification loop through a master station at the Dittmer Control Center. Such a system would have many advantages, including lower cost, higher reliability, and wider industry support. Test results indicate the GPS has sufficient accuracy and reliability for this and other current timing requirements including synchronous phase angle measurements. A phasor measurement system which provides phase angle has recently been tested with excellent results. Phase angle is a key parameter in power system control applications including dynamic braking, DC modulation, remedial action schemes, and system state estimation. Further research is required to determine the applications which can most effectively use real-time phase angle measurements and the best method to apply them.

  1. Real-time Precise Point Positioning with Ambiguity Resolution for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Meng, X.; Teferle, F. N.; Dodson, A. H.; Ge, M.; Shi, C.; Liu, J.

    2009-04-01

    Real-time provision of information on large scale crustal deformation during an earthquake can be crucial in assessing property damage and managing relief operations. Moreover, such a real-time monitoring system may even lead to the accurate prediction of earthquakes in future and help the subsequent studies on the mechanism involved. During the past two decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements have been extensively applied to investigate such processes in the geosciences. Precise point positioning (PPP) using GPS based on single stations can achieve comparable accuracies to conventional relative positioning, when precise satellite orbits and clocks, and Earth rotation products are used. Thus, PPP does not need any reference stations to achieve high positioning accuracy, e.g. at the millimetre level in static and centimetre level in kinematic applications. This has both technical and economic advantages and may be the only feasible option in some specific applications such as Tsunami early warning systems. However, unlike relative positioning, PPP suffers from unresolved integer ambiguities, which prevented further accuracy improvements within short observation periods or in real-time. On account of the great potential of PPP, we developed a prototype real-time PPP system which also employs ambiguity resolution at a single station. This development is based on the PANDA (Positioning And Navigation Data Analyst) software, which was originally developed at Wuhan University in China, and has been significantly refined by the authors. To assess this system, about 30 stations from the EUREF Permanent Network Internet Protocol (EUREF-IP) pilot project are used to produce the real-time satellite clocks, with satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP) fixed to the predicted part of the IGS (International GNSS Service) ultra-rapid products. This is followed by the estimation of the uncalibrated hardware delays (UHD), which are crucial in resolving the

  2. The Goos-Hanchen shift in Helmholtz-Gauss beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezzini, Moises A.; Gutierrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2006-08-01

    We present a study of the total internal reflection of a Helmholtz-Gauss beam at a plane interface between two dielectric media. The derivation is based on the decomposition of the Helmholtz-Gauss beams in terms of its constituent plane waves components. We determine the shift predicted by the classical theory of the Goos- Hänchen shift and analyze the transverse intensity patterns of the reflected waves for a variety of Helmholtz-Gauss beam including Bessel-Gauss and Cosine-Gauss beams.

  3. High-Precision Marine Sr Isotope Geochronology in Deep Time: Permian Tuffs and Conodonts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M. D.; Davydov, V. I.; Snyder, W. S.

    2007-12-01

    Stratigraphic sections of the Southern Urals containing abundant and well-preserved fauna for precise biostratigraphic correlation and common instratified volcanic ash beds dated by U-Pb zircon geochronology offer a unique opportunity to constrain a temporally accurate Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian seawater Sr curve. The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of conodonts (biogenic apatite) were measured by high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry following rigorous pretreatment protocols, and plotted within an age model calibrated by 13 high-precision U-Pb zircon ash bed ages. The resulting seawater Sr curve shows a significant reduction in data scatter by comparison to earlier curves (Denison et al., 1994; Veizer et al., 1999; Bruckschen et al., 1999; Korte et al., 2006), suggesting that our conodont pre-dissolution treatment was highly effective for retrieving the original seawater Sr signal. The relatively flat Late Moscovian through mid-Ghzelian seawater Sr curve of this study is generally consistent with that of Bruckschen et al. (1999). Beginning in the mid-Ghzelian, our data define a decreasing trend in 87Sr/86Sr through the mid-Sakmarian, consistent with the data of Korte et al. (2006). By combining our high precision 87Sr/86Sr measurements and U-Pb age calibration, the resolution of Sr isotope geochronology approaches 0.5 Ma in this interval. This highly resolved seawater 87Sr/86Sr record obtained for the Late Moscovian through mid-Sakmarian will aid in global carbonate chemostratigraphic correlation and contribute to our understanding of the timing of Late Paleozoic glacial and tectonic events. References: Bruckschen, P., Oesmann, S., Veizer, J., 1999. Isotope stratigraphy of the European Carboniferous: proxy signals for ocean chemistry, climate and tectonics. Chemical Geology 161, p. 127-163. Denison, R.E., Koepnick, R.B., Burke, W.H., Hetherington, E.A., Fletcher, A., 1994. Construction of the Mississippian, Pennsylvanian and Permian seawater 87Sr/86Sr

  4. A benchmark test of accuracy and precision in estimating dynamical systems characteristics from a time series.

    PubMed

    Rispens, S M; Pijnappels, M; van Dieën, J H; van Schooten, K S; Beek, P J; Daffertshofer, A

    2014-01-22

    Characteristics of dynamical systems are often estimated to describe physiological processes. For instance, Lyapunov exponents have been determined to assess the stability of the cardio-vascular system, respiration, and, more recently, human gait and posture. However, the systematic evaluation of the accuracy and precision of these estimates is problematic because the proper values of the characteristics are typically unknown. We fill this void with a set of standardized time series with well-defined dynamical characteristics that serve as a benchmark. Estimates ought to match these characteristics, at least to good approximation. We outline a procedure to employ this generic benchmark test and illustrate its capacity by examining methods for estimating the maximum Lyapunov exponent. In particular, we discuss algorithms by Wolf and co-workers and by Rosenstein and co-workers and evaluate their performances as a function of signal length and signal-to-noise ratio. In all scenarios, the precision of Rosenstein's algorithm was found to be equal to or greater than Wolf's algorithm. The latter, however, appeared more accurate if reasonably large signal lengths are available and noise levels are sufficiently low. Due to its modularity, the presented benchmark test can be used to evaluate and tune any estimation method to perform optimally for arbitrary experimental data.

  5. Maintaining high precision of isotope ratio analysis over extended periods of time.

    PubMed

    Brand, Willi A

    2009-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios are reliable and long lasting process tracers. In order to compare data from different locations or different sampling times at a high level of precision, a measurement strategy must include reliable traceability to an international stable isotope scale via a reference material (RM). Since these international RMs are available in low quantities only, we have developed our own analysis schemes involving laboratory working RM. In addition, quality assurance RMs are used to control the long-term performance of the delta-value assignments. The analysis schemes allow the construction of quality assurance performance charts over years of operation. In this contribution, the performance of three typical techniques established in IsoLab at the MPI-BGC in Jena is discussed. The techniques are (1) isotope ratio mass spectrometry with an elemental analyser for delta(15)N and delta(13)C analysis of bulk (organic) material, (2) high precision delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of CO(2) in clean-air samples, and (3) stable isotope analysis of water samples using a high-temperature reaction with carbon. In addition, reference strategies on a laser ablation system for high spatial resolution delta(13)C analysis in tree rings is exemplified briefly.

  6. Gauss's law test of gravity at short range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, M. V.; Paik, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A null test of the gravitational inverse-square law can be performed by testing Gauss's law for the field. We have constructed a three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer and carried out such a test. A lead pendulum weighing 1500 kg was used to produce a time-varying field. This experiment places a new (2-sigma) limit of alpha = (0.9 + or - 4.6) x 10 exp -4 at lambda of 1.5 m, where alpha and lambda are parameters for the generalized potential phi = -(GM/r)(l + alpha e exp -r/lambda).

  7. Integrity monitoring in real-time precise point positioning in the presence of ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wezka, K.; Galas, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric disturbances are characterized as fast and random variability in the ionosphere. Those phenomena are difficult to predict, detect and model. Occurrence of some strong ionospheric disturbances can cause, inter alia degradation and interruption of GNSS signals. Therefore they are especially harmful for real-time applications, as for example Precise Point Positioning (PPP) in real time, where one of the most important requirements is to ensure the high level of reliability. In such applications verification and confirmation of a high trust degree towards the estimated coordinates is a very critical issue. In one of the previous papers (K. Wezka, 2012 -Identification of system performance parameters and their usability) two sets of parameters have been proposed for enhance reliability of the PPP. The first one for data quality control (QC) of the raw GNSS observations and the second one for examination of the quality, robustness and performance of various processing approaches (strategies). To the second group the following parameters has been proposed: accuracy, precision, availability, integrity and convergence time. In consideration of perturbation of GNSS signal resulting from sudden ionospheric disturbances, one of the most important demands is effective autonomous integrity monitoring. The poster presents first preliminary results of the applicability of the proposed parameters in order to ensure the high level of reliability/integrity of GNSS observations and positioning results under the presence of strong ionospheric anomalies. The data-set from continuously operated GNSS station located at high latitude, where ionospheric disturbances occur more frequently, were used for the analysis. Various selected Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) approaches for quality control of the GNSS observables are applied to the data sets recorded under different (low/quite and high) ionospheric activities. Based on those analyses the usability of the

  8. Seasonal plasticity of precise spike timing in the avian auditory system.

    PubMed

    Caras, Melissa L; Sen, Kamal; Rubel, Edwin W; Brenowitz, Eliot A

    2015-02-25

    Vertebrate audition is a dynamic process, capable of exhibiting both short- and long-term adaptations to varying listening conditions. Precise spike timing has long been known to play an important role in auditory encoding, but its role in sensory plasticity remains largely unexplored. We addressed this issue in Gambel's white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii), a songbird that shows pronounced seasonal fluctuations in circulating levels of sex-steroid hormones, which are known to be potent neuromodulators of auditory function. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in the auditory forebrain of males and females under different breeding conditions and used a computational approach to explore two potential strategies for the neural discrimination of sound level: one based on spike counts and one based on spike timing reliability. We report that breeding condition has robust sex-specific effects on spike timing. Specifically, in females, breeding condition increases the proportion of cells that rely solely on spike timing information and increases the temporal resolution required for optimal intensity encoding. Furthermore, in a functionally distinct subset of cells that are particularly well suited for amplitude encoding, female breeding condition enhances spike timing-based discrimination accuracy. No effects of breeding condition were observed in males. Our results suggest that high-resolution temporal discharge patterns may provide a plastic neural substrate for sensory coding.

  9. Seasonal Plasticity of Precise Spike Timing in the Avian Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Kamal; Rubel, Edwin W; Brenowitz, Eliot A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate audition is a dynamic process, capable of exhibiting both short- and long-term adaptations to varying listening conditions. Precise spike timing has long been known to play an important role in auditory encoding, but its role in sensory plasticity remains largely unexplored. We addressed this issue in Gambel's white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii), a songbird that shows pronounced seasonal fluctuations in circulating levels of sex-steroid hormones, which are known to be potent neuromodulators of auditory function. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in the auditory forebrain of males and females under different breeding conditions and used a computational approach to explore two potential strategies for the neural discrimination of sound level: one based on spike counts and one based on spike timing reliability. We report that breeding condition has robust sex-specific effects on spike timing. Specifically, in females, breeding condition increases the proportion of cells that rely solely on spike timing information and increases the temporal resolution required for optimal intensity encoding. Furthermore, in a functionally distinct subset of cells that are particularly well suited for amplitude encoding, female breeding condition enhances spike timing-based discrimination accuracy. No effects of breeding condition were observed in males. Our results suggest that high-resolution temporal discharge patterns may provide a plastic neural substrate for sensory coding. PMID:25716843

  10. Improving BeiDou real-time precise point positioning with numerical weather models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixian; Li, Xingxing; Zus, Florian; Heinkelmann, Robert; Dick, Galina; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Precise positioning with the current Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is proven to be of comparable accuracy to the Global Positioning System, which is at centimeter level for the horizontal components and sub-decimeter level for the vertical component. But the BeiDou precise point positioning (PPP) shows its limitation in requiring a relatively long convergence time. In this study, we develop a numerical weather model (NWM) augmented PPP processing algorithm to improve BeiDou precise positioning. Tropospheric delay parameters, i.e., zenith delays, mapping functions, and horizontal delay gradients, derived from short-range forecasts from the Global Forecast System of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) are applied into BeiDou real-time PPP. Observational data from stations that are capable of tracking the BeiDou constellation from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiments network are processed, with the introduced NWM-augmented PPP and the standard PPP processing. The accuracy of tropospheric delays derived from NCEP is assessed against with the IGS final tropospheric delay products. The positioning results show that an improvement in convergence time up to 60.0 and 66.7% for the east and vertical components, respectively, can be achieved with the NWM-augmented PPP solution compared to the standard PPP solutions, while only slight improvement in the solution convergence can be found for the north component. A positioning accuracy of 5.7 and 5.9 cm for the east component is achieved with the standard PPP that estimates gradients and the one that estimates no gradients, respectively, in comparison to 3.5 cm of the NWM-augmented PPP, showing an improvement of 38.6 and 40.1%. Compared to the accuracy of 3.7 and 4.1 cm for the north component derived from the two standard PPP solutions, the one of the NWM-augmented PPP solution is improved to 2.0 cm, by about 45.9 and 51.2%. The positioning accuracy for the up component

  11. Real Time Precise Point Positioning: Preliminary Results for the Brazilian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João.; Hirokazu Shimabukuro, Milton; Aquino, Marcio

    2010-05-01

    GNSS positioning can be carried out in relative or absolute approach. In the last years, more attention has been driven to the real time precise point positioning (PPP). To achieve centimeter accuracy with this method in real time it is necessary to have available the satellites precise coordinates as well as satellites clocks corrections. The coordinates can be used from the predicted IGU ephemeris, but the satellites clocks must be estimated in a real time. It can be made from a GNSS network as can be seen from EUREF Permanent Network. The infra-structure to realize the PPP in real time is being available in Brazil through the Brazilian Continuous Monitoring Network (RBMC) together with the Sao Paulo State GNSS network which are transmitting GNSS data using NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol) caster. Based on this information it was proposed a PhD thesis in the Univ. Estadual Paulista (UNESP) aiming to investigate and develop the methodology to estimate the satellites clocks and realize PPP in real time. Then, software is being developed to process GNSS data in the real time PPP mode. A preliminary version of the software was called PPP_RT and is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and satellites clocks. The PPP processing can be accomplished considering the absolute satellite antenna Phase Center Variation (PCV), Ocean Tide Loading (OTL), Earth Body Tide, among others. The first order ionospheric effects can be eliminated or minimized by ion-free combination or parameterized in the receiver-satellite direction using a stochastic process, e.g. random walk or white noise. In the case of ionosphere estimation, a pseudo-observable is introduced in the mathematical model for each satellite and the initial value can be computed from Klobuchar model or from Global Ionospheric Map (GIM). The adjustment is realized in the recursive mode and the DIA (Detection Identification and Adaptation) is used for quality control. In

  12. Real-time PCR for the detection of precise transgene copy number in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, Agata; Giancaspro, Angelica; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Blanco, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Recent results obtained in various crops indicate that real-time PCR could be a powerful tool for the detection and characterization of transgene locus structures. The determination of transgenic locus number through real-time PCR overcomes the problems linked to phenotypic segregation analysis (i.e. lack of detectable expression even when the transgenes are present) and can analyse hundreds of samples in a day, making it an efficient method for estimating gene copy number. Despite these advantages, many authors speak of "estimating" copy number by real-time PCR, and this is because the detection of a precise number of transgene depends on how well real-time PCR performs.This study was conducted to determine transgene copy number in transgenic wheat lines and to investigate potential variability in sensitivity and resolution of real-time chemistry by TaqMan probes. We have applied real-time PCR to a set of four transgenic durum wheat lines previously obtained. A total of 24 experiments (three experiments for two genes in each transgenic line) were conducted and standard curves were obtained from serial dilutions of the plasmids containing the genes of interest. The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.95 to 0.97. By using TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR we were able to detect 1 to 41 copies of transgenes per haploid genome in the DNA of homozygous T4 transformants. Although a slight variability was observed among PCR experiments, in our study we found real-time PCR to be a fast, sensitive and reliable method for the detection of transgene copy number in durum wheat, and a useful adjunct to Southern blot and FISH analyses to detect the presence of transgenic DNA in plant material.

  13. High precision electric gate for time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer having a chamber with electrodes to generate an electric field in the chamber and electric gating for allowing ions with a predetermined mass and velocity into the electric field. The design uses a row of very thin parallel aligned wires that are pulsed in sequence so the ion can pass through the gap of two parallel plates, which are biased to prevent passage of the ion. This design by itself can provide a high mass resolution capability and a very precise start pulse for an ion mass spectrometer. Furthermore, the ion will only pass through the chamber if it is within a wire diameter of the first wire when it is pulsed and has the right speed so it is near all other wires when they are pulsed.

  14. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; ...

    2014-05-22

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This study provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance ofmore » the fissionTPC.« less

  15. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Baker, J.; Barrett, S.; Brune, C.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Carter, D.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Hager, U.; Hertel, N.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Jewell, K.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Kudo, R.; Laptev, A. B.; Leonard, M.; Loveland, W.; Massey, T. N.; McGrath, C.; Meharchand, R.; Montoya, L.; Pickle, N.; Qu, H.; Riot, V.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Sharma, S.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.; Yao, L.

    2014-05-22

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This study provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  16. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Baker, J.; Barrett, S.; Brune, C.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Carter, D.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Hager, U.; Hertel, N.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Jewell, K.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Kudo, R.; Laptev, A. B.; Leonard, M.; Loveland, W.; Massey, T. N.; McGrath, C.; Meharchand, R.; Montoya, L.; Pickle, N.; Qu, H.; Riot, V.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Sharma, S.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.; Yao, L.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  17. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  18. Precise Spatially Selective Photothermolysis Using Modulated Femtosecond Lasers and Real-time Multimodal Microscopy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yimei; Lui, Harvey; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Zeng, Haishan

    2017-01-01

    The successful application of lasers in the treatment of skin diseases and cosmetic surgery is largely based on the principle of conventional selective photothermolysis which relies strongly on the difference in the absorption between the therapeutic target and its surroundings. However, when the differentiation in absorption is not sufficient, collateral damage would occur due to indiscriminate and nonspecific tissue heating. To deal with such cases, we introduce a novel spatially selective photothermolysis method based on multiphoton absorption in which the radiant energy of a tightly focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam can be directed spatially by aiming the laser focal point to the target of interest. We construct a multimodal optical microscope to perform and monitor the spatially selective photothermolysis. We demonstrate that precise alteration of the targeted tissue is achieved while leaving surrounding tissue intact by choosing appropriate femtosecond laser exposure with multimodal optical microscopy monitoring in real time. PMID:28255346

  19. Entanglement temperature with Gauss-Bonnet term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Shesansu Sekhar; Panda, Sudhakar

    2015-09-01

    We compute the entanglement temperature using the first law-like of thermodynamics, ΔE =Tent ΔSEE, up to Gauss-Bonnet term in the Jacobson-Myers entropy functional in any arbitrary spacetime dimension. The computation is done when the entangling region is the geometry of a slab. We also show that such a Gauss-Bonnet term, which becomes a total derivative, when the co-dimension two hypersurface is four dimensional, does not contribute to the finite term in the entanglement entropy. We observe that the Weyl-squared term does not contribute to the entanglement entropy. It is important to note that the calculations are performed when the entangling region is very small and the energy is calculated using the normal Hamiltonian.

  20. Demystifying electric flux and Gauss's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    Many physics students have experienced the difficulty of internalizing concepts in electrostatics. After studying concrete, measurable details in mechanics, they are challenged by abstract ideas such as electric fields, flux, Gauss's law, and electric potential. There are a few well-known hands-on activities that help students get experience with these ideas. Perhaps the most popular are field-mapping activities in many forms ranging from metal electrodes in a shallow dish of water to metal pens and conductive paper. My experience of teaching with these activities in my AP Physics course left me disappointed and my students still mystified. Over the last several years, I have developed some hands-on activities that have helped my students better understand and apply these concepts. In this column, I will describe one such activity, a flux calculation that presents an opportunity to apply Gauss's law.

  1. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  2. Application of troposphere model from NWP and GNSS data into real-time precise positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hadas, Tomasz; Kazmierski, Kamil; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2016-04-01

    The tropospheric delay empirical models are usually functions of meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity). The application of standard atmosphere parameters or global models, such as GPT (global pressure/temperature) model or UNB3 (University of New Brunswick, version 3) model, may not be sufficient, especially for positioning in non-standard weather conditions. The possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. We implement a regional troposphere model into the PPP (Precise Point Positioning) software GNSS-WARP (Wroclaw Algorithms for Real-time Positioning) developed at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences. The software is capable of processing static and kinematic multi-GNSS data in real-time and post-processing mode and takes advantage of final IGS (International GNSS Service) products as well as IGS RTS (Real-Time Service) products. A shortcoming of PPP technique is the time required for the solution to converge. One of the reasons is the high correlation among the estimated parameters: troposphere delay, receiver clock offset and receiver height. To efficiently decorrelate these parameters, a significant change in satellite geometry is required. Alternative solution is to introduce the external high-quality regional troposphere delay model to constrain troposphere estimates. The proposed model consists of zenith total delays (ZTD) and mapping functions calculated from meteorological parameters from Numerical Weather Prediction model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and ZTDs from ground-based GNSS stations using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zurich.

  3. Vorticity, Stokes' Theorem and the Gauss's Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Vorticity is a property of the flow of any fluid and moving fluids acquire properties that allow an engineer to describe that particular flow in greater detail. It is important to recognize that mere motion alone does not guarantee that the air or any fluid has vorticity. Vorticity is one of four important quantities that define the kinematic properties of any fluid flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are the foundation of fluid mechanics, and Stokes' theorem is used in nearly every branch of mechanics as well as electromagnetics. Stokes' Theorem also plays a vital role in many secondary theorems such as those pertaining to vorticity and circulation. However, the divergence theorem is a mathematical statement of the physical fact that, in the absence of the creation or destruction of matter, the density within a region of space can change only by having it flow into, or away from the region through its boundary. This is also known as Gauss's Theorem. It should also be noted that there are many useful extensions of Gauss's Theorem, including the extension to include surfaces of discontinuity in V. Mathematically expressed, Stokes' theorem can be expressed by considering a surface S having a bounding curve C. Here, V is any sufficiently smooth vector field defined on the surface and its bounding curve C. Integral (Surface) [(DEL X V)] . dS = Integral (Contour) [V . dx] In this paper, the author outlines and stresses the importance of studying and teaching these mathematical techniques while developing a course in Hydrology and Fluid Mechanics. References Arfken, G. "Gauss's Theorem." 1.11 in Mathematical Methods for Physicists, 3rd ed. Orlando, FL: Academic Press, pp. 57-61, 1985. Morse, P. M. and Feshbach, H. "Gauss's Theorem." In Methods of Theoretical Physics, Part I. New York: McGraw-Hill, pp. 37-38, 1953. Eric W. Weisstein. "Divergence Theorem." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/DivergenceTheorem.html

  4. Energy conditions in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Nadiezhda Montelongo; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2011-05-15

    In considering alternative higher-order gravity theories, one is liable to be motivated in pursuing models consistent and inspired by several candidates of a fundamental theory of quantum gravity. Indeed, motivations from string/M theory predict that scalar field couplings with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant, G, are important in the appearance of nonsingular early time cosmologies. In this work, we discuss the viability of an interesting alternative gravitational theory, namely, modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity or f(G) gravity. We consider specific realistic forms of f(G) analyzed in the literature that account for the late-time cosmic acceleration and that have been found to cure the finite-time future singularities present in the dark energy models. We present the general inequalities imposed by the energy conditions and use the recent estimated values of the Hubble, deceleration, jerk and snap parameters to examine the viability of the above-mentioned forms of f(G) imposed by the weak energy condition.

  5. Radioisotopic Tie Points of the Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS): How Accurate and Precise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of the geomagnetic field are recorded globally by sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These geodynamo instabilities provide a rich set of chronostratigraphic tie points for the Quaternary period that can provide tests of age models central to paleoclimate studies. Radioisotopic dating of volcanic rocks, mainly 40Ar/39Ar dating of lava flows, coupled with astronomically-dated deep sea sediments, reveals 10 polarity reversals and 27 field excursions during the Quaternary (Singer, 2014). A key question concerns the uncertainties associated with radioisotopic dates of those geodynamo instabilities that have been identified both in terrestrial volcanic rocks and in deep sea sediments. These particular features offer the highest confidence in linking 40Ar/39Ar dates to the global marine climate record. Geological issues aside, for rocks in which the build-up of 40Ar by decay of 40K may be overwhelmed by atmospheric 40Ar at the time of eruption, the uncertainty in 40Ar/39Ar dates derives from three sources: (1) analytical uncertainty associated with measurement of the isotopes; this is straightforward to estimate; (2) systematic uncertainties stemming from the age of standard minerals, such as the Fish Canyon sanidine, and in the 40K decay constant; and (3) systematic uncertainty introduced during analysis, mainly the size and reproducibility of procedural blanks. Whereas 1 and 2 control the precision of an age determination, 2 and 3 also control accuracy. In parallel with an astronomical calibration of 28.201 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine standard, awareness of the importance of procedural blanks, and a new generation multi-collector mass spectrometer capable of exceptionally low-blank and isobar-free analysis, are improving both accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dates. Results from lavas recording the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal, the Santa Rosa excursion, and the reversal at the top of the Cobb Mtn subchron demonstrate these advances. Current best

  6. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE PAGES

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  7. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  8. Scintillating fiber detectors for precise time and position measurements read out with Si-PMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, A.; Bravar, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the development and performance of compact scintillating fiber detectors read out with silicon photo-multipliers (Si-PMs). The compact size, fast response, and insensitivity to magnetic fields make these detectors suitable for a variety of applications where precise tracking and timing information is required. These detectors will be used with different particle beams (electrons, protons, heavy ions) at very high rates. In particular, we present the SciFi tracker/time of flight detector that is being developed for the Mu3e experiment at PSI (search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ → eee at very high rates). We also present the SciFi beam position detectors that will be employed in NA61 at CERN to track the incoming proton and heavy ion beam particles. We are considering different readout scenarios in which (a) each fiber is individually coupled to a single Si-PM photo-sensor and (b) fibers are arranged in columns and coupled to a Si-PM arrays.

  9. A fast algorithm to compute precise type-2 centroids for real-time control applications.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sumantra; Konar, Amit; Ralescu, Anca; Pal, Nikhil R

    2015-02-01

    An interval type-2 fuzzy set (IT2 FS) is characterized by its upper and lower membership functions containing all possible embedded fuzzy sets, which together is referred to as the footprint of uncertainty (FOU). The FOU results in a span of uncertainty measured in the defuzzified space and is determined by the positional difference of the centroids of all the embedded fuzzy sets taken together. This paper provides a closed-form formula to evaluate the span of uncertainty of an IT2 FS. The closed-form formula offers a precise measurement of the degree of uncertainty in an IT2 FS with a runtime complexity less than that of the classical iterative Karnik-Mendel algorithm and other formulations employing the iterative Newton-Raphson algorithm. This paper also demonstrates a real-time control application using the proposed closed-form formula of centroids with reduced root mean square error and computational overhead than those of the existing methods. Computer simulations for this real-time control application indicate that parallel realization of the IT2 defuzzification outperforms its competitors with respect to maximum overshoot even at high sampling rates. Furthermore, in the presence of measurement noise in system (plant) states, the proposed IT2 FS based scheme outperforms its type-1 counterpart with respect to peak overshoot and root mean square error in plant response.

  10. Precision Spectroscopy of Trapped HfF^+ with a Coherence Time of 1 Second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin; Cairncross, William; Grau, Matt; Gresh, Dan; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Trapped molecular ions provide new systems for precision spectroscopy and tests of fundamental physics. For example, measurements of the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) test time-reversal symmetry. Currently, we are using Ramsey spectroscopy between spin states of the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped HfF^+ for a measurement of the eEDM. We are regularly performing spectroscopy with a Ramsey time of 500 ms yielding what, to our knowledge, is the narrowest spectral line observed in a molecular system. Here, we will provide an overview of the experiment and the current eEDM results. The ACME Collaboration, et al., Science 343, 269 (2014) H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013). A. E. Leanhardt, J. L. Bohn, H. Loh, M. C. Grau, P. Maletinski, E. R. Meyer, L. C. Sinclair, R. P. Stutz, E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spec. 270, 1 (2011).

  11. Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escofet, Anna; Elizalde, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The following issue is addressed: How the addition of a Gauss-Bonnet term (generically coming from most fundamental theories, as string and M theories), to a viable model, can change the specific properties, and even the physical nature, of the corresponding cosmological solutions? Specifically, brand new original dark energy models are obtained in this way with quite interesting properties, which exhibit, in a unified fashion, the three distinguished possible cosmological phases corresponding to phantom matter, quintessence and ordinary matter, respectively. A model, in which the equation of state (EoS) parameter, w, is a function of time, is seen to lead either to a singularity of the Big Rip kind or to a bouncing solution which evolves into a de Sitter universe with w = -1. Moreover, new Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity models with bouncing behavior in the early stages of the universe evolution are obtained and tested for the validity and stability of the corresponding solutions. They allow for a remarkably natural, unified description of a bouncing behavior at early times and accelerated expansion at present.

  12. Magnetic-field effects on p-wave phase transition in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Jin, Yong-Yi; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Si-Yu; Wang, Cui

    2014-07-01

    In the probe limit, we study the holographic p-wave phase transition in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity via numerical and analytical methods. Concretely, we study the influences of the external magnetic field on the Maxwell complex vector model in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and soliton backgrounds, respectively. For the two backgrounds, the results show that the magnetic field enhances the superconductor phase transition in the case of the lowest Landau level, while the increasing Gauss-Bonnet parameter always hinders the vector condensate. Moreover, the Maxwell complex vector model is a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model all the time. In addition, the analytical results backup the numerical results. Furthermore, this model might provide a holographic realization for the QCD vacuum instability.

  13. Inhomogeneous dust collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingan, S.; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2010-01-15

    We consider a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi type space-time in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms, and present an exact solution in closed form. It turns out that the presence of the coupling constant of the Gauss-Bonnet terms {alpha}>0 completely changes the causal structure of the singularities from the analogous general relativistic case. The gravitational collapse of inhomogeneous dust in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet extended Einstein equations leads to formation of a massive, but weak, timelike singularity which is forbidden in general relativity. Interestingly, this is a counterexample to three conjectures, viz., cosmic censorship conjecture, hoop conjecture, and Seifert's conjecture.

  14. Dynamics of a Flat Multidimensional Anisotropic Universe in the Gauss-Bonnet Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toporensky, Alexey; Kirnos, Ilya; Pavluchenko, Sergyey

    We consider a flat anisotropic metric in (4+1)- and (5+1)-dimensional space-time in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. In the present presentation we are interesting in the behavior mostly in the vicinity of the cosmological singularity, which allows us to take into account only corrections of the highest possible order. In our case it is the Gauss-Bonnet contribution, so we neglect Einstein terms. In the absence of matter sources this problem have been studied in Ref. 1,2, in the present presentation we take matter into account. The full Einstein - Gauss-Bonnet system shows a complicated behavior even in the vacuum case3,4 and we leave investigation of such system with matter for a future work.

  15. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  16. Ultrahigh-precision GPS applications using real-time kinematic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Langley, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    RTK (real-time kinematic) processing is a GPS technique pioneered by surveyors and geodesists for determining the coordinates of points with centimetre-level accuracy or better in "real-time". GPS carrier-phase measurements must be used to attain the required positioning accuracies. As improvements are made in positioning accuracies which can be achieved in real-time, RTK techniques are being embraced for an increasing number of applications so that the distinction between navigation and geodesy applications is becoming less distinct. This is evident in high-precision, real-time, scientific and civil applications such as establishing geodetic control networks, mitigating earthquake hazards, monitoring dam and bridge deformation, auto-steering gantry cranes and so on. These applications require positioning accuracies better than a few centimetres with extremely high reliability in either static or kinematic mode and in both post-processing and real-time situations. The University of New Brunswick (UNB) RTK software, initially designed for a gantry crane auto-steering system at Korea International Terminals' Kwangyang Port in South Korea, is able to provide navigation solutions in real time at an up to 25 Hz update rate commensurate with the dual-frequency data rate. The software works in conjunction with a GPS receiver and 2.4 GHz wireless LAN (WLAN) master unit at a base station and two dual-frequency GPS receivers and a WLAN adapter installed on the cranes. We have explored the capabilities of the software in new GPS applications. Recently, tests of this software for deformation monitoring have been carried out at Highland Valley Copper Mine in British Columbia, Canada. Also, tests to investigate the performance of the software under long-baseline situations including on-land and offshore environments are planned. UHF point-to-point, WLAN and LAN communications will be used for real-time testing. In this contribution, we introduce the UNB RTK approach. Technical

  17. Efficient generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams through kinoform phase elements.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Olivas, Dilia; Mellado-Villaseñor, Gabriel; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, David; Arrizón, Victor

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the generation of Hermite-Gauss and Ince-Gauss beams employing phase elements whose transmittances coincide with the phase modulations of such beams. A scaled version of the desired field appears, distorted by marginal optical noise, at the element's Fourier domain. The motivation to perform this study is that, in the context of the proposed approach, the desired beams are generated with the maximum possible efficiency. A disadvantage of the method is the distortion of the desired beams by the influence of several nondesired beam modes generated by the phase elements. We evaluate such distortion employing the root mean square deviation as a figure of merit.

  18. Role of precise spike timing in coding of dynamic vibrissa stimuli in somatosensory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, Marcelo A; Panzeri, Stefano; Maravall, Miguel; Alenda, Andrea; Bale, Michael R; Brambilla, Marco; Petersen, Rasmus S

    2007-10-01

    Rats discriminate texture by whisking their vibrissae across the surfaces of objects. This process induces corresponding vibrissa vibrations, which must be accurately represented by neurons in the somatosensory pathway. In this study, we investigated the neural code for vibrissa motion in the ventroposterior medial (VPm) nucleus of the thalamus by single-unit recording. We found that neurons conveyed a great deal of information (up to 77.9 bits/s) about vibrissa dynamics. The key was precise spike timing, which typically varied by less than a millisecond from trial to trial. The neural code was sparse, the average spike being remarkably informative (5.8 bits/spike). This implies that as few as four VPm spikes, coding independent information, might reliably differentiate between 10(6) textures. To probe the mechanism of information transmission, we compared the role of time-varying firing rate to that of temporally correlated spike patterns in two ways: 93.9% of the information encoded by a neuron could be accounted for by a hypothetical neuron with the same time-dependent firing rate but no correlations between spikes; moreover, > or =93.4% of the information in the spike trains could be decoded even if temporal correlations were ignored. Taken together, these results suggest that the essence of the VPm code for vibrissa motion is firing rate modulation on a submillisecond timescale. The significance of such a code may be that it enables a small number of neurons, firing only few spikes, to convey distinctions between very many different textures to the barrel cortex.

