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Sample records for gazprom ma europu

  1. Politics or profits? Gazprom, the Kremlin, and Russian energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinn, Eric S.

    This paper adds to the ongoing discussion of Gazprom's role in Russia by placing the debate around Gazprom within the broader contexts of both the increasing prevalence of national oil companies in the world and the changing natural gas landscape. It assesses how the interplay between politics and profits has affected the way Gazprom can adapt to a rapidly changing world natural gas environment and how both the Kremlin and Gazprom are adjusting---or failing to adjust---their strategies accordingly. It concludes that Gazprom and the Kremlin are both adjusting to changes in the world natural gas environment, but they are doing so in their own ways, but given the affects the actions of one has on the other, the pace of adaptation is slower than what we might see with an entirely independent firm. The paper begins with a discussion of the tradeoffs inherent in Gazprom's relationship with the Kremlin. It identifies various factors at work politically that prevent Gazprom from profiting in the domestic economy. Primary among these factors are entrenched rent-seeking interests and philosophies about natural resources, as well as geopolitical interests. The paper identifies the 2006 and 2009 gas disputes with Ukraine as evidence of Kremlin interference in Gazprom's commercial activities and concrete examples of the boundaries between these two entities as well as the seeming blurring of these boundaries. The paper then moves into a discussion of increased volatility and risk in Gazprom's primary export market, Europe. The systemic context of a discussion of Gazprom today must include factors such as increased supply options for Europe that make natural gas a more fungible commodity than in the past and new legislation aimed at promoting energy independence via the development of a competitive natural gas market. This new context threatens Gazprom's ability to mitigate price risk in its export market, which in turn makes providing for the domestic market through gas rents

  2. Gazprom Market for energy installations using fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galitskiy, Yu.V.

    1996-04-01

    The Gazprom RAO [Russian joint-stock company] is a major industrial and financial complex whose job is to provide gas for the national economy of Russia, as well as to supply it under international and intergovernmental agreements. The existing capacity of its production structures and high level of scientific potential allow Gazprom to forecast the future with confidence.

  3. The delicate balance: Gazprom and Russia's competing and complementary roles in 21st century international relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, David

    Since the fall of the Soviet Union, many have accused Russia of using its energy monopoly Gazprom as a foreign policy tool in Europe. Those who believe this point to three gas disputes between Russia and Ukraine, which they see as punishment for Ukraine's democratic reforms. However, this argument fails to consider Gazprom's actions in terms of its goals of a corporation. This paper shows, through qualitative research and interviews, that Gazprom has goals independent of Russian foreign policy objectives, and that the company has embraced corporate values at a time when Russia is moving away from western liberal ideals.

  4. Gazprom and Russia: The economic rationality of Russian foreign energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloudis, Stergos Carl Thornton

    Charges of imperialism underpinned by coercive economic tactics are some of the accusations leveled against Vladimir Putin's foreign energy policy during his presidential tenure. However, after the traditional policies of coercion failed to secure Russian interests in Europe during the 1990's, this dissertation argues Putin adopted a radically different approach upon his rise to the Presidency. Driven by public demand to continue the domestic subsidization of natural gas and realizing that the chief avenue for securing revenue was in gas sales to Europe, this project suggests that Putin developed a new foreign energy policy approach meant to secure Russian interests. This transformation was accomplished by the Presidential Administration's efforts during Putin's tenure to bring the Russian natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, under its control. Dubbed Persuasive Politics, this paradigm suggests that the foreign energy policies of the Presidential Administration and Gazprom during Putin's tenure were underpinned by the rational economic argument that the only route to Russian resurgence in the medium term was through profitable economic relations with the European states. To test this theoretical approach the author employs a case study analysis of Russian relations with the European Union member state Greece as well as the non-EU state of Ukraine. The intent is to identify how a mutually beneficial relationship was constructed to persuade both governments through the utilization of economic inducements that cooperation with Russia in the natural gas sphere was in their own best interest.

  5. [Evaluating efficiency of combined vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal infection in workers of "Gazprom transgaz Yekaterinburg" company].

    PubMed

    Lugovskaia, N A; Bushueva, L E; Tulupova, L G; Kholopov, I O

    2014-01-01

    Influenza-like diseases are among the causes of disability. Risk of these diseases is increased with other occupational hazards. The study covered efficiency of combined vaccination against influenza (annually, over 2 years, with inactivated split-vaccine Vaxigrip) and pneumococcal infection (single, with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine Pneumo 23) in 318 workers of Neviansk branch of "Gazprom transgaz Yekaterinburg" company. Among them, 49 workers (welders and joiners) were exposed to occupational hazards. Findings are that general frequency of such diseases decreased by 17% over the first year after the vaccination and by 27% over the second year, and in welders and joiners group--by 33% and 44% respectively. The authors proved economic efficiency of combined vaccination with Vaxigrip and Pneumo 23.

  6. [MaRS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aruljothi, Arunvenkatesh

    2016-01-01

    The Space Exploration Division of the Safety and Mission Assurances Directorate is responsible for reducing the risk to Human Space Flight Programs by providing system safety, reliability, and risk analysis. The Risk & Reliability Analysis branch plays a part in this by utilizing Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) tools to identify possible types of failure and effective solutions. A continuous effort of this branch is MaRS, or Mass and Reliability System, a tool that was the focus of this internship. Future long duration space missions will have to find a balance between the mass and reliability of their spare parts. They will be unable take spares of everything and will have to determine what is most likely to require maintenance and spares. Currently there is no database that combines mass and reliability data of low level space-grade components. MaRS aims to be the first database to do this. The data in MaRS will be based on the hardware flown on the International Space Stations (ISS). The components on the ISS have a long history and are well documented, making them the perfect source. Currently, MaRS is a functioning excel workbook database; the backend is complete and only requires optimization. MaRS has been populated with all the assemblies and their components that are used on the ISS; the failures of these components are updated regularly. This project was a continuation on the efforts of previous intern groups. Once complete, R&M engineers working on future space flight missions will be able to quickly access failure and mass data on assemblies and components, allowing them to make important decisions and tradeoffs.

  7. Ma'adim Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Color image of Ma'adim Vallis region of Mars; north toward top. Image shows the 600-km-long channel that drained into impact crater Gusev. Crater Gusev is about 160 km in diameter. This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 13 degrees S. to 29 degrees S. and from longitude 180 degrees to 188 degrees; Mercator projection. Ma'adim Vallis is cut into the degraded highlands of Mars and has morphologic characteristics of terrestrial river beds, including the well-developed dentritic tributaries that constitute an integrated river system. However, the junction angles between tributaries commonly show a wide variation, which gives the channel system a more random directional pattern than typical terrestrial drainage networks. Topographic contours suggest a large drainage basin once existed for this channel. Gradients for the channel are high, about 0.007, over the central 300 km of its length; this is about two times that of the upper 450 km of the Colorado River. In places, some tributaries are discontinuous, perhaps indicating burial by more recent material. After the channel breaches Gusev it appears to end within the crater. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flow percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  8. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs and... qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive program are required to identify... qualifying MA EPs or potentially qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive...

  9. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs and... qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive program are required to identify... qualifying MA EPs or potentially qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the MA EHR incentive...

  10. Discovery and utilization of sorghum genes (Ma5/Ma6)

    DOEpatents

    Mullet, John E; Rooney, William L; Klein, Patricia E; Morishige, Daryl; Murphy, Rebecca; Brady, Jeff A

    2012-11-13

    Methods and composition for the production of non-flowering or late flowering sorghum hybrid. For example, in certain aspects methods for use of molecular markers that constitute the Ma5/Ma6 pathway to modulate photoperiod sensitivity are described. The invention allows the production of plants having improved productivity and biomass generation.

  11. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  12. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals. 495.202 Section 495.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE.... (4) Beginning with bids due in June 2014 (for plan year 2015), all MA organizations with potentially...

  13. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for qualifying MA-EPs and qualifying MA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitals for which such qualifying organizations received incentive payments were meaningful EHR users in... of EHR incentive payment due the MA organization. (c) Amount payable to qualifying MA organization... for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program...

  14. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for qualifying MA-EPs and qualifying MA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitals for which such qualifying organizations received incentive payments were meaningful EHR users in... of EHR incentive payment due the MA organization. (c) Amount payable to qualifying MA organization... for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program...

  15. Anti-Ma and anti-Ma2-associated paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ortega Suero, G; Sola-Valls, N; Escudero, D; Saiz, A; Graus, F

    2016-07-25

    Analyse the clinical profile, associated tumour types, and response to treatment of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes associated with antibodies against Ma proteins. A retrospective study of patients with antibodies against Ma proteins identified in a neuroimmunology laboratory of reference. Of the 32 patients identified, 20 showed reactivity against Ma2 only (anti-Ma2 antibodies), 11 against Ma1 and Ma2 (anti-Ma antibodies), and 1 with reactivity against Ma1 only (anti-Ma1 antibodies). The most common clinical presentations were limbic encephalopathy, diencephalic dysfunction, or brainstem encephalopathy, frequently appearing as a combination of these features. Three patients had isolated cerebellar dysfunction with anti-Ma antibodies, and 2 exhibited peripheral nervous system syndrome with anti-Ma2 antibodies. Testicular tumours were the most common neoplasms (40%) in the anti-Ma2 cases. In the group associated with anti-Ma1 antibodies, the most common were lung tumours (36%), followed by testicular tumours. All idiopathic cases were reactive to Ma2. The clinical outcome was significantly better in the anti-Ma2 group. The patient with anti-Ma1 presented with limbic encephalitis and brainstem dysfunction associated with lymphoepithelioma of the bladder. Specifically determining the different reactivities of anti-Ma protein antibodies in order to differentiate between Ma1 and Ma2 antibodies is important because anti-Ma2-associated paraneoplastic syndromes have a better outcome. Lastly, this study is the first to confirm that there may be cases that react exclusively to antibodies against Ma1. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrophoresis technology experiment MA-011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. E.; Barlow, G. H.; Bier, M.; Bigazzi, P. E.; Knox, R. J.; Micale, F. J.; Seaman, G. V. F.; Vanderhoff, J. W.; Vanoss, C. J.; Patterson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Experiment MA-011, electrophoresis technology, was designed to test electrophoresis hardware that would continue the development of technology for electrophoretic separation of materials in the near zero g environment of space. The experimental hardware generally functioned as planned. Frozen live cells were successfully transported into space, electrophoretic processing was performed, and viable cells were returned to earth. A separation of the three types of fixed red blood cells (rabbit, human, and horse) was demonstrated. The human lymphocytes, however, showed no apparent migration. The separation of human kidney cells produced the most exciting data. Analysis shows electrophoretic separation throughout the entire column with at least four bands of viable cells. The isotachophoresis experiment definitely demonstrated the isotachophoretic separation of biological cells in a near zero g environment.

  17. 33 CFR 80.135 - Hull, MA to Race Point, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.135 Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. (a... position latitude 42°16.7′ N., longitude 70°52.6′ W., to Race Point on Cape Cod. (b) A line drawn from...

  18. 33 CFR 80.135 - Hull, MA to Race Point, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.135 Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. (a... position latitude 42°16.7′ N., longitude 70°52.6′ W., to Race Point on Cape Cod. (b) A line drawn from...

  19. 33 CFR 80.135 - Hull, MA to Race Point, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.135 Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. (a... position latitude 42°16.7′ N., longitude 70°52.6′ W., to Race Point on Cape Cod. (b) A line drawn from...

  20. 33 CFR 80.135 - Hull, MA to Race Point, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.135 Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. (a... position latitude 42°16.7′ N., longitude 70°52.6′ W., to Race Point on Cape Cod. (b) A line drawn from...

  1. 33 CFR 80.135 - Hull, MA to Race Point, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.135 Hull, MA to Race Point, MA. (a... position latitude 42°16.7′ N., longitude 70°52.6′ W., to Race Point on Cape Cod. (b) A line drawn from...

  2. Software Aspects of PuMa-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppusamy, R.; Stappers, B.; Stappers, B.

    2006-08-01

    The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) is a state of the art pulsar machine-installed at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), in December 2005. PuMa-II is a flexible instrument and is designed around an ensemble of 44 high-performance computers running the Linux operating system. Much of the flexibility of PuMa-II comes from the software that is being developed for this instrument. The radio signals reaching the telescope undergo several stages of electronic and software processing before a scientifically useful data product is generated. The electronic processing of signals includes the usual RF to IF conversion, analogue to digital conversion and telescope dependent electronic digital delay compensation that happen in the signal chain of WSRT. Within PuMa-II, this data is acquired, stored and suitably processed. In this poster we present various aspects of PuMa-II software and illustrate its pulsar signal processing capabilities.

  3. 33 CFR 80.125 - Marblehead Neck, MA to Nahant, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marblehead Neck, MA to Nahant, MA. 80.125 Section 80.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.125 Marblehead Neck, MA to...

  4. 33 CFR 80.120 - Cape Ann, MA to Marblehead Neck, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Ann, MA to Marblehead Neck, MA. 80.120 Section 80.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.120 Cape Ann, MA...

  5. PuMa, a digital Pulsar Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voûte, J. L. L.; Kouwenhoven, M. L. A.; van Haren, P. C.; Langerak, J. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Driesens, D.; Ramachandran, R.; Beijaard, Th. D.

    2002-04-01

    We have designed and constructed PuMa, a pulsar machine that has both a baseband recording and a digital filterbank mode. Its design is based on the use of digital signal processors (DSPs). Their operation is controlled by software, which makes PuMa reconfigurable, flexible and easy to operate. The maximum number of channels in the digital filterbank mode is 32 768 over a bandwidth of 80 MHz. This makes PuMa suitable for pulsar observations at low sky frequencies. The maximum bandwidth in baseband recording mode is two times 10 MHz. The machine was installed at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in The Netherlands in 1998. We discuss in some detail PuMa's technical properties and capabilities. Recent observations, a sample of which are presented here, demonstrate its capabilities and that it is performing up to its specifications.

  6. S&MA Requirements Tool (SMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulpa, Vyga

    2004-01-01

    In FY03 QS10 began building an S&MA web based data management tool,"Safety & Mission Assurance Requirements Tool" (SMART) that identifies S&MA requirements, tailors requirements to IAW project/program categories, tracks implementation, and provides a template for developing requirements and tracking waivers. This report provides a SMART process flow, typical application, typical data requirement deliverables, progress in 03, and FY04 activities.

  7. Antiasthmatic Effects of Herbal Complex MA and Its Fermented Product MA128

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Seon; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Yang, Min Cheol; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if oral administration of the novel herbal medicine, MA, and its Lactobacillus acidophilus fermented product, MA128, have therapeutic properties for the treatment of asthma. Asthma was induced in BALB/c mice by systemic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by intratracheal, intraperitoneal, and aerosol allergen challenges. MA and MA128 were orally administered 6 times a week for 4 weeks. At 1 day after the last ovalbumin exposure, airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed and samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung cells, and serum were collected for further analysis. We investigated the effect of MA and MA128 on airway hyperresponsiveness, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, various immune cell phenotypes, Th2 cytokine production, OVA-specific IgE production, and Th1/Th2 cytokine production in this mouse model of asthma. In BALB/c mice, we found that MA and MA128 treatment suppressed eosinophil infiltration into airways and blood, allergic airway inflammation and AHR by suppressing the production of IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, Eotaxin, and OVA-specific IgE, by upregulating the production of OVA-specific Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ), and by downregulating OVA-specific Th2 cytokine (IL-4) in the culture supernatant of spleen cells. The effectiveness of MA was increased by fermentation with Lactobacillus acidophilus. PMID:22203879

  8. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to Medicare... fact that they meet the definition of HMO in 42 U.S.C. 300gg-91(b)(3)—section 2791(b)(3) of the PHS Act...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs and...

  9. 42 CFR 495.202 - Identification of qualifying MA organizations, MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to Medicare... fact that they meet the definition of HMO in 42 U.S.C. 300gg-91(b)(3)—section 2791(b)(3) of the PHS Act...) are not meaningful users of certified EHR technology. (b) Identification of qualifying MA EPs and...

  10. MaRIE Undulator & XFEL Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-03-23

    The 22 slides in this presentation treat the subject under the following headings: MaRIE XFEL Performance Parameters, Input Electron Beam Parameters, Undulator Design, Genesis Simulations, Risks, and Summary It is concluded that time-dependent Genesis simulations show the MaRIE XFEL can deliver the number of photons within the required bandwidth, provided a number of assumptions are met; the highest risks are associated with the electron beam driving the XFEL undulator; and risks associated with the undulator and/or distributed seeding technique may be evaluated or retired by performing early validation experiments.

  11. 75 FR 3764 - Massachusetts Disaster # MA-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 01/15/2010. Incident: Mystic Side Estates Apartment Building Fire. Incident Period: 01/09.... Contiguous Counties: Massachusetts: Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk, Worcester. New Hampshire: Hillsborough. The...

  12. 75 FR 22874 - Massachusetts Disaster # MA-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the State of Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 04/22/2010. Incident: Severe storms and flooding...

  13. 76 FR 65557 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00043

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00043 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 10/13/2011. ] Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 10/04/2011. Effective...: Massachusetts Middlesex, Suffolk. New Hampshire: Hillsborough, Rockingham. The Interest Rates are: Percent For...

  14. 76 FR 36952 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the State of Massachusetts (FEMA--1994--DR), dated 06/15/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and...

  15. 76 FR 40766 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 06/29/2011. Incident: Johnsonia Apartment Building Fire Incident Period: 06/13/2011...: Massachusetts: Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk. Connecticut: Tolland, Windham. New Hampshire...

  16. 77 FR 76584 - Massachusetts Disaster # MA-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ...] Massachusetts Disaster MA-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts dated 12/12... Counties: Massachusetts: Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk. Connecticut: Tolland, Windham...

  17. 76 FR 36953 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts (FEMA--1994--DR), dated 06/15/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 06/01...): Massachusetts: Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire, Middlesex, Norfolk. Connecticut: Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland...

  18. 76 FR 13697 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the State of Massachusetts (FEMA--1959--DR), dated 03/07/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  19. 75 FR 79064 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00030 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 12/07/2010. Incident: Apartment complex fire. Incident Period: 11/21/2010. Effective Date...: Massachusetts: Berkshire, Hampshire, Worcester. Connecticut: Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland. The Interest Rates...

  20. 75 FR 45681 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00028.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00028. AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... MASSACHUSETTS dated 07/27/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 07/10/2010. DATES...: Massachusetts: Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk, Worcester. New Hampshire: Hillsborough. The Interest Rates are: Percent...

  1. 77 FR 12350 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00047

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00047 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 02/21/2012. Incident: Brookline Apartment Building Fire. Incident Period: 01/16/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Norfolk. Contiguous Counties: Massachusetts: Bristol...

  2. 77 FR 33263 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 05/29/2012. Incident: Lake Williams Condominium Complex Fire. Incident Period: 04/23/2012... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Middlesex. Contiguous Counties: Massachusetts: Essex...

  3. 76 FR 56853 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (FEMA-4028-DR), dated 09/03/2011. Incident: Tropical Storm Irene...

  4. 75 FR 17177 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 03/29/ 2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 03/12..., Plymouth, Suffolk, Worcester. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Massachusetts: Barnstable...

  5. 76 FR 56859 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00039

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts (FEMA-4028-DR), dated 09/03/2011. Incident: Tropical Storm Irene. Incident Period: 08/27/2011...: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Massachusetts: Hampden, Hampshire, Worcester. Connecticut: Litchfield. New...

  6. 76 FR 30748 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00033 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 05/19/2011. Incident: Apartment Building Fire. Incident Period: 04/30/2011. Effective Date...: Massachusetts: Berkshire, Hampshire, Worcester. Connecticut: Hartford, Litchfield, Tolland. The Interest Rates...

  7. 77 FR 2600 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the State of Massachusetts (FEMA-4051-DR), dated 01/06/2012. Incident: Severe Storm and Snowstorm...

  8. 77 FR 66214 - Massachusetts Disaster # MA-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... Massachusetts dated 10/22/2012. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident Period: 09/05/2012. Effective... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Bristol. Contiguous Counties: Massachusetts: Norfolk...

  9. 78 FR 25336 - Massachusetts Disaster #MA-00054

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster MA-00054 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...: 01/21/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  10. Ma'adim Vallis From the Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a still from an animation showing the geography of Ma'adim Vallis, a valley or channel that enters Gusev Crater. The view of the crater is from the northwest, which is not the direction from which Spirit approached the crater as it landed.

  11. Teacher MA Attainment Rates, 1970-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, S. Eric

    2010-01-01

    The share of female teachers in the U.S. with an MA more than doubled between 1970 and 2000. This increase is puzzling, as it is much larger than that of other college-educated women, and it occurred over a period of declining teacher aptitude. I estimate the contribution of changes in teacher demographic characteristics, increases in the returns…

  12. Ma'adim Vallis From the Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a still from an animation showing the geography of Ma'adim Vallis, a valley or channel that enters Gusev Crater. The view of the crater is from the northwest, which is not the direction from which Spirit approached the crater as it landed.

  13. Fabrication technology for ODS Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; MM Paxton; WF Brown

    2000-03-16

    A successful fabrication schedule has been developed at Carpenter Technology Corporation for the production of MA957 fuel and blanket cladding. Difficulties with gun drilling, plug drawing and recrystallization were overcome to produce a pilot lot of tubing. This report documents the fabrication efforts of two qualified vendors and the support studies performed at WHC to develop the fabrication-schedule.

  14. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes

  15. Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design.

    PubMed

    Freidlin, Boris; Korn, Edward L; Gray, Robert

    2014-02-01

    New targeted anticancer therapies often benefit only a subset of patients with a given cancer. Definitive evaluation of these agents may require phase III randomized clinical trial designs that integrate evaluation of the new treatment and the predictive ability of the biomarker that putatively determines the sensitive subset. We propose a new integrated biomarker design, the Marker Sequential Test (MaST) design, that allows sequential testing of the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups and overall population while controlling the relevant type I error rates. After defining the testing and error framework for integrated biomarker designs, we review the commonly used approaches to integrated biomarker testing. We then present a general form of the MaST design and describe how it can be used to provide proper control of false-positive error rates for biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups. The operating characteristics of the MaST design are compared by analytical methods and simulations to the sequential subgroup-specific design that sequentially assesses the treatment effect in the biomarker subgroups. Practical aspects of MaST design implementation are discussed. The MaST design is shown to have higher power relative to the sequential subgroup-specific design in situations where the treatment effect is homogeneous across biomarker subgroups, while preserving the power for settings where treatment benefit is limited to biomarker-positive subgroup. For example, in the time-to-event setting considered with 30% biomarker-positive prevalence, the MaST design provides up to a 30% increase in power in the biomarker-positive and biomarker-negative subgroups when the treatment benefits all patients equally, while sustaining less than a 2% loss of power against alternatives where the benefit is limited to the biomarker-positive subgroup. The proposed design is appropriate for settings where it is reasonable to assume that the treatment will not be

  16. MaJAZ1 Attenuates the MaLBD5-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of Jasmonate Biosynthesis Gene MaAOC2 in Regulating Cold Tolerance of Banana Fruit.

    PubMed

    Ba, Liang-jie; Kuang, Jian-fei; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-02-03

    Previous studies indicated that methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment could effectively reduce the chilling injury of many fruits, including banana, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, one lateral organ boundaries (LOB) domain (LBD) gene, designated as MaLBD5, was isolated and characterized from banana fruit. Expression analysis revealed that accumulation of MaLBD5 was induced by cold temperature and MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that MaLBD5 was localized to the nucleus and possessed transcriptional activation activity. Protein-protein interaction analysis demonstrated that MaLBD5 physically interacted with MaJAZ1, a potential repressor of jasmonate signaling. Furthermore, transient expression assays indicated that MaLBD5 transactivated a jasmonate biosynthesis gene, termed MaAOC2, which was also induced by cold and MeJA. More interestingly, MaJAZ1 attenuated the MaLBD5-mediated transactivation of MaAOC2. These results suggest that MaLBD5 and MaJAZ1 might act antagonistically in relation to MeJA-induced cold tolerance of banana fruit, at least partially via affecting jasmonate biosynthesis. Collectively, our findings expand the knowledge of the transcriptional regulatory network of MeJA-mediated cold tolerance of banana fruit.

  17. Mass and Reliability System (MaRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate is responsible for mitigating risk, providing system safety, and lowering risk for space programs from ground to space. The S&MA is divided into 4 divisions: The Space Exploration Division (NC), the International Space Station Division (NE), the Safety & Test Operations Division (NS), and the Quality and Flight Equipment Division (NT). The interns, myself and Arun Aruljothi, will be working with the Risk & Reliability Analysis Branch under the NC Division's. The mission of this division is to identify, characterize, diminish, and communicate risk by implementing an efficient and effective assurance model. The team utilizes Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to ensure decisions concerning risks are informed, vehicles are safe and reliable, and program/project requirements are realistic and realized. This project pertains to the Orion mission, so it is geared toward a long duration Human Space Flight Program(s). For space missions, payload is a critical concept; balancing what hardware can be replaced by components verse by Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) or subassemblies is key. For this effort a database was created that combines mass and reliability data, called Mass and Reliability System or MaRS. The U.S. International Space Station (ISS) components are used as reference parts in the MaRS database. Using ISS components as a platform is beneficial because of the historical context and the environment similarities to a space flight mission. MaRS uses a combination of systems: International Space Station PART for failure data, Vehicle Master Database (VMDB) for ORU & components, Maintenance & Analysis Data Set (MADS) for operation hours and other pertinent data, & Hardware History Retrieval System (HHRS) for unit weights. MaRS is populated using a Visual Basic Application. Once populated, the excel spreadsheet is comprised of information on ISS components including

  18. Vaccines against stimulants: cocaine and MA

    PubMed Central

    Kosten, Thomas; Domingo, Coreen; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma

    2014-01-01

    While the worldwide prevalence of cocaine use remains significant, medications, or small molecule approaches, to treat drug addictions have met with limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, on the other hand, have demonstrated great potential for treating drug abuse using a distinctly different mechanism of eliciting an antibody response that blocks the pharmacological effects of drugs. We provide a review of vaccine-based approaches to treating stimulant addictions; specifically and cocaine addictions. This selective review article focuses on the one cocaine vaccine that has been into clinical trials and presents new data related to pre-clinical development of a methamphetamine (MA) vaccine. We also review the mechanism of action for vaccine induced antibodies to abused drugs, which involves kinetic slowing of brain entry as well as simple blocking properties. We present pre-clinical innovations for MA vaccines including hapten design, linkage to carrier proteins and new adjuvants beyond alum. We provide some new information on hapten structures and linkers and variations in protein carriers. We consider a carrier, outer membrance polysaccharide coat protein (OMPC), that provides some self-adjuvant through lipopolysaccharide components and provide new results with a monophosopholipid adjuvant for the more standard carrier proteins with cocaine and MA. The review then covers the clinical trials with the cocaine vaccine TA-CD. The clinical prospects for advances in this field over the next few years include a multi-site cocaine vaccine clinical trial to be reported in 2013 and phase 1 clinical trials of a MA vaccine in 2014. PMID:23509915

  19. Vaccines against stimulants: cocaine and MA.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Thomas; Domingo, Coreen; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma

    2014-02-01

    While the worldwide prevalence of cocaine use remains significant, medications, or small molecule approaches, to treat drug addictions have met with limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, on the other hand, have demonstrated great potential for treating drug abuse using a distinctly different mechanism of eliciting an antibody response that blocks the pharmacological effects of drugs. We provide a review of vaccine-based approaches to treating stimulant addictions; specifically and cocaine addictions. This selective review article focuses on the one cocaine vaccine that has been into clinical trials and presents new data related to pre-clinical development of a methamphetamine (MA) vaccine. We also review the mechanism of action for vaccine induced antibodies to abused drugs, which involves kinetic slowing of brain entry as well as simple blocking properties. We present pre-clinical innovations for MA vaccines including hapten design, linkage to carrier proteins and new adjuvants beyond alum. We provide some new information on hapten structures and linkers and variations in protein carriers. We consider a carrier, outer membrance polysaccharide coat protein (OMPC), that provides some self-adjuvant through lipopolysaccharide components and provide new results with a monophosopholipid adjuvant for the more standard carrier proteins with cocaine and MA. The review then covers the clinical trials with the cocaine vaccine TA-CD. The clinical prospects for advances in this field over the next few years include a multi-site cocaine vaccine clinical trial to be reported in 2013 and phase 1 clinical trials of a MA vaccine in 2014. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-2 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-02-21

    S61-01226 (21 Feb. 1961) --- Launch of the unmanned Mercury-Atlas 2 (MA-2) vehicle for a suborbital test flight of the Mercury capsule. The upper part of Atlas is stengthened by an eight-inch wide stainless steel band. The capsule was recovered less than one hour after launch. The altitude was 108 miles. Speed was 13,000 mph. Recovered 1,425 miles downrange. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Boston, MA and New England Coastline

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-05-381 (22 June 1973) --- Boston, MA and the New England Coastline (43.5N, 84.0W) can be seen in this view. The typical rugged rocky coast of Maine is the result of heavy glacial action producing the rocky cliffs, jagged spurs of land and islands that characterize Main's Atlantic Coast. During the last Ice Age, extensive sediments were laid down producing a landscape of rolling hills with rocky outcrops. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Earth-Moon Impacts at 300 Ma and 500 Ma Ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Barra, F.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Spudis, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    Impact events have played an important role in the evolution of planets and small bodies in the Solar System. Meteorites, lunar melt rocks, and lunar impact glasses provide important information about the geology of the parent body and the age of the impacting episodes. Over 2400 impact glasses from 4 Apollo regolith samples have been geochemically analyzed and a subset has been dated by the (40)Ar/(39)Ar method. New results, consistent with 2 break-ups in the Asteroid Belt, are presented here. Our previous study reported that (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages from 9 impact glasses showed that the Moon experienced significant impacts at approx. 800 Ma and at approx. 3800 Ma ago, somewhere in the vicinity of the Apollo 16 landing site. Additionally, reported on Apollo 12 samples with ages around 800 Ma, together implying global bombardment events. New data on 7 glasses from regolith sample 66041,127 show that the Moon also experienced impact events at approx. 300 Ma and > 500 Ma ago, which may coincide with the break-ups in the Asteroid Belt of the L- and H-chrondrite parent bodies. Since meteoritic evidence for these breakups has been found on Earth, it follows that evidence should be found in lunar samples as well. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  3. Indus River above Hyderabad photographed during MA-9 flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    S63-06455 (15-16 May 1963) --- Indus River above Hyderabad, photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit MA-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Exploring MaNGA's kinematic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Different galaxy formation processes leave different imprints on the gas and stellar kinematic patterns for a galaxy. With MaNGA, we now have after one year of observations an unprecedented sample of 1400 nearby galaxies for which we can study gas and stellar kinematics in much detail, based on integral-field spectroscopy. We are measuring kinematic quantities such as LambdaR (angular momentum) and their (possible) correlations with other galaxy properties such as mass, morphology and environment. By quantifying the kinematic (sub)structures in velocity and dispersion maps, we will construct a kinematic galaxy classification that can be linked to their formation processes.

  5. 1900-Ma ocean crust in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The oldest known occurrence in North America of an ophiolite, considered to be a piece of ancient ocean crust, has been reported in the Cape Smith Belt in northern Quebec, Canada.The recognition last summer of a key structural component of the characteristic ophiolite suite has buttressed confidence in the theory that the 1900-Ma fragments of an ocean basin were accreted to an early Proterozoic Canadian continent. The tectonic mixing of oceanic and continental crust is strong evidence for the operation of plate tectonics early in Earth's history.

  6. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  7. Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris William

    2015-03-30

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s proposed MaRIE facility is slated to introduce the world’s highest energy hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). As the light source for the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes experimental facility (MaRIE), the 42-keV XFEL, with bursts of x-ray pulses at gigahertz repetition for studying fast dynamical processes, will help accelerate discovery and design of the advanced materials needed to meet 21st-century national security and energy security challenges. Yet the science of free-electron lasers has a long and distinguished history at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), where for nearly four decades Los Alamos scientists have been performing research, design, development, and collaboration work in FEL science. The work at Los Alamos has evolved from low-gain amplifier and oscillator FEL development to highbrightness photoinjector development, and later, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) and high-gain amplifier FEL development.

  8. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2015-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a 'Color-Enhanced' sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  9. Characterization and expression profiles of MaACS and MaACO genes from mulberry (Morus alba L.)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-ying; Lü, Rui-hua; Li, Jun; Zhao, Ai-chun; Wang, Xi-ling; Diane, Umuhoza; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wang, Chuan-hong; Yu, Ya-sheng; Han, Shu-mei; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Mao-de

    2014-01-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) are encoded by multigene families and are involved in fruit ripening by catalyzing the production of ethylene throughout the development of fruit. However, there are no reports on ACS or ACO genes in mulberry, partly because of the limited molecular research background. In this study, we have obtained five ACS gene sequences and two ACO gene sequences from Morus Genome Database. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed that their amino acids are conserved compared with ACO proteins from other species. MaACS1 and MaACS2 are type I, MaACS3 and MaACS4 are type II, and MaACS5 is type III, with different C-terminal sequences. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) expression analysis showed that the transcripts of MaACS genes were strongly expressed in fruit, and more weakly in other tissues. The expression of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed different patterns in various mulberry tissues. MaACS and MaACO genes demonstrated two patterns throughout the development of mulberry fruit, and both of them were strongly up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon. PMID:25001221

  10. Characterization and expression profiles of MaACS and MaACO genes from mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-ying; Lü, Rui-hua; Li, Jun; Zhao, Ai-chun; Wang, Xi-ling; Diane, Umuhoza; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wang, Chuan-hong; Yu, Ya-sheng; Han, Shu-mei; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Mao-de

    2014-07-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) are encoded by multigene families and are involved in fruit ripening by catalyzing the production of ethylene throughout the development of fruit. However, there are no reports on ACS or ACO genes in mulberry, partly because of the limited molecular research background. In this study, we have obtained five ACS gene sequences and two ACO gene sequences from Morus Genome Database. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed that their amino acids are conserved compared with ACO proteins from other species. MaACS1 and MaACS2 are type I, MaACS3 and MaACS4 are type II, and MaACS5 is type III, with different C-terminal sequences. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) expression analysis showed that the transcripts of MaACS genes were strongly expressed in fruit, and more weakly in other tissues. The expression of MaACO1 and MaACO2 showed different patterns in various mulberry tissues. MaACS and MaACO genes demonstrated two patterns throughout the development of mulberry fruit, and both of them were strongly up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and ethephon.

  11. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  12. The 300 mA SRF ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-11-07

    Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) are important for a variety of applications, from high-power Free-Electron Lasers (FEL) to polarized-electron polarized-proton colliders. The ERL current is arguably the most important characteristic of ERLs for such applications. With that in mind, the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory embarked on the development of a 300 mA ERL to serve as an R and D test-bed for high-current ERL technologies. These include high-current, extremely well damped superconducting accelerating cavities, high-current superconducting laser-photocathode electron guns and high quantum-efficiency photocathodes. In this presentation I will cover these ERL related developments.

  13. Anthelmintic macrolactams from Nonomuraea turkmeniaca MA7364.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Sloan; Zink, Deborah L; Mohn, Kenneth; Powell, Joanne Staats; Brown, Christine M; Murphy, Terry; Grund, Alan; Genilloud, Olga; Salazar, Oscar; Thompson, Donald; Singh, Sheo B

    2007-08-01

    Two new macrolactams, 6-desmethyl-N-methylfluvirucin A1 (1) and N-methylfluvirucin A1 (2), have been isolated from the acetone extract of Nonomuraea turkmeniaca MA7364. These compounds were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation as part of our search for new anthelmintics. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by comparison of their NMR and MS data to those of previously reported fluvirucins and confirmed by 2D NMR. Compound 1 exhibited in vitro activity (EC(90) 15 +/- 5 microg/mL) against Haemonchus contortus larvae, whereas compound 2, while a bit less active in vitro (EC(90) 29 +/- 8 microg/mL), showed modest in vivo activity against a surrogate organism, Heligmosomoides polygyrus in mice, at 50 mg/kg.

  14. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... compute payments for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital... used under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program in § 495.104 of this part in computing... hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program, rather than through the MA EHR hospital...

  15. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... compute payments for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital... used under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program in § 495.104 of this part in computing... hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital incentive program, rather than through the MA EHR hospital...

  16. 42 CFR 495.204 - Incentive payments to qualifying MA organizations for MA-EPs and MA-affiliated eligible hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... meaningful EHR users in accordance with § 422.504 of this chapter. (1) The reviews include validation of the... purpose than to compute the amount of EHR incentive payment due the MA organization. (c) Amount payable to... compute payments for qualifying MA-affiliated eligible hospitals under the Medicare FFS EHR hospital...

