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Sample records for gaussianized blackwell-rao estimator

  1. Cosmic Microwave Background Likelihood Approximation by a Gaussianized Blackwell-Rao Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudjord, Ø.; Groeneboom, N. E.; Eriksen, H. K.; Huey, Greg; Górski, K. M.; Jewell, J. B.

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a new cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature likelihood approximation called the Gaussianized Blackwell-Rao estimator. This estimator is derived by transforming the observed marginal power spectrum distributions obtained by the CMB Gibbs sampler into standard univariate Gaussians, and then approximating their joint transformed distribution by a multivariate Gaussian. The method is exact for full-sky coverage and uniform noise and an excellent approximation for sky cuts and scanning patterns relevant for modern satellite experiments such as the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck. The result is a stable, accurate, and computationally very efficient CMB temperature likelihood representation that allows the user to exploit the unique error propagation capabilities of the Gibbs sampler to high ells. A single evaluation of this estimator between ell = 2 and 200 takes ~0.2 CPU milliseconds, while for comparison, a singe pixel space likelihood evaluation between ell = 2 and 30 for a map with ~2500 pixels requires ~20 s. We apply this tool to the five-year WMAP temperature data, and re-estimate the angular temperature power spectrum, C ell, and likelihood, L(C_{ℓ}), for ell <= 200, and derive new cosmological parameters for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model. Our spectrum is in excellent agreement with the official WMAP spectrum, but we find slight differences in the derived cosmological parameters. Most importantly, the spectral index of scalar perturbations is ns = 0.973 ± 0.014, 1.9σ away from unity and 0.6σ higher than the official WMAP result, ns = 0.965 ± 0.014. This suggests that an exact likelihood treatment is required to higher ells than previously believed, reinforcing and extending our conclusions from the three-year WMAP analysis. In that case, we found that the suboptimal likelihood approximation adopted between ell = 12 and 30 by the WMAP team biased ns low by 0.4σ, while here we find that the same

  2. Cosmological parameter constraints via Gibbs sampling and the Blackwell-Rao estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, I.-Wen Mike

    We study the Blackwell-Rao (BR) estimator of the probability distribution of the angular power spectrum, P ( C [cursive l] | d ), generated via Gibbs sampling of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data. From simulated samples of full-sky no-noise CMB maps, we find the estimator to be very fast and also highly accurate. We also find that the number of samples required for convergence of the BR estimate rises rapidly with increasing [cursive l], at least at low [cursive l]. Our existing sample chains as applied to the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe (WMAP) data are only long enough to achieve convergence at [cursive l] [Special characters omitted.] 40. In comparison with P ( C [cursive l] | d ) as reported by the WMAP team we find significant differences at these low [cursive l] values. These differences lead to up to ~ 0.5 s shifts in the estimates of parameters in a 7-parameter LCDM model with non-zero d n s /d ln k , the running in the spectral index. Fixing d n s /dln k = 0 makes these shifts much less significant. Unlike existing analytic approximations, the BR estimator can be straightforwardly extended for the case of power spectra from correlated fields, such as temperature and polarization. We discuss challenges to extending the procedure to higher [cursive l] and provide some solutions.

  3. Homodyne estimation of Gaussian quantum discord.

    PubMed

    Blandino, Rémi; Genoni, Marco G; Etesse, Jean; Barbieri, Marco; Paris, Matteo G A; Grangier, Philippe; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa

    2012-11-02

    We address the experimental estimation of Gaussian quantum discord for a two-mode squeezed thermal state, and demonstrate a measurement scheme based on a pair of homodyne detectors assisted by Bayesian analysis, which provides nearly optimal estimation for small value of discord. In addition, though homodyne detection is not optimal for Gaussian discord, the noise ratio to the ultimate quantum limit, as dictated by the quantum Cramer-Rao bound, is limited to about 10 dB.

  4. Estimating Mutual Information by Local Gaussian Approximation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    any one-dimensional kernel function . Then the Local Gaussian Density Estimator, or LGDE, of f(x) is given by f̂ (x) = Nd (x;µ(x),Σ(x)) , (6) Here µ,Σ...term in the right hand side of Eq. 8 is the local- ized version of Gaussian log-likelihood. One can see that without the kernel function , Eq. 8 becomes...similar to the global log-likelihood function of the Gaussian parametric family. However, since we do not have sufficient infor- mation to specify a

  5. Modified Gaussian estimation for correlated binary data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemao; Paul, Sudhir

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a Gaussian estimation (GE) procedure to estimate the parameters of a regression model for correlated (longitudinal) binary response data using a working correlation matrix. A two-step iterative procedure is proposed for estimating the regression parameters by the GE method and the correlation parameters by the method of moments. Consistency properties of the estimators are discussed. A simulation study was conducted to compare 11 estimators of the regression parameters, namely, four versions of the GE, five versions of the generalized estimating equations (GEEs), and two versions of the weighted GEE. Simulations show that (i) the Gaussian estimates have the smallest mean square error and best coverage probability if the working correlation structure is correctly specified and (ii) when the working correlation structure is correctly specified, the GE and the GEE with exchangeable correlation structure perform best as opposed to when the correlation structure is misspecified. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Nonparametric estimation of stochastic differential equations with sparse Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Constantino A.; Otero, Abraham; Félix, Paulo; Presedo, Jesús; Márquez, David G.

    2017-08-01

    The application of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) to the analysis of temporal data has attracted increasing attention, due to their ability to describe complex dynamics with physically interpretable equations. In this paper, we introduce a nonparametric method for estimating the drift and diffusion terms of SDEs from a densely observed discrete time series. The use of Gaussian processes as priors permits working directly in a function-space view and thus the inference takes place directly in this space. To cope with the computational complexity that requires the use of Gaussian processes, a sparse Gaussian process approximation is provided. This approximation permits the efficient computation of predictions for the drift and diffusion terms by using a distribution over a small subset of pseudosamples. The proposed method has been validated using both simulated data and real data from economy and paleoclimatology. The application of the method to real data demonstrates its ability to capture the behavior of complex systems.

  7. Image estimation using doubly stochastic gaussian random field models.

    PubMed

    Woods, J W; Dravida, S; Mediavilla, R

    1987-02-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) doubly stochastic Gaussian (DSG) model was introduced by one of the authors to provide a complete model for spatial filters which adapt to the local structure in an image signal. Here we present the optimal estimator and 2-D fixed-lag smoother for this DSG model extending earlier work of Ackerson and Fu. As the optimal estimator has an exponentially growing state space, we investigate suboptimal estimators using both a tree and a decision-directed method. Experimental results are presented.

  8. Estimation of nonclassical independent Gaussian processes by classical interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, László; Filip, Radim

    2017-01-01

    We propose classical interferometry with low-intensity thermal radiation for the estimation of nonclassical independent Gaussian processes in material samples. We generally determine the mean square error of the phase-independent parameters of an unknown Gaussian process, considering a noisy source of radiation the phase of which is not locked to the pump of the process. We verify the sufficiency of passive optical elements in the interferometer, active optical elements do not improve the quality of the estimation. We also prove the robustness of the method against the noise and loss in both interferometric channels and the sample. The proposed method is suitable even for the case when a source of radiation sufficient for homodyne detection is not available. PMID:28051094

  9. Robust image reconstruction enhancement based on Gaussian mixture model estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Han, Xizhen; Wang, He; Liu, Bochao

    2016-03-01

    The low quality of an image is often characterized by low contrast and blurred edge details. Gradients have a direct relationship with image edge details. More specifically, the larger the gradients, the clearer the image details become. Robust image reconstruction enhancement based on Gaussian mixture model estimation is proposed here. First, image is transformed to its gradient domain, obtaining the gradient histogram. Second, the gradient histogram is estimated and extended using a Gaussian mixture model, and the predetermined function is constructed. Then, using histogram specification technology, the gradient field is enhanced with the constraint of the predetermined function. Finally, a matrix sine transform-based method is applied to reconstruct the enhanced image from the enhanced gradient field. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively enhance different types of images such as medical image, aerial image, and visible image, providing high-quality image information for high-level processing.

  10. Gaussian estimates on networks with dynamic stochastic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoni, Francesco; di Persio, Luca

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness for the solution to a stochastic reaction-diffusion equation, defined on a network, and subjected to nonlocal dynamic stochastic boundary conditions. The result is obtained by deriving a Gaussian-type estimate for the related leading semigroup, under rather mild regularity assumptions on the coefficients. An application of the latter to a stochastic optimal control problem on graphs, is also provided.

  11. Gaussian interferometric power and Black box estimation of Unruh temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-15

    We present a black box estimation paradigm of Unruh temperature in a relativistic bosonic continuous-variable setting. It is shown that the guaranteed precision for the estimation of Unruh temperature can be evaluated by the Gaussian interferometric power for a given probe state. We demonstrate that the amount of interferometric power is always beyond the entanglement type quantum correlations in a relativistic setting. It is found that due to the fact that Unruh radiation acts as a thermal bath on the probe system, it destroys available resources of the probe system and reduces the guaranteed precision of the estimation of Unruh temperature. We also find that the thermal noise induced by Unruh effect will generate interferometric power between accelerated Bob and his auxiliary partner anti-Bob, while it does not generate any correlation between inertial Alice and anti-Bob.

  12. Nonparametric autocovariance estimation from censored time series by Gaussian imputation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Genton, Marc G.; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most frequently used methods to model the autocovariance function of a second-order stationary time series is to use the parametric framework of autoregressive and moving average models developed by Box and Jenkins. However, such parametric models, though very flexible, may not always be adequate to model autocovariance functions with sharp changes. Furthermore, if the data do not follow the parametric model and are censored at a certain value, the estimation results may not be reliable. We develop a Gaussian imputation method to estimate an autocovariance structure via nonparametric estimation of the autocovariance function in order to address both censoring and incorrect model specification. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique in terms of bias and efficiency with simulations under various rates of censoring and underlying models. We describe its application to a time series of silicon concentrations in the Arctic. PMID:20072705

  13. pyGMMis: Mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, Peter; Goulding, Andy D.

    2016-11-01

    pyGMMis is a mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method that accounts for arbitrary incompleteness in the process that creates the samples as long as the incompleteness is known over the entire feature space and does not depend on the sample density (missing at random). pyGMMis uses the Expectation-Maximization procedure and generates its best guess of the unobserved samples on the fly. It can also incorporate an uniform "background" distribution as well as independent multivariate normal measurement errors for each of the observed samples, and then recovers an estimate of the error-free distribution from which both observed and unobserved samples are drawn. The code automatically segments the data into localized neighborhoods, and is capable of performing density estimation with millions of samples and thousands of model components on machines with sufficient memory.

  14. Gaussian interferometric power and Black box estimation of Unruh temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieci; Cao, Haixin; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-01

    We present a black box estimation paradigm of Unruh temperature in a relativistic bosonic continuous-variable setting. It is shown that the guaranteed precision for the estimation of Unruh temperature can be evaluated by the Gaussian interferometric power for a given probe state. We demonstrate that the amount of interferometric power is always beyond the entanglement type quantum correlations in a relativistic setting. It is found that due to the fact that Unruh radiation acts as a thermal bath on the probe system, it destroys available resources of the probe system and reduces the guaranteed precision of the estimation of Unruh temperature. We also find that the thermal noise induced by Unruh effect will generate interferometric power between accelerated Bob and his auxiliary partner anti-Bob, while it does not generate any correlation between inertial Alice and anti-Bob.

  15. Nonparametric autocovariance estimation from censored time series by Gaussian imputation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Genton, Marc G; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2009-02-01

    One of the most frequently used methods to model the autocovariance function of a second-order stationary time series is to use the parametric framework of autoregressive and moving average models developed by Box and Jenkins. However, such parametric models, though very flexible, may not always be adequate to model autocovariance functions with sharp changes. Furthermore, if the data do not follow the parametric model and are censored at a certain value, the estimation results may not be reliable. We develop a Gaussian imputation method to estimate an autocovariance structure via nonparametric estimation of the autocovariance function in order to address both censoring and incorrect model specification. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique in terms of bias and efficiency with simulations under various rates of censoring and underlying models. We describe its application to a time series of silicon concentrations in the Arctic.

  16. Spectrum-based kernel length estimation for Gaussian process classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Li, Chuan

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that Gaussian process (GP) classification, a discriminative supervised learning approach, has achieved competitive performance in real applications compared with most state-of-the-art supervised learning methods. However, the problem of automatic model selection in GP classification, involving the kernel function form and the corresponding parameter values (which are unknown in advance), remains a challenge. To make GP classification a more practical tool, this paper presents a novel spectrum analysis-based approach for model selection by refining the GP kernel function to match the given input data. Specifically, we target the problem of GP kernel length scale estimation. Spectrums are first calculated analytically from the kernel function itself using the autocorrelation theorem as well as being estimated numerically from the training data themselves. Then, the kernel length scale is automatically estimated by equating the two spectrum values, i.e., the kernel function spectrum equals to the estimated training data spectrum. Compared with the classical Bayesian method for kernel length scale estimation via maximizing the marginal likelihood (which is time consuming and could suffer from multiple local optima), extensive experimental results on various data sets show that our proposed method is both efficient and accurate.

  17. Gaussian Process Regression for Uncertainty Estimation on Ecosystem Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; Moffat, A.; Lasslop, G.; Reichstein, M.

    2011-12-01

    The flow of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is mainly driven by nonlinear, complex and time-lagged processes. Understanding the associated ecosystem responses and climatic feedbacks is a key challenge regarding climate change questions such as increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Usually, the underlying relationships are implemented in models as prescribed functions which interlink numerous meteorological, radiative and gas exchange variables. In contrast, supervised Machine Learning algorithms, such as Artificial Neural Networks or Gaussian Processes, allow for an insight into the relationships directly from a data perspective. Micrometeorological, high resolution measurements at flux towers of the FLUXNET observational network are an essential tool for obtaining quantifications of the ecosystem variables, as they continuously record e.g. CO2 exchange, solar radiation and air temperature. In order to facilitate the investigation of the interactions and feedbacks between these variables, several challenging data properties need to be taken into account: noisy, multidimensional and incomplete (Moffat, Accepted). The task of estimating uncertainties in such micrometeorological measurements can be addressed by Gaussian Processes (GPs), a modern nonparametric method for nonlinear regression. The GP approach has recently been shown to be a powerful modeling tool, regardless of the input dimensionality, the degree of nonlinearity and the noise level (Rasmussen and Williams, 2006). Heteroscedastic Gaussian Processes (HGPs) are a specialized GP method for data with a varying, inhomogeneous noise variance (Goldberg et al., 1998; Kersting et al., 2007), as usually observed in CO2 flux measurements (Richardson et al., 2006). Here, we showed by an evaluation of the HGP performance in several artificial experiments and a comparison to existing nonlinear regression methods, that their outstanding ability is to capture measurement noise levels, concurrently

  18. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric Δz = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute Δz = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ≤ zs ≤ 2 on the simulated data, and Δz = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  19. Searching for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using a combined estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Wuensche, C.A.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2014-01-01

    The extensive search for deviations from Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is very important due to the information about the very early moments of the universe encoded there. Recent analyses from Planck CMB data do not exclude the presence of non-Gaussianity of small amplitude, although they are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The use of different techniques is essential to provide information about types and amplitudes of non-Gaussianities in the CMB data. In particular, we find interesting to construct an estimator based upon the combination of two powerful statistical tools that appears to be sensitive enough to detect tiny deviations from Gaussianity in CMB maps. This estimator combines the Minkowski functionals with a Neural Network, maximizing a tool widely used to study non-Gaussian signals with a reinforcement of another tool designed to identify patterns in a data set. We test our estimator by analyzing simulated CMB maps contaminated with different amounts of local primordial non-Gaussianity quantified by the dimensionless parameter f{sub  NL}. We apply it to these sets of CMB maps and find ∼> 98% of chance of positive detection, even for small intensity local non-Gaussianity like f{sub  NL} = 38±18, the current limit from Planck data for large angular scales. Additionally, we test the suitability to distinguish between primary and secondary non-Gaussianities: first we train the Neural Network with two sets, one of nearly Gaussian CMB maps (|f{sub  NL}| ≤ 10) but contaminated with realistic inhomogeneous Planck noise (i.e., secondary non-Gaussianity) and the other of non-Gaussian CMB maps, that is, maps endowed with weak primordial non-Gaussianity (28 ≤ f{sub  NL} ≤ 48); after that we test an ensemble composed of CMB maps either with one of these non-Gaussian contaminations, and find out that our method successfully classifies ∼ 95% of the tested maps as being CMB maps containing primordial or

  20. Estimating Cortical Feature Maps with Dependent Gaussian Processes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicholas J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2017-10-01

    A striking example of brain organisation is the stereotyped arrangement of cell preferences in the visual cortex for edges of particular orientations in the visual image. These "orientation preference maps" appear to have remarkably consistent statistical properties across many species. However fine scale analysis of these properties requires the accurate reconstruction of maps from imaging data which is highly noisy. A new approach for solving this reconstruction problem is to use Bayesian Gaussian process methods, which produce more accurate results than classical techniques. However, so far this work has not considered the fact that maps for several other features of visual input coexist with the orientation preference map and that these maps have mutually dependent spatial arrangements. Here we extend the Gaussian process framework to the multiple output case, so that we can consider multiple maps simultaneously. We demonstrate that this improves reconstruction of multiple maps compared to both classical techniques and the single output approach, can encode the empirically observed relationships, and is easily extendible. This provides the first principled approach for studying the spatial relationships between feature maps in visual cortex.

  1. Improved estimator for non-Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Grin, Daniel; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-03-01

    An improved estimator for the amplitude fNL of local-type non-Gaussianity from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum is discussed. The standard estimator is constructed to be optimal in the zero-signal (i.e., Gaussian) limit. When applied to CMB maps which have a detectable level of non-Gaussianity the standard estimator is no longer optimal, possibly limiting the sensitivity of future observations to a non-Gaussian signal. Previous studies have proposed an improved estimator by using a realization-dependent normalization. Under the approximations of a flat sky and a vanishingly thin last-scattering surface, these studies showed that the variance of this improved estimator can be significantly smaller than the variance of the standard estimator when applied to non-Gaussian CMB maps. Here this technique is generalized to the full sky and to include the full radiation transfer function, yielding expressions for the improved estimator that can be directly applied to CMB maps. The ability of this estimator to reduce the variance as compared to the standard estimator in the face of a significant non-Gaussian signal is re-assessed using the full CMB transfer function. As a result of the late time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the performance of the improved estimator is degraded. If CMB maps are first cleaned of the late-time ISW effect using a tracer of foreground structure, such as a galaxy survey or a measurement of CMB weak lensing, the new estimator does remove a majority of the excess variance, allowing a higher significance detection of fNL.

  2. Divergences and estimating tight bounds on Bayes error with applications to multivariate Gaussian copula and latent Gaussian copula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Brian J.; Xique, Ismael J.; Burns, Joseph W.; Goley, G. Steven; Nolan, Adam R.; Benson, Jonathan W.

    2017-04-01

    In Bayesian decision theory, there has been a great amount of research into theoretical frameworks and information- theoretic quantities that can be used to provide lower and upper bounds for the Bayes error. These include well-known bounds such as Chernoff, Battacharrya, and J-divergence. Part of the challenge of utilizing these various metrics in practice is (i) whether they are "loose" or "tight" bounds, (ii) how they might be estimated via either parametric or non-parametric methods, and (iii) how accurate the estimates are for limited amounts of data. In general what is desired is a methodology for generating relatively tight lower and upper bounds, and then an approach to estimate these bounds efficiently from data. In this paper, we explore the so-called triangle divergence which has been around for a while, but was recently made more prominent in some recent research on non-parametric estimation of information metrics. Part of this work is motivated by applications for quantifying fundamental information content in SAR/LIDAR data, and to help in this, we have developed a flexible multivariate modeling framework based on multivariate Gaussian copula models which can be combined with the triangle divergence framework to quantify this information, and provide approximate bounds on Bayes error. In this paper we present an overview of the bounds, including those based on triangle divergence and verify that under a number of multivariate models, the upper and lower bounds derived from triangle divergence are significantly tighter than the other common bounds, and often times, dramatically so. We also propose some simple but effective means for computing the triangle divergence using Monte Carlo methods, and then discuss estimation of the triangle divergence from empirical data based on Gaussian Copula models.

  3. Parameter estimation in the presence of the most general Gaussian dissipative reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzyna, Marcin; Zwierz, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the performance of quantum parameter estimation in the presence of the most general Gaussian dissipative reservoir. We derive lower bounds on the precision of phase estimation and a closely related problem of frequency estimation. For both problems we show that it is impossible to achieve the Heisenberg limit asymptotically in the presence of such a reservoir. However, we also find that for any fixed number of probes used in the setup there exists a Gaussian dissipative reservoir, which, in principle, allows for the Heisenberg-limited performance for that number of probes. We discuss a realistic implementation of a frequency estimation scheme in the presence of a Gaussian dissipative reservoir in a cavity system.

  4. Gaussian estimation for discretely observed Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chao; Shu, Huisheng; Liu, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the parameter estimation problem for Cox-Ingersoll-Ross model based on discrete observation. First, a new discretized process is built based on the Euler-Maruyama scheme. Then, the parameter estimators are obtained by employing the maximum likelihood method and the explicit expressions of the error of estimation are given. Subsequently, the consistency property of all parameter estimators are proved by applying the law of large numbers for martingales, Holder's inequality, B-D-G inequality and Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Finally, a numerical simulation example for estimators and the absolute error between estimators and true values is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the estimation approach used in this paper.

  5. Stellar atmospheric parameter estimation using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Pan, Jingchang

    2015-02-01

    As is well known, it is necessary to derive stellar parameters from massive amounts of spectral data automatically and efficiently. However, in traditional automatic methods such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and kernel regression (KR), it is often difficult to optimize the algorithm structure and determine the optimal algorithm parameters. Gaussian process regression (GPR) is a recently developed method that has been proven to be capable of overcoming these difficulties. Here we apply GPR to derive stellar atmospheric parameters from spectra. Through evaluating the performance of GPR on Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, Medium resolution Isaac Newton Telescope Library of Empirical Spectra (MILES) spectra, ELODIE spectra and the spectra of member stars of galactic globular clusters, we conclude that GPR can derive stellar parameters accurately and precisely, especially when we use data preprocessed with principal component analysis (PCA). We then compare the performance of GPR with that of several widely used regression methods (ANNs, support-vector regression and KR) and find that with GPR it is easier to optimize structures and parameters and more efficient and accurate to extract atmospheric parameters.

  6. Adaptive channel estimation for soft decision decoding over non-Gaussian optical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jing-song; Miao, Tao-tao; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Huan-lin

    2016-10-01

    An adaptive priori likelihood ratio (LLR) estimation method is proposed over non-Gaussian channel in the intensity modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) optical communication systems. Using the nonparametric histogram and the weighted least square linear fitting in the tail regions, the LLR is estimated and used for the soft decision decoding of the low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. This method can adapt well to the three main kinds of intensity modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) optical channel, i.e., the chi-square channel, the Webb-Gaussian channel and the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The performance penalty of channel estimation is neglected.

  7. A Gaussian Model-Based Probabilistic Approach for Pulse Transit Time Estimation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probabilistic approach to pulse transit time (PTT) estimation using a Gaussian distribution model. It is motivated basically by the hypothesis that PTTs normalized by RR intervals follow the Gaussian distribution. To verify the hypothesis, we demonstrate the effects of arterial compliance on the normalized PTTs using the Moens-Korteweg equation. Furthermore, we observe a Gaussian distribution of the normalized PTTs on real data. In order to estimate the PTT using the hypothesis, we first assumed that R-waves in the electrocardiogram (ECG) can be correctly identified. The R-waves limit searching ranges to detect pulse peaks in the photoplethysmogram (PPG) and to synchronize the results with cardiac beats--i.e., the peaks of the PPG are extracted within the corresponding RR interval of the ECG as pulse peak candidates. Their probabilities of being the actual pulse peak are then calculated using a Gaussian probability function. The parameters of the Gaussian function are automatically updated when a new pulse peak is identified. This update makes the probability function adaptive to variations of cardiac cycles. Finally, the pulse peak is identified as the candidate with the highest probability. The proposed approach is tested on a database where ECG and PPG waveforms are collected simultaneously during the submaximal bicycle ergometer exercise test. The results are promising, suggesting that the method provides a simple but more accurate PTT estimation in real applications.

  8. Parametric Estimation from Approximate Data: Non-Gaussian Diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azencott, Robert; Ren, Peng; Timofeyev, Ilya

    2015-12-01

    We study the problem of parameters estimation in indirect observability contexts, where X_t in R^r is an unobservable stationary process parametrized by a vector of unknown parameters and all observable data are generated by an approximating process Y^{\\varepsilon }_t which is close to X_t in L^4 norm.We construct consistent parameter estimators which are smooth functions of the sub-sampled empirical mean and empirical lagged covariance matrices computed from the observable data. We derive explicit optimal sub-sampling schemes specifying the best paired choices of sub-sampling time-step and number of observations. We show that these choices ensure that our parameter estimators reach optimized asymptotic L^2-convergence rates, which are constant multiples of the L^4 norm || Y^{\\varepsilon }_t - X_t ||.

  9. EXACT MINIMAX ESTIMATION OF THE PREDICTIVE DENSITY IN SPARSE GAUSSIAN MODELS1

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Gourab; Johnstone, Iain M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider estimating the predictive density under Kullback–Leibler loss in an ℓ0 sparse Gaussian sequence model. Explicit expressions of the first order minimax risk along with its exact constant, asymptotically least favorable priors and optimal predictive density estimates are derived. Compared to the sparse recovery results involving point estimation of the normal mean, new decision theoretic phenomena are seen. Suboptimal performance of the class of plug-in density estimates reflects the predictive nature of the problem and optimal strategies need diversification of the future risk. We find that minimax optimal strategies lie outside the Gaussian family but can be constructed with threshold predictive density estimates. Novel minimax techniques involving simultaneous calibration of the sparsity adjustment and the risk diversification mechanisms are used to design optimal predictive density estimates. PMID:26448678

  10. EXACT MINIMAX ESTIMATION OF THE PREDICTIVE DENSITY IN SPARSE GAUSSIAN MODELS.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Gourab; Johnstone, Iain M

    We consider estimating the predictive density under Kullback-Leibler loss in an ℓ0 sparse Gaussian sequence model. Explicit expressions of the first order minimax risk along with its exact constant, asymptotically least favorable priors and optimal predictive density estimates are derived. Compared to the sparse recovery results involving point estimation of the normal mean, new decision theoretic phenomena are seen. Suboptimal performance of the class of plug-in density estimates reflects the predictive nature of the problem and optimal strategies need diversification of the future risk. We find that minimax optimal strategies lie outside the Gaussian family but can be constructed with threshold predictive density estimates. Novel minimax techniques involving simultaneous calibration of the sparsity adjustment and the risk diversification mechanisms are used to design optimal predictive density estimates.

  11. Solving inverse problems with piecewise linear estimators: from Gaussian mixture models to structured sparsity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoshen; Sapiro, Guillermo; Mallat, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A general framework for solving image inverse problems with piecewise linear estimations is introduced in this paper. The approach is based on Gaussian mixture models, which are estimated via a maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization algorithm. A dual mathematical interpretation of the proposed framework with a structured sparse estimation is described, which shows that the resulting piecewise linear estimate stabilizes the estimation when compared with traditional sparse inverse problem techniques. We demonstrate that, in a number of image inverse problems, including interpolation, zooming, and deblurring of narrow kernels, the same simple and computationally efficient algorithm yields results in the same ballpark as that of the state of the art.

  12. Weak measurement-based state estimation of Gaussian states of one-variable quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debmalya; Arvind

    2017-04-01

    We present a scheme to estimate Gaussian states of one-dimensional continuous variable systems, based on weak (unsharp) quantum measurements. The estimation of a Gaussian state requires us to find position (q), momentum (p) and their second order moments. We measure q weakly and follow it up with a projective measurement of p on half of the ensemble, and on the other half we measure p weakly followed by a projective measurement of q. In each case we use the state twice before discarding it. We compare our results with projective measurements and demonstrate that under certain conditions such weak measurement-based estimation schemes, where recycling of the states is possible, can outperform projective measurement-based state estimation schemes. We establish beyond statistical fluctuations that our method works better for small ensemble sizes.

  13. An unbiased risk estimator for image denoising in the presence of mixed poisson-gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Le Montagner, Yoann; Angelini, Elsa D; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The behavior and performance of denoising algorithms are governed by one or several parameters, whose optimal settings depend on the content of the processed image and the characteristics of the noise, and are generally designed to minimize the mean squared error (MSE) between the denoised image returned by the algorithm and a virtual ground truth. In this paper, we introduce a new Poisson-Gaussian unbiased risk estimator (PG-URE) of the MSE applicable to a mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise model that unifies the widely used Gaussian and Poisson noise models in fluorescence bioimaging applications. We propose a stochastic methodology to evaluate this estimator in the case when little is known about the internal machinery of the considered denoising algorithm, and we analyze both theoretically and empirically the characteristics of the PG-URE estimator. Finally, we evaluate the PG-URE-driven parametrization for three standard denoising algorithms, with and without variance stabilizing transforms, and different characteristics of the Poisson-Gaussian noise mixture.

  14. On estimating the phase of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, researchers have taken a new look at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a nearly periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, based on observation during a given time interval. Parts 1 and 2 are very briefly reviewed. In part 3, the actual performances of some of the highly nonlinear estimation algorithms of parts 1 and 2 are evaluated by numerical simulation using Monte Carlo techniques.

  15. Oscillometric blood pressure estimation by combining nonparametric bootstrap with Gaussian mixture model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soojeong; Rajan, Sreeraman; Jeon, Gwanggil; Chang, Joon-Hyuk; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z

    2017-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important vital indicators and plays a key role in determining the cardiovascular activity of patients. This paper proposes a hybrid approach consisting of nonparametric bootstrap (NPB) and machine learning techniques to obtain the characteristic ratios (CR) used in the blood pressure estimation algorithm to improve the accuracy of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) estimates and obtain confidence intervals (CI). The NPB technique is used to circumvent the requirement for large sample set for obtaining the CI. A mixture of Gaussian densities is assumed for the CRs and Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is chosen to estimate the SBP and DBP ratios. The K-means clustering technique is used to obtain the mixture order of the Gaussian densities. The proposed approach achieves grade "A" under British Society of Hypertension testing protocol and is superior to the conventional approach based on maximum amplitude algorithm (MAA) that uses fixed CR ratios. The proposed approach also yields a lower mean error (ME) and the standard deviation of the error (SDE) in the estimates when compared to the conventional MAA method. In addition, CIs obtained through the proposed hybrid approach are also narrower with a lower SDE. The proposed approach combining the NPB technique with the GMM provides a methodology to derive individualized characteristic ratio. The results exhibit that the proposed approach enhances the accuracy of SBP and DBP estimation and provides narrower confidence intervals for the estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Iterative Diffusion-Based Distributed Cubature Gaussian Mixture Filter for Multisensor Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Bin; Sun, Tao; Xin, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a distributed cubature Gaussian mixture filter (DCGMF) based on an iterative diffusion strategy (DCGMF-ID) is proposed for multisensor estimation and information fusion. The uncertainties are represented as Gaussian mixtures at each sensor node. A high-degree cubature Kalman filter provides accurate estimation of each Gaussian mixture component. An iterative diffusion scheme is utilized to fuse the mean and covariance of each Gaussian component obtained from each sensor node. The DCGMF-ID extends the conventional diffusion-based fusion strategy by using multiple iterative information exchanges among neighboring sensor nodes. The convergence property of the iterative diffusion is analyzed. In addition, it is shown that the convergence of the iterative diffusion can be interpreted from the information-theoretic perspective as minimization of the Kullback–Leibler divergence. The performance of the DCGMF-ID is compared with the DCGMF based on the average consensus (DCGMF-AC) and the DCGMF based on the iterative covariance intersection (DCGMF-ICI) via a maneuvering target-tracking problem using multiple sensors. The simulation results show that the DCGMF-ID has better performance than the DCGMF based on noniterative diffusion, which validates the benefit of iterative information exchanges. In addition, the DCGMF-ID outperforms the DCGMF-ICI and DCGMF-AC when the number of iterations is limited. PMID:27775620

  17. Nonlinear Bayesian Estimation of BOLD Signal under Non-Gaussian Noise

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ali Fahim; Younis, Muhammad Shahzad; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF. PMID:25691911

  18. Residual foreground contamination in the WMAP data and bias in non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2013-02-01

    We analyze whether there is any residual foreground contamination in the cleaned WMAP 7 years data for the differential assemblies, Q, V and W. We calculate the correlation between the foreground map, from which long wavelength correlations have been subtracted, and the foreground reduced map for each differential assembly after applying the Galaxy and point sources masks. We find positive correlations for all the differential assemblies, with high statistical significance. For Q and V, we find that a large fraction of the contamination comes from pixels where the foreground maps have positive values larger than three times the rms values. These findings imply the presence of residual contamination from Galactic emissions and unresolved point sources. We redo the analysis after masking the extended point sources cataloque of Scodeller et al. [7] and find a drop in the correlation and corresponding significance values. To quantify the effect of the residual contamination on the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the CMB we add estimated contaminant fraction to simulated Gaussian CMB maps and calculate the characteristic non-Gaussian deviation shapes of Minkowski Functionals that arise due to the contamination. We find remarkable agreement of these deviation shapes with those measured from WMAP data, which imply that a major fraction of the observed non-Gaussian deviation comes from residual foreground contamination. We also compute non-Gaussian deviations of Minkowski Functionals after applying the point sources mask of Scodeller et al. and find a decrease in the overall amplitudes of the deviations which is consistent with a decrease in the level of contamination.

  19. Diurnal spatial variability of soil respiration estimated by ordinary kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bortoli Teixeira, Daniel; Rodrigo Panosso, Alan; Tadeu Pereira, Gener; Pelegrino Cerri, Carlos Eduardo; La Scala, Newton, Jr.

    2010-05-01

    The role of greenhouse gases in the climate change is well know, however, the balance of greenhouse gases due to land use and management is still lacking. Hence it is important to characterize the main aspects of soil respiration (or soil CO2 emission) in agricultural areas, including its spatial variability, as quantitatively as possible. The objective of this work was to study the diurnal spatial variability of the soil respiration including their estimations by different methods: ordinary kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation. Evaluations were conducted in a regular grid having 64 points installed over a bare Eutrustox clay texture during the morning and afternoon periods. Measurements were conducted from 7:30 - 10:30 am (morning) and 13:30 - 16:30 pm (afternoon) using a portable soil respiration system (LI-8100), Lincoln, NE, USA. In order to estimate the best interpolation method it was applied the so-called external validation, where the respiration values of 5 points in grid were removed from interpolation process and after were estimated in the same points by kriging or sequential Gaussian simulation methods. This evaluation was also based on the sum of the square of residues, comparing observed with predicted respiration values in each of the 5 points selected for external validation. The highest CO2 emission was observed in the afternoon period, with mean value of 6.24 µmol m-2 s-1, when compared to the morning (4.54 µmol m-2 s-1). Our results indicate that the measurement period (morning or afternoon) did not interfere into the definition of emission spatial variability structure, as coefficient of variation, spatial variability models and their parameters were quite similar in morning and afternoon. However, despite the high correlation between kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation respiration maps (R2 =0.99) sequential Gaussian simulation showed to be more efficient into the estimations of non-sampled emissions in both periods, mornings and

  20. Measuring the mass of Kepler-78b using nonparametric Gaussian process estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Howard, Andrew W.; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring the masses of rocky planets is quite difficult, as the relevant signal produced by such planets is often dwarfed by stellar activity by an order of magnitude or more. Developing a more robust way to isolate the stellar activity in these measurements is crucial to the search for Earth-like planets. We estimate the mass of Earth-size planet Kepler-78b using a Gaussian process estimator to describe the stellar activity in both photometric and radial velocity (RV) data, confirming previous results with a more robust technique that can be extended toward Earth analogues.

  1. Robustness of Estimators of Long-Range Dependence and Self-Similarity under non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, C.; Watkins, N. W.; Graves, T.; Gramacy, R.; Hughes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity are ubiquitous in many natural systems like ecosystems, biological systems and climate. However, it is not always appreciated that both phenomena may occur together in natural systems and that self-similarity in a system can be a superposition of both phenomena. These features, which are common in complex systems, impact the attribution of trends and the occurrence and clustering of extremes. The risk assessment of systems with these properties will lead to different outcomes (e.g. return periods) than the more common assumption of independence of extremes. Two paradigmatic models are discussed which can simultaneously account for long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity: Autoregressive Fractional Integrated Moving Average (ARFIMA) and Linear Fractional Stable Motion (LFSM). Statistical properties of estimators for long-range dependence and self-similarity are critically assessed. It is found that the most popular estimators can be biased in the presence of important features of many natural systems like trends and multiplicative noise. Also the long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity of two typical natural time series are discussed.

  2. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  3. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  4. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  5. Asymptotically Normal and Efficient Estimation of Covariate-Adjusted Gaussian Graphical Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengjie; Ren, Zhao; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhou, Harrison

    2015-01-01

    A tuning-free procedure is proposed to estimate the covariate-adjusted Gaussian graphical model. For each finite subgraph, this estimator is asymptotically normal and efficient. As a consequence, a confidence interval can be obtained for each edge. The procedure enjoys easy implementation and efficient computation through parallel estimation on subgraphs or edges. We further apply the asymptotic normality result to perform support recovery through edge-wise adaptive thresholding. This support recovery procedure is called ANTAC, standing for Asymptotically Normal estimation with Thresholding after Adjusting Covariates. ANTAC outperforms other methodologies in the literature in a range of simulation studies. We apply ANTAC to identify gene-gene interactions using an eQTL dataset. Our result achieves better interpretability and accuracy in comparison with CAMPE. PMID:27499564

  6. Sampling schemes and parameter estimation for nonlinear Bernoulli-Gaussian sparse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudineau, Mégane; Carfantan, Hervé; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Bazot, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We address the sparse approximation problem in the case where the data are approximated by the linear combination of a small number of elementary signals, each of these signals depending non-linearly on additional parameters. Sparsity is explicitly expressed through a Bernoulli-Gaussian hierarchical model in a Bayesian framework. Posterior mean estimates are computed using Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms. We generalize the partially marginalized Gibbs sampler proposed in the linear case in [1], and build an hybrid Hastings-within-Gibbs algorithm in order to account for the nonlinear parameters. All model parameters are then estimated in an unsupervised procedure. The resulting method is evaluated on a sparse spectral analysis problem. It is shown to converge more efficiently than the classical joint estimation procedure, with only a slight increase of the computational cost per iteration, consequently reducing the global cost of the estimation procedure.

  7. Uncertainties associated with the estimation of mass balances and gaussian parameters from atmospheric tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, P.A.; Reible, D.D.; Shair, F.H.

    1982-07-01

    Data resulting from two atmospheric tracer experiments in the land-sea breeze winds in Los Angeles, CA are used to compare the observed and released amounts of tracer (a mass balance). The mass balance calculation indicated that essentially all of the tracer transported to sea during the land breeze was transpoted back across the shore during the subsequent sea breeze. A methodology for calculating a mass balance and the associated uncertainties is presented. The experimental and calculation procedures presented allowed mass balance estimates with less uncertainty than is present in individual measurements of concentration or mixing height. Similarly, a methodology for calculating dispersion parameters for the gaussian plume model from tracer data is discussed and applied to the results of two atmospheric tracer studies conducted during the afternoon sea breeze in the Santa Barbara Channel of California. The method presented involves the integral definitions of the statistical quantities. By considering only tracer concentrations greater than 10% of the maximum concentration, and by considering sufficiently many data points, the uncertainty associated with the parameter estimation was again less than the relative uncertainties in any individual data point. These studies were primarily designed to relate the uncertainties in estimates of mass balances and in estimations of gaussian parameters to the uncertainties inherent within field data.

  8. Improving CMB non-Gaussianity estimators using tracers of local structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, James M. G.; King, Lindsay; Lewis, Antony

    2011-01-15

    Local non-Gaussianity causes correlations between large-scale perturbation modes and the small-scale power. The large-scale CMB signal has contributions from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, which does not correlate with the small-scale power. If this ISW contribution can be removed, the sensitivity to local non-Gaussianity is improved. Gravitational lensing and galaxy counts can be used to trace the ISW contribution; in particular, we show that the CMB lensing potential is highly correlated with the ISW signal. We construct a nearly optimal estimator for the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} and investigate to what extent we can use this to decrease the variance on f{sub NL}. We show that the variance can be decreased by up to 20% at Planck sensitivity using galaxy counts. CMB lensing is a good bias-independent ISW tracer for future more sensitive observations, though the fractional decrease in variance is small if good polarization data are also available.

  9. mclust 5: Clustering, Classification and Density Estimation Using Gaussian Finite Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Scrucca, Luca; Fop, Michael; Murphy, T. Brendan; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Finite mixture models are being used increasingly to model a wide variety of random phenomena for clustering, classification and density estimation. mclust is a powerful and popular package which allows modelling of data as a Gaussian finite mixture with different covariance structures and different numbers of mixture components, for a variety of purposes of analysis. Recently, version 5 of the package has been made available on CRAN. This updated version adds new covariance structures, dimension reduction capabilities for visualisation, model selection criteria, initialisation strategies for the EM algorithm, and bootstrap-based inference, making it a full-featured R package for data analysis via finite mixture modelling. PMID:27818791

  10. Bayesian estimation of airborne fugitive emissions using a Gaussian plume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Stockie, John M.

    2016-09-01

    A new method is proposed for estimating the rate of fugitive emissions of particulate matter from multiple time-dependent sources via measurements of deposition and concentration. We cast this source inversion problem within the Bayesian framework, and use a forward model based on a Gaussian plume solution. We present three alternate models for constructing the prior distribution on the emission rates as functions of time. Next, we present an industrial case study in which our framework is applied to estimate the rate of fugitive emissions of lead particulates from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, Canada. The Bayesian framework not only provides an approximate solution to the inverse problem, but also quantifies the uncertainty in the solution. Using this information we perform an uncertainty propagation study in order to assess the impact of the estimated sources on the area surrounding the industrial site.

  11. On estimating the phase of periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1984-11-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, a new look is taken at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise. The general problem was introduced and the maximum a posteriori probability criterion with signal space interpretation was used to obtain the structures of optimum and some suboptimum phase estimators for known constant frequency and unknown constant phase with an a priori distribution. Optimal algorithms are obtained for some cases where the frequency is a parameterized function of time with the unknown parameters and phase having a joint a priori distribution. In the last section, the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of hypersurfaces is introduced to provide insight to the estimation problem for the small noise and large noise cases.

  12. Modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent of fractional Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingjun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tianzi; Yang, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    Fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) is an important and widely used self-similar process, which is mainly parametrized by its Hurst exponent (H) . Many researchers have proposed methods for estimating the Hurst exponent of fGn. In this paper we put forward a modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent based on a refined approximation of the spectral density function. Generalizing the spectral exponent from a linear function to a piecewise polynomial, we obtained a closer approximation of the fGn's spectral density function. This procedure is significant because it reduced the bias in the estimation of H . Furthermore, the averaging technique that we used markedly reduced the variance of estimates. We also considered the asymptotical unbiasedness of the method and derived the upper bound of its variance and confidence interval. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the proposed estimator was superior to a wavelet maximum likelihood estimator in terms of mean-squared error and was comparable to Whittle's estimator. In addition, a real data set of Nile river minima was employed to evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method. These tests confirmed that our proposed method was computationally simpler and faster than Whittle's estimator.

  13. The Connection Between Bayesian Estimation of a Gaussian Random Field and RKHS.

    PubMed

    Aravkin, Aleksandr Y; Bell, Bradley M; Burke, James V; Pillonetto, Gianluigi

    2015-07-01

    Reconstruction of a function from noisy data is key in machine learning and is often formulated as a regularized optimization problem over an infinite-dimensional reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). The solution suitably balances adherence to the observed data and the corresponding RKHS norm. When the data fit is measured using a quadratic loss, this estimator has a known statistical interpretation. Given the noisy measurements, the RKHS estimate represents the posterior mean (minimum variance estimate) of a Gaussian random field with covariance proportional to the kernel associated with the RKHS. In this brief, we provide a statistical interpretation when more general losses are used, such as absolute value, Vapnik or Huber. Specifically, for any finite set of sampling locations (that includes where the data were collected), the maximum a posteriori estimate for the signal samples is given by the RKHS estimate evaluated at the sampling locations. This connection establishes a firm statistical foundation for several stochastic approaches used to estimate unknown regularization parameters. To illustrate this, we develop a numerical scheme that implements a Bayesian estimator with an absolute value loss. This estimator is used to learn a function from measurements contaminated by outliers.

  14. Modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent of fractional Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingjun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tianzi; Yang, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    Fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) is an important and widely used self-similar process, which is mainly parametrized by its Hurst exponent (H) . Many researchers have proposed methods for estimating the Hurst exponent of fGn. In this paper we put forward a modified periodogram method for estimating the Hurst exponent based on a refined approximation of the spectral density function. Generalizing the spectral exponent from a linear function to a piecewise polynomial, we obtained a closer approximation of the fGn’s spectral density function. This procedure is significant because it reduced the bias in the estimation of H . Furthermore, the averaging technique that we used markedly reduced the variance of estimates. We also considered the asymptotical unbiasedness of the method and derived the upper bound of its variance and confidence interval. Monte Carlo simulations showed that the proposed estimator was superior to a wavelet maximum likelihood estimator in terms of mean-squared error and was comparable to Whittle’s estimator. In addition, a real data set of Nile river minima was employed to evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method. These tests confirmed that our proposed method was computationally simpler and faster than Whittle’s estimator.

  15. The cluster graphical lasso for improved estimation of Gaussian graphical models

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela; Shojaie, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The task of estimating a Gaussian graphical model in the high-dimensional setting is considered. The graphical lasso, which involves maximizing the Gaussian log likelihood subject to a lasso penalty, is a well-studied approach for this task. A surprising connection between the graphical lasso and hierarchical clustering is introduced: the graphical lasso in effect performs a two-step procedure, in which (1) single linkage hierarchical clustering is performed on the variables in order to identify connected components, and then (2) a penalized log likelihood is maximized on the subset of variables within each connected component. Thus, the graphical lasso determines the connected components of the estimated network via single linkage clustering. The single linkage clustering is known to perform poorly in certain finite-sample settings. Therefore, the cluster graphical lasso, which involves clustering the features using an alternative to single linkage clustering, and then performing the graphical lasso on the subset of variables within each cluster, is proposed. Model selection consistency for this technique is established, and its improved performance relative to the graphical lasso is demonstrated in a simulation study, as well as in applications to a university webpage and a gene expression data sets. PMID:25642008

  16. Using Monte Carlo/Gaussian Based Small Area Estimates to Predict Where Medicaid Patients Reside

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Jess J.; Wen, Xuejin; Goel, Satyender; Zhou, Jing; Fu, Lina; Kho, Abel N.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHR) are rapidly becoming accepted as tools for planning and population health1,2. With the national dialogue around Medicaid expansion12, the role of EHR data has become even more important. For their potential to be fully realized and contribute to these discussions, techniques for creating accurate small area estimates is vital. As such, we examined the efficacy of developing small area estimates for Medicaid patients in two locations, Albuquerque and Chicago, by using a Monte Carlo/Gaussian technique that has worked in accurately locating registered voters in North Carolina11. The Albuquerque data, which includes patient address, will first be used to assess the accuracy of the methodology. Subsequently, it will be combined with the EHR data from Chicago to develop a regression that predicts Medicaid patients by US Block Group. We seek to create a tool that is effective in translating EHR data’s potential for population health studies. PMID:28269824

  17. State-space models’ dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Lewis, Mark A.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results.

  18. Additive white Gaussian noise level estimation in SVD domain for images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lin, Weisi

    2013-03-01

    Accurate estimation of Gaussian noise level is of fundamental interest in a wide variety of vision and image processing applications as it is critical to the processing techniques that follow. In this paper, a new effective noise level estimation method is proposed on the basis of the study of singular values of noise-corrupted images. Two novel aspects of this paper address the major challenges in noise estimation: 1) the use of the tail of singular values for noise estimation to alleviate the influence of the signal on the data basis for the noise estimation process and 2) the addition of known noise to estimate the content-dependent parameter, so that the proposed scheme is adaptive to visual signals, thereby enabling a wider application scope of the proposed scheme. The analysis and experiment results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reliably infer noise levels and show robust behavior over a wide range of visual content and noise conditions, and that is outperforms relevant existing methods.

  19. State-space models' dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems.

    PubMed

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M; Derocher, Andrew E; Lewis, Mark A; Jonsen, Ian D; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-05-25

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results.

  20. State-space models’ dirty little secrets: even simple linear Gaussian models can have estimation problems

    PubMed Central

    Auger-Méthé, Marie; Field, Chris; Albertsen, Christoffer M.; Derocher, Andrew E.; Lewis, Mark A.; Jonsen, Ian D.; Mills Flemming, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    State-space models (SSMs) are increasingly used in ecology to model time-series such as animal movement paths and population dynamics. This type of hierarchical model is often structured to account for two levels of variability: biological stochasticity and measurement error. SSMs are flexible. They can model linear and nonlinear processes using a variety of statistical distributions. Recent ecological SSMs are often complex, with a large number of parameters to estimate. Through a simulation study, we show that even simple linear Gaussian SSMs can suffer from parameter- and state-estimation problems. We demonstrate that these problems occur primarily when measurement error is larger than biological stochasticity, the condition that often drives ecologists to use SSMs. Using an animal movement example, we show how these estimation problems can affect ecological inference. Biased parameter estimates of a SSM describing the movement of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) result in overestimating their energy expenditure. We suggest potential solutions, but show that it often remains difficult to estimate parameters. While SSMs are powerful tools, they can give misleading results and we urge ecologists to assess whether the parameters can be estimated accurately before drawing ecological conclusions from their results. PMID:27220686

  1. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; ...

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore » of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  2. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  3. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Anže E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors Δg/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  4. Contaminant dispersion prediction and source estimation with integrated Gaussian-machine learning network model for point source emission in atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ma, Denglong; Zhang, Zaoxiao

    2016-07-05

    Gas dispersion model is important for predicting the gas concentrations when contaminant gas leakage occurs. Intelligent network models such as radial basis function (RBF), back propagation (BP) neural network and support vector machine (SVM) model can be used for gas dispersion prediction. However, the prediction results from these network models with too many inputs based on original monitoring parameters are not in good agreement with the experimental data. Then, a new series of machine learning algorithms (MLA) models combined classic Gaussian model with MLA algorithm has been presented. The prediction results from new models are improved greatly. Among these models, Gaussian-SVM model performs best and its computation time is close to that of classic Gaussian dispersion model. Finally, Gaussian-MLA models were applied to identifying the emission source parameters with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The estimation performance of PSO with Gaussian-MLA is better than that with Gaussian, Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and network models based on original monitoring parameters. Hence, the new prediction model based on Gaussian-MLA is potentially a good method to predict contaminant gas dispersion as well as a good forward model in emission source parameters identification problem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Release the BEESTS: Bayesian Estimation of Ex-Gaussian STop-Signal reaction time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Matzke, Dora; Love, Jonathon; Wiecki, Thomas V.; Brown, Scott D.; Logan, Gordon D.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The stop-signal paradigm is frequently used to study response inhibition. In this paradigm, participants perform a two-choice response time (RT) task where the primary task is occasionally interrupted by a stop-signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The primary goal is to estimate the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop signal reaction time or SSRT). Recently, Matzke et al. (2013) have developed a Bayesian parametric approach (BPA) that allows for the estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. The BPA assumes that SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to estimate the parameters of the SSRT distribution. Here we present an efficient and user-friendly software implementation of the BPA—BEESTS—that can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical stop-signal data. BEESTS comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface and provides users with summary statistics of the posterior distribution of the parameters as well various diagnostic tools to assess the quality of the parameter estimates. The software is open source and runs on Windows and OS X operating systems. In sum, BEESTS allows experimental and clinical psychologists to estimate entire distributions of SSRTs and hence facilitates the more rigorous analysis of stop-signal data. PMID:24339819

  6. Trispectrum estimation in various models of equilateral type non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Keisuke; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Koyama, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the shape correlations between trispectra in various equilateral non-Gaussian models, including Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation, ghost inflation and Lifshitz scalars, using the full trispectrum as well as the reduced trispectrum. We find that most theoretical models are distinguishable from the shapes of primordial trispectra except for several exceptions where it is difficult to discriminate between the models, such as single field Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation and a Lifshitz scalar model. We introduce an estimator for the amplitude of the trispectrum, gNLequil and relate it to model parameters in various models. Using constraints on gNLequil from WMAP5, we give constraints on the model parameters.

  7. Wavelet and Gaussian Approaches for Estimation of Groundwater Variations Using GRACE Data.

    PubMed

    Fatolazadeh, Farzam; Voosoghi, Behzad; Naeeni, Mehdi Raoofian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a scheme is presented to estimate groundwater storage variations in Iran. The variations are estimated using 11 years of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiments (GRACE) observations from period of 2003 to April 2014 in combination with the outputs of Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (GLDAS) model including soil moisture, snow water equivalent, and total canopy water storage. To do so, the sums of GLDAS outputs are subtracted from terrestrial water storage variations determined by GRACE observations. Because of stripping errors in the GRACE data, two methodologies based on wavelet analysis and Gaussian filtering are applied to refine the GRACE data. It is shown that the wavelet approach could better localize the desired signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio and thus results in more accurate estimation of groundwater storage variations. To validate the results of our procedure in estimation of ground water storage variations, they are compared with the measurements of pisometric wells data near the Urmia Lake which shows favorable agreements with our results.