  19. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R L; Chen, J H; Ku, T L; Wasserburg, G J

    1987-06-19

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of (230)Th abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in (238)U-(234)U-(230)Th dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10(8) atoms of (230)Th can be measured to an accuracy of +/-3 percent (2sigma) and 3 x 10(10) atoms of (230)Th can be measured to an accuracy of +/-0.2 percent. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to (14)C dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can now be determined should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly postdate, the summer solar insolation high at 65 degrees N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  20. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.; Chen, J.H.; Ku, T.L.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1987-06-19

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of STTh abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in STYU-STUU-STTh dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10Y atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 3% (2sigma) and 3 x 10 atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.2%. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to UC dating. The precision should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly postdate, the summer solar insolation high at 65N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  1. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China’s HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2–0.4 m and 0.2–0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3–5 dm for position and 0.3–0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  2. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-12-04

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method.

  3. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Ku, T.-L.; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of Th-230 abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in (U-238)-(U-234)-(Th-230) dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 3 percent (2sigma), and 3 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 0.2 percent. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to C-14 dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can now be determined should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly post-date, the summer solar insolation high at 65 deg N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  4. Unified solutions of extended Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, A. I.; Açıkgöz, I.

    2016-12-01

    We study some scale factor power-law solutions of the field equations of the extended Gauss Bonnet gravity in the spatial FRW (Friedmann-Robertson-Walker) universe. We consider the lagrangian density given by F ( R, G ) =f ( G ) + R + α R2 which exhibits a modification comparing with the modified Gauss Bonnet gravity. After constructing the Friedmann equations and finding the power-law solution we obtain the real valued of our model describing a mechanism that shows transitions among three stages of the universe (inflation, deceleration, acceleration) in an unified way. In particular, in this unified solution we obtained an inflation model without using any scalar field description when α>0, and also we verified our early time inflationary scenario using observational parameters, i.e. ns, r. Further, we research for the power-law solution of our model when the universe is in the phantom phase. Here, it is observed that the acceleration of the universe in phantom region is composed of two phases which congruent with the recent observations.

  5. Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting (42nd Annual) Held in Reston, Virginia on November 15-18, 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    i 42nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting Proceedings of a meeting sponsored by...collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources...NATIONAL LABORATORY UPDATES Greg Weaver, Chairman Johns Hopkins University Time and Frequency Activities at the U.S. Naval Observatory

  6. Normalization of optical Weber waves and Weber-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lara, B M

    2010-02-01

    The normalization of energy divergent Weber waves and finite energy Weber-Gauss beams is reported. The well-known Bessel and Mathieu waves are used to derive the integral relations between circular, elliptic, and parabolic waves and to present the Bessel and Mathieu wave decomposition of the Weber waves. The efficiency to approximate a Weber-Gauss beam as a finite superposition of Bessel-Gauss beams is also given.

  7. Graviton emission from a Gauss-Bonnet brane

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, Kenichiro

    2007-05-15

    We study the emission of gravitons by a homogeneous brane with the Gauss-Bonnet term into an anti-de Sitter five dimensional bulk spacetime. It is found that the graviton emission depends on the curvature scale and the Gauss-Bonnnet coupling and that the amount of emission generally decreases. Therefore nucleosynthesis constraints are easier to satisfy by including the Gauss-Bonnet term.

  8. Uncertainty in the Timing of Origin of Animals and the Limits of Precision in Molecular Timescales

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Mario; Thawornwattana, Yuttapong; Angelis, Konstantinos; Telford, Maximilian J.; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Yang, Ziheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary The timing of divergences among metazoan lineages is integral to understanding the processes of animal evolution, placing the biological events of species divergences into the correct geological timeframe. Recent fossil discoveries and molecular clock dating studies have suggested a divergence of bilaterian phyla >100 million years before the Cambrian, when the first definite crown-bilaterian fossils occur. Most previous molecular clock dating studies, however, have suffered from limited data and biases in methodologies, and virtually all have failed to acknowledge the large uncertainties associated with the fossil record of early animals, leading to inconsistent estimates among studies. Here we use an unprecedented amount of molecular data, combined with four fossil calibration strategies (reflecting disparate and controversial interpretations of the metazoan fossil record) to obtain Bayesian estimates of metazoan divergence times. Our results indicate that the uncertain nature of ancient fossils and violations of the molecular clock impose a limit on the precision that can be achieved in estimates of ancient molecular timescales. For example, although we can assert that crown Metazoa originated during the Cryogenian (with most crown-bilaterian phyla diversifying during the Ediacaran), it is not possible with current data to pinpoint the divergence events with sufficient accuracy to test for correlations between geological and biological events in the history of animals. Although a Cryogenian origin of crown Metazoa agrees with current geological interpretations, the divergence dates of the bilaterians remain controversial. Thus, attempts to build evolutionary narratives of early animal evolution based on molecular clock timescales appear to be premature. PMID:26603774

  9. STICK: Spike Time Interval Computational Kernel, a Framework for General Purpose Computation Using Neurons, Precise Timing, Delays, and Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, Xavier; Benosman, Ryad

    2015-11-01

    There has been significant research over the past two decades in developing new platforms for spiking neural computation. Current neural computers are primarily developed to mimic biology. They use neural networks, which can be trained to perform specific tasks to mainly solve pattern recognition problems. These machines can do more than simulate biology; they allow us to rethink our current paradigm of computation. The ultimate goal is to develop brain-inspired general purpose computation architectures that can breach the current bottleneck introduced by the von Neumann architecture. This work proposes a new framework for such a machine. We show that the use of neuron-like units with precise timing representation, synaptic diversity, and temporal delays allows us to set a complete, scalable compact computation framework. The framework provides both linear and nonlinear operations, allowing us to represent and solve any function. We show usability in solving real use cases from simple differential equations to sets of nonlinear differential equations leading to chaotic attractors.

  10. Fast-Time Analysis Support for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing (TAPSS) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulfinger, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes research conducted using the Stochastic Terminal Area Simulation Software to determine spacing buffers for the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing human-in-the-loop simulation.

  11. Heavy duty precision leveling jacks expedite setup time on horizontal boring mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellenbaugh, W.; Jones, C.

    1966-01-01

    Leveling jack is a precise alignment tool which expedites the setup of components or assemblies up to 2500 pounds on horizontal boring mills. This tool eliminates the necessity of wedges and blocks to shim the components to proper position.

  12. Fractional Fourier transform of Lorentz-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2009-02-01

    Lorentz-Gauss beams are introduced to describe certain laser sources that produce highly divergent beams. The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is applied to treat the propagation of Lorentz-Gauss beams. Based on the definition of convolution and the convolution theorem of the Fourier transform, an analytical expression for a Lorentz-Gauss beam passing through an FRFT system has been derived. By using the derived expression, the properties of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in the FRFT plane are graphically illustrated with numerical examples.

  13. Small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengxin; Liu, Kui; Liu, Zunlong; Guo, Pengliang; Zhang, Junxiang; Gao, Jiangrui

    2014-03-24

    We present a scheme for small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes and balanced homodyne detection. We demonstrate its use with experimental results of displacement measurements using fundamental transverse mode TEM{sub 00} and first order transverse mode TEM{sub 10} as signal modes. The results show a factor of 1.41 improvement in measurement precision with the TEM{sub 10} mode compared with that with the TEM{sub 00} mode. This scheme has potential applications in precision metrology, atomic force microscopy, and optical imaging.

  14. A 24 hr global campaign to assess precision timing of the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747

    SciTech Connect

    Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S.; Bassa, C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Janssen, G.; Kondratiev, V.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Jordan, C.; Keith, M.; Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Cognard, I.; Demorest, P. B.; Jenet, F. A.; Jones, G.; and others

    2014-10-10

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array Collaboration undertook a 24 hr global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1-24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nançay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized √N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the signal-to-noise ratio of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.

  15. Surface terms and the Gauss Bonnet Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Antonio

    2003-07-01

    We derive the gravitational Hamiltonian starting from the Gauss Bonnet action, keeping track of all surface terms. This is done using the language of orthonormal frames and forms to keep things as tidy as possible. The surface terms in the Hamiltonian give a remarkably simple expression for the total energy of a spacetime. This expression is consistent with energy expressions found in Preprint hep-th/0212292. However, we can apply our results whatever the choice of background and whatever the symmetries of the spacetime.

  16. Multivariate curve-fitting in GAUSS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Multivariate curve-fitting techniques for repeated measures have been developed and an interactive program has been written in GAUSS. The program implements not only the one-factor design described in Morrison (1967) but also includes pairwise comparisons of curves and rates, a two-factor design, and other options. Strategies for selecting the appropriate degree for the polynomial are provided. The methods and program are illustrated with data from studies of the effects of environmental contaminants on ducklings, nesting kestrels and quail.

  17. Potassium conductance dynamics confer robust spike-time precision in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in neuroscience is how neurons perform precise operations despite inherent variability. This question also applies to neuromorphic engineering, where low-power microchips emulate the brain using large populations of diverse silicon neurons. Biological neurons in the auditory pathway display precise spike timing, critical for sound localization and interpretation of complex waveforms such as speech, even though they are a heterogeneous population. Silicon neurons are also heterogeneous, due to a key design constraint in neuromorphic engineering: smaller transistors offer lower power consumption and more neurons per unit area of silicon, but also more variability between transistors and thus between silicon neurons. Utilizing this variability in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem with 1,080 silicon neurons, we found that a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance (gKL) enables precise spike timing via two mechanisms: statically reducing the resting membrane time constant and dynamically suppressing late synaptic inputs. The relative contribution of these two mechanisms is unknown because blocking gKL in vitro eliminates dynamic adaptation but also lengthens the membrane time constant. We replaced gKL with a static leak in silico to recover the short membrane time constant and found that silicon neurons could mimic the spike-time precision of their biological counterparts, but only over a narrow range of stimulus intensities and biophysical parameters. The dynamics of gKL were required for precise spike timing robust to stimulus variation across a heterogeneous population of silicon neurons, thus explaining how neural and neuromorphic systems may perform precise operations despite inherent variability. PMID:23554436

  18. Optimizing the precision-per-unit-time of quantitative MR metrics: examples for T1, T2, and DTI.

    PubMed

    Fleysher, Lazar; Fleysher, Roman; Liu, Songtao; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Gonen, Oded

    2007-02-01

    Quantitative MR metrics (e.g., T1, T2, diffusion coefficients, and magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs etc)) are often derived from two images collected with one acquisition parameter changed between them (the "two-point" method). Since a low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) adversely affects the precision of these metrics, averaging is frequently used, although improvement accrues slowly-in proportion to the square root of imaging time. Fortunately, the relationship between the images' SNRs and the metric's precision can be exploited to our advantage. Using error propagation rules, we show that for a given sequence, specifying the total imaging time uniquely determines the optimal acquisition protocol. Specifically, instead of changing only one acquisition parameter and repeating the imaging pair until all available time is spent, we propose to adjust all of the parameters and the number of averages at each point according to their contribution to the sought metric's precision. The tactic is shown to increase the precision of the well-known two-point T1, T2, and diffusion coefficients estimation by 13-90% for the same sample, sequence, hardware, and duration. It is also shown that under this general framework, precision accrues faster than the square root of time. Tables of optimal parameters are provided for various experimental scenarios.

  19. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Ferdman, R. D.; Lyne, A. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Nice, D. J.; Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. M.; Camilo, F.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2011-12-20

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s{sup -1}, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M{sub Sun }. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |{Delta}| to 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |{alpha}-hat3| to 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} (95% confidence).

  20. The timing and precision of action prediction in the aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alex L.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Successful social interactions depend on the ability to anticipate other people's actions. Current conceptualizations of brain function propose that causes of sensory input are inferred through their integration with internal predictions generated in the observer's motor system during action observation. Less is known concerning how action prediction changes with age. Previously we showed that internal action representations are less specific in older compared with younger adults at behavioral and neural levels. Here, we characterize how neural activity varies while healthy older adults aged 56–71 years predict the time‐course of an unfolding action as well as the relation to task performance. By using fMRI, brain activity was measured while participants observed partly occluded actions and judged the temporal coherence of the action continuation that was manipulated. We found that neural activity in frontoparietal and occipitotemporal regions increased the more an action continuation was shifted backwards in time. Action continuations that were shifted towards the future preferentially engaged early visual cortices. Increasing age was associated with neural activity that extended from posterior to anterior regions in frontal and superior temporal cortices. Lower sensitivity in action prediction resulted in activity increases in the caudate. These results imply that the neural implementation of predicting actions undergoes similar changes as the neural process of executing actions in older adults. The comparison between internal predictions and sensory input seems to become less precise with age leading to difficulties in anticipating observed actions accurately, possibly due to less specific internal action models. Hum Brain Mapp 37:54–66, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26503586

  1. GNSS related periodic signals in coordinate time-series from Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraha, K. E.; Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.; Dach, R.

    2017-03-01

    In Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) coordinate time-series unrecognized errors and unmodelled (periodic) effects may bias nonlinear motions induced by geophysical signals. Hence, understanding and mitigating these errors is vital to reducing biases and on revealing subtle geophysical signals. To assess the nature of periodic signals in coordinate time-series Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions for the period 2008-2015 are generated. The solutions consider Global Positioning System (GPS), GLObalnaya NAvigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) or combined GPS+GLONASS (GNSS) observations. We assess the periodic signals of station coordinates computed using the combined International GNSS Service (IGS) and four of its Analysis Centers (ACs) products. Furthermore, we make use of different filtering methods to investigate the sources of the periodic signals. A faint fortnightly signal in our PPP solution based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) products and the existence of an 8 d period for those ACs generating combined GPS+GLONASS products are the main features in the GPS-only solutions. The existence of the 8 d period in the GPS-only solution indicates that GPS orbits computed in a combined GNSS solution contain GLONASS-specific signals. The GLONASS-only solution shows highly elevated powers at the third draconitic harmonic (˜120 d period), at the 8 d period and its harmonics (4 d, 2.67 d) besides the well-known annual, semi-annual and other draconitic harmonics. We show that the GLONASS constellation gaps before December 2011 contribute to the power at some of the frequencies. However, the well-known fortnightly signal in GPS-only solutions is not discernible in the GLONASS-only solution. The combined GNSS solution contains periodic signals from both systems, with most of the powers being reduced when compared to the single-GNSS solutions. A 52 per cent reduction for the horizontal components and a 36 per cent reduction for the vertical component

  2. Time interval measurement device based on surface acoustic wave filter excitation, providing 1 ps precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan

    2007-09-01

    This article deals with the time interval measurement device, which is based on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) filter as a time interpolator. The operating principle is based on the fact that a transversal SAW filter excited by a short pulse can generate a finite signal with highly suppressed spectra outside a narrow frequency band. If the responses to two excitations are sampled at clock ticks, they can be precisely reconstructed from a finite number of samples and then compared so as to determine the time interval between the two excitations. We have designed and constructed a two-channel time interval measurement device which allows independent timing of two events and evaluation of the time interval between them. The device has been constructed using commercially available components. The experimental results proved the concept. We have assessed the single-shot time interval measurement precision of 1.3ps rms that corresponds to the time of arrival precision of 0.9ps rms in each channel. The temperature drift of the measured time interval on temperature is lower than 0.5ps/K, and the long term stability is better than ±0.2ps/h. These are to our knowledge the best values reported for the time interval measurement device. The results are in good agreement with the error budget based on the theoretical analysis.

  3. Research progress on real-time measurement of soil attributes for precision agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and accurate measurement of soil organic matter content and nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other nutrients is the basis for variable rate fertilizer application in precision agriculture, and it is also a difficult problem that scientists have been committed to resolving. On the basis of ...

  4. Scalar modified Bessel-Gauss beams and waves.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2007-09-01

    For modified Bessel-Gauss beams, the modulating function for the Gaussian, instead of a Bessel function of real argument, is a Bessel function of imaginary argument. The modified Bessel-Gauss beams and their full wave generalizations are treated with particular attention to the spreading properties on propagation for the azimuthal mode numbers m=0 and m=1. The spreading on propagation of the peak and the null in the radiation pattern obtained in the propagation direction for m=0 and m=1, respectively, is substantially less for the modified Bessel-Gauss waves than that for the corresponding Bessel-Gauss waves. The total power transported by the waves is determined and compared with that of the corresponding paraxial beam to assess the quality of the paraxial beam approximation for the wave. The powers in the Bessel-Gauss wave and the modified Bessel-Gauss wave are finite in contrast to that in the Bessel wave. With respect to both the spreading properties and the quality of the paraxial beam approximation, the modified Bessel-Gauss beam is an improvement over the Bessel-Gauss beam.

  5. Precise time-window for the onset of glacial termination found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.-C.; Tseng, Y.-H.; Dietrich, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Following a set of three simple rules, we have found a precise time-window (TW) for each onset of a glacial termination (GT) appeared during the last million years. The onset of GT (OGT) is defined as the year when the following two conditions are met: (1) the benthic delta 18-O is a maximum and greater than 4.5‰ and (2) its value continually drops 1‰ within 5 Ky. We developed the rules based on three hypotheses. We hypothesize that: (H1) The Earth's three orbital parameters (eccentricity, obliquity and precession of equinox) determine the insolation which is the key force to the climate system. (H2) However, only a small fraction of insolation is converted into sensible heat (SH) and chemical energy through photosynthesis (CETP) as influxes to the climate system's main heat capacitors (HCs), namely the world oceans. When insolation increases, both the SH flux and CETP increase. The downward SH flux will only increase the stability of the seawater. Nonetheless, the CETP gets accumulated faster than average. The CETP cascades through the marine food web and bacterial degradation. Finally, it is stored in the simple gas molecules (such as CH4) that form methane hydrate (MH) and other hydrates such as hydrogen sulfide hydrate (HSH) in deep sea sediments after a long time. While hydrates deposit accumulates with time, it also breaks off from the sediments from time to time. Since the density of MH is slightly smaller than average seawater, the MH ascends slowly from deep sea into upper part of ocean. But, HSH is slightly denser than the warm seawater in the upper part of ocean. Over the portion of glacial cycle when insolation is strong, the existence of a residual SH prevents the ascension of hydrates. (H3) Internal forcing - An internal energy converter or a heat generator exists in the oceans. Lai (2007) has found the link between the observed seawater warming at intermediate depth (400 - 750 m) (Barnett et al. 2001) and the dissociation of floating microscopic

  6. Time-varying enhancement of human cortical excitability mediated by cutaneous inputs during precision grip.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, R S; Lemon, R N; Westling, G

    1994-01-01

    1. We have investigated the afferent neurogram, muscular activity and mechanical responses while subjects restrained, with a precision grip, an object subjected to pulling loads directed away from the hand. At unpredictable times 'ramp-and-hold' loads of 1 N were delivered at a rate of ca 80 N s-1. The load ramp produced a sharp increase in multiunit activity recorded from cutaneous afferents of the median nerve. The first response in the EMG of distal hand muscles commenced at 51 +/- 2.4 ms (mean +/- S.D.); a further steep increase in activity began about 20 ms later, and this was associated with a marked augmentation of the grip force increase. 2. In four subjects, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the contralateral motor cortex in 1000 out of a total of 1500 loading trials. The time of the stimulus was randomly selected to occur either at one of nine defined points (separated by 20 ms) before and after the computer command triggering the load force increase, or during steady periods of grip. 3. In most hand and arm muscles, there was a powerful facilitation of the short-latency EMG responses evoked by TMS delivered 40-140 ms after the load force command. The amplitudes of the largest responses (TMS delivered at 80-100 ms) were 850% higher on average than those observed when subjects gripped the unloaded object or when they restrained the statically loaded object. This large modulation was only obtained with stimulus intensities that were subthreshold in the relaxed subject. 4. The modulation was not simply a reflection of the time-varying level of motoneuronal activity during the loading trial. In most muscles, changes in the amplitude of the TMS-evoked responses were disproportionately larger than the corresponding modulation of the background EMG activity. At its maximum, the modulation in the TMS-evoked response was nearly 300% larger. Furthermore, the strength of the TMS-evoked responses did not strictly co-vary with amplitude of

  7. Holographic p-wave superconductors from Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Zhang Haiqing

    2010-09-15

    We study the holographic p-wave superconductors in a five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity with an SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge field. In the probe approximation, we find that when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient grows, the condensation of the vector field becomes harder, both the perpendicular and parallel components, with respect to the direction of the condensation, of the anisotropic conductivity decrease. We also study the mass of the quasiparticle excitations, the gap frequency and the DC conductivities of the p-wave superconductor. All of them depend on the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient. In addition, we observe a strange behavior for the condensation and the relation between the gap frequency and the mass of quasiparticles when the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient is larger than 9/100, which is the upper bound for the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient from the causality of the dual field theory.

  8. Electromagnetic modified Bessel-Gauss beams and waves.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2008-01-01

    The transverse magnetic (TM) modified Bessel-Gauss beams and their full-wave generalizations are treated. Attention is paid to the spreading properties on propagation of the null in the radiation intensity pattern for the azimuthal mode numbers m=0 and 1. The rate of spreading of the null in the propagation direction is significantly less for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss waves than those for the corresponding TM Bessel-Gauss waves. The total power transported by the waves is determined and compared with that of the corresponding paraxial beam to estimate the quality of the paraxial beam approximation of the wave. The dependence of the quality of the paraxial beam approximation on the azimuthal mode number, the beam shape parameter, and the ratio of the beam waist to the wavelength has a regular pattern for the TM Bessel-Gauss wave and not for the TM modified Bessel-Gauss wave.

  9. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  10. Precision of computer vision systems for real-time inspection of contact wire wear in railways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borromeo, Susana; Aparicio, Jose L.

    2005-02-01

    This paper is oriented to study techniques to improve the precision of the systems for wear measurement of contact wire in the railways. The problematic of wear measurement characterized by some important determining factors like rate of sampling and auscultation conditions is studied in detail. The different solutions to resolve the problematic successfully are examined. Issues related to image acquisition and image processing are discussed. Type of illumination and sensors employed, image processing hardware and image processing algorithms are some topics studied. Once analyzed each one factor which have influence on the precision of the measurement system, there are proposed an assembly of solutions that allow to optimize the conditions under which the inspection can be carried out.

  11. Optimization Experiments With A Double Gauss Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brixner, Berlyn; Klein, Morris M.

    1988-05-01

    This paper describes how a lens can be generated by starting from plane surfaces. Three different experiments, using the Los Alamos National Laboratory optimization procedure, all converged on the same stable prescriptions in the optimum minimum region. The starts were made first from an already optimized lens appearing in the literature, then from a powerless plane-surfaces configuration, and finally from a crude Super Angulon configuration. In each case the result was a double Gauss lens, which suggests that this type of lens may be the best compact six-glass solution for one imaging problem: an f/2 aperture and a moderate field of view. The procedures and results are discussed in detail.

  12. Meta-analysis of time perception and temporal processing in schizophrenia: Differential effects on precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Thoenes, Sven; Oberfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-29

    Numerous studies have reported that time perception and temporal processing are impaired in schizophrenia. In a meta-analytical review, we differentiate between time perception (judgments of time intervals) and basic temporal processing (e.g., judgments of temporal order) as well as between effects on accuracy (deviation of estimates from the veridical value) and precision (variability of judgments). In a meta-regression approach, we also included the specific tasks and the different time interval ranges as covariates. We considered 68 publications of the past 65years, and meta-analyzed data from 957 patients with schizophrenia and 1060 healthy control participants. Independent of tasks and interval durations, our results demonstrate that time perception and basic temporal processing are less precise (more variable) in patients (Hedges' g>1.00), whereas effects of schizophrenia on accuracy of time perception are rather small and task-dependent. Our review also shows that several aspects, e.g., potential influences of medication, have not yet been investigated in sufficient detail. In conclusion, the results are in accordance with theoretical assumptions and the notion of a more variable internal clock in patients with schizophrenia, but not with a strong effect of schizophrenia on clock speed. The impairment of temporal precision, however, may also be clock-unspecific as part of a general cognitive deficiency in schizophrenia.

  13. An Efficient Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (RT-PPP) Solution for Offshore Surveys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Nurhan Çelik, Rahmi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) has launched the real-time service (IGS-RTS). The IGS-RTS has shown promise accuracy in precise point positioning applications. Currently, the precise point positioning technique is used extensively in marine applications. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) solution using the IGS-RTS for offshore surveys in Turkey. Dual-frequency GPS data is collected onboard a vessel and then processed using the Bernese 5.2 PPP module. The IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used in order to account for the satellite orbit and clock products. To investigate the accuracy of the RT-PPP technique, the positioning accuracy is assessed and compared with the traditional double-difference solution. It is shown that the RT-PPP solution has good agreement with the double-difference solution. Also, the proposed solution efficiently fulfills the international maritime organization (IMO) standards for the offshore surveys.

  14. Factorizing numbers with the Gauss sum technique: NMR implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Mahesh, T. S.; Rajendran, Nageswaran; Peng Xinhua; Suter, Dieter

    2007-06-15

    Several physics-based algorithms for factorizing large numbers were recently presented. A notable recent algorthm by Schleich et al. uses Gauss sums for distinguishing between factors and nonfactors. We demonstrate two NMR techniques that evaluate Gauss sums and thus implement their algorithm. The first one is based on differential excitation of a single spin magnetization by a cascade of rf pulses. The second method is based on spatial averaging and selective refocusing of magnetization for Gauss sums corresponding to factors. All factors of 16 637 and 52 882 363 are successfully obtained.0.

  15. Introducing SummerTime: A package for high-precision computation of sums appearing in DRA1 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Mingulov, Kirill T.

    2016-06-01

    We present the Mathematica package SummerTime for arbitrary-precision computation of sums appearing in the results of DRA method (Lee, 2010). So far these results include the following families of the integrals: 3-loop onshell massless vertices, 3-loop onshell mass operator type integrals, 4-loop QED-type tadpoles, 4-loop massless propagators (Lee et al., 2010; Lee and Smirnov, 2011; Lee et al., 2011, 2012). The package can be used for high-precision numerical computation of the expansion of the integrals from the above families around arbitrary space-time dimension. In addition, this package contains convenient tools for the calculation of multiple zeta values, harmonic polylogarithms and other transcendental numbers expressed in terms of nested sums with factorized summand.

  16. Precision of the IAS monitoring system based on the elapsed time method in the spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, H.; Girardin, F.; Bourdon, A.; Antoni, J.; Rémond, D.

    2014-02-01

    Instantaneous Angular Speed (IAS) has recently appeared as an original and promising tool for monitoring mechanical parts of rotating machines. Mechanisms running under non-stationary conditions, such as wind turbine, are especially suited to this method since the issued signal is intrinsically sampled in the angular domain. Although processing tools are developed to enhance its use in the industry, this method is lacking a proper identification of its limitations and this paper aims at precisely understanding two of its main shortcomings: the aliasing and the quantization phenomena. After having presented the measurement method, both the aliasing and the quantization error are theoretically dissected. Formula is proposed to estimate their influence in the spectral observation of the IAS, and a good signal-to-noise ratio appraisal for this measurement technique is finally obtained. It can eventually be used as a first guide to conveniently design an IAS based control/monitoring system.

  17. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  18. Slow-roll inflation with a Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zongkuan; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2010-06-15

    We consider slow-roll inflation for a single scalar field with an arbitrary potential and an arbitrary nonminimal coupling to the Gauss-Bonnet term. By introducing a combined hierarchy of Hubble and Gauss-Bonnet flow functions, we analytically derive the power spectra of scalar and tensor perturbations. The standard consistency relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the spectral index of tensor perturbations is broken. We apply this formalism to a specific model with a monomial potential and an inverse monomial Gauss-Bonnet coupling and constrain it by the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. The Gauss-Bonnet term with a positive (or negative) coupling may lead to a reduction (or enhancement) of the tensor-to-scalar ratio and hence may revive the quartic potential ruled out by recent cosmological data.

  19. Composite Gauss-Legendre Quadrature with Error Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature for determining definite integrals, including a means of controlling the approximation error. We compare the form and performance of the algorithm with standard Newton-Cotes quadrature. (Contains 1 table.)

  20. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF SPIN NOISE IN THE PRECISION TIMING OF MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Ryan M.; Cordes, James M. E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.ed

    2010-12-20

    We investigate rotational spin noise (referred to as timing noise) in non-accreting pulsars: millisecond pulsars, canonical pulsars, and magnetars. Particular attention is placed on quantifying the strength and non-stationarity of timing noise in millisecond pulsars because the long-term stability of these objects is required to detect nanohertz gravitational radiation. We show that a single scaling law is sufficient to characterize timing noise in millisecond and canonical pulsars while the same scaling law underestimates the levels of timing noise in magnetars. The scaling law, along with a detailed study of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21, leads us to conclude that timing noise is latent in most millisecond pulsars and will be measurable in many objects when better arrival time estimates are obtained over long data spans. The sensitivity of a pulsar timing array to gravitational radiation is strongly affected by any timing noise. We conclude that detection of proposed gravitational wave backgrounds will require the analysis of more objects than previously suggested over data spans that depend on the spectra of both the gravitational wave background and of the timing noise. It is imperative to find additional millisecond pulsars in current and future surveys in order to reduce the effects of timing noise.

  1. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle α-circumflex and corresponding parameters ā and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as θ{sub ∞}, s and r{sub m}.

  2. Domain walls in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate the dynamics of a n-dimensional domain wall in a n+1-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet bulk. Exact effective potential induced by the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term on the wall is derived. In the absence of the GB term we recover the familiar gravitational and antiharmonic oscillator potentials. Inclusion of the GB correction gives rise to a minimum radius of bounce for the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe expanding with a negative pressure on the domain wall.

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) applications and Planning Meeting (9th), Held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, November 29 - December 1, 1977

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    relating the time recovered from the satellite to the masterclock at Wallops Island is given below. Term 1 is known to better thanI 0s using the data logger...34/. .- ’."’" _’ _ . _.., , _ " . • • II I , Best Available Copy NASA Technical Memorandum 78104 ROCEEDINGS CO F THE INTH ANNUAL RECISE TIME AND IME INTERVAL (PTTI...Distribt Itd TM 78104 PROCEEDINGS OF THE NINTH ANNUAL PRECISE TIME AND TIME INTERVAL (PTTI) APPLICATIONS AND PLANNING MEETING Held at NASA Goddard Space

  4. Live-timer method of automatic dead-time correction for precision counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porges, K. G.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic correction for dead time losses in nuclear counting experiments is implemented by a simple live timer arrangement in which each counting interval is extended for compensation for the dead time during that interval. this method eliminates repetitious manual calculations, source of error, and dependence upon paralysis shifts.

  5. Research progress on real-time measurement of soil attributes for precision agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop a real-time analyzer for soil attributes, this study analyzed the needs for real-time measurement of soil attributes and reviewed major soil attributes to be measured in soil testing and commonly-used testing methods, including traditional chemical analysis, methods based on elec...

  6. PSynUTC - Evaluation of a High-Precision Time Synchronization Prototype System for Ethernet LANs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    now been taken over by our spin-off company Oregano Systems (http://www.oregano.at). Roland Höller, Nikolaus Kerö Department of Computer Technology... Oregano Systems, will demonstrate the feasibility of GPS time distribution and time synchronization in Ethernet- based LANs with a worst-case

  7. Accuracy and reliability of multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning: GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, and Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Dai, Xiaolei; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-06-01

    In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. A rigorous multi-GNSS analysis is performed to achieve the best possible consistency by processing the observations from different GNSS together in one common parameter estimation procedure. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the multi-GNSS Experiment, BeiDou Experimental Tracking Network, and International GNSS Service networks including stations all over the world. The statistical analysis of the 6-h predicted orbits show that the radial and cross root mean square (RMS) values are smaller than 10 cm for BeiDou and Galileo, and smaller than 5 cm for both GLONASS and GPS satellites, respectively. The RMS values of the clock differences between real-time and batch-processed solutions for GPS satellites are about 0.10 ns, while the RMS values for BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS are 0.13, 0.13 and 0.14 ns, respectively. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70 %, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25 %. Some outliers in the GPS-only solutions vanish when multi-GNSS observations are processed simultaneous. The availability and reliability of GPS precise positioning decrease dramatically as the elevation cutoff increases. However, the accuracy of multi-GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) is hardly decreased and few centimeter are still achievable in the horizontal components even with 40 elevation cutoff. At 30 and 40 elevation cutoffs, the availability rates of GPS-only solution drop significantly to only around 70 and 40 %, respectively. However, multi-GNSS PPP can provide precise position estimates continuously (availability rate is more than 99

  8. Precision electronics for a system of custom MCPs in the TORCH Time of Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2017-03-01

    The TORCH detector will provide charged particle pi/K/p identification up to 10 GeV/c, combining Time-of-Flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on a scalable design, a Time-of-Flight electronics readout system has been developed to instrument a novel customized 512-channel Micro Channel Plate (MCP) device. A Gigabit Ethernet-based readout scheme that operates the TORCH demonstration unit consisting of ten such MCPs will be reported. The trigger and clock distribution will also be discussed.

  9. Time-Separating Heating and Sensor Functions of Thermistors in Precision Thermal Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Hyung J.; Sukhatme, Kalyani G.; Mahoney, John C.; Penanen, Konstantin Penanen; Vargas, Rudolph, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A method allows combining the functions of a heater and a thermometer in a single device, a thermistor, with minimal temperature read errors. Because thermistors typically have a much smaller thermal mass than the objects they monitor, the thermal time to equilibrate the thermometer to the temperature of the object is typically much shorter than the thermal time of the object to change its temperature in response to an external perturbation.