  17. Ma-huang strikes again: ephedrine nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Powell, T; Hsu, F F; Turk, J; Hruska, K

    1998-07-01

    Ephedrine and its metabolites are naturally occurring alkaloids that can be derived from evergreens worldwide and have been used as medicinals for hundreds of years. Because they have "real" pharmacological alpha and beta catecholamine effects and are "natural" products, the alternative medicine industry has popularized them for multiple uses, including asthma, weight loss, energy and sexual enhancement, and euphoria. Several recent reviews have documented the dangerous nature of using these "drugs" unsupervised, including multiple deaths, and the FDA is currently reviewing ephedrine's use in the alternative medicine industry. We report a new toxicity, ephedrine nephrolithiasis, in a patient using an energy supplement, Ma-Huang extract, which contains ephedrine. Although previously not reported, the Louis C. Herring and Company kidney stone database show that this is an endemic complication of ephedrine with hundreds of previous episodes. Using gas chromatography (GC) mass spectrometry, we were able to positively identify the chemical structure of our patient's stone, as well as other similar stones from Louis Herring, as containing ephedrine, norephedrine, and pseudoephedrine.

  18. 42 CFR 422.520 - Prompt payment by MA organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.520 Prompt payment by MA organization. (a) Contract between CMS...

  19. 42 CFR 422.520 - Prompt payment by MA organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.520 Prompt payment by MA organization. (a) Contract between CMS...

  20. Changing the S and MA [Safety and Mission Assurance] Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Optimize S&MA organization to best facilitate Shuttle transition in 2010, successfully support Ares developmental responsibilities, and minimize the impacts of the gap between last Shuttle flight and start of Ares V Project. 2) Improve leveraging of critical skills and experience between Shuttle and Ares. 3) Split technical and supervisory functions to facilitate technical penetration. 4) Create Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) stand-alone position for successfully implementation of S&MA Technical Authority. 5) Minimize disruption to customers. 6) Provide early involvement of S&MA leadership team and frequent/open communications with S&MA team members and steak-holders.

  1. Calmodulin disrupts the structure of the HIV-1 MA protein†

    PubMed Central

    Chow, John Y. H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill

    2010-01-01

    The MA protein from HIV-1 is a small, multifunctional protein responsible for regulating various stages of the viral replication cycle. To achieve its diverse tasks MA interacts with host cell proteins and it has been reported that one of these is the ubiquitous calcium -sensing calmodulin (CaM) which is up-regulated upon HIV-1 infection. The nature of the CaM-MA interaction has been the subject of structural studies using peptides based on the MA sequence that have led to conflicting conclusions. The results presented here show that CaM binds intact MA with 1:1 stoichiometry in a Ca2+-dependent manner and that the complex adopts a highly extended conformation in solution as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering. Alterations in tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the two tryptophans at the N-terminus of MA mediate the CaM interaction. Major chemical shift changes occur in the NMR spectrum of MA upon complex formation, while chemical shift changes in the CaM spectrum are quite modest and are assigned to residues within the target-protein binding hydrophobic clefts of CaM. The NMR data indicate that CaM binds MA via its N-and C-terminal lobes and induces a dramatic conformational change involving a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structure within MA. Circular dichroism experiments suggest that MA looses ~20% of its α-helical content upon CaM binding. Thus CaM binding is expected to impact upon the accessibility of interaction sites within MA that are involved in its various functions. PMID:20488189

  2. Banana Transcription Factor MaERF11 Recruits Histone Deacetylase MaHDA1 and Represses the Expression of MaACO1 and Expansins during Fruit Ripening1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chao; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Fu, Chang-Chun; Wang, Jun-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone ethylene controls diverse developmental and physiological processes such as fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Our previous study identified that ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR11 (MaERF11), a transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, negatively regulates the ripening of banana, but the mechanism for the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Here we showed that MaERF11 has intrinsic transcriptional repression activity in planta. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that MaERF11 binds to promoters of three ripening-related Expansin genes, MaEXP2, MaEXP7 and MaEXP8, as well as an ethylene biosynthetic gene MaACO1, via the GCC-box motif. Furthermore, expression patterns of MaACO1, MaEXP2, MaEXP7, and MaEXP8 genes are correlated with the changes of histone H3 and H4 acetylation level during fruit ripening. Moreover, we found that MaERF11 physically interacts with a histone deacetylase, MaHDA1, which has histone deacetylase activity, and the interaction significantly strengthens the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional repression of MaACO1 and Expansins. Taken together, these findings suggest that MaERF11 may recruit MaHDA1 to its target genes and repress their expression via histone deacetylation. PMID:27208241

  3. 42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an MA MSA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefits under an MA MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422... Benefits under an MA MSA plan. (a) General rule. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must make...) Countable expenses. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must count toward the annual deductible...

  4. 42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an MA MSA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benefits under an MA MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422... § 422.103 Benefits under an MA MSA plan. (a) General rule. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan... deductible. (b) Countable expenses. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must count toward the annual...

  5. 42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an MA MSA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benefits under an MA MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422... § 422.103 Benefits under an MA MSA plan. (a) General rule. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan... deductible. (b) Countable expenses. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must count toward the annual...

  6. 42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an MA MSA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benefits under an MA MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422... § 422.103 Benefits under an MA MSA plan. (a) General rule. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan... deductible. (b) Countable expenses. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must count toward the annual...

  7. MaROS: Information Management Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Daniel A.; Gladden, Roy E.; Wright, Jesse J.; Hy, Franklin H.; Rabideau, Gregg R.; Wallick, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    This software is provided by the Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS) task to a variety of Mars projects for the purpose of coordinating communications sessions between landed spacecraft assets and orbiting spacecraft assets at Mars. The Information Management Service centralizes a set of functions previously distributed across multiple spacecraft operations teams, and as such, greatly improves visibility into the end-to-end strategic coordination process. Most of the process revolves around the scheduling of communications sessions between the spacecraft during periods of time when a landed asset on Mars is geometrically visible by an orbiting spacecraft. These relay sessions are used to transfer data both to and from the landed asset via the orbiting asset on behalf of Earth-based spacecraft operators. This software component is an application process running as a Java virtual machine. The component provides all service interfaces via a Representational State Transfer (REST) protocol over https to external clients. There are two general interaction modes with the service: upload and download of data. For data upload, the service must execute logic specific to the upload data type and trigger any applicable calculations including pass delivery latencies and overflight conflicts. For data download, the software must retrieve and correlate requested information and deliver to the requesting client. The provision of this service enables several key advancements over legacy processes and systems. For one, this service represents the first time that end-to-end relay information is correlated into a single shared repository. The software also provides the first multimission latency calculator; previous latency calculations had been performed on a mission-by-mission basis.

  8. MA-9 PILOT L. GORDON COOPER INSIDE HIS MERCURY SPACECRAFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    MA-9 PILOT L. GORDON COOPER INSIDE HIS MERCURY SPACECRAFT S-63-6129 P-07144, ARCHIVE-03810 MA-9 pilot, L. Gordon Cooper, inside his Mercury spacecraft runs through one of the numerous pre-flight checks surrounded by dials, switches, indicators and buttons representing the complciated engineering technology of the space age.

  9. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544... Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form MA-315. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Binder, which may be obtained from the American...

  10. 46 CFR 308.550 - Certificate, Form MA-320.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iv-General § 308.550 Certificate, Form MA-320. Wherever any provision of this... MA-320-C for a corporation, which forms may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD....

  11. 42 CFR 422.306 - Annual MA capitation rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... use of electronic health records. (c) Phase-out of the indirect costs of medical education from MA... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual MA capitation rates. 422.306 Section 422.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. Great Indian Desert photographed during MA-9 flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    S63-06447 (15-16 May 1963) --- The Great Indian Desert, located west of New Delhi, India, as photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit MA-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  13. 46 CFR 308.533 - Closing report, Form MA-313.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Closing report, Form MA-313. 308.533 Section 308.533 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.533 Closing report, Form MA-313....

  14. 17 CFR 240.15Ba1-5 - Amendments to Form MA and Form MA-I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amendments to Form MA and Form MA-I. 240.15Ba1-5 Section 240.15Ba1-5 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Rules and...

  15. Paleomagnetism of ~635 Ma "Elatina Rhythmites," Reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raub, T. D.; Raub, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    Extraordinary laminated sand-siltstone of South Australia's synglacial/deglacial Elatina Formation-equivalent at Pichi Richi Pass is an iconic outcrop for paleomagnetists, paleoclimatologists, and astrophysicists. Cyclic- bedded stacks of coarse/fine-grained doublets have been interpreted as rhythmites of semi-diurnal tidal origin in a deep-water delta front environment. Cycle analysis has yielded estimates of Earth's paleorotation and revolution periods and lunar distance. The reported 10 m (interpreted 60 year) record disagrees somewhat with coeval and younger biological "sediment-clocks," and Williams (2000) argues that the sedimentological context and extraordinary preservation of Elatina rhythmites makes that record preferable. A paleomagnetic "synsedimentary fold" test on <8 cm amplitude antiforms from the Pichi Richi Pass rhythmites confirmed low-latitude Neoproterozoic glaciation (Sumner et al., 1987) and inspired the formal "Snowball Earth" hypothesis (Kirschvink, 1989). Repeated study of the Elatina rhythmites (Schmidt and Williams, 1995 and citations therein) has documented NRM essentially equal to ChRM carried by detrital hematite, "locked-in" synchronously with "deformation" of "antiforms" (i.e., within hours to days of deposition). "Synfolding" remanence has been ascribed to superposition of slump-shear and DRM. Anomalously shallow inclination of rhythmites (Sohl et al., 1999) could represent inadequate averaging of ca. 635 Ma geomagnetic secular variation. New measurement of ten stratigraphic sections through rhythmite-bearing facies outside of Pichi Richi Pass supports a distributary environment since rhythmites are expressed in multiple lithologies closely beneath ultimate deglacial, Nuccaleena cap dolostone. At Pichi Richi Pass, a full section of rhythmites approx. 18 meters thick is now documented, supporting a novel magnetostratigraphic collection of 130 samples. It is necessary to re-examine the DRM interpretation of Elatina rhythmite

  16. Sediment Flux from Stratigraphy: Insights from <1 Ma to >300 Ma Sedimentary Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romans, B.; Mason, C. C.; Eriksson, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic or climate signals that originate in net-erosional catchments are transmitted down-system as sediment. The accumulation of that sediment in net-depositional regions and preservation as stratigraphy can be accessed and used to reconstruct signal generation and propagation. Studies of modern to <20 ka sedimentary systems suggest that signal propagation (or lack thereof) is, in part, controlled by the size, relief, and other morphologic characteristics of sediment-production segments. Thus, it's critical to measure, estimate, or infer aspects of the feeder catchment when reconstructing system behavior from sedimentary deposits. Here, we present results from two studies aimed at determining paleo-sediment flux from stratigraphic archives. The first study uses outcropping middle Pleistocene (~0.6 Ma) alluvial-fan deposits in the Panamint Mountains, California, to investigate the relationship of sediment supply to stratigraphic architecture in a small catchment-fan system. The youth of this system allows us to estimate fan volumes from facies architecture and depositional system dimensions based on catchment-area to fan-area relationships of nearby modern systems. These data, combined with preliminary cosmogenic radionuclide-derived paleo-denudation rates, provide an opportunity to examine the nature of erosional signal propagation. The second study examines much older, Upper Mississippian (~325 Ma), fluvial and deltaic strata. Absolute chronologic tools to calculate centennial-millennial rates in deep-time sedimentary archives do not yet exist. Here, we use the extraordinary tidal rhythmite deposits of the Pride Shale in the Appalachian Basin as a high-resolution chronometer to constrain the duration of basin filling. We then use the scale of fluvial channel bodies in the underlying and overlying units combined with climate-specific empirical relationships derived from modern systems to estimate the size of the paleo-catchment. The resultant estimates of

  17. Kinetics of Cyclic Oxidation and Cracking and Finite Element Analysis of MA956 and Sapphire/MA956 Composite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Sapphire fiber-reinforced MA956 composites hold promise for significant weight savings and increased high-temperature structural capability, as compared to unreinforced MA956. As part of an overall assessment of the high-temperature characteristics of this material system, cyclic oxidation behavior was studied at 1093 C and 1204 C. Initially, both sets of coupons exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics. Later, monolithic MA956 exhibited spallation and a linear weight loss, whereas the composite showed a linear weight gain without spallation. Weight loss of the monolithic MA956 resulted from the linking of a multiplicity of randomly oriented and closely spaced surface cracks that facilitated ready spallation. By contrast, cracking of the composite's oxide layer was nonintersecting and aligned nominally parallel with the orientation of the subsurface reinforcing fibers. Oxidative lifetime of monolithic MA956 was projected from the observed oxidation kinetics. Linear elastic, finite element continuum, and micromechanics analyses were performed on coupons of the monolithic and composite materials. Results of the analyses qualitatively agreed well with the observed oxide cracking and spallation behavior of both the MA956 and the Sapphire/MA956 composite coupons.

  18. RadNet Air Data From Worcester, MA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Worcester, MA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  19. RadNet Air Data From Boston, MA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Boston, MA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  20. 76 FR 58558 - Massachusetts Disaster Number MA-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster Number MA-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance. BILLING...

  1. HoCaMA: Home Care Hybrid Multiagent Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Juan A.; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    Home Care is one of the main objectives of Ambient Intelligence. Nowadays, the disabled and elderly population, which represents a significant part of our society, requires novel solutions for providing home care in an effective way. In this chapter, we present HoCaMA, a hybrid multiagent architecture that facilitates remote monitoring and care services for disabled patients at their homes. HoCaMA combines multiagent systems and Web services to facilitate the communication and integration with multiple health care systems. In addition, HoCaMA focuses on the design of reactive agents capable of interacting with different sensors present in the environment, and incorporates a system of alerts through SMS and MMS mobile technologies. Finally, it uses Radio Frequency IDentification and JavaCard technologies to provide advanced location and identification systems, as well as automatic access control facilities. HoCaMA has been implemented in a real environment and the results obtained are presented within this chapter.

  2. The banana fruit Dof transcription factor MaDof23 acts as a repressor and interacts with MaERF9 in regulating ripening-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bi-hong; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fan, Zhong-qi; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-01-01

    The DNA binding with one finger (Dof) proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in a variety of plant biological processes. However, little information is available on their involvement in fruit ripening. We have characterized 25 MaDof genes from banana fruit (Musa acuminata), designated as MaDof1–MaDof25. Gene expression analysis in fruit subjected to different ripening conditions revealed that MaDofs were differentially expressed during different stages of ripening. MaDof10, 23, 24, and 25 were ethylene-inducible and nuclear-localized, and their transcript levels increased during fruit ripening. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses demonstrated a physical interaction between MaDof23 and MaERF9, a potential regulator of fruit ripening reported in a previous study. We determined that MaDof23 is a transcriptional repressor, whereas MaERF9 is a transcriptional activator. We suggest that they might act antagonistically in regulating 10 ripening-related genes, including MaEXP1/2/3/5, MaXET7, MaPG1, MaPME3, MaPL2, MaCAT, and MaPDC, which are associated with cell wall degradation and aroma formation. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the transcriptional regulation network controlling banana fruit ripening. PMID:26889012

  3. The banana fruit Dof transcription factor MaDof23 acts as a repressor and interacts with MaERF9 in regulating ripening-related genes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bi-hong; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fan, Zhong-qi; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-04-01

    The DNA binding with one finger (Dof) proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in a variety of plant biological processes. However, little information is available on their involvement in fruit ripening. We have characterized 25 MaDof genes from banana fruit (Musa acuminata), designated as MaDof1-MaDof25 Gene expression analysis in fruit subjected to different ripening conditions revealed that MaDofs were differentially expressed during different stages of ripening. MaDof10, 23, 24, and 25 were ethylene-inducible and nuclear-localized, and their transcript levels increased during fruit ripening. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses demonstrated a physical interaction between MaDof23 and MaERF9, a potential regulator of fruit ripening reported in a previous study. We determined that MaDof23 is a transcriptional repressor, whereas MaERF9 is a transcriptional activator. We suggest that they might act antagonistically in regulating 10 ripening-related genes, including MaEXP1/2/3/5, MaXET7, MaPG1, MaPME3, MaPL2, MaCAT, and MaPDC, which are associated with cell wall degradation and aroma formation. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the transcriptional regulation network controlling banana fruit ripening. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. 46 CFR 7.15 - Massachusetts Bay, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Massachusetts Bay, MA. 7.15 Section 7.15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.15 Massachusetts Bay, MA. A line drawn from latitude 42°37.9′ N. longitude 70°31.2′ W. (Cape Ann...

  5. A new 40 MA ranchero explosive pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James; Herrera, Dennis; Oona, Hank; Torres, David; Atchison, W L; Colgate, S A; Griego, J R; Guzik, J; Holtkamp, D B; Idzorek, G; Kaul, A; Kirkpatrick, R C; Menikoff, R; Reardon, P T; Reinovsky, R E; Rousculp, C L; Sgro, A G; Tabaka, L J; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a new high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system based on the 1.4 m long Ranchero generator which was developed in 1999 for driving solid density z-pinch loads. The new application requires approximately 40 MA to implode similar liners, but the liners cannot tolerate the 65 {micro}s, 3 MA current pulse associated with delivering the initial magnetic flux to the 200 nH generator. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system with an internal start switch and four explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches. The integral start switch is installed between the output glide plane and the armature. It functions in the same manner as a standard input crowbar switch when armature motion begins, but initially isolates the load. The circuit is completed during the flux loading phase using post hole convolutes. Each convolute attaches the inner (coaxial) output transmission line to the outside of the outer coax through a penetration of the outer coaxial line. The attachment is made with the conductor of an EFF at each location. The EFFs conduct 0.75 MA each, and are actuated just after the internal start switch connects to the load. EFFs operating at these parameters have been tested in the past. The post hole convolutes must withstand as much as 80 kV at peak dl/dt during the Ranchero load current pulse. We describe the design of this new HEPP system in detail, and give the experimental results available at conference time. In addition, we discuss the work we are doing to test the upper current limits of a single standard size Ranchero module. Calculations have suggested that the generator could function at up to {approx}120 MA, the rule of thumb we follow (1 MA/cm) suggests 90 MA, and simple flux compression calculations, along with the {approx}4 MA seed current available from our capacitor bank, suggests 118 MA is the currently available upper limit.

  6. MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, A.-M.; MaNGA Team

    2016-10-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) is a galaxy integral-field spectroscopic survey within the fourth generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). It will be mapping the composition and kinematics of gas and stars in 10,000 nearby galaxies, using 17 differently sized fiber bundles. MaNGA's goal is to provide new insights in galaxy formation and evolution, and to deliver a local benchmark for current and future high-redshift studies.

  7. 42 CFR 422.62 - Election of coverage under an MA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... § 422.62 Election of coverage under an MA plan. (a) General: Coverage election periods—(1) Initial... enrolled in an MA-PD plan may elect another MA-PD plan or original Medicare and coverage under a PDP. Such... individual may not elect an MA-PD plan or coverage under a PDP. (ii) Newly eligible MA individual....

  8. 42 CFR 422.50 - Eligibility to elect an MA plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Eligibility to elect an MA plan. For this subpart, all references to an MA plan include MA-PD and both MA... individual is eligible to elect an MA plan if he or she— (1) Is entitled to Medicare under Part A...

  9. 42 CFR 422.455 - Special rules for MA Regional Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., especially those residing in rural areas. (4) Market survey and analysis. Before establishing MA regions, CMS....455 Special rules for MA Regional Plans. (a) Coverage of entire MA region. The service area for an MA regional plan will consist of an entire MA region established under paragraph (b) of this section, and...

  10. MaRIE theory, modeling and computation roadmap executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Lookman, Turab

    2010-01-01

    The confluence of MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extreme) and extreme (exascale) computing timelines offers a unique opportunity in co-designing the elements of materials discovery, with theory and high performance computing, itself co-designed by constrained optimization of hardware and software, and experiments. MaRIE's theory, modeling, and computation (TMC) roadmap efforts have paralleled 'MaRIE First Experiments' science activities in the areas of materials dynamics, irradiated materials and complex functional materials in extreme conditions. The documents that follow this executive summary describe in detail for each of these areas the current state of the art, the gaps that exist and the road map to MaRIE and beyond. Here we integrate the various elements to articulate an overarching theme related to the role and consequences of heterogeneities which manifest as competing states in a complex energy landscape. MaRIE experiments will locate, measure and follow the dynamical evolution of these heterogeneities. Our TMC vision spans the various pillar science and highlights the key theoretical and experimental challenges. We also present a theory, modeling and computation roadmap of the path to and beyond MaRIE in each of the science areas.

  11. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Project Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the scientific motivation and basic design of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV program, MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory. MaNGA is currently in its second year of operations with roughly 2000 galaxies now observed, already the largest integral field spectroscopic survey of galaxies ever conducted. By combining the wealth of information made available by resolved spectroscopy with the statistical power of a sample of 10,000 galaxies, MaNGA is providing transformative insights on key questions about the life history of galaxies. These questions range from the nature of growth of star-forming disks and stellar spheroidals, to the physical origin of star formation quenching, to the ways in which the different mass components in galaxies interact and assemble over time. MaNGA's success owes to a dedicated team of scientists, engineers, and observers working to optimize the survey operations and develop advanced data processing, analysis, and interface tools in order to fully realize MaNGA's exciting potential. Continuing in the Sloan tradition, MaNGA data products will be made publicly available, with the first release scheduled for Summer 2016.

  12. Increase in physical activities in kindergarten children with cerebral palsy by employing MaKey-MaKey-based task systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ming

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we employed Flash- and Scratch-based multimedia by using a MaKey-MaKey-based task system to increase the motivation level of children with cerebral palsy to perform physical activities. MaKey MaKey is a circuit board that converts physical touch to a digital signal, which is interpreted by a computer as a keyboard message. In this study, we used conductive materials to control this interaction. This study followed single-case design using ABAB models in which A indicated the baseline and B indicated the intervention. The experiment period comprised 1 month and a half. The experimental results demonstrated that in the case of two kindergarten children with cerebral palsy, their scores were considerably increased during the intervention phrases. The developmental applications of the results are also discussed.

  13. 42 CFR 422.322 - Source of payment and effect of MA plan election on payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payments. (1) Payments under this subpart for original fee-for-service benefits to MA organizations or MA... the Act. (2) Payments to MA-PD organizations for statutory drug benefits provided under this title...

  14. 42 CFR 422.322 - Source of payment and effect of MA plan election on payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... payments. (1) Payments under this subpart for original fee-for-service benefits to MA organizations or MA... the Act. (2) Payments to MA-PD organizations for statutory drug benefits provided under this title...

  15. Transmutation of MA in the high flux thermal reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Hu, Wenchao; Wang, Kai; Huang, Liming; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Tu, Jing; Zhu, Yangni

    2013-06-01

    We study the MA transmutation characteristics in the high flux thermal reactor, our calculation shows that different MA nuclides may have the drastically different effects on keff, Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 decrease keff greatly, Cm-244 affects the keff slightly, but Cm-245 boosts the keff significantly. The MA nuclides actually can act as the burnable poisons in the thermal reactors. The SCALE simulation shows that after 300-day-exposure in high flux thermal reactor the disappearance rate of Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 are 73.7%, 98.1% and 82.8% respectively. The SCALE simulation results also show that the total transmutation rate of MA nuclides by fission which include direct and indirect fission after 300-day-exposure in the high flux thermal reactor is 6.3%. The SCALE simulation indicates at least 44.2% MA nuclides transmute to plutonium isotopes by various reactions and 63% of the Pu-238 in the MOX fuel is consumed during 300-day-exposure in this reactor.

  16. MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    I describe a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory). One of three core programs in the 6-year SDSS-IV project† that began on July 1st, 2014, MaNGA will deploy 17 fiber-bundle IFUs across the Sloan 2.5m Telescope's 3 degree field-of-view, targeting a mass-selected sample with a median redshift of 0.03, typical spatial resolution of 1-2 kpc, and a per-fiber signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 in the outskirts of target galaxies. For each galaxy in the sample, MaNGA will provide maps and measured gradients of the composition and dynamics of both stars and gas. I discuss early results that highlight MaNGA's potential to shed light on the ionization and chemical enrichment of gas in galaxies, spatial patterns in their star formation histories, and the internal makeup of stellar populations. MaNGA's unprecedented data set will not only provide powerful new insight on galaxy formation and evolution but will serve as a valuable benchmark for future high-z observations from large telescopes and space-based facilities.

  17. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Jablonski, Nina G.; Leakey, Meave G.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2013-01-01

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0–2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0–1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets. PMID:23733967

  18. Molecular evolution of the Sorghum Maturity Gene Ma3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tan, Lubin; Fu, Yongcai; Zhu, Zuofeng; Liu, Fengxia; Sun, Chuanqing; Cai, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Time to maturity is a critical trait in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) breeding, as it determines whether a variety can be grown in a particular cropping system or ecosystem. Understanding the nucleotide variation and the mechanisms of molecular evolution of the maturity genes would be helpful for breeding programs. In this study, we analyzed the nucleotide diversity of Ma3, an important maturity gene in sorghum, using 252 cultivated and wild sorghum materials from all over the world. The nucleotide variation and diversity were analyzed based both on race- and usage-based groups. We also sequenced 12 genes around the Ma3 gene in 185 of these materials to search for a selective sweep and found that purifying selection was the strongest force on Ma3, as low nucleotide diversity and low-frequency amino acid variants were observed. However, a very special mutation, described as ma3R, seemed to be under positive selection, as indicated by dramatically reduced nucleotide variation not only at the loci but also in the surrounding regions among individuals carrying the mutations. In addition, in an association study using the Ma3 nucleotide variations, we detected 3 significant SNPs for the heading date at a high-latitude environment (Beijing) and 17 at a low-latitude environment (Hainan). The results of this study increases our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms of the maturity genes in sorghum and will be useful in sorghum breeding.

  19. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cerling, Thure E; Chritz, Kendra L; Jablonski, Nina G; Leakey, Meave G; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2013-06-25

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0-2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0-1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets.

  20. MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    I present the design and execution of a new survey to obtain resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory). One of three core programs in the 6-year SDSS-IV project that began on July 1st, 2014, MaNGA will deploy 17 fiber-bundle IFUs across the Sloan 2.5m Telescope's 3 degree field-of-view, targeting a mass-selected sample with a median redshift of 0.03, typical spatial resolution of 1-2 kpc, and a per-fiber signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 in the outskirts of target galaxies. For each galaxy in the sample, MaNGA will provide maps and measured gradients of the composition and dynamics of both stars and gas. Early results highlight MaNGA's potential to shed light on the ionization and chemical enrichment of gas in galaxies, spatial patterns in their star formation histories, and the internal makeup of stellar populations. MaNGA's unprecedented data set will not only provide powerful new insight on galaxy formation and evolution but will serve as a valuable benchmark for future high-z observations from large telescopes as well as space-based facilities.

  1. Molecular Evolution of the Sorghum Maturity Gene Ma3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Tan, Lubin; Fu, Yongcai; Zhu, Zuofeng; Liu, Fengxia; Sun, Chuanqing; Cai, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Time to maturity is a critical trait in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) breeding, as it determines whether a variety can be grown in a particular cropping system or ecosystem. Understanding the nucleotide variation and the mechanisms of molecular evolution of the maturity genes would be helpful for breeding programs. In this study, we analyzed the nucleotide diversity of Ma3, an important maturity gene in sorghum, using 252 cultivated and wild sorghum materials from all over the world. The nucleotide variation and diversity were analyzed based both on race- and usage-based groups. We also sequenced 12 genes around the Ma3 gene in 185 of these materials to search for a selective sweep and found that purifying selection was the strongest force on Ma3, as low nucleotide diversity and low-frequency amino acid variants were observed. However, a very special mutation, described as ma3R, seemed to be under positive selection, as indicated by dramatically reduced nucleotide variation not only at the loci but also in the surrounding regions among individuals carrying the mutations. In addition, in an association study using the Ma3 nucleotide variations, we detected 3 significant SNPs for the heading date at a high-latitude environment (Beijing) and 17 at a low-latitude environment (Hainan). The results of this study increases our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms of the maturity genes in sorghum and will be useful in sorghum breeding. PMID:25961888

  2. Diet of Theropithecus from 4 to 1 Ma in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Chritz, Kendra L.; Jablonski, Nina G.; Leakey, Meave G.; Kyalo Manthi, Fredrick

    2013-06-01

    Theropithecus was a common large-bodied primate that co-occurred with hominins in many Plio-Pleistocene deposits in East and South Africa. Stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from T. brumpti (4.0-2.5 Ma) and T. oswaldi (2.0-1.0 Ma) in Kenya show that the earliest Theropithecus at 4 Ma had a diet dominated by C4 resources. Progressively, this genus increased the proportion of C4-derived resources in its diet and by 1.0 Ma, had a diet that was nearly 100% C4-derived. It is likely that this diet was comprised of grasses or sedges; stable isotopes cannot, by themselves, give an indication of the relative importance of leaves, seeds, or underground storage organs to the diet of this primate. Theropithecus throughout the 4- to 1-Ma time range has a diet that is more C4-based than contemporaneous hominins of the genera Australopithecus, Kenyanthropus, and Homo; however, Theropithecus and Paranthropus have similar proportions of C4-based resources in their respective diets.

  3. Pyroxenite in the Galapagos plume source at 65 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, W. T.; Gazel, E.; Vidito, C. A.; Herzberg, C. T.; Class, C.; Bizimis, M.; Alvarado-Induni, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mantle plumes originate from boundary layers below the upper mantle. Their surface expressions as hotspot tracks have been linked to voluminous outpourings of lava in the form of large igneous provinces. The Galapagos hotspot has been active since ~90 Ma and the oldest lavas of its associated submarine ridge have been dated to ~14 Ma, subducting at the Middle America Trench, off Costa Rica. The Galapagos plume head magmatic production is preserved as the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). A series of 15-65 Ma accreted Galapagos paleo-ridges and islands/seamounts are accreted in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and Panama. One of these accreted terranes, the Quepos block on the west coast of Costa Rica is an ancient, ~65 Ma Galapagos island. Olivine phenocrysts from Quepos picrites have elevated Ni and low Ca and Mn and Fe/Mn indicative of a dominant pyroxenite source component while CLIP samples are dominated by a peridotite source. The mantle potential temperature (max) of the plume changed from ~1650 to ~1550 C at 65 Ma. This change correlates with the first appearance of the pyroxenite component and an EMII signature (Northern Galapagos Domain) in the Galapagos plume. A relatively dense pyroxenite component may provide a mechanism for the change in Tp due to its effect on the plume's bouyancy. Alternatively, the pyroxenite component was diluted by high peridotite melt fraction during the massive production of the CLIP.

  4. Synthesis and screening of 3-MA derivatives for autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyang; Wang, Xin; Guo, Haijing; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Yu, Li

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a conserved degradation process, which plays important pathophysiological roles. The lack of effective inhibitors of autophagy has been an obstacle in both basic research and understanding the physiological role of autophagy in disease manifestation. The most widely used inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), is poorly soluble at room temperature and is effective only at high concentrations. In this study, we synthesized a library of small compounds by chemically modifying 3-MA and screened this library for autophagy inhibitors. Three 3-MA derivatives generated through this approach showed improved solubility and effectiveness in inhibiting autophagy. We demonstrated that chemical modification of an existing autophagy inhibitor is an effective method to generate improved autophagy inhibitors.

  5. Changing the Safety and Mission Assurance (S and MA) Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W.; Safie, Fayssal M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the change in the work and impact of the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center. It reviews the background and the reasons given for a strong Safety & Mission Assurance presence in all planning for space flight. This was pointed out by the Rogers Commission Report after the Space Challenger accident, by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) and by a 2006 NASA Exploration Safety Study (NESS) Team. The overall objective of the work in this area was to improve and maintain S&MA expertise and skills. Training for this work was improved and the S&MA organization was reorganized. This has resulted in a paradigm shift for NASA's safety efforts, which is described. The presentation then reviews the impact of the new S&MA work in the Ares I design and development.

  6. Reduced convergence within the Tibetan Plateau by 26 Ma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jun; Coe, Robert S.; Wang, Chengshan; Gilder, Stuart A.; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Hao; Li, Yalin; Ma, Pengfei; Shi, Kai; Li, Shuai