  8. A statistical framework for neuroimaging data analysis based on mutual information estimated via a gaussian copula

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Kayser, Christoph; Rousselet, Guillaume A.; Gross, Joachim; Schyns, Philippe G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We begin by reviewing the statistical framework of information theory as applicable to neuroimaging data analysis. A major factor hindering wider adoption of this framework in neuroimaging is the difficulty of estimating information theoretic quantities in practice. We present a novel estimation technique that combines the statistical theory of copulas with the closed form solution for the entropy of Gaussian variables. This results in a general, computationally efficient, flexible, and robust multivariate statistical framework that provides effect sizes on a common meaningful scale, allows for unified treatment of discrete, continuous, unidimensional and multidimensional variables, and enables direct comparisons of representations from behavioral and brain responses across any recording modality. We validate the use of this estimate as a statistical test within a neuroimaging context, considering both discrete stimulus classes and continuous stimulus features. We also present examples of analyses facilitated by these developments, including application of multivariate analyses to MEG planar magnetic field gradients, and pairwise temporal interactions in evoked EEG responses. We show the benefit of considering the instantaneous temporal derivative together with the raw values of M/EEG signals as a multivariate response, how we can separately quantify modulations of amplitude and direction for vector quantities, and how we can measure the emergence of novel information over time in evoked responses. Open‐source Matlab and Python code implementing the new methods accompanies this article. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1541–1573, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27860095

  9. A statistical framework for neuroimaging data analysis based on mutual information estimated via a gaussian copula.

    PubMed

    Ince, Robin A A; Giordano, Bruno L; Kayser, Christoph; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Gross, Joachim; Schyns, Philippe G

    2017-03-01

    We begin by reviewing the statistical framework of information theory as applicable to neuroimaging data analysis. A major factor hindering wider adoption of this framework in neuroimaging is the difficulty of estimating information theoretic quantities in practice. We present a novel estimation technique that combines the statistical theory of copulas with the closed form solution for the entropy of Gaussian variables. This results in a general, computationally efficient, flexible, and robust multivariate statistical framework that provides effect sizes on a common meaningful scale, allows for unified treatment of discrete, continuous, unidimensional and multidimensional variables, and enables direct comparisons of representations from behavioral and brain responses across any recording modality. We validate the use of this estimate as a statistical test within a neuroimaging context, considering both discrete stimulus classes and continuous stimulus features. We also present examples of analyses facilitated by these developments, including application of multivariate analyses to MEG planar magnetic field gradients, and pairwise temporal interactions in evoked EEG responses. We show the benefit of considering the instantaneous temporal derivative together with the raw values of M/EEG signals as a multivariate response, how we can separately quantify modulations of amplitude and direction for vector quantities, and how we can measure the emergence of novel information over time in evoked responses. Open-source Matlab and Python code implementing the new methods accompanies this article. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1541-1573, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. SAR amplitude probability density function estimation based on a generalized Gaussian model.

    PubMed

    Moser, Gabriele; Zerubia, Josiane; Serpico, Sebastiano B

    2006-06-01

    In the context of remotely sensed data analysis, an important problem is the development of accurate models for the statistics of the pixel intensities. Focusing on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, this modeling process turns out to be a crucial task, for instance, for classification or for denoising purposes. In this paper, an innovative parametric estimation methodology for SAR amplitude data is proposed that adopts a generalized Gaussian (GG) model for the complex SAR backscattered signal. A closed-form expression for the corresponding amplitude probability density function (PDF) is derived and a specific parameter estimation algorithm is developed in order to deal with the proposed model. Specifically, the recently proposed "method-of-log-cumulants" (MoLC) is applied, which stems from the adoption of the Mellin transform (instead of the usual Fourier transform) in the computation of characteristic functions and from the corresponding generalization of the concepts of moment and cumulant. For the developed GG-based amplitude model, the resulting MoLC estimates turn out to be numerically feasible and are also analytically proved to be consistent. The proposed parametric approach was validated by using several real ERS-1, XSAR, E-SAR, and NASA/JPL airborne SAR images, and the experimental results prove that the method models the amplitude PDF better than several previously proposed parametric models for backscattering phenomena.

  11. A Gaussian mixture model based cost function for parameter estimation of chaotic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekofteh, Yasser; Jafari, Sajad; Sprott, Julien Clinton; Hashemi Golpayegani, S. Mohammad Reza; Almasganj, Farshad

    2015-02-01

    As we know, many biological systems such as neurons or the heart can exhibit chaotic behavior. Conventional methods for parameter estimation in models of these systems have some limitations caused by sensitivity to initial conditions. In this paper, a novel cost function is proposed to overcome those limitations by building a statistical model on the distribution of the real system attractor in state space. This cost function is defined by the use of a likelihood score in a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) which is fitted to the observed attractor generated by the real system. Using that learned GMM, a similarity score can be defined by the computed likelihood score of the model time series. We have applied the proposed method to the parameter estimation of two important biological systems, a neuron and a cardiac pacemaker, which show chaotic behavior. Some simulated experiments are given to verify the usefulness of the proposed approach in clean and noisy conditions. The results show the adequacy of the proposed cost function.

  12. The binned bispectrum estimator: template-based and non-parametric CMB non-Gaussianity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Racine, Benjamin; van Tent, Bartjan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the details of the binned bispectrum estimator as used for the official 2013 and 2015 analyses of the temperature and polarization CMB maps from the ESA Planck satellite. The defining aspect of this estimator is the determination of a map bispectrum (3-point correlation function) that has been binned in harmonic space. For a parametric determination of the non-Gaussianity in the map (the so-called fNL parameters), one takes the inner product of this binned bispectrum with theoretically motivated templates. However, as a complementary approach one can also smooth the binned bispectrum using a variable smoothing scale in order to suppress noise and make coherent features stand out above the noise. This allows one to look in a model-independent way for any statistically significant bispectral signal. This approach is useful for characterizing the bispectral shape of the galactic foreground emission, for which a theoretical prediction of the bispectral anisotropy is lacking, and for detecting a serendipitous primordial signal, for which a theoretical template has not yet been put forth. Both the template-based and the non-parametric approaches are described in this paper.

  13. A Joint Gaussian Process Model for Active Visual Recognition with Expertise Estimation in Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chengjiang; Hua, Gang; Kapoor, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    We present a noise resilient probabilistic model for active learning of a Gaussian process classifier from crowds, i.e., a set of noisy labelers. It explicitly models both the overall label noise and the expertise level of each individual labeler with two levels of flip models. Expectation propagation is adopted for efficient approximate Bayesian inference of our probabilistic model for classification, based on which, a generalized EM algorithm is derived to estimate both the global label noise and the expertise of each individual labeler. The probabilistic nature of our model immediately allows the adoption of the prediction entropy for active selection of data samples to be labeled, and active selection of high quality labelers based on their estimated expertise to label the data. We apply the proposed model for four visual recognition tasks, i.e., object category recognition, multi-modal activity recognition, gender recognition, and fine-grained classification, on four datasets with real crowd-sourced labels from the Amazon Mechanical Turk. The experiments clearly demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed model. In addition, we extend the proposed model with the Predictive Active Set Selection Method to speed up the active learning system, whose efficacy is verified by conducting experiments on the first three datasets. The results show our extended model can not only preserve a higher accuracy, but also achieve a higher efficiency. PMID:26924892

  14. An Inverse Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Thermal Properties of Orthotropic Materials using Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. S.; Somasundharam, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) involving the simultaneous estimation of principal thermal conductivities (kxx,kyy,kzz ) and specific heat capacity of orthotropic materials is solved by using surrogate forward model. Uniformly distributed random samples for each unknown parameter is generated from the prior knowledge about these parameters and Finite Volume Method (FVM) is employed to solve the forward problem for temperature distribution with space and time. A supervised machine learning technique- Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) is used to construct the surrogate forward model with the available temperature solution and randomly generated unknown parameter data. The statistical and machine learning toolbox available in MATLAB R2015b is used for this purpose. The robustness of the surrogate model constructed using GPR is examined by carrying out the parameter estimation for 100 new randomly generated test samples at a measurement error of ±0.3K. The temperature measurement is obtained by adding random noise with the mean at zero and known standard deviation (σ = 0.1) to the FVM solution of the forward problem. The test results show that Mean Percentage Deviation (MPD) of all test samples for all parameters is < 10%.

  15. Optimal bispectrum estimator and simulations of the CMB lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe non-Gaussian signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, A.; Wandelt, B.; Elsner, F.; Liguori, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present the tools to optimally extract the lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe (L-ISW) bispectrum signal from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We implemented two different methods to simulate the non-Gaussian CMB maps with the L-ISW signal: a non-perturbative method based on the FLINTS lensing code and the separable mode-expansion method. We implemented the Komatsu, Spergel, and Wandelt (KSW) optimal estimator analysis for the L-ISW bispectrum and tested it on the non-Gaussian simulations for realistic CMB experimental settings with an inhomogeneous sky coverage. We show that the estimator approaches the Cramer-Rao bound and that Wiener filtering the L-ISW simulations slightly improves the estimate of fNLL-ISW by ≤ 10%. For a realistic CMB experimental setting that accounts for anisotropic noise and masked sky, we show that the linear term of the estimator is highly correlated to the cubic term and it is necessary to recover the signal and the optimal error bars. We also show that the L-ISW bispectrum, if not correctly accounted for, yields an underestimation of the fNLlocal error bars of ≃ 4%. A joint analysis of the non-Gaussian shapes and/or L-ISW template subtraction is needed to recover unbiased results of the primordial non-Gaussian signal from ongoing and future CMB experiments.

  16. Estimation of biogas produced by the landfill of Palermo, applying a Gaussian model.

    PubMed

    Aronica, S; Bonanno, A; Piazza, V; Pignato, L; Trapani, S

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a procedure is suggested to assess the rate of biogas emitted by the Bellolampo landfill (Palermo, Italy), starting from the data acquired by two of the stations for monitoring meteorological parameters and polluting gases. The data used refer to the period November 2005-July 2006. The methane concentration, measured in the CEP suburb of Palermo, has been analysed together with the meteorological data collected by the station situated inside the landfill area. In the present study, the methane has been chosen as a tracer of the atmospheric pollutants produced by the dump. The data used for assessing the biogas emission refer to night time periods characterized by weak wind blowing from the hill toward the city. The methane rate emitted by the Bellolampo dump has been evaluated using a Gaussian model and considering the landfill both as a single point source and as a multiple point one. The comparison of the results shows that for a first approximation it is sufficient to consider the landfill of Palermo as a single point source. Starting from the monthly percentage composition of the biogas, estimated for the study period, the rate of biogas produced by the dump was evaluated. The total biogas produced by the landfill, obtained as the sum of the emitted component and the recovered one, ranged from 7519.97 to 10,153.7m3/h. For the study period the average monthly estimations of biogas emissions into the atmosphere amount to about 60% of the total biogas produced by the landfill, a little higher than the one estimated by the company responsible for the biogas recovery plant at the landfill.

  17. Soil moisture estimation using synergy of optical, SAR, and topographic data with Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamenkovic, J.; Notarnicola, C.; Spindler, N.; Cuozzo, G.; Bertoldi, G.; Della Chiesa, S.; Niedrist, G.; Greifeneder, F.; Tuia, D.; Borgeaud, M.; Thiran, J.-Ph.

    2014-10-01

    In this work we address the synergy of optical, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and topographic data in soil moisture retrieval over an Alpine area. As estimation technique, we consider Gaussian Process Regression (GPR). The test area is located in South Tyrol, Italy where the main land types are meadows and pastures. Time series of ASAR Wide Swath - SAR, optical, topographic and ancillary data (meteorological information and snow cover maps) acquired repetitively in 2010 were examined. Regarding optical data, we used both, daily MODIS reflectances, and daily NDVI, interpolated from the 16-day MODIS composite. Slope, elevation and aspect were extracted from a 2.5 m DEM (Digital Elevation Model) and resampled to 10 m. Daily soil moisture measurements were collected in the three fixed stations (two located in meadows and one located in pasture). The snow maps were used to mask the points covered by snow. The best performance was obtained by adding MODIS band 6 at 1640 nm to SAR and DEM features. The corresponding coefficient of determination, R2, was equal to 0.848, and the root mean square error, RMSE, to 5.4 % Vol. Compared to the case when no optical data were considered, there was an increase of ca. 0.05 in R2 and a decrease in RMSE of ca. 0.7 % Vol. This work showed that the joint use of NDVI or water absorption reflectance with SAR and topographic data can improve the estimation of soil moisture in specific Alpine area and that GPR is an effective method for estimation.

  18. Gaussian processes uncertainty estimates in experimental Sentinel-2 LAI and leaf chlorophyll content retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, Juan Pablo; Moreno, José; Camps-Valls, Gustavo

    2013-12-01

    ESA's upcoming Sentinel-2 (S2) Multispectral Instrument (MSI) foresees to provide continuity to land monitoring services by relying on optical payload with visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared sensors with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. This unprecedented data availability leads to an urgent need for developing robust and accurate retrieval methods, which ideally should provide uncertainty intervals for the predictions. Statistical learning regression algorithms are powerful candidats for the estimation of biophysical parameters from satellite reflectance measurements because of their ability to perform adaptive, nonlinear data fitting. In this paper, we focus on a new emerging technique in the field of Bayesian nonparametric modeling. We exploit Gaussian process regression (GPR) for retrieval, which is an accurate method that also provides uncertainty intervals along with the mean estimates. This distinct feature is not shared by other machine learning approaches. In view of implementing the regressor into operational monitoring applications, here the portability of locally trained GPR models was evaluated. Experimental data came from the ESA-led field campaign SPARC (Barrax, Spain). For various simulated S2 configurations (S2-10m, S2-20m and S2-60m) two important biophysical parameters were estimated: leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and leaf area index (LAI). Local evaluation of an extended training dataset with more variation over bare soil sites led to improved LCC and LAI mapping with reduced uncertainties. GPR reached the 10% precision required by end users, with for LCC a NRMSE of 3.5-9.2% (r2: 0.95-0.99) and for LAI a NRMSE of 6.5-7.3% (r2: 0.95-0.96). The developed GPR models were subsequently applied to simulated Sentinel images over various sites. The associated uncertainty maps proved to be a good indicator for evaluating the robustness of the retrieval performance. The generally low uncertainty intervals over vegetated surfaces

  19. GPZ: non-stationary sparse Gaussian processes for heteroscedastic uncertainty estimation in photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    The next generation of cosmology experiments will be required to use photometric redshifts rather than spectroscopic redshifts. Obtaining accurate and well-characterized photometric redshift distributions is therefore critical for Euclid, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. However, determining accurate variance predictions alongside single point estimates is crucial, as they can be used to optimize the sample of galaxies for the specific experiment (e.g. weak lensing, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae), trading off between completeness and reliability in the galaxy sample. The various sources of uncertainty in measurements of the photometry and redshifts put a lower bound on the accuracy that any model can hope to achieve. The intrinsic uncertainty associated with estimates is often non-uniform and input-dependent, commonly known in statistics as heteroscedastic noise. However, existing approaches are susceptible to outliers and do not take into account variance induced by non-uniform data density and in most cases require manual tuning of many parameters. In this paper, we present a Bayesian machine learning approach that jointly optimizes the model with respect to both the predictive mean and variance we refer to as Gaussian processes for photometric redshifts (GPZ). The predictive variance of the model takes into account both the variance due to data density and photometric noise. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR12 data, we show that our approach substantially outperforms other machine learning methods for photo-z estimation and their associated variance, such as TPZ and ANNZ2. We provide a MATLAB and PYTHON implementations that are available to download at https://github.com/OxfordML/GPz.

  20. No-reference peak signal to noise ratio estimation based on generalized Gaussian modeling of transform coefficient distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ji-Woo; Lee, Seon-Oh; Sim, Dong-Gyu; Han, Jong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    We present a no-reference peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) estimation algorithm based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficient distributions from H.264/MPEG-4 part 10 advanced video codec (H.264/AVC) bitstreams. To estimate the PSNR of a compressed picture without the original picture on the decoder side, it is important to model the distribution of transform coefficients obtained from quantized coefficients accurately. Whereas several conventional algorithms use the Laplacian or Cauchy distribution to model the DCT coefficient distribution, the proposed algorithm uses a generalized Gaussian distribution. Pearson's χ2 (chi-square) test was applied to show that the generalized Gaussian distribution is more appropriate than the other models for modeling the transform coefficients. The χ2 test was also used to find optimum parameters for the generalized Gaussian model. It was found that the generalized Gaussian model improves the accuracy of the DCT coefficient distribution, thus reducing the mean squared error between the real and the estimated PSNR.

  1. Making Sense of High-latitude Geospace Observations Through Bayesian State Estimation for Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, T.; McGranaghan, R. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Effective inference of the electrodynamic state of the polar ionosphere is of paramount interest to the space science community. It defines one of the major driving forces of the thermosphere and ionosphere and provides us with a means to probe physical processes in the magnetosphere. The recent advent of global monitoring of magnetic perturbation fields by the magnetometers on ground and satellites at LEO altitudes (e.g., AMPERE, SuperMag), and of ionospheric plasma velocities made available through a network of the ground-based radars (e.g., SuperDARN) prompts us to reexamine the limitations of the current data assimilation approaches adopted in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics procedure. This presentation will demonstrate how recent technical improvements informed by a Bayesian inferential framework for Gaussian processes enable us to bring together multiple types of high-latitude geospace observations more effectively to yield a self-consistent global picture of polar ionospheric electrodynamic states. These improvements include (1) more rigorous consideration of prior model errors and observational errors, (2) optimization in terms of the magnetic potential and electrostatic potential to reduce the impact of conductance uncertainty on the field-aligned current estimation, and (3) treatment of ionospheric conductance as an integral part of the inference.

  2. Online Estimation and Prediction for a Non-Gaussian Orbital Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Morzfeld, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimation and prediction of orbital trajectories of space objects has become an important problem due to the dramatic increase in the number of space debris and the resulting higher risk of collisions. In this work we present a series of assimilation experiments with a two-dimensional orbital propagation model to study the efficiency and applicability of three types of data assimilation methods to this problem. In particular, we consider the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), Monte Carlo (MC) sampling, and variational data assimilation (4D-Var). A series of experiments are performed were a number of conditions are tested, including the frequency of assimilation, and number of particles/ensemble members. The assimilation is performed under the twin-experiment framework, where the observations are sampled from a reference run and assimilated into a control run. The assimilation experiments show that the EnKF suffers from filter divergence when the observations are infrequently measured. In fact, the EnKF becomes unstable unless the assimilation is performed at least every 15 minutes approximately. This is mainly due to the strong non-linearity of the orbital propagation model, which results in a non-Gaussian posterior. In contrast, both 4D-Var and MC sampling performance is stable and reliable, and provide accurate estimates of positions and velocities, even if only the positions of the space objects are measured infrequently. While 4D-Var is computationally the most efficient method, MC sampling provides an accurate quantitative assessment of the uncertainty of the position and velocity of the space object. In particular, we found that implicit sampling, which can be thought of as a randomized variational sampling scheme, gave the best performance in terms of reliability, accuracy, and computation time.

  3. Determining the Mass of Kepler-78b with Nonparametric Gaussian Process Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Howard, Andrew W.; Haywood, Raphaëlle D.

    2015-08-01

    Kepler-78b is a transiting planet that is 1.2 times the radius of Earth and orbits a young, active K dwarf every 8 hr. The mass of Kepler-78b has been independently reported by two teams based on radial velocity (RV) measurements using the HIRES and HARPS-N spectrographs. Due to the active nature of the host star, a stellar activity model is required to distinguish and isolate the planetary signal in RV data. Whereas previous studies tested parametric stellar activity models, we modeled this system using nonparametric Gaussian process (GP) regression. We produced a GP regression of relevant Kepler photometry. We then use the posterior parameter distribution for our photometric fit as a prior for our simultaneous GP + Keplerian orbit models of the RV data sets. We tested three simple kernel functions for our GP regressions. Based on a Bayesian likelihood analysis, we selected a quasi-periodic kernel model with GP hyperparameters coupled between the two RV data sets, giving a Doppler amplitude of 1.86 ± 0.25 m s-1 and supporting our belief that the correlated noise we are modeling is astrophysical. The corresponding mass of {1.87}-0.26+0.27 {M}\\oplus is consistent with that measured in previous studies, and more robust due to our nonparametric signal estimation. Based on our mass and the radius measurement from transit photometry, Kepler-78b has a bulk density of {6.0}-1.4+1.9 g cm-3. We estimate that Kepler-78b is 32% ± 26% iron using a two-component rock-iron model. This is consistent with an Earth-like composition, with uncertainty spanning Moon-like to Mercury-like compositions.

  4. Determining the Mass of Kepler-78b with Nonparametric Gaussian Process Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel Kai; Howard, Andrew; Haywood, Raphaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Kepler-78b is a transiting planet that is 1.2 times the radius of Earth and orbits a young, active K dwarf every 8 hr. The mass of Kepler-78b has been independently reported by two teams based on radial velocity (RV) measurements using the HIRES and HARPS-N spectrographs. Due to the active nature of the host star, a stellar activity model is required to distinguish and isolate the planetary signal in RV data. Whereas previous studies tested parametric stellar activity models, we modeled this system using nonparametric Gaussian process (GP) regression. We produced a GP regression of relevant Kepler photometry. We then use the posterior parameter distribution for our photometric fit as a prior for our simultaneous GP + Keplerian orbit models of the RV data sets. We tested three simple kernel functions for our GP regressions. Based on a Bayesian likelihood analysis, we selected a quasi-periodic kernel model with GP hyperparameters coupled between the two RV data sets, giving a Doppler amplitude of 1.86 ± 0.25 m s-1 and supporting our belief that the correlated noise we are modeling is astrophysical. The corresponding mass of 1.87-0.26+0.27 ME is consistent with that measured in previous studies, and more robust due to our nonparametric signal estimation. Based on our mass and the radius measurement from transit photometry, Kepler-78b has a bulk density of 6.0-1.4+1.9 g cm-3. We estimate that Kepler-78b is 32% ± 26% iron using a two-component rock-iron model. This is consistent with an Earth-like composition, with uncertainty spanning Moon-like to Mercury-like compositions.

  5. Determining the Mass of Kepler-78b With Nonparametric Gaussian Process Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Howard, Andrew; Haywood, Raphaëlle

    2015-12-01

    Kepler-78b is a transiting planet that is 1.2 times the radius of Earth and orbits a young, active K dwarf every 8 hours. The mass of Kepler-78b has been independently reported by two teams based on radial velocity measurements using the HIRES and HARPS-N spectrographs. Due to the active nature of the host star, a stellar activity model is required to distinguish and isolate the planetary signal in radial velocity data. Whereas previous studies tested parametric stellar activity models, we modeled this system using nonparametric Gaussian process (GP) regression. We produced a GP regression of relevant Kepler photometry. We then use the posterior parameter distribution for our photometric fit as a prior for our simultaneous GP + Keplerian orbit models of the radial velocity datasets. We tested three simple kernel functions for our GP regressions. Based on a Bayesian likelihood analysis, we selected a quasi-periodic kernel model with GP hyperparameters coupled between the two RV datasets, giving a Doppler amplitude of 1.86 ± 0.25 m s-1 and supporting our belief that the correlated noise we are modeling is astrophysical. The corresponding mass of 1.87 +0.27-0.26 M⊕ is consistent with that measured in previous studies, and more robust due to our nonparametric signal estimation. Based on our mass and the radius measurement from transit photometry, Kepler-78b has a bulk density of 6.0+1.9-1.4 g cm-3. We estimate that Kepler-78b is 32±26% iron using a two-component rock-iron model. This is consistent with an Earth-like composition, with uncertainty spanning Moon-like to Mercury-like compositions.

  6. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S.; Wuensche, C.A. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found f{sub NL} = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval f{sub NL}  element of  [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  7. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found fNL = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval fNL in [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  8. Removing the ISW-lensing bias from the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Rotti, Aditya E-mail: aditya@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-04-01

    The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect produces a secondary temperature aniso\\-tropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as CMB photons travel through time-varying potentials along the line-of-sight. The main contribution comes from redshifts z∼<2, where dark energy leads to a decay of potentials. As the same photons are gravitationally lensed by these decaying potentials, there exists a high degree of correlation between the ISW effect and CMB lensing, leading to a non-zero three-point correlation (bispectrum) of the observed temperature anisotropy. This ISW-lensing bispectrum, whose shape resembles that of the so-called ''local-form'' primordial bispectrum parametrized by f{sub NL}, is known to be the largest contamination of f{sub NL}. In order to avoid a spurious detection of primordial non-Gaussianity, we need to remove the ISW-lensing bias. In this work, we investigate three debiasing methods: (I) subtraction of an expected, ensemble average of the ISW-lensing bispectrum; (II) subtraction of a measured ISW-lensing bispectrum; and (III) direct subtraction of an estimated ISW signal from an observed temperature map. One may use an estimation of the ISW map from external non-CMB data or that from the CMB data themselves. As the methods II and III are based on fewer assumptions about the nature of dark energy, they are preferred over the method I. While the methods I and II yield unbiased estimates of f{sub NL} with comparable error bars, the method III yields a biased result when the underlying primordial f{sub NL} is non-zero and the ISW map is estimated from a lensing potential reconstructed from the observed temperature map. One of the sources of the bias is a lensing reconstruction noise bias which is independent of f{sub NL} and can be calculated precisely, but other f{sub NL}-dependent terms are difficult to compute reliably. We thus conclude that the method II is the best, model-independent way to remove the ISW-lensing bias of f{sub NL

  9. Predicting microRNA precursors with a generalized Gaussian components based density estimation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Hung; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao; Hsueh, Cheng-Hao; Wu, Chi-Yeh; Oyang, Yen-Jen

    2010-01-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules, which play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. There have been many efforts to discover miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) over the years. Recently, ab initio approaches have attracted more attention because they do not depend on homology information and provide broader applications than comparative approaches. Kernel based classifiers such as support vector machine (SVM) are extensively adopted in these ab initio approaches due to the prediction performance they achieved. On the other hand, logic based classifiers such as decision tree, of which the constructed model is interpretable, have attracted less attention. This article reports the design of a predictor of pre-miRNAs with a novel kernel based classifier named the generalized Gaussian density estimator (G2DE) based classifier. The G2DE is a kernel based algorithm designed to provide interpretability by utilizing a few but representative kernels for constructing the classification model. The performance of the proposed predictor has been evaluated with 692 human pre-miRNAs and has been compared with two kernel based and two logic based classifiers. The experimental results show that the proposed predictor is capable of achieving prediction performance comparable to those delivered by the prevailing kernel based classification algorithms, while providing the user with an overall picture of the distribution of the data set. Software predictors that identify pre-miRNAs in genomic sequences have been exploited by biologists to facilitate molecular biology research in recent years. The G2DE employed in this study can deliver prediction accuracy comparable with the state-of-the-art kernel based machine learning algorithms. Furthermore, biologists can obtain valuable insights about the different characteristics of the sequences of pre-miRNAs with the models generated by the G2DE based predictor.

  10. A new method based on the subpixel Gaussian model for accurate estimation of asteroid coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanevych, V. E.; Briukhovetskyi, O. B.; Sokovikova, N. S.; Bezkrovny, M. M.; Vavilova, I. B.; Ivashchenko, Yu. M.; Elenin, L. V.; Khlamov, S. V.; Movsesian, Ia. S.; Dashkova, A. M.; Pogorelov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a new iteration method to estimate asteroid coordinates, based on a subpixel Gaussian model of the discrete object image. The method operates by continuous parameters (asteroid coordinates) in a discrete observational space (the set of pixel potentials) of the CCD frame. In this model, the kind of coordinate distribution of the photons hitting a pixel of the CCD frame is known a priori, while the associated parameters are determined from a real digital object image. The method that is developed, which is flexible in adapting to any form of object image, has a high measurement accuracy along with a low calculating complexity, due to the maximum-likelihood procedure that is implemented to obtain the best fit instead of a least-squares method and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for minimization of the quadratic form. Since 2010, the method has been tested as the basis of our Collection Light Technology (COLITEC) software, which has been installed at several observatories across the world with the aim of the automatic discovery of asteroids and comets in sets of CCD frames. As a result, four comets (C/2010 X1 (Elenin), P/2011 NO1(Elenin), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and P/2013 V3 (Nevski)) as well as more than 1500 small Solar system bodies (including five near-Earth objects (NEOs), 21 Trojan asteroids of Jupiter and one Centaur object) have been discovered. We discuss these results, which allowed us to compare the accuracy parameters of the new method and confirm its efficiency. In 2014, the COLITEC software was recommended to all members of the Gaia-FUN-SSO network for analysing observations as a tool to detect faint moving objects in frames.

  11. Estimating non-Gaussian diffusion model parameters in the presence of physiological noise and Rician signal bias.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effects of Rician bias and physiological noise on parameter estimation for non-Gaussian diffusion models. At high b-values, there are deviations from monoexponential signal decay known as non-Gaussian diffusion. Magnitude images have a Rician distribution, which introduces a bias that appears as non-Gaussian diffusion. A second factor that complicates parameter estimation is physiological noise. It has an intensity that depends on the b-value in a complicated manner. Hence, the signal distribution is unknown a priori. By measuring a large number of averages, however, the variance at each b-value can be estimated. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compared uncorrected estimation to a corrected scheme that involves fitting to the mean value of the Rician distribution. We also evaluated effects of weighting with the inverse of the estimated variance in least-squares fitting. A human brain experiment illustrates parameter estimation effects and identifies brain regions affected by physiological noise. The simulations show that the corrected estimator is very accurate. The uncorrected estimator is heavily biased. In the human brain experiment, the magnitude of the relative bias ranges from 6%-31%, depending on the diffusion model. Weighting has negligible effects on accuracy, but improves precision in the presence of physiological noise. At low b-values, physiological noise is prominent in cerebrospinal fluid. At high b-values there is physiological noise in white matter structures near the ventricles. Bias correction is essential and weighting may be beneficial. Physiological noise has significant effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assessment of groundwater level estimation uncertainty using sequential Gaussian simulation and Bayesian bootstrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2015-04-01

    Space-time geostatistical approaches can improve the reliability of dynamic groundwater level models in areas with limited spatial and temporal data. Space-time residual Kriging (STRK) is a reliable method for spatiotemporal interpolation that can incorporate auxiliary information. The method usually leads to an underestimation of the prediction uncertainty. The uncertainty of spatiotemporal models is usually estimated by determining the space-time Kriging variance or by means of cross validation analysis. For de-trended data the former is not usually applied when complex spatiotemporal trend functions are assigned. A Bayesian approach based on the bootstrap idea and sequential Gaussian simulation are employed to determine the uncertainty of the spatiotemporal model (trend and covariance) parameters. These stochastic modelling approaches produce multiple realizations, rank the prediction results on the basis of specified criteria and capture the range of the uncertainty. The correlation of the spatiotemporal residuals is modeled using a non-separable space-time variogram based on the Spartan covariance family (Hristopulos and Elogne 2007, Varouchakis and Hristopulos 2013). We apply these simulation methods to investigate the uncertainty of groundwater level variations. The available dataset consists of bi-annual (dry and wet hydrological period) groundwater level measurements in 15 monitoring locations for the time period 1981 to 2010. The space-time trend function is approximated using a physical law that governs the groundwater flow in the aquifer in the presence of pumping. The main objective of this research is to compare the performance of two simulation methods for prediction uncertainty estimation. In addition, we investigate the performance of the Spartan spatiotemporal covariance function for spatiotemporal geostatistical analysis. Hristopulos, D.T. and Elogne, S.N. 2007. Analytic properties and covariance functions for a new class of generalized Gibbs

  13. Multidimensional Hermite-Gaussian quadrature formulae and their application to nonlinear estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcreynolds, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified technique is proposed for calculating multidimensional Hermite-Gaussian quadratures that involves taking the square root of a matrix by the Cholesky algorithm rather than computation of the eigenvectors of the matrix. Ways of reducing the dimension, number, and order of the quadratures are set forth. If the function f(x) under the integral sign is not well approximated by a low-order algebraic expression, the order of the quadrature may be reduced by factoring f(x) into an expression that is nearly algebraic and one that is Gaussian.

  14. Multidimensional Hermite-Gaussian quadrature formulae and their application to nonlinear estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcreynolds, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified technique is proposed for calculating multidimensional Hermite-Gaussian quadratures that involves taking the square root of a matrix by the Cholesky algorithm rather than computation of the eigenvectors of the matrix. Ways of reducing the dimension, number, and order of the quadratures are set forth. If the function f(x) under the integral sign is not well approximated by a low-order algebraic expression, the order of the quadrature may be reduced by factoring f(x) into an expression that is nearly algebraic and one that is Gaussian.

  15. Estimation of focal and extra-focal radiation profiles based on Gaussian modeling in medical linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Anai, Shigeo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Araki, Fujio; Matsuki, Takaomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Nobuo

    2011-07-01

    The X-ray source or focal radiation is one of the factors that can degrade the conformal field edge in stereotactic body radiotherapy. For that reason, it is very important to estimate the total focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators, which consists of X-ray focal-spot radiation and extra-focal radiation profiles. Our purpose in this study was to propose an experimental method for estimating the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles of linear accelerators based on triple Gaussian functions. We measured the total X-ray focal radiation profiles of the accelerators by moving a slit in conjunction with a photon field p-type silicon diode. The slit width was changed so that the extra-focal radiation could be optimally included in the total focal radiation. The total focal radiation profiles of an accelerator at 4-MV and 10-MV energies were approximated with a combination of triple Gaussian functions, which correspond to the focal-spot radiation, extra-focal radiation, and radiation transmitted through the slit assembly. As a result, the ratios of the Gaussian peak value of the extra-focal radiation to that of the focal spot for 4 and 10 MV were 0.077 and 0.159, respectively. The peak widths of the focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles were 0.57 and 25.0 mm for 4 MV, respectively, and 0.60 and 22.0 mm for 10 MV, respectively. We concluded that the proposed focal radiation profile model based on the triple Gaussian functions may be feasible for estimating the X-ray focal-spot and extra-focal radiation profiles.

  16. Improving satellite-based PM2.5 estimates in China using Gaussian processes modeling in a Bayesian hierarchical setting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenxi; Liu, Yang; Ma, Zongwei; Bi, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Using satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements and statistical models to estimate ground-level PM2.5 is a promising way to fill the areas that are not covered by ground PM2.5 monitors. The statistical models used in previous studies are primarily Linear Mixed Effects (LME) and Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) models. In this study, we developed a new regression model between PM2.5 and AOD using Gaussian processes in a Bayesian hierarchical setting. Gaussian processes model the stochastic nature of the spatial random effects, where the mean surface and the covariance function is specified. The spatial stochastic process is incorporated under the Bayesian hierarchical framework to explain the variation of PM2.5 concentrations together with other factors, such as AOD, spatial and non-spatial random effects. We evaluate the results of our model and compare them with those of other, conventional statistical models (GWR and LME) by within-sample model fitting and out-of-sample validation (cross validation, CV). The results show that our model possesses a CV result (R(2) = 0.81) that reflects higher accuracy than that of GWR and LME (0.74 and 0.48, respectively). Our results indicate that Gaussian process models have the potential to improve the accuracy of satellite-based PM2.5 estimates.

  17. Solving Inverse Problems with Piecewise Linear Estimators: From Gaussian Mixture Models to Structured Sparsity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-15

    of-the-art inpainting [31]. Portilla et al. have shown image denoising impressive results June 15, 2010 DRAFT 2 by assuming Gaussian scale mixture...beta and Dirichlet processes, which leads to excellent results in denoising and inpainting [71]. The now popular sparse signal models, on the other...b) (c) (d) Fig. 2. (a) Some typical dictionary atoms learned from the image Lena (Figure 3-(a)) with K- SVD [2]. (b)-(d) A numerical procedure to

  18. General second-order covariance of Gaussian maximum likelihood estimates applied to passive source localization in fluctuating waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bertsatos, Ioannis; Zanolin, Michele; Ratilal, Purnima; Chen, Tianrun; Makris, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    A method is provided for determining necessary conditions on sample size or signal to noise ratio (SNR) to obtain accurate parameter estimates from remote sensing measurements in fluctuating environments. These conditions are derived by expanding the bias and covariance of maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) in inverse orders of sample size or SNR, where the first-order covariance term is the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB). Necessary sample sizes or SNRs are determined by requiring that (i) the first-order bias and the second-order covariance are much smaller than the true parameter value and the CRLB, respectively, and (ii) the CRLB falls within desired error thresholds. An analytical expression is provided for the second-order covariance of MLEs obtained from general complex Gaussian data vectors, which can be used in many practical problems since (i) data distributions can often be assumed to be Gaussian by virtue of the central limit theorem, and (ii) it allows for both the mean and variance of the measurement to be functions of the estimation parameters. Here, conditions are derived to obtain accurate source localization estimates in a fluctuating ocean waveguide containing random internal waves, and the consequences of the loss of coherence on their accuracy are quantified.

  19. Ideogram-based Gaussian Estimator for the Model Uncertainty in the Extraction of Qw(p) from PVES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Qweak Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    As the Qweak collaboration gets closer to unblinding our final result, a method to account for the model uncertainty in the extraction of Qw(p) from a fit to existing parity-violating electron scattering data has been developed. Choices made in selecting the database used in the fit, the strange dipole mass, the functional form of GE, M s, axial constraints, charge-symmetry breaking effects, and in the electromagnetic form factors all contribute to this model uncertainty. An ideogram-inspired Gaussian estimator of this model uncertainty is derived from a fit to a sum of Gaussians, each characterized by the central value and uncertainty of the weak charge obtained from fits using each choice. The width of the resulting summed Gaussian is used to extract the model uncertainty in quadrature from the statistical and systematic errors assumed in the baseline analysis. Finally, this result is compared to the ``stand-alone'' weak charge determined from the single datum representing the asymmetry expected from the (as yet unblinded) Qweak experiment, using calculated electromagnetic, strange, and axial contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  20. Moments and Root-Mean-Square Error of the Bayesian MMSE Estimator of Classification Error in the Gaussian Model.

    PubMed

    Zollanvari, Amin; Dougherty, Edward R

    2014-06-01

    The most important aspect of any classifier is its error rate, because this quantifies its predictive capacity. Thus, the accuracy of error estimation is critical. Error estimation is problematic in small-sample classifier design because the error must be estimated using the same data from which the classifier has been designed. Use of prior knowledge, in the form of a prior distribution on an uncertainty class of feature-label distributions to which the true, but unknown, feature-distribution belongs, can facilitate accurate error estimation (in the mean-square sense) in circumstances where accurate completely model-free error estimation is impossible. This paper provides analytic asymptotically exact finite-sample approximations for various performance metrics of the resulting Bayesian Minimum Mean-Square-Error (MMSE) error estimator in the case of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in the multivariate Gaussian model. These performance metrics include the first, second, and cross moments of the Bayesian MMSE error estimator with the true error of LDA, and therefore, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of the estimator. We lay down the theoretical groundwork for Kolmogorov double-asymptotics in a Bayesian setting, which enables us to derive asymptotic expressions of the desired performance metrics. From these we produce analytic finite-sample approximations and demonstrate their accuracy via numerical examples. Various examples illustrate the behavior of these approximations and their use in determining the necessary sample size to achieve a desired RMS. The Supplementary Material contains derivations for some equations and added figures.

  1. Moments and Root-Mean-Square Error of the Bayesian MMSE Estimator of Classification Error in the Gaussian Model

    PubMed Central

    Zollanvari, Amin; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    The most important aspect of any classifier is its error rate, because this quantifies its predictive capacity. Thus, the accuracy of error estimation is critical. Error estimation is problematic in small-sample classifier design because the error must be estimated using the same data from which the classifier has been designed. Use of prior knowledge, in the form of a prior distribution on an uncertainty class of feature-label distributions to which the true, but unknown, feature-distribution belongs, can facilitate accurate error estimation (in the mean-square sense) in circumstances where accurate completely model-free error estimation is impossible. This paper provides analytic asymptotically exact finite-sample approximations for various performance metrics of the resulting Bayesian Minimum Mean-Square-Error (MMSE) error estimator in the case of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) in the multivariate Gaussian model. These performance metrics include the first, second, and cross moments of the Bayesian MMSE error estimator with the true error of LDA, and therefore, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of the estimator. We lay down the theoretical groundwork for Kolmogorov double-asymptotics in a Bayesian setting, which enables us to derive asymptotic expressions of the desired performance metrics. From these we produce analytic finite-sample approximations and demonstrate their accuracy via numerical examples. Various examples illustrate the behavior of these approximations and their use in determining the necessary sample size to achieve a desired RMS. The Supplementary Material contains derivations for some equations and added figures. PMID:24729636

  2. Robustness of Estimators of Long-range Dependence and Self-Similarity for Non-Gaussian Datasets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, N. W.; Franzke, C. L. E.; Graves, T.; Gramacy, R. B.; Hughes, C.

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity is ubiquitous in many natural systems like ecosystems, biological systems and climate. However, it is not always appreciated that both phenomena frequently occur together in natural systems, and that self-similarity of a system can result from the superposition of both phenomena. These features, which are common in complex systems, impact the attribution of trends and the occurrence and clustering of extremes. The risk assessment of systems posessing these properties will lead to different outcomes (e.g. return periods) than the more common assumption of independence of extremes. We discuss two paradigmatic models which can simultaneously account for long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity: Autoregressive Fractional Integrated Moving Average (ARFIMA) and Linear Fractional Stable Motion (LFSM). The statistical properties of estimators for long-range dependence and self-similarity are critically assessed as applied to these models. It is seen that the most popular estimators are not robust. In particular, they can be biased in the presence of important features of many natural systems like annual cycles, trends and multiplicative noise. [Related paper in press, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A; preprint at arXiv:1101.5018

  3. Estimation of continuous multi-DOF finger joint kinematics from surface EMG using a multi-output Gaussian Process.

    PubMed

    Ngeo, Jimson; Tamei, Tomoya; Shibata, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals have often been used in estimating upper and lower limb dynamics and kinematics for the purpose of controlling robotic devices such as robot prosthesis and finger exoskeletons. However, in estimating multiple and a high number of degrees-of-freedom (DOF) kinematics from EMG, output DOFs are usually estimated independently. In this study, we estimate finger joint kinematics from EMG signals using a multi-output convolved Gaussian Process (Multi-output Full GP) that considers dependencies between outputs. We show that estimation of finger joints from muscle activation inputs can be improved by using a regression model that considers inherent coupling or correlation within the hand and finger joints. We also provide a comparison of estimation performance between different regression methods, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) which is used by many of the related studies. We show that using a multi-output GP gives improved estimation compared to multi-output ANN and even dedicated or independent regression models.

  4. On the Linear Term Correction for Needlet/Wavelet Non-Gaussianity Estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, Simona; Hansen, Frode K.; Liguori, Michele; Marinucci, Domenico; Matarrese, Sabino

    2012-08-01

    We derive the linear correction term for needlet and wavelet estimators of the bispectrum and the nonlinearity parameter f NL on cosmic microwave background radiation data. We show that on masked WMAP-like data with anisotropic noise, the error bars improve by 10%-20% and almost reach the optimal error bars obtained with the bispectrum estimator also known as "KSW". In the limit of full-sky and isotropic noise, this term vanishes. We apply needlet and wavelet estimators to the WMAP 7-year data and obtain our best estimate f NL = 37.5 ± 21.8 (68% CL).

  5. ON THE LINEAR TERM CORRECTION FOR NEEDLET/WAVELET NON-GAUSSIANITY ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Donzelli, Simona; Hansen, Frode K.; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Marinucci, Domenico

    2012-08-10

    We derive the linear correction term for needlet and wavelet estimators of the bispectrum and the nonlinearity parameter f{sub NL} on cosmic microwave background radiation data. We show that on masked WMAP-like data with anisotropic noise, the error bars improve by 10%-20% and almost reach the optimal error bars obtained with the bispectrum estimator also known as 'KSW'. In the limit of full-sky and isotropic noise, this term vanishes. We apply needlet and wavelet estimators to the WMAP 7-year data and obtain our best estimate f{sub NL} = 37.5 {+-} 21.8 (68% CL).

  6. Gaussian process models for reference ET estimation from alternative meteorological data sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) are needed for efficient irrigation management, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where crop water demand exceeds rainfall. Daily grass or alfalfa reference ET values and crop coefficients are widely used to estimate crop water demand. ...

  7. Simultaneous Multiple Response Regression and Inverse Covariance Matrix Estimation via Penalized Gaussian Maximum Likelihood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonyul; Liu, Yufeng

    2012-10-01

    Multivariate regression is a common statistical tool for practical problems. Many multivariate regression techniques are designed for univariate response cases. For problems with multiple response variables available, one common approach is to apply the univariate response regression technique separately on each response variable. Although it is simple and popular, the univariate response approach ignores the joint information among response variables. In this paper, we propose three new methods for utilizing joint information among response variables. All methods are in a penalized likelihood framework with weighted L(1) regularization. The proposed methods provide sparse estimators of conditional inverse co-variance matrix of response vector given explanatory variables as well as sparse estimators of regression parameters. Our first approach is to estimate the regression coefficients with plug-in estimated inverse covariance matrices, and our second approach is to estimate the inverse covariance matrix with plug-in estimated regression parameters. Our third approach is to estimate both simultaneously. Asymptotic properties of these methods are explored. Our numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed methods perform competitively in terms of prediction, variable selection, as well as inverse covariance matrix estimation.

  8. Estimating modal abundances from the spectra of natural and laboratory pyroxene mixtures using the modified Gaussian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunshine, J. M.; Pieters, C. M.

    1993-05-01

    The modified Gaussian model (MGM) is used to explore spectra of samples containing multiple pyroxene components as a function of modal abundance. The MGM allows spectra to be analyzed directly, without the use of actual or assumed end-member spectra and therefore holds great promise for remote applications. A series of mass fraction mixtures created from several different particle size fractions are analyzed with the MGM to quantify the properties of pyroxene mixtures as a function of both modal abundance and grain size. Band centers, band widths, and relative band strengths of absorptions from individual pyroxenes in mixture spectra are found to be largely independent of particle size. Spectral properties of both zoned and exsolved pyroxene components are resolved in exsolved samples using the MGM, and modal abundances are accurately estimated to within 5-10 percent without predetermined knowledge of the end-member spectra.

  9. Estimating modal abundances from the spectra of natural and laboratory pyroxene mixtures using the modified Gaussian model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunshine, Jessica M.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1993-01-01

    The modified Gaussian model (MGM) is used to explore spectra of samples containing multiple pyroxene components as a function of modal abundance. The MGM allows spectra to be analyzed directly, without the use of actual or assumed end-member spectra and therefore holds great promise for remote applications. A series of mass fraction mixtures created from several different particle size fractions are analyzed with the MGM to quantify the properties of pyroxene mixtures as a function of both modal abundance and grain size. Band centers, band widths, and relative band strengths of absorptions from individual pyroxenes in mixture spectra are found to be largely independent of particle size. Spectral properties of both zoned and exsolved pyroxene components are resolved in exsolved samples using the MGM, and modal abundances are accurately estimated to within 5-10 percent without predetermined knowledge of the end-member spectra.

  10. Gaussian Light Field: Estimation of Viewpoint-Dependent Blur for Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuta; Amano, Toshiyuki; Iwai, Daisuke; Klinker, Gudrun

    2016-11-01

    We propose a method to calibrate viewpoint-dependent, channel-wise image blur of near-eye displays, especially of Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays (OST-HMDs). Imperfections in HMD optics cause channel-wise image shift and blur that degrade the image quality of the display at a user's viewpoint. If we can estimate such characteristics perfectly, we could mitigate the effect by applying correction techniques from the computational photography in computer vision as analogous to cameras. Unfortunately, directly applying existing calibration techniques of cameras to OST-HMDs is not a straightforward task. Unlike ordinary imaging systems, image blur in OST-HMDs is viewpoint-dependent, i.e., the optical characteristic of a display dynamically changes depending on the current viewpoint of the user. This constraint makes the problem challenging since we must measure image blur of an HMD, ideally, over the entire 3D eyebox in which a user can see an image. To overcome this problem, we model the viewpoint-dependent blur as a Gaussian Light Field (GLF) that stores spatial information of the display screen as a (4D) light field with depth information and the blur as point-spread functions in the form of Gaussian kernels, respectively. We first describe both our GLF model and a calibration procedure to learn a GLF for a given OST-HMD. We then apply our calibration method to two HMDs that use different optics: a cubic prism or holographic gratings. The results show that our method achieves significantly better accuracy in Point-Spread Function (PSF) estimations with an accuracy about 2 to 7 dB in Peak SNR.

  11. Estimation of linear observer templates in the presence of multi-peaked gaussian noise through 2AFC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Darrin C.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Metz, Charles E.

    2000-04-01

    We extend a method for linear template estimation developed by Abbey et al. which demonstrated that a linear observer template can be estimated effectively through a two- alternative forced choice (2AFC) experiment, assuming the noise in the images is Gaussian, or multivariate normal (MVN). We relax this assumption, allowing the noise in the images to be drawn from a weighted sum of MVN distributions, which we call a multi-peaked MVN (MPMVN) distribution. Our motivation is that more complicated probability density functions might be approximated in general by such MPMVN distributions. Our extension of Abbey et al.'s method requires us to impose the additional constraint that the covariance matrices of the component peaks of the signal-present noise distribution all be equal, and that the covariance matrices of the component peaks of the signal-absent noise distribution all be equal (but different in general from the signal-present covariance matrices). Preliminary research shows that our generalized method is capable of producing unbiased estimates of linear observer templates in the presence of MPMVN noise under the stated assumptions. We believe this extension represents a next step toward the general treatment of arbitrary image noise distributions.

  12. Iterative Procedures for Exact Maximum Likelihood Estimation in the First-Order Gaussian Moving Average Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    findings contained in this report are thosE Df the author(s) and should not he construed as an official Department Df the Army position, policy , or...Marquardt methods" to perform linear and nonlinear estimations. One idea in this area by Box and Jenkins (1976) was the " backcasting " procedure to evaluate

  13. Randomized Unscented Transform in State Estimation of Non-Gaussian Systems: Algorithms and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    analysis with respect to the description of random quantities . A gen- eral solution to recursive state estimation problems within the Bayesian framework...and the proposed algo- rithm is illustrated in a numerical example. The analysis of the numerical example involves a comparison of several filters...approxima- tion of pdf’s [14], [15] and using approximation techniques of the local methods, (ii) the numerical approach using point- mass

  14. Gaussian wavelet transform and classifier to reliably estimate latency of multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP).

    PubMed

    Thie, Johnson; Sriram, Prema; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method to reliably estimate latency of multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) and a classifier to automatically separate reliable mfVEP traces from noisy traces. We also investigated which mfVEP peaks have reproducible latency across recording sessions. The proposed method performs cross-correlation between mfVEP traces and second order Gaussian wavelet kernels and measures the timing of the resulting peaks. These peak times offset by the wavelet kernel's peak time represents the mfVEP latency. The classifier algorithm performs an exhaustive series of leave-one-out classifications to find the champion mfVEP features which are most frequently selected to infer reliable traces from noisy traces. Monopolar mfVEP recording was performed on 10 subjects using the Accumap1™ system. Pattern-reversal protocol was used with 24 sectors and eccentricity upto 33°. A bipolar channel was recorded at midline with electrodes placed above and below the inion. The largest mfVEP peak and the immediate peak prior had the smallest latency variability across recording sessions, about ±2ms. The optimal classifier selected three champion features, namely, signal-to-noise ratio, the signal's peak magnitude response from 5 to 15Hz and the peak-to-peak amplitude of the trace between 70 and 250 ms. The classifier algorithm can separate reliable and noisy traces with a high success rate, typically 93%. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cluster Analysis and Gaussian Mixture Estimation of Correlated Time-Series by Means of Multi-dimensional Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibuki, Takero; Suzuki, Sei; Inoue, Jun-ichi

    We investigate cross-correlations between typical Japanese stocks collected through Yahoo!Japan website ( http://finance.yahoo.co.jp/ ). By making use of multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) for the cross-correlation matrices, we draw two-dimensional scattered plots in which each point corresponds to each stock. To make a clustering for these data plots, we utilize the mixture of Gaussians to fit the data set to several Gaussian densities. By minimizing the so-called Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) with respect to parameters in the mixture, we attempt to specify the best possible mixture of Gaussians. It might be naturally assumed that all the two-dimensional data points of stocks shrink into a single small region when some economic crisis takes place. The justification of this assumption is numerically checked for the empirical Japanese stock data, for instance, those around 11 March 2011.

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters of a bivariate Gaussian-Weibull distribution from machine stress-rated data

    Treesearch

    Steve P. Verrill; David E. Kretschmann; James W. Evans

    2016-01-01

    Two important wood properties are stiffness (modulus of elasticity, MOE) and bending strength (modulus of rupture, MOR). In the past, MOE has often been modeled as a Gaussian and MOR as a lognormal or a two- or threeparameter Weibull. It is well known that MOE and MOR are positively correlated. To model the simultaneous behavior of MOE and MOR for the purposes of wood...