  10. Search for the best timing strategy in high-precision drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1983-06-01

    Computer simulated drift chamber pulses are used to investigate various possible timing strategies in the drift chambers. In particular, the leading edge, the multiple threshold and the flash ADC timing methods are compared. Although the presented method is general for any drift geometry, we concentrate our discussion on the jet chambers where the drift velocity is about 3 to 5 cm/..mu..sec and the individual ionization clusters are not resolved due to a finite speed of our electronics.

  11. High-order generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto formulae for Jacobi and Laguerre weight functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautschi, Walter

    2009-06-01

    The generation of generalized Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto quadrature formulae by methods developed by us earlier breaks down in the case of Jacobi and Laguerre measures when the order of the quadrature rules becomes very large. The reason for this is underflow resp. overflow of the respective monic orthogonal polynomials. By rescaling of the polynomials, and other corrective measures, the problem can be circumvented, and formulae can be generated of orders as high as 1,000.

  12. Highly precise determination of optical constants in olive oil using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiusheng; Yao, Jianquan

    2008-12-01

    Recently, there has been a remarkable effort in employing terahertz (THz) spectroscopy for investigating material properties. Pulsed THz time-domain spectroscopy is a coherent technique, in which both the amplitude and the phase of a THz pulse are measured. Coherent detection enables direct calculations of both the imaginary and the real parts of the refractive index without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. In this letter, the terahertz absorption spectra and the refractive indices of olive oil were measured by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the frequency range extending from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. The terahertz dielectric properties of olive oil were characterized by THz-TDS, and the consistency with the known parameters was identified. A novel iterative algorithm improves the existing data extraction algorithms and further enhances the accuracy of the parameter extraction for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The results obtained in this study suggest that the THz-TDS method is a useful tool for vegetable oils characterization in the far infrared region. This method can be applied not only to terahertz time-domain spectroscopy but also to any kind of optical constant measurement in the time domain.

  13. Redox-Activated Light-Up Nanomicelle for Precise Imaging-Guided Cancer Therapy and Real-Time Pharmacokinetic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingang; Wu, Min; Hu, Qinglian; Bai, Hongzhen; Zhang, Shuoqing; Shen, Youqing; Tang, Guping; Ping, Yuan

    2016-12-27

    Simultaneous tumor imaging, therapy, and pharmacokinetic monitoring can offer a safe and effective strategy for cancer therapy. This work describes the design of a fluorescence light-up nanomicelle that can afford precise imaging-guided drug delivery and pharmacokinetic monitoring in a real-time fashion for cancer chemotherapy. The nanomicelle, which contains a boron dipyrromethene based fluorescent probe as the hydrophobic core and a redox-triggered detachable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) shell, can accumulate at the tumor site via enhanced permeation and retention effect. The PEG detachment induced by tumoral and intracellular glutathione can destabilize the nanomicelle, leading to fluorescence light up and simultaneous drug release. Importantly, the fluorescence intensities generated by the nanomicelles in different organs are well-correlated with released drug concentrations in both temporal and spatial manners, suggesting its precise role for imaging-guided drug delivery and pharmacokinetic monitoring in vivo. The tumor growth can be effectively inhibited by the docetaxel-loaded nanomicelle formulation, and the nanomicelles are monitored to be excreted via hepatobiliary routes. This nanomicelle for precise imaging-guided chemotherapy provides a safe and robust theranostic strategy for the evaluation of cancer nanomedicine.

  14. Locus-specific Retention Predictor (LsRP): A Peptide Retention Time Predictor Developed for Precision Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenyuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Liu, Shanshan; Cao, Weiqian; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Pengyuan

    2017-01-01

    The precision prediction of peptide retention time (RT) plays an increasingly important role in liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) based proteomics. Owing to the high reproducibility of liquid chromatography, RT prediction provides promising information for both identification and quantification experiment design. In this work, we present a Locus-specific Retention Predictor (LsRP) for precise prediction of peptide RT, which is based on amino acid locus information and Support Vector Regression (SVR) algorithm. Corresponding to amino acid locus, each peptide sequence was converted to a featured locus vector consisting of zeros and ones. With locus vector information from LC-MS/MS data sets, an SVR computational process was trained and evaluated. LsRP finally provided a prediction correlation coefficient of 0.95~0.99. We compared our method with two common predictors. Results showed that LsRP outperforms these methods and tracked up to 30% extra peptides in an extraction RT window of 2 min. A new strategy by combining LsRP and calibration peptide approach was then proposed, which open up new opportunities for precision proteomics. PMID:28303880

  15. A new algorithm for computing multivariate Gauss-like quadrature points.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark A.; Bos, Len P.; Wingate, Beth A.

    2004-06-01

    The diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method has proven very successful in geophysical applications dominated by wave propagation. For these problems, the ability to run fully explicit time stepping schemes at relatively high order makes the method more competitive then finite element methods which require the inversion of a mass matrix. The method relies on Gauss-Lobatto points to be successful, since the grid points used are required to produce well conditioned polynomial interpolants, and be high quality 'Gauss-like' quadrature points that exactly integrate a space of polynomials of higher dimension than the number of quadrature points. These two requirements have traditionally limited the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method to use square or quadrilateral elements, where tensor products of Gauss-Lobatto points can be used. In non-tensor product domains such as the triangle, both optimal interpolation points and Gauss-like quadrature points are difficult to construct and there are few analytic results. To extend the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method to (for example) triangular elements, one must find appropriate points numerically. One successful approach has been to perform numerical searches for high quality interpolation points, as measured by the Lebesgue constant (Such as minimum energy electrostatic points and Fekete points). However, these points typically do not have any Gauss-like quadrature properties. In this work, we describe a new numerical method to look for Gauss-like quadrature points in the triangle, based on a previous algorithm for computing Fekete points. Performing a brute force search for such points is extremely difficult. A common strategy to increase the numerical efficiency of these searches is to reduce the number of unknowns by imposing symmetry conditions on the quadrature points. Motivated by spectral element methods, we propose a different way to reduce the number of unknowns: We look for quadrature formula

  16. Stability of anti-de sitter space in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2015-02-20

    Recently it has been argued that in Einstein gravity anti-de Sitter spacetime is unstable against the formation of black holes for a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. We examine the effects of including a Gauss-Bonnet term. In five dimensions, spherically symmetric Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity has two key features: Choptuik scaling exhibits a radius gap, and the mass function goes to a finite value as the horizon radius vanishes. These suggest that black holes will not form dynamically if the total mass-energy content of the spacetime is too small, thereby restoring the stability of anti-de Sitter spacetime in this context. We support this claim with numerical simulations and uncover a rich structure in horizon radii and formation times as a function of perturbation amplitude.

  17. Application of Gauss-Seidel multilevel control to a single axis torsional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1981-01-01

    An approach to the application of multilevel control techniques for large space structures is presented. Gauss-Seidel second level controls and an extension of standard linear quadratic regulator techniques are applied to a model consisting of a flexible space vehicle comprising three rigid bodies rotating about a common axis. The method incorporates second order derivatives with respect to time, entailing the use of a two level hierarchy of subsystems. Gauss-Seidel second level control formulations were chosen to avoid the necessity of having as many controls as constraints or using gradient techniques in the choice of the Hamiltonian. The modular nature of the resulting control system allows applications for spacecraft with larger numbers of modules.

  18. Precise time and Time Interval (PTTI) measurements from the navigation technology satellites and the GPS NAVSTAR-4 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buisson, J. A.; Mccaskill, T., B.; Oaks, O. J.; Jeffries, M. M.; Stebbins, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    A time domain estimate for the NAVSTAR-4 SV clock offset was obtained for each SV pass over the GPS monitor sites, using a smoothed reference ephemeris, with corrections for ionospheric delay, tropospheric delay, earth rotation and relativistic effects. Conversion from the time domain to the frequency domain was made using the two sample Allan Variance; sigma-tau plots used to identify the noise processes. Estimates of flicker and white frequency noise for the NAVSTAR-4 rubidium frequency standard were obtained. The contribution of the reference ground clocks and other error sources to the frequency stability estimates were also considered.

  19. Gravity effects obtained from global hydrology models in comparison with high precision gravimetric time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Wilmes, Herbert; Güntner, Andreas; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Water mass changes are a major source of variations in residual gravimetric time series obtained from the combination of observations with superconducting and absolute gravimeters. Changes in the local water storage are the main influence, but global variations contribute to the signal significantly. For three European gravity stations, Bad Homburg, Wettzell and Medicina, different global hydrology models are compared. The influence of topographic effects is discussed and due to the long-term stability of the combined gravity time series, inter-annual signals in model data and gravimetric observations are compared. Two sources of influence are discriminated, i.e., the effect of a local zone with an extent of a few kilometers around the gravimetric station and the global contribution beyond 50km. Considering their coarse resolution and uncertainties, local effects calculated from global hydrological models are compared with the in-situ gravity observations and, for the station Wettzell, with local hydrological monitoring data.

  20. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  1. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment

    PubMed Central

    Vu, An T.; Phillips, Jeffrey S.; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2017-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  2. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  3. Precise Determination of Thicknesses of Multilayer Polyethylene Composite Materials by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Krimi, Soufiene; Ospald, Frank; Miedzinska, Danuta; Gieleta, Roman; Malek, Marcin; Beigang, Rene

    2015-06-01

    The multilayer structure of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) composite material was investigated in the terahertz (THz) spectral range by means of time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) technique. Such structures consist of many alternating layers of fibers, each being perpendicular to the other and each having a thickness of about 50 μm. Refractive indices of two composite samples and of a sample composed of four single layers (plies) having the same fiber orientation were determined for two orthogonal orientations of the electric field in a transmission TDS system. The birefringence of a single layer was measured, and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed. Using the TDS system in reflection, the formation of many pulses shifted in time was observed originating from reflections from interfaces of successive layers caused by the periodic modulation of the refractive index along the propagation of the THz radiation. This phenomenon is theoretically described and simulated by means of a transfer matrix method (TMM). A time-domain fitting procedure was used to determine thicknesses of all layers of the composite material. The reconstructed waveform based on the optimized thicknesses shows very good agreement with the measured waveform, with typical differences between measurements and simulations between 3 and 7 μm (depending on the sample). As a result, we were able to determine the thicknesses of all layers of two multilayer (~200 plies) structures by means of the reflection TDS technology with high accuracy.

  4. White Matter Integrity of Specific Dentato-Thalamo-Cortical Pathways is Associated with Learning Gains in Precise Movement Timing.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Robert; Wessel, Maximilian J; Zimerman, Máximo; Timmermann, Jan E; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2015-07-01

    The dentato-thalamo-cortical tract (DTCT) connects the lateral cerebellum with contralateral motor and nonmotor areas, such as the primary motor cortex (M1), the ventral premotor cortex (PMv), and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). As the acquisition of precisely timed finger movements requires the interplay between these brain regions, the structural integrity of the underlying connections might explain variance in behavior. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to 1) reconstruct the DTCT connecting the dentate nucleus with M1, PMv, and DLPFC and 2) examine to which extent their microstructural integrity (tract-related fractional anisotropy) relates to learning gains in a motor-sequence learning paradigm consisting of a synchronization and continuation part. Continuous DTCT were reconstructed from the dentate nucleus to all cortical target areas. We found that the microstructural integrity of the DTCT connecting the left dentate nucleus with the right DLPFC was associated with better early consolidation in rhythm continuation (R = -0.69, P = 0.02). The present data further advances the knowledge about a right-hemispheric timing network in the human brain with the DLPFC as an important node contributing to learning gains in precise movement timing.

  5. Efficient population coding of naturalistic whisker motion in the ventro-posterior medial thalamus based on precise spike timing

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Michael R.; Ince, Robin A. A.; Santagata, Greta; Petersen, Rasmus S.

    2015-01-01

    The rodent whisker-associated thalamic nucleus (VPM) contains a somatotopic map where whisker representation is divided into distinct neuronal sub-populations, called “barreloids”. Each barreloid projects to its associated cortical barrel column and so forms a gateway for incoming sensory stimuli to the barrel cortex. We aimed to determine how the population of neurons within one barreloid encodes naturalistic whisker motion. In rats, we recorded the extracellular activity of up to nine single neurons within a single barreloid, by implanting silicon probes parallel to the longitudinal axis of the barreloids. We found that play-back of texture-induced whisker motion evoked sparse responses, timed with millisecond precision. At the population level, there was synchronous activity: however, different subsets of neurons were synchronously active at different times. Mutual information between population responses and whisker motion increased near linearly with population size. When normalized to factor out firing rate differences, we found that texture was encoded with greater informational-efficiency than white noise. These results indicate that, within each VPM barreloid, there is a rich and efficient population code for naturalistic whisker motion based on precisely timed, population spike patterns. PMID:26441549

  6. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  7. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Igarashi, Y.; Iwashita, Y.; Ino, T.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Kitahara, R.; Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K.; Nagakura, N.; Oide, H.; Otono, H.; Sakakibara, R.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Sugino, T.; Sumi, N.; Sumino, H.; Taketani, K.; Tanaka, G.; Tanaka, M.; Tauchi, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tomita, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoshioka, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with 6Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  8. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document is a Final Technical Report that describes the results of the Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) research project. The objectives were to construct a geophysical data acquisition system that uses a remotely operated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and to evaluate its effectiveness for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. The GAUSS is a data acquisition system that mitigates the potential risk to personnel during geophysical characterization of hazardous or radioactive sites. The fundamental basis of the GAUSS is as follows: (1) an unmanned survey vehicle carries geophysical sensors into a hazardous location, (2) the pilot remains outside the hazardous site and operates the vehicle using radio control, (3) geophysical measurements and their spatial locations are processed by an automated data-acquisition system which displays data on an off-site monitor in real-time, and (4) the pilot uses the display to direct the survey vehicle for complete site coverage. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a data acquisition and processing (DAP) subsystem and geophysical sensors suitable for UAV deployment. We integrated these two subsystems to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system. The objective of the Phase II effort was to modify the subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. The completed GAUSS DAP system consists of a UAV platform, a laser tracking and ranging subsystem, a telemetry subsystem, light-weight geophysical sensors, a base-station computer (BC), and custom-written survey control software (SCS). We have utilized off-the-shelf commercial products, where possible, to reduce cost and design time.

  9. Precision Medicine Starts With Preanalytics: Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Fixation Quality by Ultrasound Time-of-Flight Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Melissa L; Bauer, Daniel R; Chafin, David; Theiss, Abbey; Otter, Michael; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine promises diagnosis and treatment of disease at the individual level and relies heavily on clinical specimen integrity and diagnostic assay quality. Preanalytics, the collection and handling steps of a clinical specimen before immunohistochemistry or other clinical assay, are critically important to enable the correct diagnosis of disease. However, the effects of preanalytics are often overlooked due to a lack of standardization and limited assessment tools to quantify their variation. Here, we report a novel real-time ultrasound time-of-flight instrument that is capable of monitoring and imaging the critical step in formalin fixation, diffusion of the fixative into tissue, which provides a quantifiable quality metric for tissue fixation in the clinical laboratory ensuring consistent downstream molecular assay results. We analyzed hundreds of tissue specimens from 34 distinct human tissue types and 12 clinically relevant diseased tissues for diffusion and fixation metrics. Our measurements can be converted into tissue diffusivity constants that correlate with the apparent diffusion constant calculated using magnetic resonance imaging (R=0.83), despite the differences in the approaches, indicating that our approach is biophysically plausible. Using data collected from time-of-flight analysis of many tissues, we have therefore developed a novel rapid fixation program that could ensure high-quality downstream assay results for a broad range of human tissue types.

  10. Precision Medicine Starts With Preanalytics: Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Fixation Quality by Ultrasound Time-of-Flight Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Melissa L.; Bauer, Daniel R.; Chafin, David; Theiss, Abbey; Otter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises diagnosis and treatment of disease at the individual level and relies heavily on clinical specimen integrity and diagnostic assay quality. Preanalytics, the collection and handling steps of a clinical specimen before immunohistochemistry or other clinical assay, are critically important to enable the correct diagnosis of disease. However, the effects of preanalytics are often overlooked due to a lack of standardization and limited assessment tools to quantify their variation. Here, we report a novel real-time ultrasound time-of-flight instrument that is capable of monitoring and imaging the critical step in formalin fixation, diffusion of the fixative into tissue, which provides a quantifiable quality metric for tissue fixation in the clinical laboratory ensuring consistent downstream molecular assay results. We analyzed hundreds of tissue specimens from 34 distinct human tissue types and 12 clinically relevant diseased tissues for diffusion and fixation metrics. Our measurements can be converted into tissue diffusivity constants that correlate with the apparent diffusion constant calculated using magnetic resonance imaging (R2=0.83), despite the differences in the approaches, indicating that our approach is biophysically plausible. Using data collected from time-of-flight analysis of many tissues, we have therefore developed a novel rapid fixation program that could ensure high-quality downstream assay results for a broad range of human tissue types. PMID:28027117

  11. Position estimation for timing belt drives of precision machinery using structured neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ergin; Dogruer, Can Ulas; Dolen, Melik; Koku, Ahmet Bugra

    2012-05-01

    This paper focuses on a viable position estimation scheme for timing-belt drives using artificial neural networks. In this study, the position of a carriage (load) is calculated via a structured neural network topology accepting input from a position sensor on the actuator side of the timing belt. The paper presents a detailed discussion on the source of transmission errors. The characteristics of the error in different operation regimes are exploited to construct different network topologies. That is, a relevant neural network model is developed by the sketchy guidance of a priori knowledge on the process. The resulting structured neural network is shown to estimate the error of the carriage quite accurately whereas generic recurrent neural networks fail to capture the dynamics of the system under investigation altogether. Extensive testing demonstrates the effectiveness of proposed method when the drive system is not subjected to external loads while the operating conditions such as ambient temperature and belt tensions do not deviate from the experimental conditions.

  12. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    PubMed Central

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars’ surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA’s Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  13. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode.

  14. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-12-22

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10(-19)/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a "virtual" clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10(-20) at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology.

  15. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-12-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10-19/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a “virtual” clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10-20 at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology.

  16. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10−19/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a “virtual” clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10−20 at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology. PMID:26691731

  17. Improving the Precision of Time-delay Cosmography with Observations of Galaxies along the Line of Sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Zach S.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Hilbert, Stefan; Auger, Matthew W.; Collett, Thomas E.; Marshall, Philip J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Blandford, Roger D.; Bradač, Maruša; Koopmans, Léon V. E.

    2013-05-01

    In order to use strong gravitational lens time delays to measure precise and accurate cosmological parameters the effects of mass along the line of sight must be taken into account. We present a method to achieve this by constraining the probability distribution function of the effective line-of-sight convergence κext. The method is based on matching the observed overdensity in the weighted number of galaxies to that found in mock catalogs with κext obtained by ray-tracing through structure formation simulations. We explore weighting schemes based on projected distance, mass, luminosity, and redshift. This additional information reduces the uncertainty of κext from σκ ~ 0.06 to ~0.04 for very overdense LOSs like that of the system B1608+656. For more common LOSs, σκ is reduced to lsim0.03, corresponding to an uncertainty of <~ 3% on distance. This uncertainty has comparable effects on cosmological parameters to that arising from the mass model of the deflector and its immediate environment. Photometric redshifts based on g, r, i and K photometries are sufficient to constrain κext almost as well as with spectroscopic redshifts. As an illustration, we apply our method to the system B1608+656. Our most reliable κext estimator gives σκ = 0.047 down from 0.065 using only galaxy counts. Although deeper multiband observations of the field of B1608+656 are necessary to obtain a more precise estimate, we conclude that griK photometry, in addition to spectroscopy to characterize the immediate environment, is an effective way to increase the precision of time-delay cosmography.

  18. IMPROVING THE PRECISION OF TIME-DELAY COSMOGRAPHY WITH OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXIES ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Zach S.; Suyu, Sherry H.; Treu, Tommaso; Hilbert, Stefan; Blandford, Roger D.; Auger, Matthew W.; Collett, Thomas E.; Marshall, Philip J.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Bradac, Marusa; Koopmans, Leon V. E.

    2013-05-01

    In order to use strong gravitational lens time delays to measure precise and accurate cosmological parameters the effects of mass along the line of sight must be taken into account. We present a method to achieve this by constraining the probability distribution function of the effective line-of-sight convergence {kappa}{sub ext}. The method is based on matching the observed overdensity in the weighted number of galaxies to that found in mock catalogs with {kappa}{sub ext} obtained by ray-tracing through structure formation simulations. We explore weighting schemes based on projected distance, mass, luminosity, and redshift. This additional information reduces the uncertainty of {kappa}{sub ext} from {sigma}{sub {kappa}} {approx} 0.06 to {approx}0.04 for very overdense LOSs like that of the system B1608+656. For more common LOSs, {sigma}{sub {kappa}} is reduced to {approx}<0.03, corresponding to an uncertainty of {approx}< 3% on distance. This uncertainty has comparable effects on cosmological parameters to that arising from the mass model of the deflector and its immediate environment. Photometric redshifts based on g, r, i and K photometries are sufficient to constrain {kappa}{sub ext} almost as well as with spectroscopic redshifts. As an illustration, we apply our method to the system B1608+656. Our most reliable {kappa}{sub ext} estimator gives {sigma}{sub {kappa}} = 0.047 down from 0.065 using only galaxy counts. Although deeper multiband observations of the field of B1608+656 are necessary to obtain a more precise estimate, we conclude that griK photometry, in addition to spectroscopy to characterize the immediate environment, is an effective way to increase the precision of time-delay cosmography.

  19. Approach towards sensor placement, selection and fusion for real-time condition monitoring of precision machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Poi Voon; Teo, Chek Sing; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2016-02-01

    Moving mechanical parts in a machine will inevitably generate vibration profiles reflecting its operating conditions. Vibration profile analysis is a useful tool for real-time condition monitoring to avoid loss of performance and unwanted machine downtime. In this paper, we propose and validate an approach for sensor placement, selection and fusion for continuous machine condition monitoring. The main idea is to use a minimal series of sensors mounted at key locations of a machine to measure and infer the actual vibration spectrum at a critical point where it is not suitable to mount a sensor. The locations for sensors' mountings which are subsequently used for vibration inference are identified based on sensitivity calibration at these locations moderated with normalized Fisher Information (NFI) associated with the measurement quality of the sensor at that location. Each of the identified sensor placement location is associated with one or more sensitive frequencies for which it ranks top in terms of the moderated sensitivities calibrated. A set of Radial Basis Function (RBF), each of them associated with a range of sensitive frequencies, is used to infer the vibration at the critical point for that frequency. The overall vibration spectrum of the critical point is then fused from these components. A comprehensive set of experimental results for validation of the proposed approach is provided in the paper.

  20. Carbon isotope records reveal precise timing of enhanced Southern Ocean upwelling during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Siani, Giuseppe; Michel, Elisabeth; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Devries, Tim; Lamy, Frank; Carel, Mélanie; Isguder, Gulay; Dewilde, Fabien; Lourantou, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a prominent role in the Earth's climate and carbon cycle. Changes in the Southern Ocean circulation may have regulated the release of CO₂ to the atmosphere from a deep-ocean reservoir during the last deglaciation. However, the path and exact timing of this deglacial CO₂ release are still under debate. Here we present measurements of deglacial surface reservoir ¹⁴C age changes in the eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, obtained by ¹⁴C dating of tephra deposited over the marine and terrestrial regions. These results, along with records of foraminifera benthic-planktic ¹⁴C age and δ¹³C difference, provide evidence for three periods of enhanced upwelling in the Southern Ocean during the last deglaciation, supporting the hypothesis that Southern Ocean upwelling contributed to the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO₂. These independently dated marine records suggest synchronous changes in the Southern Ocean circulation and Antarctic climate during the last deglaciation.

  1. Radiation hardness and precision timing study of silicon detectors for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currás, Esteban; Fernández, Marcos; Gallrapp, Christian; Gray, Lindsey; Mannelli, Marcello; Meridiani, Paolo; Moll, Michael; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Scharf, Christian; Silva, Pedro; Steinbrueck, Georg; Fatis, Tommaso Tabarelli de; Vila, Iván

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgraded LHC or Phase-II is expected to increase the instantaneous luminosity by a factor of 10 beyond the LHC's design value, expecting to deliver 250 fb-1 per year for a further 10 years of operation. Under these conditions the performance degradation due to integrated radiation dose will need to be addressed. The CMS collaboration is planning to upgrade the forward calorimeters. The replacement is called the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC) and it will be realized as a sampling calorimeter with layers of silicon detectors interleaved. The sensors will be realized as pad detectors with sizes of less that ∼1.0 cm2 and an active thickness between 100 and 300 μm depending on the position, respectively, the expected radiation levels. For an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1, the electromagnetic calorimetry will sustain integrated doses of 1.5 MGy (150 Mrads) and neutron fluences up to 1016 neq/cm2. A radiation tolerance study after neutron irradiation of 300, 200, and 100 μm n-on-p and p-on-n silicon pads irradiated to fluences up to 1.6×1016 neq/cm2 is presented. The properties of these diodes studied before and after irradiation were leakage current, capacitance, charge collection efficiency, annealing effects and timing capability. The results of these measurements validate these sensors as candidates for the HGC system.

  2. High-precision study of time- and temperature-dependence of the elastic properties of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, B.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, A.; Betts, J. B.; Freibert, F.; Migliori, A.

    2015-03-01

    It is important to determine the origin of changes in elastic properties in 239Pu as a function of time. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. The precision of these measurements enabled observation of changes in elastic properties of 1 part in 107 for measurements lasting hours up to several days. The most-likely source of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products such as He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) phase instabilities associated with transformations to the delta phase or to Pu3Ga. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, measurements were made of the mechanical resonance frequencies of 300mg cylinders of fine-grained polycrystalline alpha-phase 239Pu with about 600PPM Ga. We present the surprising result that at temperatures below 60K, there is a strong dependence on temperature of the rate of change of elastic moduli with time. Older results showed that the sign of this rate of change reverses at higher temperature. Such studies of nascent state are key to exploring damage evolution and its impact on specific volume and elastic moduli. Future studies will continue these measurements to above ambient temperatures.

  3. Real-time and long-time in vivo imaging in the shortwave infrared window of perforator vessels for more precise evaluation of flap perfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoqing; Chen, Jun; Wo, Yan; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Shiyi; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-10-01

    Effective real-time and long-time in vivo imaging for flap perfusion requires bright and stable imaging agents whose emissions can effectively penetrate live tissues without photobleaching. Compared to the standard imaging agent today - intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG), quantum dots (QDs) is a more attractive alternative due to its excellent optical properties including broad emission spectrum and stability against photobleaching. Recent studies have confirmed that the shortwave infrared window (SWIR) between 1000 and 2300 nm is the most sensitive spectral range for in vivo imaging due to its extremely low tissue absorption and autofluorescence. Here, we, for the first time, report a novel approach of flap perfusion assessment that provides real-time and long-time in vivo imaging using lead sulfide (PbS) QDs. Our results show that PbS QDs, as an imaging agent, can improve the stability of in vivo high-resolution images in a sustained manner, thus facilitating the precise evaluation of flap perfusion. In summary, compared to current imaging reporters, SWIR QDs have high photostability and deep tissue penetration, which makes them as promising in vivo imaging agents for more precise evaluation of flap perfusion.

  4. Entanglement of Ince-Gauss Modes of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Plick, William; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-02-01

    Ince-Gauss modes are solutions of the paraxial wave equation in elliptical coordinates [1]. They are natural generalizations both of Laguerre-Gauss and of Hermite-Gauss modes, which have been used extensively in quantum optics and quantum information processing over the last decade [2]. Ince-Gauss modes are described by one additional real parameter -- ellipticity. For each value of ellipticity, a discrete infinite-dimensional Hilbert space exists. This conceptually new degree of freedom could open up exciting possibilities for higher-dimensional quantum optical experiments. We present the first entanglement of non-trivial Ince-Gauss Modes. In our setup, we take advantage of a spontaneous parametric down-conversion process in a non-linear crystal to create entangled photon pairs. Spatial light modulators (SLMs) are used as analyzers. [1] Miguel A. Bandres and Julio C. Guti'errez-Vega ``Ince Gaussian beams", Optics Letters, Vol. 29, Issue 2, 144-146 (2004) [2] Adetunmise C. Dada, Jonathan Leach, Gerald S. Buller, Miles J. Padgett, and Erika Andersson, ``Experimental high-dimensional two-photon entanglement and violations of generalized Bell inequalities", Nature Physics 7, 677-680 (2011)

  5. Precision Shock Timing Measurements to set the Fuel Adiabat in Ignition Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, Peter

    2011-10-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements both in the target design and in the physics packages in the radiation-hydrodynamic codes used to design and model these targets. We can set an accurately tuned pulse shape within a series of approximately 5 shots. The results and interpretation of these tuning experiments will be described. In collaboration with: T.R. Boehly, H.F. Robey, J.L. Kline, D.R. Farley, S. Le Pape, J.D. Moody, R.E. Olson, D.H. Munro, J.L. Milovich, P.A. Sterne, O.S. Jones, D.A. Callahan, A. Nikroo, J.J. Kroll, J.B. Horner, A.V. Hamza, S.D. Bhandarkar, J.H. Eggert, R.F. Smith, D.G. Hicks, H.-S Park, B.K. Young, W.W. Hsing, G.W. Collins, O.L. Landen and the NIC team. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. High Precision and Real Time Tracking of Low Earth Orbiters With GPS: Case Studies With TOPEX/POSEIDON and EUVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Bertiger, Winy I.; Gold, Kenn; Guinn, Joseph; Reichert, Angie; Watkins, Michael

    1995-01-01

    TOPEX/POSEIDON carries a dual-frequency 6 channel GPS receiver while EUVE has a 12 channel single frequency receiver. Flying at an altitude of 1334 km, TOPEX/POSEIDON performs precise ocean altimetry, which demands the highest possible accuracy in determining the radial orbit component in post-processing. Radial RMS accuracies of about 2 cm were realized using reduced dynamic tracking techniques. In this approach, orbit errors due to force are substantially reduced by exploiting the geometric strength of GPS to solve for a set of stochastic forces. On EUVE, the emphasis was on evaluating real time positioning techniques with a single frequency receiver. The capability for real time 3D accuracies of 15 m in the presence of Selective Availability was shown. This was validated by comparing to a post-processed differential GPS truth orbit believed accurate to about 1 m.!.

  7. Development of a Double-Gauss Lens Based Setup for Optoacoustic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hojong; Ryu, Jae-Myung; Yeom, Jung-Yeol

    2017-01-01

    In optoacoustic (photoacoustic) systems, different echo signal intensities such as amplitudes, center frequencies, and bandwidths need to be compensated by utilizing variable gain or time-gain compensation amplifiers. However, such electronic components can increase system complexities and signal noise levels. In this paper, we introduce a double-Gauss lens to generate a large field of view with uniform light intensity due to the low chromatic aberrations of the lens, thus obtaining uniform echo signal intensities across the field of view of the optoacoustic system. In order to validate the uniformity of the echo signal intensities in the system, an in-house transducer was placed at various positions above a tissue sample and echo signals were measured and compared with each other. The custom designed double-Gauss lens demonstrated negligible light intensity variation (±1.5%) across the illumination field of view (~2 cm diameter). When the transducer was used to measure echo signal from an eye of a bigeye tuna within a range of ±1 cm, the peak-to-peak amplitude, center frequency, and their −6 dB bandwidth variations were less than 2 mV, 1 MHz, and 6%, respectively. The custom designed double-Gauss lens can provide uniform light beam across a wide area while generating insignificant echo signal variations, and thus can lower the burden of the receiving electronics or signal processing in the optoacoustic system. PMID:28273794

  8. Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization by Gauss Elimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, Lyle; Trimble, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Described is the hand-calculation method for the orthogonalization of a given set of vectors through the integration of Gaussian elimination with existing algorithms. Although not numerically preferable, this method adds increased precision as well as organization to the solution process. (JJK)

  9. Gauss-Bonnet chameleon mechanism of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Yusaku; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    2009-05-15

    As a model of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe, we consider a model of the scalar-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. This model includes the propagating scalar modes, which might give a large correction to the Newton law. In order to avoid this problem, we propose an extension of the chameleon mechanism where the scalar mode becomes massive due to the coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet term. Since the Gauss-Bonnet invariant does not vanish near the Earth or in the Solar System, even in the vacuum, the scalar mode is massive even in the vacuum and the correction to the Newton law could be small. We also discuss the possibility that the model could describe simultaneously the inflation in the early Universe, in addition to the current accelerated expansion.

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting (15th) Held at Washington, DC on 6-8 December 1983,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-02

    John McK. Luck, John R. Woodger, James E. Wells, Peter N. Churchill and Philip A. Clements Separating the Variances of Noise Components in the Global...auditorium; it will be held in a separate building and is restricted to cleared U.S. citizens. So please take this into consideration. If you have a question... separately . It is obvious that precisions for Loran-C reception (sample time = 1 hour) at SO, CSAO and BAO are 0.046, 0.178 and 0.089pJs

  11. Rotating black holes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory.

    PubMed

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen

    2011-04-15

    We construct generalizations of the Kerr black holes by including higher-curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. We show that the domain of existence of these Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton (EGBD) black holes is bounded by the Kerr black holes, the critical EGBD black holes, and the singular extremal EGBD solutions. The angular momentum of the EGBD black holes can exceed the Kerr bound. The EGBD black holes satisfy a generalized Smarr relation. We also compare their innermost stable circular orbits with those of the Kerr black holes and show the existence of differences which might be observable in astrophysical systems.

  12. A discrete time-varying internal model-based approach for high precision tracking of a multi-axis servo gantry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Yan, Peng; Jiang, Huan; Ye, Peiqing

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we consider the discrete time-varying internal model-based control design for high precision tracking of complicated reference trajectories generated by time-varying systems. Based on a novel parallel time-varying internal model structure, asymptotic tracking conditions for the design of internal model units are developed, and a low order robust time-varying stabilizer is further synthesized. In a discrete time setting, the high precision tracking control architecture is deployed on a Voice Coil Motor (VCM) actuated servo gantry system, where numerical simulations and real time experimental results are provided, achieving the tracking errors around 3.5‰ for frequency-varying signals.