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of double-thickening and uplifting of the Tibetan crust requires constraints on the magnitude and timing of crustal shortening. New elongation/inclination (E/I)-corrected paleomagnetic data from 26-22 Ma sediments indicate that the latitude of southern Tibet in the early Miocene was 31.1/-6.8/+5.2°N, not significantly different from today. This implies that the southern margin of Asia, which was at 21-24°N latitude from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene, advanced 8-10° northward between the early Eocene and the latest Oligocene. Our results therefore suggest that at least 900-1100 km of continental shortening and significant regional uplift of the plateau occurred between the early Eocene and late Oligocene. Our results suggest that N-S intra-Asian convergence was considerably reduced around 26 Ma, corresponding to a transition from compression to extension within the Tibetan Plateau.Plain Language SummaryTwo critical questions involving the geodynamic evolution of the Tibetan plateau are (i) when did a compression-dominated tectonic regime change to an extension-dominated tectonic regime on the plateau and (ii) how does this timing correlate with double thickening of the crust? Here we provide paleomagnetic evidence for the timing, magnitude, and partitioning of intra-Asian convergence. Our results imply a first-order constraint of 900-1100 km north-south shortening concentrated within the interval from 53 to 26 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This suggests that a fundamental change at 26 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> occurred in the geodynamics of the Tibetan Plateau marked by a reduction in large-scale convergence and compressive deformation. The implication is that significant regional uplift of the proto-Tibetan Plateau occurred within the 55-26 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> interval. The paleolatitude, paleoclimate, and topography of south central Tibet seen at present were likely established around 26 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20403259','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20403259"><span>[The anatomical concept of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Wang Dui archeological artifacts].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yang, Su-Tso</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Amongst the archeological findings of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Wang Dui that concern the human anatomy, the first noted was a well-preserved female corpse, which demonstrated superb antiseptic techniques of the ancient Chinese. Also, 14 medical books were excavated and revealed a prototype of human visceral anatomy. The differentiation between small and large intestines was absent, and only the term of "intestine" was mentioned. The term of "triple energizers" was absent, too. However, contexts of surface anatomy were already abundant. Analyzing the terms of relative position, the anatomical position portrayed by the <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Wang Dui medical texts is very similar to that of modern medicine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24894503','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24894503"><span>Next <span class="hlt">ma</span>SigPro: updating <span class="hlt">ma</span>SigPro bioconductor package for RNA-seq time series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nueda, María José; Tarazona, Sonia; Conesa, Ana</p> <p>2014-09-15</p> <p>The widespread adoption of RNA-seq to quantitatively measure gene expression has increased the scope of sequencing experimental designs to include time-course experiments. <span class="hlt">ma</span>SigPro is an R package specifically suited for the analysis of time-course gene expression data, which was developed originally for microarrays and hence was limited in its application to count data. We have updated <span class="hlt">ma</span>SigPro to support RNA-seq time series analysis by introducing generalized linear models in the algorithm to support the modeling of count data while maintaining the traditional functionalities of the package. We show a good performance of the <span class="hlt">ma</span>SigPro-GLM method in several simulated time-course scenarios and in a real experimental dataset. The package is freely available under the LGPL license from the Bioconductor Web site (http://bioconductor.org). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-31/pdf/2011-28168.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-31/pdf/2011-28168.pdf"><span>76 FR 67245 - Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00040</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-31</p> <p>... ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12803 and 12804 Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small... of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (FEMA-4028-DR... Massachusetts, dated 09/03/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-05-07/pdf/2010-10777.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-05-07/pdf/2010-10777.pdf"><span>75 FR 25305 - Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-05-07</p> <p>... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Commonwealth of Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 03/29/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident... Commonwealth of Massachusetts, dated 03/29/2010 is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-05-07/pdf/2010-10776.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-05-07/pdf/2010-10776.pdf"><span>75 FR 25305 - Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00027</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-05-07</p> <p>... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00027 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 04/22/2010. Incident: Severe... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, dated 04/22...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-07/pdf/2010-16444.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-07/pdf/2010-16444.pdf"><span>75 FR 39059 - Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-07</p> <p>... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... Commonwealth of Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 03/29/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident... Massachusetts, dated 03/29/2010 is hereby amended to extend the deadline for filing applications for physical...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-02/pdf/2010-13194.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-02/pdf/2010-13194.pdf"><span>75 FR 30872 - Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-06-02</p> <p>... ADMINISTRATION Massachusetts Disaster Number <span class="hlt">MA</span>-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION... of Massachusetts (FEMA-1895-DR), dated 03/ 29/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding. Incident... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of Massachusetts, dated 03...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol1-sec7-15.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol1-sec7-15.pdf"><span>46 CFR 7.15 - Massachusetts Bay, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... § 7.15 Massachusetts Bay, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. A line drawn from latitude 42°37.9′ N. longitude 70°31.2′ W. (Cape Ann Lighted Whistle Buoy “2”) to latitude 42°22.7′ N. longitude 70°47.0′ W. (Boston Lighted Horn Buoy...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.4 - Types of <span class="hlt">MA</span> plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... coordinated care plan. A coordinated care plan is a plan that includes a network of providers that are under... network is approved by CMS to ensure that all applicable requirements are met, including access and...) of this section. (D) Other network plans (except PFFS plans). (iv) A specialized <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.4 - Types of <span class="hlt">MA</span> plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>...) A coordinated care plan. A coordinated care plan is a plan that includes a network of providers that.... (i) The network is approved by CMS to ensure that all applicable requirements are met, including... paragraph (a)(1)(v) of this section. (D) Other network plans (except PFFS plans). (iv) A specialized <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-4.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.4 - Types of <span class="hlt">MA</span> plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>...) A coordinated care plan. A coordinated care plan is a plan that includes a network of providers that.... (i) The network is approved by CMS to ensure that all applicable requirements are met, including... paragraph (a)(1)(v) of this section. (D) Other network plans (except PFFS plans). (iv) A specialized <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9139490&hterms=Friendship&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DFriendship','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9139490&hterms=Friendship&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DFriendship"><span>The Launch of the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6, Friendship 7</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-01-01</p> <p>The launch of the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6, Friendship 7, on February 20, 1962. Boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), Friendship 7 was the first U.S. marned orbital flight and carried Astronaut John H. Glenn into orbit. Astronaut Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-18/pdf/2011-6339.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-03-18/pdf/2011-6339.pdf"><span>76 FR 14804 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bass River, Beverly, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-03-18</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Bass River, Beverly, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY... the Hall Whitaker Bridge at mile 0.6 across the Bass River ] at Beverly, Massachusetts. The deviation.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Hall Whitaker Bridge, across the Bass River at Beverly, Massachusetts, has...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Murray&pg=5&id=EJ898091','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Murray&pg=5&id=EJ898091"><span>Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS: A Roadmap for Success</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCarthy, Maeve L.; Fister, K. Renee</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The manuscript outlines the impact that our National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences program, Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS, has had on the students and faculty at Murray State University. This interdisciplinary program teams mathematics and biology undergraduate students with mathematics and…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-10/pdf/2012-297.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-10/pdf/2012-297.pdf"><span>77 FR 1503 - Massasoit National Wildlife Refuge, Plymouth, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-10</p> <p>... Fish and Wildlife Service Massasoit National Wildlife Refuge, Plymouth, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... Wildlife Refuge (the refuge, NWR) in Plymouth, Massachusetts. We provide this notice in compliance with our.... Mail: Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 73 Weir...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.533 - Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.533 Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313. This form, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD, shall be filed...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-17/pdf/2011-26545.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-17/pdf/2011-26545.pdf"><span>76 FR 64009 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Apponagansett River, Dartmouth, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-17</p> <p>..., Dartmouth, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has changed the... River, mile 1.0, at Dartmouth, Massachusetts. The owner of the bridge requested relief from crewing the... Apponagansett River, mile 1.0, at Dartmouth, Massachusetts, has a vertical clearance in the closed position of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-2268.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-2268.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.2268 - Standards for <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization marketing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... non-health care related products to prospective enrollees during any <span class="hlt">MA</span> or Part D sales activity or presentation. This is considered cross-selling and is prohibited. (g) Market any health care related product... offices or other areas where health care is delivered to individuals, except in the case where such...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-306.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-306.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.306 - Annual <span class="hlt">MA</span> capitation rates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual <span class="hlt">MA</span> capitation rates. 422.306 Section 422.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-64.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-64.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.64 - Information about the <span class="hlt">MA</span> program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information about the <span class="hlt">MA</span> program. 422.64 Section 422.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-64.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-64.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.64 - Information about the <span class="hlt">MA</span> program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information about the <span class="hlt">MA</span> program. 422.64 Section 422.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.74 - Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Section 422.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment... commits fraud or permits abuse of enrollment card—(i) Basis for disenrollment. An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization may...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-26/pdf/2010-26984.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-26/pdf/2010-26984.pdf"><span>75 FR 65567 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Mystic River, Charlestown, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-26</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Mystic River, Charlestown, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY... Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of.... Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bio&pg=7&id=EJ898091','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bio&pg=7&id=EJ898091"><span>Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS: A Roadmap for Success</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCarthy, Maeve L.; Fister, K. Renee</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The manuscript outlines the impact that our National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences program, Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS, has had on the students and faculty at Murray State University. This interdisciplinary program teams mathematics and biology undergraduate students with mathematics and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mergers+AND+acquisitions&pg=2&id=EJ923076','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mergers+AND+acquisitions&pg=2&id=EJ923076"><span>Organisational Learning through International <span class="hlt">M&A</span> Integration Strategies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Holland, Wayne; Salama, Alzira</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to explore the learning process associated with international mergers and acquisitions (<span class="hlt">M&A</span>) integration strategies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a comparative case study methodology, utilising qualitative data through in-depth interviews with top management responsible for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21922403P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21922403P"><span>No<span class="hlt">Ma</span>DS: The Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pellerin, Anne; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Barbá, R. H.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present the Northern Massive Dim Stars Survey (No<span class="hlt">Ma</span>DS), a high-resolution spectroscopic campaign at the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The project aims at building the most complete and homogeneous spectroscopic database of hot, massive Galactic OB stars. No<span class="hlt">Ma</span>DS is part of an international collaboration that combines observations from Chilean, Spanish, and Texan facilities. The contribution of No<span class="hlt">Ma</span>DS is to complement the other sister surveys by providing high signal-to-noise echelle spectra (R=30000) of Galactic OB stars that are too faint for smaller ground-based telescopes. No<span class="hlt">Ma</span>DS will provide a sample of about 200 stars, many of which have never been observed before at such a high resolution. Here we present the details of the survey, as well as echelle spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph since May 2011. This includes spectra of standard OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, binary systems, and oblique magnetic rotators. This survey will provide unprecedented spectroscopic database for a more accurate spectral classification, a quantitative analysis using atmosphere modeling, the detection and follow up of the orbits of massive spectroscopic binaries as well as the study of diffuse interstellar bands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.74 - Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... fraudulent information on his or her election form or permits abuse of his or her enrollment card as... and developmental disabilities. In addition, the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization must inform the individual of the..., unless otherwise determined by CMS. (3) Individual commits fraud or permits abuse of enrollment...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-03-11/pdf/2013-05548.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-03-11/pdf/2013-05548.pdf"><span>78 FR 15292 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; West Bay, Osterville, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-03-11</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; West Bay, Osterville, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the West Bay Bridge across West Bay, mile 1.2, Osterville, Massachusetts. Under this temporary deviation, the bridge may remain in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=TEFL&pg=3&id=EJ1072430','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=TEFL&pg=3&id=EJ1072430"><span>Thesis Writing Challenges for Non-Native <span class="hlt">MA</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sadeghi, Karim; Shirzad Khajepasha, Arash</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Writing in a second (L2)/foreign language is generally a challenging activity, and writing an <span class="hlt">MA</span> thesis, as an example of academic enterprise, can be daunting when done in a language in which the writer is not fully competent. The challenge such a genre of writing poses for L2 writers has not been properly addressed. To fill in the gap in this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CG.....85....1D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CG.....85....1D"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RGEE: Move and Rotate Google Earth Elements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dordevic, Mladen M.; Whitmeyer, Steven J.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Google Earth is recognized as a highly effective visualization tool for geospatial information. However, there remain serious limitations that have hindered its acceptance as a tool for research and education in the geosciences. One significant limitation is the inability to translate or rotate geometrical elements on the Google Earth virtual globe. Here we present a new JavaScript web application to "Move and Rotate Google Earth Elements" (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>RGEE). <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RGEE includes tools to simplify, translate, and rotate elements, add intermediate steps to a transposition, and batch process multiple transpositions. The transposition algorithm uses spherical geometry calculations, such as the haversine formula, to accurately reposition groups of points, paths, and polygons on the Google Earth globe without distortion. Due to the imminent deprecation of the Google Earth API and browser plugin, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RGEE uses a Google Maps interface to facilitate and illustrate the transpositions. However, the inherent spatial distortions that result from the Google Maps Web Mercator projection are not apparent once the transposed elements are saved as a KML file and opened in Google Earth. Potential applications of the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RGEE toolkit include tectonic reconstructions, the movements of glaciers or thrust sheets, and time-based animations of other large- and small-scale geologic processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.74 - Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>..., as determined by CMS, for individuals with mental or cognitive conditions, including mental illness... disenrollment, including conditions on future enrollment, within 20 working days. During the review, CMS will... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-74.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.74 - Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>..., as determined by CMS, for individuals with mental or cognitive conditions, including mental illness... disenrollment, including conditions on future enrollment, within 20 working days. During the review, CMS will... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disenrollment by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+english+AND+foreign+AND+language&pg=3&id=EJ1072430','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+english+AND+foreign+AND+language&pg=3&id=EJ1072430"><span>Thesis Writing Challenges for Non-Native <span class="hlt">MA</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sadeghi, Karim; Shirzad Khajepasha, Arash</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Writing in a second (L2)/foreign language is generally a challenging activity, and writing an <span class="hlt">MA</span> thesis, as an example of academic enterprise, can be daunting when done in a language in which the writer is not fully competent. The challenge such a genre of writing poses for L2 writers has not been properly addressed. To fill in the gap in this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06429.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06429.html"><span>Photograph taken Eastern Himalayas during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 22 orbit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-05-16</p> <p>S63-06429 (15-16 May 1963) --- Photograph taken of the eastern Himalayas, Tibet, China, India and Burma from the Mercury-Atlas 9 capsule taken by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit Mercury-Atlas 9 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-9) spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.533 - Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.533 Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313. This form, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD, shall be filed...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-533.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.533 - Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.533 Closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313. This form, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD, shall be filed...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=structures+AND+innovative+AND+organizations&pg=5&id=EJ923076','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=structures+AND+innovative+AND+organizations&pg=5&id=EJ923076"><span>Organisational Learning through International <span class="hlt">M&A</span> Integration Strategies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Holland, Wayne; Salama, Alzira</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to explore the learning process associated with international mergers and acquisitions (<span class="hlt">M&A</span>) integration strategies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs a comparative case study methodology, utilising qualitative data through in-depth interviews with top management responsible for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RCD....15..646M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RCD....15..646M"><span>Two remarks about <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ñé's conjecture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Massart, D.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>We consider <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ñé's conjectures and prove that the one he made in [1] is stronger than the one he made in [2]. Then we prove that the most straightforward approach to prove the strong conjecture doesn't work in the C 4 topology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-50.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-50.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.50 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... and both <span class="hlt">MA</span> local and <span class="hlt">MA</span> regional plans, as defined in § 422.2 unless specifically noted otherwise. (a... terminated the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's contract for the plan or discontinued the plan in the area in which the... discontinued in the area in which the individual resides, he or she may elect another <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan; and (iii)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.62 - Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... make is not limited (except as provided for in paragraph (d) of this section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans). Subject... by CMS, is not limited (except as provided for in paragraph (d) of this section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans) in... that begins on the effective date of enrollment in the <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan. (d) Special rules for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.104 - Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... Beneficiary Protections § 422.104 Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization offering an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan may not provide supplemental benefits that cover expenses that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-52.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-52.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.52 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs individuals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs..., and Enrollment § 422.52 Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs individuals. (a) General rule. In order to elect a specialized <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for a special needs individual (Special Needs <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.104 - Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... and Beneficiary Protections § 422.104 Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization offering an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan may not provide supplemental benefits that cover expenses...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.62 - Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans). Subject to the <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan being open to enrollees as provided under § 422.60(a)(2... paragraph (d) of this section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans) in the number of elections or changes he or she may make... MSA plans—(1) Enrollment. An individual may enroll in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan only during an initial coverage...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.104 - Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... and Beneficiary Protections § 422.104 Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization offering an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan may not provide supplemental benefits that cover expenses...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.62 - Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans). Subject to the <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan being open to enrollees as provided under § 422.60(a)(2... paragraph (d) of this section for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans) in the number of elections or changes he or she may make... MSA plans—(1) Enrollment. An individual may enroll in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan only during an initial coverage...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-104.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.104 - Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... and Beneficiary Protections § 422.104 Special rules on supplemental benefits for <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization offering an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan may not provide supplemental benefits that cover expenses...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70171568','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70171568"><span>Component geochronology in the polyphase ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Acasta Gneiss</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Cates, Nicole L.; Caro, Guillaume; Trail, Dustin; Abramov, Oleg; Guitreau, Martin; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Hopkins, Michelle D.; Bleeker, Wouter</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The oldest compiled U–Pb zircon ages for the Acasta Gneiss Complex in the Northwest Territories of Canada span about 4050–3850 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>; yet older ca. 4200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> xenocrystic U–Pb zircon ages have also been reported for this terrane. The AGC expresses at least 25 km2 of outcrop exposure, but only a small subset of this has been documented in the detail required to investigate a complex history and resolve disputes over emplacement ages. To better understand this history, we combined new ion microprobe235,238U–207,206Pb zircon geochronology with whole-rock and zircon rare earth element compositions ([REE]zirc), Ti-in-zircon thermometry (Tixln) and 147Sm–143Nd geochronology for an individual subdivided ∼60 cm2 slab of Acasta banded gneiss comprising five separate lithologic components. Results were compared to other variably deformed granitoid-gneisses and plagioclase-hornblende rocks from elsewhere in the AGC. We show that different gneissic components carry distinct [Th/U]zirc vs. Tixln and [REE]zirc signatures correlative with different zircon U–Pb age populations and WR compositions, but not with 147Sm–143Nd isotope systematics. Modeled  [REE] from lattice-strain theory reconciles only the ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> zircons with the oldest component that also preserves strong positive Eu∗ anomalies. Magmas which gave rise to the somewhat older (inherited) ca. 4020 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> AGC zircon age population formed at ∼IW (iron–wüstite) to <FMQ (fayalite–magnetite–quartz) oxygen fugacities. A ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> emplacement age for the AGC is contemporaneous with bombardment of the inner solar system. Analytical bombardment simulations show that crustal re-working from the impact epoch potentially affected the precursors to the Acasta gneisses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.133...68M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.133...68M"><span>Component geochronology in the polyphase ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Acasta Gneiss</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Cates, Nicole L.; Caro, Guillaume; Trail, Dustin; Abramov, Oleg; Guitreau, Martin; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Hopkins, Michelle D.; Bleeker, Wouter</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The oldest compiled U-Pb zircon ages for the Acasta Gneiss Complex in the Northwest Territories of Canada span about 4050-3850 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>; yet older ca. 4200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> xenocrystic U-Pb zircon ages have also been reported for this terrane. The AGC expresses at least 25 km2 of outcrop exposure, but only a small subset of this has been documented in the detail required to investigate a complex history and resolve disputes over emplacement ages. To better understand this history, we combined new ion microprobe 235,238U-207,206Pb zircon geochronology with whole-rock and zircon rare earth element compositions ([REE]zirc), Ti-in-zircon thermometry (Tixln) and 147Sm-143Nd geochronology for an individual subdivided ˜60 cm2 slab of Acasta banded gneiss comprising five separate lithologic components. Results were compared to other variably deformed granitoid-gneisses and plagioclase-hornblende rocks from elsewhere in the AGC. We show that different gneissic components carry distinct [Th/U]zirc vs. Tixln and [REE]zirc signatures correlative with different zircon U-Pb age populations and WR compositions, but not with 147Sm-143Nd isotope systematics. Modeled DWRzircon [REE] from lattice-strain theory reconciles only the ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> zircons with the oldest component that also preserves strong positive Eu∗ anomalies. Magmas which gave rise to the somewhat older (inherited) ca. 4020 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> AGC zircon age population formed at ˜IW (iron-wüstite) to <FMQ (fayalite-magnetite-quartz) oxygen fugacities. A ca. 3920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> emplacement age for the AGC is contemporaneous with bombardment of the inner solar system. Analytical bombardment simulations show that crustal re-working from the impact epoch potentially affected the precursors to the Acasta gneisses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008369"><span>Cell-laden photocrosslinked Gel<span class="hlt">MA-DexMA</span> copolymer hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties for tissue engineering.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Hang; Zhou, Lei; Liao, Jingwen; Tan, Ying; Ouyang, Kongyou; Ning, Chenyun; Ni, Guoxin; Tan, Guoxin</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>To effectively repair or replace damaged tissues, it is necessary to design three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffolds with tunable biomechanical properties close to the desired tissue application. In the present work, gelatin methacrylate (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) and dextran glycidyl methacrylate (Dex<span class="hlt">MA</span>) with tunable mechanical and biological properties were utilized to prepared novel bicomponent polymeric hydrogels by cross-linking polymerization using photoinitiation. We controlled the degree of substitution (DS) of glycidyl methacrylate in Dex<span class="hlt">MA</span> so that they could obtain relevant mechanical properties. The results indicated that copolymer hydrogels demonstrated a lower swelling ratio and higher compressive modulus as compared to the Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>. Moreover, all of the hydrogels exhibited a honeycomb-like architecture, the pore sizes decreased as DS increased, and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in these hydrogels all exhibited excellent viability. These characteristics suggest a class of photocrosslinkable, tunable mechanically copolymer hydrogels that may find potential application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24548087','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24548087"><span>Banana fruit NAC transcription factor <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 is a direct target of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 and involved in cold stress through interacting with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>CBF1.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shan, Wei; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Lu, Wang-Jin; Chen, Jian-Ye</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Our previous studies have indicated that the banana ripening-induced <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1, a NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) transcription factor (TF) gene, is regulated by ethylene during fruit ripening, and propylene, a functional ethylene analogue, induces cold tolerance of banana fruits. However, the involvement of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 in propylene-induced cold tolerance of banana fruits is not understood. In the present work, the possible involvement of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 in cold tolerance of banana fruits was investigated. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 was noticeably induced by cold stress or following propylene treatment during cold storage. Transient protoplast assays showed that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 promoter was activated by cold stress and ethylene treatment. Yeast one-hybrid (Y1H), electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and transient expression assays demonstrated <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 as a novel direct target of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1, and that the ability of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 binding to <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 promoter might be enhanced by <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 phosphorylation and cold stress. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analyses revealed physical interaction between <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>CBF1, a downstream component of inducer of C-repeat binding factor (CBF) expression 1 (ICE1) in cold signalling. Taken together, these results suggest that the cold-responsive <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NAC1 may be involved in cold tolerance of banana fruits through its interaction with ICE1-CBF cold signalling pathway, providing new insights into the regulatory activity of NAC TF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28..346E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28..346E"><span>Cosmogenic Noble Gases and Their Production Rates in Eucrites, Diogenites, and Howardites: Common Asteroid Break-up Events 38 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, 21 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and 6 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Ago</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.</p> <p>1993-07-01</p> <p>It is likely that the eucrites and their associates, the howardites and diogenites, sample the surface and shallow interior of a single parent body, possibly 4 Vesta (cf. [1] and [2]). A break-up event that reaches deep enough may, thus, eject asteroidal fragments representing meteorites from all three classes. In this work we present a comprehensive investigation of the exposure age clusters for howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs). Cosmic-ray exposure ages critically depend on the production rates for cosmic-ray produced nuclei. For eucrites shielding independent production rates for ^21Ne and ^38Ar have been determined previously [3,4]. We now present production rates of ^3He, ^21Ne, ^33Ar, ^78Kr, ^83Kr, and ^126Xe for eucrites, howardites, and diogenites as a function of shielding, where appropriate, and of target element abundances as derived on the basis of ^81Kr-Kr ages. E.g., for ^21Ne we obtain: P(sub)21 (EUC) = 8.43 P^1(sub)21 [16.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 10.3]^-1, P(sub)21 (HOW) = 6.16 P^1(sub)21 [18.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 14.1]^-1, P(sub)21 (DIO) = 4.81 P^1(sub)21 [25.7 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 23.7]^-1, where P^1(sub)21 = 1.63 [Mg] + 0.6 [Al] + 0.32 [Si] + 0.22 [S] + 0.07 [Ca] + 0.021 [Fe + Ni] as given by [3]. (Elemental abundance [x] in weight %, P(sub)21 in 10^10 cm^3 STP/g, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>). Average cosmic-ray exposure ages were derived from as many nuclei as possible for 14 HEDs analyzed by us (see also [5,6]) and for those compiled by [7]. Two major exposure age clusters at 21 and 38 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> are represented in all three meteorite classes (Fig. 1). In the cluster at 21 +- 4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> are 12 out of 39 eucrites, 6 out of 14 howardites, and 7out of 12 diogenites. In the cluster at 38 +- 8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> are 6 eucrites, 5 howardites, and 4 diogenites. A third common break-up event at 5 +- 1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> is indicated by the remaining diogenite, three eucrites, and one howardite. Schultz [8] found major clusters for eucrites at 13, 21, 26, and 40 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> for howardites around 10 and 24 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3290922','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3290922"><span>Effectiveness of the Novel Herbal Medicine, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>, and Its Bioconversion Product, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128, on the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chung, Tae Ho; Kang, Tae Jin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Im, Ga Young; Lee, Geum Seon; Yang, Min Cheol; Cho, Chang-Won; Ma, Jin Yeul</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to determine if oral administration of the novel herbal medicine, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>, and its Lactobacillus acidophilus-fermented product, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128, has therapeutic properties for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Using AD-induced BALB/c mice by Ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide, the effectiveness of KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 on AD was evaluated. Oral administration of KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 reduced major clinical signs of AD including erythema/darkening, edema/papulation, excoriations, lichenification/prurigo, and dryness. Interestingly, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 more significantly improved AD-related symptoms including decrease of IgE level in the plasma as well as reduction of scratching behavior, skin severity in the AD BALB/c model. HPLC analysis showed the significant changes in the constituent patterns between KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128. Our results suggest that both KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 have potential for therapeutic reagent for the treatment of AD, and further, the efficacy is significantly enhanced by L. acidophilus fermentation via increases in its indicator molecule. PMID:22454683</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998tx19.confE.259S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998tx19.confE.259S"><span>First results from Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>: The Dutch Pulsar machine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stappers, B. W.; Ramachandran, R.; Kouwenhoven, M.; Voute, L.</p> <p>1998-12-01</p> <p>A new pulsar machine, called Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>, has been developed in the Netherlands and has recently been installed at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span> takes advantage of high speed DSPs to carry out FFTs of the incoming data rather than the traditional filter approach to sampling the bandpass. This enables the formation of very fine frequency channels thus greatly improving the ability to correct for dispersion across the bandpass. The system is also very versatile allowing the approriate number channels to be chosen for a particular experiment. As the data are sampled at 20 MHz very high time resolution can also be acheived. It is also possible to record 10 MHz of raw bandwidth which can be coherently dedispersed off-line. I will present the initial results from a number of projects which we are undertaking, including a globular cluster survey, high resolution pulse studies and polarimetry.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1033234','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1033234"><span>Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE (draft)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shlachter, Jack</p> <p>2010-09-08</p> <p>To achieve breakthrough scientific discoveries in the 21st century, a convergence and integration of world-leading experimental facilities and capabilities with theory, modeling, and simulation is necessary. In this issue of Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas, I am excited to present our plans for Los Alamos National Laboratory's future flagship experimental facility, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes). <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE is a facility that will provide transformational understanding of matter in extreme conditions required to reduce or resolve key weapons performance uncertainties, develop the materials needed for advanced energy systems, and transform our ability to create materials by design. Our unique role in materials science starting with the Manhattan Project has positioned us well to develop a contemporary materials strategy pushing the frontiers of controlled functionality - the design and tailoring of a material for the unique demands of a specific application. Controlled functionality requires improvement in understanding of the structure and properties of materials in order to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. In the nuclear weapons program today, improving data and models to increase confidence in the stockpile can take years from concept to new knowledge. Our goal with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE is to accelerate this process by enhancing predictive capability - the ability to compute a priori the observables of an experiment or test and pertinent confidence intervals using verified and validated simulation tools. It is a science-based approach that includes the use of advanced experimental tools, theoretical models, and multi-physics codes, simultaneously dealing with multiple aspects of physical operation of a system that are needed to develop an increasingly mature predictive capability. This same approach is needed to accelerate improvements to other systems such as nuclear reactors. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE will be valuable to many national security</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3753565','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3753565"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sharman, Joanna L.; Gerloff, Dietlind L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Summary: The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive ‘exploration-style’ visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein–protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Availability and Implementation: Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org Contact: joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23894142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23894142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23894142"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharman, Joanna L; Gerloff, Dietlind L</p> <p>2013-09-15</p> <p>The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive 'exploration-style' visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>GnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein-protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..CAL.F4004D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..CAL.F4004D"><span>Entropic derivation of F=<span class="hlt">ma</span> for circular motion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duncan, Michael; Singleton, Douglas; Myrzakulov, Ratbay</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>We examine the entropic picture of Newton's second law for the case of circular motion. It is shown that one must make modifications to the derivation of F = <span class="hlt">ma</span> due to a change in the effective Unruh temperature for circular motion. These modifications present a challenge to the entropic derivation of Newton's second law, but also open up the possibility to experimentally test and constrain this model for large centripetal accelerations. (Phys. Lett. B 703 (2011) 516-518)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993ITM....29.1027P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993ITM....29.1027P"><span>Design of a 500 MJ, 5 <span class="hlt">MA</span> power supply</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pappas, J. A.; Headifen, G. R.; Weldon, J. M.; Wright, J. C.; Zowarka, R. C.; Aanstoos, T. A.; Kajs, J. H.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The design of a 500 MJ, 5 <span class="hlt">MA</span> power supply for rail gun experiments under the Battery Upgraded Supply (BUS) program is examined. About 50,000 12-volt lead acid batteries are required to reach this level. BUS will be required to perform up to two discharges per week. Therefore, BUS is designed to be a low-maintenance, reliable, and fault-tolerant power supply. The design of BUS and the details of its subsystems are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.737a2005M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhCS.737a2005M"><span>Adiabatic modulation of cnoidal wave by Kuznetsov - <span class="hlt">Ma</span> soliton</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Makarov, V. A.; Petnikova, V. M.; Shuvalov, V. V.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The problem of nonlinear interaction of a cnoidal wave (a “fast” component of vector light field) with localized in time and periodic in space control signal in the form of Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> soliton (a "slow" component of the same field) is analytically solved in the adiabatic approximation. The conditions which must be fulfilled for stable propagation of the obtained solution with amplitude and frequency modulation are determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NucFu..56k2024K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NucFu..56k2024K"><span>Effect of the European design of TBMs on ITER wall loads due to fast ions in the baseline (15 <span class="hlt">MA</span>), hybrid (12.5 <span class="hlt">MA</span>), steady-state (9 <span class="hlt">MA</span>) and half-field (7.5 <span class="hlt">MA</span>) scenarios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kurki-Suonio, T.; Äkäslompolo, S.; Särkimäki, K.; Varje, J.; Asunta, O.; Cavinato, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Hirvijoki, E.; Parail, V.; Saibene, G.; Sipilä, S.; Snicker, A.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We assess the effect of the European design of the pebble-bed helium-cooled test blanket modules (TBM) on fast ion power loads on ITER material surfaces. For this purpose, the effect of not only the TBMs but also the ferritic inserts (FI), used for mitigating the toroidal field ripple, were included in unprecedented detail in the reconstruction of the 3-dimensional magnetic field. This is important because, due to their low collisionality, fast ions follow the magnetic geometry much more faithfully than the thermal plasma. The Monte Carlo orbit-following code ASCOT was used to simulate all the foreseen operating scenarios of ITER: the baseline 15 <span class="hlt">MA</span> standard H-mode operation, the 12.5 <span class="hlt">MA</span> hybrid scenario, the 9 <span class="hlt">MA</span> advanced scenario, and the half-field scenario with helium plasma that will be ITER’s initial operating scenario. The effect of TBMs was assessed by carrying out the simulations in pairs: one including only the effect of ferritic inserts, and the other including also the perturbation due to TBMs. Both thermonuclear fusion alphas and NBI ions from ITER heating beams were addressed. The TBMs are found to increase the power loads, but the absolute values remain small. Neither do they produce any additional hot spots.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000ITNS...47...91V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000ITNS...47...91V"><span>Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>, the first fully digital pulsar machine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Haren, P. C.; Voute, J. L. L.; Beijaard, T. D.; Driesens, D.; Kouwenhoven, M. L. A.; Langerak, J. J.</p> <p>2000-04-01</p> <p>Pulsars are neutron stars, rapidly rotating remains of supernova explosions, emitting bundles of broadband electromagnetic radiation. To carry out pulsar observations, two hurdles have to be overcome. Typically, the signal-to-noise ratio is poor, requiring long observations and large bandwidths. Next there is dispersion, causing the pulsating signals to smear out and calls for narrow signal bands. Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>, the first Dutch pulsar machine, uses digital signal processing to split the incoming signal in up to thousands of narrow bands. The processor based design also increases flexibility as it allows different observational modes by loading the appropriate software into the signal processors. In total 192 SHARC processors (ADSP 21062) deliver the processing capacity. For Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span> a general purpose 6-processor SHARC board was developed, optimized for concurrent use of data busses. Other parts are commercially available components and all is joined in a VME environment. Mid 1998 Pu<span class="hlt">Ma</span> was installed at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the Netherlands and its commissioning is completed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFMDI51B2671G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFMDI51B2671G"><span>Dynamic topography and lithospheric stresses since 400<span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Greff-Lefftz, M.; Besse, J., Sr.; Robert, B.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We present a model of dynamic topography and lithospheric stresses in a reference frame linked to the fixed Africa since 400 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. We start with a simple geodynamical model in which we combine contributions due to subducted lithosphere and to long wavelength upwellings during the last 400 million years. Once built this model of temporal variation of the large-scale mantle heterogeneities, we calculate the associated surface topography and lithospheric stresses and compare them with geological observations. We discuss the temporal evolution of the topographic spectrum and the permanent extensional regime over Africa. Indeed, the Peri-Pacific girdle of subduction creates a large-wavelength positive topography at the center of the ring, that is to say over Africa. The superimposition of this extension with the one induced by the dome at the bottom of the mantle leads to a permanent extensional regime over Africa which creates faults with azimuth directions depending on the direction of the most active part of the ring of subductions. We obtain fractures with an NW-SE azimuth during the period 275-165 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and with an E-W direction, between 155-95 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Finally, during the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic, we correlate the permanent extensional regime over Africa with the observed direction of the rifts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6500N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6500N"><span>SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> web-based observation data information system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Novellino, Antonio; Benedetti, Giacomo; D'Angelo, Paolo; Confalonieri, Fabio; Massa, Francesco; Povero, Paolo; Tercier-Waeber, Marie-Louise</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>It is well recognized that the need of sharing ocean data among non-specialized users is constantly increasing. Initiatives that are built upon international standards will contribute to simplify data processing and dissemination, improve user-accessibility also through web browsers, facilitate the sharing of information across the integrated network of ocean observing systems; and ultimately provide a better understanding of the ocean functioning. The SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> (Integrated in Situ Chemical MApping probe) Project is developing an open and modular sensing solution for autonomous in situ high resolution mapping of a wide range of anthropogenic and natural chemical compounds coupled to master bio-physicochemical parameters (www.schema-ocean.eu). The SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> web system is designed to ensure user-friendly data discovery, access and download as well as interoperability with other projects through a dedicated interface that implements the Global Earth Observation System of Systems - Common Infrastructure (GCI) recommendations and the international Open Geospatial Consortium - Sensor Web Enablement (OGC-SWE) standards. This approach will insure data accessibility in compliance with major European Directives and recommendations. Being modular, the system allows the plug-and-play of commercially available probes as well as new sensor probess under development within the project. The access to the network of monitoring probes is provided via a web-based system interface that, being implemented as a SOS (Sensor Observation Service), is providing standard interoperability and access tosensor observations systems through O&M standard - as well as sensor descriptions - encoded in Sensor Model Language (SensorML). The use of common vocabularies in all metadatabases and data formats, to describe data in an already harmonized and common standard is a prerequisite towards consistency and interoperability. Therefore, the SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> SOS has adopted the SeaVox common vocabularies populated by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.6592D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.6592D"><span><span class="hlt">MA</span>_MISS: Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>De Sanctis, M. C.; Coradini, A.; Ammannito, E.; Boccaccini, A.; Di Iorio, T.; Battistelli, E.; Capanni, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>A Drilling system, coupled with an in situ analysis package, is installed on the ExoMars Pasteur Rover to perform in situ investigations up to 2m in the Mars soil. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_Miss (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) is a spectrometer devoted to observe the lateral wall of the borehole generated by the Drilling system. The instrument is fully integrated with the Drill and shares its structure and electronics. For the first time in Mars exploration experiments the water/geochemical environment will be investigated as function of depth in the shallow subsurface. Samples from the subsurface of Martian soil are unaltered by weathering process, oxidation and erosion. Subsurface access can be the key to look for signs of present and past environmental conditions, associated to the possibility for life (water, volatiles and weathering process). The analysis of uncontaminated samples by means of instrumented Drill and in situ observations is the solution for unambiguous interpretation of the original environment that leading to the formation of rocks. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_Miss experiment is perfectly suited to perform multispectral imaging of the drilled layers. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_Miss is a miniaturized near-infrared imaging spectrometer in the range 0.4-2.2 µm with 20nm spectral sampling. The task of illuminating the borehole wall and collecting the diffused light from the illuminated spot on the target requires a transparent window on the Drill tool, which shall prevent the dust contamination of the optical and mechanical elements inside. Hardness of sapphire is the closest to diamond one, thus avoiding the risk of scratches on its surface. The Sapphire window is cylindrical, and bounded such as to realize a continuous auger profile. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_Miss Optical Head performs the double task of illuminating the borehole wall with a spot around 1 mm diameter and of collecting the scattered light coming from a 0.1 mm diameter spot of the target. The signal from the Optical Head to the spectrometer is transferred</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25691910','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25691910"><span>Neuroprotective effect of gui zhi (ramulus cinnamomi) on <span class="hlt">ma</span> huang- (herb ephedra-) induced toxicity in rats treated with a <span class="hlt">ma</span> huang-gui zhi herb pair.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zheng, Fang-Hao; Wei, Ping; Huo, Hui-Ling; Xing, Xue-Feng; Chen, Fei-Long; Tan, Xiao-Mei; Luo, Jia-Bo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Herb Ephedra (<span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang in Chinese) and Ramulus Cinnamomi (Gui Zhi in Chinese) are traditional Chinese herbs, often used together to treat asthma, nose and lung congestion, and fever with anhidrosis. Due to the adverse effects of ephedrine, clinical use of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang is restricted. However, Gui Zhi extract has been reported to decrease spontaneous activity in rats and exert anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. The present study explored the possible inhibitory effect of Gui Zhi on <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-induced neurotoxicity in rats when the two herbs were used in combination. All <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang and <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts were prepared using methods of traditional Chinese medicine and were normalized based on the ephedrine content. Two-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 rats/group) were administered <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang or the <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts for 7 days (ephedrine = 48 mg/kg), and locomotor activity was measured. After 7 days, oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex was measured. Gui Zhi decreased hyperactivity and sensitization produced by repeated <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang administration and attenuated oxidative stress induced by <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang. The results of this study demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of Gui Zhi in <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-induced hyperactivity and oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex of rats when used in combination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321680','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321680"><span>Neuroprotective Effect of Gui Zhi (Ramulus Cinnamomi) on <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang- (Herb Ephedra-) Induced Toxicity in Rats Treated with a <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-Gui Zhi Herb Pair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zheng, Fang-hao; Wei, Ping; Huo, Hui-ling; Xing, Xue-feng; Chen, Fei-long; Tan, Xiao-mei; Luo, Jia-bo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Herb Ephedra (<span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang in Chinese) and Ramulus Cinnamomi (Gui Zhi in Chinese) are traditional Chinese herbs, often used together to treat asthma, nose and lung congestion, and fever with anhidrosis. Due to the adverse effects of ephedrine, clinical use of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang is restricted. However, Gui Zhi extract has been reported to decrease spontaneous activity in rats and exert anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. The present study explored the possible inhibitory effect of Gui Zhi on <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-induced neurotoxicity in rats when the two herbs were used in combination. All <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang and <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts were prepared using methods of traditional Chinese medicine and were normalized based on the ephedrine content. Two-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 rats/group) were administered <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang or the <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts for 7 days (ephedrine = 48 mg/kg), and locomotor activity was measured. After 7 days, oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex was measured. Gui Zhi decreased hyperactivity and sensitization produced by repeated <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang administration and attenuated oxidative stress induced by <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang. The results of this study demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of Gui Zhi in <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang-induced hyperactivity and oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex of rats when used in combination. PMID:25691910</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-05/pdf/E9-31222.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-05/pdf/E9-31222.pdf"><span>75 FR 435 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-05</p> <p>...: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... the possession and control of the Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, <span class="hlt">MA</span>... Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst professional staff in consultation with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04065&hterms=atlantic+ocean+mercury&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Datlantic%2Bocean%2Bmercury','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04065&hterms=atlantic+ocean+mercury&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Datlantic%2Bocean%2Bmercury"><span>Astronaut Scott Carpenter being recovered from Ocean after <span class="hlt">MA</span>-7 flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-01-01</p> <p>Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 7 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-7) mission, is seen being recovered from Atlantic Ocean after <span class="hlt">MA</span>-7 flight. A diver helps Carpenter into a life raft while the capsule floats nearby.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04065&hterms=ocean+life&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Docean%2Blife','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04065&hterms=ocean+life&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Docean%2Blife"><span>Astronaut Scott Carpenter being recovered from Ocean after <span class="hlt">MA</span>-7 flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-01-01</p> <p>Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 7 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-7) mission, is seen being recovered from Atlantic Ocean after <span class="hlt">MA</span>-7 flight. A diver helps Carpenter into a life raft while the capsule floats nearby.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.57 - Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... § 422.57 Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans. An RFB society that offers an <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plan may offer that plan only to members of the church, or convention or group of churches with which the society...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.57 - Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... Enrollment § 422.57 Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans. An RFB society that offers an <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plan may offer that plan only to members of the church, or convention or group of churches with which the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.57 - Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... Enrollment § 422.57 Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans. An RFB society that offers an <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plan may offer that plan only to members of the church, or convention or group of churches with which the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-57.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.57 - Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... § 422.57 Limited enrollment under <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plans. An RFB society that offers an <span class="hlt">MA</span> RFB plan may offer that plan only to members of the church, or convention or group of churches with which the society...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1378987','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1378987"><span>SDSS-IV/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: Spectrophotometric calibration technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yan, Renbin; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Schlegel, David J.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cherinka, Brian; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Hogg, David W.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai</p> <p>2015-12-21</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2'' fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600-10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This then requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Thus, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. In using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's wavelength range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....151....8Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....151....8Y"><span>SDSS-IV/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: Spectrophotometric Calibration Technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yan, Renbin; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Schlegel, David J.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cherinka, Brian; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Hogg, David W.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600-10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's wavelength range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1378987-sdss-iv-manga-spectrophotometric-calibration-technique','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1378987-sdss-iv-manga-spectrophotometric-calibration-technique"><span>SDSS-IV/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: Spectrophotometric calibration technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Yan, Renbin; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; ...</p> <p>2015-12-21</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2'' fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600-10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss duemore » to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This then requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Thus, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. In using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's wavelength range.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22520041','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22520041"><span>SDSS-IV/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Wake, David A.; Law, David R.; Schlegel, David J.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Cherinka, Brian; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; and others</p> <p>2016-01-15</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600–10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA's wavelength range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2931663','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2931663"><span>Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS: A Roadmap for Success</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fister, K. Renee</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The manuscript outlines the impact that our National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences program, Bio<span class="hlt">Ma</span>PS, has had on the students and faculty at Murray State University. This interdisciplinary program teams mathematics and biology undergraduate students with mathematics and biology faculty and has produced research insights and curriculum developments at the intersection of these two disciplines. The goals, structure, achievements, and curriculum initiatives are described in relation to the effects they have had to enhance the study of biomathematics. PMID:20810948</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8140M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8140M"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>NIDA: an operational infrastructure for shipborne data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Macario, Ana; Scientific MaNIDA Team</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The Marine Network for Integrated Data Access (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NIDA) aims to build a sustainable e-Infrastruture to support discovery and re-use of data archived in a distributed network of data providers in Germany (see related abstracts in session ESSI1.2 and session ESSI2.2). Because one of the primary focus of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NIDA is the underway data acquired on board of German academic research vessels, we will be addressing various issues related to cruise-level metadata, shiptrack navigation, sampling events conducted during the cruise (event logs), standardization of device-related (type, name, parameters) and place-related (gazetteer) vocabularies, QA/QC procedures (near real time and post-cruise validation, corrections, quality flags) as well as ingestion and management of contextual information (e.g. various types of cruise-related reports and project-related information). One of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NIDA's long-term goal is to be able to offer an integrative "one-stop-shop" framework for management and access of ship-related information based on international standards and interoperability. This access framework will be freely available and is intended for scientists, funding agencies and the public. The master "catalog" we are building currently contains information from 13 German academic research vessels and respective cruises (to date ~1900 cruises with expected growing rate of ~150 cruises annually). Moreover, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NIDA's operational infrastructure will additionally provide a direct pipeline to SeaDataNet Cruise Summary Report Inventory, among others. In this presentation, we will focus on the extensions we are currently implementing to support automated acquisition and standardized transfer of various types of data from German research vessels to hosts on land. Our concept towards nationwide common QA/QC procedures for various types of underway data (including versioning concept) and common workflows will also be presented. The "linking" of cruise-related information with quality-controlled data</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140001469','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140001469"><span>Advanced Query and Data Mining Capabilities for <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Paul; Wallick, Michael N.; Allard, Daniel A.; Gladden, Roy E.; Hy, Franklin H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Mars Relay Operational Service (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS) comprises a number of tools to coordinate, plan, and visualize various aspects of the Mars Relay network. These levels include a Web-based user interface, a back-end "ReSTlet" built in Java, and databases that store the data as it is received from the network. As part of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS, the innovators have developed and implemented a feature set that operates on several levels of the software architecture. This new feature is an advanced querying capability through either the Web-based user interface, or through a back-end REST interface to access all of the data gathered from the network. This software is not meant to replace the REST interface, but to augment and expand the range of available data. The current REST interface provides specific data that is used by the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS Web application to display and visualize the information; however, the returned information from the REST interface has typically been pre-processed to return only a subset of the entire information within the repository, particularly only the information that is of interest to the GUI (graphical user interface). The new, advanced query and data mining capabilities allow users to retrieve the raw data and/or to perform their own data processing. The query language used to access the repository is a restricted subset of the structured query language (SQL) that can be built safely from the Web user interface, or entered as freeform SQL by a user. The results are returned in a CSV (Comma Separated Values) format for easy exporting to third party tools and applications that can be used for data mining or user-defined visualization and interpretation. This is the first time that a service is capable of providing access to all cross-project relay data from a single Web resource. Because <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS contains the data for a variety of missions from the Mars network, which span both NASA and ESA, the software also establishes an access control list (ACL) on each data record</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-56.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-56.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.56 - Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. 422.56 Section 422.56... Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. (a) General. An individual is not eligible to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan unless the... Department of Defense under 38 U.S.C. chapter 17, may not enroll in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. (c) Individuals...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-56.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-56.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.56 - Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. 422.56 Section 422.56... § 422.56 Enrollment in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. (a) General. An individual is not eligible to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... 55 or the Department of Defense under 38 U.S.C. chapter 17, may not enroll in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. (c...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.2663S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.2663S"><span>Identifying the complex melting reaction from 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 14 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in Tsona leucogranite in Southern Tibet: geochemistry, zircon U-Pb chronology and Hf isotopes evidence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Qingshang; Zhao, Zhidan; Liu, Dong; Zhu, Di-Cheng</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The Miocene leucogranites, the record of the evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan Orogen, extensively intruded the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS), and distributed along the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) (Guo and Wilson, 2012). Here we present a study of geochemistry, zircon U-Pb chronology and Hf isotopes on the Yamarong leucogranites from Tsona area, Eastern Himalaya, to explore the petrogenesis of the rocks, including melting condition and mechanism, and source of fluid within the magmatism through time. Our new results include: (1) The age of the Yamarong leucogranites range from 14 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (YM1510-1 = 19.7 ± 0.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, n = 13; YM1502-1 = 17.5 ± 0.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, n = 12; YM1412 =14.2 ± 0.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, n = 18), which suggest that the anataxis processes have lasted for more than 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. (2) The geochemical features are different between the rocks with changing ages, especially between 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The Rb/Sr value of 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> leucogranites (4.1-6.84) is lower than that of 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> samples (5.12-19.02). The 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> leucogranites have higher Ba contents (188-337 ppm) than that of 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> rocks (50-158ppm), which exhibit different trends in the Rb/Sr versus Ba plot, and reveal different melting reaction from 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. (Inger and Harris, 1993) (3) The ɛHf(t) isotopes of 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> leucogranites are lower (average ɛHf(t) = -12.5) than that of 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> ones (average ɛHf(t) = -10), which implies differential dissolution of inherited zircon during two partial melting events possibly due to different fluid contribution (Gao et al., 2017); (4) The positive linear relationship of LREEs versus Th in the rocks, with relatively higher contents of Th and LREEs in the 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and lower in the 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> leucogranites, which suggests the relationship were mostly controlled by monazite. And this further indicates more monazite was dissolved from the source region in the early stage (˜20<span class="hlt">Ma</span>) than the later (17<span class="hlt">Ma</span>) (Gao et al., 2017). In summary, our study provides new evidence for the complex melting</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.553 - Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's... Change of Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 422.553 Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization leases all or part of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.553 - Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's... Change of Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 422.553 Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization leases all or part of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.553 - Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's... Change of Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 422.553 Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization leases all or part of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s64_10801.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s64_10801.html"><span>Astronauts Carpenter and Glenn relax following breakfast during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6 activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-02-01</p> <p>S64-10801 (1962) --- Astronauts M. Scott Carpenter (far left) and John H. Glenn Jr. relax following breakfast during Mercury Atlas 6 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-6) preflight activity. Glenn is the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6 pilot. Carpenter is the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6 backup pilot. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22242248','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22242248"><span>Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong</p> <p>2014-01-03</p> <p>Highlights: •Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> might contribute to Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mas&pg=2&id=EJ932627','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mas&pg=2&id=EJ932627"><span>Emerging: The Impact of the Artist Teacher Scheme <span class="hlt">MA</span> on Students' Pedagogical and Artistic Practices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Page, Tara; Adams, Jeff; Hyde, Wendy</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The United Kingdom Artist Teacher Scheme (ATS) commissioned a study of the artistic and pedagogical practices of students on a recently established Artist Teacher Scheme <span class="hlt">MA</span> (ATS <span class="hlt">MA</span>). The aims of this study were to: investigate the motives and objectives teachers/educators have for undertaking this ATS <span class="hlt">MA</span> programme, the impact the programme had on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.553 - Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's... Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 422.553 Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization leases all or part of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.53 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing... Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment § 422.53 Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents. (a) Basic eligibility requirements. To be eligible to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> senior housing facility plan...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.53 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing... Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment § 422.53 Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents. (a) Basic eligibility requirements. To be eligible to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> senior housing facility plan...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.53 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing... Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment § 422.53 Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents. (a) Basic eligibility requirements. To be eligible to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> senior housing facility plan...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-553.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.553 - Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's... Ownership or Leasing of Facilities During Term of Contract § 422.553 Effect of leasing of an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's facilities. (a) General effect of leasing. If an <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization leases all or part of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26197349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26197349"><span>Relationship between methamphetamine use history and segmental hair analysis findings of <span class="hlt">MA</span> users.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Han, Eunyoung; Lee, Sangeun; In, Sanghwan; Park, Meejung; Park, Yonghoon; Cho, Sungnam; Shin, Junguk; Lee, Hunjoo</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between methamphetamine (<span class="hlt">MA</span>) use history and segmental hair analysis (1 and 3cm sections) and whole hair analysis results in Korean <span class="hlt">MA</span> users in rehabilitation programs. Hair samples were collected from 26 Korean <span class="hlt">MA</span> users. Eleven of the 26 subjects used cannabis with <span class="hlt">MA</span> and two used cocaine, opiates, and MDMA with <span class="hlt">MA</span>. Self-reported single dose of <span class="hlt">MA</span> from the 26 subjects ranged from 0.03 to 0.5g/one time. Concentrations of <span class="hlt">MA</span> and its metabolite amphetamine (AP) in hair were determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after derivatization. The method used was well validated. Qualitative analysis from all 1cm sections (n=154) revealed a good correlation between positive or negative results for <span class="hlt">MA</span> in hair and self-reported <span class="hlt">MA</span> use (69.48%, n=107). In detail, <span class="hlt">MA</span> results were positive in 66 hair specimens of <span class="hlt">MA</span> users who reported administering <span class="hlt">MA</span>, and <span class="hlt">MA</span> results were negative in 41 hair specimens of <span class="hlt">MA</span> users who denied <span class="hlt">MA</span> administration in the corresponding month. Test results were false-negative in 10.39% (n=16) of hair specimens and false-positive in 20.13% (n=31) of hair specimens. In false positive cases, it is considered that after <span class="hlt">MA</span> cessation it continued to be accumulated in hair still, while in false negative cases, self-reported histories showed a small amount of <span class="hlt">MA</span> use or <span class="hlt">MA</span> use 5-7 months previously. In terms of quantitative analysis, the concentrations of <span class="hlt">MA</span> in 1 and 3cm long hair segments and in whole hair samples ranged from 1.03 to 184.98 (mean 22.01), 2.26 to 89.33 (mean 18.71), and 0.91 to 124.49 (mean 15.24)ng/mg, respectively. Ten subjects showed a good correlation between <span class="hlt">MA</span> use and <span class="hlt">MA</span> concentration in hair. Correlation coefficient (r) of 7 among 10 subjects ranged from 0.71 to 0.98 (mean 0.85). Four subjects showed a low correlation between <span class="hlt">MA</span> use and <span class="hlt">MA</span> concentration in hair. Correlation coefficient (r) of 4 subjects ranged from 0.36 to 0.55. Eleven subjects showed a poor</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920019826&hterms=Pix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPix','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920019826&hterms=Pix&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPix"><span>Topography of Apollinaris Patera and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'adim Vallis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thornhill, G. D.; Rothery, D. A.; Murray, J. B.; Day, T.; Cook, A.; Muller, J.-P.; Iliffe, J. C.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Digital elevation models of the northern part of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'adim Vallis (603a41 607m/pix, 639a91 721m/pix), and Apollinaris Patera (603a42 612m/pix, 639a92 717m/pix), covering the area between 180 degrees to 190 degrees long and -2 degrees to -20 degrees lat. were obtained using a method described here. The results for the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'adim Vallis area show broad agreement with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic map of the area with a channel depth of 1 to 2 km. A detailed study of the variations in the channel depth along its course and calculations of its discharge rate from channel cross section and slope are currently being undertaken. Results for Apollinaris Patera have been obtained, although the absolute heights relative to the Mars datum are not well constrained. However, the relative heights are sufficient for some analysis. Again, the topographic map is in reasonable agreement with the USGS map of the area, although there are significant differences.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150012003&hterms=markup&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmarkup','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150012003&hterms=markup&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dmarkup"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS Strategic Relay Planning and Coordination Interfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Allard, Daniel A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The Mars Relay Operations Service (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS) is designed to provide planning and analysis tools in support of ongoing Mars Network relay operations. Strategic relay planning requires coordination between lander and orbiter mission ground data system (GDS) teams to schedule and execute relay communications passes. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ROS centralizes this process, correlating all data relevant to relay coordination to provide a cohesive picture of the relay state. Service users interact with the system through thin-layer command line and web user interface client applications. Users provide and utilize data such as lander view periods of orbiters, Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna tracks, and reports of relay pass performance. Users upload and download relevant relay data via formally defined and documented file structures including some described in Extensible Markup Language (XML). Clients interface with the system via an http-based Representational State Transfer (ReST) pattern using Javascript Object Notation (JSON) formats. This paper will provide a general overview of the service architecture and detail the software interfaces and considerations for interface design.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6368328','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6368328"><span>Oxidation of Inconel alloy <span class="hlt">MA</span>754 at low oxidation potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Braski, D.N.; Goodell, P.D.; Cathcart, J.V.; Kane, R.H.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>It has been known for some time that the addition of small oxide particles to an 80 Ni-20 Cr alloy not only increases its elevated-temperature strength, but also markedly improves its resistance to oxidation. The mechanism by which the oxide dispersoid enhances the oxidation resistance was studied. Initial experiments were performed using inconel alloy <span class="hlt">MA</span>754, which is nominally: 78 Ni, 20 Cr, 0.05 C, 0.3 Al, 0.5 Ti, 1.0 Fe, and 0.6 Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (wt %). Small disks (3 mm diam x 0.38 mm thick) were cut from <span class="hlt">MA</span>754 plate stock and prepared with two different surface conditions. The first was prepared by mechanically polishing one side of a disk through 0.5 ..mu..m diamond on a syntron polisher while the second used an additional sulfuric acid-methanol electropolishing treatment to remove the cold-worked surface layer. Disks having both surface treatments were oxidized in a radiantly heated furnace for 30 s at 1000/sup 0/C. Three different environments were investigated: hydrogen with nominal dew points of 0/sup 0/C, -25/sup 0/C, and -55/sup 0/C. The oxide particles and films were examined in TEM by using extraction replicas (carbon) and by backpolishing to the oxide/metal interface. The particles were analyzed by EDS and SAD. Preliminary results are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JNuM..464...80H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JNuM..464...80H"><span>Selective laser sintering of <span class="hlt">MA</span>956 oxide dispersion strengthened steel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hunt, Ryan M.; Kramer, Kevin J.; El-Dasher, Bassem</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels' qualities of radiation damage resistance and high strength at high temperature make them promising nuclear structural materials. However, the dispersed yttria that gives ODS steel its beneficial qualities are generally compromised during joining processes, making fabrication difficult and expensive. The selective laser sintering process offers a potential path through this barrier by which net-shape parts can feasibly be built via additive manufacturing without fully melting the structure. Rastering a 400 W laser over a 110 μm <span class="hlt">MA</span>956 ODS steel powder bed, we additively built parts with varying build conditions. Although density was achieved to within 97% of the wrought <span class="hlt">MA</span>956, ultimate tensile strengths achieved only 65% of the wrought strength. Spectroscopy analysis points to the agglomeration of the yttria nano-particles as a possible explanation for the loss in strength. Further study might benefit from exploration of other parameters such as thinner powder build layers which would require less energy input to achieve sintering while minimizing time above the melting temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/14628','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/14628"><span>Science and Technology of the 10-<span class="hlt">MA</span> Spherical Tori</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Peng, Y-K.M.</p> <p>1999-11-14</p> <p>The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 <span class="hlt">MA</span> in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 <span class="hlt">MA</span> in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991NIMPB..56.1236H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991NIMPB..56.1236H"><span>5 MV 30 <span class="hlt">mA</span> industrial electron processing system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hoshi, Y.; Mizusawa, K.</p> <p>1991-05-01</p> <p>Industrial electron beam processing systems have been in use in various application fields such as: improving heat resistivity of wire insulation; controlling quality of automobile rubber tires and melt index characteristics of PE foams; and curing paintings or printing inks. Recently, there has come up a need for electron beam with an energy higher than 3 MV in order to disinfect salmonella in chicken meat, to kill bugs in fruits, and to sterilize medical disposables. To meet this need we developed a 5 MV 30 <span class="hlt">mA</span> electron processing system with an X-ray conversion target. The machine was tested in NHV's plant in Kyoto at continuous operation of full voltage and full current. It proved to be very steady in operation with a high efficiency (as much as 72%). Also, the X-ray target was tested in a continuous run of 5 MV 30 <span class="hlt">mA</span> (150 kW). It proved to be viable in industrial utilization. This paper introduces the process and the results of the development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984E%26PSL..70..325B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984E%26PSL..70..325B"><span>Breakup of a supercontinent between 625 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 555 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> - New evidence and implications for continental histories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bond, G. C.; Nickeson, P. A.; Kominz, M. A.</p> <p>1984-10-01</p> <p>Tectonic subsidence histories for the early Paleozoic miogeoclines support hypotheses that pertain to the existence and fragmentation of a late Proterozoic supercontinent, and suggest novel, testable hypotheses for the configuration of such a landmass and the timing of a major phase in its eventual breakup and dispersal. Analyses of tectonic subsidence constrain the timing of a widespread episode of continental breakup to a relatively narrow interval between 625 and 555 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. It is concluded that the geologic evidence of the breakup event in early Paleozoic miogeoclines occurs in strata of Vendian and earliest Cambrian age.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25097074','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25097074"><span>A ripening-induced transcription factor <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 interacts with promoters of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/2 from banana fruit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ba, Liang-Jie; Shan, Wei; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Chen, Jian-Ye; Lu, Wang-Jin; Kuang, Jian-Fei</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The ripening-induced <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 acts as a transcriptional activator, and might be involved in banana fruit ripening partly through directly activating the expression of two ripening-associated genes, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/2. BSD (BTF2-like transcription factors, synapse-associated proteins and DOS2-like proteins) transcription factors are characterized by a typical BSD domain. However, little information is available concerning their possible roles in plant growth and development, especially in fruit ripening. In the present study, one BSD gene, designated as <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1, was isolated from banana fruit. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 has an open reading frame (ORF) of 921 bp which encodes a polypeptide of 306 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 34.80 kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.54. Subcellular localization and transcriptional activation assays showed that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm and possessed transcriptional activity. RT-qPCR and promoter activity analysis indicated that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 was ethylene and ripening inducible, and the accumulation of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 transcript was correlated well with the evolution of ethylene production and ripening process. Moreover, transient assay showed that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 could activate the expression of two cell wall modification-related genes, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/2, via directly interacting with their promoters. Together, these data suggest that ripening-induced <span class="hlt">Ma</span>BSD1 acts as a transcriptional activator and might be associated with banana fruit ripening, at least partially through directly activating the expression of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/2, expanding the limited information concerning the BSD transcription factor in relation to fruit ripening.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1750899','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1750899"><span>Rae1 interaction with Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is required for bipolar spindle formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wong, Richard W.; Blobel, Günter; Coutavas, Elias</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>In eukaryotic cells, the faithful segregation of daughter chromosomes during cell division depends on formation of a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle apparatus. The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>) is recruited from interphase nuclei to spindle MTs during mitosis. The carboxy terminal domain of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> binds MTs, allowing a Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> dimer to function as a “divalent” crosslinker that bundles MTs. The messenger RNA export factor, Rae1, also binds to MTs. Lowering Rae1 or increasing Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> levels in cells results in spindle abnormalities. We have identified a mitotic-specific interaction between Rae1 and Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and have explored the relationship between Rae1 and Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> in spindle formation. We have mapped a specific binding site for Rae1 on Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> that would convert a Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> dimer to a “tetravalent” crosslinker of MTs. In mitosis, reducing Rae1 or increasing Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> concentration would be expected to alter the valency of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> toward MTs; the “density” of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>-MT crosslinks in these conditions would be diminished, even though a threshold number of crosslinks sufficient to stabilize aberrant multipolar spindles may form. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that coupling Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> overexpression to Rae1 overexpression or coupling Rae1 depletion to Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> depletion prevented the formation of aberrant spindles. Likewise, we found that overexpression of the specific Rae1-binding domain of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> in HeLa cells led to aberrant spindle formation. These data point to the Rae1–Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> interaction as a critical element for normal spindle formation in mitosis. PMID:17172455</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol5-sec495-211.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol5-sec495-211.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.211 - Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent <span class="hlt">MA</span> payment years with respect to <span class="hlt">MA</span> EPs and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... meaningful use) are not meaningful EHR users. (b) Adjustment based on payment adjustment year. The payment... subsequent payment adjustment years, if a qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> EP is not a meaningful EHR user during the payment... organization) attests that a qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>-affiliated eligible hospital is not a meaningful EHR user for a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol5-sec495-211.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol5-sec495-211.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.211 - Payment adjustments effective for 2015 and subsequent <span class="hlt">MA</span> payment years with respect to <span class="hlt">MA</span> EPs and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... meaningful use) are not meaningful EHR users. (b) Adjustment based on payment adjustment year. The payment... subsequent payment adjustment years, if a qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> EP is not a meaningful EHR user during the payment... organization) attests that a qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>-affiliated eligible hospital is not a meaningful EHR user for a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..1914492T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..1914492T"><span>SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> open and modular in situ sensing solution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tercier-Waeber, Marie Louise; Novellino, Antonio</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Marine environments are highly vulnerable and influenced by a wide diversity of anthropogenic and natural substances and organisms that may have adverse effects on the ecosystem equilibrium, on living resources and, ultimately, on human health. Identification of relevant types of hazards at the appropriate temporal and spatial scale is crucial to detect their sources and origin, to understand the processes governing their magnitude and distribution, and to ultimately evaluate and manage their risks and consequences preventing economic losses. This can be addressed only by the development of innovative, compact, rugged, automated, sensor networks allowing long-term monitoring. Development of such tools is a challenging task as it requires many analytical and technical innovations. The FP7-OCEAN 2013-SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> project aims to contribute to meet this challenge by providing an open and modular sensing solution for autonomous in situ high resolution mapping of a range of anthropogenic and natural chemical compounds (trace metals, nutrients, anthropogenic organic compounds, toxic algae species and toxins, species relevant to the carbon cycle). To achieve this, SCHe<span class="hlt">MA</span> activities focus on the development of : 1) an array of miniature sensor probes taking advantage of various innovative solutions, namely: (polymer-based) gel-integrated sensors; solid state ion-selective membrane sensors coupled to an on-line desalination module; mid-infrared optical sensors; optochemical multichannel devices; enOcean technology; 2) dedicated hardware, firmware and software components allowing their plug-and-play integration, localization as well as wireless bidirectional communication via advanced OGC-SWE wired/wireless dedicated interfaces; 3) a web-based front-end system compatible with EU standard requirements and principles (INSPIRE, GEO/GEOSS) and configured to insure easy interoperability with national, regional and local marine observation systems. This lecture will present examples of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPP13A1389G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPP13A1389G"><span>Global Paleobathymetry for the Cenomanian-Turonian (90 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Goswami, A.; Olson, P.; Hinnov, L. A.; Gnanadesikan, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We present a paleo-ocean bathymetry reconstruction for Cenomanian-Turonian (90 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) time in a 0.1°x0.1° resolution for use in paleo-climate studies. Age of the ocean floor for the Cenomanian-Turonian (90 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) is from Müller et al. (2008 a,b); coastlines are from the PALEOMAP Project (Scotese, 2011). To reconstruct paleo-ocean bathymetry, we use a plate model equation to model depth to basement (Turcotte and Schubert, 2002). We estimate plate model equation parameter values from measurements of modern oceans (Crosby et al., 2006). On top of the depth to basement, we isostatically add a multilayer sediment model derived from area-corrected sediment thickness data (Divins, 2003; Whittaker et al., 2013). Lastly, we parameterize the modern continental shelf, slope, and rise in a "sediment wedge model" to connect the coastline with the closest ocean crust as defined by Müller et al. (2008 a, b). These parameters are defined using empirical relationships obtained from study of modern ocean transects where a complete rifting history is preserved (Atlantic and Southern oceans), and the closest approach of the respective oceanic crust (Müller et al., 2008a,b) to the coastline. We use the modern ocean as a test, comparing maps and cross sections of modern ocean bathymetry modeled using our reconstruction method with that of ETOPO1 (Amante and Eakins, 2009). Adding sea plateaus and seamounts minimize the difference between our modeled bathymetry and ETOPO1. Finally, we also present a comparison of our reconstructed paleo-bathymetry to that of Müller et al. (2008 a,b) for the Cenomanian-Turonian (90 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>). References: Amante, C., Eakins, B.W., 2009, NOAA Tech. Memo. NESDIS NGDC-24, 19 p. Crosby, A., McKenzie, D., Sclater, J.G., 2006, Geophysical Journal Int. 166.2, 553-573. Divins, D., 2003, NOAA NGDC, Boulder, CO. Müller, R., Sdrolias, M., Gaina, C., Roest, W., 2008b, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 9, Q04006, doi:10.1029/2007GC001743 Müller, R., Sdrolias, M., Gaina</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMGP23A..01K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMGP23A..01K"><span>Mexican data indicating ca.700 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> breakup of Rodinia and ca.550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> separation of Avalonia: analogous to events in western Laurentia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Keppie, J. D.; Nance, R. D.; Miller, B. V.; Dostal, J.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>The supercontinent, Rodinia, appears to have been amalgamated by ca.1 Ga, however, its breakup in Laurentia appears to have occurred in two stages. Current hypotheses suggest that East Gondwana or Siberia separated from western Laurentia at ca.700 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> followed by separation of (?) South China at ca.550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> producing two superposed passive margin sequences. Although prevailing wisdom suggests that the birth of Iapetus between North and South America occurred at ca.550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, a similar 2-stage process is evident in both eastern Laurentia and Mexico. At ca.1 Ga, Mexico appears to have been located in or close to the North-South America suture and so provides crucial data. Geochronological data indicate that cooling following ca.1 Ga granulite facies orogenesis in Mexico followed two different paths. In southern Mexico the rocks initially cooled through ca.450° C at a rate of ca.8° C/my between 978 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 945 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> related to flat-slab subduction, followed by a cooling rate of ca.2° C/my through ca.150° C. In northern Mexico the rocks cooled at a steady rate of ca.1.8° C/my through ca.300° C and are cut by plume-related mafic dykes. Extrapolating these cooling paths to the surface indicates that southern Mexico reached the surface between 710 and 760 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, whereas northern Mexico reached the surface by 550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This may be partly explained by different depths of exhumation: 30 versus 37 km for southern and northern Mexico, respectively. On the other hand, the oldest rocks resting on the ca.1 Ga basement are Tremadocian (ca.490-480 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) in southern Mexico and Middle Silurian (ca.430-425 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) in northern Mexico. Thus it would appear that Mexico records two breakup stages: (1) at ca.700 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> possibly related to the breakup of Rodinia; (2) at ca.550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> possibly related to the transcurrent separation of Avalonia followed by thermal equilibration at ca.500 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> leading to subsidence and development of a passive margin. These data suggest that the breakup of Rodinia occurred at ca.700</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6423110','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6423110"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV (maneuverable reentry vehicles) PoP (probability of penetration) vs CEP (circular error probability) analysis concept study (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV Penetration Study Project)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Morris, J M</p> <p>1986-08-01</p> <p>The performance analysis of maneuverable reentry vehicles (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV) in terms of its probability of penetration (PoP) against terminal engagement with a ballistic missile defense (BMD) system and in terms of its associate circular error probability (CEP), at impact is a very complex problem. A thorough study of this problem under the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV Penetration Study Project will require the development of a number of analytical and simulation tools. As a result of a preliminary study, a <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV PoP vs CEP analysis concept has been formulated to support the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV Penetration Study Project. The concept is based on analytical models and techniques and, moreover, exploits the existing knowledge base and is physically intuitive. The analysis concept, as formulated, is applicable to arbitrary <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RV's and BMD systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvL.112i7201P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvL.112i7201P"><span>Random Fields, Topology, and the Imry-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> Argument</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Proctor, Thomas C.; Garanin, Dmitry A.; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>We consider an n-component fixed-length order parameter interacting with a weak random field in d =1, 2, 3 dimensions. Relaxation from the initially ordered state and spin-spin correlation functions are studied on lattices containing hundreds of millions of sites. At n≤d the presence of topological defects leads to strong metastability and glassy behavior, with the final state depending on the initial condition. At n=d+1, when topological structures are nonsingular, the system possesses a weak metastability. At n>d+1, when topological objects are absent, the final, lowest-energy state is independent of the initial condition. It is characterized by the exponential decay of correlations that agrees quantitatively with the theory based upon the Imry-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> argument.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3376454','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3376454"><span>Observation of Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> soliton dynamics in optical fibre</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kibler, B.; Fatome, J.; Finot, C.; Millot, G.; Genty, G.; Wetzel, B.; Akhmediev, N.; Dias, F.; Dudley, J. M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) is a central model of nonlinear science, applying to hydrodynamics, plasma physics, molecular biology and optics. The NLSE admits only few elementary analytic solutions, but one in particular describing a localized soliton on a finite background is of intense current interest in the context of understanding the physics of extreme waves. However, although the first solution of this type was the Kuznetzov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> (KM) soliton derived in 1977, there have in fact been no quantitative experiments confirming its validity. We report here novel experiments in optical fibre that confirm the KM soliton theory, completing an important series of experiments that have now observed a complete family of soliton on background solutions to the NLSE. Our results also show that KM dynamics appear more universally than for the specific conditions originally considered, and can be interpreted as an analytic description of Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence in NLSE propagation. PMID:22712052</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Galax...3..156F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Galax...3..156F"><span>Isolated Galaxies versus Interacting Pairs with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fernández, María; Yuan, Fangting; Shen, Shiyin; Yin, Jun; Chang, Ruixiang; Feng, Shuai</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We present preliminary results of the spectral analysis on the radial distributions of the star formation history in both, a galaxy merger and a spiral isolated galaxy observed with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA. We find that the central part of the isolated galaxy is composed by older stellar population ($\\sim$2 Gyr) than in the outskirts ($\\sim$7 Gyr). Also, the time-scale is gradually larger from 1 Gyr in the inner part to 3 Gyr in the outer regions of the galaxy. In the case of the merger, the stellar population in the central region is older than in the tails, presenting a longer time-scale in comparison to central part in the isolated galaxy. Our results are in agreement with a scenario where spiral galaxies are built from inside-out. In the case of the merger, we find evidence that interactions enhance star formation in the central part of the galaxy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.1794C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.1794C"><span>Evidence for an extensive Antarctic Ice Sheet by 37 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We present observational evidence that both the East and West Antarctic ice sheets had expanded to the coast by 37 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, predating, by at least 3 Myr, a major drop in atmospheric CO2 at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary widely considered responsible for Antarctic Ice Sheet expansion. Our evidence comes from the provenance (geochronology, thermochronometry, mineralogy) of iceberg-rafted debris identified in Late Eocene marine sediments from (ODP) Leg 113 Site 696 in the NW Weddell Sea. The existence of an significant Antarctic Ice Sheet in a Late Eocene high pCO2 world calls into question the role of atmospheric CO2 concentrations as the dominant mechanism for ice sheet expansion and whether topography and ocean circulation only play a secondary role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000APS..DPPMP1080P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000APS..DPPMP1080P"><span>SNL-Z wire-array initiation to 1 <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Presura, R.; Bauer, B. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Le Galloudec, N.; Sarkisov, G. S.; Shlyaptseva, A. S.; Batie, S.; Brinsmead, W.; Faretto, H.; Le Galloudec, B.; Oxner, A.; Al-Shorman, M.; Fedin, D.; McCrorey, D.; Hansen, S.; Zheng, H.; Jones, A.; Lebeau, H.; Ouart, N.; Rogowski, S.; Farley, J.; Glassman, J.</p> <p>2000-10-01</p> <p>The formation of plasma from SNL-Z-style single and nested W wire arrays is being investigated by driving such arrays with the Zebra pulsed power generator. Typically 0.9 <span class="hlt">MA</span> is driven through the load with 70 ns (0.1-0.9) rise-time and 10^13 A/s current rise rate, parameters close to the Z machine prepulse. The ratio of the current flowing through the inner array to the total current going to the load is measured as a function of time. Streaked optical spectroscopy, gated optical imaging, extreme UV spectroscopy, x-pinch backlighting, and laser diagnostics are under development. The early spectrum of perturbations and the diffusion of magnetic field are required inputs for 2D radial-axial MHD computer simulations of wire-array implosions. Topics to be investigated include the dependence of the plasma formation on load preparation and configuration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5031696','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5031696"><span>Synthesis, Biodistribution and In vitro Evaluation of Brain Permeable High Affinity Type 2 Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists [11C]<span class="hlt">MA</span>2 and [18F]<span class="hlt">MA</span>3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ahamed, Muneer; van Veghel, Daisy; Ullmer, Christoph; Van Laere, Koen; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2) is a member of the endocannabinoid system and is known for its important role in (neuro)inflammation. A PET-imaging agent that allows in vivo visualization of CB2 expression may thus allow quantification of neuroinflammation. In this paper, we report the synthesis, radiosynthesis, biodistribution and in vitro evaluation of a carbon-11 ([11C]<span class="hlt">MA</span>2) and a fluorine-18 ([18F]<span class="hlt">MA</span>3) labeled analog of a highly potent N-arylamide oxadiazole CB2 agonist (EC50 = 0.015 nM). <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 and <span class="hlt">MA</span>3 behaved as potent CB2 agonist (EC50: 3 nM and 0.1 nM, respectively) and their in vitro binding affinity for hCB2 was found to be 87 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. Also <span class="hlt">MA</span>3 (substituted with a fluoro ethyl group) was found to have higher binding affinity and EC50 values when compared to the originally reported trifluoromethyl analog 12. [11C]<span class="hlt">MA</span>2 and [18F]<span class="hlt">MA</span>3 were successfully synthesized with good radiochemical yield, high radiochemical purity and high specific activity. In mice, both tracers were efficiently cleared from blood and all major organs by the hepatobiliary pathway and importantly these compounds showed high brain uptake. In conclusion, [11C]<span class="hlt">MA</span>2 and [18F]<span class="hlt">MA</span>3 are shown to be high potent CB2 agonists with good brain uptake, these favorable characteristics makes them potential PET probes for in vivo imaging of brain CB2 receptors. However, in view of its higher affinity and selectivity, further detailed evaluation of <span class="hlt">MA</span>3 as a PET tracer for CB2 is warranted. PMID:27713686</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ESASP.532E..30G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ESASP.532E..30G"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>TeLo: Automated Testing Suite for Software Validation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guiotto, A.; Acquaroli, B.; Martelli, A.</p> <p></p> <p>It is universally known that testing has a predominant role when developing software: more and more efforts are spent on testing to detect programming faults, to evaluate the code reliability or performance, to ensure that a critical function of a system meets given requirements. The ratio of time spent on testing should not be neglected and this explains why there is a real need to improve the development process, especially as systems are becoming larger and larger. It is necessary to keep under control the schedule and budget of developments, and controlling the testing phase is a real issue, often underestimated in many industrial sectors. The industry is heightened at different stages regarding testing, and the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>TeLo project is committed to promote the use of statistical tools &methods to answer European industry's needs: • have the ability to choose relevant test cases instead of a human- biased selection • know when to stop testing (definition of a stopping criteria) instead of a vague and informal criteria • adopt an identical strategy for different developments • automate the testing process, and thus to make testing not human error prone <span class="hlt">Ma</span>TeLo (Markov Test Logic) study is a study currently under development in the frame of the IST program of the European Community. The aim of the project is to define, implement and validate a new approach for supporting the software testing activities in various industrial fields. One of the major goals is in particular to provide the software teams with a new tool able to automatically produce and execute the Test Cases starting from the software specifications. Further, the tool is conceived to provide metrics that could help technical staff to determine software quality and to evaluate how much expected results are met. The tool is based on Markov chains theory and belongs to statistical testing software tools family [Runeson] [Whittaker].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3414894','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3414894"><span>Calmodulin Binds a Highly Extended HIV-1 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Protein That Refolds Upon Its Release</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Taylor, James E.; Chow, John Y.H.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Kwan, Ann H.; Duff, Anthony P.; Hamilton, William A.; Trewhella, Jill</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Calmodulin (CaM) expression is upregulated upon HIV-1 infection and interacts with proteins involved in viral processing, including the multifunctional HIV-1 <span class="hlt">MA</span> protein. We present here the results of studies utilizing small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation that, when considered in the light of earlier fluorescence and NMR data, show CaM binds <span class="hlt">MA</span> in an extended open-clamp conformation via interactions with two tryptophans that are widely spaced in sequence and space. The interaction requires a disruption of the <span class="hlt">MA</span> tertiary fold such that <span class="hlt">MA</span> becomes highly extended in a long snakelike conformation. The CaM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> interface is extensive, covering ∼70% of the length of the <span class="hlt">MA</span> such that regions known to be important in <span class="hlt">MA</span> interactions with critical binding partners would be impacted. The CaM conformation is semiextended and as such is distinct from the classical CaM-collapse about short α-helical targets. NMR data show that upon dissociation of the CaM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> complex, either by the removal of Ca2+ or increasing ionic strength, <span class="hlt">MA</span> reforms its native tertiary contacts. Thus, we observe a high level of structural plasticity in <span class="hlt">MA</span> that may facilitate regulation of its activities via intracellular Ca2+-signaling during viral processing. PMID:22947870</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=112364','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=112364"><span>Biochemical Characterization of Rotavirus Receptors in <span class="hlt">MA</span>104 Cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Guerrero, Carlos A.; Zárate, Selene; Corkidi, Gabriel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>We have tested the effect of metabolic inhibitors, membrane cholesterol depletion, and detergent extraction of cell surface molecules on the susceptibility of <span class="hlt">MA</span>104 cells to infection by rotaviruses. Treatment of cells with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of protein N glycosylation, blocked the infectivity of the SA-dependent rotavirus RRV and its SA-independent variant nar3 by about 50%, while the inhibition of O glycosylation had no effect. The inhibitor of glycolipid biosynthesis d,l-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) blocked the infectivity of RRV, nar3, and the human rotavirus strain Wa by about 70%. Sequestration of cholesterol from the cell membrane with β-cyclodextrin reduced the infectivity of the three viruses by more than 90%. The involvement of N-glycoproteins, glycolipids, and cholesterol in rotavirus infection suggests that the virus receptor(s) might be forming part of lipid microdomains in the cell membrane. <span class="hlt">MA</span>104 cells incubated with the nonionic detergent octyl-β-glucoside (OG) showed a ca. 60% reduction in their ability to bind rotaviruses, the same degree to which they became refractory to infection, suggesting that OG extracts the potential virus receptor(s) from the cell surface. Accordingly, when preincubated with the viruses, the OG extract inhibited the virus infectivity by more than 95%. This inhibition was abolished when the extract was treated with either proteases or heat but not when it was treated with neuraminidase, indicating the protein nature of the inhibitor. Two protein fractions of around 57 and 75 kDa were isolated from the extract, and these fractions were shown to have rotavirus-blocking activity. Also, antibodies to these fractions efficiently inhibited the infectivity of the viruses in untreated as well as in neuraminidase-treated cells. Five individual protein bands of 30, 45, 57, 75, and 110 kDa, which exhibited virus-blocking activity, were finally isolated from the OG extract. These proteins are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28637685','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28637685"><span>Milk Oligosaccharides Inhibit Human Rotavirus Infectivity in <span class="hlt">MA</span>104 Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laucirica, Daniel R; Triantis, Vassilis; Schoemaker, Ruud; Estes, Mary K; Ramani, Sasirekha</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Background: Oligosaccharides in milk act as soluble decoy receptors and prevent pathogen adhesion to the infant gut. Milk oligosaccharides reduce infectivity of a porcine rotavirus strain; however, the effects on human rotaviruses are less well understood.Objective: In this study, we determined the effect of specific and abundant milk oligosaccharides on the infectivity of 2 globally dominant human rotavirus strains.Methods: Four milk oligosaccharides-2'-fucosyllactose (2'FL), 3'-sialyllactose (3'SL), 6'-sialyllactose (6'SL), and galacto-oligosaccharides-were tested for their effects on the infectivity of human rotaviruses G1P[8] and G2P[4] through fluorescent focus assays on African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (<span class="hlt">MA</span>104 cells). Oligosaccharides were added at different time points in the infectivity assays. Infections in the absence of oligosaccharides served as controls.Results: When compared with infections in the absence of glycans, all oligosaccharides substantially reduced the infectivity of both human rotavirus strains in vitro; however, virus strain-specific differences in effects were observed. Compared with control infections, the maximum reduction in G1P[8] infectivity was seen with 2'FL when added after the onset of infection (62% reduction, P < 0.01), whereas the maximum reduction in G2P[4] infectivity was seen with the mixture of 3'SL + 6'SL when added during infection (73% reduction, P < 0.01). The mixture of 3'SL + 6'SL at the same ratio as is present in breast milk was more potent in reducing G2P[4] infectivity (73% reduction, P < 0.01) than when compared with 3'SL (47% reduction) or 6'SL (40% reduction) individually. For all oligosaccharides the reduction in infectivity was mediated by an effect on the virus and not on the cells.Conclusions: Milk oligosaccharides reduce the infectivity of human rotaviruses in <span class="hlt">MA</span>104 cells, primarily through an effect on the virus. Although breastfed infants are directly protected, the addition of specific</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.P51D..09S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.P51D..09S"><span>Irregular Mare Patches (IMPs): 100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> or 3 Ga?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stopar, J.; Robinson, M. S.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Giguere, T.; Lawrence, S. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Clegg-Watkins, R. N.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>IMPs exhibit a perplexing combination of characteristics that are consistent with either a 100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> or 3 Ga formation. Dozens of small-area IMPs have crisp morphologies and crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) that denote relatively recent geologic activity (<100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>); however, the apparently well-developed regolith on portions of the IMPs are in conflict with such a young age [1]. To test possible formation hypotheses (e.g., [1-5]), which range from ancient volcanism to contemporary outgassing, we examined IMP morphology at the meter-scale with LROC NAC images and derived elevation models. We focused on the largest IMPs (Ina, Sosigenes, Cauchy, Maskelyne, and Nubium), where contacts between deposits are best developed. Most of our observations are consistent with multiple generations of inflation and breakouts (or squeeze-ups) of basaltic lavas that were affected by local slopes. Some of the extrusions coalesced into larger mounds or filled pre-existing craters. We did not observe evidence of large-scale void space (e.g., fissures, fractures, linear depressions, or pits) within or beneath the mounds or rougher deposits (e.g., [5]). But, small-scale voids may be signified by isolated pitted textures. We also did not detect evidence of the cooling fractures or lava plates expected in young lava flows and observed in lunar impact melt deposits. The smooth texture of the mounds is enigmatic. Block-less craters suggest at least 5 m of friable or poorly-cohesive material (such as regolith), yet mound margins exhibit slopes > 30° requiring significant material strength. Blocks are not common on the mounds, but are sometimes excavated by impacts (usually excavated from beneath the mounds). The uneven deposits are equally enigmatic and texturally varied (blocky, pitted, and crenulated). They are deficient in superposed craters compared to the mounds. If the mounds are indeed of similar age to the rougher units, then their different superposed crater morphologies and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/993476','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/993476"><span>Development of a Hydronic Rooftop Unit-HyPak-<span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, Eric; Berman, Mark</p> <p>2009-11-14</p> <p>The majority of U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by rooftop HVAC units (RTUs). RTU popularity derives chiefly from their low initial cost and relative ease of service access without disturbing building occupants. Unfortunately, current RTUs are inherently inefficient due to a combination of characteristics that unnecessarily increase cooling loads and energy use. 36% percent of annual U.S. energy, and two-thirds of electricity, is consumed in and by buildings. Commercial buildings consume approximately 4.2 quads of energy each year at a cost of $230 billion per year, with HVAC equipment consuming 1.2 quads of electricity. More than half of all U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by packaged HVAC units, most of which are rooftop units (RTUs). Inefficient RTUs create an estimated 3.5% of U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions, thus contributing significantly to global warming5. Also, RTUs often fail to maintain adequate ventilation air and air filtration, reducing indoor air quality. This is the second HyPak project to be supported by DOE through NETL. The prior project, referred to as HyPak-1 in this report, had two rounds of prototype fabrication and testing as well as computer modeling and market research. The HyPak-1 prototypes demonstrated the high performance capabilities of the HyPak concept, but made it clear that further development was required to reduce heat exchanger cost and improve system reliability before HyPak commercialization can commence. The HyPak-1 prototypes were limited to about 25% ventilation air fraction, limiting performance and marketability. The current project is intended to develop a 'mixed-air' product that is capable of full 0-100% modulation in ventilation air fraction, hence it was referred to as HyPak-<span class="hlt">MA</span> in the proposal. (For simplicity, the -<span class="hlt">MA</span> has been dropped when referencing the current project.) The objective of the HyPak Project is to design, develop and test a hydronic RTU that provides a quantum improvement over conventional RTU</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160012275','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160012275"><span>Irregular Mare Patches (IMPs): 100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> or 3 Ga?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stopar, Julie; Robinson, Mark Southwick; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Giguere, Thomas; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Ostrach, Lillian Rose; Clegg-Watkins, Ryan N.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>IMPs exhibit a perplexing combination of characteristics that are consistent with either an approximately 100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> or 3 Ga formation. Dozens of small-area IMPs have crisp morphologies and crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) that denote relatively recent geologic activity (less than 100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>); however, the apparently well-developed regolith on portions of the IMPs are in conflict with such a young age [1]. To test possible formation hypotheses (e.g., [1-5]), which range from ancient volcanism to contemporary outgassing, we examined IMP morphology at the meter-scale with LROC NAC images and derived elevation models. We focused on the largest IMPs (Ina, Sosigenes, Cauchy, Maskelyne, and Nubium), where contacts between deposits are best developed. Most of our observations are consistent with multiple generations of inflation and breakouts (or squeeze-ups) of basaltic lavas that were affected by local slopes. Some of the extrusions coalesced into larger mounds or filled pre-existing craters. We did not observe evidence of large-scale void space (e.g., fissures, fractures, linear depressions, or pits) within or beneath the mounds or rougher deposits (e.g., [5]). But, small-scale voids may be signified by isolated pitted textures. We also did not detect evidence of the cooling fractures or lava plates expected in young lava flows and observed in lunar impact melt deposits. The smooth texture of the mounds is enigmatic. Block-less craters suggest at least 5 m of friable or poorly-cohesive material (such as regolith), yet mound margins exhibit slopes greater than 30 deg requiring significant material strength. Blocks are not common on the mounds, but are sometimes excavated by impacts (usually excavated from beneath the mounds). The uneven deposits are equally enigmatic and texturally varied (blocky, pitted, and crenulated). They are deficient in superposed craters compared to the mounds. If the mounds are indeed of similar age to the rougher units, then their different</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27210444','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27210444"><span>Isolation, Structural Elucidation, and Synthesis of Lepteridine From <span class="hlt">Ma</span>̅nuka (Leptospermum scoparium) Honey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Daniels, Benjamin J; Prijic, Gordana; Meidinger, Sarah; Loomes, Kerry M; Stephens, Jonathan M; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Furkert, Daniel P; Brimble, Margaret A</p> <p>2016-06-22</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span>̅nuka honey, made from the nectar of Leptospermum scoparium, has garnered scientific and economical interest due to its nonperoxide antibacterial activity. Biomarkers for genuine <span class="hlt">ma</span>̅nuka honey are increasingly in demand due to the presence of counterfeit <span class="hlt">ma</span>̅nuka honey. This work reports the identification of a compound previously unreported in <span class="hlt">ma</span>̅nuka honey by HPLC, and determination of the structure of the as 3,6,7-trimethyllumazine using NMR, MS, IR, and UV/vis spectroscopy. This assignment was confirmed by total synthesis. The natural product, renamed lepteridine, was only observed in <span class="hlt">ma</span>̅nuka honeys and could potentially serve as a biomarker for genuine <span class="hlt">ma</span>̅nuka honey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19..572H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19..572H"><span>Proposal <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MBA - Moon and Mars Base Analog</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heinicke, Christiane; Foing, Bernard</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Despite impressive progress in robotic exploration of celestial bodies, robots are believed to never reach the effectiveness and efficiency of a trained human. Consequently, ESA proposes to build an international Moon Village in roughly 15 years and NASA plans for the first manned mission to Mars shortly after. One of the challenges still remaining is the need for a shelter, a habitat which allows human spacefarers to safely live and work on the surface of a celestial body. Although various prototype habitats have been built and inhabited during the last decade, they typically share two fundamental flaws: First, they usually consist of a single space, which may become uninhabitable after depressurization due to just one single catastrophic event. Second, none of the habitats provides shielding against radiation, one of the major health concerns for spacefaring crews. Project <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MBA will address these two problems at the root and build an underground habitat comprised of five connected, but independent modules. The habitat will serve for testing technologies like life support, power systems, and interplanetary communication. Special attention will be given to the development of the geoscience laboratory module. In addition to the technological aspects, the envisioned habitat will serve as a unique test ground for studies on the effects of underground habitation on a crew.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5580630','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5580630"><span>Personal Hygiene Practices among Urban Homeless Persons in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Leibler, Jessica H.; León, Casey; Gaeta, Jessie M.; Perez, Debora</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Persons experiencing homelessness in the United States experience significant barriers to self-care and personal hygiene, including limited access to clean showers, laundry and hand washing facilities. While the obstacles to personal hygiene associated with homelessness may increase risk of infectious disease, hygiene-related behaviors among people experiencing homelessness has received limited attention. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals experiencing homelessness in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> (n = 194) to identify hygiene-related self-care practices and risk factors for reduced hygiene in this population. Most participants (72%) reported taking a daily shower. More than 60% reported hand washing with soap five or more times each day, and use of hand sanitizer was widespread (89% reported using sanitizer in the last week). A majority (86%) used a laundromat or laundry machine to wash clothing, while 14% reported washing clothing in the sink. Heavy drinking, injection drug use, and sleeping outdoors were identified as significant risk factors for reduced hygiene practices. People experiencing homelessness who also engage in these activities may be among the most difficult to reach for intervention, yet targeted efforts may decrease illness risk associated with reduced hygiene. Housed friends and family play a critical role in assisting homeless individuals maintain hygiene by providing showers and laundry facilities. PMID:28820454</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28820454','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28820454"><span>Personal Hygiene Practices among Urban Homeless Persons in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Leibler, Jessica H; Nguyen, Daniel D; León, Casey; Gaeta, Jessie M; Perez, Debora</p> <p>2017-08-18</p> <p>Persons experiencing homelessness in the United States experience significant barriers to self-care and personal hygiene, including limited access to clean showers, laundry and hand washing facilities. While the obstacles to personal hygiene associated with homelessness may increase risk of infectious disease, hygiene-related behaviors among people experiencing homelessness has received limited attention. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals experiencing homelessness in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> (n = 194) to identify hygiene-related self-care practices and risk factors for reduced hygiene in this population. Most participants (72%) reported taking a daily shower. More than 60% reported hand washing with soap five or more times each day, and use of hand sanitizer was widespread (89% reported using sanitizer in the last week). A majority (86%) used a laundromat or laundry machine to wash clothing, while 14% reported washing clothing in the sink. Heavy drinking, injection drug use, and sleeping outdoors were identified as significant risk factors for reduced hygiene practices. People experiencing homelessness who also engage in these activities may be among the most difficult to reach for intervention, yet targeted efforts may decrease illness risk associated with reduced hygiene. Housed friends and family play a critical role in assisting homeless individuals maintain hygiene by providing showers and laundry facilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3361282','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3361282"><span>Molecular Mechanism of Isocupressic Acid Supresses <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 Cell Steroidogenesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Wu, Leang-Shin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Consumption of ponderosa pine needles causes late-term abortions in cattle and is a serious poisonous plant problem in foothill and mountain rangelands. Isocupressic acid (IA) is the component of pine needles responsible for the abortifacient effect, its abortifacient effect may be due to inhibition of steroidogenesis. To investigate the more detail molecular mechanism, we used <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell, which is wild used to investigate molecular mechanism of steroidogenesis, to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of IA in more detail. In this report, we focus on the function of IA on important steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD). We found that IA does not affect enzyme activities of these genes but inhibits transcription of P450scc and translation of StAR and P450scc through attenuating cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, steroid productions of cells were suppressed. PMID:22666287</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22666287','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22666287"><span>Molecular Mechanism of Isocupressic Acid Supresses <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 Cell Steroidogenesis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Wu, Leang-Shin; Chiu, Chih-Hsien</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Consumption of ponderosa pine needles causes late-term abortions in cattle and is a serious poisonous plant problem in foothill and mountain rangelands. Isocupressic acid (IA) is the component of pine needles responsible for the abortifacient effect, its abortifacient effect may be due to inhibition of steroidogenesis. To investigate the more detail molecular mechanism, we used <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell, which is wild used to investigate molecular mechanism of steroidogenesis, to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of IA in more detail. In this report, we focus on the function of IA on important steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD). We found that IA does not affect enzyme activities of these genes but inhibits transcription of P450scc and translation of StAR and P450scc through attenuating cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, steroid productions of cells were suppressed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882980','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/882980"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2005-02-25</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22731213L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22731213L"><span>SDSS-IV <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: Data Products, Quality, and Initial Public Release</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; MaNGA Team</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>As a spectroscopic imaging survey, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA presents a host of technical challenges ranging from spectrophotometic calibration to image reconstruction. I will present an overview of the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA data reduction pipeline (DRP) and the algorithms used to process the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA data. Additionally, I will describe the format and quality of the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA data products, and the means by which the first year of survey data will be made publicly available in SDSS Data Release 13 (DR-13).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=319450&keyword=jacobs&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85856167&CFTOKEN=41551518','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=319450&keyword=jacobs&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=85856167&CFTOKEN=41551518"><span>Integrated EPA Science for Decision-Making: Lawrence, <span class="hlt">MA</span> Water Strategy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Powerpoint presentation on the Lawrence <span class="hlt">MA</span> Making a Visible Difference in Communities project’s comprehensive water quality strategy, demonstrating a systems approach applying integrated EPA science</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1091718','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1091718"><span>Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus <span class="hlt">MA</span> Protein Interaction with Membranes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">MA</span> domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) <span class="hlt">MA</span>-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified <span class="hlt">MA</span> and <span class="hlt">MA</span>-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant <span class="hlt">MA</span> protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV <span class="hlt">MA</span> for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of <span class="hlt">MA</span> bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric <span class="hlt">MA</span>. This result suggests that the clustering of <span class="hlt">MA</span> domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-512.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-512.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.512 - Termination of contract by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.512 Termination of contract by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-512.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-512.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.512 - Termination of contract by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.512 Termination of contract by the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=319450&keyword=science+AND+news&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=319450&keyword=science+AND+news&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>Integrated EPA Science for Decision-Making: Lawrence, <span class="hlt">MA</span> Water Strategy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Powerpoint presentation on the Lawrence <span class="hlt">MA</span> Making a Visible Difference in Communities project’s comprehensive water quality strategy, demonstrating a systems approach applying integrated EPA science</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24371089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24371089"><span>Cell cycle-regulated membrane binding of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> contributes to efficient anaphase chromosome separation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zheng, Zhen; Wan, Qingwen; Meixiong, Gerry; Du, Quansheng</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Accurate and efficient separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is critical for faithful cell division. It has been proposed that cortical dynein-generated pulling forces on astral microtubules contribute to anaphase spindle elongation and chromosome separation. In mammalian cells, however, definitive evidence for the involvement of cortical dynein in chromosome separation is missing. It is believed that dynein is recruited and anchored at the cell cortex during mitosis by the α subunit of heterotrimeric G protein (Gα)/mammalian homologue of Drosophila Partner of Inscuteable/nuclear mitotic apparatus (Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>) ternary complex. Here we uncover a Gα/LGN-independent lipid- and membrane-binding domain at the C-terminus of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. We show that the membrane binding of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is cell cycle regulated-it is inhibited during prophase and metaphase by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-mediated phosphorylation and only occurs after anaphase onset when CDK1 activity is down-regulated. Further studies indicate that cell cycle-regulated membrane association of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> underlies anaphase-specific enhancement of cortical Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and dynein. By replacing endogenous Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> with membrane-binding-deficient Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>, we can specifically reduce the cortical accumulation of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and dynein during anaphase and demonstrate that cortical Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and dynein contribute to efficient chromosome separation in mammalian cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA155808','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA155808"><span>National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Ames Pond Dam (<span class="hlt">MA</span> 01006) Dike A (<span class="hlt">MA</span> 01296) Merrimack River Basin, Tewksbury, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-12-01</p> <p>Massachusetts 02146 . Copies of this report will be made available to the public, upon request to this office, under the Freedom of Information Act...Ownership. Ames Pond Dam is owned by the Beacon Mortgage, Inc. 1425 Beacon St., Brookline, <span class="hlt">MA</span> 02146 . Tele: 617-232-7850. An Engineering Report shown...Brookline, <span class="hlt">MA</span> 02146 . Tele: 617-232-7850. g. Purpose of Dam. The dam impounds a pond used for recreational purposes. 3</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936693','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936693"><span>Induction of neuronal cell death by paraneoplastic <span class="hlt">Ma</span>1 antigen.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Huai-Lu; D'Mello, Santosh R</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Paraneoplastic <span class="hlt">Ma</span>1 (PNMA1) is a member of a family of proteins involved in an autoimmune disorder called paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Although it is widely expressed in brain, nothing is known about the function of PNMA1 in neurons. We find that PNMA1 expression is highest in the perinatal brain, a period during which developmentally regulated neuronal death occurs. PNMA1 expression increases in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced to die by low potassium (LK) and in cortical neurons following homocysteic acid (HCA) treament. Elevated PNMA1 expression is also observed in the degenerating striatum in two separate mouse models of Huntington's disease, the R6/2 transgenic model and the 3-nitropropionic acid-induced chemical model. Suppression of endogenous PNMA1 expression inhibits LK-induced neuronal apoptosis. Ectopic expression of PNMA1 promotes apoptosis even in medium containing high potassium, a condition that normally ensures survival of CGNs. Deletion of the N-terminal half of the PNMA1 protein abrogates its apoptotic activity, whereas deletion of the C-terminal half renders the protein more toxic. Within the N-terminal half, the ability to induce neuronal death depends on the presence of a BH3-like domain. In addition to being necessary for apoptosis, the BH3-like domain is necessary for self-association of PNMA1. Apoptosis by PNMA1 expression is inhibited by overexpression of Bcl2, suggesting that PNMA1-induced neuronal death may depend on the binding of a proapoptotic member of the Bcl2 family to the BH3 domain. Taken together, our results suggest that PNMA1 is a proapoptotic protein in neurons, elevated expression of which may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12800718','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12800718"><span><span class="hlt">M&A</span> needn't be a loser's game.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Selden, Larry; Colvin, Geoffrey</p> <p>2003-06-01</p> <p>Three out of four acquisitions fail; they destroy wealth for the buyer's shareholders, who end up worse off than they would have been had the deal not been done. But it doesn't have to be that way, argue the authors. In evaluating acquisitions, companies must look beyond the lure of profits the income statement promises and examine the balance sheet, where the company keeps track of capital. It's ignoring the balance sheet that causes so many acquisitions to destroy shareholders' wealth. Unfortunately, most executives focus only on sales and profits going up, never realizing that they've put in motion a plan to destroy their company's true profitability--its return on invested capital. <span class="hlt">M&A</span>, like other aspects of running a company, works best when seen as a way to create shareholder value through customers. Some deals are sought to help create better value propositions for the business or to better execute current strategies--or to block competitors from doing these things. But most deals are about customers and should start with an analysis of customer profitability. Some customers are deliciously profitable; others are dismal money losers. The better an acquirer understands the profitability of its own customers, the better positioned it will be to perform such analyses on other companies. In this article, the authors show that customer profitability varies far more dramatically than most managers suspect. They also describe how to measure the profitability of customers. By understanding the economics of customer profitability, companies can avoid making deals that hurt their shareholders, they can identify surprising deals that do create wealth, and they can salvage deals that would otherwise be losers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22731202Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22731202Y"><span>SDSS-IV <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA: Survey Design and Progress</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yan, Renbin; MaNGA Team</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The ongoing SDSS-IV/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA Survey will obtain integral field spectroscopy at a resolution of R~2000 with a wavelength coverage from 3,600A to 10,300A for 10,000 nearby galaxies. Within each 3 degree diameter pointing of the 2.5m Sloan Telescope, we deploy 17 hexagonal fiber bundles with sizes ranging from 12 to 32 arcsec in diameter. The bundles are build with 2 arcsec fibers and have a 56% fill factor. During observations, we obtained sets of exposures at 3 different dither positions to achieve near-critical sampling of the effective point spread function, which has a FWHM about 2.5 arcsec, corresponding to 1-2 kpc for the majority of the galaxies targeted. The flux calibration is done using 12 additional mini-fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with science targets, achieving a calibration accuracy better than 5% over 90% of the wavelength range. The target galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radii for the majority of the galaxies while maximizing spatial resolution. About 2/3 of the sample is covered out to 1.5Re (primary sample) and 1/3 of the sample covered to 2.5Re (secondary sample). The sample is designed to have approximately equal representation from high and low mass galaxies while maintaining volume-limited selection at fixed absolute magnitudes. We obtain an average S/N of 4 per Angstrom in r-band continuum at a surface brightness of 23 AB arcsec-2. With spectral stacking in an elliptical annulus covering 1-1.5Re, our primary sample galaxies have a median S/N of ~60 per Angstrom in r-band.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963844','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/963844"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2009-08-28</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22651394','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22651394"><span>Induction of jasmonate signalling regulators <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2s and their physical interactions with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 in methyl jasmonate-induced chilling tolerance in banana fruit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Ming-Lei; Wang, Jun-Ning; Shan, Wei; Fan, Jia-Geng; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Wu, Ke-Qiang; Li, Xue-Ping; Chen, Wei-Xin; He, Fang-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Ye; Lu, Wang-Jin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>MYC2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, is a key regulator in the activation of jasmonate (JA) response. However, the molecular details of MYC2 involving in methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced chilling tolerance of fruit remain largely unclear. In the present work, two MYC2 genes, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2a and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2b, and one homolog of the inducer of the C-repeat-binding factor (CBF) gene, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 were isolated and characterized from banana fruit. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2s and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1 were found to be all localized in the nucleus. In addition, the proline-rich domain (PRD) and the acidic domain (AD) in the N-terminus were important for the transcriptional activation of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2 in yeast cells. Unlike <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1's constitutive expression, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2a and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2b were induced rapidly following MeJA treatment during cold storage. Moreover, protein-protein interaction analysis confirmed that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2s interacted with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1. The expression of ICE-CBF cold-responsive pathway genes including <span class="hlt">Ma</span>CBF1, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>CBF2, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>COR1, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>KIN2, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RD2 and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RD5 was also significantly induced by MeJA. Taken together, our work provides strong evidence that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>MYC2 is involved in MeJA-induced chilling tolerance in banana fruit through physically interacting and likely functionally coordinating with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>ICE1, revealing a novel mechanism for ICE1 in response to cold stress as well as during development of induced chilling tolerance. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-62.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.62 - Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan. 422.62... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment § 422.62 Election of coverage under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan. (a) General: Coverage election periods—(1)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-50.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-50.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.50 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... local and <span class="hlt">MA</span> regional plans, as defined in § 422.2 unless specifically noted otherwise. (a) An... organization's contract for the plan or discontinued the plan in the area in which the individual resides, is eligible to elect another <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan. If the plan so elected is later terminated or discontinued in the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-66.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-66.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.66 - Coordination of enrollment and disenrollment through <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... § 422.54. (2) An individual enrolled in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan that becomes an <span class="hlt">MA</span>-PD plan on January 1, 2006, will...-PD plan offered by the same organization as of January 1, 2006. (4) An individual who has elected an... form with the organization or through other mechanisms as determined by CMS. (b)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-66.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-66.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.66 - Coordination of enrollment and disenrollment through <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... § 422.54. (2) An individual enrolled in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan that becomes an <span class="hlt">MA</span>-PD plan on January 1, 2006, will...-PD plan offered by the same organization as of January 1, 2006. (4) An individual who has elected an... form with the organization or through other mechanisms as determined by CMS. (b)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol2-sec165-T01-0542.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol2-sec165-T01-0542.pdf"><span>33 CFR 165.T01-0542 - Safety Zones: Neptune Deepwater Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zones: Neptune Deepwater Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 165.T01-0542 Section 165.T01-0542 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.T01-0542 Safety Zones: Neptune Deepwater Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. (a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec80-145.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec80-145.pdf"><span>33 CFR 80.145 - Race Point, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, to Watch Hill, RI.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Race Point, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, to Watch Hill, RI... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.145 Race Point, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, to Watch Hill... and Rhode Island from Race Point to Watch Hill. (b) A line drawn from Nobska Point Light to Tarpaulin...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biogerontology&id=EJ951012','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biogerontology&id=EJ951012"><span>European Master's Program in Gerontology (Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G): Goals, Curriculum, and Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aartsen, Marja</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The European Master's Program in Gerontology (Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G) started in September 2003 with support from the European Commission. The Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G is a modular, 2-year, part-time international training program about the aging process and its societal implications. The multidisciplinary curriculum comprises four domains of gerontology (i.e., social gerontology,…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009debs.book..187W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009debs.book..187W"><span>Patent Analysis for Supporting Merger and Acquisition (<span class="hlt">M&A</span>) Prediction: A Data Mining Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wei, Chih-Ping; Jiang, Yu-Syun; Yang, Chin-Sheng</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">M&A</span> plays an increasingly important role in the contemporary business environment. Companies usually conduct <span class="hlt">M&A</span> to pursue complementarity from other companies for preserving and/or extending their competitive advantages. For the given bidder company, a critical first step to the success of <span class="hlt">M&A</span> activities is the appropriate selection of target companies. However, existing studies on <span class="hlt">M&A</span> prediction incur several limitations, such as the exclusion of technological variables in <span class="hlt">M&A</span> prediction models and the omission of the profile of the respective bidder company and its compatibility with candidate target companies. In response to these limitations, we propose an <span class="hlt">M&A</span> prediction technique which not only encompasses technological variables derived from patent analysis as prediction indictors but also takes into account the profiles of both bidder and candidate target companies when building an <span class="hlt">M&A</span> prediction model. We collect a set of real-world <span class="hlt">M&A</span> cases to evaluate the proposed technique. The evaluation results are encouraging and will serve as a basis for future studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.206 - Timeframe for payment to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program according to § 495.102. (b) Payments to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>... the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, following the timeline in specified in § 495.104 of this part... common corporate governance under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, payment is made under the <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.206 - Timeframe for payment to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program according to § 495.102. (b) Payments to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>... the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, following the timeline in specified in § 495.104 of this part... common corporate governance under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, payment is made under the <span class="hlt">MA</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA... Advantage Organizations § 422.314 Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. (a) Establishment and designation of medical savings account (MSA). A beneficiary who elects coverage under an...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-S62-00993.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-S62-00993.html"><span>ASTRONAUT GLENN, JOHN H., JR. - INSERTION PRACTICE - MERCURY-ATLAS (<span class="hlt">MA</span>)-6 - FRIENDSHIP "7" - CAPE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-02-05</p> <p>S62-00993 (1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-6) mission, practices insertion into the Mercury "Friendship 7" spacecraft during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6 preflight training activity at Cape Canaveral, Florida. He is wearing the full pressure suit and helmet. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.528 - Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.528 Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308. The Standard Form of Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.517 - Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.517 Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300. The standard form of War Risk Open Cargo, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06434.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06434.html"><span>East-looking view across Atlantic waters during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 22 orbit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-05-16</p> <p>S63-06434 (15-16 May 1963) --- East looking view across Atlantic waters toward Africa, showing Mauritania and Spanish Sahara photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for graduate medical education costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... travel and lodging where applicable); and (2) Reasonable compensation to the non-hospital site for... chapter. (3) There is a written agreement between the <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization and the non-hospital site that... reasonable compensation to the non-hospital site for teaching activities. (c) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=G&pg=7&id=EJ951012','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=G&pg=7&id=EJ951012"><span>European Master's Program in Gerontology (Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G): Goals, Curriculum, and Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aartsen, Marja</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The European Master's Program in Gerontology (Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G) started in September 2003 with support from the European Commission. The Eu<span class="hlt">Ma</span>G is a modular, 2-year, part-time international training program about the aging process and its societal implications. The multidisciplinary curriculum comprises four domains of gerontology (i.e., social gerontology,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMPP13B1836M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMPP13B1836M"><span>Exploring African Aridification and Wet/dry Cycles Over the Last 3 <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meyers, C.; Tierney, J. E.; DeMenocal, P. B.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Marine sediment records document a gradual increase in aeolian dust supply from Africa over the last 3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the Atlantic, Gulf of Aden, and Mediterranean (Larrasoaña et al., 2003, deMenocal 2004), with 'steps' in period and amplitude at ~2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, ~1.7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and ~1.0 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. However, Mediterranean sapropel sequences document regular, precession-paced wet/dry cycles from changes in the strength of the African monsoon and Nile runoff since at least the Miocene (Rossignol-Strick, 1985, Krijgsman et al., 1995, Lourens et al., 1996). The influence of long-term drying trends in Africa on the movements and strength of the African monsoon over the late Pliocene and Pleistocene is not understood. We have constructed a biomarker-based African climate record by analyzing concentrations and δ D from long-chain, saturated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) in eastern Mediterranean ODP Site 967 sediments from 2.8 - 3.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 1.6 - 1.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Long-chain fatty acids are produced in the leaf waxes of terrestrial plants (Eglinton and Hamilton, 1967) and are transported to marine sediments via aeolian and fluvial action. Sapropel sediments corresponding with precession minima and enhanced Nile River runoff (Rossignol-Strick, 1985) contain much higher concentrations of FAMEs than carbonate-rich sediments. Comparisons of the two intervals will be presented to illustrate changes in monsoon strength from 3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 1.6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1080964.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1080964.pdf"><span>ESP Needs Analysis of Iranian <span class="hlt">MA</span> Students: A Case Study of the University of Isfahan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moslemi, Fatemeh; Moinzadeh, Ahmad; Dabaghi, Azizollah</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to investigate the foreign language learning needs of Iranian <span class="hlt">MA</span> students, in particular those who were majoring in biology, psychology, physical training, accounting and west philosophy. A total of 80 students from five <span class="hlt">MA</span> majors studying at university of Isfahan participated in the study. Additionally, twenty-five…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=m%26a&pg=6&id=EJ676791','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=m%26a&pg=6&id=EJ676791"><span>Lessons Learned from <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. Candidates Pursuing National Board Certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Unrau, Norman J.