  17. From almost Gaussian to Gaussian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Max H. M.; Rioul, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    We consider lower and upper bounds on the difference of differential entropies of a Gaussian random vector and an approximately Gaussian random vector after they are "smoothed" by an arbitrarily distributed random vector of finite power. These bounds are important to establish the optimality of the corner points in the capacity region of Gaussian interference channels. A problematic issue in a previous attempt to establish these bounds was detected in 2004 and the mentioned corner points have since been dubbed "the missing corner points". The importance of the given bounds comes from the fact that they induce Fano-type inequalities for the Gaussian interference channel. Usual Fano inequalities are based on a communication requirement. In this case, the new inequalities are derived from a non-disturbance constraint. The upper bound on the difference of differential entropies is established by the data processing inequality (DPI). For the lower bound, we do not have a complete proof, but we present an argument based on continuity and the DPI.

  18. Out-of-plane motion estimation based on a Rician-Inverse Gaussian model of RF ultrasound signals: speckle tracking without fully developed speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsham, N.; Najafi, M.; Abolmaesumi, P.; Rohling, R.

    2012-03-01

    Fully developed speckle has been used previously to estimate the out-of-plane motion of ultrasound images. However, in real tissue the rarity of such patterns and the presence of coherency diminish both the precision and the accuracy of the out-of-plane motion estimation. In this paper, for the first time, we propose a simple mathematical derivation for out-of-plane motion estimation in which the coherent and non-coherent parts of the RF echo signal are separated. This method is based on the Rician-Inverse Gaussian stochastic model of the speckle formation process, which can be considered as a generalized form of the K-distribution with richer parameterization. The flexibility of the proposed method allows considering any patch of the RF echo signal for the purpose of displacement estimation. The experimental results on real tissue demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for accurate out-of-plane estimation. The underestimation of motion in ex vivo bovine tissue at 1 mm displacement is reduced to 15.5% compared to 37% for a base-line method.

  19. Identifying outliers of non-Gaussian groundwater state data based on ensemble estimation for long-term trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jina; Park, Eungyu; Han, Weon Shik; Kim, Kueyoung; Choung, Sungwook; Chung, Il Moon

    2017-05-01

    A hydrogeological dataset often includes substantial deviations that need to be inspected. In the present study, three outlier identification methods - the three sigma rule (3σ), inter quantile range (IQR), and median absolute deviation (MAD) - that take advantage of the ensemble regression method are proposed by considering non-Gaussian characteristics of groundwater data. For validation purposes, the performance of the methods is compared using simulated and actual groundwater data with a few hypothetical conditions. In the validations using simulated data, all of the proposed methods reasonably identify outliers at a 5% outlier level; whereas, only the IQR method performs well for identifying outliers at a 30% outlier level. When applying the methods to real groundwater data, the outlier identification performance of the IQR method is found to be superior to the other two methods. However, the IQR method shows limitation by identifying excessive false outliers, which may be overcome by its joint application with other methods (for example, the 3σ rule and MAD methods). The proposed methods can be also applied as potential tools for the detection of future anomalies by model training based on currently available data.

  20. A tight distance-dependent estimator for screening three-center Coulomb integrals over Gaussian basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollman, David S.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2015-04-01

    A new estimator for three-center two-particle Coulomb integrals is presented. Our estimator is exact for some classes of integrals and is much more efficient than the standard Schwartz counterpart due to the proper account of distance decay. Although it is not a rigorous upper bound, the maximum degree of underestimation can be controlled by two adjustable parameters. We also give numerical evidence of the excellent tightness of the estimator. The use of the estimator will lead to increased efficiency in reduced-scaling one- and many-body electronic structure theories.

  1. On the Equivalence of Maximum SNR and MMSE Estimation: Applications to Additive Non-Gaussian Channels and Quantized Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugini, Luca; Banelli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    The minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) is one of the most popular criteria for Bayesian estimation. Conversely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a typical performance criterion in communications, radar, and generally detection theory. In this paper we first formalize an SNR criterion to design an estimator, and then we prove that there exists an equivalence between MMSE and maximum-SNR estimators, for any statistics. We also extend this equivalence to specific classes of suboptimal estimators, which are expressed by a basis expansion model (BEM). Then, by exploiting an orthogonal BEM for the estimator, we derive the MMSE estimator constrained to a given quantization resolution of the noisy observations, and we prove that this suboptimal MMSE estimator tends to the optimal MMSE estimator that uses an infinite resolution of the observation. Besides, we derive closed-form expressions for the mean-squared error (MSE) and for the SNR of the proposed suboptimal estimators, and we show that these expressions constitute tight, asymptotically exact, bounds for the optimal MMSE and maximum SNR.

  2. A tight distance-dependent estimator for screening three-center Coulomb integrals over Gaussian basis functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hollman, David S.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2015-04-21

    A new estimator for three-center two-particle Coulomb integrals is presented. Our estimator is exact for some classes of integrals and is much more efficient than the standard Schwartz counterpart due to the proper account of distance decay. Although it is not a rigorous upper bound, the maximum degree of underestimation can be controlled by two adjustable parameters. We also give numerical evidence of the excellent tightness of the estimator. The use of the estimator will lead to increased efficiency in reduced-scaling one- and many-body electronic structure theories.

  3. Gaussian processes-based predictive models to estimate reference ET from alternative meteorological data sources for irrigation scheduling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate estimates of daily crop evapotranspiration (ET) are needed for efficient irrigation management, especially in arid and semi-arid irrigated regions where crop water demand exceeds rainfall. The impact of inaccurate ET estimates can be tremendous in both irrigation cost and the increased dema...

  4. Gaussian Process Morphable Models.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Marcel; Gerig, Thomas; Jud, Christoph; Vetter, Thomas

    2017-08-14

    Models of shape variations have become a central component for the automated analysis of images. An important class of shape models are point distribution models (PDMs). These models represent a class of shapes as a normal distribution of point variations, whose parameters are estimated from example shapes. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to obtain a low-dimensional representation of the shape variation in terms of the leading principal components. In this paper, we propose a generalization of PDMs, which we refer to as Gaussian Process Morphable Models (GPMMs). We model the shape variations with a Gaussian process, which we represent using the leading components of its Karhunen-Loève expansion. To compute the expansion, we make use of an approximation scheme based on the Nyström method. The resulting model can be seen as a continuous analog of a standard PDM. However, while for PDMs the shape variation is restricted to the linear span of the example data, with GPMMs we can define the shape variation using any Gaussian process. For example, we can build shape models that correspond to classical spline models and thus do not require any example data. Furthermore, Gaussian processes make it possible to combine different models. For example, a PDM can be extended with a spline model, to obtain a model that incorporates learned shape characteristics but is flexible enough to explain shapes that cannot be represented by the PDM.

  5. Segmentation of 3D microPET images of the rat brain via the hybrid gaussian mixture method with kernel density estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Been; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2012-01-01

    Segmentation of positron emission tomography (PET) is typically achieved using the K-Means method or other approaches. In preclinical and clinical applications, the K-Means method needs a prior estimation of parameters such as the number of clusters and appropriate initialized values. This work segments microPET images using a hybrid method combining the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with kernel density estimation. Segmentation is crucial to registration of disordered 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) accumulation locations with functional diagnosis and to estimate standardized uptake values (SUVs) of region of interests (ROIs) in PET images. Therefore, simulation studies are conducted to apply spherical targets to evaluate segmentation accuracy based on Tanimoto's definition of similarity. The proposed method generates a higher degree of similarity than the K-Means method. The PET images of a rat brain are used to compare the segmented shape and area of the cerebral cortex by the K-Means method and the proposed method by volume rendering. The proposed method provides clearer and more detailed activity structures of an FDG accumulation location in the cerebral cortex than those by the K-Means method.

  6. Some results on Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgueiras, Miguel; Santos, Rui; Martins, João Paulo

    2014-10-01

    We investigate Gaussian mixtures with independent components, whose parameters are numerically estimated. A decomposition of a Gaussian mixture is presented when the components have a common variance. We introduce a shifted and scaled t-Student distribution as an approximation for the distribution of Gaussian mixtures when their components have a common mean and develop a hypothesis test for testing the equality of the components means. Finally, we analyse the fitness of the approximate model to the logarithmic daily returns of the Portuguese stock index PSI-20.

  7. Gaussian Decomposition of Laser Altimeter Waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofton, Michelle A.; Minster, J. Bernard; Blair, J. Bryan

    1999-01-01

    We develop a method to decompose a laser altimeter return waveform into its Gaussian components assuming that the position of each Gaussian within the waveform can be used to calculate the mean elevation of a specific reflecting surface within the laser footprint. We estimate the number of Gaussian components from the number of inflection points of a smoothed copy of the laser waveform, and obtain initial estimates of the Gaussian half-widths and positions from the positions of its consecutive inflection points. Initial amplitude estimates are obtained using a non-negative least-squares method. To reduce the likelihood of fitting the background noise within the waveform and to minimize the number of Gaussians needed in the approximation, we rank the "importance" of each Gaussian in the decomposition using its initial half-width and amplitude estimates. The initial parameter estimates of all Gaussians ranked "important" are optimized using the Levenburg-Marquardt method. If the sum of the Gaussians does not approximate the return waveform to a prescribed accuracy, then additional Gaussians are included in the optimization procedure. The Gaussian decomposition method is demonstrated on data collected by the airborne Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) in October 1997 over the Sequoia National Forest, California.

  8. Simulation and analysis of magnetic resonance elastography wave images using coupled harmonic oscillators and Gaussian local frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Buntkowsky, G; Bernarding, J; Tolxdorff, T; Sack, I

    2001-06-01

    New methods for simulating and analyzing Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) images are introduced. To simulate a two-dimensional shear wave pattern, the wave equation is solved for a field of coupled harmonic oscillators with spatially varying coupling and damping coefficients in the presence of an external force. The spatial distribution of the coupling and the damping constants are derived from an MR image of the investigated object. To validate the simulation as well as to derive the elasticity modules from experimental MRE images, the wave patterns are analyzed using a Local Frequency Estimation (LFE) algorithm based on Gauss filter functions with variable bandwidths. The algorithms are tested using an Agar gel phantom with spatially varying elasticity constants. Simulated wave patterns and LFE results show a high agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, brain images with estimated elasticities for gray and white matter as well as for exemplary tumor tissue are used to simulate experimental MRE data. The calculations show that already small distributions of pathologically changed brain tissue should be detectable by MRE even within the limit of relatively low shear wave excitation frequency around 0.2 kHz.

  9. Information geometry of Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-06-15

    We define a local Riemannian metric tensor in the manifold of Gaussian channels and the distance that it induces. We adopt an information-geometric approach and define a metric derived from the Bures-Fisher metric for quantum states. The resulting metric inherits several desirable properties from the Bures-Fisher metric and is operationally motivated by distinguishability considerations: It serves as an upper bound to the attainable quantum Fisher information for the channel parameters using Gaussian states, under generic constraints on the physically available resources. Our approach naturally includes the use of entangled Gaussian probe states. We prove that the metric enjoys some desirable properties like stability and covariance. As a by-product, we also obtain some general results in Gaussian channel estimation that are the continuous-variable analogs of previously known results in finite dimensions. We prove that optimal probe states are always pure and bounded in the number of ancillary modes, even in the presence of constraints on the reduced state input in the channel. This has experimental and computational implications. It limits the complexity of optimal experimental setups for channel estimation and reduces the computational requirements for the evaluation of the metric: Indeed, we construct a converging algorithm for its computation. We provide explicit formulas for computing the multiparametric quantum Fisher information for dissipative channels probed with arbitrary Gaussian states and provide the optimal observables for the estimation of the channel parameters (e.g., bath couplings, squeezing, and temperature).

  10. SU-E-J-164: Estimation of DVH Variation for PTV Due to Interfraction Organ Motion in Prostate VMAT Using Gaussian Error Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C; Jiang, R; Chow, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We developed a method to predict the change of DVH for PTV due to interfraction organ motion in prostate VMAT without repeating the CT scan and treatment planning. The method is based on a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curves of PTV modelled by the Gaussian error function (GEF). Methods: For a group of 30 patients with different prostate sizes, their VMAT plans were recalculated by shifting their PTVs 1 cm with 10 increments in the anterior-posterior, left-right and superior-inferior directions. The DVH curve of PTV in each replan was then fitted by the GEF to determine parameters describing the shape of curve. Information of parameters, varying with the DVH change due to prostate motion for different prostate sizes, was analyzed and stored in a database of a program written by MATLAB. Results: To predict a new DVH for PTV due to prostate interfraction motion, prostate size and shift distance with direction were input to the program. Parameters modelling the DVH for PTV were determined based on the pre-calculated patient dataset. From the new parameters, DVH curves of PTVs with and without considering the prostate motion were plotted for comparison. The program was verified with different prostate cases involving interfraction prostate shifts and replans. Conclusion: Variation of DVH for PTV in prostate VMAT can be predicted using a pre-calculated patient database with DVH curve fitting. The computing time is fast because CT rescan and replan are not required. This quick DVH estimation can help radiation staff to determine if the changed PTV coverage due to prostate shift is tolerable in the treatment. However, it should be noted that the program can only consider prostate interfraction motions along three axes, and is restricted to prostate VMAT plan using the same plan script in the treatment planning system.

  11. Binomial Gaussian mixture filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Piché, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for approximating a normal distribution with a weighted sum of normal distributions. The approximation is used for splitting normally distributed components in a Gaussian mixture filter, such that components have smaller covariances and cause smaller linearization errors when nonlinear measurements are used for the state update. Our splitting method uses weights from the binomial distribution as component weights. The method preserves the mean and covariance of the original normal distribution, and in addition, the resulting probability density and cumulative distribution functions converge to the original normal distribution when the number of components is increased. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to do the splitting such as to keep the linearization error below a given threshold with a minimum number of components. The accuracy of the estimate provided by the proposed method is evaluated in four simulated single-update cases and one time series tracking case. In these tests, it is found that the proposed method is more accurate than other Gaussian mixture filters found in the literature when the same number of components is used and that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than particle filters.

  12. Optimality of Gaussian Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-10-01

    In this Letter we exploit the recently solved conjecture on the bosonic minimum output entropy to show the optimality of Gaussian discord, so that the computation of quantum discord for bipartite Gaussian states can be restricted to local Gaussian measurements. We prove such optimality for a large family of Gaussian states, including all two-mode squeezed thermal states, which are the most typical Gaussian states realized in experiments. Our family also includes other types of Gaussian states and spans their entire set in a suitable limit where they become Choi matrices of Gaussian channels. As a result, we completely characterize the quantum correlations possessed by some of the most important bosonic states in quantum optics and quantum information.

  13. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  14. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  15. Gaussian Intrinsic Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišta, Ladislav; Tatham, Richard

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a cryptographically motivated quantifier of entanglement in bipartite Gaussian systems called Gaussian intrinsic entanglement (GIE). The GIE is defined as the optimized mutual information of a Gaussian distribution of outcomes of measurements on parts of a system, conditioned on the outcomes of a measurement on a purifying subsystem. We show that GIE vanishes only on separable states and exhibits monotonicity under Gaussian local trace-preserving operations and classical communication. In the two-mode case, we compute GIE for all pure states as well as for several important classes of symmetric and asymmetric mixed states. Surprisingly, in all of these cases, GIE is equal to Gaussian Rényi-2 entanglement. As GIE is operationally associated with the secret-key agreement protocol and can be computed for several important classes of states, it offers a compromise between computable and physically meaningful entanglement quantifiers.

  16. Variational learning for Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Nasios, Nikolaos; Bors, Adrian G

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes a joint maximum likelihood and Bayesian methodology for estimating Gaussian mixture models. In Bayesian inference, the distributions of parameters are modeled, characterized by hyperparameters. In the case of Gaussian mixtures, the distributions of parameters are considered as Gaussian for the mean, Wishart for the covariance, and Dirichlet for the mixing probability. The learning task consists of estimating the hyperparameters characterizing these distributions. The integration in the parameter space is decoupled using an unsupervised variational methodology entitled variational expectation-maximization (VEM). This paper introduces a hyperparameter initialization procedure for the training algorithm. In the first stage, distributions of parameters resulting from successive runs of the expectation-maximization algorithm are formed. Afterward, maximum-likelihood estimators are applied to find appropriate initial values for the hyperparameters. The proposed initialization provides faster convergence, more accurate hyperparameter estimates, and better generalization for the VEM training algorithm. The proposed methodology is applied in blind signal detection and in color image segmentation.

  17. Information bounds for Gaussian copulas

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Peter D.; Niu, Xiaoyue; Wellner, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    Often of primary interest in the analysis of multivariate data are the copula parameters describing the dependence among the variables, rather than the univariate marginal distributions. Since the ranks of a multivariate dataset are invariant to changes in the univariate marginal distributions, rank-based estimators are natural candidates for semiparametric copula estimation. Asymptotic information bounds for such estimators can be obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the rank likelihood, i.e. the probability of the multivariate ranks. In this article, we obtain limiting normal distributions of the rank likelihood for Gaussian copula models. Our results cover models with structured correlation matrices, such as exchangeable or circular correlation models, as well as unstructured correlation matrices. For all Gaussian copula models, the limiting distribution of the rank likelihood ratio is shown to be equal to that of a parametric likelihood ratio for an appropriately chosen multivariate normal model. This implies that the semiparametric information bounds for rank-based estimators are the same as the information bounds for estimators based on the full data, and that the multivariate normal distributions are least favorable. PMID:25313292

  18. Gaussian Multipole Model (GMM)

    PubMed Central

    Elking, Dennis M.; Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    An electrostatic model based on charge density is proposed as a model for future force fields. The model is composed of a nucleus and a single Slater-type contracted Gaussian multipole charge density on each atom. The Gaussian multipoles are fit to the electrostatic potential (ESP) calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* and HF/aug-cc-pVTZ levels of theory and tested by comparing electrostatic dimer energies, inter-molecular density overlap integrals, and permanent molecular multipole moments with their respective ab initio values. For the case of water, the atomic Gaussian multipole moments Qlm are shown to be a smooth function of internal geometry (bond length and bond angle), which can be approximated by a truncated linear Taylor series. In addition, results are given when the Gaussian multipole charge density is applied to a model for exchange-repulsion energy based on the inter-molecular density overlap. PMID:20209077

  19. George: Gaussian Process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    George is a fast and flexible library, implemented in C++ with Python bindings, for Gaussian Process regression useful for accounting for correlated noise in astronomical datasets, including those for transiting exoplanet discovery and characterization and stellar population modeling.

  20. Are Bragg Peaks Gaussian?

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, Boualem

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice to assume that Bragg scattering peaks have Gaussian shape. The Gaussian shape function is used to perform most instrumental smearing corrections. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulation, the resolution of a realistic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument is generated reliably. Including a single-crystal sample with large d-spacing, Bragg peaks are produced. Bragg peaks contain contributions from the resolution function and from spread in the sample structure. Results show that Bragg peaks are Gaussian in the resolution-limited condition (with negligible sample spread) while this is not the case when spread in the sample structure is non-negligible. When sample spread contributes, the exponentially modified Gaussian function is a better account of the Bragg peak shape. This function is characterized by a non-zero third moment (skewness) which makes Bragg peaks asymmetric for broad neutron wavelength spreads. PMID:26601025

  1. Gaussian operations and privacy

    SciTech Connect

    Navascues, Miguel; Acin, Antonio

    2005-07-15

    We consider the possibilities offered by Gaussian states and operations for two honest parties, Alice and Bob, to obtain privacy against a third eavesdropping party, Eve. We first extend the security analysis of the protocol proposed in [Navascues et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 010502 (2005)]. Then, we prove that a generalized version of this protocol does not allow one to distill a secret key out of bound entangled Gaussian states.

  2. Gaussian quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedbrook, Christian; Pirandola, Stefano; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Ralph, Timothy C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Lloyd, Seth

    2012-04-01

    The science of quantum information has arisen over the last two decades centered on the manipulation of individual quanta of information, known as quantum bits or qubits. Quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum teleportation are among the most celebrated ideas that have emerged from this new field. It was realized later on that using continuous-variable quantum information carriers, instead of qubits, constitutes an extremely powerful alternative approach to quantum information processing. This review focuses on continuous-variable quantum information processes that rely on any combination of Gaussian states, Gaussian operations, and Gaussian measurements. Interestingly, such a restriction to the Gaussian realm comes with various benefits, since on the theoretical side, simple analytical tools are available and, on the experimental side, optical components effecting Gaussian processes are readily available in the laboratory. Yet, Gaussian quantum information processing opens the way to a wide variety of tasks and applications, including quantum communication, quantum cryptography, quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and quantum state and channel discrimination. This review reports on the state of the art in this field, ranging from the basic theoretical tools and landmark experimental realizations to the most recent successful developments.

  3. CS2 analysis in presence of non-Gaussian background noise - Effect on traditional estimators and resilience of log-envelope indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.; Antoni, J.

    2017-06-01

    Second-order cyclostationary (CS2) analysis has become popular in the field of machine diagnostics and a series of digital signal processing techniques have been developed to extract CS2 components from the background noise. Among those techniques, squared envelope spectrum (SES) and cyclic modulation spectrum (CMS) have gained popularity thanks to their high computational efficiency and simple implementation. The effectiveness of CMS and SES has been previously quantified based on the hypothesis of Gaussian background noise and has led to statistical tests for the presence of CS2 peaks in squared envelope spectra and cyclic modulation spectra. However a recently established link of CMS with SES and of SES with kurtosis has exposed a potential weakness of those indicators in the case of highly leptokurtic background noise. This case is often present in practice when the machine is subjected to highly impulsive phenomena, either due to harsh operating conditions or to electric noise generated by power electronics and captured by the sensor. This study investigates and quantifies for the first time the effect of leptokurtic noise on the capabilities of SES and CMS, by analysing three progressively harsh situations: high kurtosis, infinite kurtosis and alpha-stable background noise (for which even first and second-order moments are not defined). Then the resilience of a recently proposed family of CS2 indicators, based on the log-envelope, is verified analytically, numerically and experimentally in the case of highly leptokurtic noise.

  4. Semisupervised Gaussian Process for Automated Enzyme Search.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Joseph; Grigoras, Ioana; Carbonell, Pablo; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-06-17

    Synthetic biology is today harnessing the design of novel and greener biosynthesis routes for the production of added-value chemicals and natural products. The design of novel pathways often requires a detailed selection of enzyme sequences to import into the chassis at each of the reaction steps. To address such design requirements in an automated way, we present here a tool for exploring the space of enzymatic reactions. Given a reaction and an enzyme the tool provides a probability estimate that the enzyme catalyzes the reaction. Our tool first considers the similarity of a reaction to known biochemical reactions with respect to signatures around their reaction centers. Signatures are defined based on chemical transformation rules by using extended connectivity fingerprint descriptors. A semisupervised Gaussian process model associated with the similar known reactions then provides the probability estimate. The Gaussian process model uses information about both the reaction and the enzyme in providing the estimate. These estimates were validated experimentally by the application of the Gaussian process model to a newly identified metabolite in Escherichia coli in order to search for the enzymes catalyzing its associated reactions. Furthermore, we show with several pathway design examples how such ability to assign probability estimates to enzymatic reactions provides the potential to assist in bioengineering applications, providing experimental validation to our proposed approach. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed approach is the first application of Gaussian processes dealing with biological sequences and chemicals, the use of a semisupervised Gaussian process framework is also novel in the context of machine learning applied to bioinformatics. However, the ability of an enzyme to catalyze a reaction depends on the affinity between the substrates of the reaction and the enzyme. This affinity is generally quantified by the Michaelis constant KM

  5. Gaussian particle flow implementation of PHD filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Wang, Junjie; Li, Yunpeng; Coates, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Particle filter and Gaussian mixture implementations of random finite set filters have been proposed to tackle the issue of jointly estimating the number of targets and their states. The Gaussian mixture PHD (GM-PHD) filter has a closed-form expression for the PHD for linear and Gaussian target models, and extensions using the extended Kalman filter or unscented Kalman Filter have been developed to allow the GM-PHD filter to accommodate mildly nonlinear dynamics. Errors resulting from linearization or model mismatch are unavoidable. A particle filter implementation of the PHD filter (PF-PHD) is more suitable for nonlinear and non-Gaussian target models. The particle filter implementations are much more computationally expensive and performance can suffer when the proposal distribution is not a good match to the posterior. In this paper, we propose a novel implementation of the PHD filter named the Gaussian particle flow PHD filter (GPF-PHD). It employs a bank of particle flow filters to approximate the PHD; these play the same role as the Gaussian components in the GM-PHD filter but are better suited to non-linear dynamics and measurement equations. Using the particle flow filter allows the GPF-PHD filter to migrate particles to the dense regions of the posterior, which leads to higher efficiency than the PF-PHD. We explore the performance of the new algorithm through numerical simulations.

  6. Evaluation of Bayesian source estimation methods with Prairie Grass observations and Gaussian plume model: A comparison of likelihood functions and distance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Hong; Huang, Lida; Ristic, Branko

    2017-03-01

    Source term estimation for atmospheric dispersion deals with estimation of the emission strength and location of an emitting source using all available information, including site description, meteorological data, concentration observations and prior information. In this paper, Bayesian methods for source term estimation are evaluated using Prairie Grass field observations. The methods include those that require the specification of the likelihood function and those which are likelihood free, also known as approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) methods. The performances of five different likelihood functions in the former and six different distance measures in the latter case are compared for each component of the source parameter vector based on Nemenyi test over all the 68 data sets available in the Prairie Grass field experiment. Several likelihood functions and distance measures are introduced to source term estimation for the first time. Also, ABC method is improved in many aspects. Results show that discrepancy measures which refer to likelihood functions and distance measures collectively have significant influence on source estimation. There is no single winning algorithm, but these methods can be used collectively to provide more robust estimates.

  7. Inhomogeneous non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Christian T.; Nurmi, Sami; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Wands, David E-mail: s.nurmi@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2012-03-01

    We propose a method to probe higher-order correlators of the primordial density field through the inhomogeneity of local non-Gaussian parameters, such as f{sub NL}, measured within smaller patches of the sky. Correlators between n-point functions measured in one patch of the sky and k-point functions measured in another patch depend upon the (n+k)-point functions over the entire sky. The inhomogeneity of non-Gaussian parameters may be a feasible way to detect or constrain higher- order correlators in local models of non-Gaussianity, as well as to distinguish between single and multiple-source scenarios for generating the primordial density perturbation, and more generally to probe the details of inflationary physics.

  8. Asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A; Porfirev, Alexey P

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a Gaussian optical beam with an embedded off-axis optical vortex. We also experimentally generate such an asymmetric Gaussian optical vortex by using an off-axis spiral phase plate. It is shown that depending on the shift distance the laser beam has the form of a crescent, which is rotated upon propagation. An analytical expression is obtained for the orbital angular momentum of such a beam, which appears to be fractional. When the shift increases, the greater the number of spirality of the phase plate or the "fork" hologram, the slower the momentum decreases. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the theory.

  9. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  10. On Gaussian feedback capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    Pinsker and Ebert (1970) proved that in channels with additive Gaussian noise, feedback at most doubles the capacity. Cover and Pombra (1989) proved that feedback at most adds half a bit per transmission. Following their approach, the author proves that in the limit as signal power approaches either zero (very low SNR) or infinity (very high SNR), feedback does not increase the finite block-length capacity (which for nonstationary Gaussian channels replaces the standard notion of capacity that may not exist). Tighter upper bounds on the capacity are obtained in the process. Specializing these results to stationary channels, the author recovers some of the bounds recently obtained by Ozarow.

  11. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  12. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Dickey, John

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  13. Optimal Gaussian entanglement swapping

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelscher-Obermaier, Jason; Loock, Peter van

    2011-01-15

    We consider entanglement swapping with general mixed two-mode Gaussian states and calculate the optimal gains for a broad class of such states including those states most relevant in communication scenarios. We show that, for this class of states, entanglement swapping adds no additional mixedness; that is, the ensemble-average output state has the same purity as the input states. This implies that, by using intermediate entanglement swapping steps, it is, in principle, possible to distribute entangled two-mode Gaussian states of higher purity as compared to direct transmission. We then apply the general results on optimal Gaussian swapping to the problem of quantum communication over a lossy fiber and demonstrate that, in contrast to the negative conclusions in the literature, swapping-based schemes in fact often perform better than direct transmission for high input squeezing. However, an effective transmission analysis reveals that the hope for improved performance based on optimal Gaussian entanglement swapping is spurious since the swapping does not lead to an enhancement of the effective transmission. This implies that the same or better results can always be obtained using direct transmission in combination with, in general, less squeezing.

  14. Speech Enhancement Using Gaussian Scale Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiucang; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-08-11

    This paper presents a novel probabilistic approach to speech enhancement. Instead of a deterministic logarithmic relationship, we assume a probabilistic relationship between the frequency coefficients and the log-spectra. The speech model in the log-spectral domain is a Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The frequency coefficients obey a zero-mean Gaussian whose covariance equals to the exponential of the log-spectra. This results in a Gaussian scale mixture model (GSMM) for the speech signal in the frequency domain, since the log-spectra can be regarded as scaling factors. The probabilistic relation between frequency coefficients and log-spectra allows these to be treated as two random variables, both to be estimated from the noisy signals. Expectation-maximization (EM) was used to train the GSMM and Bayesian inference was used to compute the posterior signal distribution. Because exact inference of this full probabilistic model is computationally intractable, we developed two approaches to enhance the efficiency: the Laplace method and a variational approximation. The proposed methods were applied to enhance speech corrupted by Gaussian noise and speech-shaped noise (SSN). For both approximations, signals reconstructed from the estimated frequency coefficients provided higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and those reconstructed from the estimated log-spectra produced lower word recognition error rate because the log-spectra fit the inputs to the recognizer better. Our algorithms effectively reduced the SSN, which algorithms based on spectral analysis were not able to suppress.

  15. Temperature modes for nonlinear Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Myers, Matthew R; Soneson, Joshua E

    2009-07-01

    In assessing the influence of nonlinear acoustic propagation on thermal bioeffects, approximate methods for quickly estimating the temperature rise as operational parameters are varied can be very useful. This paper provides a formula for the transient temperature rise associated with nonlinear propagation of Gaussian beams. The pressure amplitudes for the Gaussian modes can be obtained rapidly using a method previously published for simulating nonlinear propagation of Gaussian beams. The temperature-mode series shows that the nth temperature mode generated by nonlinear propagation, when normalized by the fundamental, is weaker than the nth heat-rate mode (also normalized by the fundamental in the heat-rate series) by a factor of log(n)/n, where n is the mode number. Predictions of temperature rise and thermal dose were found to be in close agreement with full, finite-difference calculations of the pressure fields, temperature rise, and thermal dose. Applications to non-Gaussian beams were made by fitting the main lobe of the significant modes to Gaussian functions.

  16. Note on non-Gaussianities in two-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tower

    2010-12-01

    Two-field slow-roll inflation is the most conservative modification of a single-field model. The main motivations to study it are its entropic mode and non-Gaussianity. Several years ago, for a two-field model with additive separable potentials, Vernizzi and Wands invented an analytic method to estimate its non-Gaussianities. Later on, Choi et al. applied this method to the model with multiplicative separable potentials. In this note, we design a larger class of models whose non-Gaussianity can be estimated by the same method. Under some simplistic assumptions, roughly these models are unlikely able to generate a large non-Gaussianity. We look over some specific models of this class by scanning the full parameter space, but still no large non-Gaussianity appears in the slow-roll region. These models and scanning techniques would be useful for a future model hunt if observational evidence shows up for two-field inflation.

  17. On Gaussian random supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2014-04-01

    We study the distribution of metastable vacua and the likelihood of slow roll inflation in high dimensional random landscapes. We consider two examples of landscapes: a Gaussian random potential and an effective supergravity potential defined via a Gaussian random superpotential and a trivial Kähler potential. To examine these landscapes we introduce a random matrix model that describes the correlations between various derivatives and we propose an efficient algorithm that allows for a numerical study of high dimensional random fields. Using these novel tools, we find that the vast majority of metastable critical points in N dimensional random supergravities are either approximately supersymmetric with | F| ≪ M susy or supersymmetric. Such approximately supersymmetric points are dynamical attractors in the landscape and the probability that a randomly chosen critical point is metastable scales as log( P ) ∝ - N. We argue that random supergravities lead to potentially interesting inflationary dynamics.

  18. Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    redundant model of the data to be used in classification . There are two classes of learning, or adaptation schemes. The first, unsupervised learning...37, No. 3, pp. 242-247, 1983. [2] E. F. Codd, Cellular Automata , Academic Press, 1968. [31 H. Everett, G. Gilbreath, S. Alderson, D. J. Marchette...Na al Oca aytm aete !JTI FL E COPY AD-A 199 030 Technical Document 1335 August 1988 Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classif ication C. E. Priebe D. J

  19. Mode Gaussian beam tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, M. Yu.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A mode parabolic equation in the ray centered coordinates for 3D underwater sound propagation is developed. The Gaussian beam tracing in this case is constructed. The test calculations are carried out for the ASA wedge benchmark and proved an excellent agreement with the source images method in the case of cross-slope propagation. But in the cases of wave propagation at some angles to the cross-slope direction an account of mode interaction becomes necessary.

  20. Resonant non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: ep295@cornell.edu

    2011-01-01

    We provide a derivation from first principles of the primordial bispectrum of scalar perturbations produced during inflation driven by a canonically normalized scalar field whose potential exhibits small sinusoidal modulations. A potential of this type has been derived in a class of string theory models of inflation based on axion monodromy. We use this model as a concrete example, but we present our derivations and results for a general slow-roll potential with superimposed modulations. We show analytically that a resonance between the oscillations of the background and the oscillations of the fluctuations is responsible for the production of an observably large non-Gaussian signal. We provide an explicit expression for the shape of this resonant non-Gaussianity. We show that there is essentially no overlap between this shape and the local, equilateral, and orthogonal shapes, and we stress that resonant non-Gaussianity is not captured by the simplest version of the effective field theory of inflation. We hope our analytic expression will be useful to further observationally constrain this class of models.

  1. Non-Gaussianity effects in petrophysical quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koohi Lai, Z.; Jafari, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    It has been proved that there are many indicators (petrophysical quantities) for the estimation of petroleum reservoirs. The value of information contained in each indicator is yet to be addressed. In this work, the most famous and applicable petrophysical quantities for a reservoir, which are the gamma emission (GR), sonic transient time (DT), neutron porosity (NPHI), bulk density (RHOB), and deep induced resistivity (ILD), have been analyzed in order to characterize a reservoir. The implemented technique is the well-logging method. Based on the log-normal model defined in random multiplicative processes, the probability distribution function (PDF) for the data sets is described. The shape of the PDF depends on the parameter λ2 which determines the efficiency of non-Gaussianity. When non-Gaussianity appears, it is a sign of uncertainty and phase transition in the critical regime. The large value and scale-invariant behavior of the non-Gaussian parameter λ2 is an indication of a new phase which proves adequate for the existence of petroleum reservoirs. Our results show that one of the indicators (GR) is more non-Gaussian than the other indicators, scale wise. This means that GR is a continuously critical indicator. But by moving windows with various scales, the estimated λ2 shows that the most appropriate indicator for distinguishing the critical regime is ILD, which shows an increase at the end of the measured region of the well.

  2. An analysis of a non-Gaussian, Gaussian laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, T. Sean

    2006-02-01

    It is possible to construct summations of Laguerre-Gaussian modes which have the appearance of a zero order fundamental Gaussian but which, in fact, have no zero order content. These examples have circulated informally as a warning against trusting a single beam profile measurement as to the indication of the modal content of a given beam. These 'non-Gaussian' Gaussian beams also turn out to be extremely revealing of the fundamental assumptions upon which all modal decompositions and modal-based beam quality measures are based upon. Due to the contrived nature of these beams, they are also subject to some very subtle but important theoretical errors. This paper will rigorously examine a 'non-Gaussian', Gaussian beam in terms of its amplitude and phase characteristics, propagation behavior, M2 and what it reveals about modal decompositions and modal beam quality measures in general.

  3. Truncated Gaussians as tolerance sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozman, Fabio; Krotkov, Eric

    1994-01-01

    This work focuses on the use of truncated Gaussian distributions as models for bounded data measurements that are constrained to appear between fixed limits. The authors prove that the truncated Gaussian can be viewed as a maximum entropy distribution for truncated bounded data, when mean and covariance are given. The characteristic function for the truncated Gaussian is presented; from this, algorithms are derived for calculation of mean, variance, summation, application of Bayes rule and filtering with truncated Gaussians. As an example of the power of their methods, a derivation of the disparity constraint (used in computer vision) from their models is described. The authors' approach complements results in Statistics, but their proposal is not only to use the truncated Gaussian as a model for selected data; they propose to model measurements as fundamentally in terms of truncated Gaussians.

  4. Elliptic Gaussian optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze an elliptic optical vortex embedded into a Gaussian beam. Explicit closed expressions for the complex amplitude and normalized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of such a beam are derived. The resulting elliptic Gaussian vortex (EGV) is shown to have a fractional OAM whose maximal value equal to the topological charge n of a conventional Gauss vortex is attained for a zero-ellipticity vortex. As the beam propagates, the major axis of the intensity ellipse in the beam cross section rotates, making the angle of 90° between the initial plane and the focal plane of a spherical lens. On the major axis of the intensity ellipse, there are n intensity nulls of the EGV, with the distance between them varying with propagation distance and varying ellipticity. The distance between the intensity nulls is found to be maximal in the focal plane for a given ellipticity. For zero ellipticity, all intensity nulls get merged into a single n -times degenerate on-axis intensity null. The experimental results are in good agreement with theory.

  5. Bayesian source separation with mixture of Gaussians prior for sources and Gaussian prior for mixture coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoussi, Hichem; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2001-05-01

    In this contribution, we present new algorithms to source separation for the case of noisy instantaneous linear mixture, within the Bayesian statistical framework. The source distribution prior is modeled by a mixture of Gaussians [1] and the mixing matrix elements distributions by a Gaussian [2]. We model the mixture of Gaussians hierarchically by mean of hidden variables representing the labels of the mixture. Then, we consider the joint a posteriori distribution of sources, mixing matrix elements, labels of the mixture and other parameters of the mixture with appropriate prior probability laws to eliminate degeneracy of the likelihood function of variance parameters and we propose two iterative algorithms to estimate jointly sources, mixing matrix and hyperparameters: Joint MAP (Maximum a posteriori) algorithm and penalized EM algorithm. The illustrative example is taken in [3] to compare with other algorithms proposed in literature. .

  6. Holographic non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas E-mail: K.Skenderis@uva.nl

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the non-Gaussianity of primordial cosmological perturbations within our recently proposed holographic description of inflationary universes. We derive a holographic formula that determines the bispectrum of cosmological curvature perturbations in terms of correlation functions of a holographically dual three-dimensional non-gravitational quantum field theory (QFT). This allows us to compute the primordial bispectrum for a universe which started in a non-geometric holographic phase, using perturbative QFT calculations. Strikingly, for a class of models specified by a three-dimensional super-renormalisable QFT, the primordial bispectrum is of exactly the factorisable equilateral form with f{sub NL}{sup equil.} = 5/36, irrespective of the details of the dual QFT. A by-product of this investigation is a holographic formula for the three-point function of the trace of the stress-energy tensor along general holographic RG flows, which should have applications outside the remit of this work.

  7. Non-Gaussian extrema counts for CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Pichon, Christophe; Gay, Christophe

    2011-10-15

    In the context of the geometrical analysis of weakly non-Gaussian cosmic microwave background maps, the 2D differential extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold is derived from the full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian. Analytic expressions for these counts are given to second order in the non-Gaussian correction, while a Monte Carlo method to compute them to arbitrary order is presented. Matching count statistics to these estimators is illustrated on fiducial non-Gaussian Planck data.

  8. Noncommutative geometry modified non-Gaussianities of cosmological perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Kejie; Xue Wei; Chen Bin

    2008-03-15

    We investigate the noncommutative effect on the non-Gaussianities of primordial cosmological perturbation. In the lowest order of string length and slow-roll parameter, we find that in the models with small speed of sound the noncommutative modifications could be observable if assuming a relatively low string scale. In particular, the dominant modification of the non-Gaussianity estimator f{sub NL} could reach O(1) in Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) inflation and K-inflation. The corrections are sensitive to the speed of sound and the choice of string length scale. Moreover the shapes of the corrected non-Gaussianities are distinct from that of ordinary ones.

  9. Minimal disturbance measurement for coherent states is non-Gaussian

    SciTech Connect

    Mista, Ladislav Jr.

    2006-03-15

    In standard coherent state teleportation with a shared two-mode squeezed vacuum (TMSV) state there is a trade-off between the teleportation fidelity and the fidelity of estimation of the teleported state from the results of the Bell measurement. Within the class of Gaussian operations this trade-off is optimal, i.e., there is not a Gaussian operation that would give a larger estimation fidelity for a given output fidelity. We show that this trade-off can be improved by up to 2.77% if we use a suitable non-Gaussian operation. This operation can be implemented by the standard teleportation protocol in which the shared TMSV state is replaced with a suitable non-Gaussian entangled state. We also demonstrate that this operation can be used to enhance the transmission fidelity of a certain noisy channel.

  10. Normal form decomposition for Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Palma, Giacomo; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Holevo, Alexander S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we explore the set of linear maps sending the set of quantum Gaussian states into itself. These maps are in general not positive, a feature which can be exploited as a test to check whether a given quantum state belongs to the convex hull of Gaussian states (if one of the considered maps sends it into a non-positive operator, the above state is certified not to belong to the set). Generalizing a result known to be valid under the assumption of complete positivity, we provide a characterization of these Gaussian-to-Gaussian (not necessarily positive) superoperators in terms of their action on the characteristic function of the inputs. For the special case of one-mode mappings, we also show that any Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperator can be expressed as a concatenation of a phase-space dilatation, followed by the action of a completely positive Gaussian channel, possibly composed with a transposition. While a similar decomposition is shown to fail in the multi-mode scenario, we prove that it still holds at least under the further hypothesis of homogeneous action on the covariance matrix.

  11. Normal form decomposition for Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperators

    SciTech Connect

    De Palma, Giacomo; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Holevo, Alexander S.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we explore the set of linear maps sending the set of quantum Gaussian states into itself. These maps are in general not positive, a feature which can be exploited as a test to check whether a given quantum state belongs to the convex hull of Gaussian states (if one of the considered maps sends it into a non-positive operator, the above state is certified not to belong to the set). Generalizing a result known to be valid under the assumption of complete positivity, we provide a characterization of these Gaussian-to-Gaussian (not necessarily positive) superoperators in terms of their action on the characteristic function of the inputs. For the special case of one-mode mappings, we also show that any Gaussian-to-Gaussian superoperator can be expressed as a concatenation of a phase-space dilatation, followed by the action of a completely positive Gaussian channel, possibly composed with a transposition. While a similar decomposition is shown to fail in the multi-mode scenario, we prove that it still holds at least under the further hypothesis of homogeneous action on the covariance matrix.

  12. Detection of a non-Gaussian spot in WMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Vielva, P.; Cayón, L.

    2005-01-01

    An extremely cold and big spot in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 1-yr data is analysed. Our work is a continuation of a previous paper by Vielva et al. that reported the detection of non-Gaussianity, with a method based on the spherical Mexican hat wavelet (SMHW) technique. We study the spots at different thresholds on the SMHW coefficient maps, considering six estimators, namely the number of maxima, the number of minima, the numbers of hot and cold spots, and the number of pixels of those spots. At SMHW scales around 4° (10° on the sky), the data deviate from Gaussianity. The analysis is performed on all of the sky, the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and on four regions covering all of the sky. A cold spot at (b=-57°,l= 209°) is found to be the source of this non-Gaussian signature. We compare the spots of our data with 10000 Gaussian simulations, and conclude that only around 0.2 per cent of them present such a cold spot. Excluding this spot, the remaining map is compatible with Gaussianity, and even the excess of kurtosis in the paper by Vielva et al. is found to be due exclusively to this spot. Finally, we study whether the spot causing the observed deviation from Gaussianity could be generated by systematics or foregrounds. None of them seem to be responsible for the non-Gaussian detection.

  13. Gaussian and non-Gaussian fluctuations in pure classical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naleem, Nawavi; Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E.

    2017-03-01

    The particle number, energy, and volume probability distributions in the canonical, isothermal-isobaric, grand canonical, and isobaric-isenthalpic ensembles are investigated. In particular, we consider Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior and formulate the results in terms of a single expression valid for all the ensembles employing common, experimentally accessible, thermodynamic derivatives. This is achieved using Fluctuation Solution Theory to help manipulate derivatives of the entropy. The properties of the distributions are then investigated using available equations of state for fluid water and argon. Purely Gaussian behavior is not observed for any of the state points considered here. A set of simple measures, involving thermodynamic derivatives, indicating non-Gaussian behavior is proposed. A general expression, valid in the high temperature limit, for small energy fluctuations in the canonical ensemble is provided.

  14. Making tensor factorizations robust to non-gaussian noise.

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Eric C.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2011-03-01

    Tensors are multi-way arrays, and the CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization has found application in many different domains. The CP model is typically fit using a least squares objective function, which is a maximum likelihood estimate under the assumption of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian noise. We demonstrate that this loss function can be highly sensitive to non-Gaussian noise. Therefore, we propose a loss function based on the 1-norm because it can accommodate both Gaussian and grossly non-Gaussian perturbations. We also present an alternating majorization-minimization (MM) algorithm for fitting a CP model using our proposed loss function (CPAL1) and compare its performance to the workhorse algorithm for fitting CP models, CP alternating least squares (CPALS).

  15. Rotation-invariant texture retrieval with Gaussianized steerable pyramids.

    PubMed

    Tzagkarakis, George; Beferull-Lozano, Baltasar; Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a novel rotation-invariant image retrieval scheme based on a transformation of the texture information via a steerable pyramid. First, we fit the distribution of the subband coefficients using a joint alpha-stable sub-Gaussian model to capture their non-Gaussian behavior. Then, we apply a normalization process in order to Gaussianize the coefficients. As a result, the feature extraction step consists of estimating the covariances between the normalized pyramid coefficients. The similarity between two distinct texture images is measured by minimizing a rotation-invariant version of the Kullback-Leibler Divergence between their corresponding multivariate Gaussian distributions, where the minimization is performed over a set of rotation angles.

  16. Arbitrage with fractional Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xili; Xiao, Weilin

    2017-04-01

    While the arbitrage opportunity in the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Brownian motion has a long history, the arbitrage strategy in the Black-Scholes model driven by general fractional Gaussian processes is in its infancy. The development of stochastic calculus with respect to fractional Gaussian processes allowed us to study such models. In this paper, following the idea of Shiryaev (1998), an arbitrage strategy is constructed for the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Gaussian processes, when the stochastic integral is interpreted in the Riemann-Stieltjes sense. Arbitrage opportunities in some fractional Gaussian processes, including fractional Brownian motion, sub-fractional Brownian motion, bi-fractional Brownian motion, weighted-fractional Brownian motion and tempered fractional Brownian motion, are also investigated.

  17. Cusped-gaussian wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Sara; Steiner, Erich

    The single-excitation configuration interaction method is used to calculate the spin density at the nucleus in the Li atom and the LiH+ molecular ion. A variety of cusped-gaussian, all-gaussian and Slater function basis sets are compared. It is shown that whilst it is difficult to obtain reliable values for the spin density with conventional gaussian basis sets, the cusped-gaussian basis can give values of the properties at a nucleus that are very similar to those obtained with a Slater function basis. It is shown that it is essential for accurate work to ensure that the basis is highly flexible in the region close to a nucleus.

  18. Least-squares Gaussian beam migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Maolin; Huang, Jianping; Liao, Wenyuan; Jiang, Fuyou

    2017-02-01

    A theory of least-squares Gaussian beam migration (LSGBM) is presented to optimally estimate a subsurface reflectivity. In the iterative inversion scheme, a Gaussian beam (GB) propagator is used as the kernel of linearized forward modeling (demigration) and its adjoint (migration). Born approximation based GB demigration relies on the calculation of Green’s function by a Gaussian-beam summation for the downward and upward wavefields. The adjoint operator of GB demigration accounts for GB prestack depth migration under the cross-correlation imaging condition, where seismic traces are processed one by one for each shot. A numerical test on the point diffractors model suggests that GB demigration can successfully simulate primary scattered data, while migration (adjoint) can yield a corresponding image. The GB demigration/migration algorithms are used for the least-squares migration scheme to deblur conventional migrated images. The proposed LSGBM is illustrated with two synthetic data for a four-layer model and the Marmousi2 model. Numerical results show that LSGBM, compared to migration (adjoint) with GBs, produces images with more balanced amplitude, higher resolution and even fewer artifacts. Additionally, the LSGBM shows a robust convergence rate.

  19. Gaussian Hypothesis Testing and Quantum Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Tomamichel, Marco; Lloyd, Seth; Berta, Mario

    2017-09-01

    Quantum hypothesis testing is one of the most basic tasks in quantum information theory and has fundamental links with quantum communication and estimation theory. In this paper, we establish a formula that characterizes the decay rate of the minimal type-II error probability in a quantum hypothesis test of two Gaussian states given a fixed constraint on the type-I error probability. This formula is a direct function of the mean vectors and covariance matrices of the quantum Gaussian states in question. We give an application to quantum illumination, which is the task of determining whether there is a low-reflectivity object embedded in a target region with a bright thermal-noise bath. For the asymmetric-error setting, we find that a quantum illumination transmitter can achieve an error probability exponent stronger than a coherent-state transmitter of the same mean photon number, and furthermore, that it requires far fewer trials to do so. This occurs when the background thermal noise is either low or bright, which means that a quantum advantage is even easier to witness than in the symmetric-error setting because it occurs for a larger range of parameters. Going forward from here, we expect our formula to have applications in settings well beyond those considered in this paper, especially to quantum communication tasks involving quantum Gaussian channels.

  20. The Multilinear Compound Gaussian Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    which we call the Multilinear Compound Gaussian (MCG) distribution, subsumes both GSM [1] and the previously developed MICA [3-4] distributions as...modeling various natural phenomena of interest. Index Terms— GSM, MICA , MCG, Bayesian, Nonlinear I. INTRODUCTION The compound Gaussian (CG) model—also...We will see how the MCG model developed subsumes both CG and the previously developed multilinear ICA ( MICA ) distribution [3-4] as complementary

  1. Modulation depth of Michelson interferometer with Gaussian beam.

    PubMed

    Välikylä, Tuomas; Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2011-12-20

    Mirror misalignment or the tilt angle of the Michelson interferometer can be estimated from the modulation depth measured with collimated monochromatic light. The intensity of the light beam is usually assumed to be uniform, but, for example, with gas lasers it generally has a Gaussian distribution, which makes the modulation depth less sensitive to the tilt angle. With this assumption, the tilt angle may be underestimated by about 50%. We have derived a mathematical model for modulation depth with a circular aperture and Gaussian beam. The model reduces the error of the tilt angle estimate to below 1%. The results of the model have been verified experimentally.

  2. 2DPUF: A sequential gaussian puff model

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.; O'Steen, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the Environmental Transport Section's (ETS) two-dimensional, sequential gaussian puff transport and dispersion model for emergency response. The sequential puff scheme is described, and the dispersion equations are presented. The advantages of this model over the ETS's PUFF/PLUME model are discussed. Options are calculating a two-dimensional wind field, interpolation procedures, and the wind field grid are described. The various grid systems for puff transport calculations and dose estimates are also described. A flow diagram for the modules comprising the 2DPUF code and a description of each module is presented.

  3. 2DPUF: A sequential gaussian puff model

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1990-12-31

    This report documents the Environmental Transport Section`s (ETS) two-dimensional, sequential gaussian puff transport and dispersion model for emergency response. The sequential puff scheme is described, and the dispersion equations are presented. The advantages of this model over the ETS`s PUFF/PLUME model are discussed. Options are calculating a two-dimensional wind field, interpolation procedures, and the wind field grid are described. The various grid systems for puff transport calculations and dose estimates are also described. A flow diagram for the modules comprising the 2DPUF code and a description of each module is presented.

  4. Non-Gaussian probabilistic MEG source localisation based on kernel density estimation☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Hamid R.; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Woolrich, Mark W.; Baker, Adam; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Probert-Smith, Penny

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that data recorded from magnetoencephalography (MEG) follows a non-Gaussian distribution. However, existing standard methods for source localisation model the data using only second order statistics, and therefore use the inherent assumption of a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we present a new general method for non-Gaussian source estimation of stationary signals for localising brain activity from MEG data. By providing a Bayesian formulation for MEG source localisation, we show that the source probability density function (pdf), which is not necessarily Gaussian, can be estimated using multivariate kernel density estimators. In the case of Gaussian data, the solution of the method is equivalent to that of widely used linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. The method is also extended to handle data with highly correlated sources using the marginal distribution of the estimated joint distribution, which, in the case of Gaussian measurements, corresponds to the null-beamformer. The proposed non-Gaussian source localisation approach is shown to give better spatial estimates than the LCMV beamformer, both in simulations incorporating non-Gaussian signals, and in real MEG measurements of auditory and visual evoked responses, where the highly correlated sources are known to be difficult to estimate. PMID:24055702

  5. Continuous ultrasound speckle tracking with Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schretter, Colas; Sun, Jianyong; Bundervoet, Shaun; Dooms, Ann; Schelkens, Peter; de Brito Carvalho, Catarina; Slagmolen, Pieter; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) is now widely used for measuring strain, deformations, and motion in cardiology. STE involves three successive steps: acquisition of individual frames, speckle detection, and image registration using speckles as landmarks. This work proposes to avoid explicit detection and registration by representing dynamic ultrasound images as sparse collections of moving Gaussian elements in the continuous joint space-time space. Individual speckles or local clusters of speckles are approximated by a single multivariate Gaussian kernel with associated linear trajectory over a short time span. A hierarchical tree-structured model is fitted to sampled input data such that predicted image estimates can be retrieved by regression after reconstruction, allowing a (bias-variance) trade-off between model complexity and image resolution. The inverse image reconstruction problem is solved with an online Bayesian statistical estimation algorithm. Experiments on clinical data could estimate subtle sub-pixel accurate motion that is difficult to capture with frame-to-frame elastic image registration techniques.