  13. Cosmological dynamics of spatially flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet models in various dimensions: Vacuum case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavluchenko, Sergey A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of vacuum spatially flat anisotropic [(3 +D )+1 ]-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet cosmological models. We consider models that topologically are the product of two flat isotropic submanifolds with different scale factors. One of these submanifolds is three dimensional and represents our 3D space and the other is D dimensional and represents extra dimensions. We consider no Ansatz on the scale factors, which makes our results quite general. With both Einstein-Hilbert and Gauss-Bonnet contributions in play and with the symmetry involved, the cases with D =1 , D =2 , D =3 , and D ≥4 have different dynamics due to the different structures of the equations of motion. We analytically analyze equations of motion in all cases and describe all possible regimes. It appears that the only regimes with nonsingular future asymptotes are the Kasner regime in general relativity and exponential regimes. As of the past asymptotes, for a smooth transition only the Kasner regime in Gauss-Bonnet is an option. With this at hand, we are down to only two viable regimes: the "pure" Kasner regime [transition from a high-energy (Gauss-Bonnet) to a low-energy (general relativity) Kasner regime] and a transition from a high-energy Kasner regime to an anisotropic exponential solution. It appears that these regimes take place for different signs of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling α : the "pure" Kasner regime occurs for α >0 at low D and α <0 for high D ; the anisotropic exponential regime is reached only for α >0 . So if we restrain ourselves with α >0 solutions (which would be the case, say, if we identify α with inverse string tension in heterotic string theory), the only late-time regimes are Kasner for D =1 , 2 and anisotropic exponential for D ≥2 . Also, low-energy Kasner regimes [a (t )∝tp] have expansion rates for (3 +1 )-dimensional subspace ("our Universe") ranging from p =0.5 (D =1 ) to p =1 /√{3 }≈0.577 (D →∞ ), which

  14. Enhancing real-time precise point positioning with zenith troposphere delay products and the determination of corresponding tropospheric stochastic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yibin; Peng, Wenjie; Xu, Chaoqian; Cheng, Shuyang

    2017-02-01

    By introducing two types of zenith troposphere delay (ZTD) products in precise point positioning (PPP), we developed the ZTD-corrected PPP and the ZTD-constrained PPP, both of them reduced the PPP convergence time. Both enhanced PPP methods are examined by global empirical ZTD models and regional ZTD corrections. For global ZTD models, we verified that ZTD-corrected PPP will deviate the positioning results, while ZTD-constrained PPP could produce unbiased estimations. Therefore, the latter is utilized to study the performance of global ZTD models (ITG, GPT2w, GZTD and UNB3m). After numerous experiments, we found that the performance of ZTD models was positively related to the real ZTD accuracy, and we proposed a universal tropospheric stochastic model 2SQR(9rms) which denotes double the square of nine times ZTD rms, to constrain ZTD in PPP. The proposed model subsequently was validated by real-time static and kinematic ZTD-constrained PPP on the premise that the ZTD rms on every station was known. Compared with traditional PPP, in static PPP, the number of improved stations is increased by 15.5 per cent (ITG), 14.4 per cent (GPT2w), 11.1 per cent (GZTD) and 8.3 per cent (UNB3m). For kinematic PPP, PPP constrained by ITG model still had the best performance, the number of improved stations is increased by 14.4 per cent, after 30 min of initialization time, 13.4 cm east, 13.4 cm north and 11.7 cm up positioning accuracy was obtained, compared with 15.3 cm east, 15.3 cm north and 14.3 cm up accuracy by traditional PPP. In addition, experiments using regional ZTD corrections to enhance real-time PPP showed that both ZTD-corrected PPP and ZTD-constrained PPP can notably reduce the convergence time on the vertical component (within 15 cm).

  15. Accuracy and precision of hind limb foot contact timings of horses determined using a pelvis-mounted inertial measurement unit.

    PubMed

    Starke, Sandra D; Witte, Thomas H; May, Stephen A; Pfau, Thilo

    2012-05-11

    Gait analysis using small sensor units is becoming increasingly popular in the clinical context. In order to segment continuous movement from a defined point of the stride cycle, knowledge about footfall timings is essential. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of foot contact timings of a defined limb determined using an inertial sensor mounted on the pelvis of ten horses during walk and trot at different speeds and in different directions. Foot contact was estimated from vertical velocity events occurring before maximum sensor roll towards the contralateral limb. Foot contact timings matched data from a synchronised hoof mounted accelerometer well when velocity minimum was used for walk (mean (SD) difference of 15 (18)ms across horses) and velocity zero-crossing for trot (mean (SD) difference from -4 (14) to 12 (7)ms depending on the condition). The stride segmentation method also remained robust when applied to movement data of hind limb lame horses. In future, this method may find application in segmenting overground sensor data of various species.

  16. High precision time calibration of the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction event in a deep marine context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Brosse, Morgane; Bagherpour, Borhan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    To construct a revised and high resolution calibrated time scale for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) we use (1) high-precision U-Pb zircon age determinations of a unique succession of volcanic ash layers interbedded with deep water fossiliferous sediments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) combined with (2) accurate quantitative biochronology based on ammonoids, conodonts, radiolarians, and foraminifera and (3) tracers of marine bioproductivity (carbon isotopes) across the PTB. The unprecedented precision of the single grain chemical abrasion isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) dating technique at sub-per mil level (radio-isotopic calibration of the PTB at the <100 ka level) now allows calibrating magmatic and biological timescales at resolution adequate for both groups of processes. Using these alignments allows (1) positioning the PTB in different depositional setting and (2) solving the age contradictions generated by the misleading use of the first occurrence (FO) of the conodont Hindeodus parvus, whose diachronous first occurrences are arbitrarily used for placing the base of the Triassic. This new age framework provides the basis for a combined calibration of chemostratigraphic records with high-resolution biochronozones of the Late Permian and Early Triassic. Here, we present new single grain U-Pb zircon data of volcanic ash layers from two deep marine sections (Dongpan and Penglaitan) revealing stratigraphic consistent dates over several volcanic ash layers bracketing the PTB. These analyses define weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 251.956±0.033 Ma (Dongpan) and 252.062±0.043 Ma (Penglaitan) for the last Permian ash bed. By calibration with detailed litho- and biostratigraphy new U-Pb ages of 251.953±0.038 Ma (Dongpan) and 251.907±0.033 Ma (Penglaitan) are established for the onset of the Triassic.

  17. Wormholes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory.

    PubMed

    Kanti, Panagiota; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2011-12-30

    We construct traversable wormholes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in four spacetime dimensions, without needing any form of exotic matter. We determine their domain of existence, and show that these wormholes satisfy a generalized Smarr relation. We demonstrate linear stability with respect to radial perturbations for a subset of these wormholes.

  18. Holographic vector superconductor in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun-Wang; Wu, Ya-Bo; Cai, Tuo; Liu, Hai-Min; Ren, Yin-Shuan; Liu, Mo-Lin

    2016-02-01

    In the probe limit, we numerically study the holographic p-wave superconductor phase transitions in the higher curvature theory. Concretely, we study the influences of Gauss-Bonnet parameter α on the Maxwell complex vector model (MCV) in the five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and soliton backgrounds, respectively. In the two backgrounds, the improving Gauss-Bonnet parameter α and dimension of the vector operator Δ inhibit the vector condensate. In the black hole, the condensate quickly saturates a stable value at lower temperature. Moreover, both the stable value of condensate and the ratio ωg /Tc increase with α. In the soliton, the location of the second pole of the imaginary part increases with α, which implies that the energy of the quasiparticle excitation increases with the improving higher curvature correction. In addition, the influences of the Gauss-Bonnet correction on the MCV model are similar to the ones on the SU(2) p-wave model, which confirms that the MCV model is a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model even without the applied magnetic field to some extent.

  19. An Exodus II specification for handling gauss points.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Jortner, Jeffrey N.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2007-11-01

    This report specifies the way in which Gauss points shall be named and ordered when storing them in an EXODUS II file so that they may be properly interpreted by visualization tools. This naming convention covers hexahedra and tetrahedra. Future revisions of this document will cover quadrilaterals, triangles, and shell elements.

  20. Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization (glesp) for CMB Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Naselsky, P. D.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Novikov, D. I.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Novikov, I. D.; Christensen, P. R.; Chiang, L.-Y.

    A new scheme of sky pixelization is developed for CMB maps. The scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map. A corresponding code has been implemented and comparison with other methods has been done.

  1. Understanding Gauss's Law Using Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Some of the results from the electrostatics portion of introductory physics are particularly difficult for students to understand and/or believe. For students who have yet to take vector calculus, Gauss's law is far from obvious and may seem more difficult than Coulomb's. When these same students are told that the minimum potential…

  2. Tonic GABAA conductance decreases membrane time constant and increases EPSP-spike precision in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I; Xu, Chun; Song, Inseon; Doronin, Maxim; Wu, Yu-Wei; Walker, Matthew C; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Because of a complex dendritic structure, pyramidal neurons have a large membrane surface relative to other cells and so a large electrical capacitance and a large membrane time constant (τm). This results in slow depolarizations in response to excitatory synaptic inputs, and consequently increased and variable action potential latencies, which may be computationally undesirable. Tonic activation of GABAA receptors increases membrane conductance and thus regulates neuronal excitability by shunting inhibition. In addition, tonic increases in membrane conductance decrease the membrane time constant (τm), and improve the temporal fidelity of neuronal firing. Here we performed whole-cell current clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and found that bath application of 10μM GABA indeed decreases τm in these cells. GABA also decreased first spike latency and jitter (standard deviation of the latency) produced by current injection of 2 rheobases (500 ms). However, when larger current injections (3-6 rheobases) were used, GABA produced no significant effect on spike jitter, which was low. Using mathematical modeling we demonstrate that the tonic GABAA conductance decreases rise time, decay time and half-width of EPSPs in pyramidal neurons. A similar effect was observed on EPSP/IPSP pairs produced by stimulation of Schaffer collaterals: the EPSP part of the response became shorter after application of GABA. Consistent with the current injection data, a significant decrease in spike latency and jitter was obtained in cell attached recordings only at near-threshold stimulation (50% success rate, S50). When stimulation was increased to 2- or 3- times S50, GABA significantly affected neither spike latency nor spike jitter. Our results suggest that a decrease in τm associated with elevations in ambient GABA can improve EPSP-spike precision at near-threshold synaptic inputs.

  3. Real-time analysis of δ13C- and δD-CH4 by high precision laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Simon; Emmenegger, Lukas; Tuzson, Béla; Fischer, Hubertus; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) contributing 18% to total radiative forcing. Anthropogenic sources (e.g. ruminants, landfills) contribute 60% to total emissions and led to an increase in its atmospheric mixing ratio from 700 ppb in pre-industrial times to 1819 ± 1 ppb in 2012 [1]. Analysis of the most abundant methane isotopologues 12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D can be used to disentangle the various source/sink processes [2] and to develop target oriented reduction strategies. High precision isotopic analysis of CH4 can be accomplished by isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) [2] and more recently by mid-infrared laser-based spectroscopic techniques. For high precision measurements in ambient air, however, both techniques rely on preconcentration of the target gas [3]. In an on-going project, we developed a fully-automated, field-deployable CH4 preconcentration unit coupled to a dual quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) for real-time analysis of CH4 isotopologues. The core part of the rack-mounted (19 inch) device is a highly-efficient adsorbent trap attached to a motorized linear drive system and enclosed in a vacuum chamber. Thereby, the adsorbent trap can be decoupled from the Stirling cooler during desorption for fast desorption and optimal heat management. A wide variety of adsorbents, including: HayeSep D, molecular sieves as well as the novel metal-organic frameworks and carbon nanotubes were characterized regarding their surface area, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and selectivity for methane over nitrogen. The most promising candidates were tested on the preconcentration device and a preconcentration by a factor > 500 was obtained. Furthermore analytical interferants (e.g. N2O, CO2) are separated by step-wise desorption of trace gases. A QCL absorption spectrometer previously described by Tuzson et al. (2010) for CH4 flux measurements was modified to obtain a platform for high precision and simultaneous

  4. Digital signal processor-based high-precision on-line Voigt lineshape fitting for direct absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Zheng, Deyan; Cao, Zhang; Cai, Weiwei

    2014-12-01

    To realize on-line high-accuracy measurement in direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS), a system-on-chip, high-precision digital signal processor-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting implementation is introduced in this paper. Given that the Voigt lineshape is determined by the Gauss full width at half maximum (FWHM) and Lorentz FWHM, a look-up table, which covers a range of combinations of both, is first built to achieve rapid and accurate calculation of Voigt lineshape. With the look-up table and raw absorbance data in hand, Gauss-Newton nonlinear fitting module is implemented to obtain the parameters including both the Gauss and Lorentz FWHMs, which can be used to calculate the integrated absorbance. To realize the proposed method in hardware, a digital signal processor (DSP) is adopted to fit the Voigt lineshape in a real-time DAS measurement system. In experiment, temperature and H2O concentration of a flat flame are recovered from the transitions of 7444.36 cm(-1) and 7185.6 cm(-1) by the DSP-based on-line Voigt lineshape fitting and on-line integral of the raw absorbance, respectively. The results show that the proposed method can not only fit the Voigt lineshape on-line but also improve the measurement accuracy compared with those obtained from the direct integral of the raw absorbance.

  5. The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter A.; Henzlova, Daniela; Hauck, Danielle K.; Favalli, Andrea

    2012-07-13

    The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting

  6. High precision thorium-230 ages of corals and the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques for the measurement of {sup 230}Th and {sup 234}U have been developed. These techniques have made it possible to reduce the analytical errors in {sup 230}Th dating of corals using very small samples (10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} atoms). The time range over which useful data on corals can now be obtained ranges from 15 to 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to {sup 14}C dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can not be determined makes it possible to determine the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122 to 130 ky. The ages coincide with or slightly postdate the summer solar insolation high at 65{degree}N latitude, which occurred 128 ky ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of orbital forcing. Coral ages may allow us to resolve the ages of individual coseismic uplift events and thereby date prehistoric earthquakes. This possibility has been examined at two localities, northwest Santo Island and north Malekula Island, Vanuatu. The {sup 230}Th growth dates of the surfaces of adjacent emerged coral heads, collected from the same elevation on northwest Santo Island, were, within analytical error, identical (A.D. 1866 {plus minus} 4 and A.D. 1864 {plus minus} 4). This indicates that the corals died at the same time and is consistent with the idea that they were killed by coseismic uplift. Similar adjacent coral heads on north Malekula Island yielded {sup 230}Th growth dates of A.D. 1729 {plus minus} 3 and A.D. 1718 {plus minus} 5. The ages are similar but analytically distinguishable. The difference may be due to erosion of the outer, younger, portion of the latter coral head.

  7. Evaluating precision and accuracy when quantifying different endogenous control reference genes in maize using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Scholdberg, Tandace A; Norden, Tim D; Nelson, Daishia D; Jenkins, G Ronald

    2009-04-08

    The agricultural biotechnology industry routinely utilizes real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) for the detection of biotechnology-derived traits in plant material, particularly for meeting the requirements of legislative mandates that rely upon the trace detection of DNA. Quantification via real-time RT-qPCR in plant species involves the measurement of the copy number of a taxon-specific, endogenous control gene exposed to the same manipulations as the target gene prior to amplification. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO 21570:2005) specifies that the copy number of an endogenous reference gene be used for normalizing the concentration (expressed as a % w/w) of a trait-specific target gene when using RT-qPCR. For this purpose, the copy number of a constitutively expressed endogenous reference gene in the same sample is routinely monitored. Real-time qPCR was employed to evaluate the predictability and performance of commonly used endogenous control genes (starch synthase, SSIIb-2, SSIIb-3; alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH; high-mobility group, HMG; zein; and invertase, IVR) used to detect biotechnology-derived traits in maize. The data revealed relatively accurate and precise amplification efficiencies when isogenic maize was compared to certified reference standards, but highly variable results when 23 nonisogenic maize cultivars were compared to an IRMM Bt-11 reference standard. Identifying the most suitable endogenous control gene, one that amplifies consistently and predictably across different maize cultivars, and implementing this as an internationally recognized standard would contribute toward harmonized testing of biotechnology-derived traits in maize.

  8. Holographic superconductors with various condensates in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Qiyuan; Wang Bin; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Pavan, A. B.

    2010-05-15

    We study holographic superconductors in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We consider two particular backgrounds: a d-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole and a Gauss-Bonnet-AdS soliton. We discuss in detail the effects that the mass of the scalar field, the Gauss-Bonnet coupling and the dimensionality of the AdS space have on the condensation formation and conductivity. We also study the ratio {omega}{sub g}/T{sub c} for various masses of the scalar field and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  9. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D. Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Holst, B.; Bracco, G.

    2016-02-15

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  10. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Bracco, G.; Holst, B.

    2016-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  11. A Stable Clock Error Model Using Coupled First and Second Order Gauss-Markov Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell; Lee, Taesul

    2008-01-01

    Long data outages may occur in applications of global navigation satellite system technology to orbit determination for missions that spend significant fractions of their orbits above the navigation satellite constellation(s). Current clock error models based on the random walk idealization may not be suitable in these circumstances, since the covariance of the clock errors may become large enough to overflow flight computer arithmetic. A model that is stable, but which approximates the existing models over short time horizons is desirable. A coupled first- and second-order Gauss-Markov process is such a model.

  12. The precision analysis of time series photometry and its application to searches for pre-main-sequence objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Ryan James

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in the detection, classification and understanding of exoplanets and binary star systems. This is due, in large part, to the increase in use of small aperture telescopes (< 20 cm) to survey large portions of the night sky to milli-mag precision with rapid cadence. The vast majority of the planetary and binary systems studied consist of objects on the main sequence or the giant branch, leading to a dearth of knowledge of properties at early times (<50 Myr). Only a dozen binaries and one possible transiting Hot Jupiter are known among pre-main sequence objects, yet these are the systems that can provide the best constraints on stellar formation and planetary migration models. The deficiency in the number of well-characterized systems is driven by the inherent and aperiodic variability found in pre-main-sequence objects which can mask and mimic eclipse signals. Nevertheless, a dramatic increase in the total number of systems at early times is required to alleviate the conflict between theory and observation. We have recently completed a photometric survey of 3 nearby (<150 pc) and young (<50 Myr) moving groups with a small aperture telescope. We discovered over 300 likely pre-main sequence binaries and ruled out 7 possible transiting Hot Jupiters using techniques developed by reducing crowded, defocused images from an analogous system. Using these observations we have determined a lower-limit on the migration timescale for Hot Jupiters to be 11 Myr and have identified numerous high priority pre-main-sequence binary candidates requiring further follow up.

  13. Proper cyclin B3 dosage is important for precision of metaphase-to-anaphase onset timing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Chen, Nansheng

    2012-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their compulsory cofactors, the cyclins, are the two key classes of regulatory molecules that determine the eukaryotic cell's progress through the cell cycle by substrate phosphorylation. Cdk1 forms complexes with B-type cyclins and phosphorylates a number of substrates as cells prepare to enter mitosis. CYB-3 (Cyclin B3) is a B-type cyclin that has been recently shown to be required for the timely metaphase-to-anaphase transition, presumably by alleviating a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) block. Previously, we have shown that doubling the CYB-3 dosage suppresses sterility in the absence of the essential SAC component MDF-1/Mad1. Here we demonstrate the importance of the Mos1-mediated single-copy insertion method for understanding the effects of gene dosage by generating strains that have more (two or three) copies of the cyb-3 in wild-type and mdf-1(gk2) backgrounds to investigate dosage effect of CYB-3 on mitotic progression as well as development and fertility in the absence and the presence of the MDF-1 checkpoint component. We show that tripling the dosage of CYB-3 results in a significantly variable metaphase-to-anaphase transition, both in wild-type and mdf-1(gk2) mutant backgrounds. Although a majority of embryos initiate anaphase onset normally, a significant number of embryos initiate anaphase with a delay. We also show that tripling the dosage of CYB-3 has no effect on viability in the wild-type background; however, it does reduce the sterility caused by the absence of MDF-1. Together, these data reveal that proper dosage of CYB-3 is important for precision of timely execution of anaphase onset regardless of the presence of the MDF-1 checkpoint component.

  14. Towards the GEOSAT Follow-On Precise Orbit Determination Goals of High Accuracy and Near-Real-Time Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Lillibridge, John L.

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft (GFO) primary mission objective is to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Satellite laser ranging data, especially in combination with altimeter crossover data, offer the only means of determining high-quality precise orbits. Two tuned gravity models, PGS7727 and PGS7777b, were created at NASA GSFC for GFO that reduce the predicted radial orbit through degree 70 to 13.7 and 10.0 mm. A macromodel was developed to model the nonconservative forces and the SLR spacecraft measurement offset was adjusted to remove a mean bias. Using these improved models, satellite-ranging data, altimeter crossover data, and Doppler data are used to compute both daily medium precision orbits with a latency of less than 24 hours. Final precise orbits are also computed using these tracking data and exported with a latency of three to four weeks to NOAA for use on the GFO Geophysical Data Records (GDR s). The estimated orbit precision of the daily orbits is between 10 and 20 cm, whereas the precise orbits have a precision of 5 cm.

  15. Holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shancheng; Pan, Qiyuan; Jing, Jiliang

    2017-02-01

    We construct the holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity via a Maxwell complex vector field model and investigate the effect of the curvature correction on the superfluid phase transition in the probe limit. We obtain the rich phase structure and find that the higher curvature correction hinders the condensate of the vector field but makes it easier for the appearance of translating point from the second-order transition to the first-order one or for the emergence of the Cave of Winds. Moreover, for the supercurrents versus the superfluid velocity, we observe that our results near the critical temperature are independent of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and agree well with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction.

  16. Noether symmetries in Gauss-Bonnet-teleparallel cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Dialektopoulos, Konstantinos F.

    2016-11-01

    A generalized teleparallel cosmological model, f(T_{G},T), containing the torsion scalar T and the teleparallel counterpart of the Gauss-Bonnet topological invariant T_{{G}}, is studied in the framework of the Noether symmetry approach. As f({G}, R) gravity, where {G} is the Gauss-Bonnet topological invariant and R is the Ricci curvature scalar, exhausts all the curvature information that one can construct from the Riemann tensor, in the same way, f(T_{G},T) contains all the possible information directly related to the torsion tensor. In this paper, we discuss how the Noether symmetry approach allows one to fix the form of the function f(T_{G},T) and to derive exact cosmological solutions.

  17. Debye screening versus Gauss law in electrostatics: Finite size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ritesh Kumar; Menon, V. J.; Mishra, M.; Tripathi, D. N.

    2007-10-01

    We revisit the well-known topics of self- and induced-screening in an otherwise isotropic neutral plasma/colloid. It is pointed out that the standard Debye-Hückel (DH) theory (ignoring finite size effects) suffers from many ambiguities related to net ionic numbers, total charge of the system, role of the electrostatic Gauss law, short-distance behaviour of the potential and incorrectly normalized pair correlation functions. We give a new formulation (incorporating finite size effects) such that ionic numbers are maintained, the total charge of the system has physically correct value, the Gauss law boundary conditions are rigorously obeyed, short-distance behaviour of the potential is guaranteed automatically, and correlation functions are correctly normalized. Numerical differences between the two approaches show up if the screening length μ-1 becomes comparable to the size R of the system.

  18. Noether symmetries in Gauss-Bonnet-teleparallel cosmology.

    PubMed

    Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Dialektopoulos, Konstantinos F

    2016-01-01

    A generalized teleparallel cosmological model, [Formula: see text], containing the torsion scalar T and the teleparallel counterpart of the Gauss-Bonnet topological invariant [Formula: see text], is studied in the framework of the Noether symmetry approach. As [Formula: see text] gravity, where [Formula: see text] is the Gauss-Bonnet topological invariant and R is the Ricci curvature scalar, exhausts all the curvature information that one can construct from the Riemann tensor, in the same way, [Formula: see text] contains all the possible information directly related to the torsion tensor. In this paper, we discuss how the Noether symmetry approach allows one to fix the form of the function [Formula: see text] and to derive exact cosmological solutions.

  19. Dark energy from Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, L. N.; Jimenez, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    We consider a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and nonminimal couplings. Exact cosmological solutions were found in the absence of potential that give equations of state of dark energy consistent with current observational constraints, but with different asymptotic behaviors depending on the couplings of the model. A detailed reconstruction procedure is given for the scalar potential and the Gauss-Bonnet coupling for any given cosmological scenario. In particular we consider conditions for the existence of a variety of cosmological solutions with accelerated expansion, including quintessence, phantom, de Sitter, and Little Rip. For the case of quintessence and phantom we have found a scalar potential of the Albrecht-Skordis type, where the potential is an exponential with a polynomial factor.

  20. Bouncing loop quantum cosmology in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, J.; Makarenko, A. N.; Myagky, A. N.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective Gauss-Bonnet extension of loop quantum cosmology, by introducing holonomy corrections in modified F (G ) theories of gravity. Within the context of our formalism, we provide a perturbative expansion in the critical density, a parameter characteristic of loop quantum gravity theories, and we result in having leading order corrections to the classical F (G ) theories of gravity. After extensively discussing the formalism, we present a reconstruction method that makes it possible to find the loop quantum cosmology corrected F (G ) theory that can realize various cosmological scenarios. We exemplify our theoretical constructions by using bouncing cosmologies, and we investigate which loop quantum cosmology corrected Gauss-Bonnet modified gravities can successfully realize such cosmologies.

  1. Time Variable Gravity modeling for Precise Orbits Across the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-l and Jason-2 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas; Beckley, Brain D.; Melachroinos, Stavros; Rowlands, David D.; Luthcke, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of the Time Variable Gravity (TVG) is believed to constitute one of the the largest remaining source of orbit error for altimeter satellite POD. The GSFC operational TVG model consists of forward modeling the atmospheric gravity using ECMWF 6-hour pressure data, a GRACE derived 20x20 annual field to account for changes in the hydrology and ocean water mass, and linear rates for C20, C30, C40, based on 17 years of SLR data analysis (IERS 2003) using the EIGEN-GL04S1 (a GRACE+Lageos-based geopotential solution). Although the GSFC Operational model can be applied from 1987, there may be long-term variations not captured by these linear models, and more importantly the linear models may not be consistent with more recent surface mass trends due to global climate change, We have evaluated the impact of TVG in two different wavs: (1) by using the more recent EIGEN-6S gravity model developed by the GFZ/GRGS tearm, which consists of annual, semi-annual and secular changes in the coefficients to 50x50 determined over 8(?) years of GRACE+Lageos+GOCE data (2003-200?): (2) Application of 4x4 solutions developed from a multi satellite SLR+DORIS solution based on GGM03S that span the period from 1993 to 2011. We have evaluated the recently released EIGEN6s static and time-varying gravity field for Jason-2 (J2). Jason-I (J1), and TOPEX/Posiedon (TP) Precise Orbit Determination (POD) spanning 1993-2011. Although EIGEN6s shows significant improvement for J2POD spanning 2008 - 2011, it also shows significant degradation for TP POD from 1992. The GSFC 4x4 time SLR+DORIS-based series spans 1993 to mid 2011, and shows promise for POD. We evaluate the performance of the different TVG models based on analysis of tracking data residuals use of independent data such as altimeter crossovers, and through analysis of differences with internally-generated and externally generated orbits.

  2. Precision errors, least significant change, and monitoring time interval in pediatric measurements of bone mineral density, body composition, and mechanostat parameters by GE lunar prodigy.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Maciej; Pludowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method is widely used in pediatrics in the study of bone density and body composition. However, there is a limit to how precise DXA can estimate bone and body composition measures in children. The study was aimed to (1) evaluate precision errors for bone mineral density, bone mass and bone area, body composition, and mechanostat parameters, (2) assess the relationships between precision errors and anthropometric parameters, and (3) calculate a "least significant change" and "monitoring time interval" values for DXA measures in children of wide age range (5-18yr) using GE Lunar Prodigy densitometer. It is observed that absolute precision error values were different for thin and standard technical modes of DXA measures and depended on age, body weight, and height. In contrast, relative precision error values expressed in percentages were similar for thin and standard modes (except total body bone mineral density [TBBMD]) and were not related to anthropometric variables (except TBBMD). Concluding, due to stability of percentage coefficient of variation values in wide range of age, the use of precision error expressed in percentages, instead of absolute error, appeared as convenient in pediatric population.

  3. Accelerating the Gauss-Seidel Power Flow Solver on a High Performance Reconfigurable Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Jong-Ho; Ravindran, Arun; Mukherjee, Arindam; Joshi, Bharat; Chassin, David P.

    2009-09-01

    The computationally intensive power flow problem determines the voltage magnitude and phase angle at each bus in a power system for hundreds of thousands of buses under balanced three-phase steady-state conditions. We report an FPGA acceleration of the Gauss-Seidel based power flow solver employed in the transmission module of the GridLAB-D power distribution simulator and analysis tool. The prototype hardware is implemented on an SGI Altix-RASC system equipped with a Xilinx Virtex II 6000 FPGA. Due to capacity limitations of the FPGA, only the bus voltage calculations of the power network are implemented on hardware while the branch current calculations are implemented in software. For a 200,000 bus system, the bus voltage calculation on the FPGA achieves a 48x speed-up with PQ buses and a 62 times for PV over an equivalent sequential software implementation. The average overall speed up of the FPGA-CPU implementation with 100 iterations of the Gauss-Seidel power solver is 2.6x over a software implementation, with the branch calculations on the CPU accounting for 85% of the total execution time. The FPGA-CPU implementation also shows linear scaling with increase in the size of the input power network.

  4. Quarter-sweep Gauss-Seidel method with quadratic spline scheme applied to fourth order two-point boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Fauzi, Norizyan Izzati; Sulaiman, Jumat

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the application of Quarter-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (QSGS) iterative method using quadratic spline scheme for solving fourth order two-point linear boundary value problems. In the line to derive approximation equations, firstly the fourth order problems need to be reduced onto a system of second-order two-point boundary value problems. Then two linear systems have been constructed via discretization process by using the corresponding quarter-sweep quadratic spline approximation equations. The generated linear systems have been solved using the proposed QSGS iterative method to show the superiority over Full-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (FSGS) and Half-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (HSGS) methods. Computational results are provided to illustrate that the effectiveness of the proposed QSGS method is more superior in terms of computational time and number of iterations as compared to other tested methods.

  5. A Spectral Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto Collocation Method for a Space-Fractional Advection Diffusion Equations with Variable Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhrawy, A. H.; Baleanu, D.

    2013-10-01

    An efficient Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto collocation (L-GL-C) method is applied to solve the space-fractional advection diffusion equation with nonhomogeneous initial-boundary conditions. The Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto points are used as collocation nodes for spatial fractional derivatives as well as the Caputo fractional derivative. This approach is reducing the problem to the solution of a system of ordinary differential equations in time which can be solved by using any standard numerical techniques. The proposed numerical solutions when compared with the exact solutions reveal that the obtained solution produces highly accurate results. The results show that the proposed method has high accuracy and is efficient for solving the space-fractional advection diffusion equation.

  6. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design and the Difference-in-Difference Design in Educational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Marie-Andrée; Zhu, Pei; Jacob, Robin; Bloom, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the validity and precision of two nonexperimental study designs (NXDs) that can be used in educational evaluation: the comparative interrupted time series (CITS) design and the difference-in-difference (DD) design. In a CITS design, program impacts are evaluated by looking at whether the treatment group deviates from its…

  7. Generalizing higher-order Bessel-Gauss beams: analytical description and demonstration.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Damian N; Schulte, Jan; Putnam, William P; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-11-19

    We report on a novel class of higher-order Bessel-Gauss beams in which the well-known Bessel-Gauss beam is the fundamental mode and the azimuthally symmetric Laguerre-Gaussian beams are special cases. We find these higher-order Bessel-Gauss beams by superimposing decentered Hermite-Gaussian beams. We show analytically and experimentally that these higher-order Bessel-Gauss beams resemble higher-order eigenmodes of optical resonators consisting of aspheric mirrors. This work is relevant for the many applications of Bessel-Gauss beams in particular the more recently proposed high-intensity Bessel-Gauss enhancement cavities for strong-field physics applications.

  8. Nonzonal Expressions of GAUSS-KRÜGER Projection in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmei; Bian, Shaofeng; Liu, Qiang; Li, Houpu; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-06-01

    With conformal colatitude introduced, based on the mathematical relationship between exponential and logarithmic functions by complex numbers, strict equation of complex conformal colatitude is derived, and then theoretically strict nonzonal expressions of Gauss projection in polar regions are carried out. By means of the computer algebra system, correctness of these expressions is verified, and sketches of Gauss-krüger projection without bandwidth restriction in polar regions are charted. In the Arctic or Antarctic region, graticule of nonzonal Gauss projection complies with people's reading habit and reflects real ground-object distribution. Achievements in this paper could perfect mathematical basis of Gauss projection and provide reference frame for polar surveying and photogrammetry.

  9. Average intensity and spreading of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2010-01-18

    The propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and the Hermite-Gaussian expansion of a Lorentz function, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a Lorentz-Gauss beam are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in turbulent atmosphere are also discussed in detail.

  10. Precision Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radius, Marcie; And Others

    The manual provides information for precision measurement (counting of movements per minute of a chosen activity) of achievement in special education students. Initial sections give guidelines for the teacher, parent, and student to follow for various methods of charting behavior. It is explained that precision measurement is a way to measure the…

  11. Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy from a Gauss-Manin monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    Sugny, D.; Jauslin, H. R.; Mardesic, P.; Pelletier, M.; Jebrane, A.

    2008-04-15

    Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy is a generalization of the notion of Hamiltonian monodromy, recently introduced by [Nekhoroshev, Sadovskii, and Zhilinskii, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 1 335, 985 (2002); and Ann. Henri Poincare 7, 1099 (2006)] for energy-momentum maps whose image has a particular type of nonisolated singularities. In this paper, we analyze the notion of fractional Hamiltonian monodromy in terms of the Gauss-Manin monodromy of a Riemann surface constructed from the energy-momentum map and associated with a loop in complex space which bypasses the line of singularities. We also prove some propositions on fractional Hamiltonian monodromy for 1:-n and m:-n resonant systems.