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Presents lessons learned by following <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. candidates who were supported by California State University, Los Angeles, as they pursued National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification. Discusses the introduction of NBPTS certification to <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. candidates, launching certification projects, and what NBPTS certification…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-52.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-52.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.52 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs individuals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election, and Enrollment § 422.52 Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for special needs individuals. (a) General...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Humanism&pg=2&id=EJ984643','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Humanism&pg=2&id=EJ984643"><span>Liberal Arts in China's Modern Universities: Lessons from the Great Catholic Educator and Statesman, <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Xiangbo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jiang, You Guo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span> Xiangbo was born in 1840 and became a pioneer of educational reform during the republican period. He was responsible for introducing the idea that science and humanities should be valued equally in liberal arts education, a concept that became key to the model of university education. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s view of education combined Western humanism and science…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06443.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06443.html"><span>Northwest view of Pakistan, eastern Iran and Afghanistan during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-05-16</p> <p>S63-06443 (15-16 May 1963) --- A northwest-looking view across Pakistan, eastern Iran and Afghanistan as photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=humanism+AND+education&id=EJ984643','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=humanism+AND+education&id=EJ984643"><span>Liberal Arts in China's Modern Universities: Lessons from the Great Catholic Educator and Statesman, <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Xiangbo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jiang, You Guo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span> Xiangbo was born in 1840 and became a pioneer of educational reform during the republican period. He was responsible for introducing the idea that science and humanities should be valued equally in liberal arts education, a concept that became key to the model of university education. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s view of education combined Western humanism and science…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s62_00469.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s62_00469.html"><span>MERCURY-ATLAS (<span class="hlt">MA</span>)-6 - ASTRONAUT GLENN - LT. O'HARA, DELORES (DEE)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-03-09</p> <p>S62-00469 (1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-6) Earth-orbital space mission, confers with astronaut nurse Dolores B. O'Hara, R.N., during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-6 prelaunch preparations. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06438.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-06438.html"><span>Changsha area showing Tung Ting Lake region photographed during <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 22 orbit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-05-16</p> <p>S63-06438 (15-16 May 1963) --- Changsha area in China, showing Tung Ting lake region, as photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.528 - Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.528 Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308. The Standard Form of Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.517 - Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.517 Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300. The standard form of War Risk Open Cargo, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.517 - Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.517 Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300. The standard form of War Risk Open Cargo, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.517 - Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.517 Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300. The standard form of War Risk Open Cargo, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300, may be obtained from MARAD's underwriting agent or MARAD....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.528 - Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.528 Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308. The Standard Form of Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.528 - Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.528 Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308. The Standard Form of Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308, which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-529.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-529.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.529 - Surety Bond B, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-309.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surety Bond B, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-309. 308.529 Section 308.529 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.529 Surety Bond B, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-309....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-517.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.517 - Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.517 Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300. The standard form of War Risk Open Cargo, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-300, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-528.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.528 - Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308. 308.528 Section 308.528 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.528 Surety Bond A, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-308....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nbpts&pg=3&id=EJ676791','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nbpts&pg=3&id=EJ676791"><span>Lessons Learned from <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. Candidates Pursuing National Board Certification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Unrau, Norman J.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Presents lessons learned by following <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. candidates who were supported by California State University, Los Angeles, as they pursued National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification. Discusses the introduction of NBPTS certification to <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. candidates, launching certification projects, and what NBPTS certification…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832443','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832443"><span>Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> Phosphorylation by Aurora-A Orchestrates Spindle Orientation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gallini, Sara; Carminati, Manuel; De Mattia, Fabiola; Pirovano, Laura; Martini, Emanuele; Oldani, Amanda; Asteriti, Italia Anna; Guarguaglini, Giulia; Mapelli, Marina</p> <p>2016-02-22</p> <p>Spindle positioning is essential for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The signaling network synchronizing spindle placement with mitotic progression relies on timely recruitment at the cell cortex of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>:LGN:Gαi complexes, in which Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> acts as a receptor for the microtubule motor Dynein. To study the implication of Aurora-A in spindle orientation, we developed protocols for the partial inhibition of its activity. Under these conditions, in metaphase Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and Dynein accumulate abnormally at the spindle poles and do not reach the cortex, while the cortical distribution of LGN remains unperturbed. FRAP experiments revealed that Aurora-A governs the dynamic exchange between the cytoplasmic and the spindle pole-localized pools of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. We show that Aurora-A phosphorylates directly the C terminus of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> on three Ser residues, of which Ser1969 determines the dynamic behavior and the spindle orientation functions of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. Most interestingly, we identify a new microtubule-binding domain of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>, which does not overlap with the LGN-binding motif. Our study demonstrates that in metaphase the direct phosphorylation of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> by Aurora-A controls its cortical enrichment, and that this is the major event underlying the spindle orientation functions of Aurora-A in transformed and non-transformed cells in culture. Phosphorylation of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> by Aurora-A does not affect its affinity for microtubules or for LGN but rather determines the mobility of the protein at the spindle poles. The finding that Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> can associate concomitantly with LGN and microtubules suggests that its microtubule-binding activity contributes to anchor Dynein-loaded microtubule +TIPs at cortical sites with LGN.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22752296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22752296"><span>Dentin tubule occlusion and erosion protection effects of dentifrice containing bioadhesive PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> copolymers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Qin; Kang, Yang; Barnes, Virginia; DeVizio, William; Kashi, Ajay; Ren, Yan-Fang</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>To study the effectiveness of a dentifrice containing polyvinylmethyl ether-maleic acid (PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span>) copolymer in occluding dentin tubules and investigate the interaction between PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> and type I collagen using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Fifteen volunteers brushed dentin discs in situ using dentifrices with and without PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> copolymer in a cross-over design. Dentin tubule occlusion was evaluated after brushing, after overnight saliva challenge in vivo for 12 h and after drinking 250 ml of orange juice. Dentin tubule occlusion and tubule size were compared between the two groups using repeated ANOVA and before and after erosive challenges using paired t tests. SPR using type I collagen as ligand and PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> as analyte was performed to evaluate the binding of the two macromolecules. A median of 91% of dentin tubules were occluded after a single brushing in the PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> group, as compared to 9% in the controls. After overnight saliva challenge and 10 min of erosion by orange juice, a median of 73% of the dentin tubules remained fully occluded in the PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> group as compared to zero in the controls. Dentin tubule size increased after orange juice erosion in the controls but not in the PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> group. SPR study showed that PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> bound readily to collagen molecules in a 4 to 1 ratio. Dentifrice containing PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> could effectively occlude dentin tubules and prevent dentin erosion. PVM/<span class="hlt">MA</span> may improve adhesive retention of intra-tubular dentifrice plugs through binding to dentin surface collagen. Brushing with dentifrice containing adhesive polymers has preventive effect against dentin erosion and dentin sensitivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.tmp..234R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.tmp..234R"><span>Preserved History of Global Mean Spreading Rate: 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to Present</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rowan, Christopher J.; Rowley, David B.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Using an up-to-date global plate rotation model, applied to the end points of preserved major spreading ridge isochrons, we have calculated the explicitly reconstructable length-weighted mean global half-spreading rate, ridge length, and area production as a function of time since the end of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron at 83.0 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Our calculations integrate uncertainties in rotation parameters and chron boundary ages with the partial sampling uncertainties arising from progressive subduction of older oceanic lithosphere and its preserved spreading record. This record of directly reconstructable oceanic ridge production provides a well-constrained baseline that can be compared to reconstructions that include the largely unconstrained extrapolated histories of entirely subducted oceanic plates. The directly reconstructable global mean half-spreading rate has not varied by more than ± 15% about an average rate of 28.4 ± 4.6 mm/a since 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. No long-term secular trend is evident: a maximum global mean half-rate of 32 ± 6 mm/a occurred from 33.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to about 25.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, with minima of 26 ± 5 mm/a between about 56 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 40.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and 24 ± 1 mm/a since 3.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Only this most recent interval has a rate that differs significantly (at ± 2σ) from the long-term mean. The global, reconstructable ridge length at 56 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> decreases by less than 15% relative to the modern ridge system; by 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> it has decreased by 38%. These relatively high preserved ridge fractions mean that the estimated uncertainty due to partial sampling stays roughly equivalent to the estimated rotation model uncertainties, allowing long-term spreading rate variations of > 20% since the Late Cretaceous to be ruled out. In contrast, prior to 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> too little oceanic lithosphere is preserved to reliably reconstruct global spreading rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS53E1095G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS53E1095G"><span>Mercury Cycling in Salt Marsh Pond Ecosystems: Cape Cod, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ganguli, P. M.; Gonneea, M. E.; Lamborg, C. H.; Kroeger, K. D.; Swarr, G.; Vadman, K. J.; Baldwin, S.; Brooks, T. W.; Green, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>We are measuring total mercury (HgT) and monomethylmercury (CH3Hg+ or MMHg) in pore water, surface water, and sediment cores from two salt marsh pond systems on the south shore of Cape Cod, <span class="hlt">MA</span> to characterize the distribution of mercury species and to identify features that influence mercury speciation and transport. Sage Lot Pond is relatively undisturbed and has low nitrogen loading (12 kg ha-1 y-1). It is part of the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Reserve and is surrounded by undeveloped wooded uplands. In contrast, Great Pond is highly impacted. Nitrogen loading to the site is elevated (600 kg ha-1 y-1) and the marsh is adjacent to a large residential area. In both systems, a 1 to 2 m organic-rich peat layer overlies the permeable sand aquifer. Groundwater in this region is typically oxic, where pore water within salt marsh peat is suboxic to anoxic. We hypothesize that redox gradients at the transition from the root zone to peat and at the peat-sand interface may provide habitat for MMHg-producing anaerobic bacteria. Preliminary results from a 2-m nearshore depth profile at Sage Lot Pond indicate HgT in groundwater within the sand aquifer occurred primarily in the > 0.2 μm fraction, with unfiltered concentrations exceeding 100 pM. Filtered (< 0.2 μm) HgT in groundwater was substantially lower (~ 5 pM). In contrast, HgT concentrations in filtered and unfiltered pore water within the peat layer were similar and ranged from about 2 to 3 pM. Complexation between mercury and dissolved organic carbon may account for the elevated fraction of filtered HgT in peat pore water. Although MMHg in both groundwater and pore water remained around 1 pM throughout our depth profile, we observed an increase in sediment MMHg (0.3 to 1.6 μg/kg) at the peat-sand interface. MMHg comprised ~50% of the HgT concentration in pore water suggesting mercury in the salt marsh peat is biologically available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1010869','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1010869"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2011-04-04</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/978521','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/978521"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS31B1422K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS31B1422K"><span>Anthropogenic Influences on Estuarine Sedimentation in Salem Sound, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kristiansen, E. R.; Hubeny, J. B.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.; Warren, B.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The Salem Sound watershed (<span class="hlt">MA</span>) historically has been a region of significant industrial activity. Two specific point sources for pollution in the region are the South Essex Sewerage District (SESD) wastewater treatment facility, and the Salem Harbor Power Station, a coal-burning power plant. This study tests the hypothesis that human impact on Salem Sound is preserved in the sediment record. A sediment core was taken near the location of the SESD outfall. This core was analyzed for content of organic matter via loss on ignition (LOI), as well as magnetic susceptibility. An age model was constructed using 137Cs and 210Pb. Below 31 cm (mid-nineteenth century), the core contains mean background values of 2.7% LOI and values increase above this depth. At 21cm, a rapid increase in organic matter concentration from 6.6% to 11.8% is observed. This depth corresponds to ~1905 which is contemporaneous with construction of the outfall pipe discharging raw wastewater. At a depth of 7 cm (mid 1970s), LOI values decrease from 11.7% to 9.3%. This shift is likely attributed to SESD beginning primary treatment in 1977. LOI values continue to drop at 2cm (late 1990s), from 7.8% to 6.3%, and remain at 6.1% to the modern surface, likely a result of SESD upgrading to secondary treatment in 1998. Magnetic susceptibility also shows variability down core that is likely attributed to human impact. At a depth of approximately 20cm susceptibility values start increasing from 4.2 SI units until they reach a peak at 15cm (8.8 SI units). This increase can be attributed to the industrial revolution and increased industrial activity in the area. A decrease in susceptibility is observed at 15cm to 11cm (5.6 SI units) that may be attributed to the Great Depression and less fossil fuels being burned due to the economic situation. At approximately 10cm and 8.0 SI units, an increasing trend is first observed. This trend continues up to the modern surface where it eventually reaches 19.9 SI units. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900924','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/900924"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2007-03-12</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000Geo....28...47V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000Geo....28...47V"><span>Change of tectono-stratigraphic regime in the Australian plate during the 99 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (mid-Cretaceous) and 43 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (mid-Eocene) swerves of the Pacific</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Veevers, J. J.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The clockwise bend at 99 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (mid-Cretaceous) in linear volcanic chains in the tropical Pacific coincides with a change from pre-99 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> head-on Chilean-type subduction of the Pacific plate beneath eastern Gondwana to 99 43 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> sinistral oblique Mariana-type subduction and strike-slip breakup by simple sea-floor spreading between Australia and Antarctica and by backarc spreading in the southwest Pacific. The 99 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> breakup of Australia from Antarctica is documented by a mid-Cretaceous unconformity. This tectono-stratigraphic change founded modern Australia, with a mountain chain along an upper plate margin in the east and lowlands on the lower plate margin in the south. The counterclockwise bend at 43 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (mid-Eocene)—the Emperor-Hawaiian bend—coincides with the onset of structure in the Challenger Rift of New Zealand, the Eromanga-Cooper basin of central Australia, and the oil-shale grabens of coastal Queensland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27178180','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27178180"><span>Antioxidative effects in vivo and colonization of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 in the murine intestinal tract.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tang, Wei; Xing, Zhuqing; Hu, Wei; Li, Chao; Wang, Jinju; Wang, Yanping</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 was isolated from traditional Chinese Tibet kefir grains, which possess several excellent properties and functions. We previously demonstrated the antioxidant activities of this bacterium in vitro. However, the maintenance and survival of L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 inside the murine intestinal tract, where it exerts its probiotic properties, and whether its effects are elicited directly on the host remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the mechanisms of L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 in aging mice following D-galactose administration. The levels of malondialdehyde decreased significantly in the L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 groups after oral ingestion compared to the D-galactose model group, and total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in the serum and liver. We combined fluorescein isothiocyanate labeling and green fluorescent protein expression to dynamically monitor the colonization and distribution of L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 in the murine intestinal tract. The results indicated that L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 was detected in the ileum, colon, and feces after single and continuous oral administration at day 21 and was maintained at 10(4)-10(5) CFU/g. These results suggest that L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 colonizes and survives in the murine intestinal tract to exert its antioxidative effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4610009','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4610009"><span>Synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications of gelatin methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) hydrogels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yue, Kan; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-de; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Tamayol, Ali; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Gelatin methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) hydrogels have been widely used for various biomedical applications due to their suitable biological properties and tunable physical characteristics. Three dimensional (3D) Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> hydrogels closely resemble some essential properties of native extracellular matrix (ECM) due to the presence of cell-attaching and matrix metalloproteinase responsive peptide motifs, which allow cells to proliferate and spread in Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-based scaffolds. Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> is also versatile from a processing perspective. It crosslinks when exposed to light irradiation to form hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties which mimic the native ECM. It can also be microfabricated using different methodologies including micromolding, photomasking, bioprinting, self-assembly, and microfluidic techniques to generate constructs with controlled architectures. Hybrid hydrogel systems can also be formed by mixing Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> with nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide, and other polymers to form networks with desired combined properties and characteristics for specific biological applications. Recent research has demonstrated the proficiency of Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-based hydrogels in a wide range of applications including engineering of bone, cartilage, cardiac, and vascular tissues, among others. Other applications of Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> hydrogels, besides tissue engineering, include fundamental single-single cell research, cell signaling, drug and gene delivery, and bio-sensing. PMID:26414409</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E5143X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E5143X"><span>Diversity in early crustal evolution: 4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> zircons in the Cathaysia Block of southern China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xing, Guang-Fu; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wan, Yusheng; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Yang; Kitajima, Kouki; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Gopon, Phillip</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Zircons are crucial to understanding the first 500 Myr of crustal evolution of Earth. Very few zircons of this age (>4050 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) have been found other than from a ~300 km diameter domain of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. Here we report SIMS U-Pb and O isotope ratios and trace element analyses for two ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> detrital zircons from a Paleozoic quartzite at the Longquan area of the Cathaysia Block. One zircon (207Pb/206Pb age of 4127 +/- 4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) shows normal oscillatory zonation and constant oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O = 5.8 to 6.0‰). The other zircon grain has a ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> magmatic core surrounded by a ~4070 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> metamorphic mantle. The magmatic core has elevated δ18O (7.2 +/- 0.2‰), high titanium concentration (53 +/- 3.4 ppm) and a positive cerium anomaly, yielding anomalously high calculated oxygen fugacity (FMQ + 5) and a high crystallization temperature (910°C). These results are unique among Hadean zircons and suggest a granitoid source generated from dry remelting of partly oxidizing supracrustal sediments altered by surface waters. The ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> dry melting and subsequent ~4070 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> metamorphism provide new evidence for the diversity of the Earth's earliest crust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5758..373H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5758..373H"><span>Identifying dynamic characteristics of structures to estimate the performance of a smart wireless <span class="hlt">MA</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heo, Gwanghee; Lee, WooSang; Lee, Giu; Lee, Donggi</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>In this paper, a smart wireless MEMS-based accelerometer(<span class="hlt">MA</span>) system has been designed and experimented for smart monitoring system of civil structures. In order to estimate the performance of a smart wireless <span class="hlt">MA</span> system(SWMAS), dynamic characteristics of our model structure need to be identified. This system thus employed a high-performance AVR microcontroller, a wireless modem, and <span class="hlt">MA</span> for multiplex communication capability and real time duplex communication. Various performance and experimental tests have been carried out to evaluate whether this system is suitable for monitoring system of civil structures. First, we examined its sensitivity, resolution, and noise, specifically to evaluate the performance of the smart wireless <span class="hlt">MA</span> system. The results of experiments enabled us to estimate performance of the <span class="hlt">MA</span> in SWMAS in comparison to the value of data sheet from <span class="hlt">MA</span>. Second, characteristics of model structure were analyzed by the ambient vibration test based on the NExT combined with ERA. Finally, this analysis was compared to the one that was made by FE results, and the comparison proved that a smart wireless <span class="hlt">MA</span> system was fitted in smart monitoring system effectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24888297','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24888297"><span>Diversity in early crustal evolution: 4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> zircons in the Cathaysia Block of southern China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xing, Guang-Fu; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Wan, Yusheng; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Yang; Kitajima, Kouki; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Gopon, Phillip</p> <p>2014-06-03</p> <p>Zircons are crucial to understanding the first 500 Myr of crustal evolution of Earth. Very few zircons of this age (>4050 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) have been found other than from a ~300 km diameter domain of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. Here we report SIMS U-Pb and O isotope ratios and trace element analyses for two ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> detrital zircons from a Paleozoic quartzite at the Longquan area of the Cathaysia Block. One zircon ((207)Pb/(206)Pb age of 4127 ± 4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) shows normal oscillatory zonation and constant oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O = 5.8 to 6.0‰). The other zircon grain has a ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> magmatic core surrounded by a ~4070 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> metamorphic mantle. The magmatic core has elevated δ(18)O (7.2 ± 0.2‰), high titanium concentration (53 ± 3.4 ppm) and a positive cerium anomaly, yielding anomalously high calculated oxygen fugacity (FMQ + 5) and a high crystallization temperature (910°C). These results are unique among Hadean zircons and suggest a granitoid source generated from dry remelting of partly oxidizing supracrustal sediments altered by surface waters. The ~4100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> dry melting and subsequent ~4070 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> metamorphism provide new evidence for the diversity of the Earth's earliest crust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26414409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26414409"><span>Synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications of gelatin methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) hydrogels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yue, Kan; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Tamayol, Ali; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Gelatin methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) hydrogels have been widely used for various biomedical applications due to their suitable biological properties and tunable physical characteristics. Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> hydrogels closely resemble some essential properties of native extracellular matrix (ECM) due to the presence of cell-attaching and matrix metalloproteinase responsive peptide motifs, which allow cells to proliferate and spread in Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-based scaffolds. Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> is also versatile from a processing perspective. It crosslinks when exposed to light irradiation to form hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties. It can also be microfabricated using different methodologies including micromolding, photomasking, bioprinting, self-assembly, and microfluidic techniques to generate constructs with controlled architectures. Hybrid hydrogel systems can also be formed by mixing Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> with nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide, and other polymers to form networks with desired combined properties and characteristics for specific biological applications. Recent research has demonstrated the proficiency of Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-based hydrogels in a wide range of tissue engineering applications including engineering of bone, cartilage, cardiac, and vascular tissues, among others. Other applications of Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> hydrogels, besides tissue engineering, include fundamental cell research, cell signaling, drug and gene delivery, and bio-sensing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/969900','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/969900"><span>Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rathbone, Bruce A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-<span class="hlt">MA</span>-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208.1173R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208.1173R"><span>Preserved history of global mean spreading rate: 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to present</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rowan, Christopher J.; Rowley, David B.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Using an up-to-date global plate rotation model, applied to the endpoints of preserved major spreading ridge isochrons, we have calculated the explicitly reconstructable length-weighted mean global half-spreading rate (HSR), ridge length and area production as a function of time since the end of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron at 83.0 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Our calculations integrate uncertainties in rotation parameters and chron boundary ages with the partial sampling uncertainties arising from progressive subduction of older oceanic lithosphere and its preserved spreading record. This record of directly reconstructable oceanic ridge production provides a well-constrained baseline that can be compared to reconstructions that include the largely unconstrained extrapolated histories of entirely subducted oceanic plates. The directly reconstructable global mean HSR has not varied by more than ±15 per cent about an average rate of 28.4 ± 4.6 mm a-1 since 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. No long-term secular trend is evident: a maximum global mean half-rate of 32 ± 6 mm a-1 occurred from 33.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to about 25.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, with minima of 26 ± 5 mm a-1 between about 56 and 40.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and 24 ± 1 mm a-1 since 3.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Only this most recent interval has a rate that differs significantly (at ±2σ) from the long-term mean. The global, reconstructable ridge length at 56 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> decreases by less than 15 per cent relative to the modern ridge system; by 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> it has decreased by 38 per cent. These relatively high preserved ridge fractions mean that the estimated uncertainty due to partial sampling stays roughly equivalent to the estimated rotation model uncertainties, allowing long-term spreading rate variations of >20 per cent since the Late Cretaceous to be ruled out. In contrast, prior to 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> too little oceanic lithosphere is preserved to reliably reconstruct global spreading rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5421913','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5421913"><span>Volcano-tectonic evolution of the Castle Mountains: 22 to 14 <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Capps, R.C. . Dept. of Geology)</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>The alkali-calcic Castle Mountains Volcanic rocks (CMV) are host to major gold mineralization. They are located about 100 km south of Las Vegas, Nevada and are on the boundary between the Basin and Range Province and Colorado River extensional corridor (35[degree]18 minutes 45 seconds N, 115[degree]05 minutes 10 seconds W). New data show the following chronology. 22 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. A regional rhyolite ash-flow tuff, the Castle Mountain Tuff member, was deposited on a Proterozoic-Paleozoic basement of low relief. <22 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> - > 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Normal faulting (N30--60[degree]W, 60--65[degree]NE) formed half-grabens. Latite and basalt flows, minor ash-flow tuffs, lahars and sediments (Jacks Well member - JW) were deposited unconformably. JW magmas are enriched in light REE compared to the younger CMV. <17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 15.5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Oxidizing upper portions (796 C) of a shallowly emplaced silicic melt erupted to form the high-silica rhyolite dome complexes and intrusives (Linder Peak member - LP) of the NNE-striking Castle Mountains. NW-striking transverse structures caused discontinuities in strike direction of the subvolcanic intrusive and domes and helped form a synvolcanic depression. During a hiatus in volcanism, early Hart Peak member (HP) sediments were deposited marginal to the Castle Mountains. Major gold mineralization and widespread hydrothermal alteration occurred at about 15.5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. 16 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 14 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Early HP volcaniclastic sediments, rhyolite pyroclastic-surge tuff, and basaltic flows, were deposited during late hydrothermal alteration and then fractured and displaced by NNE-striking normal faults, especially in the eastern and northeastern CMV. < 14 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Tectonically significant flat-lying boulder conglomerate and unconformably overlying, largely andesitic flows fill depressions in the Castle Mountains and the Piute Range to the east.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4540T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4540T"><span>Reconstructing the temperature and salinity of the Mediterranean Sea through the Late Miocene (13 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> - 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tzanova, Alexandrina; Herbert, Timothy; Peterson, Laura</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We present a unique, alkenone-based record of sea surface temperatures spanning 13 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> from the uplifted, pelagic, Mediterranean sequence at Monte dei Corvi. The thick salt layers resulting from the isolation of the Mediterranean have so far been an obstacle to conventional drilling in obtaining a high-resolution, continuous record of the basin's conditions prior to ~6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This is especially important when reconstructing the climate conditions that preceded and contributed to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Uplifted sections allow access to this otherwise unresolved time period. Planktonic d18O records from uplifted marine sections exist; however, they are hampered by the lack of independent temperature reconstruction in order to detangle the competing influence of both temperature and salinity on such data. Using alkenone paleothermometry we show that the Late Miocene Mediterranean Sea was notably warmer than present with SSTs equivalent and even higher than the warmest parts of the modern ocean. Between ~ 12.9 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to ~8.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> temperatures hovered close to 28oC and possibly even higher. At ~8.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, concurrent with notable changes in the vegetation pattern of the area as well as globally, sea surface temperatures show a distinct cooling trend punctuated with a cold episode at ~7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> which coincides with the first appearance of desert conditions in the Sahara. The cooling trend continues up to the Messinian Salinity Crisis at which point marine sedimentation was interrupted at the site. Our dataset contains four high-resolution windows where we examine the precession scale SST changes that contributed to sapropel formation and comparing them with the regime established for the Plio-Pleistocene. The reconstructed sea surface temperatures allow us to reconstruct the paleo-salinity of the Mediterranean leading up to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The uncorrected the published d18O planktonic records show a sharp enrichment at ~7.5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Once corrected for temperature</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046022','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046022"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE: an experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials in extremes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barnes, Cris W</p> <p>2011-01-07</p> <p>The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE) project intends to create an experimental facility that will revolutionize the control of materials in extremes. That control extends to extreme regimes where solid material has failed and begins to flow - the regimes of fluid dynamics and turbulent mixing. This presentation introduces the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE facility concept, demonstrates examples of the science case that determine its functional requirements, and kicks-off the discussion of the decadal scientific challenges of mixing in extremes, including those <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE might address.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1238139','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1238139"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced Light Sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sykora, Milan; Kober, Edward Martin</p> <p>2016-02-16</p> <p>Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a concept for a new research facility, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE: Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. The key motivation for <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE is to develop new experimental capabilities needed to fill the existing gaps in our fundamental understanding of materials important for key National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) goals. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE will bring two major new capabilities: (a) the ability to characterize the meso- and microstructure of materials in bulk as well as local dynamic response characteristics, and (b) the ability to characterize how this microstructure evolves under NNSA-relevant conditions and impacts the material’s performance in this regime.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28096546','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28096546"><span><span class="hlt">MA</span>026, an anti-hepatitis C virus compound, opens tight junctions of the epithelial cell membrane.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kanda, Yusuke; Yamasaki, Youhei; Shimura, Satomi; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">MA</span>026 is an antiviral natural compound against hepatitis C virus (HCV). It was recently reported that <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 binds claudin-1 (CLDN1) and inhibits HCV infection. Although CLDN1 is an important component of tight junctions (TJ) in the epithelial cell layer, the effects of <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 on the TJ barrier function remained to be revealed. Here we report that <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 irreversibly opens the TJ. <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 irreversibly increased FD4 permeability and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) for at least 5 h. Although <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 increased Ca(2+) influx in layered MDCKII cells, the Ca(2+) influx was less than that of capsaicin, a reversible TJ opener. Moreover, <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 did not induce the dephosphorylation of cofilin and reorganization of F-actin structure. Although the mechanism is left to be disclosed, these results suggest that <span class="hlt">MA</span>026 is a novel irreversible TJ opener probably by targeting CLDN1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=80275&keyword=mackay&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=80275&keyword=mackay&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, SUPERFUND SITE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>New Bedford Harbor (NBH), <span class="hlt">MA</span>, is a Superfund site due to high sediment polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. An initial remedial dredging operation removed the most contaminated sediments from the upper harbor ("Hot Spot"). During remediation, a monitoring program assess...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf"><span>21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf"><span>21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf"><span>21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf"><span>21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec872-3500.pdf"><span>21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70018843','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70018843"><span>Tectonic implications of post-30 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Pacific and North American relative plate motions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.534 - Certificate to be attached to closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... to be attached to the closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.524 - Application for cancellation of Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... application for cancellation of an Open Cargo Policy Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304 may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-30/pdf/2010-6923.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-30/pdf/2010-6923.pdf"><span>75 FR 15740 - Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc.: Norton, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Notice of Termination of Investigation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-03-30</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc.: Norton, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Notice of Termination... of Valentine Tool and Stamping, Inc., Norton, Massachusetts. The petitioner has requested that...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.206 - Timeframe for payment to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... organizations for qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>-affiliated eligible hospitals under common corporate governance are made under... common corporate governance under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, payment is made under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.206 - Timeframe for payment to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... organizations for qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>-affiliated eligible hospitals under common corporate governance are made under... common corporate governance under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, payment is made under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol5-sec495-206.pdf"><span>42 CFR 495.206 - Timeframe for payment to qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... organizations for qualifying <span class="hlt">MA</span>-affiliated eligible hospitals under common corporate governance are made under... common corporate governance under the Medicare FFS EHR incentive program, payment is made under the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04058&hterms=Carpenter&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DCarpenter','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S62-04058&hterms=Carpenter&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DCarpenter"><span>Astronaut Scott Carpenter on recovery ship U.S.S. Intrepid after <span class="hlt">MA</span>-7 flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1962-01-01</p> <p>Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter, prime pilot for the Mercury-Atlas 7 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-7) mission, arrives aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Intrepid, during recovery operations following his earth-orbital mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030112227&hterms=opnet&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dopnet','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030112227&hterms=opnet&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dopnet"><span>Comparison of TCe<span class="hlt">MA</span> and TDMA for Inter-Satellite Communications using OPNET Simulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hain, Regina Rosales; Ramanathan, Ram; Bergamo, Marcos; Wallett, Thomas M.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>A robust data link protocol, enabling unique physical and MAC layer technologies and sub-network level protocols, is needed in order to take advantage of the full potential of using both TDMA and CDMA in a satellite communication network. A novel MAC layer protocol, TDMA with CDMA-encoding multiple access (TCe<span class="hlt">MA</span>) integrated with null-steered digital beam-forming spatial multiplexing, is investigated to support flexible spacecraft communications. Abstract models of the TCe<span class="hlt">MA</span> and TDMA processes are developed in OPNFiT and a comparison of the performances of TCe<span class="hlt">MA</span> and TDMA in a satellite network simulation are made. TCe<span class="hlt">MA</span> provides the better connectivity and capacity with respect to TDMA for satellite communication traffic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0472.photos.363607p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0472.photos.363607p/"><span>48. Quincy, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>48. Quincy, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior detail of water and hydraulic pumps VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17672331','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17672331"><span>[Mutagenic effects of gamma-rays on Coix lacryma-jobi var. <span class="hlt">ma</span>-yuen].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Xiao-xia; Wang, Zhi-an; Yu, Xu-ping</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>To study the mutagenic effect of gamma-rays on Coix lacryma-jobi var. <span class="hlt">ma</span>-yuen. Physiological and mutagenic effects of gamma-rays on C. lacryma-jobi var. <span class="hlt">ma</span>-yuen dormant seeds were studied. The germination percentage, seeding survival, seeding height and root length of M1 plants and the frequency of chlorophyll mutation in M2 generation were selected as criteria. The gamma-rays showed obvious inhibitory action to the seedling growth, and a strong ability in inducing the chlorophyll mutation. The gamma-rays is one kind of C. lacryma-jobi var. <span class="hlt">ma</span>-yuen effective mutagen. The appropriate dose of gamma-rays is 450 Gy for C. lacryma-jobi var. <span class="hlt">ma</span>-yuen dormant seeds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.534 - Certificate to be attached to closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... to be attached to the closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.524 - Application for cancellation of Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... application for cancellation of an Open Cargo Policy Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304 may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.524 - Application for cancellation of Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... application for cancellation of an Open Cargo Policy Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304 may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.534 - Certificate to be attached to closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... to be attached to the closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A, may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-524.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.524 - Application for cancellation of Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance... application for cancellation of an Open Cargo Policy Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-304 may be obtained from the American War...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-23/pdf/2010-9485.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-23/pdf/2010-9485.pdf"><span>75 FR 21367 - Advanced Electronics, Inc.; Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Notice of Negative Determination on Remand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-23</p> <p>... Employment and Training Administration Advanced Electronics, Inc.; Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Notice of Negative... Department of Labor (Department) for further investigation Former Employees of Advanced Electronics, Inc. v... Adjustment Assistance (ATAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Advanced Electronics, Inc.,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-07857.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s63-07857.html"><span>MERCURY-ATLAS (<span class="hlt">MA</span>)-9 - SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR. ASTRONAUT - MERCURY CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - CAPE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-05-16</p> <p>S63-07857 (15-16 May 1963) --- Astronaut Alan Shepard (left) and Walter C. Williams monitor progress of the Mercury Atlas 9 (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-9) mission from Mercury Control Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-16/pdf/2010-17379.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-16/pdf/2010-17379.pdf"><span>75 FR 41524 - Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cranston Print Works Company...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-16</p> <p>... Employment and Training Administration Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cranston Print Works Company, Corporate Offices, Cranston, RI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 6, 2009, applicable to workers of Cranston Print...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-06/pdf/2012-2533.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-06/pdf/2012-2533.pdf"><span>77 FR 5841 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-02-06</p> <p>... of Smith College, Northampton, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, from Ward's Natural Science Establishment of Rochester, NY, and... objects are present. Ward's Natural Science Establishment, which is still in operation today, could not...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.V41C0728C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.V41C0728C"><span>21 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Eclogite From the Main Central Thrust Sheet, Eastern Nepal Himalaya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Corrie, S. L.; Kohn, M. J.; Vervoort, J. D.; Parkinson, C. D.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Though uncommon throughout the Himalaya, eclogites have been documented in the Kaghan Valley of Pakistan, the Tso Morari dome in India, the Kharta region of Tibet, and the Makalu-Everest region of the Arun River valley in eastern Nepal. The Kaghan and Tso Morari UHP eclogites have been dated at ~50 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and are commonly viewed as reflecting aborted subduction of the leading edge of the Indian plate during the initial stages of Indo- Asian collision. Here we show that the Arun eclogites are significantly younger, only ~21 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, so reflect either different origins, or substantial time lags in tectonics along strike. The Arun eclogites are stratigraphically continuous with the surrounding Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) felsic gneisses, and have been interpreted as metamorphosed basaltic sills. P-T conditions have been estimated at >14 kbar at 670-710 °C. The GHS in this region overlies Lesser Himalayan rocks along the Main Central Thrust (MCT), which can be traced for over 2000 km along strike. Lu-Hf dates from garnet separates in one relict eclogite indicate an age of 20.7±0.4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (MSWD = 2.2). Five garnet amphibolites from nearby were also dated via Lu-Hf, and their ages range from 14-20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (13.9±2.5, 14.1±0.3, 14.5±2.8, 15.1±0.6, and 19.8±1.