  6. Quantum correlations in Gaussian states via Gaussian channels: steering, entanglement, and discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong-Xiao; Wang, Shuhao; Li, Qiting; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Here we study the quantum steering, quantum entanglement, and quantum discord for Gaussian Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states via Gaussian channels. And the sudden death phenomena for Gaussian steering and Gaussian entanglement are theoretically observed. We find that some Gaussian states have only one-way steering, which confirms the asymmetry of quantum steering. Also we investigate that the entangled Gaussian states without Gaussian steering and correlated Gaussian states own no Gaussian entanglement. Meanwhile, our results support the assumption that quantum entanglement is intermediate between quantum discord and quantum steering. Furthermore, we give experimental recipes for preparing quantum states with desired types of quantum correlations.

  7. Truncated Gaussian and derived methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Hélène; Renard, Didier

    2016-09-01

    The interest of a digital model to represent the geological characteristics of the field is well established. However, the way to obtain it is not straightforward because this translation is necessarily a simplification of the actual field. This paper describes a stochastic model called truncated Gaussian simulations (TGS), which distributes a collection of facies or lithotypes over an area of interest. This method is based on facies proportions, spatial distribution and relationships, which can be easily tuned to produce numerous different textures. Initially developed for ordered facies, this model has been extended to complex organizations, where facies are not sequentially ordered. This method called pluri-Gaussian simulation (PGS) considers several Gaussian random functions, which can be correlated. PGS can produce a large variety of lithotype setups, as illustrated by several examples such as oriented deposits or high frequency layering.

  8. Gaussian entanglement distribution via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinidehaj, Nedasadat; Malaney, Robert

    2015-02-01

    In this work we analyze three quantum communication schemes for the generation of Gaussian entanglement between two ground stations. Communication occurs via a satellite over two independent atmospheric fading channels dominated by turbulence-induced beam wander. In our first scheme, the engineering complexity remains largely on the ground transceivers, with the satellite acting simply as a reflector. Although the channel state information of the two atmospheric channels remains unknown in this scheme, the Gaussian entanglement generation between the ground stations can still be determined. On the ground, distillation and Gaussification procedures can be applied, leading to a refined Gaussian entanglement generation rate between the ground stations. We compare the rates produced by this first scheme with two competing schemes in which quantum complexity is added to the satellite, thereby illustrating the tradeoff between space-based engineering complexity and the rate of ground-station entanglement generation.

  9. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  10. Multiqubit spectroscopy of Gaussian quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A.; Norris, Leigh M.; Viola, Lorenza

    2017-02-01

    We introduce multipulse quantum noise spectroscopy protocols for spectral estimation of the noise affecting multiple qubits coupled to Gaussian dephasing environments including both classical and quantum sources. Our protocols are capable of reconstructing all the noise auto- and cross-correlation spectra entering the multiqubit dynamics, providing access, in particular, to the asymmetric spectra associated with nonclassical environments. Our result relies on (i) an exact analytic solution for the reduced multiqubit dynamics that holds in the presence of an arbitrary Gaussian environment and dephasing-preserving control; (ii) the use of specific timing symmetries, which allow for a frequency comb to be engineered for all filter functions of interest, and for the spectra to be related to experimentally accessible observables. We show that quantum spectra have distinctive dynamical signatures, which we explore in two paradigmatic open-system models describing spin and charge qubits coupled to bosonic environments. Complete noise spectroscopy is demonstrated numerically in a realistic setting consisting of two-exciton qubits coupled to a phonon bath. The estimated spectra allow us to accurately predict the exciton dynamics as well as extract the temperature and spectral density of the quantum environment.

  11. The effect of noise and lipid signals on determination of Gaussian and non-Gaussian diffusion parameters in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Donnie; Bouhrara, Mustapha; Reiter, David A; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Choi, Seongjin; Bergeron, Christopher M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-04-06

    This work characterizes the effect of lipid and noise signals on muscle diffusion parameter estimation in several conventional and non-Gaussian models, the ultimate objectives being to characterize popular fat suppression approaches for human muscle diffusion studies, to provide simulations to inform experimental work and to report normative non-Gaussian parameter values. The models investigated in this work were the Gaussian monoexponential and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) models, and the non-Gaussian kurtosis and stretched exponential models. These were evaluated via simulations, and in vitro and in vivo experiments. Simulations were performed using literature input values, modeling fat contamination as an additive baseline to data, whereas phantom studies used a phantom containing aliphatic and olefinic fats and muscle-like gel. Human imaging was performed in the hamstring muscles of 10 volunteers. Diffusion-weighted imaging was applied with spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR), slice-select gradient reversal and water-specific excitation fat suppression, alone and in combination. Measurement bias (accuracy) and dispersion (precision) were evaluated, together with intra- and inter-scan repeatability. Simulations indicated that noise in magnitude images resulted in <6% bias in diffusion coefficients and non-Gaussian parameters (α, K), whereas baseline fitting minimized fat bias for all models, except IVIM. In vivo, popular SPAIR fat suppression proved inadequate for accurate parameter estimation, producing non-physiological parameter estimates without baseline fitting and large biases when it was used. Combining all three fat suppression techniques and fitting data with a baseline offset gave the best results of all the methods studied for both Gaussian diffusion and, overall, for non-Gaussian diffusion. It produced consistent parameter estimates for all models, except IVIM, and highlighted non-Gaussian behavior perpendicular to muscle fibers (

  12. An algorithm for separation of mixed sparse and Gaussian sources

    PubMed Central

    Akkalkotkar, Ameya

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a ubiquitous method for decomposing complex signal mixtures into a small set of statistically independent source signals. However, in cases in which the signal mixture consists of both nongaussian and Gaussian sources, the Gaussian sources will not be recoverable by ICA and will pollute estimates of the nongaussian sources. Therefore, it is desirable to have methods for mixed ICA/PCA which can separate mixtures of Gaussian and nongaussian sources. For mixtures of purely Gaussian sources, principal component analysis (PCA) can provide a basis for the Gaussian subspace. We introduce a new method for mixed ICA/PCA which we call Mixed ICA/PCA via Reproducibility Stability (MIPReSt). Our method uses a repeated estimations technique to rank sources by reproducibility, combined with decomposition of multiple subsamplings of the original data matrix. These multiple decompositions allow us to assess component stability as the size of the data matrix changes, which can be used to determinine the dimension of the nongaussian subspace in a mixture. We demonstrate the utility of MIPReSt for signal mixtures consisting of simulated sources and real-word (speech) sources, as well as mixture of unknown composition. PMID:28414814

  13. An algorithm for separation of mixed sparse and Gaussian sources.

    PubMed

    Akkalkotkar, Ameya; Brown, Kevin Scott

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a ubiquitous method for decomposing complex signal mixtures into a small set of statistically independent source signals. However, in cases in which the signal mixture consists of both nongaussian and Gaussian sources, the Gaussian sources will not be recoverable by ICA and will pollute estimates of the nongaussian sources. Therefore, it is desirable to have methods for mixed ICA/PCA which can separate mixtures of Gaussian and nongaussian sources. For mixtures of purely Gaussian sources, principal component analysis (PCA) can provide a basis for the Gaussian subspace. We introduce a new method for mixed ICA/PCA which we call Mixed ICA/PCA via Reproducibility Stability (MIPReSt). Our method uses a repeated estimations technique to rank sources by reproducibility, combined with decomposition of multiple subsamplings of the original data matrix. These multiple decompositions allow us to assess component stability as the size of the data matrix changes, which can be used to determinine the dimension of the nongaussian subspace in a mixture. We demonstrate the utility of MIPReSt for signal mixtures consisting of simulated sources and real-word (speech) sources, as well as mixture of unknown composition.

  14. Diagnosing non-Gaussianity of forecast and analysis errors in a convective-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, R.; Michel, Y.; Montmerle, T.

    2016-01-01

    In numerical weather prediction, the problem of estimating initial conditions with a variational approach is usually based on a Bayesian framework associated with a Gaussianity assumption of the probability density functions of both observations and background errors. In practice, Gaussianity of errors is tied to linearity, in the sense that a nonlinear model will yield non-Gaussian probability density functions. In this context, standard methods relying on Gaussian assumption may perform poorly. This study aims to describe some aspects of non-Gaussianity of forecast and analysis errors in a convective-scale model using a Monte Carlo approach based on an ensemble of data assimilations. For this purpose, an ensemble of 90 members of cycled perturbed assimilations has been run over a highly precipitating case of interest. Non-Gaussianity is measured using the K2 statistics from the D'Agostino test, which is related to the sum of the squares of univariate skewness and kurtosis. Results confirm that specific humidity is the least Gaussian variable according to that measure and also that non-Gaussianity is generally more pronounced in the boundary layer and in cloudy areas. The dynamical control variables used in our data assimilation, namely vorticity and divergence, also show distinct non-Gaussian behaviour. It is shown that while non-Gaussianity increases with forecast lead time, it is efficiently reduced by the data assimilation step especially in areas well covered by observations. Our findings may have implication for the choice of the control variables.

  15. Identification of the distribution parameters of additive and multiplicative non-Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushenko, V. M.; Volovach, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers issues related to the identification of the parameters and form of the probability density function of generally non-Gaussian additive and multiplicative noise affecting the signal. The results of numerical simulation of methods for estimating the information parameters of random processes with a non-Gaussian probability density function for a finite sample.

  16. Gaussian Markov Random Field Model without Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakami, Shun; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Murata, Shin; Okada, Masato

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed a Gaussian Markov random field model without periodic boundary conditions. On the basis of a Bayesian inference framework, we showed that image restoration, hyperparameter estimation, and an expectation value of free energy can be conducted analytically. Through numerical simulations, we showed the difference between methods with and without periodic boundary conditions and verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. 2012 Problem 1: Gaussian Cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qing; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui; Zhou, Huijun

    2015-10-01

    Using the theory of elasticity, we establish an accurate collision model and quantitatively explain how Gaussian Cannon gains its most powerful shot under certain experimental parameters. The work done by magnetic force on the steel ball is obtained by measuring the magnetic force. Essential factors to acquire higher ejection speed have been found.

  18. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  19. Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Imagine a world where gravity is so strong that if an ice cube is tilted the shear forces melt the surface and water avalanches down. Further imagine that the ambient temperature is so low that the water re-freezes almost immediately. This is the world of granular flows. As a granular solid is tilted the surface undergoes a sublimation phase transition and a granular gas avalanches down the surface, but the inelastic collisions rapidly remove energy from the flow lowering the granular temperature (kinetic energy per particle) until the gas solidifies again. It is under these extreme conditions that we attempt to uncover continuum granular flow properties. Typical continuum theories like Navier-Stokes equation for fluids follow the space-time evolution of the first few moments of the velocity distribution. We study continuously avalanching flow in a rotating two-dimensional granular drum using high-speed video imaging and extract the position and velocities of the particles. We find a universal near Gaussian velocity distribution throughout the flowing regions, which are characterized by a liquid-like radial distribution function. In the remaining regions, in which the radial distribution function develops sharp crystalline peaks, the velocity distribution has a Gaussian peak but is much broader in the tails. In a companion experiment on a vibrated two-dimensional granular fluid under constant pressure, we find a clear gas-solid phase transition in which both the temperature and density change discontinuously. This suggests that a low temperature crystal and a high temperature gas can coexist in steady state. This coexistence could result in a narrower, cooler, Gaussian peak and a broader, warmer, Gaussian tail like the non-Gaussian behavior seen in the crystalline portions of the rotating drum.

  20. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  1. Non-Gaussian fluctuations near the QCD critical point.

    PubMed

    Stephanov, M A

    2009-01-23

    We study the effect of the QCD critical point on non-Gaussian moments (cumulants) of fluctuations of experimental observables in heavy-ion collisions. We find that these moments are very sensitive to the proximity of the critical point, as measured by the magnitude of the correlation length xi. For example, the cubic central moment of multiplicity (deltaN)3 approximately xi4.5 and the quartic cumulant (deltaN)4c approximately xi7. We estimate the magnitude of critical point contributions to non-Gaussian fluctuations of pion and proton multiplicities.

  2. Adaptive Sampling for Learning Gaussian Processes Using Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of self-organizing sensing agents that adaptively learn an anisotropic, spatio-temporal Gaussian process using noisy measurements and move in order to improve the quality of the estimated covariance function. This approach is based on a class of anisotropic covariance functions of Gaussian processes introduced to model a broad range of spatio-temporal physical phenomena. The covariance function is assumed to be unknown a priori. Hence, it is estimated by the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator. The prediction of the field of interest is then obtained based on the MAP estimate of the covariance function. An optimal sampling strategy is proposed to minimize the information-theoretic cost function of the Fisher Information Matrix. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and the adaptability of the proposed scheme. PMID:22163785

  3. Adaptive sampling for learning gaussian processes using mobile sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of self-organizing sensing agents that adaptively learn an anisotropic, spatio-temporal gaussian process using noisy measurements and move in order to improve the quality of the estimated covariance function. This approach is based on a class of anisotropic covariance functions of gaussian processes introduced to model a broad range of spatio-temporal physical phenomena. The covariance function is assumed to be unknown a priori. Hence, it is estimated by the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator. The prediction of the field of interest is then obtained based on the MAP estimate of the covariance function. An optimal sampling strategy is proposed to minimize the information-theoretic cost function of the Fisher Information Matrix. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and the adaptability of the proposed scheme.

  4. A Gaussian Copula Model for Multivariate Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Othus, Megan; Li, Yi

    2011-01-01

    We consider a Gaussian copula model for multivariate survival times. Estimation of the copula association parameter is easily implemented with existing software using a two-stage estimation procedure. Using the Gaussian copula, we are able to test whether the association parameter is equal to zero. When the association term is positive, the model can be extended to incorporate cluster-level frailty terms. Asymptotic properties are derived under the two-stage estimation scheme. Simulation studies verify finite sample utility. We apply the method to a Children’s Oncology Group multi-center study of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The analysis estimates marginal treatment effects and examines potential clustering within treatment institution. PMID:22162742

  5. Inseparability of photon-added Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongrong; Li Fuli; Zhu Shiyao

    2007-06-15

    The inseparability of photon-added Gaussian states which are generated from two-mode Gaussian states by adding photons is investigated. According to the established inseparability conditions [New J. Phys. 7, 211 (2005); Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050503 (2006)], we find that even if a two-mode Gaussian state is separable, the photon-added Gaussian state becomes entangled when the purity of the Gaussian state is larger than a certain value. The lower bound of entanglement of symmetric photon-added Gaussian states is derived. The result shows that entanglement of the photon-added Gaussian states is involved with high-order moment correlations. We find that fidelity of teleporting coherent states cannot be raised by employing the photon-added Gaussian states as a quantum channel of teleportation.

  6. Non-Gaussianity in a quasiclassical electronic circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takafumi J.; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2017-05-01

    We study the non-Gaussian dynamics of a quasiclassical electronic circuit coupled to a mesoscopic conductor. Non-Gaussian noise accompanying the nonequilibrium transport through the conductor significantly modifies the stationary probability density function (PDF) of the flux in the dissipative circuit. We incorporate weak quantum fluctuation of the dissipative LC circuit with a stochastic method and evaluate the quantum correction of the stationary PDF. Furthermore, an inverse formula to infer the statistical properties of the non-Gaussian noise from the stationary PDF is derived in the classical-quantum crossover regime. The quantum correction is indispensable to correctly estimate the microscopic transfer events in the QPC with the quasiclassical inverse formula.

  7. Improved kernel correlation filter tracking with Gaussian scale space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shukun; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Yicui

    2016-10-01

    Recently, Kernel Correlation Filter (KCF) has achieved great attention in visual tracking filed, which provide excellent tracking performance and high possessing speed. However, how to handle the scale variation is still an open problem. In this paper, focusing on this issue that a method based on Gaussian scale space is proposed. First, we will use KCF to estimate the location of the target, the context region which includes the target and its surrounding background will be the image to be matched. In order to get the matching image of a Gaussian scale space, image with Gaussian kernel convolution can be gotten. After getting the Gaussian scale space of the image to be matched, then, according to it to estimate target image under different scales. Combine with the scale parameter of scale space, for each corresponding scale image performing bilinear interpolation operation to change the size to simulate target imaging at different scales. Finally, matching the template with different size of images with different scales, use Mean Absolute Difference (MAD) as the match criterion. After getting the optimal matching in the image with the template, we will get the best zoom ratio s, consequently estimate the target size. In the experiments, compare with CSK, KCF etc. demonstrate that the proposed method achieves high improvement in accuracy, is an efficient algorithm.

  8. Gravitational Wave Emulation Using Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; Farr, Ben; Holz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation (PE) for gravitational wave signals from compact binary coalescences (CBCs) requires reliable template waveforms which span the parameter space. Waveforms from numerical relativity are accurate but computationally expensive, so approximate templates are typically used for PE. These `approximants', while quick to compute, can introduce systematic errors and bias PE results. We describe a machine learning method for generating CBC waveforms and uncertainties using existing accurate waveforms as a training set. Coefficients of a reduced order waveform model are computed and each treated as arising from a Gaussian process. These coefficients and their uncertainties are then interpolated using Gaussian process regression (GPR). As a proof of concept, we construct a training set of approximant waveforms (rather than NR waveforms) in the two-dimensional space of chirp mass and mass ratio and interpolate new waveforms with GPR. We demonstrate that the mismatch between interpolated waveforms and approximants is below the 1% level for an appropriate choice of training set and GPR kernel hyperparameters.

  9. XDGMM: eXtreme Deconvolution Gaussian Mixture Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-08-01

    XDGMM uses Gaussian mixtures to do density estimation of noisy, heterogenous, and incomplete data using extreme deconvolution (XD) algorithms which is compatible with the scikit-learn machine learning methods. It implements both the astroML and Bovy et al. (2011) algorithms, and extends the BaseEstimator class from scikit-learn so that cross-validation methods work. It allows the user to produce a conditioned model if values of some parameters are known.

  10. Gaussianization for fast and accurate inference from cosmological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, Robert L.; Joachimi, Benjamin; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a method to transform multivariate unimodal non-Gaussian posterior probability densities into approximately Gaussian ones via non-linear mappings, such as Box-Cox transformations and generalizations thereof. This permits an analytical reconstruction of the posterior from a point sample, like a Markov chain, and simplifies the subsequent joint analysis with other experiments. This way, a multivariate posterior density can be reported efficiently, by compressing the information contained in Markov Chain Monte Carlo samples. Further, the model evidence integral (i.e. the marginal likelihood) can be computed analytically. This method is analogous to the search for normal parameters in the cosmic microwave background, but is more general. The search for the optimally Gaussianizing transformation is performed computationally through a maximum-likelihood formalism; its quality can be judged by how well the credible regions of the posterior are reproduced. We demonstrate that our method outperforms kernel density estimates in this objective. Further, we select marginal posterior samples from Planck data with several distinct strongly non-Gaussian features, and verify the reproduction of the marginal contours. To demonstrate evidence computation, we Gaussianize the joint distribution of data from weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillations, for different cosmological models, and find a preference for flat Λcold dark matter. Comparing to values computed with the Savage-Dickey density ratio, and Population Monte Carlo, we find good agreement of our method within the spread of the other two.

  11. Clustering of Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using Gaussian Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2017-09-01

    With the evolution of the LiDAR technology, multispectral airborne laser scanning systems are currently available. The first operational multispectral airborne LiDAR sensor, the Optech Titan, acquires LiDAR point clouds at three different wavelengths (1.550, 1.064, 0.532 μm), allowing the acquisition of different spectral information of land surface. Consequently, the recent studies are devoted to use the radiometric information (i.e., intensity) of the LiDAR data along with the geometric information (e.g., height) for classification purposes. In this study, a data clustering method, based on Gaussian decomposition, is presented. First, a ground filtering mechanism is applied to separate non-ground from ground points. Then, three normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs) are computed for both non-ground and ground points, followed by histograms construction from each NDVI. The Gaussian function model is used to decompose the histograms into a number of Gaussian components. The maximum likelihood estimate of the Gaussian components is then optimized using Expectation - Maximization algorithm. The intersection points of the adjacent Gaussian components are subsequently used as threshold values, whereas different classes can be clustered. This method is used to classify the terrain of an urban area in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, into four main classes, namely roofs, trees, asphalt and grass. It is shown that the proposed method has achieved an overall accuracy up to 95.1 % using different NDVIs.

  12. Rao-Blackwellization for Adaptive Gaussian Sum Nonlinear Model Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semper, Sean R.; Crassidis, John L.; George, Jemin; Mukherjee, Siddharth; Singla, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    When dealing with imperfect data and general models of dynamic systems, the best estimate is always sought in the presence of uncertainty or unknown parameters. In many cases, as the first attempt, the Extended Kalman filter (EKF) provides sufficient solutions to handling issues arising from nonlinear and non-Gaussian estimation problems. But these issues may lead unacceptable performance and even divergence. In order to accurately capture the nonlinearities of most real-world dynamic systems, advanced filtering methods have been created to reduce filter divergence while enhancing performance. Approaches, such as Gaussian sum filtering, grid based Bayesian methods and particle filters are well-known examples of advanced methods used to represent and recursively reproduce an approximation to the state probability density function (pdf). Some of these filtering methods were conceptually developed years before their widespread uses were realized. Advanced nonlinear filtering methods currently benefit from the computing advancements in computational speeds, memory, and parallel processing. Grid based methods, multiple-model approaches and Gaussian sum filtering are numerical solutions that take advantage of different state coordinates or multiple-model methods that reduced the amount of approximations used. Choosing an efficient grid is very difficult for multi-dimensional state spaces, and oftentimes expensive computations must be done at each point. For the original Gaussian sum filter, a weighted sum of Gaussian density functions approximates the pdf but suffers at the update step for the individual component weight selections. In order to improve upon the original Gaussian sum filter, Ref. [2] introduces a weight update approach at the filter propagation stage instead of the measurement update stage. This weight update is performed by minimizing the integral square difference between the true forecast pdf and its Gaussian sum approximation. By adaptively updating

  13. Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Liguori, Michele; Renzi, Alessandro; Notari, Alessio E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it E-mail: arenzi@pd.infn.it

    2013-09-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on non-Gaussianity estimators f{sub NL}. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax = 2000) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance σ for f{sub NL} both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating f{sub NL} it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects if the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.

  14. General Galilei Covariant Gaussian Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, Giulio; Toroš, Marko; Bassi, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    We characterize general non-Markovian Gaussian maps which are covariant under Galilean transformations. In particular, we consider translational and Galilean covariant maps and show that they reduce to the known Holevo result in the Markovian limit. We apply the results to discuss measures of macroscopicity based on classicalization maps, specifically addressing dissipation, Galilean covariance and non-Markovianity. We further suggest a possible generalization of the macroscopicity measure defined by Nimmrichter and Hornberger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 16 (2013)].

  15. Betti Numbers of Gaussian Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changbom; Pranav, Pratyush; Chingangbam, Pravabati; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard; Vegter, Gert; Kim, Inkang; Hidding, Johan; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2013-06-01

    We present the relation between the genus in cosmology and the Betti numbers for excursion sets of three- and two-dimensional smooth Gaussian random fields, and numerically investigate the Betti numbers as a function of threshold level. Betti numbers are topological invariants of figures that can be used to distinguish topological spaces. In the case of the excursion sets of a three-dimensional field there are three possibly non-zero Betti numbers; β_0 is the number of connected regions, β_1 is the number of circular holes (i.e., complement of solid tori), and β_2 is the number of three-dimensional voids (i.e., complement of three-dimensional excursion regions). Their sum with alternating signs is the genus of the surface of excursion regions. It is found that each Betti number has a dominant contribution to the genus in a specific threshold range. β_0 dominates the high-threshold part of the genus curve measuring the abundance of high density regions (clusters). β_1 dominates the genus near the median thresholds which measures the topology of negatively curved iso-density surfaces, and β_2 corresponds to the low-threshold part measuring the void abundance. We average the Betti number curves (the Betti numbers as a function of the threshold level) over many realizations of Gaussian fields and find that both the amplitude and shape of the Betti number curves depend on the slope of the power spectrum n in such a way that their shape becomes broader and their amplitude drops less steeply than the genus as n decreases. This behaviour contrasts with the fact that the shape of the genus curve is fixed for all Gaussian fields regardless of the power spectrum. Even though the Gaussian Betti number curves should be calculated for each given power spectrum, we propose to use the Betti numbers for better specification of the topology of large scale structures in the universe.

  16. A non-Gaussian landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, Sami; Byrnes, Christian T.; Tasinato, Gianmassimo E-mail: ctb22@sussex.ac.uk

    2013-06-01

    Primordial perturbations with wavelengths greater than the observable universe shift the effective background fields in our observable patch from their global averages over the inflating space. This leads to a landscape picture where the properties of our observable patch depend on its location and may significantly differ from the expectation values predicted by the underlying fundamental inflationary model. We show that if multiple fields are present during inflation, this may happen even if our horizon exit would be preceded by only a few e-foldings of inflation. Non-Gaussian statistics are especially affected: for example models of local non-Gaussianity predicting |f{sub NL}{sup 0}| >> 10 over the entire inflating volume can have a probability up to a few tens of percent to generate a non-detectable bispectrum in our observable patch |f{sub NL}{sup obs.}|∼<10. In this work we establish systematic connections between the observable local properties of primordial perturbations and the global properties of the inflating space which reflect the underlying high energy physics. We study in detail the implications of both a detection and non-detection of primordial non-Gaussianity by Planck, and discover novel ways of characterising the naturalness of different observational configurations.

  17. Boson sampling with Gaussian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmakhchyan, L.; Cerf, N. J.

    2017-09-01

    We develop an alternative boson sampling model operating on single-photon states followed by linear interferometry and Gaussian measurements. The hardness proof for simulating such continuous-variable measurements is established in two main steps, making use of the symmetry of quantum evolution under time reversal. Namely, we first construct a twofold version of scattershot boson sampling in which, as opposed to the original proposal, both legs of a collection of two-mode squeezed vacuum states undergo parallel linear-optical transformations. This twofold scattershot model yields, as a corollary, an instance of boson sampling from Gaussian states where photon counting is hard to simulate. Then, a time-reversed setup is used to exhibit a boson sampling model in which the simulation of Gaussian measurements—namely the outcome of eight-port homodyne detection—is proven to be computationally hard. These results illustrate how the symmetry of quantum evolution under time reversal may serve as a tool for analyzing the computational complexity of novel physically motivated computational problems.

  18. Displacement measurement on specimens subjected to non-Gaussian random vibrations in fatigue life tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2014-05-01

    High-cycle fatigue life tests conducted using controlled random vibrations are commonly used to evaluate failure in components and structures. In most cases, a Gaussian distribution of both the input vibration and the stress response is assumed, while real-life loads may be non-Gaussian causing the response to be non-Gaussian as well. Generating non-Gaussian drive signals with high kurtosis and a given power spectral density, however, does not always guarantee that the stress response will actually be non-Gaussian, because this depends on the adherence of the tested system to the Central Limit Theorem. On the other side, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations, and therefore to evaluate and select input loads. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and non-stationary non-Gaussian excitation signals. The Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) technique was used for the first time in this type of test, to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response in terms of differential displacement at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal drops occurring during the experiment is described and the results are discussed with respect to the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal.

  19. FPGA design and implementation of Gaussian filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhou, Gang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper , we choose four different variances of 1,3,6 and 12 to conduct FPGA design with three kinds of Gaussian filtering algorithm ,they are implementing Gaussian filter with a Gaussian filter template, Gaussian filter approximation with mean filtering and Gaussian filter approximation with IIR filtering. By waveform simulation and synthesis, we get the processing results on the experimental image and the consumption of FPGA resources of the three methods. We set the result of Gaussian filter used in matlab as standard to get the result error. By comparing the FPGA resources and the error of FPGA implementation methods, we get the best FPGA design to achieve a Gaussian filter. Conclusions can be drawn based on the results we have already got. When the variance is small, the FPGA resources is enough for the algorithm to implement Gaussian filter with a Gaussian filter template which is the best choice. But when the variance is so large that there is no more FPGA resources, we can chose the mean to approximate Gaussian filter with IIR filtering.

  20. Non-Gaussian Stochastic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    Underwriting Risk and Return Paradox Revisited," J. Risk and Insurance .24.L 621-627 (1982). P. Brockett and B. Arnold, "Identifiability for Dependent...Some Ruin Calculations," J. Risk and Insurance 5DIAL 727-731 (1983). P. Brockett, S. Cox, and R. Witt, "Self-Insurance and the Probability of...Financial Regret," J. Risk and Insurance 51(4) 720-729 (1984). P. Brockett, "The Likelihood Ratio Detector for Non-Gaussian Infinitely Divisible and Linear

  1. General Galilei Covariant Gaussian Maps.

    PubMed

    Gasbarri, Giulio; Toroš, Marko; Bassi, Angelo

    2017-09-08

    We characterize general non-Markovian Gaussian maps which are covariant under Galilean transformations. In particular, we consider translational and Galilean covariant maps and show that they reduce to the known Holevo result in the Markovian limit. We apply the results to discuss measures of macroscopicity based on classicalization maps, specifically addressing dissipation, Galilean covariance and non-Markovianity. We further suggest a possible generalization of the macroscopicity measure defined by Nimmrichter and Hornberger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 16 (2013)PRLTAO0031-9007].

  2. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  3. Degradability of Bosonic Gaussian channels

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, Filippo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2006-12-15

    The notion of weak-degradability of quantum channels is introduced by generalizing the degradability definition given by Devetak and Shor. Exploiting the unitary equivalence with beam-splitter/amplifier channels we then prove that a large class of one-mode Bosonic Gaussian channels are either weakly degradable or anti-degradable. In the latter case this implies that their quantum capacity Q is null. In the former case instead, this allows us to establish the additivity of the coherent information for those maps which admit unitary representation with single-mode pure environment.

  4. Fitting the Fractional Polynomial Model to Non-Gaussian Longitudinal Data.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Long, Jeffrey D; Welch, Greg W; Reynolds, Arthur; Swearer, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    As in cross sectional studies, longitudinal studies involve non-Gaussian data such as binomial, Poisson, gamma, and inverse-Gaussian distributions, and multivariate exponential families. A number of statistical tools have thus been developed to deal with non-Gaussian longitudinal data, including analytic techniques to estimate parameters in both fixed and random effects models. However, as yet growth modeling with non-Gaussian data is somewhat limited when considering the transformed expectation of the response via a linear predictor as a functional form of explanatory variables. In this study, we introduce a fractional polynomial model (FPM) that can be applied to model non-linear growth with non-Gaussian longitudinal data and demonstrate its use by fitting two empirical binary and count data models. The results clearly show the efficiency and flexibility of the FPM for such applications.

  5. Bimodal and Gaussian Ising spin glasses in dimension two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundow, P. H.; Campbell, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    An analysis is given of numerical simulation data to size L =128 on the archetype square lattice Ising spin glasses (ISGs) with bimodal (±J ) and Gaussian interaction distributions. It is well established that the ordering temperature of both models is zero. The Gaussian model has a nondegenerate ground state and thus a critical exponent η ≡0 , and a continuous distribution of energy levels. For the bimodal model, above a size-dependent crossover temperature T*(L ) there is a regime of effectively continuous energy levels; below T*(L ) there is a distinct regime dominated by the highly degenerate ground state plus an energy gap to the excited states. T*(L ) tends to zero at very large L , leaving only the effectively continuous regime in the thermodynamic limit. The simulation data on both models are analyzed with the conventional scaling variable t =T and with a scaling variable τb=T2/(1 +T2) suitable for zero-temperature transition ISGs, together with appropriate scaling expressions. The data for the temperature dependence of the reduced susceptibility χ (τb,L ) and second moment correlation length ξ (τb,L ) in the thermodynamic limit regime are extrapolated to the τb=0 critical limit. The Gaussian critical exponent estimates from the simulations, η =0 and ν =3.55 (5 ) , are in full agreement with the well-established values in the literature. The bimodal critical exponents, estimated from the thermodynamic limit regime analyses using the same extrapolation protocols as for the Gaussian model, are η =0.20 (2 ) and ν =4.8 (3 ) , distinctly different from the Gaussian critical exponents.

  6. Response measurement by laser Doppler vibrometry in vibration qualification tests with non-Gaussian random excitation.

    PubMed

    Troncossi, M; Di Sante, R; Rivola, A

    2016-10-01

    In the field of vibration qualification testing, random excitations are typically imposed on the tested system in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) profile. This is the one of the most popular ways to control the shaker or slip table for durability tests. However, these excitations (and the corresponding system responses) exhibit a Gaussian probability distribution, whereas not all real-life excitations are Gaussian, causing the response to be also non-Gaussian. In order to introduce non-Gaussian peaks, a further parameter, i.e., kurtosis, has to be controlled in addition to the PSD. However, depending on the specimen behaviour and input signal characteristics, the use of non-Gaussian excitations with high kurtosis and a given PSD does not automatically imply a non-Gaussian stress response. For an experimental investigation of these coupled features, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations and consequently evaluate the input signals most representative for real-life, non-Gaussian excitations. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and burst non-Gaussian excitation signals. The laser Doppler vibrometry technique was used in this type of test for the first time, in order to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response as proportional to the differential displacement measured at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of measurements using accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal dropouts occurring during the experiment is described. The results demonstrate the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal features and therefore to select the most appropriate input signal for the fatigue test.

  7. Response measurement by laser Doppler vibrometry in vibration qualification tests with non-Gaussian random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncossi, M.; Di Sante, R.; Rivola, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the field of vibration qualification testing, random excitations are typically imposed on the tested system in terms of a power spectral density (PSD) profile. This is the one of the most popular ways to control the shaker or slip table for durability tests. However, these excitations (and the corresponding system responses) exhibit a Gaussian probability distribution, whereas not all real-life excitations are Gaussian, causing the response to be also non-Gaussian. In order to introduce non-Gaussian peaks, a further parameter, i.e., kurtosis, has to be controlled in addition to the PSD. However, depending on the specimen behaviour and input signal characteristics, the use of non-Gaussian excitations with high kurtosis and a given PSD does not automatically imply a non-Gaussian stress response. For an experimental investigation of these coupled features, suitable measurement methods need to be developed in order to estimate the stress amplitude response at critical failure locations and consequently evaluate the input signals most representative for real-life, non-Gaussian excitations. In this paper, a simple test rig with a notched cantilevered specimen was developed to measure the response and examine the kurtosis values in the case of stationary Gaussian, stationary non-Gaussian, and burst non-Gaussian excitation signals. The laser Doppler vibrometry technique was used in this type of test for the first time, in order to estimate the specimen stress amplitude response as proportional to the differential displacement measured at the notch section ends. A method based on the use of measurements using accelerometers to correct for the occasional signal dropouts occurring during the experiment is described. The results demonstrate the ability of the test procedure to evaluate the output signal features and therefore to select the most appropriate input signal for the fatigue test.

  8. Monogamy inequality for distributed gaussian entanglement.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Tohya; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-02-02

    We show that for all n-mode Gaussian states of continuous variable systems, the entanglement shared among n parties exhibits the fundamental monogamy property. The monogamy inequality is proven by introducing the Gaussian tangle, an entanglement monotone under Gaussian local operations and classical communication, which is defined in terms of the squared negativity in complete analogy with the case of n-qubit systems. Our results elucidate the structure of quantum correlations in many-body harmonic lattice systems.

  9. Leading Non-Gaussian Corrections for Diffusion Orientation Distribution Function

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jens H.; Helpern, Joseph A.; Tabesh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An analytical representation of the leading non-Gaussian corrections for a class of diffusion orientation distribution functions (dODFs) is presented. This formula is constructed out of the diffusion and diffusional kurtosis tensors, both of which may be estimated with diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI). By incorporating model-independent non-Gaussian diffusion effects, it improves upon the Gaussian approximation used in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This analytical representation therefore provides a natural foundation for DKI-based white matter fiber tractography, which has potential advantages over conventional DTI-based fiber tractography in generating more accurate predictions for the orientations of fiber bundles and in being able to directly resolve intra-voxel fiber crossings. The formula is illustrated with numerical simulations for a two-compartment model of fiber crossings and for human brain data. These results indicate that the inclusion of the leading non-Gaussian corrections can significantly affect fiber tractography in white matter regions, such as the centrum semiovale, where fiber crossings are common. PMID:24738143

  10. Stable Lévy motion with inverse Gaussian subordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Wyłomańska, A.; Gajda, J.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we study the stable Lévy motion subordinated by the so-called inverse Gaussian process. This process extends the well known normal inverse Gaussian (NIG) process introduced by Barndorff-Nielsen, which arises by subordinating ordinary Brownian motion (with drift) with inverse Gaussian process. The NIG process found many interesting applications, especially in financial data description. We discuss here the main features of the introduced subordinated process, such as distributional properties, existence of fractional order moments and asymptotic tail behavior. We show the connection of the process with continuous time random walk. Further, the governing fractional partial differential equations for the probability density function is also obtained. Moreover, we discuss the asymptotic distribution of sample mean square displacement, the main tool in detection of anomalous diffusion phenomena (Metzler et al., 2014). In order to apply the stable Lévy motion time-changed by inverse Gaussian subordinator we propose a step-by-step procedure of parameters estimation. At the end, we show how the examined process can be useful to model financial time series.

  11. STATISTICS OF TURBULENT FIELD VARIATIONS, NON-GAUSSIANITY AND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Ragot, B. R

    2009-05-10

    Statistics of magnetic field and velocity variations are important to the study of turbulence. Their departure from Gaussianity on the short separation scales has long been recognized and ascribed to intermittency. Non-Gaussian log-normal statistics of field-line separations are now predicted, however, from simple nonfluctuating turbulence Fourier spectra that do not model any intermittency, and one may wonder how this result may impact our interpretation of the statistics of field variations. It is shown in this paper how the intermittency of the turbulence can be taken into account to estimate the distributions of field-line separations and of field variations from the simple Fourier-spectra calculations. The first accurate theory/modeling predictions for the observed in situ distributions of turbulent field variations are thereby made, free of parameter adjustment. Magnetic field data from Helios 2 and Wind are used for the validation. Because the field variations are measured between points of constant separation and not between real field lines, intermittency remains the main cause for the observed non-Gaussianity of the statistics of field variations on the short scales, even if spatial limitations and/or short-scale phase correlations could also contribute to the deviations from Gaussianity.

  12. Two-mode Gaussian product states in a lossy interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaseem, Noufal; Shaji, Anil

    2017-09-01

    The quantum Fisher information for a two-mode, Gaussian product state in an interferometer subject to photon loss is studied. We obtain the quantum Cramer-Rao bound on the achievable precision in phase estimation using such states. The scaling of the measurement precision with the mean photon number is compared to the shot noise-limited scaling for dual squeezed vacuum states and dual squeezed, displaced vacuum states.

  13. Random Walks and Branching Processes in Correlated Gaussian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurzada, Frank; Devulder, Alexis; Guillotin-Plantard, Nadine; Pène, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    We study persistence probabilities for random walks in correlated Gaussian random environment investigated by Oshanin et al. (Phys Rev Lett, 110:100602, 2013). From the persistence results, we can deduce properties of critical branching processes with offspring sizes geometrically distributed with correlated random parameters. More precisely, we obtain estimates on the tail distribution of its total population size, of its maximum population, and of its extinction time.

  14. Planck 2013 results. XXIV. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Heavens, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck nominal mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps yield unprecedented constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). Using three optimal bispectrum estimators, separable template-fitting (KSW), binned, and modal, we obtain consistent values for the primordial local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes, quoting as our final result fNLlocal = 2.7 ± 5.8, fNLequil = -42 ± 75, and fNLorth = -25 ± 39 (68% CL statistical). Non-Gaussianity is detected in the data; using skew-Cℓ statistics we find a nonzero bispectrum from residual point sources, and the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe-lensing bispectrum at a level expected in the ΛCDM scenario. The results are based on comprehensive cross-validation of these estimators on Gaussian and non-Gaussian simulations, are stable across component separation techniques, pass an extensive suite of tests, and are confirmed by skew-Cℓ, wavelet bispectrum and Minkowski functional estimators. Beyond estimates of individual shape amplitudes, we present model-independent, three-dimensional reconstructions of the Planck CMB bispectrum and thus derive constraints on early-Universe scenarios that generate primordial NG, including general single-field models of inflation, excited initial states (non-Bunch-Davies vacua), and directionally-dependent vector models. We provide an initial survey of scale-dependent feature and resonance models. These results bound both general single-field and multi-field model parameter ranges, such as the speed of sound, cs ≥ 0.02 (95% CL), in an effective field theory parametrization, and the curvaton decay fraction rD ≥ 0.15 (95% CL). The Planck data significantly limit the viable parameter space of the ekpyrotic/cyclic scenarios. The amplitude of the four-point function in the local model τNL< 2800 (95% CL). Taken together, these constraints represent the highest precision tests to date of physical mechanisms for the origin of cosmic structure.

  15. Extremes of Some Gaussian Random Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarini, Alberto; Cipriani, Alessandra; Hazra, Rajat Subhra

    2016-11-01

    In this article we give a general criterion for some dependent Gaussian models to belong to maximal domain of attraction of Gumbel, following an application of the Stein-Chen method studied in Arratia et al. (Ann Probab 17(1):9-25, 1989). We also show the convergence of the associated point process. As an application, we show the conditions are satisfied by some of the well-known supercritical Gaussian interface models, namely, membrane model, massive and massless discrete Gaussian free field, fractional Gaussian free field.

  16. Elegant Gaussian beams for enhanced optical manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpmann, Christina Schöler, Christoph; Denz, Cornelia

    2015-06-15

    Generation of micro- and nanostructured complex light beams attains increasing impact in photonics and laser applications. In this contribution, we demonstrate the implementation and experimental realization of the relatively unknown, but highly versatile class of complex-valued Elegant Hermite- and Laguerre-Gaussian beams. These beams create higher trapping forces compared to standard Gaussian light fields due to their propagation changing properties. We demonstrate optical trapping and alignment of complex functional particles as nanocontainers with standard and Elegant Gaussian light beams. Elegant Gaussian beams will inspire manifold applications in optical manipulation, direct laser writing, or microscopy, where the design of the point-spread function is relevant.

  17. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Schultz, Jussi

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  18. An empirical analysis of the distribution of overshoots in a stationary Gaussian stochastic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, M. C.; Madison, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency distribution of overshoots in a stationary Gaussian stochastic process is analyzed. The primary processes involved in this analysis are computer simulation and statistical estimation. Computer simulation is used to simulate stationary Gaussian stochastic processes that have selected autocorrelation functions. An analysis of the simulation results reveals a frequency distribution for overshoots with a functional dependence on the mean and variance of the process. Statistical estimation is then used to estimate the mean and variance of a process. It is shown that for an autocorrelation function, the mean and the variance for the number of overshoots, a frequency distribution for overshoots can be estimated.

  19. Optimisation of dispersion parameters of Gaussian plume model for CO₂ dispersion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Lu, Cheng; Michal, Guillaume; Venton, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects entail the possibility of accidental release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. To quantify the spread of CO2 following such release, the 'Gaussian' dispersion model is often used to estimate the resulting CO2 concentration levels in the surroundings. The Gaussian model enables quick estimates of the concentration levels. However, the traditionally recommended values of the 'dispersion parameters' in the Gaussian model may not be directly applicable to CO2 dispersion. This paper presents an optimisation technique to obtain the dispersion parameters in order to achieve a quick estimation of CO2 concentration levels in the atmosphere following CO2 blowouts. The optimised dispersion parameters enable the Gaussian model to produce quick estimates of CO2 concentration levels, precluding the necessity to set up and run much more complicated models. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were employed to produce reference CO2 dispersion profiles in various atmospheric stability classes (ASC), different 'source strengths' and degrees of ground roughness. The performance of the CFD models was validated against the 'Kit Fox' field measurements, involving dispersion over a flat horizontal terrain, both with low and high roughness regions. An optimisation model employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the best dispersion parameters in the Gaussian plume model was set up. Optimum values of the dispersion parameters for different ASCs that can be used in the Gaussian plume model for predicting CO2 dispersion were obtained.

  20. Parallel computation of Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, R.; von Toussaint, U.

    2017-06-01

    Within the Bayesian framework we utilize Gaussian processes for parametric studies of long running computer codes. Since the simulations are expensive it is necessary to exploit the computational budget in the best possible manner. Employing the sum over variances - being indicators for the quality of the fit - as the utility function we established an optimized and automated sequential parameter selection procedure. However, often it is also desirable to utilize the parallel running capabilities of present computer technology and abandon the sequential parameter selection for a faster overall turn-around time (wall-clock time). The paper proposes to achieve this by marginalizing over the expected outcomes at optimized test points in order to set up a pool of starting values for batch execution.

  1. Matching optics for Gaussian beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, William D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A system of matching optics for Gaussian beams is described. The matching optics system is positioned between a light beam emitter (such as a laser) and the input optics of a second optics system whereby the output from the light beam emitter is converted into an optimum input for the succeeding parts of the second optical system. The matching optics arrangement includes the combination of a light beam emitter, such as a laser with a movable afocal lens pair (telescope) and a single movable lens placed in the laser's output beam. The single movable lens serves as an input to the telescope. If desired, a second lens, which may be fixed, is positioned in the beam before the adjustable lens to serve as an input processor to the movable lens. The system provides the ability to choose waist diameter and position independently and achieve the desired values with two simple adjustments not requiring iteration.

  2. Cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2013-11-15

    Making use of the complex-source-point method in cylindrical coordinates, an exact solution representing a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam of arbitrary waist w(0) satisfying both the Helmholtz and Maxwell's equations is introduced. The Cartesian components of the electromagnetic field are derived stemming from different polarizations of the magnetic and electric vector potentials based on Maxwell's vectorial equations and Lorenz's gauge condition, without any approximations. Computations illustrate the theory for tightly focused and quasi-collimated cylindrical beams. The results are particularly useful in beam-forming design using high-aperture or collimated cylindrical laser beams in imaging microscopy, particle manipulation, optical tweezers, and the study of scattering, radiation forces, and torque on cylindrical structures.

  3. Correction Factor for Gaussian Deconvolution of Optically Thick Linewidths in Homogeneous Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Profiles of optically thick, non-Gaussian emission line profiles convoluted with Gaussian instrumental profiles are constructed, and are deconvoluted on the usual Gaussian basis to examine the departure from accuracy thereby caused in "measured" linewidths. It is found that "measured" linewidths underestimate the true linewidths of optically thick lines, by a factor which depends on the resolution factor r congruent to Doppler width/instrumental width and on the optical thickness tau(sub 0). An approximating expression is obtained for this factor, applicable in the range of at least 0 <= tau(sub 0) <= 10, which can provide estimates of the true linewidth and optical thickness.

  4. A note on population analysis of dissolution-absorption models using the inverse Gaussian function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Weiss, Michael; D'Argenio, David Z

    2008-06-01

    Because conventional absorption models often fail to describe plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration, empirical input functions such as the inverse Gaussian function have been successfully used. The purpose of this note is to extend this model by adding a first-order absorption process and to demonstrate the application of population analysis using maximum likelihood estimation via the EM algorithm (implemented in ADAPT 5). In one example, the analysis of bioavailability data of an extended-release formulation, as well as the mean dissolution times estimated in vivo and in vitro with the use of the inverse Gaussian function, is well in accordance, suggesting that the inverse Gaussian function indeed accounts for the in vivo dissolution process. In the other example, the kinetics of trapidil in patients with liver disease, the absorption/dissolution parameters are characterized by a high interindividual variability. Adding a first-order absorption process to the inverse Gaussian function improved the fit in both cases.

  5. A Gaussian process based prognostics framework for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingtao; Mohanty, Subhasish; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2009-03-01

    Prognostic algorithms indicate the remaining useful life based on fault detection and diagnosis through condition monitoring framework. Due to the wide-spread applications of advanced composite materials in industry, the importance of prognosis on composite materials is being acknowledged by the research community. Prognosis has the potential to significantly enhance structural monitoring and maintenance planning. In this paper, a Gaussian process based prognostics framework is presented. Both off-line and on-line methods combined state estimation and life prediction of composite beam subject to fatigue loading. The framework consists of three main steps: 1) data acquisition, 2) feature extraction, 3) damage state prediction and remaining useful life estimation. Active piezoelectric and acoustic emission (AE) sensing techniques are applied to monitor the damage states. Wavelet transform is used to extract the piezoelectric sensing features. The number of counts from AE system was used as a feature. Piezoelectric or AE sensing features are used to build the input and output space of the Gaussian process. The future damage states and remaining useful life are predicted by Gaussian process based off-line and on-line algorithms. Accuracy of the Gaussian process based prognosis method is improved by including more training sets. Piezoelectric and AE features are also used for the state prediction. In the test cases presented, the piezoelectric features lead to better prognosis results. On-line prognosis is completed sequentially by combining experimental and predicted features. On-line damage state prediction and remaining useful life estimation shows good correlation with experimental data at later stages of fatigue life.

  6. Statistical calibration via Gaussianization in hot-wire anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluzman, Igal; Cohen, Jacob; Oshman, Yaakov

    2017-03-01

    A statistical method is introduced, that is based on Gaussianization to estimate the nonlinear calibration curve of a hot-wire probe, relating the input flow velocity to the output (measured) voltage. The method uses as input a measured sequence of voltage samples, corresponding to different unknown flow velocities in the desired operational range, and only two measured voltages along with their known (calibrated) flow velocities. The method relies on the conditions that (1) the velocity signal is Gaussian distributed (or has another known distribution), and (2) the measured signal covers the desired velocity range over which the sensor is to be calibrated. The novel calibration method is validated against standard calibration methods using data acquired by hot-wire probes in wind-tunnel experiments. In these experiments, a hot-wire probe is placed at a certain region downstream of a cube-shaped body in a freestream of air flow, properly selected, so that the central limit theorem, when applied to the random velocity increments composing the instantaneous velocity in the wake, roughly holds, and renders the measured signal nearly Gaussian distributed. The statistical distribution of the velocity field in the wake is validated by mapping the first four statistical moments of the measured signals in different regions of the wake and comparing them with corresponding moments of the Gaussian distribution. The experimental data are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the method to the distribution of the measured signal, and the method is demonstrated to possess some robustness with respect to deviations from the Gaussian distribution.

  7. Measurement-induced Nonlocality for Gaussian States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruifen; Hou, Jinchuan; Qi, Xiaofei

    2017-04-01

    We establish an analytic formula of measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) for two-mode squeezed thermal states and mixed thermal states. Different from the quantum discord case, we show that there is no Gaussian version of MIN by Gaussian positive operator valued measurements.

  8. Conditional and unconditional Gaussian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Lami, Ludovico; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on the general theory of open quantum systems in the Gaussian regime and explores a number of diverse ramifications and consequences of the theory. We shall first introduce the Gaussian framework in its full generality, including a classification of Gaussian (also known as 'general-dyne') quantum measurements. In doing so, we will give a compact proof for the parametrisation of the most general Gaussian completely positive map, which we believe to be missing in the existing literature. We will then move on to consider the linear coupling with a white noise bath, and derive the diffusion equations that describe the evolution of Gaussian states under such circumstances. Starting from these equations, we outline a constructive method to derive general master equations that apply outside the Gaussian regime. Next, we include the general-dyne monitoring of the environmental degrees of freedom and recover the Riccati equation for the conditional evolution of Gaussian states. Our derivation relies exclusively on the standard quantum mechanical update of the system state, through the evaluation of Gaussian overlaps. The parametrisation of the conditional dynamics we obtain is novel and, at variance with existing alternatives, directly ties in to physical detection schemes. We conclude our study with two examples of conditional dynamics that can be dealt with conveniently through our formalism, demonstrating how monitoring can suppress the noise in optical parametric processes as well as stabilise systems subject to diffusive scattering.

  9. Diagnosing non-Gaussianity of forecast and analysis errors in a convective scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, R.; Michel, Y.; Montmerle, T.

    2015-07-01

    In numerical weather prediction, the problem of estimating initial conditions is usually based on a Bayesian framework. Two common derivations respectively lead to the Kalman filter and to variational approaches. They rely on either assumptions of linearity or assumptions of Gaussianity of the probability density functions of both observation and background errors. In practice, linearity and Gaussianity of errors are tied to one another, in the sense that a nonlinear model will yield non-Gaussian probability density functions, and that standard methods may perform poorly in the context of non-Gaussian probability density functions. This study aims to describe some aspects of non-Gaussianity of forecast and analysis errors in a convective scale model using a Monte-Carlo approach based on an ensemble of data assimilations. For this purpose, an ensemble of 90 members of cycled perturbed assimilations has been run over a highly precipitating case of interest. Non-Gaussianity is measured using the K2-statistics from the D'Agostino test, which is related to the sum of the squares of univariate skewness and kurtosis. Results confirm that specific humidity is the least Gaussian variable according to that measure, and also that non-Gaussianity is generally more pronounced in the boundary layer and in cloudy areas. The mass control variables used in our data assimilation, namely vorticity and divergence, also show distinct non-Gaussian behavior. It is shown that while non-Gaussianity increases with forecast lead time, it is efficiently reduced by the data assimilation step especially in areas well covered by observations. Our findings may have implication for the choice of the control variables.