  12. Nonsingular Universes in Gauss-Bonnet Gravity’s Rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Momennia, Mehrab; Eslam Panah, Behzad; Faizal, Mir

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the rainbow deformation of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology in both Einstein gravity and Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity. We demonstrate that the singularity in FRW cosmology can be removed because of the rainbow deformation of the FRW metric. We obtain the general constraints required for FRW cosmology to be free of singularities. We observe that the inclusion of GB gravity can significantly change the constraints required to obtain nonsingular universes. We use rainbow functions motivated by the hard spectra of gamma-ray bursts to deform FRW cosmology and explicitly demonstrate that such a deformation removes the singularity in FRW cosmology.

  13. Nonlinear diffraction from high-order Hermite-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Ksawery; Shapira, Asia; Libster-Hershko, Ana; Arie, Ady

    2015-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the nonlinearly diffracted second harmonic light from the first-order Hermite-Gauss beam. We investigate the cases of loosely and tightly focused beams in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal in the temperature range near the birefringent phase matching. Unlike the case of fundamental Gaussian beam, the nonlinear diffracted beam is spatially structured. Its shape depends on the focusing conditions and on the crystal temperature. Furthermore, for the case of tight focusing, the diffracted beam structure depends on the beam's position with respect to the domain wall.

  14. Light trajectory in Bessel-Gauss vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Giust, Remo; Jukna, Vytautas; Furfaro, Luca; Jacquot, Maxime; Lacourt, Pierre-Ambroise; Froehly, Luc; Dudley, John; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the early stage of propagation of Bessel-Gauss vortex beams where a transition regime shows a progressive lateral expansion of the main intensity ring before reaching a diffraction-free regime. The eikonal equation is used to characterize the beam structure. The beam is featured by a family of hyperboloids with variable waists, generating a tapered tubular caustic. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with numerical and experimental results. We show the transition regime can be well eliminated by using hollow input beams.

  15. Extension of Gauss' method for the solution of Kepler's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Fill, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Gauss' method for solving Kepler's equation is extended to arbitrary epochs and orbital eccentricities. Although originally developed for near parabolic orbits in the vicinity of pericenter, a generalization of the method leads to a highly efficient algorithm which compares favorably to other methods in current use. A key virtue of the technique is that convergence is obtained by a method of successive substitutions with an initial approximation that is independent of the orbital parameters. The equations of the algorithm are universal, i.e., independent of the nature of the orbit whether elliptic, hyperbolic, parabolic or rectilinear.

  16. Ion microscopy with resonant ionization mass spectrometry : time-of-flight depth profiling with improved isotopic precision.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Levine, J.; Zinovev, A.; Davis, A. M.; Stephan, T.; Tripa, C. E.; King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are four generally mutually exclusive requirements that plague many mass spectrometric measurements of trace constituents: (1) the small size (limited by the depth probed) of many interesting materials requires high useful yields to simply detect some trace elements, (2) the low concentrations of interesting elements require efficient discrimination from isobaric interferences, (3) it is often necessary to measure the depth distribution of elements with high surface and low bulk contributions, and (4) many applications require precise isotopic analysis. Resonant ionization mass spectrometry has made dramatic progress in addressing these difficulties over the past five years.

  17. The role of hyperpolarization-activated cationic current in spike-time precision and intrinsic resonance in cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gastrein, Philippe; Campanac, Emilie; Gasselin, Célia; Cudmore, Robert H; Bialowas, Andrzej; Carlier, Edmond; Fronzaroli-Molinieres, Laure; Ankri, Norbert; Debanne, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide modulated current (I(h)) sets resonance frequency within the θ-range (5–12 Hz) in pyramidal neurons. However, its precise contribution to the temporal fidelity of spike generation in response to stimulation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses remains unclear. In conditions where pharmacological blockade of I(h) does not affect synaptic transmission, we show that postsynaptic h-channels improve spike time precision in CA1 pyramidal neurons through two main mechanisms. I(h) enhances precision of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)--spike coupling because I(h) reduces peak EPSP duration. I(h) improves the precision of rebound spiking following inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons and sets pacemaker activity in stratum oriens interneurons because I(h) accelerates the decay of both IPSPs and after-hyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs). The contribution of h-channels to intrinsic resonance and EPSP waveform was comparatively much smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons. Our results indicate that the elementary mechanisms by which postsynaptic h-channels control fidelity of spike timing at the scale of individual neurons may account for the decreased theta-activity observed in hippocampal and neocortical networks when h-channel activity is pharmacologically reduced.

  18. Some data on the characteristics of the geomagnetic field at the Gauss-Matuyama magnetic chron boundary from the Pirnuar section, West Turkmenistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarii, G. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Extremely scarce data have been published on the structure of the geomagnetic field during the Gauss and early Matuyama chrons until recently. Only a few papers contain information about the characteristics of the field during the Gauss-Matuyama reversal, derived by studying the terrestrial sediments. This motivated us to revisit the paleomagnetism of the sedimentary rocks of Akchagyl age in the section of the Pirnuar Valley in West Kopet Dag, for the first time studied by us in the late 1960s-early 1970s. These rocks are the analog of the top Piacenzian-bottom Gelasian and span the mentioned time interval. The reanalysis was conducted with the use of the state-of-the-art paleomagnetic techniques and modern magnetostratigraphic timescale. We have studied a number of the characteristics which enabled us to distinguish the rocks whose remanence is most likely to have a depositional origin. Based on the paleomagnetic characteristics of these rocks, we reconstructed the structure of the paleomagnetic field for the studied interval (~270 ka) of the initial stage of the Gauss-Matuyama reversal and revealed the excursions at the final and initial stages of the Gauss and Matuyama chrons. This analysis has significantly updated the time constraints of the rock sedimentation in the studied section and supported the locations of the virtual geomagnetic pole during the reversal, obtained previously.

  19. Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cholerton, Brenna; Larson, Eric B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Keene, C. Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret; Crane, Paul K.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Three key elements to precision medicine are stratification by risk, detection of pathophysiological processes as early as possible (even before clinical presentation), and alignment of mechanism of action of intervention(s) with an individual's molecular driver(s) of disease. Used for decades in the management of some rare diseases and now gaining broad currency in cancer care, a precision medicine approach is beginning to be adapted to cognitive impairment and dementia. This review focuses on the application of precision medicine to address the clinical and biological complexity of two common neurodegenerative causes of dementia: Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. PMID:26724389

  20. Fast computation of the Gauss hypergeometric function with all its parameters complex with application to the Pöschl Teller Ginocchio potential wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Stoitsov, M. V.

    2008-04-01

    calculated in the frame of transformation theory with power series summations, thus providing a very fast algorithm. The evaluation of the wave functions of the analytical Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential is treated as a physical application. Solution method: The Gauss hypergeometric function F12 verifies linear transformation formulas allowing consideration of arguments of a small modulus which then can be handled by a power series. They, however, give rise to indeterminate or numerically unstable cases, when b-a and c-a-b are equal or close to integers. They are properly dealt with through analytical manipulations of the Lanczos expression providing the Gamma function. The remaining zones of the complex plane uncovered by transformation formulas are dealt with Taylor expansions of the F12 function around complex points where linear transformations can be employed. The Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential wave functions are calculated directly with F12 evaluations. Restrictions: The algorithm provides full numerical precision in almost all cases for |a|, |b|, and |c| of the order of one or smaller, but starts to be less precise or unstable when they increase, especially through a, b, and c imaginary parts. While it is possible to run the code for moderate or large |a|, |b|, and |c| and obtain satisfactory results for some specified values, the code is very likely to be unstable in this regime. Unusual features: Two different codes, one for the hypergeometric function and one for the Pöschl-Teller-Ginocchio potential wave functions, are provided in C++ and Fortran 90 versions. Running time: 20,000 F12 function evaluations take an average of one second.

  1. Quantum dynamics of electronic transitions with Gauss-Hermite wave packets.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Peluso, Andrea

    2016-03-21

    A new methodology based on the superposition of time-dependent Gauss-Hermite wave packets is developed to describe the wave function of a system in which several interacting electronic states are coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The equations of motion for the wave function parameters are obtained by employing the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. The methodology is applied to study the quantum dynamical behaviour of model systems with two interacting electronic states characterized by a relatively large reorganization energy and a range of energy biases. The favourable scaling properties make it a promising tool for the study of the dynamics of chemico-physical processes in molecular systems.

  2. A proximity algorithm accelerated by Gauss-Seidel iterations for L1/TV denoising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qia; Micchelli, Charles A.; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-09-01

    Our goal in this paper is to improve the computational performance of the proximity algorithms for the L1/TV denoising model. This leads us to a new characterization of all solutions to the L1/TV model via fixed-point equations expressed in terms of the proximity operators. Based upon this observation we develop an algorithm for solving the model and establish its convergence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can be accelerated through the use of the componentwise Gauss-Seidel iteration so that the CPU time consumed is significantly reduced. Numerical experiments using the proposed algorithm for impulsive noise removal are included, with a comparison to three recently developed algorithms. The numerical results show that while the proposed algorithm enjoys a high quality of the restored images, as the other three known algorithms do, it performs significantly better in terms of computational efficiency measured in the CPU time consumed.

  3. Image segmentation using hidden Markov Gauss mixture models.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Kyungsuk; Lim, Johan; Won, Chee Sun; Gray, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    Image segmentation is an important tool in image processing and can serve as an efficient front end to sophisticated algorithms and thereby simplify subsequent processing. We develop a multiclass image segmentation method using hidden Markov Gauss mixture models (HMGMMs) and provide examples of segmentation of aerial images and textures. HMGMMs incorporate supervised learning, fitting the observation probability distribution given each class by a Gauss mixture estimated using vector quantization with a minimum discrimination information (MDI) distortion. We formulate the image segmentation problem using a maximum a posteriori criteria and find the hidden states that maximize the posterior density given the observation. We estimate both the hidden Markov parameter and hidden states using a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm. Our results demonstrate that HMGMM provides better classification in terms of Bayes risk and spatial homogeneity of the classified objects than do several popular methods, including classification and regression trees, learning vector quantization, causal hidden Markov models (HMMs), and multiresolution HMMs. The computational load of HMGMM is similar to that of the causal HMM.

  4. Driving corrugated donut rotors with Laguerre-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Loke, Vincent L Y; Asavei, Theodor; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2014-08-11

    Tightly-focused laser beams that carry angular momentum have been used to trap and rotate microrotors. In particular, a Laguerre-Gauss mode laser beam can be used to transfer its orbital angular momentum to drive microrotors. We increase the torque efficiency by a factor of about 2 by designing the rotor such that its geometry is compatible with the driving beam, when driving the rotation with the optimum beam, rather than beams of higher or lower orbital angular momentum. Based on Floquet's theorem, the order of discrete rotational symmetry of the rotor can be made to couple with the azimuthal mode of the Laguerre-Gauss beam. We design corrugated donut rotors, that have a flat disc-like profile, with the help of the discrete dipole approximation and the T-matrix methods in parallel with experimental demonstrations of stable trapping and torque measurement. We produce and test such a rotor using two-photon photopolymerization. With a rotor that has 8-fold discrete rotational symmetry, an outer radius of 1.85 μm and a hollow core radius of 0.5 μm, we were able to transfer approximately 0.3 h̄ per photon of the orbital angular momentum from an LG04 beam.

  5. Gauss-Bonnet black holes with nonconstant curvature horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki

    2010-06-15

    We investigate static and dynamical n({>=}6)-dimensional black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity of which horizons have the isometries of an (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space with a condition on its Weyl tensor originally given by Dotti and Gleiser. Defining a generalized Misner-Sharp quasilocal mass that satisfies the unified first law, we show that most of the properties of the quasilocal mass and the trapping horizon are shared with the case with horizons of constant curvature. It is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser solution is the unique vacuum solution if the warp factor on the (n-2)-dimensional Einstein space is nonconstant. The quasilocal mass becomes constant for the Dotti-Gleiser black hole and satisfies the first law of the black-hole thermodynamics with its Wald entropy. In the non-negative curvature case with positive Gauss-Bonnet constant and zero cosmological constant, it is shown that the Dotti-Gleiser black hole is thermodynamically unstable. Even if it becomes locally stable for the nonzero cosmological constant, it cannot be globally stable for the positive cosmological constant.

  6. Application of linear gauss pseudospectral method in model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Wanchun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model predictive control(MPC) method aimed at solving the nonlinear optimal control problem with hard terminal constraints and quadratic performance index. The method combines the philosophies of the nonlinear approximation model predictive control, linear quadrature optimal control and Gauss Pseudospectral method. The current control is obtained by successively solving linear algebraic equations transferred from the original problem via linearization and the Gauss Pseudospectral method. It is not only of high computational efficiency since it does not need to solve nonlinear programming problem, but also of high accuracy though there are a few discrete points. Therefore, this method is suitable for on-board applications. A design of terminal impact with a specified direction is carried out to evaluate the performance of this method. Augmented PN guidance law in the three-dimensional coordinate system is applied to produce the initial guess. And various cases for target with straight-line movements are employed to demonstrate the applicability in different impact angles. Moreover, performance of the proposed method is also assessed by comparison with other guidance laws. Simulation results indicate that this method is not only of high computational efficiency and accuracy, but also applicable in the framework of guidance design.

  7. Bessel-Gauss pulse as an appropriate mathematical model for optically realizable localized waves.

    PubMed

    Reivelt, Kaido; Saari, Peeter

    2004-06-01

    We show that the field of the optically feasible luminal localized wave solutions of the scalar homogeneous wave equation can be modeled by means of Bessel-Gauss pulses. As the Bessel-Gauss pulses have a closed-form expression, this fact may be of great value in numerical simulations of various experimental situations.

  8. A new sum analogous to Gauss sums and its fourth power mean.

    PubMed

    Ru, Shaofeng; Zhang, Wenpeng

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to use the analytic methods and the properties of Gauss sums to study the computational problem of one kind of new sum analogous to Gauss sums and give an interesting fourth power mean and a sharp upper bound estimate for it.

  9. Crossing of the phantom divide using tachyon-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Banijamali, A.; Milani, F.; Setare, M. R.

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we consider two models. First, we study tachyon-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the condition of the equation of state crossing -1. Second, we discuss the modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the tachyon field and show the condition of {omega} crossing -1. Also, we plot figures for {omega} numerically in special potential and coupling function.

  10. The preconditioned Gauss-Seidel iterative methods for solving Fredholm integral equations of the second kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, performance analysis of the preconditioned Gauss-Seidel iterative methods for solving dense linear system arise from Fredholm integral equations of the second kind is investigated. The formulation and implementation of the preconditioned Gauss-Seidel methods are presented. Numerical results are included in order to verify the performance of the methods.

  11. [A Hyperspectral Imagery Anomaly Detection Algorithm Based on Gauss-Markov Model].

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Li-jing; Zhu, Zhen-yu; Cheng, Hao-bo

    2015-10-01

    With the development of spectral imaging technology, hyperspectral anomaly detection is getting more and more widely used in remote sensing imagery processing. The traditional RX anomaly detection algorithm neglects spatial correlation of images. Besides, it does not validly reduce the data dimension, which costs too much processing time and shows low validity on hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral images follow Gauss-Markov Random Field (GMRF) in space and spectral dimensions. The inverse matrix of covariance matrix is able to be directly calculated by building the Gauss-Markov parameters, which avoids the huge calculation of hyperspectral data. This paper proposes an improved RX anomaly detection algorithm based on three-dimensional GMRF. The hyperspectral imagery data is simulated with GMRF model, and the GMRF parameters are estimated with the Approximated Maximum Likelihood method. The detection operator is constructed with GMRF estimation parameters. The detecting pixel is considered as the centre in a local optimization window, which calls GMRF detecting window. The abnormal degree is calculated with mean vector and covariance inverse matrix, and the mean vector and covariance inverse matrix are calculated within the window. The image is detected pixel by pixel with the moving of GMRF window. The traditional RX detection algorithm, the regional hypothesis detection algorithm based on GMRF and the algorithm proposed in this paper are simulated with AVIRIS hyperspectral data. Simulation results show that the proposed anomaly detection method is able to improve the detection efficiency and reduce false alarm rate. We get the operation time statistics of the three algorithms in the same computer environment. The results show that the proposed algorithm improves the operation time by 45.2%, which shows good computing efficiency.

  12. Using the LCOGT Network To Measure a High-Precision Time Delay in the Four-Image Gravitational Lens HE0435-1223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroson, Todd A.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; McCully, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the delays in arrival time of photons between images in multiply-imaged time-varying sources such as strongly-lensed quasars opens new doors to astrophysical constraints on cosmological parameters, the structure of galaxies and their environments, and the nature of dark matter. The confidence level and accuracy of a time delay measurement in a given gravitational lens system depends on a combination of photometric precision, observational cadence, and the value of the time delay. While many such time differences have been measured, the absolute precision is rarely better than one day. To unlock the greatest potential of time delay probes, a greater than 100-fold improvement in precision is needed.In this contribution we describe a pilot ground-based campaign with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network, monitoring the four-image lensed quasar HE0435-1223. The LCOGT Network comprises nine 1-meter and two 2-meter telescopes at five sites, with optical imagers on all telescopes and low-dispersion optical spectrographs on the 2-meter telescopes. The geographical distribution of the network sites allows continuous coverage, and a single scheduler produces an optimal mapping of observation requests to the telescopes. Using network sites in Chile, Australia, and South Africa, we were able to obtain continuous optical images with a six-minute cadence over a period of 50 hours, with only one substantial gap due to bad weather at one site. Using a Bayesian-inference based analysis, we derive two plausible time delays between the leading and second images of the lensed system, with statistical uncertainties of 0.01 days (15 minutes).

  13. A Gauss-Kuzmin theorem for continued fractions associated with nonpositive integer powers of an integer m ≥ 2.

    PubMed

    Lascu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We consider a family {τ m : m ≥ 2} of interval maps which are generalizations of the Gauss transformation. For the continued fraction expansion arising from τ m , we solve a Gauss-Kuzmin-type problem.

  14. A Gauss-Kuzmin Theorem for Continued Fractions Associated with Nonpositive Integer Powers of an Integer m ≥ 2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We consider a family {τm : m ≥ 2} of interval maps which are generalizations of the Gauss transformation. For the continued fraction expansion arising from τm, we solve a Gauss-Kuzmin-type problem. PMID:24707226

  15. Anisotopic inflation with a non-abelian gauge field in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2017-01-01

    In presence of Gauss-Bonnet corrections, we study anisotropic inflation aided by a massless SU(2) gauge field where both the gauge field and the Gauss-Bonnet term are non-minimally coupled to the inflaton. In this scenario, under slow-roll approximations, the anisotropic inflation is realized as an attractor solution with quadratic forms of inflaton potential and Gauss-Bonnet coupling function. We show that the degree of anisotropy is proportional to the additive combination of two slow-roll parameters of the theory. The anisotropy may become either positive or negative similar to the non-Gauss-Bonnet framework, a feature of the model for anisotropic inflation supported by a non-abelian gauge field but the effect of Gauss-Bonnet term further enhances or suppresses the generated anisotropy.

  16. Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmological effect on relic density of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Satomi

    2009-05-15

    In Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmology, the Friedmann equation of our four-dimensional Universe on 3-brane is modified in a high energy regime (Gauss-Bonnet regime), while the standard expansion law is reproduced in low energies (standard regime). We investigate the Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmological effect on the thermal relic density of cold dark matter when the freeze-out of the dark matter occurs in the Gauss-Bonnet regime. We find that the resultant relic density is considerably reduced when the transition temperature, which connects the Gauss-Bonnet regime with the standard regime, is low enough. This result is in sharp contrast with the result previously obtained in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld cosmology, where the relic density is enhanced.

  17. Bessel-Gauss beam enhancement cavities for high-intensity applications.

    PubMed

    Putnam, William P; Schimpf, Damian N; Abram, Gilberto; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-10-22

    We introduce Bessel-Gauss beam enhancement cavities that may circumvent the major obstacles to more efficient cavity-enhanced high-field physics such as high-harmonic generation. The basic properties of Bessel-Gauss beams are reviewed and their transformation properties through simple optical systems (consisting of spherical and conical elements) are presented. A general Bessel-Gauss cavity design strategy is outlined, and a particular geometry, the confocal Bessel-Gauss cavity, is analyzed in detail. We numerically simulate the confocal Bessel-Gauss cavity and present an example cavity with 300 MHz repetition rate supporting an effective waist of 33 μm at the focus and an intensity ratio from the focus to the cavity mirror surfaces of 1.5 × 10(4).

  18. Border detection on Common Carotid Artery using Gauss-Markov Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. The arteriosclerosis of the common carotid artery is diagnosed using Intima-Media Thickness (IMT) which is obtained from echocardiogram. In order to measure IMT from echocardiogram, it is required to detect a border which is a boundary between vessel tissue layers. The method of border detection requires reproducibility, high accuracy and high-speed. In this paper, we propose the high-accuracy and high-speed detection method by Gauss-Markov estimation. About high-accuracy, it realized by attaching importance to high reliable candidate point of border. And, about high-speed, it realized by calculating matrix only one time.

  19. A computational approach for hypersonic nonequilibrium radiation utilizing space partition algorithm and Gauss quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, J. S.; Andrienko, D. A.; Huang, P. G.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    2014-06-01

    An efficient computational capability for nonequilibrium radiation simulation via the ray tracing technique has been accomplished. The radiative rate equation is iteratively coupled with the aerodynamic conservation laws including nonequilibrium chemical and chemical-physical kinetic models. The spectral properties along tracing rays are determined by a space partition algorithm of the nearest neighbor search process, and the numerical accuracy is further enhanced by a local resolution refinement using the Gauss-Lobatto polynomial. The interdisciplinary governing equations are solved by an implicit delta formulation through the diminishing residual approach. The axisymmetric radiating flow fields over the reentry RAM-CII probe have been simulated and verified with flight data and previous solutions by traditional methods. A computational efficiency gain nearly forty times is realized over that of the existing simulation procedures.

  20. Application of Gauss's law space-charge limited emission model in iterative particle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    The particle tracking method with a so-called gun iteration for modeling the space charge is discussed in the following paper. We suggest to apply the emission model based on the Gauss's law for the calculation of the space charge limited current density distribution using considered method. Based on the presented emission model we have developed a numerical algorithm for this calculations. This approach allows us to perform accurate and low time consumpting numerical simulations for different vacuum sources with the curved emitting surfaces and also in the presence of additional physical effects such as bipolar flows and backscattered electrons. The results of the simulations of the cylindrical diode and diode with elliptical emitter with the use of axysimmetric coordinates are presented. The high efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach are confirmed by the obtained results and comparisons with the analytical solutions.

  1. Precise Landslide Displacement Time Series from Continuous GPS Observations in Tectonically Active and Cold Regions: A Case Study in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) has been frequently used as a scientific tool to detect potential earth mass movements and to track creeping landslides. In this study, we investigated four-years of continuous GPS data (September 2006-July 2010) recorded at a landslide site in Alaska. This GPS station (AC55) was installed on an un-identified creeping site by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project, which was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The landslide moves with a steady horizontal velocity of 5.5 cm/year toward NEE, and had a subsidence rate of 2.6 cm/year. There was a considerable correlation between annual snow loading and melting cycles and seasonal variations of the landslide displacements. The seasonal movements vary year to year with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.5 cm and 1.0 cm in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. This study addresses three challenging issues in applying GPS for landslide monitoring in tectonically active and cold regions. The three challenges include (1) detecting GPS-derived positions that could be contaminated by the snow and ice accumulated on GPS antennas during cold seasons, (2) establishing a precise local reference frame and assessing its accuracy, and (3) excluding local seasonal ground motions from GPS-derived landslide displacements. The methods introduced in this study will be useful for GPS landslide monitoring in other tectonically active and/or cold regions.

  2. Precision metrology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Whitehouse, D J

    2012-08-28

    This article is a summary of the Satellite Meeting, which followed on from the Discussion Meeting at the Royal Society on 'Ultra-precision engineering: from physics to manufacture', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire, UK. The meeting was restricted to 18 invited experts in various aspects of precision metrology from academics from the UK and Sweden, Government Institutes from the UK and Germany and global aerospace industries. It examined and identified metrology problem areas that are, or may be, limiting future developments in precision engineering and, in particular, metrology. The Satellite Meeting was intended to produce a vision that will inspire academia and industry to address the solutions of those open-ended problems identified. The discussion covered three areas, namely the function of engineering parts, their measurement and their manufacture, as well as their interactions.

  3. Dynamical error bounds for continuum discretisation via Gauss quadrature rules—A Lieb-Robinson bound approach

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M. P.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-02-15

    Instances of discrete quantum systems coupled to a continuum of oscillators are ubiquitous in physics. Often the continua are approximated by a discrete set of modes. We derive error bounds on expectation values of system observables that have been time evolved under such discretised Hamiltonians. These bounds take on the form of a function of time and the number of discrete modes, where the discrete modes are chosen according to Gauss quadrature rules. The derivation makes use of tools from the field of Lieb-Robinson bounds and the theory of orthonormal polynomials.

  4. Multichannel low power time-to-digital converter card with 21 ps precision and full scale range up to 10 μs

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborini, D. Portaluppi, D.; Villa, F.; Tosi, A.; Tisa, S.

    2014-11-15

    We present a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) card with a compact form factor, suitable for multichannel timing instruments or for integration into more complex systems. The TDC Card provides 10 ps timing resolution over the whole measurement range, which is selectable from 160 ns up to 10 μs, reaching 21 ps rms precision, 1.25% LSB rms differential nonlinearity, up to 3 Mconversion/s with 400 mW power consumption. The I/O edge card connector provides timing data readout through either a parallel bus or a 100 MHz serial interface and further measurement information like input signal rate and valid conversion rate (typically useful for time-correlated single-photon counting application) through an independent serial link.

  5. Membrane paradigm for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted; Mohd, Arif; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2017-03-01

    We construct the membrane paradigm for black objects in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in spacetime dimensions ≥5 . As in the case of general relativity, the horizon can be modeled as a membrane endowed with fluidlike properties. We derive the stress tensor for this membrane fluid and study the perturbation around static backgrounds with constant curvature horizon cross section, for which the stress tensor can be regularized with the usual redshift factor, and expressed in the form of a Newtonian viscous fluid with pressure, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity. We evaluate the transport coefficients for black holes with constant curvature horizons and negative or zero cosmological constant. For the black brane geometry our result for the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density agrees with that obtained previously in different frameworks.

  6. Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy from a Gauss-Manin monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugny, D.; Mardešić, P.; Pelletier, M.; Jebrane, A.; Jauslin, H. R.

    2008-04-01

    Fractional Hamiltonian monodromy is a generalization of the notion of Hamiltonian monodromy, recently introduced by [Nekhoroshev, Sadovskií, and Zhilinskií, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 1 335, 985 (2002); Nekhoroshev, Sadovskií, and Zhilinskií, Ann. Henri Poincare 7, 1099 (2006)] for energy-momentum maps whose image has a particular type of nonisolated singularities. In this paper, we analyze the notion of fractional Hamiltonian monodromy in terms of the Gauss-Manin monodromy of a Riemann surface constructed from the energy-momentum map and associated with a loop in complex space which bypasses the line of singularities. We also prove some propositions on fractional Hamiltonian monodromy for 1:-n and m :-n resonant systems.

  7. Nonparaxial Bessel and Bessel-Gauss pincers light-sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-01-01

    Nonparaxial optical Bessel and Bessel-Gauss pincers optical-sheets are introduced based upon the angular spectrum decomposition in plane waves. The angular spectrum function and the beam-shape coefficients are expressed by means of improper integrals computed numerically. The radiated component of the electric field is also evaluated, displaying unique features of the nonparaxial Bessel pincers light-sheets. This new type of auto-focusing light-sheets finds potential applications in the development of novel methods in optical light-sheet tweezers for particle manipulation in opto-fluidics, particle sizing and imaging. Numerical predictions for the scattering, radiation force and torque, and particle dynamics also benefit from the developed beam solution.

  8. Near infrared reflectance analysis by Gauss-Jordan linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigs, D. E.; Freelin, J. M.; Hieftje, G. M.

    1983-02-01

    Near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) is an analytical technique that uses the near-infrared diffuse reflectance of a sample at several discrete wavelengths to predict the concentration of one or more of the chemical species in that sample. However, because near-infrared bands from solid samples are both abundant and broad, the reflectance at a given wavelength usually contains contributions from several sample components, requiring extensive calculations on overlapped bands. In the present study, these calculations have been performed using an approach similar to that employed in multi-component spectrophotometry, but with Gauss-Jordan linear algebra serving as the computational vehicle. Using this approach, correlations for percent protein in wheat flour and percent benzene in hydrocarbons have been obtained and are evaluated. The advantages of a linear-algebra approach over the common one employing stepwise regression are explored.

  9. Exponential fitted Gauss, Radau and Lobatto methods of low order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Vaquero, J.; Vigo-Aguiar, J.

    2008-08-01

    Several exponential fitting Runge-Kutta methods of collocation type are derived as a generalization of the Gauss, Radau and Lobatto traditional methods of two steps. The new methods are capable of the exact integration (with only round-off errors) of differential equations whose solutions are linear combinations of an exponential and ordinary polynomials. Theorems of the truncation error reveal the good behavior of the new methods for stiff problems. Plots of their absolute stability regions that include the whole of the negative real axis are provided. A different procedure to find the parameter of the method is proposed. The variable step Radau method of two stages is derived. Finally, numerical examples underscore the efficiency of the proposed codes, especially when they are integrating stiff problems.

  10. Nonholonomic double-bracket equations and the Gauss thermostat.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Alberto G; Bloch, Anthony M

    2009-08-01

    In this Rapid Communication we consider certain equations that arise from imposing a constant kinetic-energy constraint on a one-dimensional set of oscillators. This is a nonlinear nonholonomic constraint on these oscillators and the dynamics are consistent with Gauss's law of least constraint. Dynamics of this sort are of interest in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We show that under certain choices of external potential these equations give rise to a generalization of the so-called double-bracket equations which are of interest in studying gradient flows and integrable systems such as the Toda lattice. In the case of harmonic potentials the flow is described by a symmetric bracket and periodic solutions are obtained.

  11. Black holes in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory and the geometry of their thermodynamics—II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2010-03-01

    In the present work we study (i) the charged black hole in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) theory, known as the Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet (EMGB) black hole and (ii) the black hole in EGB gravity with a Yang-Mills field. The thermodynamic geometry of these two black hole solutions has been investigated, using the modified entropy in Gauss-Bonnet theory.

  12. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  13. Stieltjes polynomials and Gauss-Kronrod quadrature formulae for measures induced by Chebyshev polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaris, Sotirios

    1995-03-01

    Given a fixed n≥1, and a (monic) orthogonal polynomial πn(·)Dπn(·;dσ) relative to a positive measuredσ on the interval [a, b], one can define the nonnegative measure , to which correspond the (monic) orthogonal polynomials . The coefficients in the three-term recurrence relation for , whendσ is a Chebyshev measure of any of the four kinds, were obtained analytically in closed form by Gautschi and Li. Here, we give explicit formulae for the Stieltjes polynomials whendσ is any of the four Chebyshev measures. In addition, we show that the corresponding Gauss-Kronrod quadrature formulae for each of these , based on the zeros of and , have all the desirable properties of the interlacing of nodes, their inclusion in [-1, 1], and the positivity of all quadrature weights. Exceptions occur only for the Chebyshev measuredσ of the third or fourth kind andn even, in which case the inclusion property fails. The precise degree of exactness for each of these formulae is also determined.

  14. UNAVCO Real-Time GNSS Positioning: High-Precision Static and Kinematic Testing of the Next Generation GNSS network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Blume, F.; Mencin, D.; Phillips, D. A.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The GAGE Facility, managed by UNAVCO, operates a real-time GNSS (RT-GNSS) network of ~450 stations. The majority of the streaming stations are part of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). Following community input from a real-time GNSS data products and formats meeting hosted by UNAVCO in Spring of 2011, UNAVCO now provides real-time PPP positions, and network solutions where practical, for all available stations using Trimble's PIVOT RTX server software and TrackRT. The UNAVCO real-time system has the potential to enhance our understanding of earthquakes, seismic wave propagation, volcanic eruptions, magmatic intrusions, movement of ice, landslides, and the dynamics of the atmosphere. Beyond the ever increasing applications in science and engineering, RT-GNSS has the potential to provide early warning of hazards to emergency managers, utilities, other infrastructure managers, first responders and others. Upgrades to the network include eight Trimble NetR9 GNSS receivers with GLONASS and receiver-based RTX capabilities and sixteen new co-located MEMS based accelerometers. These new capabilities will allow integration of GNSS and strong motion data to produce broad-spectrum waveforms improving Earthquake Early Warning systems. Controlled outdoor kinematic and static experiments provide a useful method for evaluating and comparing real-time systems. UNAVCO has developed a portable low-cost antenna actuator to characterize the kinematic performance of receiver- and server-based real-time positioning algorithms and identify system limitations. We have performed tests using controlled 1-d antenna motions and will present comparisons between these and other post-processed kinematic algorithms including GIPSY-OASIS and TRACK. In addition to kinematic testing, long-term static testing of Trimble's RTX service is ongoing at UNAVCO and will be used to characterize the stability of the position time-series produced by RTX. In addition, with the goal of

  15. Spike-Timing Precision and Neuronal Synchrony Are Enhanced by an Interaction between Synaptic Inhibition and Membrane Oscillations in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Shabrine; Madsen, Teresa E.; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2012-01-01

    The basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) is a critical component of the neural circuit regulating fear learning. During fear learning and recall, the amygdala and other brain regions, including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, exhibit phase-locked oscillations in the high delta/low theta frequency band (∼2–6 Hz) that have been shown to contribute to the learning process. Network oscillations are commonly generated by inhibitory synaptic input that coordinates action potentials in groups of neurons. In the rat BLA, principal neurons spontaneously receive synchronized, inhibitory input in the form of compound, rhythmic, inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), likely originating from burst-firing parvalbumin interneurons. Here we investigated the role of compound IPSPs in the rat and rhesus macaque BLA in regulating action potential synchrony and spike-timing precision. Furthermore, because principal neurons exhibit intrinsic oscillatory properties and resonance between 4 and 5 Hz, in the same frequency band observed during fear, we investigated whether compound IPSPs and intrinsic oscillations interact to promote rhythmic activity in the BLA at this frequency. Using whole-cell patch clamp in brain slices, we demonstrate that compound IPSPs, which occur spontaneously and are synchronized across principal neurons in both the rat and primate BLA, significantly improve spike-timing precision in BLA principal neurons for a window of ∼300 ms following each IPSP. We also show that compound IPSPs coordinate the firing of pairs of BLA principal neurons, and significantly improve spike synchrony for a window of ∼130 ms. Compound IPSPs enhance a 5 Hz calcium-dependent membrane potential oscillation (MPO) in these neurons, likely contributing to the improvement in spike-timing precision and synchronization of spiking. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling cascade enhanced the MPO, and inhibition of this cascade blocked the MPO. We discuss these results in

  16. Precisions Measurement for the Grasp of Welding Deformation amount of Time Series for Large-Scale Industrial Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, R.; Hamada, K.; Hirata, N.; Tamura, R.; Nishi, N.