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>). The ~21 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> age obtained from the eclogite postdates eclogite ages from the western Himalaya (Kaghan and Tso Morari) by ~30 Myr, and has important implications for tectonic models of Himalayan orogenesis. One possible model is that (aborted) subduction, slab breakoff, and ascent of India's leading edge occurred diachronously: ~50 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the western Himalaya, ~20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in eastern Nepal, and presumably even younger in the eastern Himalaya. Alternatively, because the Arun eclogites did not reach ultra-high pressure conditions seen by western eclogites (only ≥45, not ≥90 km depth), they may simply reflect deepening or longer transport of the MCT in the Arun area. Regardless, a ~21 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> age for these eclogites combined with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5131250','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5131250"><span>Fermented Herbal Formulas KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 Ameliorate IL-6-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Colon Cancer Cell Line</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Park, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Gun; Lee, Bo Hyoung</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), depending on the extent and duration of intestinal inflammation. Increased IL-6 expression has been reported in IBD patients, which may be associated with intestinal barrier function through discontinuous tight junction (TJ). KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span> is a specific agent for allergic diseases and cancer, and it is composed of several plants; these herbs have been used in traditional oriental medicine. We fermented KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>, the product of KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128, using probiotics to improve the therapeutic efficacy via the absorption and bioavailability of the active ingredients. In this study, we demonstrated that KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA/MA</span>128 exhibited anticolitis effects via the modulation of TJ protein. Interleukin-6 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the TER and an increase in the FITC-dextran permeability; however, pretreatment with 400 µg/ml KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA/MA</span>128 resulted in a significant increase in the TER and a decrease in the FITC-dextran permeability via IL-6 induction. Furthermore, protein and mRNA TJ levels remained stable after pretreatment with 400 µg/ml KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA/MA</span>128. Moreover, KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA/MA</span>128 suppressed the expression of PLCγ1 and PKC. Taken together, these findings suggest novel information and clue of the anticolitis effects of KIOM-<span class="hlt">MA</span>128 via regulation of tight junction. PMID:27980357</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22934734G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22934734G"><span>Correlating The Star Formation Histories Of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA Galaxies With Their Past AGN Activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gonzalez Ortiz, Andrea</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a primary mechanism affecting star formation in <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA galaxies. Using the Pipe3D code, we modeled the stellar population from <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA spectra and derived the star formation histories of 53 AGN host galaxies. We seek to compare the star formation histories of the host galaxies of AGN with the ages of their radio lobes to better understand the role of AGN feedback in the star formation histories of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA galaxies. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO) is one of the three core programs in the fourth generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS). <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA will investigate the internal kinematics of nearly 10,000 local galaxies through dithered observations using fiber integral field units (IFUs) that vary in diameter from 12" (19 fibers) to 32" (127 fibers). In this poster, we present initial results on the star formation histories of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA AGN host galaxies. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4977492','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4977492"><span>Precise Tuning of Facile One-Pot Gelatin Methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) Synthesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shirahama, Hitomi; Lee, Bae Hoon; Tan, Lay Poh; Cho, Nam-Joon</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Gelatin-methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) is one of the most commonly used photopolymerizable biomaterials in bio-applications. However, Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis remains suboptimal, as its reaction parameters have not been fully investigated. The goal of this study is to establish an optimal route for effective and controllable Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis by systematically examining reaction parameters including carbonate-bicarbonate (CB) buffer molarity, initial pH adjustment, MAA concentration, gelatin concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time. We employed several analytical techniques in order to determine the degree of substitution (DS) and conducted detailed structural analysis of the synthesized polymer. The results enabled us to optimize Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis, showing the optimal conditions to balance the deprotonation of amino groups with minimizing MAA hydrolysis, which led to nearly complete substitution. The optimized conditions (low feed ratio of MAA to gelatin (0.1 mL/g), 0.25 M CB buffer at pH 9, and a gelatin concentration of 10–20%) enable a simplified reaction scheme that produces Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> with high substitution with just one-step addition of MAA in one pot. Looking forward, these optimal conditions not only enable facile one-pot Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis but can also guide researchers to explore the efficient, high methacrylation of other biomacromolecules. PMID:27503340</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25906742','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25906742"><span>HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span>: A Klenow sub-fragment lacking the 3'-5' exonuclease domain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martina, Cristina Elisa; Lapenta, Fabio; Montón Silva, Alejandro; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The design, construction, overexpression, and purification of a Klenow sub-fragment lacking the 3'-5' exonuclease domain is presented here. In particular, a synthetic gene coding for the residues 515-928 of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I was constructed. To improve the solubility and stability of the corresponding protein, the synthetic gene was designed to contain 11 site-specific substitutions. The gene was inserted into the pBADHis expression vector, generating 2 identical Klenow sub-fragments, bearing or not a hexahistidine tag. Both these Klenow sub-fragments, denominated HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span> and HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span>His, were purified, and their catalytic properties were compared to those of Klenow enzyme. When DNA polymerase activity was assayed under processive conditions, the Klenow enzyme performed much better than HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span> and HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span>His. However, when DNA polymerase activity was assayed under distributive conditions, the initial velocity of the reaction catalyzed by HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span> was comparable to that observed in the presence of Klenow enzyme. In particular, under distributive conditions HoLa<span class="hlt">Ma</span> was found to strongly prefer dsDNAs bearing a short template overhang, to the length of which the Klenow enzyme was relatively insensitive. Overall, our observations indicate that the exonuclease domain of the Klenow enzyme, besides its proofreading activity, does significantly contribute to the catalytic efficiency of DNA elongation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996RScI...67.1314K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996RScI...67.1314K"><span>On the development of a 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> direct current H - multicusp source</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuo, T.; Yuan, D.; Jayamanna, K.; McDonald, M.; Baartman, R.; Schmor, P.; Dutto, G.</p> <p>1996-03-01</p> <p>A 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp source has been developed for injection into a TR30 cyclotron. This source is also used with a 900 kV tandem accelerator to obtain 10 <span class="hlt">mA</span> protons at 1.8 MeV. The program is an extension of the 5-7 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- cusp source developed at TRIUMF during 1989-1990. Major efforts include the search for the optimal filament materials, shape, and location; comparison of cusp line confinement and magnetic filtering of electrons at the extraction region; optimization of extraction lense configuration; and upgrading of vacuum and power systems capability. The source is noncesiated and the maximum arc power available is only 5 kW. After the H- beams pass through an electron suppression grid and a 20 mm collimator, we obtained 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> with 0.66 π mm mrad 4 rms normalized emittance. At this output the e/H ratio was about 4. The best normalized emittance occurs around 5-7 <span class="hlt">mA</span>, having a value of 0.37 π mm mrad. Further development in the near future is planned using cesium and multiple apertures in the hope of increasing dc H- currents to 30 <span class="hlt">mA</span> while holding the normalized emittance below 0.75 π mm mrad.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2465136','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2465136"><span>Initial characterization of a subclone of the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell line.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kilgore, M W; Stocco, D M</p> <p>1989-03-01</p> <p>Cloned cell lines have proven to be useful models in understanding the regulation of endocrine cells and steroid synthesis. In this study we report the isolation and characterization of a subclone of the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 Leydig tumor cell line. Whereas there was no difference in basal steroid production between the clone (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 LP) and the parent stock (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-10), <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 LP produces very low levels of progesterone after stimulation by hCG or (Bu)2cAMP. In both cell populations, hCG stimulation resulted in the accumulation of comparable amounts of cAMP in the presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and similar levels of cAMP were measured at 30 min without inhibitor. Measurement of cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity using two separate methods demonstrated that the low steroid production in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 LP could not be accounted for by a decrease in the activity of this enzyme complex. Additionally, no difference in 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity could be demonstrated between the two cell populations. Since the lesion that attenuates the ability of <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 to synthesize progesterone is somewhere after the production of cAMP and before cholesterol side-chain cleavage activity, this system may provide a useful model for understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling steroid biosynthesis in Leydig cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...631036S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...631036S"><span>Precise Tuning of Facile One-Pot Gelatin Methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) Synthesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shirahama, Hitomi; Lee, Bae Hoon; Tan, Lay Poh; Cho, Nam-Joon</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Gelatin-methacryloyl (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>) is one of the most commonly used photopolymerizable biomaterials in bio-applications. However, Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis remains suboptimal, as its reaction parameters have not been fully investigated. The goal of this study is to establish an optimal route for effective and controllable Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis by systematically examining reaction parameters including carbonate-bicarbonate (CB) buffer molarity, initial pH adjustment, MAA concentration, gelatin concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time. We employed several analytical techniques in order to determine the degree of substitution (DS) and conducted detailed structural analysis of the synthesized polymer. The results enabled us to optimize Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis, showing the optimal conditions to balance the deprotonation of amino groups with minimizing MAA hydrolysis, which led to nearly complete substitution. The optimized conditions (low feed ratio of MAA to gelatin (0.1 mL/g), 0.25 M CB buffer at pH 9, and a gelatin concentration of 10–20%) enable a simplified reaction scheme that produces Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> with high substitution with just one-step addition of MAA in one pot. Looking forward, these optimal conditions not only enable facile one-pot Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span> synthesis but can also guide researchers to explore the efficient, high methacrylation of other biomacromolecules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=239678','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=239678"><span>Trypsin-treated <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104: a sensitive cell line for isolating enteric viruses from environmental samples.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Agbalika, F; Hartemann, P; Foliguet, J M</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>During a 1-year survey of enteroviruses in wastewater samples from the Lorraine area, three widely used continuous monkey kidney cell lines were tested: BGM, Vero, and trypsin-treated <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104. Decontaminated samples from secondary wastewater treatment plants (influent or effluent) were directly inoculated onto cells, and viruses were revealed after two passages with a liquid medium technique. Out of the total percentage of positive isolates with the three systems (32.7) 24.7% were found with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104, 14.1% with BGM, and only 1.7% with Vero cells. Poliovirus was recovered more frequently with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104 (12.3%) than with BGM (1.7%). Reovirus (3.5%) and echovirus (1.7%) were only found with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104 cells; however, BGM cells allowed the isolation of a few group B coxsackieviruses (5.9%). It must be pointed out that 7.0% of samples with an unconfirmed cytopathic effect were found with BGM against 3.4% found with <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104, but they did not have significant differences. Because of its large spectrum of sensitivity, easy maintenance, and resistance to toxic effects, trypsin-treated <span class="hlt">Ma</span>-104 may be recommended in conjunction with other cell lines for the detection of viruses from environmental samples, especially with the use of a liquid method. PMID:6324675</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5737..273H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LNCS.5737..273H"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gate Simulator: A Simulation Environment for a Decentralized Grid Scheduler</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Ye; Brocco, Amos; Courant, Michele; Hirsbrunner, Beat; Kuonen, Pierre</p> <p></p> <p>This paper presents a simulator for of a decentralized modular grid scheduler named <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gate. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gate’s design emphasizes scheduler interoperability by providing intelligent scheduling serving the grid community as a whole. Each <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gate scheduler instance is able to deal with dynamic scheduling conditions, with continuously arriving grid jobs. Received jobs are either allocated on local resources, or delegated to other <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gates for remote execution. The proposed <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gate simulator is based on GridSim toolkit and Alea simulator, and abstracts the features and behaviors of complex fundamental grid elements, such as grid jobs, grid resources, and grid users. Simulation of scheduling tasks is supported by a grid network overlay simulator executing distributed ant-based swarm intelligence algorithms to provide services such as group communication and resource discovery. For evaluation, a comparison of behaviors of different collaborative policies among a community of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>Gates is provided. Results support the use of the proposed approach as a functional ready grid scheduler simulator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2104562','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2104562"><span>Cardiotoxicity of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang/Caffeine or Ephedrine/Caffeine in a Rodent Model System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dunnick, J. K.; Kissling, G.; Gerken, D. K.; Vallant, M. A.; Nyska, A.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang (equivalent to 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg ephedrine) or ephedrine (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25 mg/kg) were administered as one bolus oral dose to male F344 rats with and without caffeine. The herbal medicine <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang (ephedra) in combination with caffeine caused rapid clinical signs of toxicity including salivation, hyperactivity, ataxia, and eventually lethargy, and failure to respond to stimuli. When this syndrome of clinical signs emerged, animals were moribund sacrificed, and a histological analysis for heart lesions performed. Cardiotoxicity included hemorrhage, necrosis, and degeneration in the ventricles or interventricular septum within 2–4 hours after treatment with <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang (ephedra)/caffeine or ephedrine (the principal active component in <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang)/caffeine. There was a steep dose response curve for cardiotoxicity with minimal toxicity seen at levels of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang (equivalent to 12.5 mg/kg ephedrine) with caffeine. However, cardiotoxic lesions occurred in 28% of animals with <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang dosages equivalent to 25 mg/kg ephedrine with 15 or 30 mg/kg caffeine, and in 90% of animals at <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang exposures equivalent to 50 mg/kg ephedrine with 15 or 30 mg/kg caffeine. Cardiotoxic lesions occurred in 47% of animals in the 25 mg/kg ephedrine groups with caffeine at 7.25, 15, or 30 mg/kg. There was no statistical difference in the occurrence of cardiotoxic lesions when 15 or 30 mg/kg caffeine was combined with <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang equivalent to 25 or 50 mg/kg ephedrine; likewise there was no statistical difference in the occurrence of cardiotoxic lesions when 7.25, 15, or 30 mg/kg caffeine was combined with 25 mg/kg ephedrine. These results show that the cardiotoxic effects of the herbal medicine, <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang, are similar to that of ephedrine, the principal active ingredient in the herbal medicine. The combination of <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Huang or ephedrine with caffeine enhanced the cardiotoxicity over that with the herbal medicine or the active ingredient alone. PMID:17676524</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207..741D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.207..741D"><span>High-resolution reconstructions of Pacific-North America plate motion: 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to present</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We present new rotations that describe the relative positions and velocities of the Pacific and North America plates at 22 times during the past 19.7 Myr, offering ≈1-Myr temporal resolution for studies of the geotectonic evolution of western North America and other plate boundary locations. Derived from ≈18 000 magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault identifications from the Pacific-Antarctic-Nubia-North America plate circuit and the velocities of 935 GPS sites on the Pacific and North America plates, the new rotations and GPS-derived angular velocity indicate that the rate of motion between the two plates increased by ≈70 per cent from 19.7 to 9±1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, but changed by less than 2 per cent since 8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and even less since 4.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The rotations further suggest that the relative plate direction has rotated clockwise for most of the past 20 Myr, with a possible hiatus from 9 to 5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This conflicts with previously reported evidence for a significant clockwise change in the plate direction at ≈8-6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Our new rotations indicate that Pacific plate motion became obliquely convergent with respect to the San Andreas Fault of central California at 5.2-4.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, in agreement with geological evidence for a Pliocene onset of folding and faulting in central California. Our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 6.3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> differs by only 15-30 km from structurally derived reconstructions after including 3-4 km Myr-1 of geodetically measured slip between the Baja California Peninsula and Pacific plate. This implies an approximate 15-30 km upper bound for plate non-rigidity integrated around the global circuit at 6.3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. A much larger 200±54 km discrepancy between our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 12 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and that estimated from structural and marine geophysical observations suggests that faults in northwestern Mexico or possibly west of the Baja California Peninsula accommodated large amounts of obliquely divergent dextral shear</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Litho.174..109P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Litho.174..109P"><span>The ca. 1380 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Mashak igneous event of the Southern Urals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Puchkov, Victor N.; Bogdanova, Svetlana V.; Ernst, Richard E.; Kozlov, Vjacheslav I.; Krasnobaev, Arthur A.; Söderlund, Ulf; Wingate, Michael T. D.; Postnikov, Alexander V.; Sergeeva, Nina D.</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>A review of the geochronology, geochemistry and distribution of the 1380 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Mashak Large Igneous Province (LIP) of the eastern margin of the East European craton indicates a potential link to a major breakup stage of the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Columbia (Nuna), link to a major stratigraphic boundary (Lowe-Middle Riphean), and economic significance for hydrocarbons and metallogeny. Specifically, the Mashak event likely has much greater extent than previously realized. Two U-Pb baddeleyite (ID TIMS) age determinations on dolerite sills obtained from borehole (Menzelinsk-Aktanysh-183) confirm the western extent of the Mashak event into the crystalline basement of the East European Craton (1382 ± 2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) and into the overlying Lower Riphean sediments (1391 ± 2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>), and the imprecise ages reported elsewhere indicate the possible extension into the Timan region, with an overall areal extent of more than 500,000 km2 (LIP scale). It has tholeiitic compositions and is associated with breakup on the eastern margin of the craton - in addition, precise SHRIMP zircon ages of 1386 ± 5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 1386 ± 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (this paper) provide confirmation of previous approximate 1380-1383 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> zircon age determination of the same formation, and suggest an age of ca. 1.4 Ga for the Lower/Middle Riphean boundary which was formerly considered to be 1350 ± 10 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Contemporaneous magmatic rocks in the northeastern Greenland part of Laurentia (Zig-Zag Dal and Midsommerso formations) and Siberia (Chieress dykes and other dolerites) together with the Mashak event are suggested to be fragments of a single huge LIP and to correspond to breakup stage of the Columbia (Nuna) supercontinent. The Mashak LIP also has some significance, at least in Volgo-Uralia, for hydrocarbons and metallogeny.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25575095','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25575095"><span>Evaluation overview for the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD) project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Davison, Kirsten K; Falbe, Jennifer; Taveras, Elsie M; Gortmaker, Steve; Kulldorff, Martin; Perkins, Meghan; Blaine, Rachel E; Franckle, Rebecca L; Ganter, Claudia; Baidal, Jennifer Woo; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Buszkiewicz, James; Smith, Lauren; Land, Thomas</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD) project is a 2-year, multilevel, multisector community intervention to prevent and control obesity among children 2-12 years of age from two predominantly low-income communities in Massachusetts. <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD includes evidence-based interventions in multiple sectors, including community health centers, early care and education centers, schools, afterschool programs, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, and the broader community. Currently, implementation of <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD is complete and the final year of data collection is in progress. Here, the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD evaluation plan is described and baseline data are presented. The impact of <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD on children's BMI, lifestyle behaviors, obesity-related care, and quality of life will be assessed using sector-specific, pre/post, time-series, and quasi-experimental designs. Change in the primary outcomes will be compared for intervention and comparison communities. Additionally, change in mean BMI and obesity prevalence in intervention school districts will be compared to similar districts throughout the state. At baseline in 2012, approximately 16% of preschool-aged and 25% of school-aged children were obese. Moreover, 15-40% of children consumed no vegetables on the previous day, 25-75% drank a sugar-sweetened beverage on the previous day, up to 87% had insufficient physical activity, 50-75% had a television in the room where they slept, and 50-80% obtained insufficient sleep. There is ample room for improvement in BMI and health behaviors in children in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD communities. If successful, <span class="hlt">MA</span>-CORD may serve as a model for multilevel, multisector approaches to childhood obesity prevention and control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.331...67R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.331...67R"><span>Earth at 200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>: Global palaeogeography refined from CAMP palaeomagnetic data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruiz-Martínez, Vicente Carlos; Torsvik, Trond H.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Gaina, Carmen</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province was formed approximately 200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> ago as a prelude to the breakup of Pangea, and may have been a cause of the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction. Based on a combination of (i) a new palaeomagnetic pole from the CAMP related Argana lavas (Moroccan Meseta Block), (ii) a global compilation of 190-210 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> poles, and (iii) a re-evaluation of relative fits between NW Africa, the Moroccan Meseta Block and Iberia, we calculate a new global 200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> pole (latitude = 70.1° S, longitude = 56.7° E and A95 = 2.7°; N = 40 poles; NW Africa co-ordinates). We consider the palaeomagnetic database to be robust at 200 ± 10 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, which allows us to craft precise reconstructions near the Triassic-Jurassic boundary: at this very important time in Earth history, Pangea was near-equatorially centered, the western sector was dominated by plate convergence and subduction, while in the eastern sector, the Palaeotethys oceanic domain was almost consumed because of a widening Neothethys. We show that there has been negligible net displacement of the Moroccan Meseta relative to Africa since 200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. We calculate a new fit between Iberia and NW Africa, showing that models inferring minor Cretaceous rotation and major Cretaceous sinistral translation of Iberia relative to Europe are inconsistent with palaeomagnetic Iberia-Africa fits at 200 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. During Pangea breakup (~ 195 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, opening of the Central Atlantic), and shortly after the CAMP outburst, Laurasia rotated clockwise relative to Gondwana around an Euler pole located in SE Iberia. The CAMP and its likely contribution to climate change, mass extinction and Pangea breakup profoundly changed planet Earth and we show that CAMP was sourced by a deep mantle plume that started its disturbing journey from the core-mantle boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2930726','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2930726"><span>The PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span>-linked Cholinesterase Tetramers Are Assembled from Homodimers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Vicky P.; Xie, Heidi Q.; Chan, Wallace K. B.; Leung, K. Wing; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Tsim, Karl W. K.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is anchored onto cell membranes by the transmembrane protein PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span> (proline-rich membrane anchor) as a tetrameric globular form that is prominently expressed in vertebrate brain. In parallel, the PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span>-linked tetrameric butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is also found in the brain. A single type of AChE-BChE hybrid tetramer was formed in cell cultures by co-transfection of cDNAs encoding AChET and BChET with proline-rich attachment domain-containing proteins, PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span> I, PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span> II, or a fragment of ColQ having a C-terminal GPI addition signal (QN-GPI). Using AChE and BChE mutants, we showed that AChE-BChE hybrids linked with PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span> or QN-GPI always consist of AChET and BChET homodimers. The dimer formation of AChET and BChET depends on the catalytic domains, and the assembly of tetramers with a proline-rich attachment domain-containing protein requires the presence of C-terminal “t-peptides” in cholinesterase subunits. Our results indicate that PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span>- or ColQ-linked cholinesterase tetramers are assembled from AChET or BChET homodimers. Moreover, the PRi<span class="hlt">MA</span>-linked AChE-BChE hybrids occur naturally in chicken brain, and their expression increases during development, suggesting that they might play a role in cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:20566626</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4435939','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4435939"><span>Critical determinants of mitochondria-associated neutral sphingomyelinase (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase) for mitochondrial localization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rajagopalan, Vinodh; Canals, Daniel; Luberto, Chiara; Snider, Justin; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Obeid, Lina M.; Hannun, Yusuf A</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND A novel murine mitochondria-associated neutral sphingomyelinase (<span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase) has been recently cloned and partially characterized. The subcellular localization of the enzyme was found to be predominantly in mitochondria. In this work, the determinants of mitochondrial localization and its topology were investigated. METHODS <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase mutants lacking consecutive regions and fusion proteins of GFP with truncated <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase regions were constructed and expressed in MCF-7 cells. Its localization was analyzed using confocal microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation methods. The sub-mitochondrial localization of <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase was determined using protease protection assay on isolated mitochondria. RESULTS The results initially showed that a putative mitochondrial localization signal (MLS), homologous to an MLS in the zebra-fish mitochondrial SMase is not necessary for the mitochondrial localization of the murine <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase. Evidence is provided to the presence of two regions in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase that are sufficient for mitochondrial localization: a signal sequence (amino acids 24–6) that is responsible for the mitochondrial localization and an additional 'signal-anchor' sequence (amino acids 77–99) that anchors the protein to the mitochondrial membrane. This protein is topologically located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where both the C and N-termini remain exposed to the cytosol. CONCLUSIONS <span class="hlt">MA</span>-nSMase is a membrane anchored protein with a MLS and a signal-anchor sequence at its N-terminal to localize it to the outer mitochondrial membrane. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE Mitochondrial sphingolipids have been reported to play a critical role in cellular viability. This study opens a new window to investigate their cellular functions, and to define novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25484313</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16036636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16036636"><span>Effects of Tremella mesenterica on steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lo, H-C; Chen, Y-W; Chien, C-H; Tseng, C-Y; Kuo, Y-M; Huang, B-M</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Tremella mesenterica (TM), a yellow jelly mushroom, has been traditionally used as food and crude medicine to improve several kinds of symptoms in Chinese society for a long time. Recent studies have illustrated that the fractions of fruiting bodies of TM exhibit a significant hypoglycemic activity in diabetic mouse models, which usually suffer from sexual dysfunction. In a previous study, we showed that TM reduced plasma testosterone production in normal rats without any positive effect in diabetic rats. It evolved a question of TM directly regulating Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In this study, <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells were treated with vehicle, different dosages of TM with or without human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG 50 ng/ml) to clarify the effects. Results showed that TM at different dosages (0.01-10 mg/ml) did not have any effect on <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell steroidogenesis (p > 0.05). In the presence of hCG, there was an inhibitory trend that TA suppressed <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell progesterone production at 3 hr treatment with a statistically significant difference by the 10 mg/ml TM (p < 0.05). In time course effect, TM alone did not have any effect on <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell steroidogenesis from at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 hr (p > 0.05). However, TM did reduce hCG-treated <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell progesterone production at 1, 2 and 3 hr (p < 0.05), respectively. To determine whether TM would have adverse effects on <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cell steroidogenesis in the presence of hCG, MTT assay and recovery studies were conducted. MTT assay indicated that TM had no effect on surviving cells. In addition, with the removal of TM, and then the addition of hCG (2 and 4 hr), progesterone levels were restored within 4 hr. Taken together, present studies suggested that TM suppressed hCG-treated steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cells without any toxicity effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3842992','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3842992"><span>Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D.; Foote, Henry P.; Lechler, Terry</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>'s cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> mimics this effect. Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>'s anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> localization and reveals the importance of Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation. PMID:24109598</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T23D1643V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T23D1643V"><span>Slow steady exhumation of the high elevation Deosai Plateau (Northern Pakistan Himalaya) since 40 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Melle, J.; van der Beek, P.; Guillot, S.; Pecher, A.; Latif, M.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Mountain ranges of the north-western Himalaya in Pakistan show strongly contrasting relief, opposing steep, deeply incised topography with extremely high peaks such as the Karakorum Range and Nanga Parbat Haramosh Massif (NPHM), to high-altitude, low-relief areas such as the Deosai Plateau located between the Karakorum and NPHM and the Tso-Morari Massif in Eastern Ladakh. In contrast, mean elevations of the different mountain ranges are comparable, the Deosai Plateau being on average even slightly higher than the adjacent NPHM. The aim of this study is to quantify the exhumation history the Deosai Plateau, in order to understand how to build such a high-altitude, low-relief plateau and how to preserve it over million-year timescales. Here, we report the first low-temperature thermochronologic data from the Deosai Plateau, to compare its exhumation history to that of the surrounding massifs. Apatite Fission Track (AFT) ages reported in the literature from the NPHM and Karakorum are extremely young (<1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> for the NPHM and between <1 and 7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in Karakorum) implying exhumation rates >1 km/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>. In contrast, our AFT ages from the Deosai Plateau are 15-27 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>; an order of magnitude older than those of the surrounding massifs. Zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He ages (measured at U of Arizona, HeDWaAZ program) range from 23-45 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and 12-15 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, respectively. Modeling the combined AFT and He ages requires continuous and very slow long term cooling rates (around 4 ° C/<span class="hlt">Ma</span>), consistent with an exhumation rate of about 0.15 km/<span class="hlt">Ma</span> for typical geothermal gradients. Our data thus suggest steady slow unroofing of the Deosai Plateau since at least 40 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. A clear link between cooling age patterns and the geomorphology is also evident, with strongly incised, high-relief massifs showing exhumation at rates an order of magnitude faster than the low-relief plateau. AFT and ZFT ages similar to our data have been reported from the Tso Morari massif further east, characterised by similar high</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JVGR..189..319B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JVGR..189..319B"><span>Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to 3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 12.5 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20381306','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20381306"><span>The impact of extended voice use on the acoustic characteristics of phonation after training and performance of actors from the La <span class="hlt">MaMa</span> Experimental Theater club.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferrone, Carol; Galgano, Jessica; Ramig, Lorraine Olson</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>To test the hypothesis that extensive use of La <span class="hlt">MaMa</span> vocal technique may result in symptoms of vocal abuse, an evaluation of the acoustic and perceptual characteristics of voice for eight performers from the Great Jones Repertory Company of the La <span class="hlt">MaMa</span> Experimental Theater was conducted. This vocal technique includes wide ranges of frequency from 46 to 2003 Hz and vocal intensity that is sustained at 90-108 dB sound pressure level with a mouth-to-microphone distance of 30 cm for 3-4 hours per performance. The actors rehearsed for 4 hours per day, 5 days per week for 14 weeks before the series of performances. Thirty-nine performances were presented in 6 weeks. Three pretraining, three posttraining, and two postperformance series data collection sessions were carried out for each performer. Speech samples were gathered using the CSL 4500 and analyzed using Real-Time Pitch program and Multidimensional Voice Program. Acoustic analysis was performed on 48 tokens of sustained vowel phonation for each subject. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test of related samples. Perceptual analysis included professional listeners rating voice quality in pretraining, posttraining, and postperformance samples of the Rainbow Passage and sample lines from the plays. The majority of professional listeners (11/12) judged that this technique would result in symptoms of vocal abuse; however, acoustic data revealed statistically stable or improved measurements for all subjects in most dependent acoustic variables when compared with both posttraining and postperformance trials. These findings add support to the notion that a technique that may be perceived as vocally abusive, generating 90-100 dB sound pressure level and sustained over 6 weeks of performances, actually resulted in improved vocal strength and flexibility. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA..tmp..293H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA..tmp..293H"><span>Study of <span class="hlt">MA</span> Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (<span class="hlt">MA</span>) fraction in these reheated zones. The <span class="hlt">MA</span> exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of <span class="hlt">MA</span> was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the <span class="hlt">MA</span>, along with debonding of <span class="hlt">MA</span> from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5508988','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5508988"><span>DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Rouskin, Silvi</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Coupling structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structural studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduces biases and necessitates population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase (TGIRT). DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in non-canonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs to their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>Pseq’s capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure. PMID:27819661</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP34A..03C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP34A..03C"><span>Glaciation and topographic evolution of the Central Patagonian Andes since 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Christeleit, E. C.; Laemel, R.; De Wolf, W. E.; Shuster, D. L.; Brandon, M. T.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>New and existing thermochronological data are used to model glacial erosion and topographic evolution of the central Patagonian Andes (~47S) over the last 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The modern Andes are cut by large valleys and fjords with local valley relief of at least 2.5 km. It is currently thought that a formerly uniformly high Andes was 'buzzed' down to the elevation of the equilibrium line altitude, presumably in the last 2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> concurrent with late Cenozoic global cooling. However, studies of glacial debris show that glaciers were present in Patagonia as early as 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The extent of these early glaciations is unclear, but recent work suggests that glacial valleys in the central Patagonian Andes were carved at a steady rate beginning at 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, implying that valley incision may be an important process in the topographic evolution of glaciated mountain ranges, rather than cirque retreat. To understand how valley relief has formed in the Andes, we dated 30 samples from Steffen Fjord in Chile using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology. We use this new data and existing thermochronological data in the region to estimate the topographic form of the central Andes at 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and model how the valley relief has evolved since the initiation of glaciation using Pecube.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA...48.4166H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MMTA...48.4166H"><span>Study of <span class="hlt">MA</span> Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (<span class="hlt">MA</span>) fraction in these reheated zones. The <span class="hlt">MA</span> exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of <span class="hlt">MA</span> was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the <span class="hlt">MA</span>, along with debonding of <span class="hlt">MA</span> from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/795137','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/795137"><span>Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 <span class="hlt">ma</span> to 49 Milliamperes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ray Tomlin</p> <p>2002-06-05</p> <p>On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 <span class="hlt">ma</span> of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 <span class="hlt">ma</span>. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 <span class="hlt">ma</span> by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 <span class="hlt">ma</span> and the 26th and 27th at 49 <span class="hlt">ma</span>. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16507311','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16507311"><span>The regulatory mechanism of Tremella mesenterica on steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Yen-Wen; Lo, Hui-Chen; Yang, Jyuer-Ger; Chien, Chi-Hsien; Lee, Shi-Hsiung; Tseng, Chi-Yu; Huang, Bu-Miin</p> <p>2006-07-04</p> <p>Tremella mesenterica (TM), a yellow jelly mushroom, has been traditionally used as tonic food to improve body condition in Chinese society for a long time. We have previously demonstrated that TM reduced in vitro hCG-treated steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells without any toxicity effect. In the present study, the mechanism how TM suppressed hCG-treated steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cells was investigated. <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cells were treated with vehicle, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 50 ng/ml), or different reagents with or without TM to clarify the effects. TM significantly suppressed progesterone production with the presences of forskolin (10 and 100 microM) or dbcAMP (0.5 and 1mM), respectively, in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cells (p<0.05), which indicated that TM suppressed steroidogenesis after PKA activation along the signal pathway. Beyond our expectation, TM induced the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein with or without hCG treatments. However, TM profoundly decreased P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) enzyme activities without any influences on the expression of both enzymes. These inhibitions on steroidogenic enzyme activities might counteract the stimulation of StAR protein expression. In conclusion, results suggest that TM suppressed hCG-treated steroidogenesis in <span class="hlt">MA</span>-10 cells by inhibiting PKA signal pathway and steroidogenic enzyme activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850061400&hterms=diffusion+different+temperature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddiffusion%2Bdifferent%2Btemperature','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850061400&hterms=diffusion+different+temperature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Ddiffusion%2Bdifferent%2Btemperature"><span>Diffusion welding of <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 and a conventional nickel-base superalloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Moore, T. J.; Glasgow, T. K.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A feasibility study of diffusion welding the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 to itself and to conventional Ni-base superalloy Udimet 700 was conducted. Butt joints between <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 pieces and lap joints between Udimet 700 and the ODS alloy were produced by hot pressing for 1.25 hr at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1200 C (1832-2192 F) in vacuum. Following pressing, all weldments were heat treated and machined into mechanical property test specimens. While three different combinations of recrystallized and unrecrystallized <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 butt joints were produced, the unrecrystallized to unrecrystallized joint was most successful as determined by mechanical properties and microstructural examination. Failure to weld the recrystallized material probably related to a lack of adequate deformation at the weld interface. While recrystallized <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 could be diffusion welded to Udimet 700 in places, complete welding over the entire lap joint was not achieved, again due to the lack of sufficient deformation at the faying surfaces. Several methods are proposed to promote the intimate contact necessary for diffusion welding <span class="hlt">MA</span> 6000 to itself and to superalloys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996Tectp.265....1M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996Tectp.265....1M"><span>The Grenville Orogenic Cycle (ca. 1350-1000 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>): an Adirondack perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McLelland, James; Daly, J. Stephen; McLelland, Jonathan M.</p> <p>1996-11-01</p> <p>The Adirondack Mountains are characterized by three major events that took place during the interval ca. 1350-1000 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The earliest of these is the arc-related Elzevirian Orogeny (ca. 1350-1185 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) during which substantial volumes of juvenile calc-alkaline crust were added to the Adirondacks as well as to the northwest segment of the Central Metasedimentary Belt. Data from the southwestern United States as well as from Ireland and Baltica indicate that Elzevirian magmatism and orogeny were of global dimensions. Within the southwestern sector of the Grenville Province, the Elzevirian Orogeny culminated at ca. 1185 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> when accretion of all outboard terranes was completed. Compressional orogeny related to this convergence resulted in overthickened crust and lithosphere which subsequently delaminated giving rise to orogen collapse and AMCG magmatism that swept southeastward from the Frontenac Terrane into the Adirondack Highlands during the interval ca. 1180-1130 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Localized compressional events within neighboring parts of the Grenville Province emphasize the continued existence of contraction during this interval, although crustal extension caused local in sedimentary basins in which were deposited the Flinton and the St. Boniface Groups. The Adirondacks have not yet provided any record of events within the interval ca. 1125-1100 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, although there is evidence of contraction elsewhere in the southwestern Grenville Province at that time. At 1100-1090 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> the northern Adirondack Highlands were invaded by mildly A-type hornblende granites (Hawkeye suite) that are interpreted to be the result of local crustal thinning contemporaneous with rifting and mafic magmatism taking place in the Midcontinent rift. Immediately following, at ca. 1090 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, the global-scale continental collision of the Ottawan Orogeny was initiated. Strong convergence, deformation, and metamorphism continued to at least ca. 1070 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and rocks older than this are profoundly affected by this event</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419636"><span>Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10-0.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Kurobegawa Granite.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ilgp.confE..21B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ilgp.confE..21B"><span>Gas Kinematics In and Around Edge-on Galaxies from <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA Observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bizyaev, D.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA) is a massive Integral Field Unit survey of a large number of relatively nearby galaxies that started in 2014 as a part of SDSS-IV at the Apache Point Observatory. After the first year of observations <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA has obtained IFU spectra of about a thousand of objects, with several dozens of edge-on galaxies among them. The two-dimensional spectra help us constrain parameters of galactic components with superior rotation curves. There is a significant fraction of galaxies in which the extra-planar gas emission is confidently detected. The extra-planar gas velocity fields in several galaxies show signs of lagging rotation with respect to the gas motion close to the galactic plane. We show progress of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA survey in observations of edge-on galaxies and discuss their impact on our understanding of gas kinematics in and around spiral galaxies after finishing the survey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T43D2709R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T43D2709R"><span>Spreading behaviour of the Pacific-Farallon ridge system between 83 and 28 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rowan, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>At 83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, the roughly N-S oriented Pacific-Farallon ridge extended more than 10,000 km from 51° N to 43° S. Despite substantial shortening of the ridge system since ~55 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, this ridge and its remnants (e.g., the East Pacific Rise/EPR) have produced as much as 45% of all the reconstructable oceanic lithosphere created in the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Accurately reconstructing the past spreading history of the Pacific-Farallon ridge is therefore of paramount importance for determining possible variations in global spreading rates over geological time, which are the basis of suggested interactions between mantle dynamics, surface tectonics, sea-level rise and climate in the past 100 Myr. However, attempts to accurately determine Pacific-Farallon spreading face the twin challenges of extensive subduction of Farallon crust - which precludes reconstruction by fitting conjugate magnetic anomaly and fracture zone traces - and the well-established asymmetric spreading behaviour of the EPR and its ancestor ridges for at least the past 51 Myr. We present improved rotation poles for the Pacific-Farallon spreading system between geomagnetic chrons 34y (83 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) and 10y (28.28 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>), complete with uncertainties that allow easier combination into global plate circuits. These poles are derived by combining magnetic anomaly and fracture zone data from both the northern and southern Pacific plate, maximising the data distribution along the original ridge length to average out local variations in spreading behaviour. We have calculated best fit 'half'-stage poles for Pacific-Farallon spreading between nine Pacific plate magnetic anomalies (34y, 33y, 29o, 24.3o, 20o, 18.2o, 17.1y, 13y and 10y). For poles younger than chron 24.3o, full stage poles have been calculated by using anomaly picks from yet-to-be subducted Farallon/Nazca crust in the south Pacific to determine spreading asymmetry. Characterisation of the variation in spreading asymmetry in the past 50 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> also allows bounds</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21646521','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21646521"><span>Earliest human occupations at Dmanisi (Georgian Caucasus) dated to 1.85-1.78 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferring, Reid; Oms, Oriol; Agustí, Jordi; Berna, Francesco; Nioradze, Medea; Shelia, Teona; Tappen, Martha; Vekua, Abesalom; Zhvania, David; Lordkipanidze, David</p> <p>2011-06-28</p> <p>The early Pleistocene colonization of temperate Eurasia by Homo erectus was not only a significant biogeographic event but also a major evolutionary threshold. Dmanisi's rich collection of hominin fossils, revealing a population that was small-brained with both primitive and derived skeletal traits, has been dated to the earliest Upper Matuyama chron (ca. 1.77 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>). Here we present archaeological and geologic evidence that push back Dmanisi's first occupations to shortly after 1.85 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and document repeated use of the site over the last half of the Olduvai subchron, 1.85-1.78 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. These discoveries show that the southern Caucasus was occupied repeatedly before Dmanisi's hominin fossil assemblage accumulated, strengthening the probability that this was part of a core area for the colonization of Eurasia. The secure age for Dmanisi's first occupations reveals that Eurasia was probably occupied before Homo erectus appears in the East African fossil record.