  10. Helical apodizers for tunable hyper Gaussian masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-Castañeda, J.; Ledesma, Sergio; Gómez-Sarabia, Cristina M.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss an optical method for controlling the half-width of Gaussian like transmittance windows, by using a pair of absorption masks that have both radial and helical amplitude variations. For describing the radial part of the proposed masks, we employ amplitude transmittance profiles of the form T(ρ) = exp(- ρ s ). For s = 2, one has an amplitude transmittance that is proportional to a Gaussian function. A sub Gaussian mask is defined by a value of s < 2. And if s > 2, one has super Gaussian masks. Our discussion considers that any of these radially varying masks has also helical modulations. We show that by using a suitable pair of this type of masks, one can control the halfwidth of Gaussian like windows.

  11. Gaussian MRF rotation-invariant features for image classification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huawu; Clausi, David A

    2004-07-01

    Features based on Markov random field (MRF) models are sensitive to texture rotation. This paper develops an anisotropic circular Gaussian MRF (ACGMRF) model for retrieving rotation-invariant texture features. To overcome the singularity problem of the least squares estimate method, an approximate least squares estimate method is designed and implemented. Rotation-invariant features are obtained from the ACGMRF model parameters using the discrete Fourier transform. The ACGMRF model is demonstrated to be a statistical improvement over three published methods. The three methods include a Laplacian pyramid, an isotropic circular GMRF (ICGMRF), and gray level cooccurrence probability features.

  12. Modeling the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Medicus, Katherine M.; Snyder, James J.; Davies, Angela

    2006-12-01

    We model the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation to identify biases in the measurement due to using a simple geometric ray-trace model instead of the more complex Gaussian model. The radius measurement is based on using an interferometer to identify the test part's position when it is at two null locations, and the distance between the positions is an estimate of the part's radius. The null condition is observed when there is no difference in curvature between the reflected reference and the test wavefronts, and a Gaussian model will provide a first-order estimate of curvature changes due to wave propagation and therefore changes to the radius measurement. We show that the geometric ray assumption leads to radius biases (errors) that are a strong function of the test part radius and increase as the radius of the part decreases. We tested for a bias for both microscaled(<1 mm) and macroscaled parts. The bias is of the order of parts in 105 for micro-optics with radii a small fraction of a millimeter and much smaller for macroscaled optics. The amount of bias depends on the interferometer configuration (numerical aperture, etc.), the nominal radius of the test part, and the distances in the interferometer.

  13. Stochastic modeling of seafloor morphology: A parameterized Gaussian model

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.A.; Jordan, T.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Stochastic methods of analysis are useful for quantifying ensemble properties of small-scale bathymetric features such as abyssal hills. In this paper the authors model the seafloor as a stationary, zero-mean, Gaussian random field completely specified by its autocovariance function. They formulate an anisotropic autocovariance function that has five free parameters describing the amplitude, anisotropic orientation and aspect ratio, characteristic length, and Hausdorff (fractal) dimension of seafloor topography. Parameters estimated from various seafloor exhibits a wide range of stochastic characteristics within the constraints of the model. Synthetic topography can be generated at arbitrary scale and resolution from the Gaussian model using a Fourier method. Color images of these synthetics are useful for illustrating the stochastic behavior of the model.

  14. Global Low-Rank Image Restoration With Gaussian Mixture Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sibo; Jiao, Licheng; Liu, Fang; Wang, Shuang

    2017-06-27

    Low-rank restoration has recently attracted a lot of attention in the research of computer vision. Empirical studies show that exploring the low-rank property of the patch groups can lead to superior restoration performance, however, there is limited achievement on the global low-rank restoration because the rank minimization at image level is too strong for the natural images which seldom match the low-rank condition. In this paper, we describe a flexible global low-rank restoration model which introduces the local statistical properties into the rank minimization. The proposed model can effectively recover the latent global low-rank structure via nuclear norm, as well as the fine details via Gaussian mixture model. An alternating scheme is developed to estimate the Gaussian parameters and the restored image, and it shows excellent convergence and stability. Besides, experiments on image and video sequence datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed method in image inpainting problems.

  15. Gaussian interferometric power as a measure of continuous-variable non-Markovianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Leonardo A. M.; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Liuzzo-Scorpo, Pietro; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the non-Markovianity of continuous-variable Gaussian quantum channels through the evolution of an operational metrological quantifier, namely, the Gaussian interferometric power, which captures the minimal precision that can be achieved using bipartite Gaussian probes in a black-box phase estimation setup, where the phase shift generator is a priori unknown. We observe that the monotonicity of the Gaussian interferometric power under the action of local Gaussian quantum channels on the ancillary arm of the bipartite probes is a natural indicator of Markovian dynamics; consequently, its breakdown for specific maps can be used to construct a witness and an effective quantifier of non-Markovianity. In our work, we consider two paradigmatic Gaussian models, the damping master equation and the quantum Brownian motion, and identify analytically and numerically the parameter regimes that give rise to non-Markovian dynamics. We then quantify the degree of non-Markovianity of the channels in terms of Gaussian interferometric power, showing, in particular, that even nonentangled probes can be useful to witness non-Markovianity. This establishes an interesting link between the dynamics of bipartite continuous-variable open systems and their potential for optical interferometry. The results are an important supplement to the recent research on characterization of non-Markovianity in continuous-variable systems.

  16. Asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a family of asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian (aLG) laser beams. The beams have been derived via a complex-valued shift of conventional LG beams in the Cartesian plane. While propagating in a uniform medium, the first bright ring of the aLG beam becomes less asymmetric and the energy is redistributed toward peripheral diffraction rings. The projection of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) onto the optical axis is calculated. The OAM is shown to grow quadratically with increasing asymmetry parameter of the aLG beam, which equals the ratio of the shift to the waist radius. Conditions for the OAM becoming equal to the topological charge have been derived. For aLG beams with zero radial index, we have deduced an expression to define the intensity maximum coordinates and shown the crescent-shaped intensity pattern to rotate during propagation. Results of the experimental generation and rotation of aLG beams agree well with theoretical predictions.

  17. Quasi-Gaussian electromagnetic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2013-03-01

    A class of Maxwellian beams, which is an exact solution of the vector wave equation (Helmholtz equation) and Maxwell's equations, is introduced. The solution, termed a quasi-Gaussian electromagnetic (EM) beam, is formed from a superposition of sources and sinks with complex coordinates, and is characterized by an arbitrary waist w0 and a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range zR. An attractive feature of this beam is the description of strongly focused (or strongly divergent) EM-optical wave fields for kw0≤1, where k is the wave number. A vector wave analysis is developed to determine and compute the spatial Cartesian components of the electric and magnetic fields (valid in the near field and the far field) stemming from Maxwell's vector equations and the Lorenz gauge condition, with particular emphasis on the parameter kw0 and the polarization states of the vector potentials used to derive the EM field's components. The results are potentially useful in the study of the axial and/or arbitrary wave scattering, radiation force, and torque in lasers operating with strongly focused (or strongly divergent) beams for particle manipulation in optical tweezers and imaging applications.

  18. Cloning of Gaussian states by linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2006-06-15

    We analyze in details a scheme for cloning of Gaussian states based on linear optical components and homodyne detection recently demonstrated by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)]. The input-output fidelity is evaluated for a generic (pure or mixed) Gaussian state taking into account the effect of nonunit quantum efficiency and unbalanced mode mixing. In addition, since in most quantum information protocols the covariance matrix of the set of input states is not perfectly known, we evaluate the average cloning fidelity for classes of Gaussian states with the degree of squeezing and the number of thermal photons being only partially known.

  19. Scalar field of nonparaxial Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Ulanowski, Z; Ludlow, I K

    2000-12-15

    A family of closed-form expressions for the scalar field of strongly focused Gaussian beams in oblate spheroidal coordinates is given. The solutions satisfy the wave equation and are free from singularities. The lowest-order solution in the far field closely matches the energy density produced by a sine-condition, high-aperture lens illuminated by a paraxial Gaussian beam. At the large waist limit the solution reduces to the paraxial Gaussian beam form. The solution is equivalent to the spherical wave of a combined complex point source and sink but has the advantage of being more directly interpretatable.

  20. Quantum bit commitment under Gaussian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandilara, Aikaterini; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum bit commitment has long been known to be impossible. Nevertheless, just as in the classical case, imposing certain constraints on the power of the parties may enable the construction of asymptotically secure protocols. Here, we introduce a quantum bit commitment protocol and prove that it is asymptotically secure if cheating is restricted to Gaussian operations. This protocol exploits continuous-variable quantum optical carriers, for which such a Gaussian constraint is experimentally relevant as the high optical nonlinearity needed to effect deterministic non-Gaussian cheating is inaccessible.

  1. Gaussian measures of entanglement versus negativities: Ordering of two-mode Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-09-15

    We study the entanglement of general (pure or mixed) two-mode Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems by comparing the two available classes of computable measures of entanglement: entropy-inspired Gaussian convex-roof measures and positive partial transposition-inspired measures (negativity and logarithmic negativity). We first review the formalism of Gaussian measures of entanglement, adopting the framework introduced in M. M. Wolf et al., Phys. Rev. A 69, 052320 (2004), where the Gaussian entanglement of formation was defined. We compute explicitly Gaussian measures of entanglement for two important families of nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian state: namely, the states of extremal (maximal and minimal) negativities at fixed global and local purities, introduced in G. Adesso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 087901 (2004). This analysis allows us to compare the different orderings induced on the set of entangled two-mode Gaussian states by the negativities and by the Gaussian measures of entanglement. We find that in a certain range of values of the global and local purities (characterizing the covariance matrix of the corresponding extremal states), states of minimum negativity can have more Gaussian entanglement of formation than states of maximum negativity. Consequently, Gaussian measures and negativities are definitely inequivalent measures of entanglement on nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian states, even when restricted to a class of extremal states. On the other hand, the two families of entanglement measures are completely equivalent on symmetric states, for which the Gaussian entanglement of formation coincides with the true entanglement of formation. Finally, we show that the inequivalence between the two families of continuous-variable entanglement measures is somehow limited. Namely, we rigorously prove that, at fixed negativities, the Gaussian measures of entanglement are bounded from below. Moreover, we provide some strong evidence suggesting that they

  2. Gaussian Curvature as an Identifier of Shell Rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Davit

    2017-07-01

    In the paper we deal with shells with non-zero Gaussian curvature. We derive sharp Korn's first (linear geometric rigidity estimate) and second inequalities on that kind of shell for zero or periodic Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin type boundary conditions. We prove that if the Gaussian curvature is positive, then the optimal constant in the first Korn inequality scales like h, and if the Gaussian curvature is negative, then the Korn constant scales like h 4/3, where h is the thickness of the shell. These results have a classical flavour in continuum mechanics, in particular shell theory. The Korn first inequalities are the linear version of the famous geometric rigidity estimate by Friesecke et al. for plates in Arch Ration Mech Anal 180(2):183-236, 2006 (where they show that the Korn constant in the nonlinear Korn's first inequality scales like h 2), extended to shells with nonzero curvature. We also recover the uniform Korn-Poincaré inequality proven for "boundary-less" shells by Lewicka and Müller in Annales de l'Institute Henri Poincare (C) Non Linear Anal 28(3):443-469, 2011 in the setting of our problem. The new estimates can also be applied to find the scaling law for the critical buckling load of the shell under in-plane loads as well as to derive energy scaling laws in the pre-buckled regime. The exponents 1 and 4/3 in the present work appear for the first time in any sharp geometric rigidity estimate.

  3. Constraining primordial non-Gaussianity with moments of the large-scale density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Qingqing; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Scoccimarro, Román; Manera, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We use cosmological N-body simulations to investigate whether measurements of the moments of large-scale structure can yield constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We measure the variance, skewness, and kurtosis of the evolved density field from simulations with Gaussian and three different non-Gaussian initial conditions: a local model with fNL = 100, an equilateral model with fNL = -400, and an orthogonal model with fNL = -400. We show that the moments of the dark matter density field differ significantly between Gaussian and non-Gaussian models. We also make the measurements on mock galaxy catalogues that contain galaxies with clustering properties similar to those of luminous red galaxies. We find that, in the case of skewness and kurtosis, galaxy bias reduces the detectability of non-Gaussianity. However, in the case of the variance, galaxy bias greatly amplifies the detectability of non-Gaussianity. In all cases, we find that redshift distortions do not significantly affect the detectability. When we restrict our measurements to volumes equivalent to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II or Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey samples, the probability of detecting a departure from the Gaussian model is high by using measurements of the variance, but very low by using only skewness and kurtosis. We estimate that in order to detect an amount of non-Gaussianity that is consistent with recent cosmic microwave background constraints using skewness or kurtosis, we would need a galaxy survey that is much larger than any planned future survey. However, future surveys should be large enough to place meaningful constraints using galaxy variance measurements.

  4. Measuring primordial non-Gaussianity with weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Stefan; Marian, Laura; Smith, Robert E.; Desjacques, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    not taken into account, a non-vanishing level of primordial non-Gaussianity will bias the estimated cosmological parameters and uncertainties for future surveys.

  5. Tchebichef moment based restoration of Gaussian blurred images.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ahlad; Paramesran, Raveendran; Lim, Chern-Loon; Dass, Sarat C

    2016-11-10

    With the knowledge of how edges vary in the presence of a Gaussian blur, a method that uses low-order Tchebichef moments is proposed to estimate the blur parameters: sigma (σ) and size (w). The difference between the Tchebichef moments of the original and the reblurred images is used as feature vectors to train an extreme learning machine for estimating the blur parameters (σ,w). The effectiveness of the proposed method to estimate the blur parameters is examined using cross-database validation. The estimated blur parameters from the proposed method are used in the split Bregman-based image restoration algorithm. A comparative analysis of the proposed method with three existing methods using all the images from the LIVE database is carried out. The results show that the proposed method in most of the cases performs better than the three existing methods in terms of the visual quality evaluated using the structural similarity index.

  6. Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Regulator Developed for a Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.

    2002-01-01

    Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control is a modern state-space technique for designing optimal dynamic regulators. It enables us to trade off regulation performance and control effort, and to take into account process and measurement noise. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed an LQG control for a fault-tolerant magnetic bearing suspension rig to optimize system performance and to reduce the sensor and processing noise. The LQG regulator consists of an optimal state-feedback gain and a Kalman state estimator. The first design step is to seek a state-feedback law that minimizes the cost function of regulation performance, which is measured by a quadratic performance criterion with user-specified weighting matrices, and to define the tradeoff between regulation performance and control effort. The next design step is to derive a state estimator using a Kalman filter because the optimal state feedback cannot be implemented without full state measurement. Since the Kalman filter is an optimal estimator when dealing with Gaussian white noise, it minimizes the asymptotic covariance of the estimation error.

  7. Improved Gaussian Beam-Scattering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The localized model of the beam-shape coefficients for Gaussian beam-scattering theory by a spherical particle provides a great simplification in the numerical implementation of the theory. We derive an alternative form for the localized coefficients that is more convenient for computer computations and that provides physical insight into the details of the scattering process. We construct a FORTRAN program for Gaussian beam scattering with the localized model and compare its computer run time on a personal computer with that of a traditional Mie scattering program and with three other published methods for computing Gaussian beam scattering. We show that the analytical form of the beam-shape coefficients makes evident the fact that the excitation rate of morphology-dependent resonances is greatly enhanced for far off-axis incidence of the Gaussian beam.

  8. Lecture Notes on Non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Christian T.

    We discuss how primordial non-Gaussianity of the curvature perturbation helps to constrain models of the early universe. Observations are consistent with Gaussian initial conditions, compatible with the predictions of the simplest models of inflation. Deviations are constrained to be at the sub percent level, constraining alternative models such as those with multiple fields, non-canonical kinetic terms or breaking the slow-roll conditions. We introduce some of the most important models of inflation which generate non-Gaussian perturbations and provide practical tools on how to calculate the three-point correlation function for a popular class of non-Gaussian models. The current state of the field is summarised and an outlook is given.

  9. Non-Gaussianities in New Ekpyrotic Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Evgeny I; Khoury, Justin; Ovrut, Burt A

    2008-05-02

    The new ekpyrotic model is an alternative scenario of the early Universe which relies on a phase of slow contraction before the big bang. We calculate the 3-point and 4-point correlation functions of primordial density perturbations and find a generically large non-Gaussian signal, just below the current sensitivity level of cosmic microwave background experiments. This is in contrast with slow-roll inflation, which predicts negligible non-Gaussianity. The model is also distinguishable from alternative inflationary scenarios that can yield large non-Gaussianity, such as Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation and the simplest curvatonlike models, through the shape dependence of the correlation functions. Non-Gaussianity therefore provides a distinguishing and testable prediction of New Ekpyrotic Cosmology.

  10. Galaxy bias and primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: D.D.Baumann@uva.nl

    2015-12-01

    We present a systematic study of galaxy biasing in the presence of primordial non-Gaussianity. For a large class of non-Gaussian initial conditions, we define a general bias expansion and prove that it is closed under renormalization, thereby showing that the basis of operators in the expansion is complete. We then study the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the statistics of galaxies. We show that the equivalence principle enforces a relation between the scale-dependent bias in the galaxy power spectrum and that in the dipolar part of the bispectrum. This provides a powerful consistency check to confirm the primordial origin of any observed scale-dependent bias. Finally, we also discuss the imprints of anisotropic non-Gaussianity as motivated by recent studies of higher-spin fields during inflation.

  11. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guţă, Mădălin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-01

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  12. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-15

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  13. Multitracing anisotropic non-Gaussianity with galaxy shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Dvorkin, Cora; Schmidt, Fabian; Spergel, David N.

    2016-12-01

    Correlations between intrinsic galaxy shapes on large scales arise due to the effect of the tidal field of the large-scale structure. Anisotropic primordial non-Gaussianity induces a distinct scale-dependent imprint in these tidal alignments on large scales. Motivated by the observational finding that the alignment strength of luminous red galaxies depends on how galaxy shapes are measured, we study the use of two different shape estimators as a multitracer probe of intrinsic alignments. We show, by means of a Fisher analysis, that this technique promises a significant improvement on anisotropic non-Gaussianity constraints over a single-tracer method. For future weak lensing surveys, the uncertainty in the anisotropic non-Gaussianity parameter, A2, is forecast to be σ (A2)≈50 , ˜40 % smaller than currently available constraints from the bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background. This corresponds to an improvement of a factor of 4-5 over the uncertainty from a single-tracer analysis.

  14. Log Gaussian Cox processes and spatially aggregated disease incidence data.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Brown, Patrick; Gesink, Dionne C; Rue, Håvard

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a methodology for modeling aggregated disease incidence data with the spatially continuous log-Gaussian Cox process. Statistical models for spatially aggregated disease incidence data usually assign the same relative risk to all individuals in the same reporting region (census areas or postal regions). A further assumption that the relative risks in two regions are independent given their neighbor's risks (the Markov assumption) makes the commonly used Besag-York-Mollié model computationally simple. The continuous model proposed here uses a data augmentation step to sample from the posterior distribution of the exact locations at each step of an Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and models the exact locations with an log-Gaussian Cox process. A simulation study shows the log-Gaussian Cox process model consistently outperforming the Besag-York-Mollié model. The method is illustrated by making inference on the spatial distribution of syphilis risk in North Carolina. The effect of several known social risk factors are estimated, and areas with risk well in excess of that expected given these risk factors are identified.

  15. Second and third harmonic waves excited by focused Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Levy, Uri; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-10-19

    Harmonic generation by tightly-focused Gaussian beams is finding important applications, primarily in nonlinear microscopy. It is often naively assumed that the nonlinear signal is generated predominantly in the focal region. However, the intensity of Gaussian-excited electromagnetic harmonic waves is sensitive to the excitation geometry and to the phase matching condition, and may depend on quite an extended region of the material away from the focal plane. Here we solve analytically the amplitude integral for second harmonic and third harmonic waves and study the generated harmonic intensities vs. focal-plane position within the material. We find that maximum intensity for positive wave-vector mismatch values, for both second harmonic and third harmonic waves, is achieved when the fundamental Gaussian is focused few Rayleigh lengths beyond the front surface. Harmonic-generation theory predicts strong intensity oscillations with thickness if the material is very thin. We reproduced these intensity oscillations in glass slabs pumped at 1550nm. From the oscillations of the 517nm third-harmonic waves with slab thickness we estimate the wave-vector mismatch in a Soda-lime glass as Δk(H)= -0.249μm(-1).

  16. Primordial non-Gaussianity from the DBI Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Shuntaro; Koyama, Kazuya

    2010-11-01

    We study primordial fluctuations generated during inflation in a class of models motivated by the DBI Galileons, which are extensions of the DBI action that yield second-order field equations. This class of models generalizes the DBI Galileons in a similar way with K inflation. We calculate the primordial non-Gaussianity from the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations at leading order in the slow-varying approximations. We show that the estimator for the equilateral-type non-Gaussianity, fNLequil, can be applied to measure the amplitude of the primordial bispectrum even in the presence of the Galileon-like term although it gives a slightly different momentum dependence from K-inflation models. For the DBI Galileons, we find -0.32/cs2Gaussianities can be obtained when cs is much smaller than 1 as in the usual DBI inflation. In G-inflation models, where a de Sitter solution is obtained without any potentials, the nonlinear parameter is given by fNLequil=4.62r-2/3, where r is the tensor to scalar ratio, giving a stringent constraint on the model.

  17. Gaussian mapping of chemical fragments in ligand binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Murcia, Marta; Constans, Pere; Pérez, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a new approach to automatically define a quasi-optimal minimal set of pharmacophoric points mapping the interaction properties of a user-defined ligand binding site. The method is based on a fitting algorithm where a grid of sampled interaction energies of the target protein with small chemical fragments in the binding site is approximated by a linear expansion of Gaussian functions. A heuristic approximation selects from this expansion the smallest possible set of Gaussians required to describe the interaction properties of the binding site within a prespecified accuracy. We have evaluated the performance of the approach by comparing the computed Gaussians with the positions of aromatic sites found in experimental protein-ligand complexes. For a set of 53 complexes, good correspondence is found in general. At a 95% significance level, ˜65% of the predicted interaction points have an aromatic binding site within 1.5 Å. We then studied the utility of these points in docking using the program DOCK. Short docking times, with an average of ˜0.18 s per conformer, are obtained, while retaining, both for rigid and flexible docking, the ability to sample native-like binding modes for the ligand. An average 4-5-fold speed-up in docking times and a similar success rate is estimated with respect to the standard DOCK protocol. Abbreviations: RMSD - root mean square deviation; ASA - Atomic Shell Approximation; LSF - Least-Squares Fitting; 3D - three-dimensional; VDW - Van der Waals.

  18. Ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian radial pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Zerwekh, P. S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer that produces an output that is a symmetrical function comprises a piezoelectric crystal with several concentric ring electrodes on one side of the crystal. A resistor network applies different amplitudes of an ac source to each of the several electrodes. A plot of the different amplitudes from the outermost electrode to the innermost electrode is the first half of a Gaussian function. Consequently, the output of the crystal from the side opposite the electrodes has a Gaussian profile.

  19. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  20. Nonnegative matrix factorization with Gaussian process priors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mikkel N; Laurberg, Hans

    2008-01-01

    We present a general method for including prior knowledge in a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), based on Gaussian process priors. We assume that the nonnegative factors in the NMF are linked by a strictly increasing function to an underlying Gaussian process specified by its covariance function. This allows us to find NMF decompositions that agree with our prior knowledge of the distribution of the factors, such as sparseness, smoothness, and symmetries. The method is demonstrated with an example from chemical shift brain imaging.

  1. Gaussian beam tracing for ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael B.; Hursky, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Gaussian beam tracing methods have emerged as a standard approach for modeling sound propagation in the ocean. The first implementations were developed in the 1970's by Bucker and evolved significantly. Today there are actually some four different types of Gaussian beam algorithms. They are quite different in terms of both the beam characteristics and their performance. This paper will review the development of the methods and their application to typical ocean acoustic problems.

  2. Statistical tests for the Gaussian nature of primordial fluctuations through CBR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X. NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 )

    1994-04-15

    Information about the physical processes that generate the primordial fluctuations in the early Universe can be gained by testing the Gaussian nature of the fluctuations through cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) temperature anisotropy experiments. One of the crucial aspects of density perturbations that are produced by the standard inflation scenario is that they are Gaussian, whereas seeds produced by topological defects left over from an early cosmic phase transition tend to be non-Gaussian. To carry out this test, sophisticated statistical tools are required. In this paper, we will discuss several such statistical tools, including multivariant skewness and kurtosis, Euler-Poincare characteristics, the three-point temperature correlation function, and Hotelling's [ital T][sup 2] statistic defined through bispectral estimates of a one-dimensional data set. The effect of noise present in the current data is discussed in detail and the COBE 53 GHz data set is analyzed. Our analysis shows that, on the large angular scale to which COBE is sensitive, the statistics are probably Gaussian. On the small angular scales, the importance of Hotelling's [ital T][sup 2] statistic is stressed, and the minimum sample size required to test Gaussianity is estimated. Although the current data set available from various experiments at half-degree scales is still too small, improvement of the data set by roughly a factor of 2 will be enough to test the Gaussianity statistically. On the arc min scale, we analyze the recent RING data through bispectral analysis, and the result indicates possible deviation from Gaussianity. Effects of point sources are also discussed. It is pointed out that the Gaussianity problem can be resolved in the near future by ground-based or balloon-borne experiments.

  3. On the relationship between Gaussian stochastic blockmodels and label propagation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhao; Chen, Tongfei; Hu, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    The problem of community detection has received great attention in recent years. Many methods have been proposed to discover communities in networks. In this paper, we propose a Gaussian stochastic blockmodel that uses Gaussian distributions to fit weight of edges in networks for non-overlapping community detection. The maximum likelihood estimation of this model has the same objective function as general label propagation with node preference. The node preference of a specific vertex turns out to be a value proportional to the intra-community eigenvector centrality (the corresponding entry in principal eigenvector of the adjacency matrix of the subgraph inside that vertex's community) under maximum likelihood estimation. Additionally, the maximum likelihood estimation of a constrained version of our model is highly related to another extension of the label propagation algorithm, namely, the label propagation algorithm under constraint. Experiments show that the proposed Gaussian stochastic blockmodel performs well on various benchmark networks.

  4. Planck 2015 results. XVII. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The Planck full mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and E-mode polarization maps are analysed to obtain constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). Using three classes of optimal bispectrum estimators - separable template-fitting (KSW), binned, and modal - we obtain consistent values for the primordial local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes, quoting as our final result from temperature alone ƒlocalNL = 2.5 ± 5.7, ƒequilNL= -16 ± 70, , and ƒorthoNL = -34 ± 32 (68% CL, statistical). Combining temperature and polarization data we obtain ƒlocalNL = 0.8 ± 5.0, ƒequilNL= -4 ± 43, and ƒorthoNL = -26 ± 21 (68% CL, statistical). The results are based on comprehensive cross-validation of these estimators on Gaussian and non-Gaussian simulations, are stable across component separation techniques, pass an extensive suite of tests, and are consistent with estimators based on measuring the Minkowski functionals of the CMB. The effect of time-domain de-glitching systematics on the bispectrum is negligible. In spite of these test outcomes we conservatively label the results including polarization data as preliminary, owing to a known mismatch of the noise model in simulations and the data. Beyond estimates of individual shape amplitudes, we present model-independent, three-dimensional reconstructions of the Planck CMB bispectrum and derive constraints on early universe scenarios that generate primordial NG, including general single-field models of inflation, axion inflation, initial state modifications, models producing parity-violating tensor bispectra, and directionally dependent vector models. We present a wide survey of scale-dependent feature and resonance models, accounting for the "look elsewhere" effect in estimating the statistical significance of features. We also look for isocurvature NG, and find no signal, but we obtain constraints that improve significantly with the inclusion of polarization. The primordial

  5. Planck 2015 results: XVII. Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; ...

    2016-09-20

    We report that the Planck full mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and E-mode polarization maps are analysed to obtain constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). Using three classes of optimal bispectrum estimators – separable template-fitting (KSW), binned, and modal – we obtain consistent values for the primordial local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes, quoting as our final result from temperature alone ƒlocalNL = 2.5 ± 5.7, ƒequilNL= -16 ± 70, , and ƒorthoNL = -34 ± 32 (68% CL, statistical). Combining temperature and polarization data we obtain ƒlocalNL = 0.8 ± 5.0, ƒequilNL= -4 ± 43, and ƒorthoNL = -26more » ± 21 (68% CL, statistical). The results are based on comprehensive cross-validation of these estimators on Gaussian and non-Gaussian simulations, are stable across component separation techniques, pass an extensive suite of tests, and are consistent with estimators based on measuring the Minkowski functionals of the CMB. The effect of time-domain de-glitching systematics on the bispectrum is negligible. In spite of these test outcomes we conservatively label the results including polarization data as preliminary, owing to a known mismatch of the noise model in simulations and the data. Beyond estimates of individual shape amplitudes, we present model-independent, three-dimensional reconstructions of the Planck CMB bispectrum and derive constraints on early universe scenarios that generate primordial NG, including general single-field models of inflation, axion inflation, initial state modifications, models producing parity-violating tensor bispectra, and directionally dependent vector models. We present a wide survey of scale-dependent feature and resonance models, accounting for the “look elsewhere” effect in estimating the statistical significance of features. We also look for isocurvature NG, and find no signal, but we obtain constraints that improve significantly with the inclusion of

  6. Non-Gaussian halo assembly bias

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth A.; Verde, Licia; Dolag, Klaus; Matarrese, Sabino; Moscardini, Lauro E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2010-07-01

    The strong dependence of the large-scale dark matter halo bias on the (local) non-Gaussianity parameter, f{sub NL}, offers a promising avenue towards constraining primordial non-Gaussianity with large-scale structure surveys. In this paper, we present the first detection of the dependence of the non-Gaussian halo bias on halo formation history using N-body simulations. We also present an analytic derivation of the expected signal based on the extended Press-Schechter formalism. In excellent agreement with our analytic prediction, we find that the halo formation history-dependent contribution to the non-Gaussian halo bias (which we call non-Gaussian halo assembly bias) can be factorized in a form approximately independent of redshift and halo mass. The correction to the non-Gaussian halo bias due to the halo formation history can be as large as 100%, with a suppression of the signal for recently formed halos and enhancement for old halos. This could in principle be a problem for realistic galaxy surveys if observational selection effects were to pick galaxies occupying only recently formed halos. Current semi-analytic galaxy formation models, for example, imply an enhancement in the expected signal of ∼ 23% and ∼ 48% for galaxies at z = 1 selected by stellar mass and star formation rate, respectively.

  7. Non-Gaussianity and intermittency in an ensemble of Gaussian fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by the need to capture statistical properties of turbulent systems in simple, analytically tractable models, an ensemble of Gaussian sub-ensembles with varying properties of the correlation function such as variance and length scale is investigated. The ensemble statistics naturally exhibit non-Gaussianity and intermittency. Due to the simplicity of Gaussian random fields, many explicit results can be obtained analytically, revealing the origin of non-Gaussianity in this framework. Potential applications of the proposed model ensemble for the description of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of complex turbulent systems are briefly discussed.

  8. Generation of Weibull distribution clutter based on correlated Gaussian sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Xin, Fengming

    2017-08-01

    With the continuous development of science and technology, the electromagnetic environment becomes more complex. Accurate clutter modeling is becoming increasingly difficult, which will have adverse effects in echo analysis. In this paper, in order to overcome electromagnetic interference, we use correlated Gaussian sequence to generate Weibull distribution clutter. Simulation results show that the estimated value of the proposed method is close to the theoretical value in the aspect of probability density and power spectral density. That demonstrates the validity of our method. Finally, the conclusions are given.

  9. Entangled qubits in a non-Gaussian quantum state

    SciTech Connect

    Kiesel, T.; Vogel, W.; Hage, B.; Schnabel, R.

    2011-06-15

    We experimentally generate and tomographically characterize a mixed, genuinely non-Gaussian bipartite continuous-variable entangled state. By testing entanglement in 2x2-dimensional two-qubit subspaces, entangled qubits are localized within the density matrix, which, first, proves the distillability of the state and, second, is useful to estimate the efficiency and test the applicability of distillation protocols. In our example, the entangled qubits are arranged in the density matrix in an asymmetric way, i.e., entanglement is found between diverse qubits composed of different photon number states, although the entangled state is symmetric under exchanging the modes.

  10. Suborbital spaceplane optimization using non-stationary Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Robin; de Muelenaere, Julien; Elham, Ali

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents multidisciplinary design optimization of a sub-orbital spaceplane. The optimization includes three disciplines: the aerodynamics, the structure and the trajectory. An Adjoint Euler code is used to calculate the aerodynamic lift and drag of the vehicle as well as their derivatives with respect to the design variables. A new surrogate model has been developed based on a non-stationary Gaussian process. That model was used to estimate the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle during the trajectory optimization. The trajectory of thevehicle has been optimized together with its geometry in order to maximize the amount of payload that can be carried by the spaceplane.

  11. CMB lensing and primordial squeezed non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Ruth; Lewis, Antony; Regan, Donough E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2012-03-01

    Squeezed primordial non-Gaussianity can strongly constrain early-universe physics, but it can only be observed on the CMB after it has been gravitationally lensed. We give a new simple non-perturbative prescription for accurately calculating the effect of lensing on any squeezed primordial bispectrum shape, and test it with simulations. We give the generalization to polarization bispectra, and discuss the effect of lensing on the trispectrum. We explain why neglecting the lensing smoothing effect does not significantly bias estimators of local primordial non-Gaussianity, even though the change in shape can be ∼>10%. We also show how τ{sub NL} trispectrum estimators can be well approximated by much simpler CMB temperature modulation estimators, and hence that there is potentially a ∼ 10–30% bias due to very large-scale lensing modes, depending on the range of modulation scales included. Including dipole sky modulations can halve the τ{sub NL} error bar if kinematic effects can be subtracted using known properties of the CMB temperature dipole. Lensing effects on the g{sub NL} trispectrum are small compared to the error bar. In appendices we give the general result for lensing of any primordial bispectrum, and show how any full-sky squeezed bispectrum can be decomposed into orthogonal modes of distinct angular dependence.

  12. Statistical Orbit Determination using the Particle Filter for Incorporating Non-Gaussian Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashiku, Alinda; Garrison, James L.; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    The tracking of space objects requires frequent and accurate monitoring for collision avoidance. As even collision events with very low probability are important, accurate prediction of collisions require the representation of the full probability density function (PDF) of the random orbit state. Through representing the full PDF of the orbit state for orbit maintenance and collision avoidance, we can take advantage of the statistical information present in the heavy tailed distributions, more accurately representing the orbit states with low probability. The classical methods of orbit determination (i.e. Kalman Filter and its derivatives) provide state estimates based on only the second moments of the state and measurement errors that are captured by assuming a Gaussian distribution. Although the measurement errors can be accurately assumed to have a Gaussian distribution, errors with a non-Gaussian distribution could arise during propagation between observations. Moreover, unmodeled dynamics in the orbit model could introduce non-Gaussian errors into the process noise. A Particle Filter (PF) is proposed as a nonlinear filtering technique that is capable of propagating and estimating a more complete representation of the state distribution as an accurate approximation of a full PDF. The PF uses Monte Carlo runs to generate particles that approximate the full PDF representation. The PF is applied in the estimation and propagation of a highly eccentric orbit and the results are compared to the Extended Kalman Filter and Splitting Gaussian Mixture algorithms to demonstrate its proficiency.

  13. Determining the Gaussian Modulus and Edge Properties of 2D Materials: From Graphene to Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelisko, Matthew; Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Gao, Huajian; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    The dominant deformation behavior of two-dimensional materials (bending) is primarily governed by just two parameters: bending rigidity and the Gaussian modulus. These properties also set the energy scale for various important physical and biological processes such as pore formation, cell fission and generally, any event accompanied by a topological change. Unlike the bending rigidity, the Gaussian modulus is, however, notoriously difficult to evaluate via either experiments or atomistic simulations. In this Letter, recognizing that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension play a nontrivial role in the fluctuations of a 2D material edge, we derive closed-form expressions for edge fluctuations. Combined with atomistic simulations, we use the developed approach to extract the Gaussian modulus and edge tension at finite temperatures for both graphene and various types of lipid bilayers. Our results possibly provide the first reliable estimate of this elusive property at finite temperatures and appear to suggest that earlier estimates must be revised. In particular, we show that, if previously estimated properties are employed, the graphene-free edge will exhibit unstable behavior at room temperature. Remarkably, in the case of graphene, we show that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension even change sign at finite temperatures.

  14. From particle counting to Gaussian tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, K. R.; Sengupta, Ritabrata

    2015-12-01

    The momentum and position observables in an n-mode boson Fock space Γ(ℂn) have the whole real line ℝ as their spectrum. But the total number operator N has a discrete spectrum ℤ+ = {0, 1, 2,…}. An n-mode Gaussian state in Γ(ℂn) is completely determined by the mean values of momentum and position observables and their covariance matrix which together constitute a family of n(2n + 3) real parameters. Starting with N and its unitary conjugates by the Weyl displacement operators and operators from a representation of the symplectic group Sp(2n) in Γ(ℂn), we construct n(2n + 3) observables with spectrum ℤ+ but whose expectation values in a Gaussian state determine all its mean and covariance parameters. Thus measurements of discrete-valued observables enable the tomography of the underlying Gaussian state and it can be done by using five one-mode and four two-mode Gaussian symplectic gates in single and pair mode wires of Γ(ℂn) = Γ(ℂ)⊗n. Thus the tomography protocol admits a simple description in a language similar to circuits in quantum computation theory. Such a Gaussian tomography applied to outputs of a Gaussian channel with coherent input states permit a tomography of the channel parameters. However, in our procedure the number of counting measurements exceeds the number of channel parameters slightly. Presently, it is not clear whether a more efficient method exists for reducing this tomographic complexity. As a byproduct of our approach an elementary derivation of the probability generating function of N in a Gaussian state is given. In many cases the distribution turns out to be infinitely divisible and its underlying Lévy measure can be obtained. However, we are unable to derive the exact distribution in all cases. Whether this property of infinite divisibility holds in general is left as an open problem.

  15. Generation of Ensemble Precipitation Forecasts From Single-Value QPF via Mixed-Type Meta-Gaussian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Seo, D.; Demargne, J.; Brown, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    In this presentation, we describe generation of ensemble precipitation forecasts from single-value quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) via the mixed-type bivariate meta-Gaussian model (Herr and Krzysztofowicz 2005). Because of the intermittent nature of precipitation, it is necessary to model precipitation amount as a mixed variable. The joint distribution of single-value QPF and observed precipitation amounts may then be modeled by the mixed-type bivariate meta-Gaussian distribution. From the single-value QPF, one may generate ensemble precipitation forecasts by sampling from the conditional distribution of the mixed-type bivariate meta-Gaussian distribution. The marginal distributions of the meta-Gaussian distribution are estimated using the Gaussian kernel smoothing technique with a plug-in bandwidth selection procedure. This methodology attempts to capture the skill and uncertainty in the QPF. We present both dependent and independent validation results for selected river basins in the AB-, CN-, and MA-RFC areas.

  16. Joint regression analysis of correlated data using Gaussian copulas.

    PubMed

    Song, Peter X-K; Li, Mingyao; Yuan, Ying

    2009-03-01

    This article concerns a new joint modeling approach for correlated data analysis. Utilizing Gaussian copulas, we present a unified and flexible machinery to integrate separate one-dimensional generalized linear models (GLMs) into a joint regression analysis of continuous, discrete, and mixed correlated outcomes. This essentially leads to a multivariate analogue of the univariate GLM theory and hence an efficiency gain in the estimation of regression coefficients. The availability of joint probability models enables us to develop a full maximum likelihood inference. Numerical illustrations are focused on regression models for discrete correlated data, including multidimensional logistic regression models and a joint model for mixed normal and binary outcomes. In the simulation studies, the proposed copula-based joint model is compared to the popular generalized estimating equations, which is a moment-based estimating equation method to join univariate GLMs. Two real-world data examples are used in the illustration.

  17. A Framework for Non-Gaussian Signal Modeling and Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    1993. [38] B. P. Carlin , N. G. Polson, and D. S. Stoffer, "A Monte Carlo approach to nonnormal and nonlinear state-space modeling," Journal of the...NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1992. [198] J. R. Thompson, Empirical Model Building. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1989. [199] J. R. Thompson and R. A. Tapia

  18. Generation of coherence via Gaussian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarelli, Francesco; Genoni, Marco G.; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2017-07-01

    We address measurement-based generation of quantum coherence in continuous variable systems. We consider Gaussian measurements performed on Gaussian states and focus on two scenarios: In the first one, we assume an initially correlated bipartite state shared by two parties and study how correlations may be exploited to remotely create quantum coherence via measurement back action. In particular, we focus on conditional states with zero first moments, so as to address coherence due to properties of the covariance matrix. We consider different classes of bipartite states with incoherent marginals and show that the larger the measurement squeezing, the larger the conditional coherence. Homodyne detection is thus the optimal Gaussian measurement to remotely generate coherence. We also show that for squeezed thermal states there exists a threshold value for the generated coherence which separates entangled and separable states at a fixed energy. Finally, we briefly discuss the tripartite case and the relationship between tripartite correlations and the conditional two-mode coherence. In the second scenario, we address the steady-state coherence of a system interacting with an environment which is continuously monitored. In particular, we discuss the dynamics of an optical parametric oscillator in order to investigate how the coherence of a Gaussian state may be increased by means of time-continuous Gaussian measurement on the interacting environment.

  19. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    We present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named ‘trap split’, in a conventional four-level double-Λ atomic system, driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can always be achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This feature is enabled by the interaction of the atomic system and the Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses with zero intensity in the center. A further advantage of using Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses is the insensitivity to fluctuation in the intensity of the lasers in such a way that the separation between the traps remains constant. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the suggested scheme with Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can form optical traps with spatial sizes that are not limited by the wavelength of the laser, and can, in principle, become smaller than the wavelength of light. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating of particles and the generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  20. Hydraulic Conductivity Fields: Gaussian or Not?

    PubMed

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Dogan, Mine; Van Dam, Remke L; Hyndman, David W; Benson, David A

    2013-08-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) fields are used to parameterize groundwater flow and transport models. Numerical simulations require a detailed representation of the K field, synthesized to interpolate between available data. Several recent studies introduced high resolution K data (HRK) at the Macro Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site, and used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to delineate the main structural features of the aquifer. This paper describes a statistical analysis of these data, and the implications for K field modeling in alluvial aquifers. Two striking observations have emerged from this analysis. The first is that a simple fractional difference filter can have a profound effect on data histograms, organizing non-Gaussian ln K data into a coherent distribution. The second is that using GPR facies allows us to reproduce the significantly non-Gaussian shape seen in real HRK data profiles, using a simulated Gaussian ln K field in each facies. This illuminates a current controversy in the literature, between those who favor Gaussian ln K models, and those who observe non-Gaussian ln K fields. Both camps are correct, but at different scales.

  1. Graphical calculus for Gaussian pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-04-15

    We provide a unified graphical calculus for all Gaussian pure states, including graph transformation rules for all local and semilocal Gaussian unitary operations, as well as local quadrature measurements. We then use this graphical calculus to analyze continuous-variable (CV) cluster states, the essential resource for one-way quantum computing with CV systems. Current graphical approaches to CV cluster states are only valid in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing, and the associated graph transformation rules only apply when the initial and final states are of this form. Our formalism applies to all Gaussian pure states and subsumes these rules in a natural way. In addition, the term 'CV graph state' currently has several inequivalent definitions in use. Using this formalism we provide a single unifying definition that encompasses all of them. We provide many examples of how the formalism may be used in the context of CV cluster states: defining the 'closest' CV cluster state to a given Gaussian pure state and quantifying the error in the approximation due to finite squeezing; analyzing the optimality of certain methods of generating CV cluster states; drawing connections between this graphical formalism and bosonic Hamiltonians with Gaussian ground states, including those useful for CV one-way quantum computing; and deriving a graphical measure of bipartite entanglement for certain classes of CV cluster states. We mention other possible applications of this formalism and conclude with a brief note on fault tolerance in CV one-way quantum computing.

  2. Comparison of Gaussian and super Gaussian laser beams for addressing atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Gillen, Glen D.; Piotrowicz, M. J.; Saffman, M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the fidelity of single-qubit quantum gates performed with two-frequency laser fields that have a Gaussian or super Gaussian spatial mode. Numerical simulations are used to account for imperfections arising from atomic motion in an optical trap, spatially varying Stark shifts of the trapping and control beams, and transverse and axial misalignment of the control beams. Numerical results that account for the three-dimensional distribution of control light show that a super Gaussian mode with intensity I˜ e^{-2(r/w_0)^n} provides reduced sensitivity to atomic motion and beam misalignment. Choosing a super Gaussian with n=6 the decay time of finite temperature Rabi oscillations can be increased by a factor of 60 compared to an n=2 Gaussian beam, while reducing crosstalk to neighboring qubit sites.

  3. Gaussian windows: A tool for exploring multivariate data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeckel, Louis A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a method for interactively exploring a large set of quantitative multivariate data, in order to estimate the shape of the underlying density function. It is assumed that the density function is more or less smooth, but no other specific assumptions are made concerning its structure. The local structure of the data in a given region may be examined by viewing the data through a Gaussian window, whose location and shape are chosen by the user. A Gaussian window is defined by giving each data point a weight based on a multivariate Gaussian function. The weighted sample mean and sample covariance matrix are then computed, using the weights attached to the data points. These quantities are used to compute an estimate of the shape of the density function in the window region. The local structure of the data is described by a method similar to the method of principal components. By taking many such local views of the data, we can form an idea of the structure of the data set. The method is applicable in any number of dimensions. The method can be used to find and describe simple structural features such as peaks, valleys, and saddle points in the density function, and also extended structures in higher dimensions. With some practice, we can apply our geometrical intuition to these structural features in any number of dimensions, so that we can think about and describe the structure of the data. Since the computations involved are relatively simple, the method can easily be implemented on a small computer.

  4. Majorization preservation of Gaussian bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels are majorization-preserving over the set of passive states of the harmonic oscillator. This means that comparable passive states under majorization are transformed into equally comparable passive states by any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. Our proof relies on a new preorder relation called Fock-majorization, which coincides with regular majorization for passive states but also induces another order relation in terms of mean boson number, thereby connecting the concepts of energy and disorder of a quantum state. The consequences of majorization preservation are discussed in the context of the broadcast communication capacity of Gaussian bosonic channels. Because most of our results are independent of the specific nature of the system under investigation, they could be generalized to other quantum systems and Hamiltonians, providing a new tool that may prove useful in quantum information theory and especially quantum thermodynamics.

  5. Index Distribution of Gaussian Random Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Nadal, Celine; Scardicchio, Antonello; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2009-11-27

    We compute analytically, for large N, the probability distribution of the number of positive eigenvalues (the index N{sub +}) of a random NxN matrix belonging to Gaussian orthogonal (beta=1), unitary (beta=2) or symplectic (beta=4) ensembles. The distribution of the fraction of positive eigenvalues c=N{sub +}/N scales, for large N, as P(c,N){approx_equal}exp[-betaN{sup 2}PHI(c)] where the rate function PHI(c), symmetric around c=1/2 and universal (independent of beta), is calculated exactly. The distribution has non-Gaussian tails, but even near its peak at c=1/2 it is not strictly Gaussian due to an unusual logarithmic singularity in the rate function.

  6. Gaussian state for the bouncing quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Piechocki, Włodzimierz

    2012-10-01

    We present results concerning propagation of the Gaussian state across the cosmological quantum bounce. The reduced phase space quantization of loop quantum cosmology is applied to the Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe with a free massless scalar field. Evolution of quantum moments of the canonical variables is investigated. The covariance turns out to be a monotonic function so it may be used as an evolution parameter having quantum origin. We show that for the Gaussian state the Universe is least quantum at the bounce. We propose explanation of this counter-intuitive feature using the entropy of squeezing. The obtained time dependence of entropy is in agreement with qualitative predictions based on von Neumann entropy for mixed states. We show that, for the considered Gaussian state, semiclassicality is preserved across the bounce, so there is no cosmic forgetfulness.

  7. Recognition of Images Degraded by Gaussian Blur.

    PubMed

    Flusser, Jan; Farokhi, Sajad; Hoschl, Cyril; Suk, Tomas; Zitova, Barbara; Pedone, Matteo

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we propose a new theory of invariants to Gaussian blur. We introduce a notion of a primordial image as a canonical form of all Gaussian blur-equivalent images. The primordial image is defined in spectral domain by means of projection operators. We prove that the moments of the primordial image are invariant to Gaussian blur and we derive recursive formulae for their direct computation without actually constructing the primordial image itself. We show how to extend their invariance also to image rotation. The application of these invariants is in blur-invariant image comparison and recognition. In the experimental part, we perform an exhaustive comparison with two main competitors, the Zhang distance and the Local Phase Quantization.

  8. Recognition of Images Degraded by Gaussian Blur.

    PubMed

    Flusser, Jan; Farokhi, Sajad; Höschl, Cyril; Suk, Tomáš; Zitová, Barbara; Pedone, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new theory of invariants to Gaussian blur. We introduce a notion of a primordial image as a canonical form of all Gaussian blur-equivalent images. The primordial image is defined in spectral domain by means of projection operators. We prove that the moments of the primordial image are invariant to Gaussian blur and we derive recursive formulas for their direct computation without actually constructing the primordial image itself. We show how to extend their invariance also to image rotation. The application of these invariants is in blur-invariant image comparison and recognition. In the experimental part, we perform an exhaustive comparison with two main competitors: 1) the Zhang distance and 2) the local phase quantization.

  9. Gaussian entanglement in the turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohmann, M.; Semenov, A. A.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2016-07-01

    We provide a rigorous treatment of the entanglement properties of two-mode Gaussian states in atmospheric channels by deriving and analyzing the input-output relations for the corresponding entanglement test. A key feature of such turbulent channels is a nontrivial dependence of the transmitted continuous-variable entanglement on coherent displacements of the quantum state of the input field. Remarkably, this allows one to optimize the entanglement certification by modifying local coherent amplitudes using a finite, but optimal amount of squeezing. In addition, we propose a protocol which, in principle, renders it possible to transfer the Gaussian entanglement through any turbulent channel over arbitrary distances. Therefore, our approach provides the theoretical foundation for advanced applications of Gaussian entanglement in free-space quantum communication.

  10. Second order Pseudo-gaussian shaper

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, Jean-Francois

    2002-11-22

    The purpose of this document is to provide a calculus spreadsheet for the design of second-order pseudo-gaussian shapers. A very interesting reference is given by C.H. Mosher ''Pseudo-Gaussian Transfer Functions with Superlative Recovery'', IEEE TNS Volume 23, p. 226-228 (1976). Fred Goulding and Don Landis have studied the structure of those filters and their implementation and this document will outline the calculation leading to the relation between the coefficients of the filter. The general equation of the second order pseudo-gaussian filter is: f(t) = P{sub 0} {center_dot} e{sup -3kt} {center_dot} sin{sup 2}(kt). The parameter k is a normalization factor.

  11. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation φ with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (φ)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (φ)F² interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ≥ 10¹⁶GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (φ) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  12. Modelling non-Gaussianity of background and observational errors by the Maximum Entropy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Carlos; Talagrand, Olivier; Bocquet, Marc

    2010-05-01

    The Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) has widely been used in atmospheric-oceanic data assimilation. However, when data errors have non-Gaussian pdfs, the BLUE differs from the absolute Minimum Variance Unbiased Estimator (MVUE), minimizing the mean square analysis error. The non-Gaussianity of errors can be due to the statistical skewness and positiveness of some physical observables (e.g. moisture, chemical species) or due to the nonlinearity of the data assimilation models and observation operators acting on Gaussian errors. Non-Gaussianity of assimilated data errors can be justified from a priori hypotheses or inferred from statistical diagnostics of innovations (observation minus background). Following this rationale, we compute measures of innovation non-Gaussianity, namely its skewness and kurtosis, relating it to: a) the non-Gaussianity of the individual error themselves, b) the correlation between nonlinear functions of errors, and c) the heteroscedasticity of errors within diagnostic samples. Those relationships impose bounds for skewness and kurtosis of errors which are critically dependent on the error variances, thus leading to a necessary tuning of error variances in order to accomplish consistency with innovations. We evaluate the sub-optimality of the BLUE as compared to the MVUE, in terms of excess of error variance, under the presence of non-Gaussian errors. The error pdfs are obtained by the maximum entropy method constrained by error moments up to fourth order, from which the Bayesian probability density function and the MVUE are computed. The impact is higher for skewed extreme innovations and grows in average with the skewness of data errors, especially if those skewnesses have the same sign. Application has been performed to the quality-accepted ECMWF innovations of brightness temperatures of a set of High Resolution Infrared Sounder channels. In this context, the MVUE has led in some extreme cases to a potential reduction of 20-60% error

  13. Cochlear toughening, protection, and potentiation of noise-induced trauma by non-Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamernik, Roger P.; Qiu, Wei; Davis, Bob

    2003-02-01

    An interrupted noise exposure of sufficient intensity, presented on a daily repeating cycle, produces a threshold shift (TS) following the first day of exposure. TSs measured on subsequent days of the exposure sequence have been shown to decrease relative to the initial TS. This reduction of TS, despite the continuing daily exposure regime, has been called a cochlear toughening effect and the exposures referred to as toughening exposures. Four groups of chinchillas were exposed to one of four different noises presented on an interrupted (6 h/day for 20 days) or noninterrupted (24 h/day for 5 days) schedule. The exposures had equivalent total energy, an overall level of 100 dB(A) SPL, and approximately the same flat, broadband long-term spectrum. The noises differed primarily in their temporal structures; two were Gaussian and two were non-Gausssian, nonstationary. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials were used to estimate hearing thresholds and surface preparation histology was used to determine sensory cell loss. The experimental results presented here show that: (1) Exposures to interrupted high-level, non-Gaussian signals produce a toughening effect comparable to that produced by an equivalent interrupted Gaussian noise. (2) Toughening, whether produced by Gaussian or non-Gaussian noise, results in reduced trauma compared to the equivalent uninterrupted noise, and (3) that both continuous and interrupted non-Gaussian exposures produce more trauma than do energy and spectrally equivalent Gaussian noises. Over the course of the 20-day exposure, the pattern of TS following each day's exposure could exhibit a variety of configurations. These results do not support the equal energy hypothesis as a unifying principal for estimating the potential of a noise exposure to produce hearing loss.