    2015-05-01

    As well as the BIM of quality management in the construction industry, demand for quality management of the manufacturing process of the member is higher in shipbuilding field. The time series of three-dimensional deformation of the each process, and are accurately be grasped strongly demanded. In this study, we focused on the shipbuilding field, will be examined three-dimensional measurement method. The shipyard, since a large equipment and components are intricately arranged in a limited space, the installation of the measuring equipment and the target is limited. There is also the element to be measured is moved in each process, the establishment of the reference point for time series comparison is necessary to devise. In this paper will be discussed method for measuring the welding deformation in time series by using a total station. In particular, by using a plurality of measurement data obtained from this approach and evaluated the amount of deformation of each process.

  17. Error analysis in some Gauss-Turan-Radau and Gauss-Turan-Lobatto quadratures for analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Spalevic, Miodrag M.

    2004-03-01

    We consider the generalized Gauss-Turan quadrature formulae of Radau and Lobatto type for approximating . The aim of this paper is to analyze the remainder term in the case when f is an analytic function in some region of the complex plane containing the interval [-1,1] in its interior. The remainder term is presented in the form of a contour integral over confocal ellipses (cf. SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 80 (1983) 1170). Sufficient conditions on the convergence for some of such quadratures, associated with the generalized Chebyshev weight functions, are found. Using some ideas from Hunter (BIT 35 (1995) 64) we obtain new estimates of the remainder term, which are very exact. Some numerical results and illustrations are shown.

  18. Development of a high-speed real-time PCR system for rapid and precise nucleotide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common method used to create copies of a specific target region of a DNA sequence and to produce large quantities of DNA. A few DNA molecules, which act as templates, are rapidly amplified by PCR into many billions of copies. PCR is a key technology in genome-based biological analysis, revolutionizing many life science fields such as medical diagnostics, food safety monitoring, and countermeasures against bioterrorism. Thus, many applications have been developed with the thermal cycling. For these PCR applications, one of the most important key factors is reduction in the data acquisition time. To reduce the acquisition time, it is necessary to decrease the temperature transition time between the high and low ends as much as possible. We have developed a novel rapid real-time PCR system based on rapid exchange of media maintained at different temperatures. This system consists of two thermal reservoirs and a reaction chamber for PCR observation. The temperature transition was achieved within 0.3 sec, and good thermal stability was achieved during thermal cycling with rapid exchange of circulating media. This system allows rigorous optimization of the temperatures required for each stage of the PCR processes. Resulting amplicons were confirmed by electrophoresis. Using the system, rapid DNA amplification was accomplished within 3.5 min, including initial heating and complete 50 PCR cycles. It clearly shows that the device could allow us faster temperature switching than the conventional conduction-based heating systems based on Peltier heating/cooling.

  19. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time-Series Design: Three Within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Travis; Hallberg, Kelly; Cook, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the conditions under which short, comparative interrupted time-series (CITS) designs represent valid alternatives to randomized experiments in educational evaluations. To do so, we conduct three within-study comparisons, each of which uses a unique data set to test the validity of the CITS design by comparing its causal estimates to…

  20. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the experiment…

  1. Spherically symmetric brane in a bulk of f(R) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-11-01

    Effective gravitational field equations on a four-dimensional brane embedded in a five-dimensional bulk have been considered. Using the Einstein-Hilbert action along with the Gauss-Bonnet correction term, we have derived static spherically symmetric vacuum solution to the effective field equations, first order in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter. The solution so obtained, has one part corresponding to general relativity with an additional correction term, proportional to the Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter. The correction term modifies the spacetime structure, in particular, the location of the event horizon. Proceeding further, we have derived effective field equations for f(R) gravity with Gauss-Bonnet correction term and a static spherically symmetric solution has been obtained. In this case the Gauss-Bonnet term modifies both the event and cosmological horizon of the spacetime. There exists another way of obtaining the brane metric—expanding the bulk gravitational field equations in the ratio of bulk to brane curvature scale and assuming a separable bulk metric ansatz. It turns out that static, spherically symmetric solutions obtained from this perturbative method can be matched exactly, with the solutions derived earlier. This will hold for Einstein-Hilbert plus Gauss-Bonnet as well as for f(R) with the Gauss-Bonnet correction. Implications of these results are discussed.

  2. Testing Gravity with Quasi-periodic Oscillations from Accreting Black Holes: The Case of Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Stella, Luigi; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-03-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray flux emitted by accreting black holes are associated with phenomena occurring near the horizon. Future very large area X-ray instruments will be able to measure QPO frequencies with very high precision, thus probing this strong-field region. Using the relativistic precession model, we show the way in which QPO frequencies could be used to test general relativity (GR) against those alternative theories of gravity which predict deviations from the classical theory in the strong-field and high-curvature regimes. We consider one of the best-motivated high-curvature corrections to GR, namely, the Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet theory, and show that a detection of QPOs with the expected sensitivity of the proposed ESA M-class mission LOFT would set the most stringent constraints on the parameter space of this theory.

  3. Precise time and frequency intercomparison between NPL, India and PTB, Federal Republic of Germany via satellite symphonie-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, B. S.; Banerjee, P.; Sood, P. C.; Saxena, M.; Kumar, N.; Suri, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A time and frequency intercomparison experiment conducted using Earth stations in New Delhi, India and Raisting, FRG is described. The NPL clock was placed at New Delhi Earth Station and the Raisting Clock was calibrated with PTB/Primary standard via LORAN-C and travelling clocks. The random uncertainity of time comparisons, represented by two sample Allan Variance sigma (30 seconds), was less than 10 nanoseconds. The relative frequency difference between the NPL and Raisting Clocks, SNPL, RAIS, as measured over the 44 days period was found to be -15.7 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between PTB Primary Standard and Raisting Clock, SPTB, RAIS, during this period, was measured to be -22.8 x 10 to the -13th power. The relative frequency difference between NPL clock and PTB Primary Standard, SNPL, PTB, thus, is +7.1 x 10 to the -13th power. The clock rate (UTC, India) of +7.1 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the -13th power, agrees well with that obtained via VLF phase measurements over one year period and with USNO travelling clock time comparisons made in September, 1980.

  4. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  5. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  6. Holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Jiliang; Wang Liancheng; Pan Qiyuan; Chen Songbai

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics. We find that the Gauss-Bonnet constant, the model parameters, and the Born-Infeld coupling parameter will affect the formation of the scalar hair, the transition point of the phase transition from the second order to the first order, and the relation connecting the gap frequency in conductivity with the critical temperature. The combination of Gauss-Bonnet gravity and the Born-Infeld electrodynamics provides richer physics in the phase transition and the condensation of the scalar hair.

  7. Power spectra from an inflaton coupled to the Gauss-Bonnet term

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zongkuan; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2009-09-15

    We consider power-law inflation with a Gauss-Bonnet correction inspired by string theory. We analyze the stability of cosmological perturbations and obtain the allowed parameter space. We find that for Gauss-Bonnet-dominated inflation ultraviolet instabilities of either scalar or tensor perturbations show up on small scales. The Gauss-Bonnet correction with a positive (or negative) coupling may lead to a reduction (or enhancement) of the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the potential-dominated case. We place tight constraints on the model parameters by making use of the WMAP 5-year data.

  8. On the remainder term of Gauss-Radau quadratures for analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Gradimir V.; Spalevic, Miodrag M.; Pranic, Miroslav S.

    2008-09-01

    For analytic functions the remainder term of Gauss-Radau quadrature formulae can be represented as a contour integral with a complex kernel. We study the kernel on elliptic contours with foci at the points ±1 and a sum of semi-axes [varrho]>1 for the Chebyshev weight function of the second kind. Starting from explicit expressions of the corresponding kernels the location of their maximum modulus on ellipses is determined. The corresponding Gautschi's conjecture from [On the remainder term for analytic functions of Gauss-Lobatto and Gauss-Radau quadratures, Rocky Mountain J. Math. 21 (1991), 209-226] is proved.

  9. Valuing option on the maximum of two assets using improving modified Gauss-Seidel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wei Sin; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram; Aruchunan, Elayaraja; Sulaiman, Jumat

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the numerical solution for the option on the maximum of two assets using Improving Modified Gauss-Seidel (IMGS) iterative method. Actually, this option can be governed by two-dimensional Black-Scholes partial differential equation (PDE). The Crank-Nicolson scheme is applied to discretize the Black-Scholes PDE in order to derive a linear system. Then, the IMGS iterative method is formulated to solve the linear system. Numerical experiments involving Gauss-Seidel (GS) and Modified Gauss-Seidel (MGS) iterative methods are implemented as control methods to test the computational efficiency of the IMGS iterative method.

  10. Quasispherical gravitational collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Jhingan, S.

    2010-07-15

    We obtain a general five-dimensional quasispherical collapsing solutions of irrotational dust in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms. These solutions are a generalization, to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, of the five-dimensional quasispherical Szkeres like collapsing solutions in general relativity. It is found that the collapse proceeds in the same way as in the analogous spherical collapse, i.e., there exists regular initial data such that the collapse proceed to form naked singularities violating cosmic censorship conjecture. The effect of Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature terms on the formation and locations of the apparent horizon is deduced.

  11. High Precision Ar/Ar Ages of Coso Volcanic Field Rhyolites: A Requirement for Constraining Eruption and Subvolcanic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Renne, P. R.; Vazquez, J.

    2006-12-01

    Study of the extended volcanic history and petrology at Coso Volcanic Field, CA has led to fundamental ideas related to silicic magma evolution and eruption prediction. Unfortunately, tests of these and related models for the time scales of subvolcanic processes at Coso are limited because relatively few modern geochronological constraints have been published. For example, tighter age constraints are needed to test the veracity of the volume-age "time-prediction" model of Bacon (1982) wherein the next eruption can be predicted reasonably well from a long-term eruption rate that simply considers the total volume of Coso rhyolites over an appropriate time span. At Coso, reported eruption events are mean ages comprising K-Ar ± hydration rind glass ages grouped by rock chemical similarities. Here we present new Ar/Ar ages for seven Pleistocene domes from groups 4, 6, and 7. Sanidine and anorthoclase were separated from nearly aphyric obsidian and pumiceous glasses. Total fusion and step-heating feldspar and glass analyses were performed. Ar/Ar spectra derived from laser step-heating of samples from previously dated domes show that excess 40Ar contamination likely biased some K-Ar results. Modern Ar/Ar analyses of the studied rhyolites with disturbed model (i.e., assuming atmospheric initial Ar) ages, but well-defined Ar isochrons still provide accurate eruption ages. In detail, a 229 ±6 ka (2 se) age is determined for the most northern dome, which is ~60 ka older than one reported K-Ar date and the nominal age for Group 4 rhyolites and ~150-370 ka younger than four other reported K-Ar dates. Based on pre-eruption zircon ages from other magma centers, the inaccuracies and magnitude of these age shifts could produce apparent magma residence times from ≥500 ka to meaningless futuristic storage times. New ages for the southern domes are older than the reported mean Group 6 age of ~90 ka. It is probable that the anomalously young K-Ar dates reflect incomplete extraction

  12. High-precision U-Pb zircon age from the Triassic of Italy: Implications for the Triassic time scale and the Carnian origin of calcareous nannoplankton and dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furin, Stefano; Preto, Nereo; Rigo, Manuel; Roghi, Guido; Gianolla, Piero; Crowley, James L.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2006-12-01

    The Triassic time scale is poorly constrained due to a paucity of high-precision radiometric ages. We present a 206Pb/238U age of 230.91 ± 0.33 Ma (error includes all known sources) for zircon from an ash bed in the upper Carnian (Upper Triassic) of southern Italy that requires a major revision of the Triassic time scale. For example, the Norian stage is lengthened to more than 20 m.y. The section containing the ash bed is correlated with other Tethyan sections and, indirectly, with the Newark astronomical polarity time scale (APTS). The dating provides also a minimum age for some important climatic and biotic events that occurred during the Carnian. We note a coincidence between these events and the eruption of the large igneous province of Wrangellia, but the possible link between volcanism and climatic and biotic events requires further scrutiny.

  13. Delayed photolysis of liposomes: a strategy for the precision timing of bolus drug release using ex-vivo photochemical sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozikowski, Raymond T.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    Chemotherapy is a standard treatment for metastatic cancer. However drug toxicity limits the dosage that can safely be used, thus reducing treatment efficacy. Drug carrier particles, like liposomes, can help reduce toxicity by shielding normal tissue from drug and selectively depositing drug in tumors. Over years of development, liposomes have been optimized to avoid uptake by the Reticuloendothelial System (RES) as well as effectively retain their drug content during circulation. As a result, liposomes release drug passively, by slow leakage, but this uncontrolled drug release can limit treatment efficacy as it can be difficult to achieve therapeutic concentrations of drug at tumor sites even with tumor-specific accumulation of the carriers. Lipid membranes can be photochemically lysed by both Type I (photosensitizer-substrate) and Type II (photosensitizer-oxygen) reactions. It has been demonstrated in red blood cells (RBCs) in vitro that these photolysis reactions can occur in two distinct steps: a light-initiated reaction followed by a thermally-initiated reaction. These separable activation steps allow for the delay of photohemolysis in a controlled manner using the irradiation energy, temperature and photosensitizer concentration. In this work we have translated this technique from RBCs to liposomal nanoparticles. To that end, we present in vitro data demonstrating this delayed bolus release from liposomes, as well as the ability to control the timing of this event. Further, we demonstrate for the first time the improved delivery of bioavailable cargo selectively to target sites in vivo.

  14. Remote sensing in precision farming: real-time monitoring of water and fertilizer requirements of agricultural crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Ben Asher, Jiftah; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2016-10-01

    The advancements in remote sensing in combination with sensor technology (both passive and active) enable growers to analyze an entire crop field as well as its local features. In particular, changes of actual evapo-transpiration (ET) as a function of water availability can be measured remotely with infrared radiometers. Detection of crop water stress and ET and combining it with the soil water flow model enable rational irrigation timing and application amounts. Nutrient deficiency, and in particular nitrogen deficiency, causes substantial crop losses. This deficiency needs to be identified immediately. A faster the detection and correction, a lesser the damage to the crop yield. In the present work, to retrieve ET a novel deterministic approach was used which is based on the remote sensing data. The algorithm can automatically provide timely valuable information on plant and soil water status, which can improve the management of irrigated crops. The solution is capable of bridging between Penman-Monteith ET model and Richards soil water flow model. This bridging can serve as a preliminary tool for expert irrigation system. To support decisions regarding fertilizers the greenness of plant canopies is assessed and quantified by using the spectral reflectance sensors and digital color imaging. Fertilization management can be provided on the basis of sampling and monitoring of crop nitrogen conditions using RS technique and translating measured N concentration in crop to kg/ha N application in the field.

  15. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-06-01

    Time-variable gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission have been available since 2002 to estimate the mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets. We analyze current progress and uncertainties in GRACE estimates of ice sheet mass balance. We discuss the impacts of errors associated with spherical harmonic truncation, spatial averaging, temporal sampling, and leakage from other time-dependent signals (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA)). The largest sources of error for Antarctica are the GIA correction, the omission of l=1 terms, nontidal changes in ocean mass, and measurement errors. For Greenland, the errors come mostly from the uncertainty in the scaling factor. Using Release 5.0 (RL05) GRACE fields for January 2003 through November 2012, we find a mass change of -258 ± 41 Gt/yr for Greenland, with an acceleration of -31 ± 6 Gt/yr2, and a loss that migrated clockwise around the ice sheet margin to progressively affect the entire periphery. For Antarctica, we report changes of -83 ± 49 and -147 ± 80 Gt/yr for two GIA models, with an acceleration of -12 ± 9 Gt/yr2 and a dominance from the southeast pacific sector of West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  16. Calibration of the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene geomagnetic polarity and astrochronological time scales: new results from high-precision U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Jahandar; Clyde, William; Wang, Tiantian; Johnson, Kirk; Bowring, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Reversals in the Earth's magnetic polarity are geologically abrupt events of global magnitude that makes them ideal timelines for stratigraphic correlation across a variety of depositional environments, especially where diagnostic marine fossils are absent. Accurate and precise calibration of the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale (GPTS) is thus essential to the reconstruction of Earth history and to resolving the mode and tempo of biotic and environmental change in deep time. The Late Cretaceous - Paleocene GPTS is of particular interest as it encompasses a critical period of Earth history marked by the Cretaceous greenhouse climate, the peak of dinosaur diversity, the end-Cretaceous mass extinction and its paleoecological aftermaths. Absolute calibration of the GPTS has been traditionally based on sea-floor spreading magnetic anomaly profiles combined with local magnetostratigraphic sequences for which a numerical age model could be established by interpolation between an often limited number of 40Ar/39Ar dates from intercalated volcanic ash deposits. Although the Neogene part of the GPTS has been adequately calibrated using cyclostratigraphy-based, astrochronological schemes, the application of these approaches to pre-Neogene parts of the timescale has been complicated given the uncertainties of the orbital models and the chaotic behavior of the solar system this far back in time. Here we present refined chronostratigraphic frameworks based on high-precision U-Pb geochronology of ash beds from the Western Interior Basin of North America and the Songliao Basin of Northeast China that places tight temporal constraints on the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene GPTS, either directly or by testing their astrochronological underpinnings. Further application of high-precision radioisotope geochronology and calibrated astrochronology promises a complete and robust Cretaceous-Paleogene GPTS, entirely independent of sea-floor magnetic anomaly profiles.

  17. Test-beam results of a silicon pixel detector with Time-over-Threshold read-out having ultra-precise time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Fiorini, M.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Albarran, M. E. Martin; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Tiuraniem, S.; Velghe, B.

    2015-12-01

    A time-tagging hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for beam tracking in the NA62 experiment has been tested in a dedicated test-beam at CERN with 10 GeV/c hadrons. Measurements include time resolution, detection efficiency and charge sharing between pixels, as well as effects due to bias voltage variations. A time resolution of less than 150 ps has been measured with a 200 μm thick silicon sensor, using an on-pixel amplifier-discriminator and an end-of-column DLL-based time-to-digital converter.

  18. GaussFit - A system for least squares and robust estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, W. H.; Fitzpatrick, M. J.; Mcarthur, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    GaussFit is a new computer program for solving least-squares and robust estimation problems. It has a number of unique features, including a complete programming language designed especially to formulate estimation problems, a built-in compiler and interpreter to support the programming language, and a built-in algebraic manipulator for calculating the required partial derivatives analytically. These features make GaussFit very easy to use, so that even complex problems can be set up and solved with minimal effort. GaussFit can correctly handle many cases of practical interest: nonlinear models, exact constraints, correlated observations, and models where the equations of condition contain more than one observed quantity. An experimental robust estimation capability is built into GaussFit so that data sets contaminated by outliers can be handled simply and efficiently.

  19. Generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams using passive axicon-theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Shahrzad; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Ramezani, Mohsen; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood

    2012-10-20

    We studied the conditions for generating passive Bessel-Gauss beams by using an axicon. We designed an appropriate Gaussian resonator and extracted a quasi-fundamental Gaussian mode from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser pumped by a Xenon flash lamp and measured its parameters, such as propagation factor, divergence angle, and Rayleigh range. Then we generated passive Bessel-Gauss beams using an axicon and investigated their propagation properties, theoretically and experimentally. For example, for the axicon of 1°, the output energy and the Rayleigh range of the generated Bessel-Gauss beams were measured to be 58 mJ and 229.3 mm, respectively. We compared these properties with our results of the Gaussian mode. Finally, by using axicons with different apex angles, and also by changing the beam spot size on the axicon, we generated Bessel-Gauss beams and studied their properties theoretically and experimentally.

  20. Warm starting the projected Gauss-Seidel algorithm for granular matter simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Servin, Martin; Berglund, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    The effect on the convergence of warm starting the projected Gauss-Seidel solver for nonsmooth discrete element simulation of granular matter are investigated. It is found that the computational performance can be increased by a factor 2-5.

  1. GLESP 2.0: Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization for CMB Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Naselsky, P. D.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Novikov, D. I.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Novikov, I. D.; Christensen, P. R.; Chiang, L.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    GLESP is a pixelization scheme for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps. This scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map.

  2. Parallel full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain by the Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the full-waveform inversion in the frequency domain. We first test the inversion ability of three numerical optimization methods, i.e., the steepest-descent method, the Newton-CG method and the Gauss- Newton method, for a simple model. The results show that the Gauss-Newton method performs well and efficiently. Then numerical computations for a benchmark model named Marmousi model by the Gauss-Newton method are implemented. Parallel algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) is applied as the inversion is a typical large-scale computational problem. Numerical computations show that the Gauss-Newton method has good ability to reconstruct the complex model.

  3. Holographic Van der Waals-like phase transition in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song; Li, Li-Fang; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong

    2017-02-01

    The Van der Waals-like phase transition is observed in temperature-thermal entropy plane in spherically symmetric charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole background. In terms of AdS/CFT, the non-local observables such as holographic entanglement entropy, Wilson loop, and two point correlation function of very heavy operators in the field theory dual to spherically symmetric charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole have been investigated. All of them exhibit the Van der Waals-like phase transition for a fixed charge parameter or Gauss-Bonnet parameter in such gravity background. Further, with choosing various values of charge or Gauss-Bonnet parameter, the equal area law and the critical exponent of the heat capacity are found to be consistent with phase structures in temperature-thermal entropy plane.

  4. The rich structure of Gauss-Bonnet holographic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Luke

    2011-10-01

    We study fully backreacting, Gauss-Bonnet (GB) holographic superconductors in 5 bulk spacetime dimensions. We explore the system's dependence on the scalar mass for both positive and negative GB coupling, α. We find that when the mass approaches the Breitenlohner-Freedman (BF) bound and α → L 2 /4 the effect of backreaction is to increase the critical temperature, T c, of the system: the opposite of its effect in the rest of parameter space. We also find that reducing α below zero increases T c and that the effect of backreaction is diminished. We study the zero temperature limit, proving that this system does not permit regular solutions for a non-trivial, tachyonic scalar field and constrain possible solutions for fields with positive masses. We investigate singular, zero temperature solutions in the Einstein limit but find them to be incompatible with the concept of GB gravity being a perturbative expansion of Einstein gravity. We study the conductivity of the system, finding that the inclusion of backreaction hinders the development of poles in the conductivity that are associated with quasi-normal modes approaching the real axis from elsewhere in the complex plane.

  5. Laguerre-Gauss basis functions in observer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    2003-05-01

    Observer models based on linear classifiers with basis functions (channels) are useful for evaluation of detection performance with medical images. They allow spatial domain calculations with a covariance matrix of tractable size. The term "channelized Fisher-Hotelling observer" will be used here. It is also called the "channelized Hotelling observer" model. There are an infinite number of basis function (channel ) sets that could be employed. Examples of channel sets that have been used include: difference of Gaussian (DOG) filters, difference of Mesa (DOM) filters and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) basis functions. Another option, sums of LG functions (LGS), will also be presented here. This set has the advantage of having no DC response. The effect of the number of images used to estimate model observer performance will be described, for both filtered 1/f3 noise and GE digital mammogram backgrounds. Finite sample image sets introduce both bias and variance to the estimate. The results presented here agree with previous work on linear classifiers. The LGS basis set gives a small but statistically significant reduction in bias. However, this may not be of much practical benefit. Finally, the effect of varying the number of basis functions included in the set will be addressed. It was found that four LG bases or three LGS bases are adequate.

  6. Charged black hole solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by high interest in the close relation between string theory and black hole solutions, in this paper, we take into account the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian in the context of massive gravity. We examine the possibility of black hole in this regard, and discuss the types of horizons. Next, we calculate conserved and thermodynamic quantities and check the validity of the first law of thermodynamics. In addition, we investigate the stability of these black holes in context of canonical ensemble. We show that number, type and place of phase transition points may be significantly affected by different parameters. Next, by considering cosmological constant as thermodynamical pressure, we will extend phase space and calculate critical values. Then, we construct thermodynamical spacetime by considering mass as thermodynamical potential. We study geometrical thermodynamics of these black holes in context of heat capacity and extended phase space. We show that studying heat capacity, geometrical thermodynamics and critical behavior in extended phase space lead to consistent results. Finally, we will employ a new method for obtaining critical values and show that the results of this method are consistent with those of other methods.

  7. Sensor based real-time process monitoring for ultra-precision manufacturing processes with non-linearity and non-stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyca, Omer Faruk

    This research investigates methodologies for real-time process monitoring in ultra-precision manufacturing processes, specifically, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and ultra-precision machining (UPM), are investigated in this dissertation. The three main components of this research are as follows: (1) developing a predictive modeling approaches for early detection of process anomalies/change points, (2) devising approaches that can capture the non-Gaussian and non-stationary characteristics of CMP and UPM processes, and (3) integrating multiple sensor data to make more reliable process related decisions in real-time. In the first part, we establish a quantitative relationship between CMP process performance, such as material removal rate (MRR) and data acquired from wireless vibration sensors. Subsequently, a non-linear sequential Bayesian analysis is integrated with decision theoretic concepts for detection of CMP process end-point for blanket copper wafers. Using this approach, CMP polishing end-point was detected within a 5% error rate. Next, a non-parametric Bayesian analytical approach is utilized to capture the inherently complex, non-Gaussian, and non-stationary sensor signal patterns observed in CMP process. An evolutionary clustering analysis, called Recurrent Nested Dirichlet Process (RNDP) approach is developed for monitoring CMP process changes using MEMS vibration signals. Using this novel signal analysis approach, process drifts are detected within 20 milliseconds and is assessed to be 3-7 times faster than traditional SPC charts. This is very beneficial to the industry from an application standpoint, because, wafer yield losses will be mitigated to a great extent, if the onset of CMP process drifts can be detected timely and accurately. Lastly, a non-parametric Bayesian modeling approach, termed Dirichlet Process (DP) is combined with a multi-level hierarchical information fusion technique for monitoring of surface finish in UPM process

  8. Design Improvement and Implementation of 3D Gauss-Markov Mobility Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-19

    AFFTC-PA-12430 Design Improvement and Implementation of 3D Gauss-Markov Mobility Model Mohammed Alenazi, Cenk Sahin , and James P.G. Sterbenz...0019 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mohammed Alenazi, Cenk Sahin , and James P.G. Sterbenz 5d. PROJECT...Gauss-Markov Mobility Model Mohammed Alenazi and Cenk Sahin Faculty Advisor: James P.G. Sterbenz Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

  9. On the equivalence of Gaussian elimination and Gauss-Jordan reduction in solving linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Nai-Kuan

    1989-01-01

    A novel general approach to round-off error analysis using the error complexity concepts is described. This is applied to the analysis of the Gaussian Elimination and Gauss-Jordan scheme for solving linear equations. The results show that the two algorithms are equivalent in terms of our error complexity measures. Thus the inherently parallel Gauss-Jordan scheme can be implemented with confidence if parallel computers are available.

  10. Short note on the mass matrix for Gauss-Lobatto grid points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2015-02-01

    The mass matrix for Gauss-Lobatto grid points is usually approximated by Gauss-Lobatto quadrature because this leads to a diagonal matrix that is easy to invert. The exact mass matrix and its inverse are full. We show that the exact mass matrix and its inverse differ from the approximate diagonal ones by a simple rank-1 update (outer product). They can thus be applied to an arbitrary vector in O (N) operations instead of O (N2).

  11. Hawking radiation via tunneling from a d-dimensional black hole in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gu-Qiang; Mo, Jie-Xiong

    2017-04-01

    We extend the Parikh-Wilczek method from Einstein gravity spacetime to Gauss-Bonnet modified gravity and study the tunneling radiation of particles across the event horizon of a d-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet Anti de-Sitter black hole. The emission rate of a particle is calculated. It is shown that the emission rate of massive particles takes the same functional form as that of massless particles although that their motion equations tunneling across the horizon are different. It is also shown that the emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum but is consistent with an underlying unitary theory. In addition, significant but interesting phenomenon is demonstrated when Gauss-Bonnet term is present. The expression of the emission rate for a black hole in Gauss-Bonnet gravity differs from that for a black hole in Einstein gravity. After adopting the conventional tunneling rate, we obtain the expression of the entropy of the Gauss-Bonnet black hole, which is in accordance with the early results but does not obey the area law. So the research of tunneling radiation in this paper may serve as a new perspective of understanding the thermodynamics of black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

  12. Constraining scalar-Gauss-Bonnet inflation by reheating, unitarity, and Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Maity, Debaprasad; Mukherjee, Rupak

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the inflationary dynamics in detail for theories with Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to scalar functions, in light of the Planck data. Considering the chaotic inflationary scenario, we constrain the parameters of two models involving inflaton-Gauss-Bonnet coupling by current Planck data. For nonzero inflaton-Gauss-Bonnet coupling β , an inflationary analysis provides us a big cosmologically viable region in the space of (m , β ), where m is the mass of the inflaton. However, we study further on constraining β arising from reheating considerations and unitarity of tree-level amplitude involving 2-graviton →2 -graviton (h h →h h ) scattering. Our analysis, particularly on reheating significantly reduces the parameter space of (m , β ) for all models. The quadratic Gauss-Bonnet coupling parameter turns out to be more strongly constrained than that of the linear coupling. For the linear Gauss-Bonnet coupling function, we obtain β ≲1 03, with the condition β (m /MP)2≃10-4. However, the study of the Higgs inflation scenario in the presence of a Gauss-Bonnet term turns out to be completely disfavored.

  13. U-238-U-234-Th-230-Th-232 systematics and the precise measurement of time over the past 500,000 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. Lawrence; Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the high-precision measurement of the Th-230 abundance in corals by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry using techniques developed by Chen and Wasserburg (1980, 1981) and Chen et al. (1986). It is shown that 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to + or - 30 percent (2 sigma) and 2 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 to + or - 2 percent. The time over which useful age data on corals can be obtained ranges from a few years to about 500 ky, with the uncertainty in age ranging from 5 y for a 180-y-old coral, to 44 y for a 8294-y-old coral, to 1.1 ky for a 123.1-ky-old coral. Ages were determined with high analytical precision for several corals that grew during high sea-level stands about 120 ky ago, supporting the view that the dominant cause of Pleistocene climate change was Milankovitch forcing.

  14. A remarkable, precisely timed release of hyperglycemic hormone from endocrine cells in the gut is associated with ecdysis in the crab Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Chung, J S; Dircksen, H; Webster, S G

    1999-11-09

    Molting or ecdysis is the most fundamentally important process in arthropod life history, because shedding of the exoskeleton is an absolute prerequisite for growth and metamorphosis. Although the hormonal mechanisms driving ecdysis in insects have been studied extensively, nothing is known about these processes in crustaceans. During late premolt and during ecdysis in the crab Carcinus maenas, we observed a precise and reproducible surge in hemolymph hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) levels, which was over 100-fold greater than levels seen in intermolt animals. The source of this hormone surge was not from the eyestalk neurosecretory tissues but from previously undescribed endocrine cells (paraneurons), in defined areas of the foregut and hindgut. During premolt (the only time when CHH is expressed by these tissues), the gut is the largest endocrine tissue in the crab. The CHH surge, which is a result of an unusual, almost complete discharge of the contents of the gut endocrine cell, regulates water and ion uptake during molting, thus allowing the swelling necessary for successful ecdysis and the subsequent increase in size during postmolt. This study defines an endocrine brain/gut axis in the arthropods. We propose that the ionoregulatory process controlled by CHH may be common to arthropods, in that, for insects, a similar mechanism seems to be involved in antidiuresis. It also seems likely that a cascade of very precisely coordinated release of (neuro) hormones controls ecdysis.

  15. Potential for bias and low precision in molecular divergence time estimation of the Canopy of Life: an example from aquatic bird families

    PubMed Central

    van Tuinen, Marcel; Torres, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in divergence time estimation is frequently studied from many angles but rarely from the perspective of phylogenetic node age. If appropriate molecular models and fossil priors are used, a multi-locus, partitioned analysis is expected to equally minimize error in accuracy and precision across all nodes of a given phylogeny. In contrast, if available models fail to completely account for rate heterogeneity, substitution saturation and incompleteness of the fossil record, uncertainty in divergence time estimation may increase with node age. While many studies have stressed this concern with regard to deep nodes in the Tree of Life, the inference that molecular divergence time estimation of shallow nodes is less sensitive to erroneous model choice has not been tested explicitly in a Bayesian framework. Because of available divergence time estimation methods that permit fossil priors across any phylogenetic node and the present increase in efficient, cheap collection of species-level genomic data, insight is needed into the performance of divergence time estimation of shallow (<10 MY) nodes. Here, we performed multiple sensitivity analyses in a multi-locus data set of aquatic birds with six fossil constraints. Comparison across divergence time analyses that varied taxon and locus sampling, number and position of fossil constraint and shape of prior distribution showed various insights. Deviation from node ages obtained from a reference analysis was generally highest for the shallowest nodes but determined more by temporal placement than number of fossil constraints. Calibration with only the shallowest nodes significantly underestimated the aquatic bird fossil record, indicating the presence of saturation. Although joint calibration with all six priors yielded ages most consistent with the fossil record, ages of shallow nodes were overestimated. This bias was found in both mtDNA and nDNA regions. Thus, divergence time estimation of shallow nodes may suffer

  16. AdS and Lifshitz scalar hairy black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Lu-Yao

    2016-09-01

    We consider Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity in general dimensions, which is nonminimally coupled to a scalar field. By choosing a scalar potential of the type V (ϕ )=2 Λ0+1/2 m2ϕ2+γ4ϕ4 , we first obtain large classes of scalar hairy black holes with spherical/hyperbolic/planar topologies that are asymptotic to locally anti- de Sitter (AdS) space-times. We derive the first law of black hole thermodynamics using Wald formalism. In particular, for one class of the solutions, the scalar hair forms a thermodynamic conjugate with the graviton and nontrivially contributes to the thermodynamical first law. We observe that except for one class of the planar black holes, all these solutions are constructed at the critical point of GB gravity where there exist unique AdS vacua. In fact, a Lifshitz vacuum is also allowed at the critical point. We then construct many new classes of neutral and charged Lifshitz black hole solutions for an either minimally or nonminimally coupled scalar and derive the thermodynamical first laws. We also obtain new classes of exact dynamical AdS and Lifshitz solutions which describe radiating white holes. The solutions eventually become AdS or Lifshitz vacua at late retarded times. However, for one class of the solutions, the final state is an AdS space-time with a globally naked singularity.

  17. Characterizing the Impact of Precision Time and Range Measurements from Two-Way Time Transfer Systems on Network Differential GPS Position Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    ON NETWORK DIFFERENTIAL GPS POSITION SOLUTIONS THESIS Kendra L . B. Cook, 2D LT, USAF AFIT/GA/ENG/06-02 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering Kendra L . B. Cook, B.S.A.E. 2D LT...MEASUREMENTS FROM TWO-WAY TIME TRANSFER SYSTEMS ON NETWORK DIFFERENTIAL GPS POSITION SOLUTIONS Kendra L . B. Cook, B.S.A.E. 2D LT, USAF

  18. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  19. Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto collocation method for the numerical solution of 1+1 nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doha, E. H.; Bhrawy, A. H.; Abdelkawy, M. A.; Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    A Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto collocation (J-GL-C) method, used in combination with the implicit Runge-Kutta method of fourth order, is proposed as a numerical algorithm for the approximation of solutions to nonlinear Schrödinger equations (NLSE) with initial-boundary data in 1+1 dimensions. Our procedure is implemented in two successive steps. In the first one, the J-GL-C is employed for approximating the functional dependence on the spatial variable, using (N-1) nodes of the Jacobi-Gauss-Lobatto interpolation which depends upon two general Jacobi parameters. The resulting equations together with the two-point boundary conditions induce a system of 2(N-1) first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time. In the second step, the implicit Runge-Kutta method of fourth order is applied to solve this temporal system. The proposed J-GL-C method, used in combination with the implicit Runge-Kutta method of fourth order, is employed to obtain highly accurate numerical approximations to four types of NLSE, including the attractive and repulsive NLSE and a Gross-Pitaevskii equation with space-periodic potential. The numerical results obtained by this algorithm have been compared with various exact solutions in order to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Indeed, for relatively few nodes used, the absolute error in our numerical solutions is sufficiently small.

  20. U-Pb dating of Plinian-eruption ashfalls by the isotope dilution method: A reliable and precise tool for time-scale calibration and biostratigraphic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.D. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of low analytical blanks, clean Pb-205 enriched tracer-solution, and refined procedures of sample preparation, it is possible to isolate and measure minute quantities of radiogenic Pb in concordant zircon, thereby permitting accurate isotopic age determinations of small multigrain samples of Paleozoic zircon with 7--20 ppm radiogenic Pb. Refinement of these procedures, including reduction of laboratory blank, allows for analysis of single grains of Paleozoic zircon with greater than 25 ppm radiogenic Pb with an age precision of better than 1%. Mass spectrometric measurement of all Pb and U isotopes allows for the calculation of three isotopic ages from a single sample. Concordant multigrain and single-grain U-Pb zircon analyses from 13 biostratigraphically dated K-bentonites in Europe and North America define an internally consistent, absolute chronostratigraphy of Middle ordovician to Upper silurian stratotypes. As a test of trans-Atlantic stratigraphic correlation, a volcanic ash from Middle Ordovician (Rocklandian) strata of North America was found to be in excellent age agreement with Caradocian K-bentonites in Britain and Sweden, demonstrating age equivalence of sedimentary sequences lacking directly comparable fauna. In other case, precise dating of single zircons from three Caradocian K-bentonite in Sweden and Virginia was performed to test a hypothesis that a single ultraplinian volcanic eruption deposited airborne debris on both Larentia and Baltica. The ages of these presumed correlative ashes will be shown to provide quantitative information about the depositional rates of their enclosing strata, as well as tectonic events affecting the margins of Iapetus in Ordovician time.

  1. Classification of small lesions in dynamic breast MRI: Eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation through spatio-temporal analysis of contrast enhancement over time.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Huber, Markus B; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Leinsinger, Gerda; Krol, Andrzej; Wismüller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the dignity of breast lesions as benign or malignant is specifically difficult for small lesions; they don't exhibit typical characteristics of malignancy and are harder to segment since margins are harder to visualize. Previous attempts at using dynamic or morphologic criteria to classify small lesions (mean lesion diameter of about 1 cm) have not yielded satisfactory results. The goal of this work was to improve the classification performance in such small diagnostically challenging lesions while concurrently eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation. To this end, we introduce a method for topological characterization of lesion enhancement patterns over time. Three Minkowski Functionals were extracted from all five post-contrast images of sixty annotated lesions on dynamic breast MRI exams. For each Minkowski Functional, topological features extracted from each post-contrast image of the lesions were combined into a high-dimensional texture feature vector. These feature vectors were classified in a machine learning task with support vector regression. For comparison, conventional Haralick texture features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were also used. A new method for extracting thresholded GLCM features was also introduced and investigated here. The best classification performance was observed with Minkowski Functionals area and perimeter, thresholded GLCM features f8 and f9, and conventional GLCM features f4 and f6. However, both Minkowski Functionals and thresholded GLCM achieved such results without lesion segmentation while the performance of GLCM features significantly deteriorated when lesions were not segmented (p < 0.05). This suggests that such advanced spatio-temporal characterization can improve the classification performance achieved in such small lesions, while simultaneously eliminating the need for precise segmentation.

  2. Nonparaxial propagation of Lorentz-Gauss beams in uniaxial crystal orthogonal to the optical axis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Liu, Zhirong; Zhao, Daomu

    2014-04-01

    Analytical expressions for the three components of nonparaxial propagation of a polarized Lorentz-Gauss beam in uniaxial crystal orthogonal to the optical axis are derived and used to investigate its propagation properties in uniaxial crystal. The influences of the initial beam parameters and the parameters of the uniaxial crystal on the evolution of the beam-intensity distribution in the uniaxial crystal are examined in detail. Results show that the statistical properties of a nonparaxial Lorentz-Gauss beam in a uniaxial crystal orthogonal to the optical axis are closely determined by the initial beam's parameters and the parameters of the crystal: the beam waist sizes-w(0), w(0x), and w(0y)-not only affect the size and shape of the beam profile in uniaxial crystal but also determine the nonparaxial effect of a Lorentz-Gauss beam; the beam profile of a Lorentz-Gauss beam in uniaxial crystal is elongated in the x or y direction, which is determined by the ratio of the extraordinary refractive index to the ordinary refractive index; with increasing deviation of the ratio from unity, the extension of the beam profile augments. The results indicate that uniaxial crystal provides an effective and convenient method for modulating the Lorentz-Gauss beams. Our results may be valuable in some fields, such as optical trapping and nonlinear optics, where a light beam with a special profile and polarization is required.

  3. Eliminating chromatic aberration in Gauss-type lens design using a novel genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Chin; Tsai, Chen-Mu; Macdonald, John; Pai, Yang-Chieh

    2007-05-01

    Two different types of Gauss lens design, which effectively eliminate primary chromatic aberration, are presented using an efficient genetic algorithm (GA). The current GA has to deal with too many targets in optical global optimization so that the performance is not much improved. Generally speaking, achromatic aberrations have a great relationship with variable glass sets for all elements. For optics whose design is roughly convergent, glass sets for optics will play a significant role in axial and lateral color aberration. Therefore better results might be derived from the optimal process of eliminating achromatic aberration, which could be carried out by finding feasible glass sets in advance. As an alternative, we propose a new optimization process by using a GA and involving theories of geometrical optics in order to select the best optical glass combination. Two Gauss-type lens designs are employed in this research. First, a telephoto lens design is sensitive to axial aberration because of its long focal length, and second, a wide-angle Gauss design is complicated by lateral color aberration at the extreme corners because Gauss design is well known not to deal well with wide-angle problems. Without numbers of higher chief rays passing the element, it is difficult to correct lateral color aberration altogether for the Gauss design. The results and conclusions show that the attempts to eliminate primary chromatic aberrations were successful.

  4. Features of warped geometry in presence of Gauss-Bonnet coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2013-02-01

    We study the role of the Gauss-Bonnet corrections and two loop higher genus contribution to the gravity action on the Kaluza-Klien modes and their interactions for different bulk fields which enable one to study various phenomenological implications of string loop corrected Gauss-Bonnet modified warped geometry model in one canvas. We have explicitly derived a phenomenological bound on the Gauss-Bonnet parameter so that the required Planck to TeV scale hierarchy can be achieved through the warp factor in the light of recently discovered Higgs like boson at 125GeV. Moreover due to the presence of small perturbative Gauss-Bonnet as well as string loop corrections we have shown that the warping solution can be obtained for both de-Sitter and anti-de-Sitter bulk which is quite distinct from Randall-Sundrum scenario. Finally we have evaluated various interactions among these bulk fields and determined the coupling parameters and the Kaluza-Klien mode masses which is crucial to understand the phenomenology of a string two loop corrected Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet warp geometry.

  5. Gauss-Newton inspired preconditioned optimization in large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Monica

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we propose a novel preconditioned optimization method in the paradigm of Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM). The preconditioned update scheme is formulated for the non-stationary and the stationary parameterizations of diffeomorphisms, yielding three different LDDMM methods. The preconditioning matrices are inspired in the Hessian approximation used in Gauss-Newton method. The derivatives are computed using Frechet differentials. Thus, optimization is performed in a Sobolev space, in contrast to optimization in L2 commonly used in non-rigid registration literature. The proposed LDDMM methods have been evaluated and compared with their respective implementations of gradient descent optimization. Evaluation has been performed using real and simulated images from the Non-rigid Image Registration Evaluation Project (NIREP). The experiments conducted in this work reported that our preconditioned LDDMM methods achieved a performance similar or superior to well-established-in-literature gradient descent non-stationary LDDMM in the great majority of cases. Moreover, preconditioned optimization showed a substantial reduction in the execution time with an affordable increase of the memory usage per iteration. Additional experiments reported that optimization using Frechet differentials should be preferable to optimization using L2 differentials.

  6. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  7. Gauss-Newton inspired preconditioned optimization in large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Monica

    2014-10-21

    In this work, we propose a novel preconditioned optimization method in the paradigm of Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM). The preconditioned update scheme is formulated for the non-stationary and the stationary parameterizations of diffeomorphisms, yielding three different LDDMM methods. The preconditioning matrices are inspired in the Hessian approximation used in Gauss-Newton method. The derivatives are computed using Frechet differentials. Thus, optimization is performed in a Sobolev space, in contrast to optimization in L(2) commonly used in non-rigid registration literature. The proposed LDDMM methods have been evaluated and compared with their respective implementations of gradient descent optimization. Evaluation has been performed using real and simulated images from the Non-rigid Image Registration Evaluation Project (NIREP). The experiments conducted in this work reported that our preconditioned LDDMM methods achieved a performance similar or superior to well-established-in-literature gradient descent non-stationary LDDMM in the great majority of cases. Moreover, preconditioned optimization showed a substantial reduction in the execution time with an affordable increase of the memory usage per iteration. Additional experiments reported that optimization using Frechet differentials should be preferable to optimization using L(2) differentials.

  8. Dark matter relic density in Gauss-Bonnet braneworld cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B. E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    The relic density of symmetric and asymmetric dark matter in a Gauss-Bonnet (GB) modified Randall-Sundrum (RS) type II braneworld cosmology is investigated. The existing study of symmetric dark matter in a GB braneworld (Okada and Okada, 2009) found that the expansion rate was reduced compared to that in standard General Relativity (GR), thereby delaying particle freeze-out and resulting in relic abundances which are suppressed by up to O(10{sup −2}). This is in direct contrast to the behaviour observed in RS braneworlds where the expansion rate is enhanced and the final relic abundance boosted. However, this finding that relic abundances are suppressed in a GB braneworld is based upon a highly contrived situation in which the GB era evolves directly into a standard GR era, rather than passing through a RS era as is the general situation. This collapse of the RS era requires equating the mass scale m{sub α} of the GB modification and the mass scale m{sub σ} of the brane tension. However, if the GB contribution is to be considered as the lowest order correction from string theory to the RS action, we would expect m{sub α} > m{sub σ}. We investigate the effect upon the relic abundance of choosing more realistic values for the ratio R{sub m} ≡ m{sub α}/m{sub σ} and find that the relic abundance can be either enhanced or suppressed by more than two orders of magnitude. However, suppression only occurs for a small range of parameter choices and, overwhelmingly, the predominant situation is that of enhancement as we recover the usual Randall-Sundrum type behaviour in the limit R{sub m} >> 1. We use the latest observational bound Ω{sub DM}h{sup 2} = 0.1187 ± 0.0017 to constrain the various model parameters and briefly discuss the implications for direct/indirect dark matter detection experiments as well as dark matter particle models.

  9. Preconditioning of the HiFi Code by Linear Discretization on the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.; Lukin, V. S.

    2013-10-01

    The most challenging aspect of extended MHD simulation is the scaling of computational time as the problem size is scaled up. The use of high-order spectral elements, as in the HiFi code, is useful for handling multiple length scales and strong anisotropy, but detailed code profiling studies show that cpu time increases rapidly with increasing np, the polynomial degree of the spectral elements, due to the cost of Jacobian matrix formation and solution. We have implemented a method of matrix preconditioning based on linear discretization of the Jacobian matrix on the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre interpolatory nodes. The resulting matrix has much fewer nonzero elements than the full Jacobian and shares the same vector format. The full solution is then obtained by matrix-free Newton-Krylov methods, which converges rapidly because the preconditioner provides an accurate approximation to the full problem. Scaling studies will be presented for a variety of applications.

  10. A constrained Gauss-Seidel method for correction of point spread function effect in MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Angelie, E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Mallet, J; Bonmartin, A; Sau, J

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio, so a compromise between spatial resolution and examination time is needed in clinical application. The reconstruction of truncated signal introduces a Point Spread Function that considerably affects the spatial resolution. In order to reduce spatial contamination, three methods, applied after Fourier transform image reconstruction, based on deconvolution or iterative techniques are tested to decrease Point Spread Function contamination. A Gauss-Seidel (GS) algorithm is used for iterative techniques with and without a non-negative constraint (GS+). Convergence and noise dependence studies of the GS algorithm have been done. The linear property of contamination was validated on a point sample phantom. A significant decrease of contamination without broadening the spatial resolution was obtained with GS+ method compared to a conventional apodization. This post-processing method can provide a contrast enhancement of clinical spectroscopic images without changes in acquisition time.

  11. Gauss-bonnet black holes and possibilities for their experimental search

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, S. O. Rannu, K. A.

    2012-03-15

    Corollaries of gravity models with second-order curvature corrections in the form of a Gauss-Bonnet term and possibilities (or impossibilities) for their experimental search or observations are discussed. The full version of the four-dimensional Schwarzschild-Gauss-Bonnet black hole solution and the constraint on the possible minimal black hole mass following from this model are considered. Using our solution as a model for the final stages of Hawking evaporation of black holes with a low initial mass (up to 10{sup 15} g) whose lifetime is comparable to that of our Universe, we have revealed differences in the patterns of evaporation: we have obtained high values of the emitted energy and showed the impossibility of an experimental search for primordial black holes by their evaporation products. Scenarios for the evaporation of Gauss-Bonnet black holes in multidimensional gravity models and possibilities for their experimental search are also discussed.

  12. Static solutions with nontrivial boundaries for the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Dotti, Gustavo; Oliva, Julio; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2010-07-15

    The classification of a certain class of static solutions for the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in vacuum is performed in d{>=}5 dimensions. The class of metrics under consideration is such that the spacelike section is a warped product of the real line and an arbitrary base manifold. It is shown that for a generic value of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling, the base manifold must be necessarily Einstein, with an additional restriction on its Weyl tensor for d>5. The boundary admits a wider class of geometries only in the special case when the Gauss-Bonnet coupling is such that the theory admits a unique maximally symmetric solution. The additional freedom in the boundary metric enlarges the class of allowed geometries in the bulk, which are classified within three main branches, containing new black holes and wormholes in vacuum.

  13. Holographic phase transitions of p-wave superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with backreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Nie Zhangyu; Zhang Haiqing

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the phase transitions of holographic p-wave superconductors in (4+1)-dimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet theories, in a grand canonical ensemble. Turning on the backreaction of the Yang-Mills field, it is found that the condensations of vector order parameter become harder if the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient grows up or the backreaction becomes stronger. In particular, the vector order parameter exhibits the features of first order and second order phase transitions, while only the second order phase transition is observed in the probe limit. We discuss the roles that the Gauss-Bonnet term and the backreaction play in changing the order of phase transition.

  14. Gauss-bonnet black holes and possibilities for their experimental search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyev, S. O.; Rannu, K. A.

    2012-03-01

    Corollaries of gravity models with second-order curvature corrections in the form of a Gauss-Bonnet term and possibilities (or impossibilities) for their experimental search or observations are discussed. The full version of the four-dimensional Schwarzschild-Gauss-Bonnet black hole solution and the constraint on the possible minimal black hole mass following from this model are considered. Using our solution as a model for the final stages of Hawking evaporation of black holes with a low initial mass (up to 1015 g) whose lifetime is comparable to that of our Universe, we have revealed differences in the patterns of evaporation: we have obtained high values of the emitted energy and showed the impossibility of an experimental search for primordial black holes by their evaporation products. Scenarios for the evaporation of Gauss-Bonnet black holes in multidimensional gravity models and possibilities for their experimental search are also discussed.

  15. Warm-tachyon Gauss-Bonnet inflation in the light of Planck 2015 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaharfar, Meysam; Sepangi, Hamid Reza

    2016-11-01

    We study a warm-tachyon inflationary model non-minimally coupled to a Gauss-Bonnet term. The general conditions required for reliability of the model are obtained by considerations of a combined hierarchy of Hubble and Gauss-Bonnet flow functions. The perturbed equations are comprehensively derived in the longitudinal gauge in the presence of slow-roll and quasi-stable conditions. General expressions for observable quantities of interest such as the tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are found in the high dissipation regime. Finally, the model is solved using exponential and inverse power-law potentials, which satisfy the properties of a tachyon potential, with parameters of the model being constrained within the framework of the Planck 2015 data. We show that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant controls termination of inflation in such a way as to be in good agreement with the Planck 2015 data.

  16. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Can Precisely Discriminate the Lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and Species of Listeria

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Takahashi, Hajime; Tamura, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The genetic lineages of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of the genus Listeria are correlated with pathogenesis in humans. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has become a prevailing tool for rapid and reliable microbial identification, the precise discrimination of Listeria species and lineages remains a crucial issue in clinical settings and for food safety. In this study, we constructed an accurate and reliable MS database to discriminate the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the species of Listeria (L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, L. ivanovii, L. grayi, and L. rocourtiae) based on the S10-spc-alpha operon gene encoded ribosomal protein mass spectrum (S10-GERMS) proteotyping method, which relies on both genetic information (genomics) and observed MS peaks in MALDI-TOF MS (proteomics). The specific set of eight biomarkers (ribosomal proteins L24, L6, L18, L15, S11, S9, L31 type B, and S16) yielded characteristic MS patterns for the lineages of L. monocytogenes and the different species of Listeria, and led to the construction of a MS database that was successful in discriminating between these organisms in MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting analysis followed by advanced proteotyping software Strain Solution analysis. We also confirmed the constructed database on the proteotyping software Strain Solution by using 23 Listeria strains collected from natural sources. PMID:27442502

  17. Carl Friedrich Gauss - General Theory of Terrestrial Magnetism - a revised translation of the German text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, K.-H.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    2014-02-01

    This is a translation of the Allgemeine Theorie des Erdmagnetismus published by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1839 in the Resultate aus den Beobachtungen des Magnetischen Vereins im Jahre 1838. The current translation is based on an earlier translation by Elizabeth Juliana Sabine published in 1841. This earlier translation has been revised, corrected, and extended. Numerous biographical comments on the scientists named in the original text have been added as well as further information on the observational material used by Carl Friedrich Gauss. An attempt is made to provide a readable text to a wider scientific community, a text laying the foundation of today's understanding of planetary magnetic fields.

  18. Tachyon Cosmology with Gauss-Bonnet and Non-Minimal Kinetic Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banijamali, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a tachyonic model of dark energy in which scalar field non-minimally coupled with curvature and kinetic part of its Lagrangian density. Additionally the model contains the Gauss-Bonnet coupling to the scalar field through an arbitrary function. The non-minimal Gauss-Bonnet coupling function and scalar field potential have been obtained for power-law solution and then for a dynamically varying equation of state. We have extracted the required condition for the so-called phantom divide line crossing in the model and represented such a crossing numerically.

  19. Addendum to ''Thin-shell wormholes supported by ordinary matter in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity''

    SciTech Connect

    Simeone, Claudio

    2011-04-15

    Thin-shell wormholes are constructed starting from the exotic branch of the Wiltshire spherically symmetric solution of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The energy-momentum tensor of the shell is studied, and it is shown that configurations supported by matter satisfying the energy conditions exist for certain values of the parameters. Differing from the previous result associated with the normal branch of the Wiltshire solution, this is achieved for small positive values of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and for vanishing charge.

  20. Development of sustainable precision farming systems for swine: estimating real-time individual amino acid requirements in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, L; Lovatto, P A; Pomar, J; Pomar, C

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a mathematical model used to estimate the daily amino acid requirements of individual growing-finishing pigs. The model includes empirical and mechanistic model components. The empirical component estimates daily feed intake (DFI), BW, and daily gain (DG) based on individual pig information collected in real time. Based on DFI, BW, and DG estimates, the mechanistic component uses classic factorial equations to estimate the optimal concentration of amino acids that must be offered to each pig to meet its requirements. The model was evaluated with data from a study that investigated the effect of feeding pigs with a 3-phase or daily multiphase system. The DFI and BW values measured in this study were compared with those estimated by the empirical component of the model. The coherence of the values estimated by the mechanistic component was evaluated by analyzing if it followed a normal pattern of requirements. Lastly, the proposed model was evaluated by comparing its estimates with those generated by the existing growth model (InraPorc). The precision of the proposed model and InraPorc in estimating DFI and BW was evaluated through the mean absolute error. The empirical component results indicated that the DFI and BW trajectories of individual pigs fed ad libitum could be predicted 1 d (DFI) or 7 d (BW) ahead with the average mean absolute error of 12.45 and 1.85%, respectively. The average mean absolute error obtained with the InraPorc for the average individual of the population was 14.72% for DFI and 5.38% for BW. Major differences were observed when estimates from InraPorc were compared with individual observations. The proposed model, however, was effective in tracking the change in DFI and BW for each individual pig. The mechanistic model component estimated the optimal standardized ileal digestible Lys to NE ratio with reasonable between animal (average CV = 7%) and overtime (average CV = 14%) variation

  1. More Questions on Precision Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybould, E. C.; Solity, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Precision teaching can accelerate basic skills progress of special needs children. Issues discussed include using probes as performance tests, charting daily progress, using the charted data to modify teaching methods, determining appropriate age levels, assessing the number of students to be precision taught, and carefully allocating time. (JDD)

  2. Coexistence of chaotic and non-chaotic states in the two-dimensional Gauss-Navier-Stokes dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giberti, C.; Rondoni, L.; Vernia, C.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, Gallavotti proposed an Equivalence Conjecture in hydrodynamics, which states that forced-damped fluids can be equally well represented by means of the Navier-Stokes equations (NS) and by means of time reversible modifications of NS called Gauss-Navier-Stokes equations (GNS). This Equivalence Conjecture received numerical support in several recent papers concerning two-dimensional fluid mechanics. The corresponding results rely on the fact that the NS and GNS systems only have one attracting set. Performing similar two-dimensional simulations, we find that there are conditions to be met by the GNS system for this to be the case. In particular, increasing the Reynolds number, while keeping fixed the number of Fourier modes, leads to the coexistence of different attractors. This makes difficult a test of the Equivalence Conjecture, but constitutes a spurious effect due to the insufficient spectral resolution. With sufficiently fine spectral resolution, the steady states are unique and the Equivalence Conjecture can be conveniently established.

  3. Second-order p-iterative solution of the Lambert/Gauss problem. [algorithm for efficient orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for efficient p-iterative solution of the Lambert/Gauss orbit-determination problem using second-order Newton iteration. The algorithm is based on a universal transformation of Kepler's time-of-flight equation and approximate inverse solutions of this equation for short-way and long-way flight paths. The approximate solutions provide both good starting values for iteration and simplified computation of the second-order term in the iteration formula. Numerical results are presented which indicate that in many cases of practical significance (except those having collinear position vectors) the algorithm produces at least eight significant digits of accuracy with just two or three steps of iteration.

  4. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  5. The Gauss and Ampere Laws: Different Laws but Similar Difficulties for Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose M.; Salinas, Julia; Zuza, Kristina; Ceberio, Mikel

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analyse university students' reasoning regarding two laws of electromagnetism: Gauss's law and Ampere's law. It has been supposed that the problems seen in understanding and applying both laws do not spring from students' misconceptions. Students habitually use reasoning known in the literature as 'common sense' methodology that…

  6. An Alternative Method to Gauss-Jordan Elimination: Minimizing Fraction Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Luke; Powell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    When solving systems of equations by using matrices, many teachers present a Gauss-Jordan elimination approach to row reducing matrices that can involve painfully tedious operations with fractions (which I will call the traditional method). In this essay, I present an alternative method to row reduce matrices that does not introduce additional…

  7. Thin-shell wormholes supported by ordinary matter in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Richarte, Martin G.; Simeone, Claudio

    2007-10-15

    The generalized Darmois-Israel formalism for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory is applied to construct thin-shell Lorentzian wormholes with spherical symmetry. We calculate the energy localized on the shell, and we find that for certain values of the parameters wormholes could be supported by matter not violating the energy conditions.

  8. Basic full-wave generalization of the real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2010-05-01

    The linearly polarized real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam is investigated by the Fourier transform method. The complex power is obtained and the reactive power of the paraxial beam is found to be zero. The complex space source required for the full-wave generalization of the real-argument Hermite-Gauss beam is deduced. The resulting basic full real-argument Hermite-Gauss wave is determined. The real and the reactive powers of the full wave are evaluated. The reactive power of the basic full real-argument Hermite-Gauss wave is infinite, and the reasons for this singularity are described. The real power depends on kw(0), m, and n, where k is the wavenumber, w(0) is the e-folding distance of the Gaussian part of the input distribution, and m and n are the mode numbers. The variation in the real power with respect to changes in kw(0) for specified m and n as well as with respect to changes in m and n for a specified kw(0) is examined.

  9. On the properties of circular beams: normalization, Laguerre-Gauss expansion, and free-space divergence.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe

    2015-04-15

    Circular beams were introduced as a very general solution to the paraxial wave equation carrying orbital angular momentum. Here, we study their properties by looking at their normalization and their expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gauss modes. We also study their far-field divergence and, for particular cases of the beam parameters, their possible experimental generation.

  10. Beam propagation factors and kurtosis parameters of a Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2014-06-01

    Based on the second-order and the higher-order moments, analytical expressions for the beam propagation factors of a Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with l=1 have been derived, and analytical propagation expressions for the kurtosis parameters of a Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with l=1 through a paraxial and real ABCD optical system have also been presented. The M² factor is determined by the parameters a and b and decreases with increasing the parameter a or b. The M² factor is validated to be larger than 2. The kurtosis parameters depend on the diffraction-free ranges of the Lorentz part, the parameters a and b, and the ratio A/B. The kurtosis parameters of a Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam propagating in free space are demonstrated in different reference planes. In the far field, the kurtosis parameter K decreases with increasing one of the parameters a and b. Upon propagation, the kurtosis parameter K first decreases, then increases, and finally tends to a saturated value. In any case, the kurtosis parameter K is larger than 2. This research is beneficial to optical trapping, guiding, and manipulation of microscopic particles and atoms using Lorentz-Gauss vortex beams.

  11. A Modified Gauss-Jordan Procedure as an Alternative to Iterative Procedures in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, John T.; Kittleson, Howard M.

    Correlation matrices involving linear dependencies are common in educational research. In such matrices, there is no unique solution for the multiple regression coefficients. Although computer programs using iterative techniques are used to overcome this problem, these techniques possess certain disadvantages. Accordingly, a modified Gauss-Jordan…

  12. A Simple Gauss-Newton Procedure for Covariance Structure Analysis with High-Level Computer Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudeck, Robert; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An implementation of the Gauss-Newton algorithm for the analysis of covariance structure that is specifically adapted for high-level computer languages is reviewed. This simple method for estimating structural equation models is useful for a variety of standard models, as is illustrated. (SLD)

  13. Generation of J0-Bessel-Gauss beam by a heterogeneous refractive index map.

    PubMed

    San-Roman-Alerigi, Damian P; Ng, Tien K; Zhang, Yaping; Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Ooi, Boon S

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical studies of a refractive index map to implement a Gauss to a J(0)-Bessel-Gauss convertor. We theoretically demonstrate the viability of a device that could be fabricated on a Si/Si(1-y)O(y)/Si(1-x-y)Ge(x)C(y) platform or by photo-refractive media. The proposed device is 200 μm in length and 25 μm in width, and its refractive index varies in controllable steps across the light propagation and transversal directions. The computed conversion efficiency and loss are 90%, and -0.457 dB, respectively. The theoretical results, obtained from the beam conversion efficiency, self-regeneration, and propagation through an opaque obstruction, demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) graded index map of the refractive index can be used to transform a Gauss beam into a J(0)-Bessel-Gauss beam. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such beam transformation by means of a 2D index-mapping that is fully integrable in silicon photonics based planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). The concept device is significant for the eventual development of a new array of technologies, such as micro optical tweezers, optical traps, beam reshaping and nonlinear beam diode lasers.

  14. Exact vs. Gauss-Seidel numerical solutions of the non-LTE radiation transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Carine; Paletou, Frédéric; Chevallier, Loïc

    2004-12-01

    Although published in 1995 (Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho, ApJ 455, 646), the Gauss-Seidel method for solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem has deserved too little attention in the astrophysical community yet. Further tests of the performances and of the accuracy of the numerical scheme are provided.

  15. Goos-Hanchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts for Hermite-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Chandra; Ranganathan, D

    2012-07-01

    We study the lateral Goos-Hanchen and the transverse Imbert-Fedorov shift produced during the reflection of Hermite-Gauss beams H(m0) or H(0m) at a plane interface. The vector angular spectrum method for a light beam in terms of a two-form angular spectrum consisting of the two orthogonal polarized components was used. We have carried out a detailed numerical calculation of these shifts at different angles of incidence, over the whole range of incidence without making the usual approximations. The shift variation as a function of refractive index and order of the Hermite-Gauss beam is studied. We also compare the shift variations with the orientation of the lobes of the Hermite-Gauss beam. We observed that the shifts are nearly equal for the two cases H(m0) (lobe oriented in the plane of incidence) and H(0m) (lobe oriented perpendicular to plane of incidence). These are the first quantitative estimates of the shifts for Hermite-Gauss beams as per our knowledge and are relevant for all cases of slab geometry.

  16. The Effects of Repeated Testing, Simulated Malingering, and Traumatic Brain Injury on High-Precision Measures of Simple Visual Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Simple reaction time (SRT), the latency to respond to a stimulus, has been widely used as a basic measure of processing speed. In the current experiments, we examined clinically-relevant properties of a new SRT test that presents visual stimuli to the left or right hemifield at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 examined test-retest reliability in 48 participants who underwent three test sessions at weekly intervals. In the first test, log-transformed (log-SRT) z-scores, corrected for the influence of age and computer-use, were well predicted by regression functions derived from a normative population of 189 control participants. Test-retest reliability of log-SRT z-scores was measured with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.83) and equaled or exceeded those of other SRT tests and other widely used tests of processing speed that are administered manually. No significant learning effects were observed across test sessions. Experiment 2 investigated the same participants when instructed to malinger during a fourth testing session: 94% showed abnormal log-SRT z-scores, with 83% producing log-SRT z-scores exceeding a cutoff of 3.0, a degree of abnormality never seen in full-effort conditions. Thus, a log-SRT z-score cutoff of 3.0 had a sensitivity (83%) and specificity (100%) that equaled or exceeded that of existing symptom validity tests. We argue that even expert malingerers, fully informed of the malingering-detection metric, would be unable to successfully feign impairments on the SRT test because of the precise control of SRT latencies that would be required. Experiment 3 investigated 26 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) tested more than 1 year post-injury. The 22 patients with mild TBI showed insignificantly faster SRTs than controls, but a small group of four patients with severe TBI showed slowed SRTs. Simple visual reaction time is a reliable measure of processing speed that is sensitive to the effects of malingering

  17. Construction and Operation of a High-Speed, High-Precision Eye Tracker for Tight Stimulus Synchronization and Real-Time Gaze Monitoring in Human and Animal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Farivar, Reza; Michaud-Landry, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the fast and precise movements of the eye—critical to many vision, oculomotor, and animal behavior studies—can be made non-invasively by video oculography. The protocol here describes the construction and operation of a research-grade video oculography system with ~0.1° precision over the full typical viewing range at over 450 Hz with tight synchronization with stimulus onset. The protocol consists of three stages: (1) system assembly, (2) calibration for both cooperative, and for minimally cooperative subjects (e.g., animals or infants), and (3) gaze monitoring and recording. PMID:27683545

  18. Comparisons between real and complex Gauss wavelet transform methods of three-dimensional shape reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Dan, Youquan; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) introduces an expandable spatial and frequency window which can overcome the inferiority of localization characteristic in Fourier transform and windowed Fourier transform. The CWT method is widely applied in the non-stationary signal analysis field including optical 3D shape reconstruction with remarkable performance. In optical 3D surface measurement, the performance of CWT for optical fringe pattern phase reconstruction usually depends on the choice of wavelet function. A large kind of wavelet functions of CWT, such as Mexican Hat wavelet, Morlet wavelet, DOG wavelet, Gabor wavelet and so on, can be generated from Gauss wavelet function. However, so far, application of the Gauss wavelet transform (GWT) method (i.e. CWT with Gauss wavelet function) in optical profilometry is few reported. In this paper, the method using GWT for optical fringe pattern phase reconstruction is presented first and the comparisons between real and complex GWT methods are discussed in detail. The examples of numerical simulations are also given and analyzed. The results show that both the real GWT method along with a Hilbert transform and the complex GWT method can realize three-dimensional surface reconstruction; and the performance of reconstruction generally depends on the frequency domain appearance of Gauss wavelet functions. For the case of optical fringe pattern of large phase variation with position, the performance of real GWT is better than that of complex one due to complex Gauss series wavelets existing frequency sidelobes. Finally, the experiments are carried out and the experimental results agree well with our theoretical analysis.