  14. Flat top solitons on linear gaussian potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarov, B. A.; Aklan, N. A. B.; Rosly, M. R.; Hassan, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    The study of Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation has been wide focus from many researchers especially analysing the result of collision as it describes the soliton propagation. This paper considers the soliton scattering of cubic-quintic Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation on localized Gaussian potential. By applying Super-Gaussian ansatz as the trial function for variational approximation (VA) method, the soliton interaction may acquire flat-top shape with appropriate parameters. The result of VA will be compared to numerical analysis to check the accuracy of analytical predictions.

  15. Cosmological Applications of the Gaussian Kinematic Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantaye, Yabebal T.; Marinucci, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    The Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF, see Adler and Taylor (2007,2011)) is an extremely powerful tool allowing for explicit analytic predictions of expected values of Minkowski functionals under realistic experimental conditions for cosmological data collections. In this paper, we implement Minkowski functionals on multipoles and needlet components of CMB fields, thus allowing a better control of cosmic variance and extraction of information on both harmonic and real domains; we then exploit the GKF to provide their expected values on spherical maps, in the presence of arbitrary sky masks, and under nonGaussian circumstances.

  16. Gaussian ensembles distributions from mixing quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Ignacio S.; Portesi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In the context of dynamical systems we present a derivation of the Gaussian ensembles distributions from quantum systems having a classical analogue that is mixing. We find that factorization property is satisfied for the mixing quantum systems expressed as a factorization of quantum mean values. For the case of the kicked rotator and in its fully chaotic regime, the factorization property links decoherence by dephasing with Gaussian ensembles in terms of the weak limit, interpreted as a decohered state. Moreover, a discussion about the connection between random matrix theory and quantum chaotic systems, based on some attempts made in previous works and from the viewpoint of the mixing quantum systems, is presented.

  17. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-15

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom-the symplectic eigenvalues-which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  18. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-01

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom—the symplectic eigenvalues—which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  19. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization with Gaussian Process Priors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mikkel N.; Laurberg, Hans

    2008-01-01

    We present a general method for including prior knowledge in a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), based on Gaussian process priors. We assume that the nonnegative factors in the NMF are linked by a strictly increasing function to an underlying Gaussian process specified by its covariance function. This allows us to find NMF decompositions that agree with our prior knowledge of the distribution of the factors, such as sparseness, smoothness, and symmetries. The method is demonstrated with an example from chemical shift brain imaging. PMID:18464923

  20. Gaussian Quadrature Formulae for Arbitrary Positive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andrew D.; Atchley, William R.

    2007-01-01

    We present computational methods and subroutines to compute Gaussian quadrature integration formulas for arbitrary positive measures. For expensive integrands that can be factored into well-known forms, Gaussian quadrature schemes allow for efficient evaluation of high-accuracy and -precision numerical integrals, especially compared to general ad hoc schemes. In addition, for certain well-known density measures (the normal, gamma, log-normal, Student’s t, inverse-gamma, beta, and Fisher’s F) we present exact formulae for computing the respective quadrature scheme. PMID:19455218

  1. Non-Gaussian Error Distributions of LMC Distance Moduli Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Sara; Ratra, Bharat

    2015-12-01

    We construct error distributions for a compilation of 232 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) distance moduli values from de Grijs et al. that give an LMC distance modulus of (m - M)0 = 18.49 ± 0.13 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error). Central estimates found from weighted mean and median statistics are used to construct the error distributions. The weighted mean error distribution is non-Gaussian—flatter and broader than Gaussian—with more (less) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of unaccounted-for systematic uncertainties. The median statistics error distribution, which does not make use of the individual measurement errors, is also non-Gaussian—more peaked than Gaussian—with less (more) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of publication bias and/or the non-independence of the measurements. We also construct the error distributions of 247 SMC distance moduli values from de Grijs & Bono. We find a central estimate of {(m-M)}0=18.94+/- 0.14 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error), and similar probabilities for the error distributions.

  2. Learning Gaussian mixture models with entropy-based criteria.

    PubMed

    Penalver Benavent, Antonio; Escolano Ruiz, Francisco; Saez, Juan Manuel

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of estimating the parameters of Gaussian mixture models. Although the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm yields the maximum-likelihood (ML) solution, its sensitivity to the selection of the starting parameters is well-known and it may converge to the boundary of the parameter space. Furthermore, the resulting mixture depends on the number of selected components, but the optimal number of kernels may be unknown beforehand. We introduce the use of the entropy of the probability density function (pdf) associated to each kernel to measure the quality of a given mixture model with a fixed number of kernels. We propose two methods to approximate the entropy of each kernel and a modification of the classical EM algorithm in order to find the optimum number of components of the mixture. Moreover, we use two stopping criteria: a novel global mixture entropy-based criterion called Gaussianity deficiency (GD) and a minimum description length (MDL) principle-based one. Our algorithm, called entropy-based EM (EBEM), starts with a unique kernel and performs only splitting by selecting the worst kernel attending to GD. We have successfully tested it in probability density estimation, pattern classification, and color image segmentation. Experimental results improve the ones of other state-of-the-art model order selection methods.

  3. Variational Bayesian localization of EEG sources with generalized Gaussian priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, J. M.; Lopez, A.; Molina, R.; Katsaggelos, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    Although in the last decades the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging has grown in popularity as a tool for the structural analysis of the brain, including MRI, fMRI and recently DTI, the ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) is, still today, an interesting technique for the understanding of brain organization and function. The main reason for this is that the EEG is a direct measure of brain bioelectrical activity, and such activity can be monitorized in the millisecond time window. For some situations and cognitive scenarios, such fine temporal resolution might suffice for some aspects of brain function; however, the EEG spatial resolution is very poor since it is based on a small number of scalp recordings, thus turning the source localization problem into an ill-posed one in which infinite possibilities exist for the localization of the neuronal generators. This is an old problem in computational neuroimaging; indeed, many methods have been proposed to overcome this localization. Here, by performing a Variational Bayesian Inference procedure with a generalized Gaussian prior, we come out with an algorithm that performs simultaneously the estimation of both sources and model parameters. The novelty for the inclusion of the generalized Gaussian prior allows to control the smoothness degree of the estimated sources. Finally, the suggested algorithm is validated on simulated data.

  4. A non-Gaussian analysis scheme using rank histograms for ensemble data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metref, S.; Cosme, E.; Snyder, C.; Brasseur, P.

    2014-08-01

    One challenge of geophysical data assimilation is to address the issue of non-Gaussianities in the distributions of the physical variables ensuing, in many cases, from nonlinear dynamical models. Non-Gaussian ensemble analysis methods fall into two categories, those remapping the ensemble particles by approximating the best linear unbiased estimate, for example, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), and those resampling the particles by directly applying Bayes' rule, like particle filters. In this article, it is suggested that the most common remapping methods can only handle weakly non-Gaussian distributions, while the others suffer from sampling issues. In between those two categories, a new remapping method directly applying Bayes' rule, the multivariate rank histogram filter (MRHF), is introduced as an extension of the rank histogram filter (RHF) first introduced by Anderson (2010). Its performance is evaluated and compared with several data assimilation methods, on different levels of non-Gaussianity with the Lorenz 63 model. The method's behavior is then illustrated on a simple density estimation problem using ensemble simulations from a coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic ocean. The MRHF performs well with low-dimensional systems in strongly non-Gaussian regimes.

  5. A Gaussian-product stochastic Gent-McWilliams parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The locally-averaged horizontal buoyancy flux by mesoscale eddies is computed from eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic simulations of ocean-mesoscale eddy dynamics. This flux has a very non-Gaussian distribution peaked at zero, not at the mean value. This non-Gaussian flux distribution arises because the flux is a product of zero-mean random variables: the eddy velocity and buoyancy. A framework for stochastic Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is presented. Gaussian random field models for subgrid-scale velocity and buoyancy are developed. The product of these Gaussian random fields is used to construct a non-Gaussian stochastic parameterization of the horizontal subgrid-scale density flux, which leads to a non-Gaussian stochastic GM parameterization. This new non-Gaussian stochastic GM parameterization is tested in an idealized box ocean model, and compared to a Gaussian approach that simply multiplies the deterministic GM parameterization by a Gaussian random field. The non-Gaussian approach has a significant impact on both the mean and variability of the simulations, more so than the Gaussian approach; for example, the non-Gaussian simulation has a much larger net kinetic energy and a stronger overturning circulation than a comparable Gaussian simulation. Future directions for development of the stochastic GM parameterization and extensions of the Gaussian-product approach are discussed.

  6. Quantum steering of multimode Gaussian states by Gaussian measurements: monogamy relations and the Peres conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Se-Wan; Kim, M. S.; Nha, Hyunchul

    2015-04-01

    It is a topic of fundamental and practical importance how a quantum correlated state can be reliably distributed through a noisy channel for quantum information processing. The concept of quantum steering recently defined in a rigorous manner is relevant to study it under certain circumstances and here we address quantum steerability of Gaussian states to this aim. In particular, we attempt to reformulate the criterion for Gaussian steering in terms of local and global purities and show that it is sufficient and necessary for the case of steering a 1-mode system by an N-mode system. It subsequently enables us to reinforce a strong monogamy relation under which only one party can steer a local system of 1-mode. Moreover, we show that only a negative partial-transpose state can manifest quantum steerability by Gaussian measurements in relation to the Peres conjecture. We also discuss our formulation for the case of distributing a two-mode squeezed state via one-way quantum channels making dissipation and amplification effects, respectively. Finally, we extend our approach to include non-Gaussian measurements, more precisely, all orders of higher-order squeezing measurements, and find that this broad set of non-Gaussian measurements is not useful to demonstrate steering for Gaussian states beyond Gaussian measurements.

  7. Non-Gaussian operations on bosonic modes of light: Photon-added Gaussian channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabapathy, Krishna Kumar; Winter, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    We present a framework for studying bosonic non-Gaussian channels of continuous-variable systems. Our emphasis is on a class of channels that we call photon-added Gaussian channels, which are experimentally viable with current quantum-optical technologies. A strong motivation for considering these channels is the fact that it is compulsory to go beyond the Gaussian domain for numerous tasks in continuous-variable quantum information processing such as entanglement distillation from Gaussian states and universal quantum computation. The single-mode photon-added channels we consider are obtained by using two-mode beam splitters and squeezing operators with photon addition applied to the ancilla ports giving rise to families of non-Gaussian channels. For each such channel, we derive its operator-sum representation, indispensable in the present context. We observe that these channels are Fock preserving (coherence nongenerating). We then report two examples of activation using our scheme of photon addition, that of quantum-optical nonclassicality at outputs of channels that would otherwise output only classical states and of both the quantum and private communication capacities, hinting at far-reaching applications for quantum-optical communication. Further, we see that noisy Gaussian channels can be expressed as a convex mixture of these non-Gaussian channels. We also present other physical and information-theoretic properties of these channels.

  8. Non-Gaussian states from continuous-wave Gaussian light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølmer, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    We present a general analysis of the state obtained by subjecting a continuous-wave (cw) Gaussian field to non-Gaussian measurements. The generic multimode state of a cw Gaussian field is fully characterized by the time dependent mean values and variances and the two-time covariances of the field quadrature variables. We present a general theory to extract from this information the results of detection and quantum state reduction within specific temporal output modes. The formalism is applied to schemes for heralded production of propagating light pulses with single photon and Schrödinger kitten states from a cw squeezed beam of light.

  9. An Accurate and Efficient Gaussian Fit Centroiding Algorithm for Star Trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabie, Tjorven; Schutter, Joris De; Vandenbussche, Bart

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel centroiding algorithm for star trackers. The proposed algorithm, which is referred to as the Gaussian Grid algorithm, fits an elliptical Gaussian function to the measured pixel data and derives explicit expressions to determine the centroids of the stars. In tests, the algorithm proved to yield accuracy comparable to that of the most accurate existing algorithms, while being significantly less computationally intensive. Hence, the Gaussian Grid algorithm can deliver high centroiding accuracy to spacecraft with limited computational power. Furthermore, a hybrid algorithm is proposed in which the Gaussian Grid algorithm yields an accurate initial estimate for a least squares fitting method, resulting in a reduced number of iterations and hence reduced computational cost. The low computational cost allows to improve performance by acquiring the attitude estimates at a higher rate or use more stars in the estimation algorithms. It is also a valuable contribution to the expanding field of small satellites, where it could enable low-cost platforms to have highly accurate attitude estimation.

  10. Anatomy of the Generalized Inverse Gaussian-Poisson Distribution with Special Applications to Bibliometric Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichel, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of the generalized inverse Gaussian-Poisson (GIGP) distribution in bibliometric studies. The main types of size-frequency distributions are described, bibliometric distributions in logarithms are examined; parameter estimation is discussed; and goodness-of-fit tests are considered. Examples of applications are included. (17…

  11. Inferring time derivatives including cell growth rates using Gaussian processes

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Peter S.; Stevenson, Keiran; Leary, Allen; Montano-Gutierrez, Luis F.; Clark, Ivan B.N.; Vogel, Jackie; Pilizota, Teuta

    2016-01-01

    Often the time derivative of a measured variable is of as much interest as the variable itself. For a growing population of biological cells, for example, the population's growth rate is typically more important than its size. Here we introduce a non-parametric method to infer first and second time derivatives as a function of time from time-series data. Our approach is based on Gaussian processes and applies to a wide range of data. In tests, the method is at least as accurate as others, but has several advantages: it estimates errors both in the inference and in any summary statistics, such as lag times, and allows interpolation with the corresponding error estimation. As illustrations, we infer growth rates of microbial cells, the rate of assembly of an amyloid fibril and both the speed and acceleration of two separating spindle pole bodies. Our algorithm should thus be broadly applicable. PMID:27941811

  12. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  13. Inferring time derivatives including cell growth rates using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Peter S.; Stevenson, Keiran; Leary, Allen; Montano-Gutierrez, Luis F.; Clark, Ivan B. N.; Vogel, Jackie; Pilizota, Teuta

    2016-12-01

    Often the time derivative of a measured variable is of as much interest as the variable itself. For a growing population of biological cells, for example, the population's growth rate is typically more important than its size. Here we introduce a non-parametric method to infer first and second time derivatives as a function of time from time-series data. Our approach is based on Gaussian processes and applies to a wide range of data. In tests, the method is at least as accurate as others, but has several advantages: it estimates errors both in the inference and in any summary statistics, such as lag times, and allows interpolation with the corresponding error estimation. As illustrations, we infer growth rates of microbial cells, the rate of assembly of an amyloid fibril and both the speed and acceleration of two separating spindle pole bodies. Our algorithm should thus be broadly applicable.

  14. How Gaussian can our Universe be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabass, G.; Pajer, E.; Schmidt, F.

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is a non-linear theory, and hence, barring cancellations, the initial super-horizon perturbations produced by inflation must contain some minimum amount of mode coupling, or primordial non-Gaussianity. In single-field slow-roll models, where this lower bound is saturated, non-Gaussianity is controlled by two observables: the tensor-to-scalar ratio, which is uncertain by more than fifty orders of magnitude; and the scalar spectral index, or tilt, which is relatively well measured. It is well known that to leading and next-to-leading order in derivatives, the contributions proportional to the tilt disappear from any local observable, and suspicion has been raised that this might happen to all orders, allowing for an arbitrarily low amount of primordial non-Gaussianity. Employing Conformal Fermi Coordinates, we show explicitly that this is not the case. Instead, a contribution of order the tilt appears in local observables. In summary, the floor of physical primordial non-Gaussianity in our Universe has a squeezed-limit scaling of kl2/ks2, similar to equilateral and orthogonal shapes, and a dimensionless amplitude of order 0.1 × (ns‑1).

  15. The Curious Nonexistence of Gaussian 2-Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin; Turner, Peter S.

    2014-03-01

    Ensembles of pure quantum states whose 2nd moments equal those of the unitarily uniform Haar ensemble— 2-designs—are optimal solutions for several tasks in quantum information science, especially state and process tomography. We show that Gaussian states cannot form a 2-design for the continuous-variable (quantum optical) Hilbert space . This is surprising because the affine symplectic group HWSp (the natural symmetry group of Gaussian states) is irreducible on the symmetric subspace of two copies. In finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, irreducibility guarantees that HWSp-covariant ensembles (such as mutually unbiased bases in prime dimensions) are always 2-designs. This property is violated by continuous variables for a subtle reason: the (well-defined) HWSp-invariant ensemble of Gaussian states does not have a density matrix because its defining integral does not converge. In fact, no Gaussian ensemble is even close (in a precise sense) to being a 2-design. This surprising difference between discrete and continuous quantum mechanics has important implications for optical state and process tomography.

  16. Halo clustering with nonlocal non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Fabian; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2010-11-15

    We show how the peak-background split (PBS) can be generalized to predict the effect of nonlocal primordial non-Gaussianity on the clustering of halos. Our approach is applicable to arbitrary primordial bispectra. We show that the scale dependence of halo clustering predicted in the peak-background split agrees with that of the local-biasing model on large scales. On smaller scales, k > or approx. 0.01h Mpc{sup -1}, the predictions diverge, a consequence of the assumption of separation of scales in the peak-background split. Even on large scales, PBS and local biasing do not generally agree on the amplitude of the effect outside of the high-peak limit. The scale dependence of the biasing - the effect that provides strong constraints to the local-model bispectrum - is far weaker for the equilateral and self-ordering-scalar-field models of non-Gaussianity. The bias scale dependence for the orthogonal and folded models is weaker than in the local model ({approx}k{sup -1}), but likely still strong enough to be constraining. We show that departures from scale-invariance of the primordial power spectrum may lead to order-unity corrections, relative to predictions made assuming scale-invariance--to the non-Gaussian bias in some of these nonlocal models for non-Gaussianity. An Appendix shows that a nonlocal model can produce the local-model bispectrum, a mathematical curiosity we uncovered in the course of this investigation.

  17. Diffusion of Super-Gaussian Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, C.-J.; Anderson, D.; Desaix, M.; Johannisson, P.; Lisak, M.

    2007-01-01

    The present analysis describes an analytically simple and systematic approximation procedure for modelling the free diffusive spreading of initially super-Gaussian profiles. The approach is based on a self-similar ansatz for the evolution of the diffusion profile, and the parameter functions involved in the modelling are determined by suitable…

  18. Efficient Matrix Completion with Gaussian Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Sapiro and Mallat have recently reported excellent results in a number of inverse problems [16]. In particular, for inpainting , which is an analogue...been shown to bring dramatic improvements over single Gaussian models in image inpaint - ing [16], are expected to better capture different characteris

  19. Primordial non-Gaussianity and reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidz, Adam; Baxter, Eric J.; Adshead, Peter; Dodelson, Scott

    2013-07-01

    The statistical properties of the primordial perturbations contain clues about their origins. Although the Planck collaboration has recently obtained tight constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from cosmic microwave background measurements, it is still worthwhile to mine upcoming data sets in an effort to place independent or competitive limits. The ionized bubbles that formed at redshift z˜6-20 during the epoch of reionization were seeded by primordial overdensities, and so the statistics of the ionization field at high redshift are related to the statistics of the primordial field. Here we model the effect of primordial non-Gaussianity on the reionization field. The epoch and duration of reionization are affected, as are the sizes of the ionized bubbles, but these changes are degenerate with variations in the properties of the ionizing sources and the surrounding intergalactic medium. A more promising signature is the power spectrum of the spatial fluctuations in the ionization field, which may be probed by upcoming 21 cm surveys. This has the expected 1/k2 dependence on large scales, characteristic of a biased tracer of the matter field. We project how well upcoming 21 cm observations will be able to disentangle this signal from foreground contamination. Although foreground cleaning inevitably removes the large-scale modes most impacted by primordial non-Gaussianity, we find that primordial non-Gaussianity can be separated from foreground contamination for a narrow range of length scales. In principle, futuristic redshifted 21 cm surveys may allow constraints competitive with Planck.

  20. Transitional behavior of quantum Gaussian memory channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.

    2010-05-01

    We address the question of optimality of entangled input states in quantum Gaussian memory channels. For a class of such channels, which can be traced back to the memoryless setting, we state a criterion which relates the optimality of entangled inputs to the symmetry properties of the channels’ action. Several examples of channel models belonging to this class are discussed.

  1. Non-Gaussian spectra in cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Magueijo, João

    1997-03-01

    Gaussian cosmic microwave background skies are fully specified by the power spectrum. The conventional method of characterizing non-Gaussian skies is to evaluate higher order moments, the n-point functions, and their Fourier transforms. We argue that this method is inefficient, due to the redundancy of information existing in the complete set of moments. In this paper we propose a set of new statistics or non-Gaussian spectra to be extracted out of the angular distribution of the Fourier transform of the temperature anisotropies in the small field limit. These statistics complement the power spectrum and act as localization, shape, and connectedness statistics. They quantify the generic non-Gaussian structure, and may be used in more general image-processing tasks. We concentrate on a subset of these statistics and argue that while they carry no information in Gaussian theories, they may be the best arena for making predictions in some non-Gaussian theories. As examples of applications we consider superposed Gaussian and non-Gaussian signals, such as point sources in Gaussian theories or the realistic Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show that in these theories non-Gaussianity is only present in a ring in Fourier space, which is best isolated in our formalism. Subtle but strongly non-Gaussian theories are also written down for which only non-Gaussian spectra may reveal non-Gaussianity.

  2. A Gaussian-product stochastic Gent-McWilliams parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, I.

    2016-12-01

    The locally-averaged horizontal buoyancy flux by mesoscale eddies is computed from eddy-resolving quasigeostrophic simulations of ocean-mesoscale eddy dynamics. This flux has a very non-Gaussian distribution peaked at zero, not at the mean value. This non-Gaussian flux distribution arises because the flux is a product of zero-mean random variables: the eddy velocity and buoyancy. A framework for stochastic Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization based around stochastic parameterization of the horizontal subgrid-scale density flux is presented. Gaussian random field models for subgrid-scale velocity and buoyancy are developed. The product of these Gaussian random fields is used to construct a non-Gaussian stochastic parameterization of the horizontal subgrid-scale density flux, which leads to a non-Gaussian stochastic GM parameterization. This new parameterization is tested in an idealized box ocean model, and compared to a Gaussian approach that simply multiplies the deterministic GM parameterization by a Gaussian random field. The non-Gaussian approach has a significant impact on both the mean and variability of the simulations, more so than the Gaussian approach; for example, the non-Gaussian simulation has a much larger net kinetic energy and a stronger overturning circulation than a comparable Gaussian simulation. Future directions for development of the stochastic GM parameterization and extensions of the Gaussian-product approach are discussed.

  3. Gaussian benchmark for optical communication aiming towards ultimate capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Ji, Se-Wan; Park, Jiyong; Nha, Hyunchul

    2016-05-01

    We establish the fundamental limit of communication capacity within Gaussian schemes under phase-insensitive Gaussian channels, which employ multimode Gaussian states for encoding and collective Gaussian operations and measurements for decoding. We prove that this Gaussian capacity is additive, i.e., its upper bound occurs with separable encoding and separable receivers so that a single-mode communication suffices to achieve the largest capacity under Gaussian schemes. This rigorously characterizes the gap between the ultimate Holevo capacity and the capacity within Gaussian communication, showing that Gaussian regime is not sufficient to achieve the Holevo bound particularly in the low-photon regime. Furthermore, the Gaussian benchmark established here can be used to critically assess the performance of non-Gaussian protocols for optical communication. We move on to identify non-Gaussian schemes to beat the Gaussian capacity and show that a non-Gaussian receiver recently implemented by Becerra et al. [F. E. Becerra et al., Nat. Photon. 7, 147 (2013), 10.1038/nphoton.2012.316] can achieve this aim with an appropriately chosen encoding strategy.

  4. a Distributed Gaussian Discrete Variable Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Hasan

    In this work a discrete variable representation (DVR) is constructed from a distributed Gaussian basis (DGB). A DGB is a finite or infinite chain of uniformly distributed Gaussians g_{n}(x) = e^{-c^2(x/d-n)^2} where n takes integer values. There are three main parts of this thesis. In the first part (Chapter III) the finite chain distributed Gaussian DVR (Finite Chain DG-DVR) is derived. In order to accomplish this, the distributed Gaussian orthogonal polynomials are introduced. The connection of these polynomials to Stieltjes-Wigert polynomials is shown. The recurrence relation for these orthogonal polynomials is derived. Tested recipes are given to calculate the quadrature points and weights and to construct the corresponding Lagrange functions which are analogs of Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The symmetries of quadrature points, weights, and Lagrange functions are derived. Limit cases ctoinfty and cto 0 are studied. In the second part (Chapter IV)the infinite chain limit DG-DVR is derived from a limit of the finite chain DG-DVR. The quadrature points and weights and the Lagrange functions are found in this limit and kinetic energy operator is constructed. It is shown that in the limit c to 0 the infinite chain DG-DVR reduces to Colbert and Miller's DVR. A discussion of ability of a distributed Gaussian basis to represent an arbitrary function is given. The results of this treatment yield a possible explanation of surprising accuracy of Colbert-Miller DVR. In the third part construction of the DG-DVR is given when one point is chosen arbitrarily. Some interesting identities and integral representations for the b _{n} and sigma_ {n} coefficients that are introduced in the second part are found.

  5. Radiation pressure acceleration of corrugated thin foils by Gaussian and super-Gaussian beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adusumilli, K.; Goyal, D.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-01-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability of radiation pressure accelerated ultrathin foils by laser having Gaussian and super-Gaussian intensity distribution is investigated using a single fluid code. The foil is allowed to have ring shaped surface ripples. The radiation pressure force on such a foil is non-uniform with finite transverse component F{sub r}; F{sub r} varies periodically with r. Subsequently, the ripple grows as the foil moves ahead along z. With a Gaussian beam, the foil acquires an overall curvature due to non-uniformity in radiation pressure and gets thinner. In the process, the ripple perturbation is considerably washed off. With super-Gaussian beam, the ripple is found to be more strongly washed out. In order to avoid transmission of the laser through the thinning foil, a criterion on the foil thickness is obtained.

  6. Gaussian States Minimize the Output Entropy of One-Mode Quantum Gaussian Channels.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giacomo; Trevisan, Dario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2017-04-21

    We prove the long-standing conjecture stating that Gaussian thermal input states minimize the output von Neumann entropy of one-mode phase-covariant quantum Gaussian channels among all the input states with a given entropy. Phase-covariant quantum Gaussian channels model the attenuation and the noise that affect any electromagnetic signal in the quantum regime. Our result is crucial to prove the converse theorems for both the triple trade-off region and the capacity region for broadcast communication of the Gaussian quantum-limited amplifier. Our result extends to the quantum regime the entropy power inequality that plays a key role in classical information theory. Our proof exploits a completely new technique based on the recent determination of the p→q norms of the quantum-limited amplifier [De Palma et al., arXiv:1610.09967]. This technique can be applied to any quantum channel.

  7. Gaussian States Minimize the Output Entropy of One-Mode Quantum Gaussian Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Palma, Giacomo; Trevisan, Dario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2017-04-01

    We prove the long-standing conjecture stating that Gaussian thermal input states minimize the output von Neumann entropy of one-mode phase-covariant quantum Gaussian channels among all the input states with a given entropy. Phase-covariant quantum Gaussian channels model the attenuation and the noise that affect any electromagnetic signal in the quantum regime. Our result is crucial to prove the converse theorems for both the triple trade-off region and the capacity region for broadcast communication of the Gaussian quantum-limited amplifier. Our result extends to the quantum regime the entropy power inequality that plays a key role in classical information theory. Our proof exploits a completely new technique based on the recent determination of the p →q norms of the quantum-limited amplifier [De Palma et al., arXiv:1610.09967]. This technique can be applied to any quantum channel.

  8. Density of states for Gaussian unitary ensemble, Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, and interpolating ensembles through supersymmetric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shamis, Mira

    2013-11-15

    We use the supersymmetric formalism to derive an integral formula for the density of states of the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble, and then apply saddle-point analysis to give a new derivation of the 1/N-correction to Wigner's law. This extends the work of Disertori on the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble. We also apply our method to the interpolating ensembles of Mehta–Pandey.

  9. Propagation of modified Bessel-Gaussian beams in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil Tanyer; Hardalaç, Fırat

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of modified Bessel-Gaussian beams traveling in a turbulent atmosphere. The source beam formulation comprises a Gaussian exponential and the summation of modified Bessel functions. Based on an extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the receiver plane intensity is formulated and solved down to a double integral stage. Source beam illustrations show that modified Bessel-Gaussian beams, except the lowest order case, will have well-like shapes. Modified Bessel-Gaussian beams with summations will experience lobe slicing and will display more or less the same profile regardless of order content. After propagating in turbulent atmosphere, it is observed that a modified Bessel-Gaussian beam will transform into a Bessel-Gaussian beam. Furthermore it is seen that modified Bessel-Gaussian beams with different Bessel function combinations, but possessing nearly the same profile, will differentiate during propagation. Increasing turbulence strength is found to accelerate the beam transformation toward the eventual Gaussian shape.

  10. Quantum Fisher information on two manifolds of two-mode Gaussian states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Paulina; Marian, Tudor A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate two special classes of two-mode Gaussian states of light that are important from both the experimental and theoretical points of view: the mode-mixed thermal states and the squeezed thermal ones. Aiming to a parallel study, we write the Uhlmann fidelity between pairs of states belonging to each class in terms of their defining parameters. The quantum Fisher information matrices on the corresponding four-dimensional manifolds are diagonal and allow insightful parameter estimation. The scalar curvatures of the Bures metric on both Riemannian manifolds of special two-mode Gaussian states are evaluated and discussed. They are functions of two variables, namely, the mean numbers of photons in the incident thermal modes. Our comparative analysis opens the door to further investigation of the interplay between geometry and statistics for Gaussian states produced in simple optical devices.

  11. Non-Gaussian effects in the cosmic microwave background from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, Alejandro

    1994-09-01

    The presence of non-Gaussian features in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps represents one of the most long-awaited clues in the search for the actual structure of primordial radiation, still needing confirmation. These features could shed some light on the nontrivial task of distinguishing the real souce of the primeval perturbations leading to large scale structure. One of the simplest non-Gaussian signals to search is the (dimensionless) skewness scrS. Explicit computations for scrS are presented in the frame of physically motivated inflationary models (natural, intermediate, and polynomial potential inflation) in the hope of finding values in agreement with estimated quantities from large angle scale (e.g., COBE DMR) maps. In all the cases considered the non-Gaussian effects turn out to lie below the level of theoretical uncertainty (cosmic variance). The possibility of unveiling the signal for scrS with multiple-field models is also discussed.

  12. Convolution of a Doppler line by a Gaussian instrument function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridovich, B.; Devi, V. M.; Das, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    A simple and direct method is obtained for assessing the distortion of a Doppler line by a Gaussian instrument function. It is suggested that a close approximation to the width of a Gaussian instrument function, or an almost Gaussian function, may be obtained by measuring a line with a Doppler absorption coefficient. The method is applicable to diode laser measurements, and may be used whenever a Gaussian instrument function is a reasonable approximation to real conditions

  13. Measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity using the WMAP 5-year temperature skewness power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Amblard, Alexandre; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha

    2009-12-15

    We constrain the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter of the local model f{sub NL} using the skewness power spectrum associated with the two-to-one cumulant correlator of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. This bispectrum-related power spectrum was constructed after weighting the temperature map with the appropriate window functions to form an estimator that probes the multipolar dependence of the underlying bispectrum associated with the primordial non-Gaussianity. We also estimate a separate skewness power spectrum sensitive more strongly to unresolved point sources. When compared to previous attempts at measuring the primordial non-Gaussianity with WMAP data, our estimators have the main advantage that we do not collapse information to a single number. When model fitting the two-to-one skewness power spectrum, we make use of bispectra generated by the primordial non-Gaussianity, radio point sources, and lensing-secondary correlation. We analyze Q, V, and W-band WMAP 5-year data using the KQ75 mask out to l{sub max}=600. Using V and W-band data and marginalizing over model parameters related to point sources and lensing-secondary bispectrum, our overall and preferred constraint on f{sub NL} is 11.0{+-}23.7 at the 68% confidence level (-36.4

  14. Measurement of damping and temperature: Precision bounds in Gaussian dissipative channels

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2011-01-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the performance of different classes of Gaussian states in the estimation of Gaussian phase-insensitive dissipative channels. In particular, we investigate the optimal estimation of the damping constant and reservoir temperature. We show that, for two-mode squeezed vacuum probe states, the quantum-limited accuracy of both parameters can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we show that for both parameters two-mode squeezed vacuum states are more efficient than coherent, thermal, or single-mode squeezed states. This suggests that at high-energy regimes, two-mode squeezed vacuum states are optimal within the Gaussian setup. This optimality result indicates a stronger form of compatibility for the estimation of the two parameters. Indeed, not only the minimum variance can be achieved at fixed probe states, but also the optimal state is common to both parameters. Additionally, we explore numerically the performance of non-Gaussian states for particular parameter values to find that maximally entangled states within d-dimensional cutoff subspaces (d{<=}6) perform better than any randomly sampled states with similar energy. However, we also find that states with very similar performance and energy exist with much less entanglement than the maximally entangled ones.

  15. Nudged elastic band calculations accelerated with Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koistinen, Olli-Pekka; Dagbjartsdóttir, Freyja B.; Ásgeirsson, Vilhjálmur; Vehtari, Aki; Jónsson, Hannes

    2017-10-01

    Minimum energy paths for transitions such as atomic and/or spin rearrangements in thermalized systems are the transition paths of largest statistical weight. Such paths are frequently calculated using the nudged elastic band method, where an initial path is iteratively shifted to the nearest minimum energy path. The computational effort can be large, especially when ab initio or electron density functional calculations are used to evaluate the energy and atomic forces. Here, we show how the number of such evaluations can be reduced by an order of magnitude using a Gaussian process regression approach where an approximate energy surface is generated and refined in each iteration. When the goal is to evaluate the transition rate within harmonic transition state theory, the evaluation of the Hessian matrix at the initial and final state minima can be carried out beforehand and used as input in the minimum energy path calculation, thereby improving stability and reducing the number of iterations needed for convergence. A Gaussian process model also provides an uncertainty estimate for the approximate energy surface, and this can be used to focus the calculations on the lesser-known part of the path, thereby reducing the number of needed energy and force evaluations to a half in the present calculations. The methodology is illustrated using the two-dimensional Müller-Brown potential surface and performance assessed on an established benchmark involving 13 rearrangement transitions of a heptamer island on a solid surface.

  16. Non-Gaussianity from self-ordering scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Daniel G.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2010-06-15

    The Universe may harbor relics of the post-inflationary epoch in the form of a network of self-ordered scalar fields. Such fossils, while consistent with current cosmological data at trace levels, may leave too weak an imprint on the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale distribution of matter to allow for direct detection. The non-Gaussian statistics of the density perturbations induced by these fields, however, permit a direct means to probe for these relics. Here we calculate the bispectrum that arises in models of self-ordered scalar fields. We find a compact analytic expression for the bispectrum, evaluate it numerically, and provide a simple approximation that may be useful for data analysis. The bispectrum is largest for triangles that are aligned (have edges k{sub 1{approx_equal}}2k{sub 2{approx_equal}}2k{sub 3}) as opposed to the local-model bispectrum, which peaks for squeezed triangles (k{sub 1{approx_equal}}k{sub 2}>>k{sub 3}), and the equilateral bispectrum, which peaks at k{sub 1{approx_equal}}k{sub 2{approx_equal}}k{sub 3}. We estimate that this non-Gaussianity should be detectable by the Planck satellite if the contribution from self-ordering scalar fields to primordial perturbations is near the current upper limit.

  17. Theory and generation of conditional, scalable sub-Gaussian random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeri, M.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    Many earth and environmental (as well as a host of other) variables, Y, and their spatial (or temporal) increments, ΔY, exhibit non-Gaussian statistical scaling. Previously we were able to capture key aspects of such non-Gaussian scaling by treating Y and/or ΔY as sub-Gaussian random fields (or processes). This however left unaddressed the empirical finding that whereas sample frequency distributions of Y tend to display relatively mild non-Gaussian peaks and tails, those of ΔY often reveal peaks that grow sharper and tails that become heavier with decreasing separation distance or lag. Recently we proposed a generalized sub-Gaussian model (GSG) which resolves this apparent inconsistency between the statistical scaling behaviors of observed variables and their increments. We presented an algorithm to generate unconditional random realizations of statistically isotropic or anisotropic GSG functions and illustrated it in two dimensions. Most importantly, we demonstrated the feasibility of estimating all parameters of a GSG model underlying a single realization of Y by analyzing jointly spatial moments of Y data and corresponding increments, ΔY. Here, we extend our GSG model to account for noisy measurements of Y at a discrete set of points in space (or time), present an algorithm to generate conditional realizations of corresponding isotropic or anisotropic random fields, introduce two approximate versions of this algorithm to reduce CPU time, and explore them on one and two-dimensional synthetic test cases.

  18. Segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive model.

    PubMed

    Comer, M L; Delp, E J

    1999-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Bayesian approach. The new algorithm uses a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive (MGAR) model for the pyramid representation of the observed image, and assumes a multiscale Markov random field model for the class label pyramid. The models used in this paper incorporate correlations between different levels of both the observed image pyramid and the class label pyramid. The criterion used for segmentation is the minimization of the expected value of the number of misclassified nodes in the multiresolution lattice. The estimate which satisfies this criterion is referred to as the "multiresolution maximization of the posterior marginals" (MMPM) estimate, and is a natural extension of the single-resolution "maximization of the posterior marginals" (MPM) estimate. Previous multiresolution segmentation techniques have been based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation criterion, which has been shown to be less appropriate for segmentation than the MPM criterion. It is assumed that the number of distinct textures in the observed image is known. The parameters of the MGAR model-the means, prediction coefficients, and prediction error variances of the different textures-are unknown. A modified version of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used to estimate these parameters. The parameters of the Gibbs distribution for the label pyramid are assumed to be known. Experimental results demonstrating the performance of the algorithm are presented.

  19. Analytic Matrix Elements and Gradients with Shifted Correlated Gaussians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are shown to be analytic. Their gradients with respect to the non-linear parameters of the Gaussians are also analytic. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.

  20. On the classical capacity of quantum Gaussian channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Pirandola, Stefano; Aniello, Paolo; Mancini, Stefano

    2011-02-01

    The set of quantum Gaussian channels acting on one bosonic mode can be classified according to the action of the group of Gaussian unitaries. We look for bounds on the classical capacity for channels belonging to such a classification. Lower bounds can be efficiently calculated by restricting the study to Gaussian encodings, for which we provide analytical expressions.

  1. The Gaussian curvature elastic energy of intermediates in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David P

    2008-12-01

    The Gaussian curvature elastic energy contribution to the energy of membrane fusion intermediates has usually been neglected because the Gaussian curvature elastic modulus, kappa, was unknown. It is now possible to measure kappa for phospholipids that form bicontinuous inverted cubic (Q(II)) phases. Here, it is shown that one can estimate kappa for lipids that do not form Q(II) phases by studying the phase behavior of lipid mixtures. The method is used to estimate kappa for several lipid compositions in excess water. The values of kappa are used to compute the curvature elastic energies of stalks and catenoidal fusion pores according to recent models. The Gaussian curvature elastic contribution is positive and similar in magnitude to the bending energy contribution: it increases the total curvature energy of all the fusion intermediates by 100 units of k(B)T or more. It is important to note that this contribution makes the predicted intermediate energies compatible with observed lipid phase behavior in excess water. An order-of-magnitude fusion rate equation is used to estimate whether the predicted stalk energies are consistent with the observed rates of stalk-mediated processes in pure lipid systems. The current theory predicts a stalk energy that is slightly too large, by approximately 30 k(B)T, to rationalize the observed rates of stalk-mediated processes in phosphatidylethanolamine or N-monomethylated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine systems. Despite this discrepancy, the results show that models of fusion intermediate energy are accurate enough to make semiquantitative predictions about how proteins mediate biomembrane fusion. The same rate model shows that for proteins to drive biomembrane fusion at observed rates, they have to perform mediating functions corresponding to a reduction in the energy of a purely lipidic stalk by several tens of k(B)T. By binding particular peptide sequences to the monolayer surface, proteins could lower fusion intermediate

  2. Gaussian process-based Bayesian nonparametric inference of population size trajectories from gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Julia A; Minin, Vladimir N

    2013-03-01

    Changes in population size influence genetic diversity of the population and, as a result, leave a signature of these changes in individual genomes in the population. We are interested in the inverse problem of reconstructing past population dynamics from genomic data. We start with a standard framework based on the coalescent, a stochastic process that generates genealogies connecting randomly sampled individuals from the population of interest. These genealogies serve as a glue between the population demographic history and genomic sequences. It turns out that only the times of genealogical lineage coalescences contain information about population size dynamics. Viewing these coalescent times as a point process, estimating population size trajectories is equivalent to estimating a conditional intensity of this point process. Therefore, our inverse problem is similar to estimating an inhomogeneous Poisson process intensity function. We demonstrate how recent advances in Gaussian process-based nonparametric inference for Poisson processes can be extended to Bayesian nonparametric estimation of population size dynamics under the coalescent. We compare our Gaussian process (GP) approach to one of the state-of-the-art Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF) methods for estimating population trajectories. Using simulated data, we demonstrate that our method has better accuracy and precision. Next, we analyze two genealogies reconstructed from real sequences of hepatitis C and human Influenza A viruses. In both cases, we recover more believed aspects of the viral demographic histories than the GMRF approach. We also find that our GP method produces more reasonable uncertainty estimates than the GMRF method.

  3. Edge Detection By Differences Of Gaussians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthon, Ph.; Thiesse, B.; Bruel, A.

    1986-06-01

    The Differences of Gaussians (DOGs) are of fundamental importance in edge detection. They belong to the human vision system as shown by Enroth-Cugell and Robson [ENR66]. The zero-crossings of their outputs mark the loci of the intensity changes. The set of descriptions from different operator sizes forms the input for later visual processes, such as stereopsis and motion analysis. We show that DOGs uniformly converge to the Laplacian of a Gaussian (ΔG2,σ) when both the inhibitory and excitatory variables converge to σ. Spatial and spectral properties of DOGs and ΔGs are compared: width and height of their central positive regions, bandiwidths... Finally, DOGs' responses to some features such as ideal edge, right angle corner, general corner..., are presented and magnitudes of error on edge position are given.

  4. Gaussian quadrature for multiple orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussement, Jonathan; van Assche, Walter

    2005-06-01

    We study multiple orthogonal polynomials of type I and type II, which have orthogonality conditions with respect to r measures. These polynomials are connected by their recurrence relation of order r+1. First we show a relation with the eigenvalue problem of a banded lower Hessenberg matrix Ln, containing the recurrence coefficients. As a consequence, we easily find that the multiple orthogonal polynomials of type I and type II satisfy a generalized Christoffel-Darboux identity. Furthermore, we explain the notion of multiple Gaussian quadrature (for proper multi-indices), which is an extension of the theory of Gaussian quadrature for orthogonal polynomials and was introduced by Borges. In particular, we show that the quadrature points and quadrature weights can be expressed in terms of the eigenvalue problem of Ln.

  5. Remarkably Gaussian Tephra Fallout from Basaltic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtland, L. M.; Kruse, S.; Connor, C.

    2008-12-01

    Tephra fallout models used to forecast volcanic hazards rely on the advection-diffusion equation to forecast hazards. If the advection-diffusion equation applies, then the thickness of tephra blanket deposits should show Gaussian crosswind profiles and exponential decay with distance from the vent. Complications may arise due to factors such as particle size distributions, particle density, and atmospheric effects not incorporated in the advection-diffusion model. Continuous profiles derived from GPR surveys collected on the tephra blanket of Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua allow us to test the advection-diffusion model. Steady trade winds coupled with eruptions that tend to be brief and relatively low energy create relatively simple deposits. Data was collected for cross wind profiles at varying distances from the vent. Horizons identified in these profiles exhibit Gaussian distributions with a high degree of statistical confidence. Additionally, the shape of one continuous profile leading from the crater rim out onto the tephra blanket is examined.

  6. Fock expansion of multimode pure Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco; Pierobon, Gianfranco

    2015-12-15

    The Fock expansion of multimode pure Gaussian states is derived starting from their representation as displaced and squeezed multimode vacuum states. The approach is new and appears to be simpler and more general than previous ones starting from the phase-space representation given by the characteristic or Wigner function. Fock expansion is performed in terms of easily evaluable two-variable Hermite–Kampé de Fériet polynomials. A relatively simple and compact expression for the joint statistical distribution of the photon numbers in the different modes is obtained. In particular, this result enables one to give a simple characterization of separable and entangled states, as shown for two-mode and three-mode Gaussian states.

  7. Large Non-Gaussianity in Axion Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, Neil; Peloso, Marco

    2011-05-06

    The inflationary paradigm has enjoyed phenomenological success; however, a compelling particle physics realization is still lacking. Axions are among the best-motivated inflaton candidates, since the flatness of their potential is naturally protected by a shift symmetry. We reconsider the cosmological perturbations in axion inflation, consistently accounting for the coupling to gauge fields c{phi}FF-tilde, which is generically present in these models. This coupling leads to production of gauge quanta, which provide a new source of inflaton fluctuations, {delta}{phi}. For c > or approx. 10{sup 2}M{sub p}{sup -1}, these dominate over the vacuum fluctuations, and non-Gaussianity exceeds the current observational bound. This regime is typical for concrete realizations that admit a UV completion; hence, large non-Gaussianity is easily obtained in minimal and natural realizations of inflation.

  8. CMB B -mode non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; van Engelen, Alexander; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2016-06-01

    We study the degree to which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be used to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity involving one tensor and two scalar fluctuations, focusing on the correlation of one polarization B mode with two temperature modes. In the simplest models of inflation, the tensor-scalar-scalar primordial bispectrum is nonvanishing and is of the same order in slow-roll parameters as the scalar-scalar-scalar bispectrum. We calculate the ⟨B T T ⟩ correlation arising from a primordial tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum, and show that constraints from an experiment like CMB-Stage IV using this observable are more than an order of magnitude better than those on the same primordial coupling obtained from temperature measurements alone. We argue that B -mode non-Gaussianity opens up an as-yet-unexplored window into the early Universe, demonstrating that significant information on primordial physics remains to be harvested from CMB anisotropies.

  9. Quantum Fidelity for Arbitrary Gaussian States.

    PubMed

    Banchi, Leonardo; Braunstein, Samuel L; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-12-31

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information, and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  10. A Fast Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rafael Coimbra; Engel, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    This work builds upon previous efforts in online incremental learning, namely the Incremental Gaussian Mixture Network (IGMN). The IGMN is capable of learning from data streams in a single-pass by improving its model after analyzing each data point and discarding it thereafter. Nevertheless, it suffers from the scalability point-of-view, due to its asymptotic time complexity of O(NKD3) for N data points, K Gaussian components and D dimensions, rendering it inadequate for high-dimensional data. In this work, we manage to reduce this complexity to O(NKD2) by deriving formulas for working directly with precision matrices instead of covariance matrices. The final result is a much faster and scalable algorithm which can be applied to high dimensional tasks. This is confirmed by applying the modified algorithm to high-dimensional classification datasets. PMID:26444880

  11. Quantum Fidelity for Arbitrary Gaussian States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information, and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  12. Controlling Hamiltonian chaos via Gaussian curvature.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, A; Teychenné, D

    1999-12-01

    We present a method allowing one to partly stabilize some chaotic Hamiltonians which have two degrees of freedom. The purpose of the method is to avoid the regions of V(q(1),q(2)) where its Gaussian curvature becomes negative. We show the stabilization of the Hénon-Heiles system, over a wide area, for the critical energy E=1/6. Total energy of the system varies only by a few percent.

  13. Entanglement Rate for Gaussian Continuous Variable Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-24

    entangledGaussian beamswith arbitrary correlators . This expression is especially useful for situationswhere the source emits an arbitrary frequency spectrum...However, such a naive approach fails if there are correlations between subsequent pairs, or if we consider entangled beams of radiation that cannot be...frequency integral over what we call a ‘spectral density of entanglement’.We showhow to obtain this from the two-point time correlators of the entangled

  14. Description and characterization of plasmonic Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ortiz, Cesar E.; Pisano, Eduardo; Coello, Victor

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we present for the first time a detailed description and experimental characterization of plasmonic Gaussian beams (PGBs), as well as the analytical expression to describe their field and intensity distributions. The propagation parameters of the PGBs, such as the divergence angle, Rayleigh range, beam width function, and the beam waist are determined experimentally in accordance to the proposed model. The radius of curvature of the wavefront and the Gouy phase shift of PGBs can also be predicted using this method.

  15. Non-Markovianity of Gaussian Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, G.; Roga, W.; Illuminati, F.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a necessary and sufficient criterion for the non-Markovianity of Gaussian quantum dynamical maps based on the violation of divisibility. The criterion is derived by defining a general vectorial representation of the covariance matrix which is then exploited to determine the condition for the complete positivity of partial maps associated with arbitrary time intervals. Such construction does not rely on the Choi-Jamiolkowski representation and does not require optimization over states.

  16. Non-Markovianity of Gaussian Channels.

    PubMed

    Torre, G; Roga, W; Illuminati, F

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a necessary and sufficient criterion for the non-Markovianity of Gaussian quantum dynamical maps based on the violation of divisibility. The criterion is derived by defining a general vectorial representation of the covariance matrix which is then exploited to determine the condition for the complete positivity of partial maps associated with arbitrary time intervals. Such construction does not rely on the Choi-Jamiolkowski representation and does not require optimization over states.

  17. Entropic Fluctuations in Gaussian Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, V.; Pillet, C.-A.; Shirikyan, A.

    2016-06-01

    We study nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of a Gaussian dynamical system and compute in closed form the large deviation functionals describing the fluctuations of the entropy production observable with respect to the reference state and the nonequilibrium steady state. The entropy production observable of this model is an unbounded function on the phase space, and its large deviation functionals have a surprisingly rich structure. We explore this structure in some detail.

  18. The Wehrl entropy has Gaussian optimizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Palma, Giacomo

    2017-09-01

    We determine the minimum Wehrl entropy among the quantum states with a given von Neumann entropy and prove that it is achieved by thermal Gaussian states. This result determines the relation between the von Neumann and the Wehrl entropies. The key idea is proving that the quantum-classical channel that associates with a quantum state its Husimi Q representation is asymptotically equivalent to the Gaussian quantum-limited amplifier with infinite amplification parameter. This equivalence also permits to determine the p→ q norms of the aforementioned quantum-classical channel in the two particular cases of one mode and p=q and prove that they are achieved by thermal Gaussian states. The same equivalence permits to prove that the Husimi Q representation of a one-mode passive state (i.e., a state diagonal in the Fock basis with eigenvalues decreasing as the energy increases) majorizes the Husimi Q representation of any other one-mode state with the same spectrum, i.e., it maximizes any convex functional.

  19. Unitarily localizable entanglement of Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, Alessio; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-03-01

    We consider generic (mxn)-mode bipartitions of continuous-variable systems, and study the associated bisymmetric multimode Gaussian states. They are defined as (m+n)-mode Gaussian states invariant under local mode permutations on the m-mode and n-mode subsystems. We prove that such states are equivalent, under local unitary transformations, to the tensor product of a two-mode state and of m+n-2 uncorrelated single-mode states. The entanglement between the m-mode and the n-mode blocks can then be completely concentrated on a single pair of modes by means of local unitary operations alone. This result allows us to prove that the PPT (positivity of the partial transpose) condition is necessary and sufficient for the separability of (m+n)-mode bisymmetric Gaussian states. We determine exactly their negativity and identify a subset of bisymmetric states whose multimode entanglement of formation can be computed analytically. We consider explicit examples of pure and mixed bisymmetric states and study their entanglement scaling with the number of modes.