  19. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  20. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  1. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  2. Precise timing of deglacial tropical warming and humidification in the Timor Sea vs Antarctic warming and global atmospheric CO2 rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Grootes, P. M.; Holbourn, A.; Kuhnt, W.

    2009-04-01

    The centennial-scale phasing of climate events in the ocean, cryo-, and atmosphere provides crucial new insights into causal linkages that have controlled the events of global climate change during the last deglacial. During Termination Ia, a first significant sea level rise occurred as early as 19.4-18.7 ka (Hanebuth et al., 2008), a first Antarctic warming followed only 18.0/17.8 to 14.7 ka (Kawamura et al., 2007), a minor atmospheric CO2 rise after 17.5 ka, and a major rise at 16.7-14.5 ka (Monnin et al., 2001). Major progress in the precise age control of associated marine climate events resulted from accepting the results of the 14C plateau-tuning method (Sarnthein et al., 2007). Accordingly, 14C reservoir ages of surface waters revealed strong temporal and spatial changes for different parts of the ocean in contrast to the previously assumed constant modern global average of 400 yr. New plateau-tuning based age estimates from the Timor Sea (Core MD01-2378) exhibit a decrease in surface water ages from >2200 yr prior to 16 ka to 410 yr subsequent to 15 ka, thus providing a much improved basis for radiocarbon-based age control of deglacial events in tropical paleoceanography. Accordingly, the benthic delta18O record of deglacial ice melt and intermediate-water warming (near 1700 m w.d.) indeed reflects a first minor response to Antarctic warming after 17.8 ka, a major response, however, only from 17.0-14.4 ka. Likewise, major sea surface warming started almost 1000 yr after Antarctic warming, at 17 ka, almost coeval with the major deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. In part, this warming may reflect a cease in the upwelling of intermediate waters along the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean, which is documented by a coeval major increase in the Mg/Ca-based temperature gradient between surface and thermocline waters and a halving of (chlorine) productivity at 16.8-16.5 ka, moreover, by the strong decrease in surface water reservoir ages, starting with 800 yr

  3. On static black holes solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with topology [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Dadhich, Naresh; Pons, Josep M

    We study static black hole solutions in Einstein and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with the topology of the product of two spheres, [Formula: see text], in higher dimensions. There is an unusual new feature of the Gauss-Bonnet black hole: the avoidance of a non-central naked singularity prescribes a mass range for the black hole in terms of [Formula: see text]. For an Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black hole a limited window of negative values for [Formula: see text] is also permitted. This topology encompasses black strings, branes, and generalized Nariai metrics. We also give new solutions with the product of two spheres of constant curvature.

  4. Numerical Algorithms for Precise and Efficient Orbit Propagation and Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Ben K.

    Motivated by the growing space catalog and the demands for precise orbit determination with shorter latency for science and reconnaissance missions, this research improves the computational performance of orbit propagation through more efficient and precise numerical integration and frame transformation implementations. Propagation of satellite orbits is required for astrodynamics applications including mission design, orbit determination in support of operations and payload data analysis, and conjunction assessment. Each of these applications has somewhat different requirements in terms of accuracy, precision, latency, and computational load. This dissertation develops procedures to achieve various levels of accuracy while minimizing computational cost for diverse orbit determination applications. This is done by addressing two aspects of orbit determination: (1) numerical integration used for orbit propagation and (2) precise frame transformations necessary for force model evaluation and station coordinate rotations. This dissertation describes a recently developed method for numerical integration, dubbed Bandlimited Collocation Implicit Runge-Kutta (BLC-IRK), and compare its efficiency in propagating orbits to existing techniques commonly used in astrodynamics. The BLC-IRK scheme uses generalized Gaussian quadratures for bandlimited functions. It requires significantly fewer force function evaluations than explicit Runge-Kutta schemes and approaches the efficiency of the 8th-order Gauss-Jackson multistep method. Converting between the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) and International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) is necessary for many applications in astrodynamics, such as orbit propagation, orbit determination, and analyzing geoscience data from satellite missions. This dissertation provides simplifications to the Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO) transformation scheme and Earth orientation parameter (EOP) storage for use in positioning and

  5. Hybrid solution of stochastic optimal control problems using Gauss pseudospectral method and generalized polynomial chaos algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrill, Gerald C.

    A hybrid numerical algorithm combining the Gauss Pseudospectral Method (GPM) with a Generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) method to solve nonlinear stochastic optimal control problems with constraint uncertainties is presented. TheGPM and gPC have been shown to be spectrally accurate numerical methods for solving deterministic optimal control problems and stochastic differential equations, respectively. The gPC uses collocation nodes to sample the random space, which are then inserted into the differential equations and solved by applying standard differential equation methods. The resulting set of deterministic solutions is used to characterize the distribution of the solution by constructing a polynomial representation of the output as a function of uncertain parameters. Optimal control problems are especially challenging to solve since they often include path constraints, bounded controls, boundary conditions, and require solutions that minimize a cost functional. Adding random parameters can make these problems even more challenging. The hybrid algorithm presented in this dissertation is the first time the GPM and gPC algorithms have been combined to solve optimal control problems with random parameters. Using the GPM in the gPC construct provides minimum cost deterministic solutions used in stochastic computations that meet path, control, and boundary constraints, thus extending current gPC methods to be applicable to stochastic optimal control problems. The hybrid GPM-gPC algorithm was applied to two concept demonstration problems: a nonlinear optimal control problem with multiplicative uncertain elements and a trajectory optimization problem simulating an aircraft flying through a threat field where exact locations of the threats are unknown. The results show that the expected value, variance, and covariance statistics of the polynomial output function approximations of the state, control, cost, and terminal time variables agree with Monte-Carlo simulation

  6. Precision optical navigation guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubov, D.; McCormick, K.; Nolan, P.; Johnson, D.; Dellosa, M.; Volfson, L.; Fallahpour, A.; Willner, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the new precision optical navigation guidance system approach that provides continuous, high quality range and bearing data to fixed wing aircraft during landing approach to an aircraft carrier. The system uses infrared optical communications to measure range between ship and aircraft with accuracy and precision better than 1 meter at ranges more than 7.5 km. The innovative receiver design measures bearing from aircraft to ship with accuracy and precision better than 0.5 mRad. The system provides real-time range and bearing updates to multiple aircraft at rates up to several kHz, and duplex data transmission between ship and aircraft.

  7. Higher-dimensional thin-shell wormholes in Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Halilsoy, M.; Amirabi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    We present thin-shell wormhole solutions in the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet (EYMGB) theory in higher dimensions d >= 5. Exact black hole solutions are employed for this purpose where the radius of the thin shell lies outside the event horizon. For some reasons the cases d = 5 and d > 5 are treated separately. The surface energy-momentum of the thin shell creates surface pressures to resist against collapse and rendering stable wormholes possible. We test the stability of the wormholes against spherical perturbations through a linear energy-pressure relation and plot stability regions. Apart from this restricted stability we investigate the possibility of normal (i.e. non-exotic) matter which satisfies the energy conditions. For negative values of the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) parameter we obtain such physical wormholes.

  8. BV weak solutions to Gauss-Codazzi system for isometric immersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoforou, Cleopatra

    The isometric immersion problem for surfaces embedded into R is studied via the fluid dynamic framework introduced in Chen et al. (2010) [6] as a system of balance laws of mixed-type. The techniques developed in the theory of weak solutions of bounded variation in continuum physics are employed to deal with the isometric immersions in the setting of differential geometry. The so-called BV framework is formed that establishes convergence of approximate solutions of bounded variation to the Gauss-Codazzi system and yields the C isometric realization of two-dimensional surfaces into R. Local and global existence results are established for weak solutions of small bounded variation to the Gauss-Codazzi system for negatively curved surfaces that admit equilibrium configurations. As an application, the case of catenoidal shell of revolution is provided.

  9. Modified teleparallel theories of gravity: Gauss-Bonnet and trace extensions.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Böhmer, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate modified theories of gravity in the context of teleparallel geometries with possible Gauss-Bonnet contributions. The possible coupling of gravity with the trace of the energy-momentum tensor is also taken into account. This is motivated by the various different theories formulated in the teleparallel approach and the metric approach without discussing the exact relationship between them. Our formulation clarifies the connections between different well-known theories. For instance, we are able to formulate the correct teleparallel equivalent of Gauss-Bonnet modified general relativity, amongst other results. Finally, we are able to identify modified gravity models which have not been studied in the past. These appear naturally within our setup and would make a interesting starting point for further studies.

  10. Gauss-Bonnet black holes and holographic heat engines beyond large N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clifford V.

    2016-11-01

    Working in the extended black hole thermodynamics where a dynamical cosmological constant defines a thermodynamic pressure p, we study the efficiency of heat engines that perform mechanical work via the pdV terms now present in the First Law. Here the black hole itself is the working substance, and we focus on a judiciously chosen engine cycle. We work in Gauss-Bonnet-Einstein-Maxwell gravity with negative cosmological constant and, using a high temperature expansion, compare the results for these ‘holographic’ heat engines to that of previously studied cases with no Gauss-Bonnet sector. From the dual holographic large N field theory perspective, this amounts to studying the effects of a class of 1/N corrections to the efficiency of the cycle.

  11. Rms characterization of Bessel Gauss beams: Correspondence between polar and Cartesian representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Gay, David; Piché, Michel

    2006-09-01

    A recent analysis [G. Rousseau, D. Gay and M. Piché, One-dimensional description of cylindrically symmetric laser beams: application to Bessel-type nondiffracting beams, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 22 (2005) 1274] has shown that any cylindrically symmetric laser beam can be synthesized from a single wave called a constituent wave. This representation allows the introduction of one-dimensional Cartesian root-mean-square (rms) parameters to describe the conical structure of cylindrically symmetric laser beams. In this paper, we compare the rms characterization of Bessel-Gauss beams in polar coordinates with that of their respective constituent waves in Cartesian coordinates. Numerical results reveal an asymptotic correspondence between polar and Cartesian rms parameters of Bessel-Gauss beams propagating in a nondiffracting regime. Such a correspondence eliminates misleading interpretations about the propagation factor and the Rayleigh range of nondiffracting Bessel-type beams characterized in terms of polar rms parameters.

  12. Phase transition for black holes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimphun, Sunly; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo

    2016-11-01

    We study the thermodynamic properties of a black hole and the Hawking-Page phase transition in the asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime in the dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravitation. We show how the higher-order curvature terms can influence both the thermodynamic properties and the phase transition. We evaluate both heat capacity and free energy difference to determine the local and global thermodynamic stabilities, respectively. We find that the phase transition occurs from the thermal anti-de Sitter to a small spherical black hole geometry and occurs to a hyperbolic black hole geometry in the (dilatonic) Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory of gravitation unlike those in Einstein's theory of gravitation.

  13. Magnetic fields greater than 10 to the 20th power gauss. [in astrophysical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Schramm, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Zaumen (1976) found that spontaneous pair production in a uniform magnetic field should be a feasible process for field strengths at least of the order of 10 to the 20th power gauss. This note points out that a magnetic field of this order of magnitude is most unlikely to occur in realistic astrophysical situations because of the large dynamical and quantum-mechanical effects such a field would produce. It is suggested that Zaumen's calculation would probably have little bearing on the suspected evolution of astrophysical systems since other processes (either dynamical or quantum-mechanical) apparently limit the field strength before such high magnetic fields would be reached. An upper limit of about 10 to the 16th power gauss is obtained by considering the isotropy of the 3-K blackbody radiation, the formation of collapsed objects in very high magnetic fields, and magnetic bremsstrahlung processes in quantum electrodynamics.

  14. Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of entangled Hermite-Gauss modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingwen; Prabhakar, Shashi; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Roux, Filippus S.; Karimi, Ebrahim; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference is demonstrated experimentally for entangled photon pairs in the Hermite-Gauss (HG) basis. We use two Dove prisms in one of the paths of the photons to manipulate the entangled quantum state that enters the HOM interferometer. It is demonstrated that, when entangled photon pairs are in a symmetric Bell state in the Laguerre-Gauss (LG) basis, they will remain symmetric after decomposing them into the HG basis, thereby resulting in no coincidence events after the HOM interference. On the other hand, if the photon pairs are in an antisymmetric Bell state in the LG basis, then they will also be antisymmetric in the HG basis, thereby producing only coincidence events as a result of the HOM interference.

  15. Area functional relation for 5D-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-08-01

    We present area (or entropy) functional relation for multi-horizons five dimensional (5D) Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole. It has been observed by exact and explicit calculation that some complicated function of two or three horizons area is mass-independent whereas the entropy product relation is not mass-independent. We also study the local thermodynamic stability of this black hole. The phase transition occurs at certain condition. Smarr mass formula and first law of thermodynamics have been derived. This mass-independent relation suggests they could turn out to be an universal quantity and further helps us to understanding the nature of black hole entropy (both interior and exterior) at the microscopic level. In the "Appendix", we have derived the thermodynamic products for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet black hole with vanishing cosmological constant.

  16. The Evaluation of the Error Term in Some Gauss-Type Formulae for the Approximation of Cauchy Principal Value Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H. V.

    2008-01-01

    A method is derived for the numerical evaluation of the error term arising in some Gauss-type formulae modified so as to approximate Cauchy Principal Value integrals. The method uses Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. Numerical solution of first order initial value problem using 7-stage tenth order Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto IIIA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Teh Yuan; Yaacob, Nazeeruddin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new implicit Runge-Kutta method which based on a 7-point Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto quadrature formula is developed. The resulting implicit method is a 7-stage tenth order Gauss-Kronrod-Lobatto IIIA method, or in brief as GKLM(7,10)-IIIA. GKLM(7,10)-IIIA requires seven function of evaluations at each integration step and it gives accuracy of order ten. In addition, GKLM(7,10)-IIIA has stage order seven and being A-stable. Numerical experiments compare the accuracy between GKLM(7,10)-IIIA and the classical 5-stage tenth order Gauss-Legendre method in solving some test problems. Numerical results reveal that GKLM(7,10)-IIIA is more accurate than the 5-stage tenth order Gauss-Legendre method because GKLM(7,10)-IIIA has higher stage order.

  18. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in a progressive and standing zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Marston, Philip L

    2017-04-01

    By means of series expansion theory, the incident quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam is expanded using spherical harmonic functions, and the beam coefficients of the quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam are calculated. According to the theory, the acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy on a unit cross-sectional surface on a sphere made of diverse materials and immersed in an ideal fluid along the propagation axis of zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss progressive and standing beams, is investigated. The acoustic radiation force function is calculated as a function of the spherical radius parameter ka and the half-cone angle β with different beam widths in a progressive and standing zero-order Bessel-Gauss beam. Simulation results indicate that the acoustic radiation forces with different waist radii demonstrate remarkably different features from those found in previous studies. The results are expected to be useful in potential applications such as acoustic tweezers.

  19. Numerical solution of first order initial value problem using 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Teh Yuan; Yaacob, Nazeeruddin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new implicit Runge-Kutta method which based on a 4-point Gauss-Kronrod-Radau II quadrature formula is developed. The resulting implicit method is a 4-stage sixth order Gauss-Kronrod-Radau IIA method, or in brief as GKRM(4,6)-IIA. GKRM(4,6)-IIA requires four function of evaluations at each integration step and it gives accuracy of order six. In addition, GKRM(4,6)-IIA has stage order four and being L-stable. Numerical experiments compare the accuracy between GKRM(4,6)-IIA and the classical 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method in solving some test problems. Numerical results reveal that GKRM(4,6)-IIA is more accurate than the 3-stage sixth order Gauss-Legendre method because GKRM(4,6)-IIA has higher stage order.

  20. On the Chern-Gauss-Bonnet theorem for the noncommutative 4-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Wilson, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    We construct a differential calculus over the noncommutative 4-sphere in the framework of pseudo-Riemannian calculi, and show that for every metric in a conformal class of perturbations of the round metric, there exists a unique metric and torsion-free connection. Furthermore, we find a localization of the projective module corresponding to the space of vector fields, which allows us to formulate a Chern-Gauss-Bonnet type theorem for the noncommutative 4-sphere.

  1. Rotation of large asymmetrical absorbing objects by Laguerre-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Herne, Catherine M; Capuzzi, Kristina M; Sobel, Emily; Kropas, Ryan T

    2015-09-01

    In this Letter, we show the manipulation and rotation of opaque graphite through adhesion with optically trapped polystyrene spheres. The absorbing graphite is rotated by the orbital angular momentum transfer from a Laguerre-Gauss laser mode and is trapped due to the presence of refracting spheres. This technique is effective for trapping and rotating absorbing objects of all sizes, including those larger than the laser mode.

  2. The nature of singularity in multidimensional anisotropic Gauss-Bonnet cosmology with a perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnos, I. V.; Makarenko, A. N.; Pavluchenko, S. A.; Toporensky, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate dynamics of (4 + 1) and (5 + 1) dimensional flat anisotropic Universe filled with a perfect fluid in the Gauss-Bonnet gravity. An analytical solutions valid for particular values of the equation of state parameter w = 1/3 have been found. For other values of w structure of cosmological singularity have been studied numerically. We found that for w > 1/3 the singularity is isotropic. Several important differences between (4 + 1) and (5 + 1) dimensional cases are discussed.

  3. Nonlinear parameter identification: Ballistic range experience applicable to flight testing. [using Gauss-Newton method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G.; Kirk, D.

    1974-01-01

    The parameter identification scheme being used is a differential correction least squares procedure (Gauss-Newton method). The position, orientation, and derivatives of these quantities with respect to the parameters of interest (i.e., sensitivity coefficients) are determined by digital integration of the equations of motion and the parametric differential equations. The application of this technique to three vastly different sets of data is used to illustrate the versatility of the method and to indicate some of the problems that still remain.

  4. Propagation Dynamics of Nonspreading Cosine-Gauss Water-Wave Pulses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-12-18

    Linear gravity water waves are highly dispersive; therefore, the spreading of initially short wave trains characterizes water surface waves, and is a universal property of a dispersive medium. Only if there is sufficient nonlinearity does this envelope admit solitary solutions which do not spread and remain in fixed forms. Here, in contrast to the nonlinear localized wave packets, we present both theoretically and experimentally a new type of linearly nondispersive water wave, having a cosine-Gauss envelope, as well as its higher-order Hermite cosine-Gauss variations. We show that these waves preserve their width despite the inherent dispersion while propagating in an 18-m wave tank, accompanied by a slowly varying carrier-envelope phase. These wave packets exhibit self-healing; i.e., they are restored after bypassing an obstacle. We further demonstrate that these nondispersive waves are robust to weakly nonlinear perturbations. In the strong nonlinear regime, symmetry breaking of these waves is observed, but their cosine-Gauss shapes are still approximately preserved during propagation.

  5. Slow-roll inflation with the Gauss-Bonnet and Chern-Simons corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Masaki

    2010-11-01

    We study slow-roll inflation with the Gauss-Bonnet and Chern-Simons corrections. We obtain general formulas for the observables: spectral indices, tensor-to-scalar ratio and circular polarization of gravitational waves. The Gauss-Bonnet term violates the consistency relation r = −8n{sub T}. Particularly, blue spectrum n{sub T} > 0 and scale invariant spectrum |8n{sub T}|/r << 1 of tensor modes are possible. These cases require the Gauss-Bonnet coupling function of ξ{sub ,φ} ∼ 10{sup 8}/M{sub Pl}. We use examples to show new-inflation-type potential with 10M{sub Pl} symmetry breaking scale and potential with flat region in φ∼>10M{sub Pl} lead to observationally consistent blue and scale invariant spectra, respectively. Hence, these interesting cases can actually be realized. The Chern-Simons term produce circularly polarized tensor modes. We show an observation of these signals supports existence of the Chern-Simons coupling function of ω{sub ,φ} ∼ 10{sup 8}/M{sub Pl}. Thus, with future observations, we can fix or constrain the value of these coupling functions, at the CMB scale.

  6. Steganalysis of content-adaptive JPEG steganography based on Gauss partial derivative filter bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Fenlin; Yang, Chunfang; Luo, Xiangyang; Song, Xiaofeng; Lu, Jicang

    2017-01-01

    A steganalysis feature extraction method based on Gauss partial derivative filter bank is proposed in this paper to improve the detection performance for content-adaptive JPEG steganography. Considering that the embedding changes of content-adaptive steganographic schemes are performed in the texture and edge regions, the proposed method generates filtered images comprising rich texture and edge information using Gauss partial derivative filter bank, and histograms of absolute values of filtered subimages are extracted as steganalysis features. Gauss partial derivative filter bank can represent texture and edge information in multiple orientations with less computation load than conventional methods and prevent redundancy in different filtered images. These two properties are beneficial in the extraction of low-complexity sensitive features. The results of experiments conducted on three selected modern JPEG steganographic schemes-uniform embedding distortion, JPEG universal wavelet relative distortion, and side-informed UNIWARD-indicate that the proposed feature set is superior to the prior art feature sets-discrete cosine transform residual, phase aware rich model, and Gabor filter residual.

  7. Wake Numerical Simulation Based on the Park-Gauss Model and Considering Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiangsheng; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Linlin; Zhu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new Park-Gauss model based on the assumption of the Park model and the Eddy-viscosity model is investigated to conduct the wake numerical simulation for solving a single wind turbine problem. The initial wake radius has been modified to improve the model’s numerical accuracy. Then the impact of the atmospheric stability based on the Park-Gauss model has been studied in the wake region. By the comparisons and the analyses of the test results, it turns out that the new Park-Gauss model could achieve better effects of the wind velocity simulation in the wake region. The wind velocity in the wake region recovers quickly under the unstable atmospheric condition provided the wind velocity is closest to the test result, and recovers slowly under stable atmospheric condition in case of the wind velocity is lower than the test result. Meanwhile, the wind velocity recovery falls in between the unstable and stable neutral atmospheric conditions.

  8. Propagation Dynamics of Nonspreading Cosine-Gauss Water-Wave Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shenhe; Tsur, Yuval; Zhou, Jianying; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2015-12-01

    Linear gravity water waves are highly dispersive; therefore, the spreading of initially short wave trains characterizes water surface waves, and is a universal property of a dispersive medium. Only if there is sufficient nonlinearity does this envelope admit solitary solutions which do not spread and remain in fixed forms. Here, in contrast to the nonlinear localized wave packets, we present both theoretically and experimentally a new type of linearly nondispersive water wave, having a cosine-Gauss envelope, as well as its higher-order Hermite cosine-Gauss variations. We show that these waves preserve their width despite the inherent dispersion while propagating in an 18-m wave tank, accompanied by a slowly varying carrier-envelope phase. These wave packets exhibit self-healing; i.e., they are restored after bypassing an obstacle. We further demonstrate that these nondispersive waves are robust to weakly nonlinear perturbations. In the strong nonlinear regime, symmetry breaking of these waves is observed, but their cosine-Gauss shapes are still approximately preserved during propagation.

  9. Asymptotically (anti)-de Sitter solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.

    2004-09-15

    In this paper I show that one can have asymptotically de Sitter, anti-de Sitter (AdS), and flat solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant term in field equations. First, I introduce static solutions whose three surfaces at fixed r and t have constant positive (k=1), negative (k=-1), or zero (k=0) curvature. I show that for k={+-}1 one can have asymptotically de Sitter, AdS, and flat spacetimes, while for the case of k=0, one has only asymptotically AdS solutions. Some of these solutions present naked singularities, while some others are black hole or topological black hole solutions. I also find that the geometrical mass of these five-dimensional spacetimes is m+2{alpha}|k|, which is different from the geometrical mass m of the solutions of Einstein gravity. This feature occurs only for the five-dimensional solutions, and is not repeated for the solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity in higher dimensions. Second, I add angular momentum to the static solutions with k=0, and introduce the asymptotically AdS charged rotating solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Finally, I introduce a class of solutions which yields an asymptotically AdS spacetime with a longitudinal magnetic field, which presents a naked singularity, and generalize it to the case of magnetic rotating solutions with two rotation parameters.

  10. State space orderings for Gauss-Seidel in Markov chains revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dayar, T.

    1996-12-31

    Symmetric state space orderings of a Markov chain may be used to reduce the magnitude of the subdominant eigenvalue of the (Gauss-Seidel) iteration matrix. Orderings that maximize the elemental mass or the number of nonzero elements in the dominant term of the Gauss-Seidel splitting (that is, the term approximating the coefficient matrix) do not necessarily converge faster. An ordering of a Markov chain that satisfies Property-R is semi-convergent. On the other hand, there are semi-convergent symmetric state space orderings that do not satisfy Property-R. For a given ordering, a simple approach for checking Property-R is shown. An algorithm that orders the states of a Markov chain so as to increase the likelihood of satisfying Property-R is presented. The computational complexity of the ordering algorithm is less than that of a single Gauss-Seidel iteration (for sparse matrices). In doing all this, the aim is to gain an insight for faster converging orderings. Results from a variety of applications improve the confidence in the algorithm.

  11. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  12. Gauss-Codazzi thermodynamics on the timelike screen

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, Federico

    2010-10-15

    It is a known result by Jacobson that the flux of energy matter through a local Rindler horizon is related with the expansion of the null generators in a way that mirrors the first law of thermodynamics. We extend such a result to a timelike screen of observers with finite acceleration. Since timelike curves have more freedom than null geodesics, the construction is more involved than Jacobson's and few geometrical constraints need to be imposed: the observers' acceleration has to be constant in time and everywhere orthogonal to the screen. Moreover, at any given time, the extrinsic curvature of the screen has to be flat. The latter requirement can be weakened by asking that the extrinsic curvature, if present at the beginning, evolves in time like on a cone and just rescales proportionally to the expansion.

  13. The uselessness of the Fast Gauss Transform for summing Gaussian radial basis function series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, John P.

    2010-02-01

    The Fast Gauss Transform is an algorithm for summing a series of Gaussians which is sometimes much faster than direct summation. Gaussian series in d dimensions are of the form ∑j=1N λjexp(-[α/h]2 ‖x-xj‖2) where the xj are the centers, h is the average separation between centers and α is the relative inverse width parameter. We show that the speed-up of the Fast Gauss Transform is bounded by a factor Ω(α). When α≪1, Ω can be large. However, when applied to Gaussian radial basis function interpolation, it is difficult to apply the Gaussian basis in this parameter range because the interpolation matrix is exponentially ill-conditioned: the condition number κ˜(1/2)exp{π2}/{4α2} for a uniform, one-dimensional grid, and larger still in two dimensions or when the grid is irregular. Furthermore, the Gaussian RBF interpolant is ill-conditioned for most series in the sense that the interpolant is the small difference of terms with exponentially large coefficients. Fornberg and Piret developed a "QR-basis" that ameliorates this difficulty for approximations on the surface of a sphere, but because the recombined basis functions are perturbed spherical harmonics, not Gaussians, the Fast Gauss Transform is no longer applicable. The solution of the interpolation matrix system by a preconditioned iteration is less sensitive to condition numbers than direct methods because iterations are self-correcting and also because the preconditioning reduces the spread of the eigenvalues. However, each iteration requires a matrix-vector multiply which is fast only if this operation can be performed by some species of Fast Summation. When α˜O(1), alas, we show that Ω is not large and the Fast Gauss Transform is not accelerative. Gaussian RBFs are unusual among RBF species through the absence of long-range interactions due to the exponential decay of the Gaussians with distance from their centers; many other RBF species do have long-range interactions, and it is well

  14. Complete gravity field of an ellipsoidal prism by Gauss-Legendre quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, C.; Verdun, J.; Cali, J.; Masson, F.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of geophysical models of the Earth's lithosphere and mantle has generated renewed interest in computation of theoretical gravity effects at global and regional scales. At the same time, the increasing availability of gravity gradient anomalies derived from satellite measurements, such as those provided by GOCE satellite, requires mathematical methods that directly model the gravity gradient anomalies in the same reference frame as GOCE gravity gradients. Our main purpose is to interpret these anomalies in terms of source and density distribution. Numerical integration methods for calculating gravity gradient values are generally based on a mass discretization obtained by decomposing the Earth's layers into a finite number of elementary solid bodies. In order to take into account the curvature of the Earth, spherical prisms or `tesseroids' have been established unequivocally as accurate computation tools for determining the gravitational effects of large-scale structures. The question which then arises from, is whether gravity calculation methods using spherical prisms remain valid when factoring in the ellipticity of the Earth. In the paper, we outline a comprehensive method to numerically compute the complete gravity field with the help of the Gauss-Legendre quadrature involving ellipsoidal shaped prisms. The assessment of this new method is conducted by comparison between the gravity gradient values of simple sources obtained by means of numerical and analytical calculations, respectively. A comparison of the gravity gradients obtained from PREM and LITHO1.0 models using spherical- and ellipsoidal-prism-based methods is also presented. Numerical results indicate that the error on gravity gradients, caused by the use of the spherical prism instead of its ellipsoidal counterpart to describe an ellipsoidally shaped Earth, is useful for a joint analysis with those deduced from GOCE satellite measurements. Provided that a suitable scaling

  15. Absolute High-Precision Localisation of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle by Using Real-Time Aerial Video Imagery for Geo-referenced Orthophoto Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Lars; Ax, Markus; Langer, Matthias; Nguyen van, Duong; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter

    This paper describes an absolute localisation method for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) if GPS is unavailable for the vehicle. The basic idea is to combine an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to the ground vehicle and use it as an external sensor platform to achieve an absolute localisation of the robotic team. Beside the discussion of the rather naive method directly using the GPS position of the aerial robot to deduce the ground robot's position the main focus of this paper lies on the indirect usage of the telemetry data of the aerial robot combined with live video images of an onboard camera to realise a registration of local video images with apriori registered orthophotos. This yields to a precise driftless absolute localisation of the unmanned ground vehicle. Experiments with our robotic team (AMOR and PSYCHE) successfully verify this approach.

  16. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  17. Precision targeting in guided munition using infrared sensor and millimeter wave radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulochana, Sreeja; Hablani, Hari B.; Arya, Hemendra

    2016-07-01

    Conventional munitions are not guided with sensors and therefore miss the target, particularly if the target is mobile. The miss distance of these munitions can be decreased by incorporating sensors to detect the target and guide the munition during flight. This paper is concerned with a precision guided munition equipped with an infrared (IR) sensor and a millimeter wave radar (MmW). Three-dimensional flight of the munition and its pitch and yaw motion models are developed and simulated. The forward and lateral motion of a target tank on the ground is modeled as two independent second-order Gauss-Markov processes. To estimate the target location on the ground and the line-of-sight (LOS) rate to intercept it, an extended Kalman filter is composed whose state vector consists of cascaded state vectors of missile dynamics and target dynamics. The LOS angle measurement from the IR seeker is by centroiding the target image in 40 Hz. The centroid estimation of the images in the focal plane is at a frequency of 10 Hz. Every 10 Hz, centroids of four consecutive images are averaged, yielding a time-averaged centroid, implying some measurement delay. The miss distance achieved by including image processing delays is 1.45 m.

  18. Precision targeting in guided munition using IR sensor and MmW radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, S.; Hablani, H. B.; Arya, H.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional munitions are not guided with sensors and therefore miss the target, particularly if the target is mobile. The miss distance of these munitions can be decreased by incorporating sensors to detect the target and guide the munition during flight. This paper is concerned with a Precision Guided Munition(PGM) equipped with an infrared sensor and a millimeter wave radar [IR and MmW, for short]. Three-dimensional flight of the munition and its pitch and yaw motion models are developed and simulated. The forward and lateral motion of a target tank on the ground is modeled as two independent second-order Gauss-Markov process. To estimate the target location on the ground and the line-of-sight rate to intercept it an Extended Kalman Filter is composed whose state vector consists of cascaded state vectors of missile dynamics and target dynamics. The line-of-sight angle measurement from the infrared seeker is by centroiding the target image in 40 Hz. The centroid estimation of the images in the focal plane is at a frequency of 10 Hz. Every 10 Hz, centroids of four consecutive images are averaged, yielding a time-averaged centroid, implying some measurement delay. The miss distance achieved by including by image processing delays is 1:45m.

  19. Precision agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a new farming practice that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision agriculture, but the central concept...

  20. Measurements of the temporal onset of mega-Gauss magnetic fields in a laser-driven solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyon, Clement; Polllock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. T.; Hazi, A.; Ross, J. S.; Mariscal, D. A.; Patankar, S.; Williams, G. J.; Farmer, W. A.; Moody, J. D.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental results obtained at Omega EP showing a nearly linear increase of the B-field up to about 2 mega-Gauss in 0.75 ns in a 1 mm3 region. The field is generated using 1 TW of 351 nm laser power ( 8*1015 W/cm2) incident on a laser-driven solenoid target. The coil target converts about 1% of the laser energy into the B-field measured both inside and outside the coil using proton deflectometry with a grid and Faraday rotation of probe beam through SiO2 glass. Proton data indicates a current rise up to hundreds of kA with a spatial distribution in the Au solenoid conductor evolving in time. These results give insight into the generating mechanism of the current between the plates and the time behavior of the field. These experiments are motivated by recent efforts to understand and utilize High Energy Density (HED) plasmas in the presence of external magnetic fields in areas of research from Astrophysics to Inertial Confinement Fusion. We will describe the experimental results and scale them to a NIF hohlraum size. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.