  20. Production and propagation of Hermite-sinusoidal-Gaussian laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tovar, A A; Casperson, L W

    1998-09-01

    Hermite-sinusoidal-Gaussian solutions to the wave equation have recently been obtained. In the limit of large Hermite-Gaussian beam size, the sinusoidal factors are dominant and reduce to the conventional modes of a rectangular waveguide. In the opposite limit the beams reduce to the familiar Hermite-Gaussian form. The propagation of these beams is examined in detail, and resonators are designed that will produce them. As an example, a special resonator is designed to produce hyperbolic-sine-Gaussian beams. This ring resonator contains a hyperbolic-cosine-Gaussian apodized aperture. The beam mode has finite energy and is perturbation stable.

  1. Local Gaussian operations can enhance continuous-variable entanglement distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shengli; Loock, Peter van

    2011-12-15

    Entanglement distillation is a fundamental building block in long-distance quantum communication. Though known to be useless on their own for distilling Gaussian entangled states, local Gaussian operations may still help to improve non-Gaussian entanglement distillation schemes. Here we show that by applying local squeezing operations both the performance and the efficiency of existing distillation protocols can be enhanced. We find that such an enhancement through local Gaussian unitaries can be obtained even when the initially shared Gaussian entangled states are mixed, as, for instance, after their distribution through a lossy-fiber communication channel.

  2. Modeling Sea-Level Change using Errors-in-Variables Integrated Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Niamh; Parnell, Andrew; Kemp, Andrew; Horton, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    We perform Bayesian inference on historical and late Holocene (last 2000 years) rates of sea-level change. The data that form the input to our model are tide-gauge measurements and proxy reconstructions from cores of coastal sediment. To accurately estimate rates of sea-level change and reliably compare tide-gauge compilations with proxy reconstructions it is necessary to account for the uncertainties that characterize each dataset. Many previous studies used simple linear regression models (most commonly polynomial regression) resulting in overly precise rate estimates. The model we propose uses an integrated Gaussian process approach, where a Gaussian process prior is placed on the rate of sea-level change and the data itself is modeled as the integral of this rate process. The non-parametric Gaussian process model is known to be well suited to modeling time series data. The advantage of using an integrated Gaussian process is that it allows for the direct estimation of the derivative of a one dimensional curve. The derivative at a particular time point will be representative of the rate of sea level change at that time point. The tide gauge and proxy data are complicated by multiple sources of uncertainty, some of which arise as part of the data collection exercise. Most notably, the proxy reconstructions include temporal uncertainty from dating of the sediment core using techniques such as radiocarbon. As a result of this, the integrated Gaussian process model is set in an errors-in-variables (EIV) framework so as to take account of this temporal uncertainty. The data must be corrected for land-level change known as glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) as it is important to isolate the climate-related sea-level signal. The correction for GIA introduces covariance between individual age and sea level observations into the model. The proposed integrated Gaussian process model allows for the estimation of instantaneous rates of sea-level change and accounts for all

  3. Intelligent adaptive sampling guided by Gaussian process inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhang; Peng, Chaoyang

    2017-10-01

    With the aim of reducing sampling density while having minimal impact on surface reconstruction accuracy, an adaptive sampling method based on Gaussian process inference is proposed. In each iterative step, the current sampling points serve as the training data to predict surface topography and then a new sampling point is adaptively located and inserted at the position where the maximum inference uncertainty is estimated. The updated samples are trained in the next step. By such an iterative training–inference–sampling approach, the reconstructed topography can converge to the expected one efficiently. Demonstrations on different structured, freeform and roughness surfaces ascertain the effectiveness of the sampling strategy. It can lead to an accurate inference of the surface topography and a sufficient reduction of data points compared with conventional uniform sampling. Robustness against random surface features, measurement noise and sharp height changes is further discussed. Such an adaptive sampling method is extremely suitable for discrete point-by-point measurements.

  4. Orbit-product representation and correction of Gaussian belief propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Chertkov, Michael; Chernyak, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We present a new interpretation of Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) based on the 'zeta function' representation of the determinant as a product over orbits of a graph. We show that GaBP captures back-tracking orbits of the graph and consider how to correct this estimate by accounting for non-backtracking orbits. We show that the product over non-backtracking orbits may be interpreted as the determinant of the non-backtracking adjacency matrix of the graph with edge weights based on the solution of GaBP. An efficient method is proposed to compute a truncated correction factor including all non-backtracking orbits up to a specified length.

  5. Gaussian Mixture Model and Rjmcmc Based RS Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Zhao, Q. H.

    2017-09-01

    For the image segmentation method based on Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), there are some problems: 1) The number of component was usually a fixed number, i.e., fixed class and 2) GMM is sensitive to image noise. This paper proposed a RS image segmentation method that combining GMM with reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC). In proposed algorithm, GMM was designed to model the distribution of pixel intensity in RS image. Assume that the number of component was a random variable. Respectively build the prior distribution of each parameter. In order to improve noise resistance, used Gibbs function to model the prior distribution of GMM weight coefficient. According to Bayes' theorem, build posterior distribution. RJMCMC was used to simulate the posterior distribution and estimate its parameters. Finally, an optimal segmentation is obtained on RS image. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can converge to the optimal number of class and get an ideal segmentation results.

  6. Gaussian maximum likelihood and contextual classification algorithms for multicrop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Zenzo, Silvano; Bernstein, Ralph; Kolsky, Harwood G.; Degloria, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reviews some of the ways in which context has been handled in the remote-sensing literature, and additional possibilities are introduced. The problem of computing exhaustive and normalized class-membership probabilities from the likelihoods provided by the Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier (to be used as initial probability estimates to start relaxation) is discussed. An efficient implementation of probabilistic relaxation is proposed, suiting the needs of actual remote-sensing applications. A modified fuzzy-relaxation algorithm using generalized operations between fuzzy sets is presented. Combined use of the two relaxation algorithms is proposed to exploit context in multispectral classification of remotely sensed data. Results on both one artificially created image and one MSS data set are reported.

  7. Gaussian maximum likelihood and contextual classification algorithms for multicrop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Zenzo, Silvano; Bernstein, Ralph; Kolsky, Harwood G.; Degloria, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reviews some of the ways in which context has been handled in the remote-sensing literature, and additional possibilities are introduced. The problem of computing exhaustive and normalized class-membership probabilities from the likelihoods provided by the Gaussian maximum likelihood classifier (to be used as initial probability estimates to start relaxation) is discussed. An efficient implementation of probabilistic relaxation is proposed, suiting the needs of actual remote-sensing applications. A modified fuzzy-relaxation algorithm using generalized operations between fuzzy sets is presented. Combined use of the two relaxation algorithms is proposed to exploit context in multispectral classification of remotely sensed data. Results on both one artificially created image and one MSS data set are reported.

  8. Exploration of lagged relationships between mastitis and milk yield in dairycows using a Bayesian structural equation Gaussian-threshold model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Heringstad, Bjørg; Gianola, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A Gaussian-threshold model is described under the general framework of structural equation models for inferring simultaneous and recursive relationships between binary and Gaussian characters, and estimating genetic parameters. Relationships between clinical mastitis (CM) and test-day milk yield (MY) in first-lactation Norwegian Red cows were examined using a recursive Gaussian-threshold model. For comparison, the data were also analyzed using a standard Gaussian-threshold, a multivariate linear model, and a recursive multivariate linear model. The first 180 days of lactation were arbitrarily divided into three periods of equal length, in order to investigate how these relationships evolve in the course of lactation. The recursive model showed negative within-period effects from (liability to) CM to test-day MY in all three lactation periods, and positive between-period effects from test-day MY to (liability to) CM in the following period. Estimates of recursive effects and of genetic parameters were time-dependent. The results suggested unfavorable effects of production on liability to mastitis, and dynamic relationships between mastitis and test-dayMYin the course of lactation. Fitting recursive effects had little influence on the estimation of genetic parameters. However, some differences were found in the estimates of heritability, genetic, and residual correlations, using different types of models (Gaussian-threshold vs. multivariate linear). PMID:18558070

  9. Detecting quantum non-Gaussianity via the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Palma, Mattia L.; Tufarelli, Tommaso; Olivares, Stefano; Kim, M. S.; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a family of criteria to detect quantum non-Gaussian states of a harmonic oscillator, that is, quantum states that cannot be expressed as a convex mixture of Gaussian states. In particular, we prove that for convex mixtures of Gaussian states, the value of the Wigner function at the origin of phase space is bounded from below by a nonzero positive quantity, which is a function only of the average number of excitations (photons) of the state. As a consequence, if this bound is violated, then the quantum state must be quantum non-Gaussian. We show that this criterion can be further generalized by considering additional Gaussian operations on the state under examination. We then apply these criteria to various non-Gaussian states evolving in a noisy Gaussian channel, proving that the bounds are violated for high values of losses, and thus also for states characterized by a positive Wigner function.

  10. Adaptive fusion of multisensor precipitation using Gaussian-scale mixtures in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebtehaj, Ardeshir Mohammad; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2011-11-01

    The past decades have witnessed a remarkable emergence of new sources of multiscale multisensor precipitation data, including global spaceborne active and passive sensors, regional ground-based weather surveillance radars, and local rain gauges. Optimal integration of these multisensor data promises a posteriori estimates of precipitation fluxes with increased accuracy and resolution to be used in hydrologic applications. In this context, a new framework is proposed for multiscale multisensor precipitation data fusion which capitalizes on two main observations: (1) non-Gaussian statistics of precipitation images, which are concisely parameterized in the wavelet domain via a class of Gaussian-scale mixtures, and (2) the conditionally Gaussian and weakly correlated local representation of remotely sensed precipitation data in the wavelet domain, which allows for exploiting the efficient linear estimation methodologies while capturing the non-Gaussian data structure of rainfall. The proposed methodology is demonstrated using a data set of coincidental observations of precipitation reflectivity images by the spaceborne precipitation radar aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission satellite and by ground-based weather surveillance Doppler radars.

  11. Intuitive understanding of non-Gaussianity in ekpyrotic and cyclic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-07-15

    It has been pointed out by several groups that ekpyrotic and cyclic models generate significant non-Gaussianity. In this paper, we present a physically intuitive, semianalytic estimate of the bispectrum. We show that, in all such models, there is an intrinsic contribution to the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} that is determined by the geometric mean of the equation of state w{sub ek} during the ekpyrotic phase and w{sub c} during the phase that curvature perturbations are generated, and whose value is O(100) or more times the intrinsic value predicted by simple slow-roll inflationary models, f{sub NL}{sup intrinsic}=O(0.1). Other contributions to f{sub NL}, which we also estimate, can increase |f{sub NL}| but are unlikely to decrease it significantly, making non-Gaussianity a useful test of these models. Furthermore, we discuss a predicted correlation between the non-Gaussianity and scalar spectral index that sharpens the test.

  12. Black hole formation and growth with non-Gaussian primordial density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Peirani, Sébastien; Dubois, Yohan; Mamon, Gary A.; Silk, Joseph; Chevallard, Jacopo

    2016-02-01

    Quasars powered by massive black holes (BHs) with mass estimates above a billion solar masses have been identified at redshift 6 and beyond. The existence of such BHs requires almost continuous growth at the Eddington limit for their whole lifetime, of the order of one billion years. In this paper, we explore the possibility that positively skewed scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations may ease the assembly of massive BHs. In particular, they produce more low-mass haloes at high redshift, thus altering the production of metals and ultraviolet flux, believed to be important factors in BH formation. Additionally, a higher number of progenitors and of nearly equal-mass halo mergers would boost the mass increase provided by BH-BH mergers and merger-driven accretion. We use a set of two cosmological simulations, with either Gaussian or scale-dependent non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations to perform a proof-of-concept experiment to estimate how BH formation and growth are altered. We estimate the BH number density and the fraction of haloes where BHs form, for both simulations and for two popular scenarios of BH formation (remnants of the first generation of stars and direct collapse in the absence of metals and molecular hydrogen). We find that the fractions of haloes where BHs form are almost identical, but that non-Gaussian primordial perturbations increase the total number density of BHs for both BH formation scenarios by a factor of 2. We also evolve BHs using merger trees extracted from the simulations and find that both the mean BH mass and the number of the most massive BHs at z = 6.5 are up to twice the values expected for Gaussian primordial density fluctuations.

  13. Gaussian capacity of the quantum bosonic memory channel with additive correlated Gaussian noise

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Joachim; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2011-09-15

    We present an algorithm for calculation of the Gaussian classical capacity of a quantum bosonic memory channel with additive Gaussian noise. The algorithm, restricted to Gaussian input states, is applicable to all channels with noise correlations obeying certain conditions and works in the full input energy domain, beyond previous treatments of this problem. As an illustration, we study the optimal input states and capacity of a quantum memory channel with Gauss-Markov noise [J. Schaefer, Phys. Rev. A 80, 062313 (2009)]. We evaluate the enhancement of the transmission rate when using these optimal entangled input states by comparison with a product coherent-state encoding and find out that such a simple coherent-state encoding achieves not less than 90% of the capacity.

  14. The Application of Gaussian Mixture Models for Signal Quantification in MALDI-ToF Mass Spectrometry of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Spainhour, John Christian G.; Janech, Michael G.; Schwacke, John H.; Velez, Juan Carlos Q.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) coupled with stable isotope standards (SIS) has been used to quantify native peptides. This peptide quantification by MALDI-TOF approach has difficulties quantifying samples containing peptides with ion currents in overlapping spectra. In these overlapping spectra the currents sum together, which modify the peak heights and make normal SIS estimation problematic. An approach using Gaussian mixtures based on known physical constants to model the isotopic cluster of a known compound is proposed here. The characteristics of this approach are examined for single and overlapping compounds. The approach is compared to two commonly used SIS quantification methods for single compound, namely Peak Intensity method and Riemann sum area under the curve (AUC) method. For studying the characteristics of the Gaussian mixture method, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin-2-10, and Angiotenisn-1-9 and their associated SIS peptides were used. The findings suggest, Gaussian mixture method has similar characteristics as the two methods compared for estimating the quantity of isolated isotopic clusters for single compounds. All three methods were tested using MALDI-TOF mass spectra collected for peptides of the renin-angiotensin system. The Gaussian mixture method accurately estimated the native to labeled ratio of several isolated angiotensin peptides (5.2% error in ratio estimation) with similar estimation errors to those calculated using peak intensity and Riemann sum AUC methods (5.9% and 7.7%, respectively). For overlapping angiotensin peptides, (where the other two methods are not applicable) the estimation error of the Gaussian mixture was 6.8%, which is within the acceptable range. In summary, for single compounds the Gaussian mixture method is equivalent or marginally superior compared to the existing methods of peptide quantification and is capable of quantifying overlapping (convolved) peptides within the

  15. High-Order Local Pooling and Encoding Gaussians Over a Dictionary of Gaussians.

    PubMed

    Li, Peihua; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Qilong; Shiu, Simon C K; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Local pooling (LP) in configuration (feature) space proposed by Boureau et al. explicitly restricts similar features to be aggregated, which can preserve as much discriminative information as possible. At the time it appeared, this method combined with sparse coding achieved competitive classification results with only a small dictionary. However, its performance lags far behind the state-of-the-art results as only the zero-order information is exploited. Inspired by the success of high-order statistical information in existing advanced feature coding or pooling methods, we make an attempt to address the limitation of LP. To this end, we present a novel method called high-order LP (HO-LP) to leverage the information higher than the zero-order one. Our idea is intuitively simple: we compute the first- and second-order statistics per configuration bin and model them as a Gaussian. Accordingly, we employ a collection of Gaussians as visual words to represent the universal probability distribution of features from all classes. Our problem is naturally formulated as encoding Gaussians over a dictionary of Gaussians as visual words. This problem, however, is challenging since the space of Gaussians is not a Euclidean space but forms a Riemannian manifold. We address this challenge by mapping Gaussians into the Euclidean space, which enables us to perform coding with common Euclidean operations rather than complex and often expensive Riemannian operations. Our HO-LP preserves the advantages of the original LP: pooling only similar features and using a small dictionary. Meanwhile, it achieves very promising performance on standard benchmarks, with either conventional, hand-engineered features or deep learning-based features.

  16. Non-Gaussian noise in x-ray and γ-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liying; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2005-04-01

    Image statistics are usually modeled as Poisson in γ-ray imaging and as Gaussian in x-ray imaging. In nuclear medicine, event-driven detectors analyze the pulses from every absorbed gamma photon individually; the resulting images rigorously obey Poisson statistics but are approximately Gaussian when the mean number of counts per pixel is large. With integrating detectors, as in digital radiography, each x-ray photon makes a contribution to the image proportional to its pulse height. One pixel senses many photons in long exposures, so the image statistics approach Gaussian by the central limit theorem (CLT). If the exposure time is short enough, however, each pixel will usually respond to no more than one photon, and we can separate individual photons for position estimation. Integrating detectors are therefore event-driven when we use many short-exposure frames rather than one long exposure. In intermediate exposures, the number of photons in one pixel is too small to invoke CLT and apply Gaussian statistics, yet too large to identify individual photons and apply Poisson statistics. In this paper, we analyze the image quality in this intermediate case. Image quality is defined for detection tasks performed by the ideal observer. Because the frames in a data set are independent of each other, the probability density function (PDF) of the whole data set is a product of the frame PDFs. The log-likelihood ratio λ of the ideal observer is thus a sum across the frames and has Gaussian statistics even with non-Gaussian images. We compare the ideal observer's performance with the Hotelling observer's performance under this approximation. A data-thresholding technique to improve Hotelling observer's performance is also discussed.

  17. Kinect Posture Reconstruction Based on a Local Mixture of Gaussian Process Models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguang; Zhou, Liuyang; Leung, Howard; Shum, Hubert P H

    2016-11-01

    Depth sensor based 3D human motion estimation hardware such as Kinect has made interactive applications more popular recently. However, it is still challenging to accurately recognize postures from a single depth camera due to the inherently noisy data derived from depth images and self-occluding action performed by the user. In this paper, we propose a new real-time probabilistic framework to enhance the accuracy of live captured postures that belong to one of the action classes in the database. We adopt the Gaussian Process model as a prior to leverage the position data obtained from Kinect and marker-based motion capture system. We also incorporate a temporal consistency term into the optimization framework to constrain the velocity variations between successive frames. To ensure that the reconstructed posture resembles the accurate parts of the observed posture, we embed a set of joint reliability measurements into the optimization framework. A major drawback of Gaussian Process is its cubic learning complexity when dealing with a large database due to the inverse of a covariance matrix. To solve the problem, we propose a new method based on a local mixture of Gaussian Processes, in which Gaussian Processes are defined in local regions of the state space. Due to the significantly decreased sample size in each local Gaussian Process, the learning time is greatly reduced. At the same time, the prediction speed is enhanced as the weighted mean prediction for a given sample is determined by the nearby local models only. Our system also allows incrementally updating a specific local Gaussian Process in real time, which enhances the likelihood of adapting to run-time postures that are different from those in the database. Experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate high quality postures even under severe self-occlusion situations, which is beneficial for real-time applications such as motion-based gaming and sport training.

  18. Non-Gaussian Multi-resolution Modeling of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, M.; Paul, D.; Lee, T. C. M.; Matsuo, T.

    2016-12-01

    The most dynamic coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere occurs in the Earth's polar atmosphere. Our objective is to model scale-dependent stochastic characteristics of high-latitude ionospheric electric fields that originate from solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions. The Earth's high-latitude ionospheric electric field exhibits considerable variability, with increasing non-Gaussian characteristics at decreasing spatio-temporal scales. Accurately representing the underlying stochastic physical process through random field modeling is crucial not only for scientific understanding of the energy, momentum and mass exchanges between the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere, but also for modern technological systems including telecommunication, navigation, positioning and satellite tracking. While a lot of efforts have been made to characterize the large-scale variability of the electric field in the context of Gaussian processes, no attempt has been made so far to model the small-scale non-Gaussian stochastic process observed in the high-latitude ionosphere. We construct a novel random field model using spherical needlets as building blocks. The double localization of spherical needlets in both spatial and frequency domains enables the model to capture the non-Gaussian and multi-resolutional characteristics of the small-scale variability. The estimation procedure is computationally feasible due to the utilization of an adaptive Gibbs sampler. We apply the proposed methodology to the computational simulation output from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) magnetosphere model. Our non-Gaussian multi-resolution model results in characterizing significantly more energy associated with the small-scale ionospheric electric field variability in comparison to Gaussian models. By accurately representing unaccounted-for additional energy and momentum sources to the Earth's upper atmosphere, our novel random field modeling

  19. Simplified algebraic description of weak measurements with Hermite-Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian pointer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    Weak measurements are recognized as a very powerful tool in measuring tiny effects that are perpendicular to the propagation direction of a light beam. In this paper, we develop a simple algebraic description of the weak measurement protocol for both Laguerre-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian pointer states in the Schrödinger representation. Since a novel class of position and momentum expectation values could be derived, the present scenario appeared to be very efficient and insightful when compared to analytical methods.

  20. Non-Gaussian Photon Probability Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the axiom that the photon's probability distribution is a Gaussian distribution. The Airy disc empirical evidence shows that the best fit, if not exact, distribution is a modified Gamma mΓ distribution (whose parameters are α = r, βr/√u ) in the plane orthogonal to the motion of the photon. This modified Gamma distribution is then used to reconstruct the probability distributions along the hypotenuse from the pinhole, arc from the pinhole, and a line parallel to photon motion. This reconstruction shows that the photon's probability distribution is not a Gaussian function. However, under certain conditions, the distribution can appear to be Normal, thereby accounting for the success of quantum mechanics. This modified Gamma distribution changes with the shape of objects around it and thus explains how the observer alters the observation. This property therefore places additional constraints to quantum entanglement experiments. This paper shows that photon interaction is a multi-phenomena effect consisting of the probability to interact Pi, the probabilistic function and the ability to interact Ai, the electromagnetic function. Splitting the probability function Pi from the electromagnetic function Ai enables the investigation of the photon behavior from a purely probabilistic Pi perspective. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis is proposed as a consistent method for handling the two different phenomena, the probability function Pi and the ability to interact Ai, thus redefining radiation shielding, stealth or cloaking, and invisibility as different effects of a single phenomenon Pi of the photon probability distribution. Sub wavelength photon behavior is successfully modeled as a multi-phenomena behavior. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis provides a good fit to Otoshi's (1972) microwave shielding, Schurig et al. (2006) microwave cloaking, and Oulton et al. (2008) sub wavelength confinement; thereby providing a strong case that

  1. Monthly streamflow forecasting using Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Wang, Dingbao; Xu, Xianli

    2014-04-01

    Streamflow forecasting plays a critical role in nearly all aspects of water resources planning and management. In this work, Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), an effective kernel-based machine learning algorithm, is applied to probabilistic streamflow forecasting. GPR is built on Gaussian process, which is a stochastic process that generalizes multivariate Gaussian distribution to infinite-dimensional space such that distributions over function values can be defined. The GPR algorithm provides a tractable and flexible hierarchical Bayesian framework for inferring the posterior distribution of streamflows. The prediction skill of the algorithm is tested for one-month-ahead prediction using the MOPEX database, which includes long-term hydrometeorological time series collected from 438 basins across the U.S. from 1948 to 2003. Comparisons with linear regression and artificial neural network models indicate that GPR outperforms both regression methods in most cases. The GPR prediction of MOPEX basins is further examined using the Budyko framework, which helps to reveal the close relationships among water-energy partitions, hydrologic similarity, and predictability. Flow regime modification and the resulting loss of predictability have been a major concern in recent years because of climate change and anthropogenic activities. The persistence of streamflow predictability is thus examined by extending the original MOPEX data records to 2012. Results indicate relatively strong persistence of streamflow predictability in the extended period, although the low-predictability basins tend to show more variations. Because many low-predictability basins are located in regions experiencing fast growth of human activities, the significance of sustainable development and water resources management can be even greater for those regions.

  2. Twisted Gaussian Schell-model beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, R. ); Mukunda, N. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore )

    1993-01-01

    The authors introduce a new class of partially coherent axially symmetric Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams incorporating a new twist phase quadratic in configuration variables. This phase twists the beam about its axis during propagation and is shown to be bounded in strength because of the positive semidefiniteness of the cross-spectral density. Propagation characteristics and invariants for such beams are derived and interpreted, and two different geometric representations are developed. Direct effects of the twist phase on free propagation as well as in parabolic index fibers are demonstrated. Production of such twisted GSM beams, starting with Li-Wolf anisotropic GSM beams, is described. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  3. A Gaussian measure of quantum phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the width of the semiclassical phase distribution of a quantum state in its dependence on the average number of photons (m) in this state. As a measure of phase noise, we choose the width, delta phi, of the best Gaussian approximation to the dominant peak of this probability curve. For a coherent state, this width decreases with the square root of (m), whereas for a truncated phase state it decreases linearly with increasing (m). For an optimal phase state, delta phi decreases exponentially but so does the area caught underneath the peak: all the probability is stored in the broad wings of the distribution.

  4. Non-Gaussianity from resonant curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Alex; Rajantie, Arttu; Nurmi, Sami E-mail: s.nurmi@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2010-01-01

    We calculate curvature perturbations in the scenario in which the curvaton field decays into another scalar field via parametric resonance. As a result of a nonlinear stage at the end of the resonance, standard perturbative calculation techniques fail in this case. Instead, we use lattice field theory simulations and the separate universe approximation to calculate the curvature perturbation as a nonlinear function of the curvaton field. For the parameters tested, the generated perturbations are highly non-Gaussian and not well approximated by the usual f{sub NL} parameterisation. Resonant decay plays an important role in the curvaton scenario and can have a substantial effect on the resulting perturbations.

  5. Non-gaussianity from broken symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio; Vallinotto, Alberto; /Chicago U. /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Recently we studied inflation models in which the inflation potential is characterized by an underlying approximate global symmetry. In the first work we pointed out that in such a model curvature perturbations are generated after the end of the slow-roll phase of inflation. In this work we develop further the observational implications of the model and compute the degree of non-Gaussianity predicted in the scenario. We find that the corresponding nonlinearity parameter, F{sub NL}, can be as large as 10{sup 2}.

  6. Learning rates of lq coefficient regularization learning with gaussian kernel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobo; Zeng, Jinshan; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2014-10-01

    Regularization is a well-recognized powerful strategy to improve the performance of a learning machine and l(q) regularization schemes with 0 < q < ∞ are central in use. It is known that different q leads to different properties of the deduced estimators, say, l(2) regularization leads to a smooth estimator, while l(1) regularization leads to a sparse estimator. Then how the generalization capability of l(q) regularization learning varies with q is worthy of investigation. In this letter, we study this problem in the framework of statistical learning theory. Our main results show that implementing l(q) coefficient regularization schemes in the sample-dependent hypothesis space associated with a gaussian kernel can attain the same almost optimal learning rates for all 0 < q < ∞. That is, the upper and lower bounds of learning rates for l(q) regularization learning are asymptotically identical for all 0 < q < ∞. Our finding tentatively reveals that in some modeling contexts, the choice of q might not have a strong impact on the generalization capability. From this perspective, q can be arbitrarily specified, or specified merely by other nongeneralization criteria like smoothness, computational complexity or sparsity.

  7. Non-Gaussianities due to relativistic corrections to the observed galaxy bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, E.; Perrier, H.; Durrer, R.; Marozzi, G.; Moradinezhad Dizgah, A.; Noreña, J.; Riotto, A.

    2017-03-01

    High-precision constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) will significantly improve our understanding of the physics of the early universe. Among all the subtleties in using large scale structure observables to constrain PNG, accounting for relativistic corrections to the clustering statistics is particularly important for the upcoming galaxy surveys covering progressively larger fraction of the sky. We focus on relativistic projection effects due to the fact that we observe the galaxies through the light that reaches the telescope on perturbed geodesics. These projection effects can give rise to an effective fNL that can be misinterpreted as the primordial non-Gaussianity signal and hence is a systematic to be carefully computed and accounted for in modelling of the bispectrum. We develop the technique to properly account for relativistic effects in terms of purely observable quantities, namely angles and redshifts. We give some examples by applying this approach to a subset of the contributions to the tree-level bispectrum of the observed galaxy number counts calculated within perturbation theory and estimate the corresponding non-Gaussianity parameter, fNL, for the local, equilateral and orthogonal shapes. For the local shape, we also compute the local non-Gaussianity resulting from terms obtained using the consistency relation for observed number counts. Our goal here is not to give a precise estimate of fNL for each shape but rather we aim to provide a scheme to compute the non-Gaussian contamination due to relativistic projection effects. For the terms considered in this work, we obtain contamination of fNLloc ~ Script O(1).

  8. Gaussian and non-Gaussian inverse modeling of groundwater flow using copulas and random mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárdossy, András.; Hörning, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new copula-based methodology for Gaussian and non-Gaussian inverse modeling of groundwater flow. The presented approach is embedded in a Monte Carlo framework and it is based on the concept of mixing spatial random fields where a spatial copula serves as spatial dependence function. The target conditional spatial distribution of hydraulic transmissivities is obtained as a linear combination of unconditional spatial fields. The corresponding weights of this linear combination are chosen such that the combined field has the prescribed spatial variability, and honors all the observations of hydraulic transmissivities. The constraints related to hydraulic head observations are nonlinear. In order to fulfill these constraints, a connected domain in the weight space, inside which all linear constraints are fulfilled, is identified. This domain is defined analytically and includes an infinite number of conditional fields (i.e., conditioned on the observed hydraulic transmissivities), and the nonlinear constraints can be fulfilled via minimization of the deviation of the modeled and the observed hydraulic heads. This procedure enables the simulation of a great number of solutions for the inverse problem, allowing a reasonable quantification of the associated uncertainties. The methodology can be used for fields with Gaussian copula dependence, and fields with specific non-Gaussian copula dependence. Further, arbitrary marginal distributions can be considered.

  9. Multivariate Bayesian analysis of Gaussian, right censored Gaussian, ordered categorical and binary traits using Gibbs sampling.

    PubMed

    Korsgaard, Inge Riis; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Sorensen, Daniel; Gianola, Daniel; Madsen, Per; Jensen, Just

    2003-01-01

    A fully Bayesian analysis using Gibbs sampling and data augmentation in a multivariate model of Gaussian, right censored, and grouped Gaussian traits is described. The grouped Gaussian traits are either ordered categorical traits (with more than two categories) or binary traits, where the grouping is determined via thresholds on the underlying Gaussian scale, the liability scale. Allowances are made for unequal models, unknown covariance matrices and missing data. Having outlined the theory, strategies for implementation are reviewed. These include joint sampling of location parameters; efficient sampling from the fully conditional posterior distribution of augmented data, a multivariate truncated normal distribution; and sampling from the conditional inverse Wishart distribution, the fully conditional posterior distribution of the residual covariance matrix. Finally, a simulated dataset was analysed to illustrate the methodology. This paper concentrates on a model where residuals associated with liabilities of the binary traits are assumed to be independent. A Bayesian analysis using Gibbs sampling is outlined for the model where this assumption is relaxed.

  10. Statistics of general functions of a Gaussian field-application to non-Gaussianity from preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-01

    We provide a general formula for calculating correlators of arbitrary function of a Gaussian field. This work extends the standard leading-order approximation based on the δN formalism to the case where truncation of the δN at some low order does not yield the correct answer. As an application of this formula, we investigate 2, 3 and 4-point functions of the primordial curvature perturbation generated in the massless preheating model by approximating the mapping between the curvature perturbation and the Gaussian field as a sum of the many spiky normal distribution functions as suggested by lattice calculations. We also discuss observational consequences of this case and show that trispectrum would be a key observable to search signature of preheating in the CMB map. It is found the forms of the curvature correlation functions for any δN, at the leading order in the correlator of the Gaussian field, coincide with the standard local type ones. Within this approximation, it is also found that the standard formula for the non-linearity parameters given by the product of the derivatives of the e-folding number still holds after we replace the bare e-folding number appearing in the original δN expansion with the one smoothed in the field space with a Gaussian window function.

  11. Escape through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored non-Gaussian and additive white Gaussian noises.

    PubMed

    Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2007-04-01

    In a previous paper [Bag and Hu, Phys. Rev. E 73, 061107 (2006)], we studied the mean lifetime (MLT) for the escape of a Brownian particle through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored Gaussian and additive Gaussian white noises and found resonant activation (RA) behavior. In the present paper we switch from Gaussian to non-Gaussian multiplicative colored noise. We find that in the RA phenomenon, the minimum appears at a smaller noise correlation time (tau) for non-Gaussian noises compared to Gaussian noises in the plot of MLT vs tau for a fixed noise variance; the same plot for a given noise strength increases linearly and the increasing rate is smaller for non-Gaussian noises than for the Gaussian noises; the plot of logarithm of inverse of MLT vs inverse of the strength of additive noise is Arrhenius-like for Gaussian colored noise and it becomes similar to the quantum-Kramers rate if the multiplicative noise is non-Gaussian.

  12. On the optimization of Gaussian basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, George A.; Zhong, Shijun; Montgomery, John A.; Frisch, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A new procedure for the optimization of the exponents, αj, of Gaussian basis functions, Ylm(ϑ,φ)rle-αjr2, is proposed and evaluated. The direct optimization of the exponents is hindered by the very strong coupling between these nonlinear variational parameters. However, expansion of the logarithms of the exponents in the orthonormal Legendre polynomials, Pk, of the index, j: ln αj=∑k=0kmaxAkPk((2j-2)/(Nprim-1)-1), yields a new set of well-conditioned parameters, Ak, and a complete sequence of well-conditioned exponent optimizations proceeding from the even-tempered basis set (kmax=1) to a fully optimized basis set (kmax=Nprim-1). The error relative to the exact numerical self-consistent field limit for a six-term expansion is consistently no more than 25% larger than the error for the completely optimized basis set. Thus, there is no need to optimize more than six well-conditioned variational parameters, even for the largest sets of Gaussian primitives.

  13. Gaussian entanglement distribution with gigahertz bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Ast, Stefan; Ast, Melanie; Mehmet, Moritz; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of entanglement with Gaussian statistic can be used to generate a mathematically proven secure key for quantum cryptography. The distributed secret key rate is limited by the entanglement strength, the entanglement bandwidth, and the bandwidth of the photoelectric detectors. The development of a source for strongly bipartite entangled light with high bandwidth promises an increased measurement speed and a linear boost in the secure data rate. Here, we present the experimental realization of a Gaussian entanglement source with a bandwidth of more than 1.25 GHz. The entanglement spectrum was measured with balanced homodyne detectors and was quantified via the inseparability criterion introduced by Duan and coworkers with a critical value of 4 below which entanglement is certified. Our measurements yielded an inseparability value of about 1.8 at a frequency of 300 MHz to about 2.8 at 1.2 GHz, extending further to about 3.1 at 1.48 GHz. In the experiment we used two 2.6 mm long monolithic periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) resonators to generate two squeezed fields at the telecommunication wavelength of 1550 nm. Our result proves the possibility of generating and detecting strong continuous-variable entanglement with high speed.

  14. Compressive tracking with incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Zhu, Gao; Zeng, Qiaoling

    2016-09-01

    Various approaches have been proposed for robust visual tracking, among which compressive tracking (CT) yields promising performance. In CT, Haar-like features are efficiently extracted with a very sparse measurement matrix and modeled as an online updated naïve Bayes classifier to account for target appearance change. The naïve Bayes classifier ignores overlap between Haar-like features and assumes that Haar-like features are independently distributed, which leads to drift in complex scenario. To address this problem, we present an extended CT algorithm, which assumes that all Haar-like features are correlated with each other and have multivariate Gaussian distribution. The mean vector and covariance matrix of multivariate normal distribution are incrementally updated with constant computational complexity to adapt to target appearance change. Each frame is associated with a temporal weight to expend less modeling power on old observation. Based on temporal weight, an update scheme with changing but convergent learning rate is derived with strict mathematic proof. Compared with CT, our extended algorithm achieves a richer representation of target appearance. The incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution is integrated into the particle filter framework to achieve better tracking performance. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate that our proposed tracker achieves superior performance both qualitatively and quantitatively over several state-of-the-art trackers.

  15. Bayesian compressive sensing for thermal imagery using Gaussian-Jeffreys prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Peng; Gu, Xingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances have shown a great potential to explore compressive sensing (CS) theory for thermal imaging due to the capability of recovering high-resolution information from low-resolution measurements. In this paper, we present a Bayesian CS reconstruction algorithm that makes use of a new sparsity-inducing prior, referred as Gaussian-Jeffreys prior, and demonstrate performance gain of imposing this new prior on thermal imagery where the signal-to-noise ratio is low. We first derive a hierarchical representation of the Gaussian-Jeffreys prior that facilitates computational tractability, then propose an efficient evidence approximation inference algorithm. We show that the proposed estimator is able to provide stronger sparsity-inducing power comparing to the conventional choices. Extensive numerical examples are provided with performance comparisons of different CS estimators, in particular when the compressive measurements are available via thermal imaging.

  16. Inversion of hierarchical Bayesian models using Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, Ekaterina I; Paliwal, Saee; Diaconescu, Andreea O; Brodersen, Kay H; Aponte, Eduardo A; Buhmann, Joachim M; Stephan, Klaas E

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, computational approaches to neuroimaging have increasingly made use of hierarchical Bayesian models (HBMs), either for inferring on physiological mechanisms underlying fMRI data (e.g., dynamic causal modelling, DCM) or for deriving computational trajectories (from behavioural data) which serve as regressors in general linear models. However, an unresolved problem is that standard methods for inverting the hierarchical Bayesian model are either very slow, e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods (MCMC), or are vulnerable to local minima in non-convex optimisation problems, such as variational Bayes (VB). This article considers Gaussian process optimisation (GPO) as an alternative approach for global optimisation of sufficiently smooth and efficiently evaluable objective functions. GPO avoids being trapped in local extrema and can be computationally much more efficient than MCMC. Here, we examine the benefits of GPO for inverting HBMs commonly used in neuroimaging, including DCM for fMRI and the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter (HGF). Importantly, to achieve computational efficiency despite high-dimensional optimisation problems, we introduce a novel combination of GPO and local gradient-based search methods. The utility of this GPO implementation for DCM and HGF is evaluated against MCMC and VB, using both synthetic data from simulations and empirical data. Our results demonstrate that GPO provides parameter estimates with equivalent or better accuracy than the other techniques, but at a fraction of the computational cost required for MCMC. We anticipate that GPO will prove useful for robust and efficient inversion of high-dimensional and nonlinear models of neuroimaging data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Uncertainty in perception and the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Christoph D; Lomakina, Ekaterina I; Daunizeau, Jean; Iglesias, Sandra; Brodersen, Kay H; Friston, Karl J; Stephan, Klaas E

    2014-01-01

    In its full sense, perception rests on an agent's model of how its sensory input comes about and the inferences it draws based on this model. These inferences are necessarily uncertain. Here, we illustrate how the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter (HGF) offers a principled and generic way to deal with the several forms that uncertainty in perception takes. The HGF is a recent derivation of one-step update equations from Bayesian principles that rests on a hierarchical generative model of the environment and its (in)stability. It is computationally highly efficient, allows for online estimates of hidden states, and has found numerous applications to experimental data from human subjects. In this paper, we generalize previous descriptions of the HGF and its account of perceptual uncertainty. First, we explicitly formulate the extension of the HGF's hierarchy to any number of levels; second, we discuss how various forms of uncertainty are accommodated by the minimization of variational free energy as encoded in the update equations; third, we combine the HGF with decision models and demonstrate the inversion of this combination; finally, we report a simulation study that compared four optimization methods for inverting the HGF/decision model combination at different noise levels. These four methods (Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm, Gaussian process-based global optimization, variational Bayes and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling) all performed well even under considerable noise, with variational Bayes offering the best combination of efficiency and informativeness of inference. Our results demonstrate that the HGF provides a principled, flexible, and efficient-but at the same time intuitive-framework for the resolution of perceptual uncertainty in behaving agents.

  18. Increasing entanglement between Gaussian states by coherent photon subtraction.

    PubMed

    Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Dantan, Aurélien; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2007-01-19

    We experimentally demonstrate that the entanglement between Gaussian entangled states can be increased by non-Gaussian operations. Coherent subtraction of single photons from Gaussian quadrature-entangled light pulses, created by a nondegenerate parametric amplifier, produces delocalized states with negative Wigner functions and complex structures more entangled than the initial states in terms of negativity. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Constraints on scale-dependent non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Shandera, Sarah E.

    2007-11-20

    We review why detection of non-Gaussianity in the spectrum of primordial fluctuations would be an indication of interesting inflationary physics and discuss the observational constraints on a simple type of scale-dependent non-Gaussianity. In particular, if the amount non-Gaussianity increases during inflation then observations on scales smaller than those probed by the Cosmic Microwave Background may provide important constraints. Clusters number counts can be a useful tool in this context.

  20. Gaussian Acoustic Classifier for the Launch of Three Weapon Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Gaussian Acoustic Classifier for the Launch of Three Weapon Systems by Christine Yang and Geoffrey H. Goldman ARL-TN-0576 September 2013...0576 September 2013 Gaussian Acoustic Classifier for the Launch of Three Weapon Systems Christine Yang and Geoffrey H. Goldman Sensors...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gaussian Acoustic Classifier for the Launch of Three Weapon Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  1. Relaxation oscillations in a laser with a Gaussian mirror.

    PubMed

    Mossakowska-Wyszyńska, Agnieszka; Witoński, Piotr; Szczepański, Paweł

    2002-03-20

    We present an analysis of the relaxation oscillations in a laser with a Gaussian mirror by taking into account the three-dimensional spatial field distribution of the laser modes and the spatial hole burning effect. In particular, we discuss the influence of the Gaussian mirror peak reflectivity and a Gaussian parameter on the damping rate and frequency of the relaxation oscillation for two different laser structures, i.e., with a classically unstable resonator and a classically stable resonator.

  2. Markov property of Gaussian states of canonical commutation relation algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Dénes; Pitrik, József

    2009-11-01

    The Markov property of Gaussian states of canonical commutation relation algebras is studied. The detailed description is given by the representing block matrix. The proof is short and allows infinite dimension. The relation to classical Gaussian Markov triplets is also described. The minimizer of relative entropy with respect to a Gaussian Markov state has the Markov property. The appendix contains formulas for the relative entropy.

  3. A Nonlinear Framework of Delayed Particle Smoothing Method for Vehicle Localization under Non-Gaussian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhu; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel nonlinear framework of smoothing method, non-Gaussian delayed particle smoother (nGDPS), is proposed, which enables vehicle state estimation (VSE) with high accuracy taking into account the non-Gaussianity of the measurement and process noises. Within the proposed method, the multivariate Student’s t-distribution is adopted in order to compute the probability distribution function (PDF) related to the process and measurement noises, which are assumed to be non-Gaussian distributed. A computation approach based on Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is designed to cope with the mean and the covariance matrix of the proposal non-Gaussian distribution. A delayed Gibbs sampling algorithm, which incorporates smoothing of the sampled trajectories over a fixed-delay, is proposed to deal with the sample degeneracy of particles. The performance is investigated based on the real-world data, which is collected by low-cost on-board vehicle sensors. The comparison study based on the real-world experiments and the statistical analysis demonstrates that the proposed nGDPS has significant improvement on the vehicle state accuracy and outperforms the existing filtering and smoothing methods. PMID:27187405

  4. Simultaneous Gaussian and exponential inversion for improved analysis of shales by NMR relaxometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Anderssen, Endre; Vogt, Sarah J.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is commonly used to provide lithology-independent porosity and pore-size estimates for petroleum resource evaluation based on fluid-phase signals. However in shales, substantial hydrogen content is associated with solid and fluid signals and both may be detected. Depending on the motional regime, the signal from the solids may be best described using either exponential or Gaussian decay functions. When the inverse Laplace transform, the standard method for analysis of NMR relaxometry results, is applied to data containing Gaussian decays, this can lead to physically unrealistic responses such as signal or porosity overcall and relaxation times that are too short to be determined using the applied instrument settings. We apply a new simultaneous Gaussian-Exponential (SGE) inversion method to simulated data and measured results obtained on a variety of oil shale samples. The SGE inversion produces more physically realistic results than the inverse Laplace transform and displays more consistent relaxation behavior at high magnetic field strengths. Residuals for the SGE inversion are consistently lower than for the inverse Laplace method and signal overcall at short T2 times is mitigated. Beyond geological samples, the method can also be applied in other fields where the sample relaxation consists of both Gaussian and exponential decays, for example in material, medical and food sciences.

  5. Super-Gaussian apodization in ground based telescopes for high contrast coronagraph imaging.

    PubMed

    Cagigas, Miguel A; Valle, Pedro J; Cagigal, Manuel P

    2013-05-20

    We introduce the use of Super-Gaussian apodizing functions in the telescope pupil plane and/or the coronagraph Lyot plane to improve the imaging contrast in ground-based coronagraphs. We describe the properties of the Super-Gaussian function, we estimate its second-order moment in the pupil and Fourier planes and we check it as an apodizing function. We then use Super-Gaussian function to apodize the telescope pupil, the coronagraph Lyot plane or both of them. The result is that a proper apodizing masks combination can reduce the exoplanet detection distance up to a 45% with respect to the classic Lyot coronagraph, for moderately aberrated wavefronts. Compared to the prolate spheroidal function the Super-Gaussian apodizing function allows the planet light up to 3 times brighter. An extra help to increase the extinction rate is to perform a frame selection (Lucky Imaging technique). We show that a selection of the 10% best frames will reduce up to a 20% the detection angular distance when using the classic Lyot coronagraph but that the reduction is only around the 5% when using an apodized coronagraph.

  6. 'The formula that killed Wall Street': the Gaussian copula and modelling practices in investment banking.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Donald; Spears, Taylor

    2014-06-01

    Drawing on documentary sources and 114 interviews with market participants, this and a companion article discuss the development and use in finance of the Gaussian copula family of models, which are employed to estimate the probability distribution of losses on a pool of loans or bonds, and which were centrally involved in the credit crisis. This article, which explores how and why the Gaussian copula family developed in the way it did, employs the concept of 'evaluation culture', a set of practices, preferences and beliefs concerning how to determine the economic value of financial instruments that is shared by members of multiple organizations. We identify an evaluation culture, dominant within the derivatives departments of investment banks, which we call the 'culture of no-arbitrage modelling', and explore its relation to the development of Gaussian copula models. The article suggests that two themes from the science and technology studies literature on models (modelling as 'impure' bricolage, and modelling as articulating with heterogeneous objectives and constraints) help elucidate the history of Gaussian copula models in finance.

  7. Simultaneous Gaussian and exponential inversion for improved analysis of shales by NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Anderssen, Endre; Vogt, Sarah J; Seymour, Joseph D; Birdwell, Justin E; Kirkland, Catherine M; Codd, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is commonly used to provide lithology-independent porosity and pore-size estimates for petroleum resource evaluation based on fluid-phase signals. However in shales, substantial hydrogen content is associated with solid and fluid signals and both may be detected. Depending on the motional regime, the signal from the solids may be best described using either exponential or Gaussian decay functions. When the inverse Laplace transform, the standard method for analysis of NMR relaxometry results, is applied to data containing Gaussian decays, this can lead to physically unrealistic responses such as signal or porosity overcall and relaxation times that are too short to be determined using the applied instrument settings. We apply a new simultaneous Gaussian-Exponential (SGE) inversion method to simulated data and measured results obtained on a variety of oil shale samples. The SGE inversion produces more physically realistic results than the inverse Laplace transform and displays more consistent relaxation behavior at high magnetic field strengths. Residuals for the SGE inversion are consistently lower than for the inverse Laplace method and signal overcall at short T2 times is mitigated. Beyond geological samples, the method can also be applied in other fields where the sample relaxation consists of both Gaussian and exponential decays, for example in material, medical and food sciences.

  8. Efficient calculation of integrals in mixed ramp-Gaussian basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    McKemmish, Laura K.

    2015-04-07

    Algorithms for the efficient calculation of two-electron integrals in the newly developed mixed ramp-Gaussian basis sets are presented, alongside a Fortran90 implementation of these algorithms, RAMPITUP. These new basis sets have significant potential to (1) give some speed-up (estimated at up to 20% for large molecules in fully optimised code) to general-purpose Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory quantum chemistry calculations, replacing all-Gaussian basis sets, and (2) give very large speed-ups for calculations of core-dependent properties, such as electron density at the nucleus, NMR parameters, relativistic corrections, and total energies, replacing the current use of Slater basis functions or very large specialised all-Gaussian basis sets for these purposes. This initial implementation already demonstrates roughly 10% speed-ups in HF/R-31G calculations compared to HF/6-31G calculations for large linear molecules, demonstrating the promise of this methodology, particularly for the second application. As well as the reduction in the total primitive number in R-31G compared to 6-31G, this timing advantage can be attributed to the significant reduction in the number of mathematically complex intermediate integrals after modelling each ramp-Gaussian basis-function-pair as a sum of ramps on a single atomic centre.

  9. Dependence of the Gaussian-Lévy transition on the disorder strength in random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppu, Ravitej; Mujumdar, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    We examine the dependence of the Gaussian-Lévy transition in random lasers on the disorder strength, through experimental and theoretical studies. Experiments are performed on samples whose disorder strength varied over almost an order of magnitude. It is found that the Lévy regime is easily accessed under low excitation when the disorder is weak, compared to the energetically expensive transition in strong disorder. Besides, under conditions of weak disorder, the transition energy is mildly dependent on the disorder strength. The Gaussian-Lévy transition also progresses rapidly in weakly scattering samples. In the theoretical investigation, we employ an analytical-numerical method to estimate the parameters of intensity statistics in random lasers. A Monte Carlo simulation is implemented to accurately calculate the excitation region of the random laser, yielding the ℓg and the geometric features of this region. The aspect ratio of this pumped region allows us to further analytically calculate the scale parameter of a photon diffusing out of the amplifying region, thereby providing the power-law exponent μ, which allows us to trace the Gaussian-Lévy transition. We find an excellent agreement between the experimental and the theoretical results on the Gaussian-Lévy transition with regard to the location and the rate of transition as a function of the disorder strength.

  10. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  11. NGMIX: Gaussian mixture models for 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Erin

    2015-08-01

    NGMIX implements Gaussian mixture models for 2D images. Both the PSF profile and the galaxy are modeled using mixtures of Gaussians. Convolutions are thus performed analytically, resulting in fast model generation as compared to methods that perform the convolution in Fourier space. For the galaxy model, NGMIX supports exponential disks and de Vaucouleurs and Sérsic profiles; these are implemented approximately as a sum of Gaussians using the fits from Hogg & Lang (2013). Additionally, any number of Gaussians can be fit, either completely free or constrained to be cocentric and co-elliptical.

  12. Post-Gaussian approximations in phase ordering kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazenko, Gene F.

    1994-05-01

    Existing theories for the growth of order in unstable systems have successfully exploited the use of a Gaussian auxiliary field. The limitations imposed on such theories by assuming this field to be Gaussian have recently become clearer. In this paper it is shown how this Gaussian restriction can be removed in order to obtain improved approximations for the scaling properties of such systems. In particular it is shown how the improved theory can explain the recent numerical results of Blundell, Bray, and Sattler [Phys. Rev. E 48, 2476 (1993)] which are in qualitative disagreement with Gaussian theories.

  13. Gaussian conditional random fields for regression in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radosavljevic, Vladan

    In recent years many remote sensing instruments of various properties have been employed in an attempt to better characterize important geophysical phenomena. Satellite instruments provide an exceptional opportunity for global long-term observations of the land, the biosphere, the atmosphere, and the oceans. The collected data are used for estimation and better understanding of geophysical parameters such as land cover type, atmospheric properties, or ocean temperature. Achieving accurate estimations of such parameters is an important requirement for development of models able to predict global climate changes. One of the most challenging climate research problems is estimation of global composition, load, and variability of aerosols, small airborne particles that reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation. The existing algorithm for aerosol prediction from satellite observations is deterministic and manually tuned by domain scientist. In contrast to domain-driven method, we show that aerosol prediction is achievable by completely data-driven approaches. These statistical methods consist of learning of nonlinear regression models to predict aerosol load using the satellite observations as inputs. Measurements from unevenly distributed ground-based sites over the world are used as proxy to ground-truth outputs. Although statistical methods achieve better accuracy than deterministic method this setup is appropriate when data are independently and identically distributed (IID). The IID assumption is often violated in remote sensing where data exhibit temporal, spatial, or spatio-temporal dependencies. In such cases, the traditional supervised learning approaches could result in a model with degraded accuracy. Conditional random fields (CRF) are widely used for predicting output variables that have some internal structure. Most of the CRF research has been done on structured classification where the outputs are discrete. We propose a CRF model for continuous outputs

  14. Multichannel adaptive signal detection in space-time colored compound-gaussian autoregressive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Ma, Xiaochuan; Yan, Shefeng; Hao, Chengpeng; Shi, Bo

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we consider the problem of adaptive detection for a multichannel signal in the presence of spatially and temporally colored compound-Gaussian disturbance. By modeling the disturbance as a multichannel autoregressive (AR) process, we first derive a parametric generalized likelihood ratio test against compound-Gaussian disturbance (CG-PGLRT) assuming that the true multichannel AR parameters are perfectly known. For the two-step GLRT design criterion, we combine the multichannel AR parameter estimation algorithm with three covariance matrix estimation strategies for compound-Gaussian environment, then obtain three adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors by replacing the ideal multichannel AR parameters with their estimates. Owing to treating the random texture components of disturbance as deterministic unknown parameters, all of the proposed detectors require no a priori knowledge about the disturbance statistics. The performance assessments are conducted by means of Monte Carlo trials. We focus on the issues of constant false alarm rate (CFAR) behavior, detection and false alarm probabilities. Numerical results show that the proposed adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors have dramatically ease the training and computational burden compared to the generalized likelihood ratio test-linear quadratic (GLRT-LQ) which is referred to as covariance matrix based detector and relies more heavily on training.

  15. Truncated multiGaussian fields and effective conductance of binary media.

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Ray, Jaideep; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Truncated Gaussian fields provide a flexible model for defining binary media with dispersed (as opposed to layered) inclusions. General properties of excursion sets on these truncated fields are coupled with a distance-based upscaling algorithm and approximations of point process theory to develop an estimation approach for effective conductivity in two-dimensions. Estimation of effective conductivity is derived directly from knowledge of the kernel size used to create the multiGaussian field, defined as the full-width at half maximum (FWHM), the truncation threshold and conductance values of the two modes. Therefore, instantiation of the multiGaussian field is not necessary for estimation of the effective conductance. The critical component of the effective medium approximation developed here is the mean distance between high conductivity inclusions. This mean distance is characterized as a function of the FWHM, the truncation threshold and the ratio of the two modal conductivities. Sensitivity of the resulting effective conductivity to this mean distance is examined for two levels of contrast in the two modal conductances and different FWHM sizes. Results demonstrate that the FWHM is a robust measure of mean travel distance in the background medium. The resulting effective conductivities are accurate when compared to numerical results and results obtained from effective media theory, distance-based upscaling and numerical simulation.

  16. Adaptive subspace detection of extended target in white Gaussian noise using sinc basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Ming; Qu, Jian-She; Yang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    For the high resolution radar (HRR), the problem of detecting the extended target is considered in this paper. Based on a single observation, a new two-step detection based on sparse representation (TSDSR) method is proposed to detect the extended target in the presence of Gaussian noise with unknown covariance. In the new method, the Sinc dictionary is introduced to sparsely represent the high resolution range profile (HRRP). Meanwhile, adaptive subspace pursuit (ASP) is presented to recover the HRRP embedded in the Gaussian noise and estimate the noise covariance matrix. Based on the Sinc dictionary and the estimated noise covariance matrix, one step subspace detector (OSSD) for the first-order Gaussian (FOG) model without secondary data is adopted to realise the extended target detection. Finally, the proposed TSDSR method is applied to raw HRR data. Experimental results demonstrate that HRRPs of different targets can be sparsely represented very well with the Sinc dictionary. Moreover, the new method can estimate the noise power with tiny errors and have a good detection performance.

  17. A fast Gaussian beam tracing method for reflection and refraction of general vectorial astigmatic Gaussian beams from general curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohani, A.; Shishegar, A. A.; Safavi-Naeini, S.

    2004-03-01

    A fast Gaussian beam tracing method for general vectorial astigmatic Gaussian beams based on phase matching has been formulated. Given the parameters of a vectorial Gaussian beam in its principal coordinate system the parameters of the reflected and refracted beams from a general curved surface (with general constitutive parameters) are found. The reflection and transmission of such beams from and through passive photonic structures such as lenses, mirrors and prisms can then be found by considering multiple reflections and transmissions.

  18. Non-Gaussian Photon Probability Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-28

    This paper investigates the axiom that the photon's probability distribution is a Gaussian distribution. The Airy disc empirical evidence shows that the best fit, if not exact, distribution is a modified Gamma mGAMMA distribution (whose parameters are alpha = r, betar/sq root(u)) in the plane orthogonal to the motion of the photon. This modified Gamma distribution is then used to reconstruct the probability distributions along the hypotenuse from the pinhole, arc from the pinhole, and a line parallel to photon motion. This reconstruction shows that the photon's probability distribution is not a Gaussian function. However, under certain conditions, the distribution can appear to be Normal, thereby accounting for the success of quantum mechanics. This modified Gamma distribution changes with the shape of objects around it and thus explains how the observer alters the observation. This property therefore places additional constraints to quantum entanglement experiments. This paper shows that photon interaction is a multi-phenomena effect consisting of the probability to interact P{sub i}, the probabilistic function and the ability to interact A{sub i}, the electromagnetic function. Splitting the probability function P{sub i} from the electromagnetic function A{sub i} enables the investigation of the photon behavior from a purely probabilistic P{sub i} perspective. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis is proposed as a consistent method for handling the two different phenomena, the probability function P{sub i} and the ability to interact A{sub i}, thus redefining radiation shielding, stealth or cloaking, and invisibility as different effects of a single phenomenon P{sub i} of the photon probability distribution. Sub wavelength photon behavior is successfully modeled as a multi-phenomena behavior. The Probabilistic Interaction Hypothesis provides a good fit to Otoshi's (1972) microwave shielding, Schurig et al.(2006) microwave cloaking, and Oulton et al.(2008) sub

  19. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-03-16

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs' RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user's location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area.

  20. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs’ RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user’s location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area. PMID:26999139

  1. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. Accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. Usually, only a limited set of accurate N-body simulations is available. Thus, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Further, relying on simulated realizations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these points in mind, this work presents a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements for galaxy samples with a trivial geometry in the case of a Gaussian approximation of the clustering likelihood. As main result of this paper, we give the explicit formulae for Fourier and configuration space covariance matrices. To validate our model, we create synthetic halo occupation distribution galaxy catalogues by populating the haloes of an ensemble of large-volume N-body simulations. Using linear and non-linear input power spectra, we find very good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements on the synthetic catalogues in the quasi-linear regime.

  2. Laguerre-Gaussian, Hermite-Gaussian, Bessel-Gaussian, and Finite-Energy Airy Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum in Strongly Nonlocal Nonlinear Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenkun; Gu, Yuzong

    2016-12-01

    The propagation of two-dimensional beams is analytically and numerically investigated in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media (SNNM) based on the ABCD matrix. The two-dimensional beams reported in this paper are described by the product of the superposition of generalized Laguerre-Gaussian (LG), Hermite-Gaussian (HG), Bessel-Gaussian (BG), and circular Airy (CA) beams, carrying an orbital angular momentum (OAM). Owing to OAM and the modulation of SNNM, we find that the propagation of these two-dimensional beams exhibits complete rotation and periodic inversion: the spatial intensity profile first extends and then diminishes, and during the propagation the process repeats to form a breath-like phenomenon.

  3. Density Estimation with Mercer Kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macready, William G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for density estimation based on Mercer kernels. The density estimate can be understood as the density induced on a data manifold by a mixture of Gaussians fit in a feature space. As is usual, the feature space and data manifold are defined with any suitable positive-definite kernel function. We modify the standard EM algorithm for mixtures of Gaussians to infer the parameters of the density. One benefit of the approach is it's conceptual simplicity, and uniform applicability over many different types of data. Preliminary results are presented for a number of simple problems.

  4. Non-Gaussianity in the foreground-reduced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, A.; Reboucas, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity by using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is crucial not only to discriminate inflationary models but also to test alternative scenarios. Non-Gaussianity offers, therefore, a powerful probe of the physics of the primordial Universe. The extraction of primordial non-Gaussianity is a difficult enterprise since several effects of a nonprimordial nature can produce non-Gaussianity. Given the far-reaching consequences of such a non-Gaussianity for our understanding of the physics of the early Universe, it is important to employ a range of different statistical tools to quantify and/or constrain its amount in order to have information that may be helpful for identifying its causes. Moreover, different indicators can in principle provide information about distinct forms of non-Gaussianity that can be present in CMB data. Most of the Gaussianity analyses of CMB data have been performed by using part-sky frequency, where the mask is used to deal with the galactic diffuse foreground emission. However, full-sky map seems to be potentially more appropriate to test for Gaussianity of the CMB data. On the other hand, masks can induce bias in some non-Gaussianity analyses. Here we use two recent large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators, based on skewness and kurtosis of large-angle patches of CMB maps, to examine the question of non-Gaussianity in the available full-sky five-year and seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) maps. We show that these full-sky foreground-reduced maps present a significant deviation from Gaussianity of different levels, which vary with the foreground-reducing procedures. We also make a Gaussianity analysis of the foreground-reduced five-year and seven-year WMAP maps with a KQ75 mask, and compare with the similar analysis performed with the corresponding full-sky foreground-reduced maps. This comparison shows a significant reduction in the levels of non-Gaussianity

  5. Exploring scalar field dynamics with Gaussian processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Remya; Jhingan, Sanjay; Jain, Deepak E-mail: sanjay.jhingan@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe remains an unsolved mystery in Cosmology. In this work we consider a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe with non-relativistic matter and a single scalar field contributing to the energy density of the Universe. Properties of this scalar field, like potential, kinetic energy, equation of state etc. are reconstructed from Supernovae and BAO data using Gaussian processes. We also reconstruct energy conditions and kinematic variables of expansion, such as the jerk and the slow roll parameter. We find that the reconstructed scalar field variables and the kinematic quantities are consistent with a flat ΛCDM Universe. Further, we find that the null energy condition is satisfied for the redshift range of the Supernovae data considered in the paper, but the strong energy condition is violated.

  6. Length of Inflation and Non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Shiro; Takami, Tomoyuki

    Certain inflation models are shown to have large non-Gaussianity in special cases. Namely, slow-roll inflation models with an effective higher derivative interaction, in which the length of inflation is finite and a scalar-matter-dominated period or power inflation is adopted as pre-inflation, are considered. Using Holman and Tolley's formula of the nonlinearity parameter in the flattened triangle configurations f flattened NL, we calculate the value of f flattened NL. The value of f flattened NL is found to be largest (f flattened NL>10) when the inflation length is approximately 60 e-folds, and f flattened NL is found to depend strongly on the length of inflation and the cut-off scale.

  7. IBS for non-gaussian distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Sidorin, A.O.; Smirnov, A.V.

    2010-09-27

    In many situations distribution can significantly deviate from Gaussian which requires accurate treatment of IBS. Our original interest in this problem was motivated by the need to have an accurate description of beam evolution due to IBS while distribution is strongly affected by the external electron cooling force. A variety of models with various degrees of approximation were developed and implemented in BETACOOL in the past to address this topic. A more complete treatment based on the friction coefficient and full 3-D diffusion tensor was introduced in BETACOOL at the end of 2007 under the name 'local IBS model'. Such a model allowed us calculation of IBS for an arbitrary beam distribution. The numerical benchmarking of this local IBS algorithm and its comparison with other models was reported before. In this paper, after briefly describing the model and its limitations, they present its comparison with available experimental data.

  8. Semiconductor band gap localization via Gaussian function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, B.; Brown, G. J.; Xi, H.

    2012-10-01

    To determine the band gap of bulk semiconductors with transmission spectroscopy alone is considered as an extremely difficult task because in the higher energy range, approaching and exceeding the band gap energy, the material is opaque yielding no useful data to be recorded. In this paper, by investigating the transmission of industrial GaSb wafers with a thickness of 500 µm, we demonstrate how these obstacles of transmission spectroscopy can be overcome. The key is the transmission spectrums’ derivative, which coincides with the Gaussian function. This understanding can be used to transfer Beers’ law in an integral form opening the pathway of band gap determinations based on mathematical parameters only. The work also emphasizes the correlation between the thermal band gap variation and Debye temperature.

  9. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  10. Primordial non-Gaussianity from G inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2011-05-15

    We present a comprehensive study of primordial fluctuations generated from G inflation, in which the inflaton Lagrangian is of the form K({phi},X)-G({phi},X){open_square}{phi} with X=-({partial_derivative}{phi}){sup 2}/2. The Lagrangian still gives rise to second-order gravitational and scalar field equations, and thus offers a more generic class of single-field inflation than ever studied, with a richer phenomenology. We compute the power spectrum and the bispectrum, and clarify how the non-Gaussian amplitude depends upon parameters such as the sound speed. In so doing we try to keep as great generality as possible, allowing for non slow-roll and deviation from the exact scale invariance.

  11. Equilateral non-Gaussianity from multifield dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, Andrew J.; Wyman, Mark

    2010-02-15

    The distinctive features of single field inflationary models with nonminimal kinetic terms, like Dirac-Born-Infeld and k inflation, can be captured by more familiar multiple-field inflationary systems of the type that typically arise in low-energy supergravity models. At least one heavy field, which we call the gelaton, has an effective potential which depends on the kinetic energy of the inflaton. Integrating out the gelaton gives rise to an effectively single field system for which the speed of sound for the adiabatic fluctuations is reduced, generating potentially observable equilateral non-Gaussianity, while causing negligible isocurvature fluctuations. This mechanism is only active if there is a relatively tight coupling between the gelaton and the inflaton. Requiring that the inflaton-gelaton system remains weakly coupled puts an upper limit on the gelaton mass. This approach gives a potentially UV-completable framework for describing large classes of k-inflationary behavior.

  12. Reversed Airy Gaussian and Airy Gaussian vortex light bullets in harmonic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xi; Peng, Yulian; Zhang, Liping; Li, Dongdong; Deng, Dongmei

    2017-05-01

    By solving the normalized dimensionless linear Schrödinger-like equation with harmonic potential analytically, we have studied the spatiotemporal Airy Gaussian (AiG) and Airy Gaussian vortex (AiGV) light bullets. The AiG light bullets are composed of the chirped Airy functions in temporal domain and the AiG functions in spatial domain, while AiGV light bullets are AiG light bullets carrying the vortex. By selecting the negative or positive linear chirp we can obtain decelerating or accelerating light bullets, respectively. Combing effects from harmonic potential with the negative quadratic chirp, we can study reversed light bullets in both spatial and temporal domains.

  13. Development and modification of a Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlag, Adam W.

    Millions of people across the world currently have noise induced hearing loss, and many are working in conditions with both continuous Gaussian and non-Gaussian noises that could affect their hearing. It was hypothesized that the energy of the noise was the cause of the hearing loss and did not depend on temporal pattern of a noise. This was referred to as the equal energy hypothesis. This hypothesis has been shown to have limitations though. This means that there is a difference in the types of noise a person receives to induce hearing loss and it is necessary to build a system that can easily mimic various conditions to conduct research. This study builds a system that can produce both non-Gaussian impulse/impact noises and continuous Gaussian noise. It was found that the peak sound pressure level of the system could reach well above the needed 120 dB level to represent acoustic trauma and could replicate well above the 85 dB A-weighted sound pressure level to produce conditions of gradual developing hearing loss. The system reached a maximum of 150 dB sound peak pressure level and a maximum of 133 dB A-weighted sound pressure level. Various parameters could easily be adjusted to control the sound, such as the high and low cutoff frequency to center the sound at 4 kHz. The system build can easily be adjusted to create numerous sound conditions and will hopefully be modified and improved in hopes of eventually being used for animal studies to lead to the creation of a method to treat or prevent noise induced hearing loss.

  14. Norms of quantum Gaussian multi-mode channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Rupert L.; Lieb, Elliott H.

    2017-06-01

    We compute the Sp→Sp norm of a general Gaussian gauge-covariant multi-mode channel for any 1 ≤ p < ∞ , where Sp is a Schatten space. As a consequence, we verify the Gaussian optimizer conjecture and the multiplicativity conjecture in these cases.

  15. Optimality of Gaussian attacks in continuous-variable quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Grosshans, Frédéric; Acín, Antonio

    2006-11-10

    We analyze the asymptotic security of the family of Gaussian modulated quantum key distribution protocols for continuous-variables systems. We prove that the Gaussian unitary attack is optimal for all the considered bounds on the key rate when the first and second momenta of the canonical variables involved are known by the honest parties.

  16. Gaussian and mean curvatures for discrete asymptotic nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schief, W. K.

    2017-04-01

    We propose discretisations of Gaussian and mean curvatures of surfaces parametrised in terms of asymptotic coordinates and examine their relevance in the context of integrable discretisations of classical classes of surfaces and their underlying integrable systems. We also record discrete analogues of the classical relation between the Gaussian curvature of hyperbolic surfaces and the torsion of their asymptotic lines.

  17. Degeneracy of energy levels of pseudo-Gaussian oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Iacob, Theodor-Felix; Iacob, Felix; Lute, Marina

    2015-12-07

    We study the main features of the isotropic radial pseudo-Gaussian oscillators spectral properties. This study is made upon the energy levels degeneracy with respect to orbital angular momentum quantum number. In a previous work [6] we have shown that the pseudo-Gaussian oscillators belong to the class of quasi-exactly solvable models and an exact solution has been found.

  18. A Paper-and-Pencil gcd Algorithm for Gaussian Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    As with natural numbers, a greatest common divisor of two Gaussian (complex) integers "a" and "b" is a Gaussian integer "d" that is a common divisor of both "a" and "b". This article explores an algorithm for such gcds that is easy to do by hand.

  19. When Does the Uncertainty Become Non-Gaussian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfriend, K.; Park, I.

    2016-09-01

    The orbit state covariance is used in the conjunction assessment/probability of collision calculation. It can also be a valuable tool in track association, maneuver detection and sensor tasking. These uses all assume that the uncertainty is Gaussian. Studies have shown that the uncertainty at epoch (time of last observation) is reasonably Gaussian, but the neglected nonlinearities in the covariance propagation eventually result in the uncertainty becoming non-Gaussian. Numerical studies have shown that for space objects in low Earth orbit the covariance remains Gaussian the longest in orbital element space. It has been shown that the covariance remains Gaussian for up to 10 days in orbital element space, but becomes non-Gaussian after 2-3 days in Cartesian coordinates for a typical LEO orbit. The fundamental question is when does it become non-Gaussian and how can one given the orbit state and covariance at epoch determine when it occurs. A tool that an operator could use to compute the approximate time when the when the uncertainty becomes non-Gaussian would be useful This paper addresses the development of such a tool.

  20. Connections between Graphical Gaussian Models and Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgueiro, M. Fatima; Smith, Peter W. F.; McDonald, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Connections between graphical Gaussian models and classical single-factor models are obtained by parameterizing the single-factor model as a graphical Gaussian model. Models are represented by independence graphs, and associations between each manifest variable and the latent factor are measured by factor partial correlations. Power calculations…

  1. Connections between Graphical Gaussian Models and Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgueiro, M. Fatima; Smith, Peter W. F.; McDonald, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Connections between graphical Gaussian models and classical single-factor models are obtained by parameterizing the single-factor model as a graphical Gaussian model. Models are represented by independence graphs, and associations between each manifest variable and the latent factor are measured by factor partial correlations. Power calculations…

  2. Multipartite Gaussian steering: Monogamy constraints and quantum cryptography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yu; Kogias, Ioannis; Adesso, Gerardo; He, Qiongyi

    2017-01-01

    We derive laws for the distribution of quantum steering among different parties in multipartite Gaussian states under Gaussian measurements. We prove that a monogamy relation akin to the generalized Coffman-Kundu-Wootters inequality holds quantitatively for a recently introduced measure of Gaussian steering. We then define the residual Gaussian steering, stemming from the monogamy inequality, as an indicator of collective steering-type correlations. For pure three-mode Gaussian states, the residual acts as a quantifier of genuine multipartite steering, and is interpreted operationally in terms of the guaranteed key rate in the task of secure quantum secret sharing. Optimal resource states for the latter protocol are identified, and their possible experimental implementation discussed. Our results pin down the role of multipartite steering for quantum communication.

  3. Distillation and purification of symmetric entangled Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2010-10-15

    We propose an entanglement distillation and purification scheme for symmetric two-mode entangled Gaussian states that allows to asymptotically extract a pure entangled Gaussian state from any input entangled symmetric Gaussian state. The proposed scheme is a modified and extended version of the entanglement distillation protocol originally developed by Browne et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062320 (2003)]. A key feature of the present protocol is that it utilizes a two-copy degaussification procedure that involves a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with single-mode non-Gaussian filters inserted in its two arms. The required non-Gaussian filtering operations can be implemented by coherently combining two sequences of single-photon addition and subtraction operations.

  4. Non-ideal boson system in the Gaussian approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, P.R.; de Toledo Piza, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate ground-state and thermal properties of a system of non-relativistic bosons interacting through repulsive, two-body interactions in a self-consistent Gaussian mean-field approximation which consists in writing the variationally determined density operator as the most general Gaussian functional of the quantized field operators. Finite temperature results are obtained in a grand canonical framework. Contact is made with the results of Lee, Yang, and Huang in terms of particular truncations of the Gaussian approximation. The full Gaussian approximation supports a free phase or a thermodynamically unstable phase when contact forces and a standard renormalization scheme are used. When applied to a Hamiltonian with zero range forces interpreted as an effective theory with a high momentum cutoff, the full Gaussian approximation generates a quasi-particle spectrum having an energy gap, in conflict with perturbation theory results. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phases

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2006-04-15

    The fidelity for cloning coherent states is improved over that provided by optimal Gaussian and non-Gaussian cloners for the subset of coherent states that are prepared with known phases. Gaussian quantum cloning duplicates all coherent states with an optimal fidelity of 2/3. Non-Gaussian cloners give optimal single-clone fidelity for a symmetric 1-to-2 cloner of 0.6826. Coherent states that have known phases can be cloned with a fidelity of 4/5. The latter is realized by a combination of two beam splitters and a four-wave mixer operated in the nonlinear regime, all of which are realized by interaction Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the photon operators. Therefore, the known Gaussian devices for cloning coherent states are extended when cloning coherent states with known phases by considering a nonbalanced beam splitter at the input side of the amplifier.

  6. Gaussian intrinsic entanglement: An entanglement quantifier based on secret correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišta, Ladislav; Tatham, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Intrinsic entanglement (IE) is a quantity which aims at quantifying bipartite entanglement carried by a quantum state as an optimal amount of the intrinsic information that can be extracted from the state by measurement. We investigate in detail the properties of a Gaussian version of IE, the so-called Gaussian intrinsic entanglement (GIE). We show explicitly how GIE simplifies to the mutual information of a distribution of outcomes of measurements on a conditional state obtained by a measurement on a purifying subsystem of the analyzed state, which is first minimized over all measurements on the purifying subsystem and then maximized over all measurements on the conditional state. By constructing for any separable Gaussian state a purification and a measurement on the purifying subsystem which projects the purification onto a product state, we prove that GIE vanishes on all Gaussian separable states. Via realization of quantum operations by teleportation, we further show that GIE is nonincreasing under Gaussian local trace-preserving operations and classical communication. For pure Gaussian states and a reduction of the continuous-variable GHZ state, we calculate GIE analytically and we show that it is always equal to the Gaussian Rényi-2 entanglement. We also extend the analysis of IE to a non-Gaussian case by deriving an analytical lower bound on IE for a particular form of the non-Gaussian continuous-variable Werner state. Our results indicate that mapping of entanglement onto intrinsic information is capable of transmitting also quantitative properties of entanglement and that this property can be used for introduction of a quantifier of Gaussian entanglement which is a compromise between computable and physically meaningful entanglement quantifiers.

  7. Recursive ideal observer detection of known M-ary signals in multiplicative and additive Gaussian noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the recursive algorithms necessary for real-time digital detection of M-ary known signals that are subject to independent multiplicative and additive Gaussian noises. The motivating application is minimum probability of error detection of digital data-link messages aboard civil aircraft in the earth reflection multipath environment. For each known signal, the detector contains one Kalman filter and one probability computer. The filters estimate the multipath disturbance. The estimates and the received signal drive the probability computers. Outputs of all the computers are compared in amplitude to give the signal decision. The practicality and usefulness of the detector are extensively discussed.

  8. Cramer-Rao Bound for Gaussian Random Processes and Applications to Radar Processing of Atmospheric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of the exact Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB) for unbiased estimates of the mean frequency, signal power, and spectral width of Doppler radar/lidar signals (a Gaussian random process) are presented. Approximate CRB's are derived using the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). These approximate results are equal to the exact CRB when the DFT coefficients are mutually uncorrelated. Previous high SNR limits for CRB's are shown to be inaccurate because the discrete summations cannot be approximated with integration. The performance of an approximate maximum likelihood estimator for mean frequency approaches the exact CRB for moderate signal to noise ratio and moderate spectral width.

  9. Linear Quadratic Gaussian-Based Closed-Loop Control of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patek, Stephen D.; Breton, Marc D.; Chen, Yuanda; Solomon, Chad; Kovatchev, Boris

    2007-01-01

    Background We investigated the applicability of linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) methodology to the subcutaneous blood glucose regulation problem. We designed an LQG-based feedback control algorithm using linearization of a previously published metabolic model of type 1 diabetes. A key feature of the controller is a Kalman filter used to estimate metabolic states of the patient based on continuous glucose monitoring. Insulin infusion is computed from linear quadratic regulator feedback gains applied to these estimates, generally seeking to minimize squared deviations from a target glucose concentration and basal insulin rate. We evaluated in silico subject-specific LQG control and compared it to preexisting proportional-integral-derivative control. PMID:19756210

  10. Multi-Target Tracking Using an Improved Gaussian Mixture CPHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Wang, Liwei; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    The cardinalized probability hypothesis density (CPHD) filter is an alternative approximation to the full multi-target Bayesian filter for tracking multiple targets. However, although the joint propagation of the posterior intensity and cardinality distribution in its recursion allows more reliable estimates of the target number than the PHD filter, the CPHD filter suffers from the spooky effect where there exists arbitrary PHD mass shifting in the presence of missed detections. To address this issue in the Gaussian mixture (GM) implementation of the CPHD filter, this paper presents an improved GM-CPHD filter, which incorporates a weight redistribution scheme into the filtering process to modify the updated weights of the Gaussian components when missed detections occur. In addition, an efficient gating strategy that can adaptively adjust the gate sizes according to the number of missed detections of each Gaussian component is also presented to further improve the computational efficiency of the proposed filter. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method offers favorable performance in terms of both estimation accuracy and robustness to clutter and detection uncertainty over the existing methods. PMID:27886106

  11. Quantum metrology. Fisher information and entanglement of non-Gaussian spin states.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Helmut; Muessel, Wolfgang; Linnemann, Daniel; Zibold, Tilman; Hume, David B; Pezzè, Luca; Smerzi, Augusto; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2014-07-25

    Entanglement is the key quantum resource for improving measurement sensitivity beyond classical limits. However, the production of entanglement in mesoscopic atomic systems has been limited to squeezed states, described by Gaussian statistics. Here, we report on the creation and characterization of non-Gaussian many-body entangled states. We develop a general method to extract the Fisher information, which reveals that the quantum dynamics of a classically unstable system creates quantum states that are not spin squeezed but nevertheless entangled. The extracted Fisher information quantifies metrologically useful entanglement, which we confirm by Bayesian phase estimation with sub-shot-noise sensitivity. These methods are scalable to large particle numbers and applicable directly to other quantum systems. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Inverse Gaussian and its inverse process as the subordinators of fractional Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Wyłomańska, A; Kumar, A; Połoczański, R; Vellaisamy, P

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the fractional Brownian motion (FBM) time changed by the inverse Gaussian (IG) process and its inverse, called the inverse to the inverse Gaussian (IIG) process. Some properties of the time-changed processes are similar to those of the classical FBM, such as long-range dependence. However, one can also observe different characteristics that are not satisfied by the FBM. We study the distributional properties of both subordinators, namely, IG and IIG processes, and also that of the FBM time changed by these subordinators. We establish also the connections between the subordinated processes considered and the continuous-time random-walk model. For the application part, we introduce the simulation procedures for both processes and discuss the estimation schemes for their parameters. The effectiveness of these methods is checked for simulated trajectories.

  13. Inverse Gaussian and its inverse process as the subordinators of fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyłomańska, A.; Kumar, A.; Połoczański, R.; Vellaisamy, P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study the fractional Brownian motion (FBM) time changed by the inverse Gaussian (IG) process and its inverse, called the inverse to the inverse Gaussian (IIG) process. Some properties of the time-changed processes are similar to those of the classical FBM, such as long-range dependence. However, one can also observe different characteristics that are not satisfied by the FBM. We study the distributional properties of both subordinators, namely, IG and IIG processes, and also that of the FBM time changed by these subordinators. We establish also the connections between the subordinated processes considered and the continuous-time random-walk model. For the application part, we introduce the simulation procedures for both processes and discuss the estimation schemes for their parameters. The effectiveness of these methods is checked for simulated trajectories.

  14. A sharp interpolation between the Hölder and Gaussian Young inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Pelo, Paolo; Lanconelli, Alberto; Stan, Aurel I.

    2016-03-01

    We prove a very general sharp inequality of the Hölder-Young-type for functions defined on infinite dimensional Gaussian spaces. We begin by considering a family of commutative products for functions which interpolates between the pointwise and Wick products; this family arises naturally in the context of stochastic differential equations, through Wong-Zakai-type approximation theorems, and plays a key role in some generalizations of the Beckner-type Poincaré inequality. We then obtain a crucial integral representation for that family of products which is employed, together with a generalization of the classic Young inequality due to Lieb, to prove our main theorem. We stress that our main inequality contains as particular cases the Hölder inequality and Nelson’s hyper-contractive estimate, thus providing a unified framework for two fundamental results of the Gaussian analysis.

  15. Spot size, depth-of-focus, and diffraction ring intensity formulas for truncated Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Urey, Hakan

    2004-01-20

    Simple polynomial formulas to calculate the FWHM and full width at 1/e2 intensity diffraction spot size and the depth of focus at a Strehl ratio of 0.8 and 0.5 as a function of a Gaussian beam truncation ratio and a system f-number are presented. Formulas are obtained by use of the numerical integration of a Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral and can be used to calculate the number of resolvable spots, the modulation transfer function, and the defocus tolerance of optical systems that employ laser beams. I also derived analytical formulas for the diffraction ring intensity as a function of the Gaussian beam truncation ratio and the system f-number. Such formulas can be used to estimate the diffraction-limited contrast of display and imaging systems.

  16. A biorthogonal decomposition for the identification and simulation of non-stationary and non-Gaussian random fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, I.; Ferré, G.; Poirion, F.; Benoit, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new method for the identification and simulation of non-Gaussian and non-stationary stochastic fields given a database is proposed. It is based on two successive biorthogonal decompositions aiming at representing spatio–temporal stochastic fields. The proposed double expansion allows to build the model even in the case of large-size problems by separating the time, space and random parts of the field. A Gaussian kernel estimator is used to simulate the high dimensional set of random variables appearing in the decomposition. The capability of the method to reproduce the non-stationary and non-Gaussian features of random phenomena is illustrated by applications to earthquakes (seismic ground motion) and sea states (wave heights).

  17. A linearly approximated iterative Gaussian decomposition method for waveform LiDAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrakis, Giorgos; Li, Yuguang

    2017-07-01

    Full-waveform LiDAR (FWL) decomposition results often act as the basis for key LiDAR-derived products, for example canopy height, biomass and carbon pool estimation, leaf area index calculation and under canopy detection. To date, the prevailing method for FWL product creation is the Gaussian Decomposition (GD) based on a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) optimization for Gaussian node parameter estimation. GD follows a ;greedy; approach that may leave weak nodes undetected, merge multiple nodes into one or separate a noisy single node into multiple ones. In this manuscript, we propose an alternative decomposition method called Linearly Approximated Iterative Gaussian Decomposition (LAIGD method). The novelty of the LAIGD method is that it follows a multi-step ;slow-and-steady; iterative structure, where new Gaussian nodes are quickly discovered and adjusted using a linear fitting technique before they are forwarded for a non-linear optimization. Two experiments were conducted, one using real full-waveform data from NASA's land, vegetation, and ice sensor (LVIS) and another using synthetic data containing different number of nodes and degrees of overlap to assess performance in variable signal complexity. LVIS data revealed considerable improvements in RMSE (44.8% lower), RSE (56.3% lower) and rRMSE (74.3% lower) values compared to the benchmark GD method. These results were further confirmed with the synthetic data. Furthermore, the proposed multi-step method reduces execution times in half, an important consideration as there are plans for global coverage with the upcoming Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation LiDAR sensor on the International Space Station.

  18. Towards an accurate model of redshift-space distortions: a bivariate Gaussian description for the galaxy pairwise velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Chiesa, Matteo; Guzzo, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    As a step towards a more accurate modelling of redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys, we develop a general description of the probability distribution function of galaxy pairwise velocities within the framework of the so-called streaming model. For a given galaxy separation , such function can be described as a superposition of virtually infinite local distributions. We characterize these in terms of their moments and then consider the specific case in which they are Gaussian functions, each with its own mean μ and variance σ2. Based on physical considerations, we make the further crucial assumption that these two parameters are in turn distributed according to a bivariate Gaussian, with its own mean and covariance matrix. Tests using numerical simulations explicitly show that with this compact description one can correctly model redshift-space distorsions on all scales, fully capturing the overall linear and nonlinear dynamics of the galaxy flow at different separations. In particular, we naturally obtain Gaussian/exponential, skewed/unskewed distribution functions, depending on separation as observed in simulations and data. Also, the recently proposed single-Gaussian description of redshift-space distortions is included in this model as a limiting case, when the bivariate Gaussian is collapsed to a two-dimensional Dirac delta function. More work is needed, but these results indicate a very promising path to make definitive progress in our program to improve RSD estimators.

  19. Statistical assessment of non-Gaussian diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Anders

    2011-12-01

    In human brain diffusion measurements, there are deviations from monoexponential signal decay at high values of the diffusion-weighting factor b. This is known as non-Gaussian diffusion and can provide novel kinds of image contrast. We evaluated quantitatively the goodness-of-fit of five popular diffusion models. Because of the Rician signal distribution and physiological noise, the measurement errors are unknown. This precludes standard χ(2) testing. By repeating the measurement 25 times, the errors were estimated. Hypothesis testing based on the residual after least squares curve fitting was then carried out. Systematic errors originating from the Rician signal bias were eliminated in the fitting procedure. We performed diffusion measurements on four healthy volunteers with b-values ranging from 0 to 5000 s/mm(2) . The data were analyzed voxelwise. The null hypothesis of a given model being adequate was rejected, if the residual after fitting exceeded a limit that corresponds to a significance level of 1%. The fraction of rejected voxels depended strongly on the number of free model parameters. The rejected fraction was: monoexponential model with two parameters, 94%; statistical model with three parameters, 29%; stretched exponential model with three parameters, 35%; cumulant model with three parameters, 48%; cumulant model with four parameters, 11%; biexponential model with four parameters, 2.9%. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dynamical phase diagram of Gaussian wave packets in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Hennig, H; Neff, T; Fleischmann, R

    2016-03-01

    We study the dynamics of self-trapping in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) loaded in deep optical lattices with Gaussian initial conditions, when the dynamics is well described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE). In the literature an approximate dynamical phase diagram based on a variational approach was introduced to distinguish different dynamical regimes: diffusion, self-trapping, and moving breathers. However, we find that the actual DNLSE dynamics shows a completely different diagram than the variational prediction. We calculate numerically a detailed dynamical phase diagram accurately describing the different dynamical regimes. It exhibits a complex structure that can readily be tested in current experiments in BECs in optical lattices and in optical waveguide arrays. Moreover, we derive an explicit theoretical estimate for the transition to self-trapping in excellent agreement with our numerical findings, which may be a valuable guide as well for future studies on a quantum dynamical phase diagram based on the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian.

  1. Model-Based Visual Self-localization Using Gaussian Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Aguirre, David; Asfour, Tamim; Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo; Dillmann, Ruediger

    A novel model-based approach for global self-localization using active stereo vision and density Gaussian spheres is presented. The proposed object recognition components deliver noisy percept subgraphs, which are filtered and fused into an ego-centered reference frame. In subsequent stages, the required vision-to-model associations are extracted by selecting ego-percept subsets in order to prune and match the corresponding world-model subgraph. Ideally, these coupled subgraphs hold necessary information to obtain the model-to-world transformation, i.e., the pose of the robot. However, the estimation of the pose is not robust due to the uncertainties introduced when recovering Euclidean metric from images and during the mapping from the camera to the ego-center. The approach models the uncertainty of the percepts with a radial normal distribution. This formulation allows a closed-form solution which not only derives the maximal density position depicting the optimal ego-center but also ensures the solution even in situations where pure geometric spheres might not intersect.

  2. Bayesian Gaussian Mixture Models for High-Density Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sabatti, Chiara; Lange, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Affymetrix's SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping chips have increased the scope and decreased the cost of gene-mapping studies. Because each SNP is queried by multiple DNA probes, the chips present interesting challenges in genotype calling. Traditional clustering methods distinguish the three genotypes of an SNP fairly well given a large enough sample of unrelated individuals or a training sample of known genotypes. This article describes our attempt to improve genotype calling by constructing Gaussian mixture models with empirically derived priors. The priors stabilize parameter estimation and borrow information collectively gathered on tens of thousands of SNPs. When data from related family members are available, our models capture the correlations in signals between relatives. With these advantages in mind, we apply the models to Affymetrix probe intensity data on 10,000 SNPs gathered on 63 genotyped individuals spread over eight pedigrees. We integrate the genotype-calling model with pedigree analysis and examine a sequence of symmetry hypotheses involving the correlated probe signals. The symmetry hypotheses raise novel mathematical issues of parameterization. Using the Bayesian information criterion, we select the best combination of symmetry assumptions. Compared to Affymetrix's software, our model leads to a reduction in no-calls with little sacrifice in overall calling accuracy. PMID:21572926

  3. Surrogacy Assessment Using Principal Stratification and a Gaussian Copula Model

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J.M.G.; Elliott, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    In clinical trials, a surrogate outcome (S) can be measured before the outcome of interest (T) and may provide early information regarding the treatment (Z) effect on T. Many methods of surrogacy validation rely on models for the conditional distribution of T given Z and S. However, S is a post-randomization variable, and unobserved, simultaneous predictors of S and T may exist, resulting in a non-causal interpretation. Frangakis and Rubin1 developed the concept of principal surrogacy, stratifying on the joint distribution of the surrogate marker under treatment and control to assess the association between the causal effects of treatment on the marker and the causal effects of treatment on the clinical outcome. Working within the principal surrogacy framework, we address the scenario of an ordinal categorical variable as a surrogate for a censored failure time true endpoint. A Gaussian copula model is used to model the joint distribution of the potential outcomes of T, given the potential outcomes of S. Because the proposed model cannot be fully identified from the data, we use a Bayesian estimation approach with prior distributions consistent with reasonable assumptions in the surrogacy assessment setting. The method is applied to data from a colorectal cancer clinical trial, previously analyzed by Burzykowski et al..2 PMID:24947559

  4. Surrogacy assessment using principal stratification and a Gaussian copula model.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Asc; Taylor, Jmg; Elliott, M R

    2017-02-01

    In clinical trials, a surrogate outcome ( S) can be measured before the outcome of interest ( T) and may provide early information regarding the treatment ( Z) effect on T. Many methods of surrogacy validation rely on models for the conditional distribution of T given Z and S. However, S is a post-randomization variable, and unobserved, simultaneous predictors of S and T may exist, resulting in a non-causal interpretation. Frangakis and Rubin developed the concept of principal surrogacy, stratifying on the joint distribution of the surrogate marker under treatment and control to assess the association between the causal effects of treatment on the marker and the causal effects of treatment on the clinical outcome. Working within the principal surrogacy framework, we address the scenario of an ordinal categorical variable as a surrogate for a censored failure time true endpoint. A Gaussian copula model is used to model the joint distribution of the potential outcomes of T, given the potential outcomes of S. Because the proposed model cannot be fully identified from the data, we use a Bayesian estimation approach with prior distributions consistent with reasonable assumptions in the surrogacy assessment setting. The method is applied to data from a colorectal cancer clinical trial, previously analyzed by Burzykowski et al.

  5. Confronting Passive and Active Sensors with Non-Gaussian Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo.; Garcia-Gago, Jesús.; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier.; González-Aguilera, Diego.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has two motivations: firstly, to compare the Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived by passive (digital camera) and by active (terrestrial laser scanner) remote sensing systems when applied to specific architectural objects, and secondly, to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics, with its Least Squares principle, adapts to data sets where asymmetrical gross errors may appear and whether this approach should be changed for a non-parametric one. The field of geomatic technology automation is immersed in a high demanding competition in which any innovation by one of the contenders immediately challenges the opponents to propose a better improvement. Nowadays, we seem to be witnessing an improvement of terrestrial photogrammetry and its integration with computer vision to overcome the performance limitations of laser scanning methods. Through this contribution some of the issues of this “technological race” are examined from the point of view of photogrammetry. A new software is introduced and an experimental test is designed, performed and assessed to try to cast some light on this thrilling match. For the case considered in this study, the results show good agreement between both sensors, despite considerable asymmetry. This asymmetry suggests that the standard Normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data, especially when accuracy is of importance. In this case, standard deviation fails to provide a good estimation of the results, whereas the results obtained for the Median Absolute Deviation and for the Biweight Midvariance are more appropriate measures. PMID:25196104

  6. Gaussian Kernel Based Classification Approach for Wheat Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, R.; Kumar, A.; Raju, P. L. N.; Krishna Murthy, Y. V. N.

    2014-11-01

    Agriculture holds a pivotal role in context to India, which is basically agrarian economy. Crop type identification is a key issue for monitoring agriculture and is the basis for crop acreage and yield estimation. However, it is very challenging to identify a specific crop using single date imagery. Hence, it is highly important to go for multi-temporal analysis approach for specific crop identification. This research work deals with implementation of fuzzy classifier; Possibilistic c-Means (PCM) with and without kernel based approach, using temporal data of Landsat 8- OLI (Operational Land Imager) for identification of wheat in Radaur City, Haryana. The multi- temporal dataset covers complete phenological cycle that is from seedling to ripening of wheat crop growth. The experimental results show that inclusion of Gaussian kernel, with Euclidean Norm (ED Norm) in Possibilistic c-Means (KPCM), soft classifier has been more robust in identification of the wheat crop. Also, identification of all the wheat fields is dependent upon appropriate selection of the temporal date. The best combination of temporal data corresponds to tillering, stem extension, heading and ripening stages of wheat crop. Entropy at testing sites of wheat has been used to validate the classified results. The entropy value at testing sites was observed to be low, implying lower uncertainty of existence of any other class at wheat test sites and high certainty of existence of wheat crop.

  7. The real shape of non-Gaussianities

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony

    2011-10-01

    I review what bispectra and trispectra look like in real space, in terms of the sign of particular shaped triangles and tetrahedrons. Having an equilateral density bispectrum of positive sign corresponds to having concentrated overdensities surrounded by larger weaker underdensities. In 3D these are concentrated density filaments, as expected in large-scale structure. As the shape changes from equilateral to flattened the concentrated overdensities flatten into lines (3D planes). I then focus on squeezed bispectra, which can be thought of as correlations of changes in small-scale power with large-scale fields, and discuss the general non-perturbative form of the squeezed bispectrum and its angular dependence. A general trispectrum has tetrahedral form and I show examples of what this can look like in real space. Squeezed trispectra are of particular interest and come in two forms, corresponding to large-scale variance of small-scale power, and correlated modulations of an equilateral-form bispectrum. Flattened trispectra can be produced by line-like features in 2D, for example from cosmic strings. I discuss the various possible physical origins of these non-Gaussianities, both in terms of primordial perturbations and late-time dynamical and geometric effects, and the relationship with statistical anisotropy.

  8. A tremor detector based on Gaussianity differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. M.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Tryon, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Slip occurring at plate boundaries creates seismic tremor as well as "normal" earthquakes. This nonvolcanic tremor appears to consist of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes which lack impulsive P and S arrivals. Tremor is accompanied by slip observed by GPS and can show anomalies in fluid flow. The seismic radiation resembles continuous microseismic noise more than discrete events. We report dual-frequency coherence (DFC) calculations on tremor and normal microseismic background noise observed on Ocean-Bottom Seismographs and land seismic stations around the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. Both the OBS and land tremor signals show a banded pattern in DFC that is absent in normal noise. The similarity in the DFC patterns between OBS and land tremor signals suggests a common source, eliminating the possibility that DFC is a property of the OBS or seafloor environment. Banded DFC patterns can be generated by repeated events with a repeat time equal to the reciprocal of the offset frequency between bands. If, as is becoming widely accepted, nonvolcanic tremor consists of swarms of low frequency earthquakes (LFE), DFC analysis may help to reveal LFE periodicities or intervals. Timeseries statistics measuring departures from Gaussianity differ between time periods containing tremor and those with only background noise, and the statistic "S" can be used as a detection statistic. We show the Receiver Operating Characteristic for such a detector.

  9. Interpolation of intermolecular potentials using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uteva, Elena; Graham, Richard S.; Wilkinson, Richard D.; Wheatley, Richard J.

    2017-10-01

    A procedure is proposed to produce intermolecular potential energy surfaces from limited data. The procedure involves generation of geometrical configurations using a Latin hypercube design, with a maximin criterion, based on inverse internuclear distances. Gaussian processes are used to interpolate the data, using over-specified inverse molecular distances as covariates, greatly improving the interpolation. Symmetric covariance functions are specified so that the interpolation surface obeys all relevant symmetries, reducing prediction errors. The interpolation scheme can be applied to many important molecular interactions with trivial modifications. Results are presented for three systems involving CO2, a system with a deep energy minimum (HF-HF), and a system with 48 symmetries (CH4-N2). In each case, the procedure accurately predicts an independent test set. Training this method with high-precision ab initio evaluations of the CO2-CO interaction enables a parameter-free, first-principles prediction of the CO2-CO cross virial coefficient that agrees very well with experiments.

  10. New window on primordial non-gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2012-07-13

    We know very little about primordial curvature perturbations on scales smaller than about a Mpc. Measurements of the μ distortion of the cosmic microwave background spectrum provide the unique opportunity to probe these scales over the unexplored range from 50 to 10(4)  Mpc(-1). This is a very clean probe, in that it relies only on well understood linear evolution. Also, just the information about the low multipoles (l∼100) of μ is necessary. We point out that correlations between μ distortion and temperature anisotropies can be used to test gaussianity at these very small scales. In particular the μT two-point correlation is proportional to the very squeezed limit of the primordial bispectrum and hence measures f(NL)(loc), while μμ is proportional to the primordial trispectrum and measures τ(NL). We present a Fisher matrix forecast of the observational constraints on f(NL)(loc) and stress that a cosmic variance limited experiment could in principle reach Δf(NL)(loc)∼O(10(-3)).

  11. Stochastic resonance in Gaussian quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Wilde, Mark M.

    2013-02-01

    We determine conditions for the presence of stochastic resonance in a lossy bosonic channel with a nonlinear, threshold decoding. The stochastic resonance effect occurs if and only if the detection threshold is outside of a ‘forbidden interval’. We show that it takes place in different settings: when transmitting classical messages through a lossy bosonic channel, when transmitting over an entanglement-assisted lossy bosonic channel and when discriminating channels with different loss parameters. Moreover, we consider a setting in which stochastic resonance occurs in the transmission of a qubit over a lossy bosonic channel with a particular encoding and decoding. In all cases, we assume the addition of Gaussian noise to the signal and show that it does not matter who, between sender and receiver, introduces such a noise. Remarkably, different results are obtained when considering a setting for private communication. In this case, the symmetry between sender and receiver is broken and the ‘forbidden interval’ may vanish, leading to the occurrence of stochastic resonance effects for any value of the detection threshold.

  12. Anomalous dimensions and non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel; Lewandowski, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo; Silverstein, Eva; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the signatures of inflationary models that are coupled to interacting field theories, a basic class of multifield models also motivated by their role in providing dynamically small scales. Near the squeezed limit of the bispectrum, we find a simple scaling behavior determined by operator dimensions, which are constrained by the appropriate unitarity bounds. Specifically, we analyze two simple and calculable classes of examples: conformal field theories (CFTs), and large-N CFTs deformed by relevant time-dependent double-trace operators. Together these two classes of examples exhibit a wide range of scalings and shapes of the bispectrum, including nearly equilateral, orthogonal and local non-Gaussianity in different regimes. Along the way, we compare and contrast the shape and amplitude with previous results on weakly coupled fields coupled to inflation. This signature provides a precision test for strongly coupled sectors coupled to inflation via irrelevant operators suppressed by a high mass scale up to ~ 103 times the inflationary Hubble scale.

  13. Evaluation of non‐Gaussian diffusion in cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    McClymont, Darryl; Teh, Irvin; Carruth, Eric; Omens, Jeffrey; McCulloch, Andrew; Whittington, Hannah J.; Kohl, Peter; Grau, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The diffusion tensor model assumes Gaussian diffusion and is widely applied in cardiac diffusion MRI. However, diffusion in biological tissue deviates from a Gaussian profile as a result of hindrance and restriction from cell and tissue microstructure, and may be quantified better by non‐Gaussian modeling. The aim of this study was to investigate non‐Gaussian diffusion in healthy and hypertrophic hearts. Methods Thirteen rat hearts (five healthy, four sham, four hypertrophic) were imaged ex vivo. Diffusion‐weighted images were acquired at b‐values up to 10,000 s/mm2. Models of diffusion were fit to the data and ranked based on the Akaike information criterion. Results The diffusion tensor was ranked best at b‐values up to 2000 s/mm2 but reflected the signal poorly in the high b‐value regime, in which the best model was a non‐Gaussian “beta distribution” model. Although there was considerable overlap in apparent diffusivities between the healthy, sham, and hypertrophic hearts, diffusion kurtosis and skewness in the hypertrophic hearts were more than 20% higher in the sheetlet and sheetlet‐normal directions. Conclusion Non‐Gaussian diffusion models have a higher sensitivity for the detection of hypertrophy compared with the Gaussian model. In particular, diffusion kurtosis may serve as a useful biomarker for characterization of disease and remodeling in the heart. Magn Reson Med 78:1174–1186, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:27670633

  14. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  15. Sample variance of non-Gaussian sky distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaochun

    1995-02-01

    Non-Gaussian distributions of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anistropics have been proposed to reconcile the discrepancies between different experiments at half-degree scales (Coulson et al. 1994). Each experiment probes a different part of the sky, furthermore, sky coverage is very small, hence the sample variance of each experiment can be large, especially when the sky signal is non-Gaussian. We model the degree-scale CMB sky as a chin exp 2 field with n-degress of freedom and show that the sample variance is enhanced over that a Gaussian distribution by a factor of (n + 6)/n. The sample variance for different experiments are calculated, both for Gaussian and non-Gaussian distributions. We also show that if the distribution is highly non-Gaussian (n less than or approximately = 4) at half-degree scales, than the non-Gaussian signature of the CMB could be detected in the FIRS map, though probably not in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) map.

  16. Recovering dark-matter clustering from galaxies with Gaussianization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, Nuala; Neyrinck, Mark; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The Gaussianization transform has been proposed as a method to remove the issues of scale-dependent galaxy bias and non-linearity from galaxy clustering statistics, but these benefits have yet to be thoroughly tested for realistic galaxy samples. In this paper, we test the effectiveness of the Gaussianization transform for different galaxy types by applying it to realistic simulated blue and red galaxy samples. We show that in real space, the shapes of the Gaussianized power spectra of both red and blue galaxies agree with that of the underlying dark matter, with the initial power spectrum, and with each other to smaller scales than do the statistics of the usual (untransformed) density field. However, we find that the agreement in the Gaussianized statistics breaks down in redshift space. We attribute this to the fact that red and blue galaxies exhibit very different fingers of god in redshift space. After applying a finger-of-god compression, the agreement on small scales between the Gaussianized power spectra is restored. We also compare the Gaussianization transform to the clipped galaxy density field and find that while both methods are effective in real space, they have more complicated behaviour in redshift space. Overall, we find that Gaussianization can be useful in recovering the shape of the underlying dark-matter power spectrum to k ˜ 0.5 h Mpc-1 and of the initial power spectrum to k ˜ 0.4 h Mpc-1 in certain cases at z = 0.

  17. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-04-28

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O(N) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O(N(2)) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O(N) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant.

  18. Gaussian quantum computation with oracle-decision problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Mark R. A.; Høyer, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.

    2013-04-01

    We study a simple-harmonic-oscillator quantum computer solving oracle decision problems. We show that such computers can perform better by using nonorthogonal Gaussian wave functions rather than orthogonal top-hat wave functions as input to the information encoding process. Using the Deutsch-Jozsa problem as an example, we demonstrate that Gaussian modulation with optimized width parameter results in a lower error rate than for the top-hat encoding. We conclude that Gaussian modulation can allow for an improved trade-off between encoding, processing and measurement of the information.

  19. Gaussian entanglement generation from coherence using beam-splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong-Xiao; Wang, Shuhao; Ma, Teng; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-11-01

    The generation and quantification of quantum entanglement is crucial for quantum information processing. Here we study the transition of Gaussian correlation under the effect of linear optical beam-splitters. We find the single-mode Gaussian coherence acts as the resource in generating Gaussian entanglement for two squeezed states as the input states. With the help of consecutive beam-splitters, single-mode coherence and quantum entanglement can be converted to each other. Our results reveal that by using finite number of beam-splitters, it is possible to extract all the entanglement from the single-mode coherence even if the entanglement is wiped out before each beam-splitter.

  20. Controllable gaussian-qubit interface for extremal quantum state engineering.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Campbell, Steve; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Paternostro, Mauro

    2010-06-18

    We study state engineering through bilinear interactions between two remote qubits and two-mode gaussian light fields. The attainable two-qubit states span the entire physically allowed region in the entanglement-versus-global-purity plane. Two-mode gaussian states with maximal entanglement at fixed global and marginal entropies produce maximally entangled two-qubit states in the corresponding entropic diagram. We show that a small set of parameters characterizing extremally entangled two-mode gaussian states is sufficient to control the engineering of extremally entangled two-qubit states, which can be realized in realistic matter-light scenarios.