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25204159','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25204159"><span>[Doctor <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Kun's experience of applying tonifying kidney and promoting blood circulation treatment of anovulatory infertility].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shan, Jing</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>With the ascending attack rate of anovulatory infertility year by year, people also began to pay attention to its treat methods. According to Doctor <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Kun,who are engaged in clinical work about the treatment for anovulatory infertility, kidney deficiency is the basic pathogenesis and blood stasis is an important factor that has been through. Flexible use of tonifying the kidney and promoting blood circulation treatment of anovulatory infertility in clinic, has achieved remarkable curative effect. Director <span class="hlt">Ma</span> adjusts menstruation by the different periods, and regulates both patients' negative emotions and sleep quality. Through years of clinical experience accumulation, Director <span class="hlt">Ma</span> gradually formes special treatment of anovulatory infertility by flexibly using of tonifying the kidney and promoting blood circulation individually.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/768655','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/768655"><span>Flux Consumption Optimization and the Achievement of 1<span class="hlt">MA</span> Discharge on NSTX</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>J. Menard; B. LeBlanc; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Bell; R. Bell; et al</p> <p>2000-11-16</p> <p>The spherical tokamak (ST), because of its slender central column, has very limited volt-second capability relative to a standard aspect ratio tokamak of similar plasma cross-section. Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have begun to quantify and optimize the ohmic current drive efficiency in a <span class="hlt">MA</span>-class ST device. Sustainable ramp-rates in excess of 5<span class="hlt">MA</span>/sec during the current rise phase have been achieved on NSTX, while faster ramps generate significant MHD activity. Discharges with IP exceeding 1<span class="hlt">MA</span> have been achieved in NSTX with nominal parameters: aspect ratio A=1.3-1.4, elongation k=2-2.2, triangularity d=0.4, internal inductance li=0.6, and Ejima coefficient CE =0.35. Flux consumption efficiency results, performance improvements associated with first boronization, and comparisons to neo-classical resistivity are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16339442','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16339442"><span>Rapid glacial erosion at 1.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> revealed by 4He/3He thermochronometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shuster, David L; Ehlers, Todd A; Rusmoren, Margaret E; Farley, Kenneth A</p> <p>2005-12-09</p> <p>Alpine glaciation and river incision control the topography of mountain ranges, but their relative contributions have been debated for years. Apatite 4He/3He thermochronometry tightly constrains the timing and rate of glacial erosion within one of the largest valleys in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. Five proximate samples require accelerated denudation of the Klinaklini Valley initiating 1.8 +/- 0.2 million years ago (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>). At least 2 kilometers of overlying rock were removed from the valley at >/=5 millimeters per year, indicating that glacial valley deepening proceeded >/=6 times as fast as erosion rates before approximately 1.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This intense erosion may be related to a global transition to enhanced climate instability approximately 1.9 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMOp...62..392A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JMOp...62..392A"><span>Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> waves train generation in a left-handed material</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Atangana, Jacques; Giscard Onana Essama, Bedel; Biya-Motto, Frederick; Mokhtari, Bouchra; Cherkaoui Eddeqaqi, Noureddine; Crépin Kofane, Timoléon</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We analyze the behavior of an electromagnetic wave which propagates in a left-handed material. Second-order dispersion and cubic-quintic nonlinearities are considered. This behavior of an electromagnetic wave is modeled by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which is solved by collective coordinates theory in order to characterize the light pulse intensity profile. More so, a specific frequency range has been outlined where electromagnetic wave behavior will be investigated. The perfect combination of second-order dispersion and cubic nonlinearity leads to a robust soliton. When the quintic nonlinearity comes into play, it provokes strong and long internal perturbations which lead to Benjamin-Feir instability. This phenomenon, also called modulational instability, induces appearance of a Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> waves train. We numerically verify the validity of Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> theory by presenting physical conditions which lead to Kuznetsov-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> waves train generation. Thereafter, some properties of such waves train are also verified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27979141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27979141"><span>Molecular mechanisms and in vitro antioxidant effects of Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tang, Wei; Xing, Zhuqing; Li, Chao; Wang, Jinju; Wang, Yanping</p> <p>2017-04-15</p> <p>Lactobacillus plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 was isolated from Chinese traditional Tibetan kefir grains. The antioxidant activities in vitro of this strain were evaluated extensively. The results showed that L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 can tolerate hydrogen peroxide up to 2.0mM, and its fermentate (fermented supernatant, intact cell and cell-free extract) had strong reducing capacities, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacities, Fe(2+)-chelating abilities, as well as various free radical scavenging capacities. Additionally, both the fermented supernatant and cell homogenate exhibited glutathione peroxidase activity and superoxide dismutase activity. In order to investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L. plantarum <span class="hlt">MA</span>2 at the molecular level, eight antioxidant-related genes were identified, and further analyzed. Three groups of genes cat, gshR and npx, were found up-regulated under H2O2 challenge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1212..106M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1212..106M"><span>Modified variational iteration method for partial differential equations using <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s transformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mohyud-Din, Syed Tauseef</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>In this paper, we apply the modified variational iteration method (MVIM) for solving partial differential equations using <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s transformation. The proposed modification is made by introducing He's polynomials in the correction functional of the variational iteration method (VIM). Moreover, we use a very efficient and reliable transformation which is mainly due to <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and converts the given partial differential equations (PDES) into the corresponding ordinary differential equations (ODES). The proposed MVIM is applied on the re-formulated ODES, which in turn gives the solution in terms of the transformed variables and the application of the inverse transformation yields the required series solution. Several examples are given to re-confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the suggested algorithm. It is observed that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s transformation makes the solution procedure very convenient and simple.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1327983','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1327983"><span>Using superconducting undulator for enhanced imaging capabilities of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yampolsky, Nikolai</p> <p>2016-09-22</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE x-ray free electron laser (FEL) is envisioned to deliver a burst of closely spaced in time pulses for enabling the capability of studying the dynamic processes in a sample. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE capability can be largely enhanced using the superconducting undulator, which has the capability of doubling its period. This technology will allow reaching the photon energy as low as ~200-500 eV. As a result, the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE facility will have a broader photon energy range enabling a larger variety of experiments. The soft x-ray capability is more likely to achieve the 3D imaging of dynamic processes in noncrystal materials than the hard x-ray capability alone.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4939300','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4939300"><span>The Banana Transcriptional Repressor <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fan, Zhong-qi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fu, Chang-chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Ye, Yu-jie; Lu, Wang-jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-wu; Chen, Jian-ye</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/3, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PG1, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>XTH10, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PL3, and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening. PMID:27462342</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27462342','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27462342"><span>The Banana Transcriptional Repressor <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 Negatively Regulates Cell Wall-Modifying Genes Involved in Fruit Ripening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fan, Zhong-Qi; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Fu, Chang-Chun; Shan, Wei; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Ye, Yu-Jie; Lu, Wang-Jin; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Duan, Xue-Wu; Chen, Jian-Ye</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Ethylene plays an essential role in many biological processes including fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs) are key transcription factors (TFs) involved in ethylene perception and are divided into AP2, RAV, ERF, and DREB sub-families. Although a number of studies have implicated the involvement of DREB sub-family genes in stress responses, little is known about their roles in fruit ripening. In this study, we identified a DREB TF with a EAR motif, designated as <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1, which is a nucleus-localized transcriptional repressor. Expression analysis indicated that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 expression was repressed by ethylene, with reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation at its regulatory regions during fruit ripening. In addition, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 promoter activity was also suppressed in response to ethylene treatment. More importantly, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 directly binds to the DRE/CRT motifs in promoters of several cell wall-modifying genes including <span class="hlt">Ma</span>EXP1/3, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PG1, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>XTH10, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PL3, and <span class="hlt">Ma</span>PME3 associated with fruit softening during ripening and represses their activities. These data suggest that <span class="hlt">Ma</span>DEAR1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of cell wall-modifying genes, and may be negatively involved in ethylene-mediated ripening of banana fruit. Our findings provide new insights into the involvement of DREB TFs in the regulation of fruit ripening.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.2972..110H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.2972..110H"><span>Influence of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span>, verteporfin) on murine dendritic cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hunt, David W. C.; King, Diane E.; Levy, Julia G.</p> <p>1997-05-01</p> <p>The impact of bensoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A, and visible light was determined for mouse splenic dendritic cells (DC), potent antigen-presenting cells (APC) of the immune system. It was discovered that sub-lethal doses of BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and light significantly altered the surface receptor pattern of DC as well as diminishing the capacity of these cells to activate allogeneic T cells. Treatment of highly purified DC with BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and 690 nm wavelength light decreased DC expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) Class I and II antigens, leukocyte common antigen CD45, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), the co- stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, CD95 as well as integrin CD11c. In contrast, DC expression of leukocyte function-associated-1 (LFA-1, CD11a), CD11b, CD18, CD40, and the DC DEC-205 receptor increased after the treatment. Changes in receptor levels occurred rapidly. DC MHC Class I and ICAM-1 expression declined to 40 percent of control levels by 2 hours post-PDT. DC treated with BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and light were poor stimulators of allogeneic T cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span>, in the absence of light, had no effect on the immunostimulatory properties of these cells. The changes in DC receptor expression pattern produced by BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span> and light were comparable to those produced by ultraviolet B light, a treatment known to alter the immunostimulatory characteristics of DC. Photodynamic therapy with BPD-<span class="hlt">MA</span> represents an innovative approach for the modification of immune reactivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....152...83L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AJ....152...83L"><span>The Data Reduction Pipeline for the SDSS-IV <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA IFU Galaxy Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Andrews, Brett H.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Chen, Yanmei; Drory, Niv; D'Souza, Richard; Fu, Hai; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere; MacDonald, Nicholas; Masters, Karen L.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Parejko, John K.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622-10354 Å and an average footprint of ˜500 arcsec2 per IFU the scientific data products derived from <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA is expected to obtain ˜100 million raw-frame spectra and ˜10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ˜8500 Å and reach a typical 10σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ = 23.5 AB arcsec-2 in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g-band. The wavelength calibration of the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA data is accurate to 5 km s-1 rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ = 72 km s-1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234862','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234862"><span>Ecological change in the lower Omo Valley around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bibi, Faysal; Souron, Antoine; Bocherens, Hervé; Uno, Kevin; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud</p> <p>2013-02-23</p> <p>Late Pliocene climate changes have long been implicated in environmental changes and mammalian evolution in Africa, but high-resolution examinations of the fossil and climatic records have been hampered by poor sampling. By using fossils from the well-dated Shungura Formation (lower Omo Valley, northern Turkana Basin, southern Ethiopia), we investigate palaeodietary changes in one bovid and in one suid lineage from 3 to 2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> using stable isotope analysis of tooth enamel. Results show unexpectedly large increases in C(4) dietary intake around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in both the bovid and suid, and possibly in a previously reported hippopotamid species. Enamel δ(13)C values after 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the bovid (Tragelaphus nakuae) are higher than recorded for any living tragelaphin, and are not expected given its conservative dental morphology. A shift towards increased C(4) feeding at 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the suid (Kolpochoerus limnetes) appears similarly decoupled from a well-documented record of dental evolution indicating gradual and progressive dietary change. The fact that two, perhaps three, disparate Pliocene herbivore lineages exhibit similar, and contemporaneous changes in dietary behaviour suggests a common environmental driver. Local and regional pollen, palaeosol and faunal records indicate increased aridity but no corresponding large and rapid expansion of grasslands in the Turkana Basin at 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Our results provide new evidence supporting ecological change in the eastern African record around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, but raise questions about the resolution at which different ecological proxies may be comparable, the correlation of vegetation and faunal change, and the interpretation of low δ(13)C values in the African Pliocene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3565503','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3565503"><span>Ecological change in the lower Omo Valley around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bibi, Faysal; Souron, Antoine; Bocherens, Hervé; Uno, Kevin; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Late Pliocene climate changes have long been implicated in environmental changes and mammalian evolution in Africa, but high-resolution examinations of the fossil and climatic records have been hampered by poor sampling. By using fossils from the well-dated Shungura Formation (lower Omo Valley, northern Turkana Basin, southern Ethiopia), we investigate palaeodietary changes in one bovid and in one suid lineage from 3 to 2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> using stable isotope analysis of tooth enamel. Results show unexpectedly large increases in C4 dietary intake around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in both the bovid and suid, and possibly in a previously reported hippopotamid species. Enamel δ13C values after 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the bovid (Tragelaphus nakuae) are higher than recorded for any living tragelaphin, and are not expected given its conservative dental morphology. A shift towards increased C4 feeding at 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in the suid (Kolpochoerus limnetes) appears similarly decoupled from a well-documented record of dental evolution indicating gradual and progressive dietary change. The fact that two, perhaps three, disparate Pliocene herbivore lineages exhibit similar, and contemporaneous changes in dietary behaviour suggests a common environmental driver. Local and regional pollen, palaeosol and faunal records indicate increased aridity but no corresponding large and rapid expansion of grasslands in the Turkana Basin at 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Our results provide new evidence supporting ecological change in the eastern African record around 2.8 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, but raise questions about the resolution at which different ecological proxies may be comparable, the correlation of vegetation and faunal change, and the interpretation of low δ13C values in the African Pliocene. PMID:23234862</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AsBio..17..612D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AsBio..17..612D"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS on ExoMars: Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Subsurface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Altieri, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Biondi, David; De Angelis, Simone; Meini, Marco; Mondello, Giuseppe; Novi, Samuele; Paolinetti, Riccardo; Soldani, Massimo; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Vago, Jorge L.; Ma_MISS Team</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) experiment is the visible and near infrared (VNIR) miniaturized spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS will perform IR spectral reflectance investigations in the 0.4-2.2 μm range to characterize the mineralogy of excavated borehole walls at different depths (between 0 and 2 m). The spectral sampling is about 20 nm, whereas the spatial resolution over the target is 120 μm. Making use of the drill's movement, the instrument slit can scan a ring and build up hyperspectral images of a borehole. The main goal of the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS instrument is to study the martian subsurface environment. Access to the martian subsurface is crucial to our ability to constrain the nature, timing, and duration of alteration and sedimentation processes on Mars, as well as habitability conditions. Subsurface deposits likely host and preserve H2O ice and hydrated materials that will contribute to our understanding of the H2O geochemical environment (both in the liquid and in the solid state) at the ExoMars 2020 landing site. The <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS spectral range and sampling capabilities have been carefully selected to allow the study of minerals and ices in situ before the collection of samples. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS will be implemented to accomplish the following scientific objectives: (1) determine the composition of subsurface materials, (2) map the distribution of subsurface H2O and volatiles, (3) characterize important optical and physical properties of materials (e.g., grain size), and (4) produce a stratigraphic column that will inform with regard to subsurface geological processes. The <span class="hlt">Ma</span>_MISS findings will help to refine essential criteria that will aid in our selection of the most interesting subsurface formations from which to collect samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17144191','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17144191"><span>[The medical theory of Lee Je-<span class="hlt">ma</span> and its character].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Kyung-Lock</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Lee Je-<span class="hlt">ma</span> 1837-1900) was a prominent scholar as well as an Korean physician. classified every people into four distinctive types: greater yang [tai yang] person, lesser yin [shao yin] person, greater yin [tai yin] person, lesser yin [shao yin] person. This theory would dictate proper treatment for each type in accordance with individual differences of physical and temperament features. Using these four types he created The Medical Science of Four Types. This article is intended to look into the connection between Lee Je-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s 'The Medical Science of Four Types' and 'The Modern' with organizing his ideas about the human body and the human being. Through The Modern, the theory of human being underwent a complete change. Human being in The Premodern, which was determined by sex, age and social status has been changed to the individual human being, which is featured by equality. Lee Je-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s medical theory of The Medical Science of Four Types would be analyzed as follow. His concept of human body is oriented toward observable objectivity. But on the other hand, it still remains transcendent status of medical science, which is subordinated by philosophy. According to Lee Je-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s theory of human being, human is an equal individual in a modern way of thinking, not as a part of hierarchical group. But on the other hand, it still remains incomplete from getting rid of morality aspect that includes virtue and vice in the concept of human body. The common factors in Lee Je-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s ideas about the human body and the human being is 'Dualism of mind and body that means all kinds of status and results depends on each individual. As is stated above, Lee Je-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>'s medical theory has many aspects of The Modern and it proves that Korean traditional medicine could be modernized by itself.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22471143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22471143"><span>[<span class="hlt">MA</span> Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Yong-Qing; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Bai-Xiao</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>To summarize <span class="hlt">MA</span> Shao-qun's clinical experience of warm moxibustion for the liver diseases. The warm moxibustion was put to use by <span class="hlt">MA</span> Shao-qun to treat many diseases, including hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver functional disorder. Under the human-oriented theory, he focuses on regulating the whole function of the body and tonifying the original qi to increase physical fitness and avoid illness. Besides, he is good at the combination of multi-acupoints for long-term and circulating moxibustion treatment, and also pays attention to nourishing the spleen-stomach, adjusting the fu-qi and resolving the dampness in the body.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RScI...81bA712J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RScI...81bA712J"><span>Emittance improvement efforts on the 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp sourcea)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jia, Xianlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Zheng, Xia; Zhang, Suping; Zou, Jian; Lin, Jun</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>A 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> beam from the 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp source has been obtained at China Institute of Atomic Energy. In order to improve the emittance of extracted beam from this new multicusp source, some measures have been taken, i.e., increasing the length of the ion source body, improving the vacuum in the extraction area, injecting cesium vapor into the ion source, etc. The hardware, including the lengthened source body, the improved back cover and cesium heating system, and the extraction vacuum box, will be described. Initial results for these efforts aimed at emittance improvement will also be given in the paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192382','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192382"><span>Emittance improvement efforts on the 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp source.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jia, Xianlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Zheng, Xia; Zhang, Suping; Zou, Jian; Lin, Jun</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>A 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> beam from the 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H(-) multicusp source has been obtained at China Institute of Atomic Energy. In order to improve the emittance of extracted beam from this new multicusp source, some measures have been taken, i.e., increasing the length of the ion source body, improving the vacuum in the extraction area, injecting cesium vapor into the ion source, etc. The hardware, including the lengthened source body, the improved back cover and cesium heating system, and the extraction vacuum box, will be described. Initial results for these efforts aimed at emittance improvement will also be given in the paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059759','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059759"><span>Abundant DNA 6<span class="hlt">mA</span> methylation during early embryogenesis of zebrafish and pig</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Jianzhao; Zhu, Yuanxiang; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Xinxia; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xiaona; Zong, Xin; Chen, Kai; Yin, Hang; Fu, Ye; Han, Dali; Wang, Yizhen; Chen, Dahua; He, Chuan</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>DNA N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6<span class="hlt">mA</span>) is a well-known prokaryotic DNA modification that has been shown to exist and play epigenetic roles in eukaryotic DNA. Here we report that 6<span class="hlt">mA</span> accumulates up to ∼0.1–0.2% of total deoxyadenosine during early embryogenesis of vertebrates, but diminishes to the background level with the progression of the embryo development. During this process a large fraction of 6mAs locate in repetitive regions of the genome. PMID:27713410</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T23D2442H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T23D2442H"><span>African absolute plate motion and True Polar Wander at about 50<span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harada, Y.; Wessel, P.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Using new data set of seamount ages on the African plate, a model of motion of the African plate relative to the African hotspots are calculated by the Polygonal Finite Rotation Method; PFRM (Harada and Hamano, 2000). The new motion of the African plate has more abrupt change at about 50<span class="hlt">Ma</span> than the previous models of the African plate mainly due to the PFRM which can allow the finite pole of the plate rotation to move continuously. The new model of the motion fits positions and ages of the almost all seamounts which are created by the African hotspots, whereas the previous models do not fit with positions of northwestern hotspots of the African plate such as Canary, Cape Verde, Meteor and Bathymetric hotspot. The new model suggests that the African plate rotated counter clockwise abruptly at about 50<span class="hlt">Ma</span>. To compare the 50<span class="hlt">Ma</span> abrupt change with coeval event at the Pacific plate motion, we utilized the paleomagnetic data from both plates. From the apparent geomagnetic polar wander path of the African plate and African plate motion relative to the African hotspots, we calculated geomagnetic polar motion relative to the African hotspots. Similarly, we calculated geomagnetic polar motion relative to the Pacific hotspots from the Pacific sets of paleomagnetic data and plate motion. The geomagnetic polar motion or true polar wander should be only one, therefore we can calculate relative motion of the African hotspots and the Pacific hotspots. The result shows that there was no significant motion between two groups of hotspots since about 70<span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The new true polar wander path since 70<span class="hlt">Ma</span>, thus, presented by averaging the two models of motions, and this has about 90 degree clockwise change of directions at about 50<span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This study strongly suggests below. 1, There was coeval event of the African plate motion with Hawaii-Emperor bend event at the Pacific plate. 2, There was no significant relative motion between global hotspots for the time scale of 70Myr even though there was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.196.1281M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.196.1281M"><span>High-resolution estimates of Nubia-North America plate motion: 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> to present</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Merkouriev, S.; DeMets, C.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>We present new, detailed estimates of Nubia-North America plate motion since 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> based on 21 rotations that reconstruct seafloor spreading magnetic lineations and fracture zone flow lines between the two plates and an instantaneous angular velocity that best fits the velocities of 1343 GPS stations on the two plates. Total opening distances and opening gradients along the plate boundary are constrained by nearly 11 000 crossings of magnetic reversals 1n (0.78 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) to 6n (19.7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) from shipboard and aeromagnetic data surveys of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between the Azores triple junction and Fifteen-Twenty fracture zone. Plate slip directions are estimated from flow lines digitized from multibeam, single-beam and satellite-based bathymetry for the Oceanographer, Hayes and Atlantis fracture zones. Linear extrapolations of seafloor spreading distances for young magnetic reversals to zero seafloor age shows that magnetic reversal boundaries everywhere along the plate boundary are shifted outwards by 1 ± 0.5 km from the spreading axis with respect to their idealized locations; small corrections to the finite opening rotations to compensate for this outward displacement are thus made to reveal the underlying plate motion. A single inversion of the nearly 13 000 kinematic data is used to estimate the 21 rotations that simultaneously optimize the fits to the reconstructed magnetic lineations and the three fracture zone flow lines and their transform fault traces. Uncertainties in the rotations are estimated via bootstrapping. The new rotations indicate that seafloor spreading rates remained steady from 20 to 8.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, slowed by 25 per cent between 8.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 6.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and remained steady since 6.2 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> within the ≈1 mm yr-1 resolution of our new rotations. Our kinematic results corroborate a significant change in motion at ≈7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> previously identified by Sloan and Patriat from a dense magnetic survey of young seafloor from 28°N to 29°N. The timing and magnitude of the change</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T14C..02B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.T14C..02B"><span>New Constraints on Baja California-North America Relative Plate Motion Since 11 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bennett, S. E.; Skinner, L. A.; Darin, M. H.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Oskin, M. E.; Dorsey, R. J.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Tectonic reconstructions of the Pacific-North America (PAC-NAM) plate boundary across the Gulf of California and Salton Trough (GCAST) constrain the controversial magnitude of Baja California microplate-North America (BCM-NAM) relative motion since middle Miocene time. We use estimates of total PAC-NAM relative dextral-oblique motion from the updated global plate-circuit model (Atwater and Stock, 2013; GSA Cordilleran Mtg) to resolve the proportion of this motion on faults east of the BCM. Modern GPS studies and offset of late Miocene cross-gulf geologic tie points both suggest that BCM has never been completely coupled to the Pacific plate. Thus, our preferred GCAST reconstruction uses 93% BCM-PAC coupling from the present back to 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. We assume BCM-PAC coupling of 60% between 6 and 7 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and 25% between 7 and 11 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, to avoid unacceptable overlap of continental crustal blocks between Baja California and the Sierra Madre Occidental (on stable NAM). Using these coupling ratios and PAC-NAM stage Euler poles, we determine the azimuth and velocity of individual points on the BCM in 1 million year increments back to 11 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. This procedure accounts for minor clockwise rotation of BCM that occurred during oblique rifting, and shows how total BCM-NAM relative motion increases from north to south due to greater distance from the Euler pole. Finer-scale restoration of tectonic blocks along significant (>1 km offset) faults, across extensional (e.g. pull-apart and half-graben) basins, and by vertical-axis rotation is constrained by local geologic and marine-geophysical datasets and accomplished via the open-source Tectonic Reconstruct ArcGIS tool. We find that restoration across the Gulf of California completely closes marine basins and their terrestrial predecessors between 6 and 9 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Latest Miocene opening of these basins was coincident with a ~10° clockwise azimuthal change from 8 to 6 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> in PAC-NAM relative motion, as revealed by the global plate circuit model. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003Geo....31..335T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003Geo....31..335T"><span>Intermittent 1630 1220 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> magmatism in central Mazatzal province: New geochronologic piercing points and some tectonic implications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tapani Rämö, O.; McLemore, Virginia T.; Hamilton, Michael A.; Kosunen, Paula J.; Heizler, Matt; Haapala, Ilmari</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>The northern Burro Mountains in southwestern New Mexico reveal three distinct, intimately juxtaposed Mesoproterozoic magmatic suites in southern Laurentia. At 1633 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, the newly formed Mazatzal crust was intruded by tholeiitic diabase with a depleted-mantle type Nd isotope composition but with enriched incompatible trace element abundances. A potassic granite-minette suite was emplaced ca. 1460 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and a tholeiitic A-type granite-anorthosite suite intruded ca. 1225 1220 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. The diabase-minette-anorthosite sequence and the associated silicic rocks record dominantly juvenile additions to the cratonic margin and imply subcontinental enrichment events ca. 1650 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (accretion), prior to 1460 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (potassic metasomatism), and ca. 1220 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (magmatic underplating). The latter two may have been controlled by a major transcurrent structure along the south margin of Laurentia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ATel.9736....1L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ATel.9736....1L"><span>Fermi-LAT detection of a very bright Gamma-ray Onset from the Galactic Nova ASASSN-16<span class="hlt">ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Kwan-Lok; Chomiuk, Laura; Strader, Jay</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We report the detection of gamma-ray emission from ASASSN-16<span class="hlt">ma</span>, spectroscopically classified as a classical nova (ATel #9669 and ATel #9678). Because of the close proximity to TCP J18102829-2729590 (separated from ASAS-SN 16<span class="hlt">ma</span> by 2.5 degrees), ASASSN-16<span class="hlt">ma</span> is under our Fermi ToO monitoring triggered for TCP J18102829-2729590 since 2016-10-25 (ATel #9699).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=down+AND+21&id=EJ742984','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=down+AND+21&id=EJ742984"><span>Voluntary Orienting among Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome and <span class="hlt">MA</span>-Matched Typically Developing Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Goldman, Karen J.; Flanagan, Tara; Shulman, Cory; Enns, James T.; Burack, Jacob A.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A forced-choice reaction-time (RT) task was used to examine voluntary visual orienting among children and adolescents with trisomy 21 Down syndrome and typically developing children matched at an <span class="hlt">MA</span> of approximately 5.6 years, an age when the development of orienting abilities reaches optimal adult-like efficiency. Both groups displayed faster…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S-63-6247&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DGordon','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=S-63-6247&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DGordon"><span><span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 ASTRONAUT L. GORDON COOPER LEAVES TRANSFER VAN AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 14</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 ASTRONAUT L. GORDON COOPER LEAVES TRANSFER VAN AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 14 S-63-6247 P-07136, ARCHIVE-03808 Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, Jr., leaves the transfer van at Pad #14 for his ride up the gantry elevator to the 11th deck where he will be inserted into the spacecraft for his 22-orbit mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=63-MA9-36&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DGordon','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=63-MA9-36&hterms=Gordon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DGordon"><span><span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 ASTRONAUT GORDON COOPER EXPLAINS CAMERA TO BACKUP PILOT ALAN SHEPARD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1963-01-01</p> <p>Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper explains the 16MM handheld spacecraft camera to his back-up pilot Astronaut Alan Shepard. The camera designed by J. R. Hereford, McDonnell Aircraft Corp., will be used by Cooper during the <span class="hlt">MA</span>-9 mission.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED536455.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED536455.pdf"><span>Searching for New Directions: Developing <span class="hlt">MA</span> Action Research Project as a Tool for Teaching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Young Ah; Wang, Ye</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Action research has been recognized as a useful professional development tool for teaching, but for inservice teachers, conducting action research can be challenging. Their learning about action research can be influenced by social situations--whether in an <span class="hlt">MA</span> (Master of Arts) program or other professional development. The purpose of this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for graduate medical education costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... reasonable compensation to the non-hospital site for teaching activities. (c) An <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization's allowable direct graduate medical education costs, subject to the redistribution and community support principles... teaching activities related to the training of medical residents. (d) The direct graduate medical education...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-02/pdf/2012-18832.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-02/pdf/2012-18832.pdf"><span>77 FR 45991 - Regulated Navigation Area; Buzzard's Bay, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-02</p> <p>...-45992] [FR Doc No: 2012-18832] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 161 and 165...'s Bay, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Navigable Waterways Within the First Coast Guard District AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard announces the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-22/pdf/2011-15584.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-22/pdf/2011-15584.pdf"><span>76 FR 36311 - Special Local Regulation; Extreme Sailing Series Boston; Boston Harbor, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-06-22</p> <p>..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Extreme Sailing Series Boston; Boston Harbor, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-24/pdf/2011-15789.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-24/pdf/2011-15789.pdf"><span>76 FR 37005 - Safety Zone; Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks, Boston Harbor, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-06-24</p> <p>... procedures; and related management systems practices) that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks, Boston Harbor, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-20/pdf/2013-03883.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-20/pdf/2013-03883.pdf"><span>78 FR 11747 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Chelsea River, Chelsea and East Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-02-20</p> <p>... Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulation. SUMMARY: The... Street Bridge across the Chelsea River, mile 1.2, between Chelsea and East Boston, Massachusetts. The... inspection or copying at the Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-116.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-116.pdf"><span>33 CFR 100.116 - Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 100.116 Section 100.116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.116 Swim Buzzards Bay Day...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-113.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec100-113.pdf"><span>33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 100.113 Section 100.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.113 Provincetown Harbor Swim...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=111623&keyword=mackay&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=111623&keyword=mackay&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50"><span>ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, SUPERFUND SITE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>New Bedford Harbor (NBH), <span class="hlt">MA</span>, is a Superfund site because of high polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the sediment. From April 1994 to September 1995, a remedial dredging operation (termed the 'Hot Spot') removed the most contaminated sediments (PCB concentrations gr...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1170260','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1170260"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barnes, Cris William; Kippen, Karen Elizabeth</p> <p>2015-02-11</p> <p>To meet new and emerging national security issues the Laboratory is stepping up to meet another grand challenge—transitioning from observing to controlling a material’s performance. This challenge requires the best of experiment, modeling, simulation, and computational tools. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RIE is the Laboratory’s proposed flagship experimental facility intended to meet the challenge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.1431R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MNRAS.461.1431R"><span>red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC: selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Abate, A.; Bonnett, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, C.; Hoyle, B.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; O'Neill, C. R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Uddin, S.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; da Costa, L. N.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We introduce red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC, an automated algorithm for selecting luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was specifically developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC achieves this by self-training the colour cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sample of constant comoving density. We demonstrate that red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine learning-based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC catalogue sampling the redshift range z ∈ [0.2, 0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1 Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec - zphoto) and scatter (σz/(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017, respectively. The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4 per cent. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1 per cent level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2013-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for graduate medical education costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... that residents spend in non-hospital provider settings such as freestanding clinics, nursing homes, and... time assigned to patient care activities. (2) The <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization incurs “all or substantially all” of... (2) Medicare's share, which is equal to the ratio of the number of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2014-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for graduate medical education costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... that residents spend in non-hospital provider settings such as freestanding clinics, nursing homes, and... time assigned to patient care activities. (2) The <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization incurs “all or substantially all” of... (2) Medicare's share, which is equal to the ratio of the number of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-324.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for graduate medical education costs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... residents spend in non-hospital provider settings such as freestanding clinics, nursing homes, and... time assigned to patient care activities. (2) The <span class="hlt">MA</span> organization incurs “all or substantially all” of... (2) Medicare's share, which is equal to the ratio of the number of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26024368','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26024368"><span>Agrobacterium-mediated transient <span class="hlt">Ma</span>FT expression in mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Su-Li; Yang, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Li-Qun; Jiang, Tao; Wu, Hai; Su, Chao; Qian, Yong-Hua; Jiao, Feng</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>To optimize Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation assay in mulberry (Morus alba L.), various infiltration methods, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens) strains, and bacterial concentrations were tested in mulberry seedlings. Compared with LBA4404, GV3101 harboring pBE2133 plasmids presented stronger GUS signals at 3 days post infiltration using syringe. Recombinant plasmids pBE2133:GFP and pBE2133:GFP:<span class="hlt">Ma</span>FT were successfully constructed. Transient expression of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>FT:GFP protein was found in leaves, petiole (cross section), and shoot apical meristem (SAM) of mulberry according to the GFP signal. Moreover, <span class="hlt">Ma</span>FT:GFP mRNA was also detected in leaves and SAM via RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. An efficient transient transformation system could be achieved in mulberry seedlings by syringe using A. tumefaciens GV3101 at the OD600 of 0.5. The movement of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>FT expression from leaves to SAM might trigger the precocious flowering of mulberry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Tectp.681...85G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Tectp.681...85G"><span>Was there a super-eruption on the Gondwanan coast 477 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> ago?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Gutiérrez-Marco, J. C.; Fernández-Suárez, J.; Bernárdez, E.; Corfu, F.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Precise zircon and monazite ID-TIMS U-Pb dating of three Lower Ordovician altered ash-fall tuff beds (K-bentonites) in the Cantabrian Zone of NW Iberia yielded coeval ages together with an equivalent previously studied sample (477.5 ± 1 (Gutierrez-Alonso et al., 2007)), of 477 ± 1.3 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, 477.2 ± 1.1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> and 477.3 ± 1 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, with a pooled concordia age (all analyses in the four samples) of 477.2 ± 0.74 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. A conservative estimation of the volume and mass of the studied K-bentonite beds (using exclusively the CZ data) yields a volume for the preserved deposits of ca. 37.5 km3 (Volcanic Explosivity Index - VEI = 6, Colossal). When considering other putative equivalent beds in Iberia and neighboring realms (i.e. Armorica, Sardinia) the volume of ejecta associated to this event would make it reach the Supervolcanic-Apocalyptic status (VEI = 8, > 1000 km3). At variance with most known cases of this kind of gigantic eruption events, geological observations indicate that the studied magmatic event was related to continental margin extension and thinning and not to plate convergence. We speculate that a geochronologically equivalent large caldera event recognized in the geological record of NW Iberia could be ground zero of this super-eruption.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parks&pg=7&id=EJ1096587','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parks&pg=7&id=EJ1096587"><span>Place-Based Learning: Action Learning in <span class="hlt">MA</span> Program for Educational Practitioners</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glassner, Amnon; Eran-Zoran, Yael</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The study presents a new pedagogical idea and practice for educational practitioners. The practice was developed as a workshop of <span class="hlt">MA</span> program in order to change and expand the meaning of education for the wellbeing of the community. The "place-based learning" workshop combined action learning (AL) with project-based learning (PBL). The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-16/pdf/2013-19980.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-08-16/pdf/2013-19980.pdf"><span>78 FR 49918 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-08-16</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall... across the Taunton River, mile 2.1, between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts. The bridge owner...) entitled, ``Drawbridge Operation Regulation: Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, <span class="hlt">MA</span>'' in the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1371551','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1371551"><span>red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC: Selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Abate, A.; Bonnett, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, C.; Hoyle, B.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carollo, D.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Davis, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; O'Neill, C. R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Uddin, S.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; da Costa, L. N.</p> <p>2016-05-30</p> <p>Here, we introduce red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC, an automated algorithm for selecting luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was specifically developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC achieves this by self-training the colour cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sample of constant comoving density. We demonstrate that red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine learning-based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC catalogue sampling the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10<sup>–3</sup> (h<sup>–1</sup> Mpc)<sup>–3</sup>, and a median photo-z bias (zspec – zphoto) and scatter (σz/(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017, respectively. The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4 per cent. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1 per cent level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2351882','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2351882"><span>The physics of spinal manipulation. Part I. The myth of F = <span class="hlt">ma</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haas, M</p> <p>1990-05-01</p> <p>The product of the adjusting physician's mass and acceleration does not quantify the adjustive force as popularly believed, an error stemming from a misunderstanding of Newton's second law. In this paper, a gedanken experiment illustrates the misapplication of F = <span class="hlt">ma</span> and suggests that the adjustive force depends on the impact velocity, mass of the doctor, and intrinsic physical properties of the doctor and patient.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-09-12/pdf/2012-22485.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-09-12/pdf/2012-22485.pdf"><span>77 FR 56115 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Fort Point Channel, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-09-12</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Fort Point Channel, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>... of the Northern Avenue Bridge, mile 0.1, across the Fort Point Channel, at Boston, Massachusetts...: The Northern Avenue Bridge, across the Fort Point Channel, mile 0.1, has a vertical clearance in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19603829','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19603829"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba: a software application for spectral library-based MRM transition list assembly.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sherwood, Carly A; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Peterson, Amelia; Eng, Jimmy K; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W; Risler, Jenni; Tasman, Natalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Lam, Henry; Martin, Daniel B</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a targeted analysis method that has been increasingly viewed as an avenue to explore proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and throughput. We have developed a software tool, called <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba, to automate the creation of explicitly defined MRM transition lists required to program triple quadrupole mass spectrometers in such analyses. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba creates MRM transition lists from downloaded or custom-built spectral libraries, restricts output to specified proteins or peptides, and filters based on precursor peptide and product ion properties. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba can also create MRM lists containing corresponding transitions for isotopically heavy peptides, for which the precursor and product ions are adjusted according to user specifications. This open-source application is operated through a graphical user interface incorporated into the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, and it outputs the final MRM list to a text file for upload to MS instruments. To illustrate the use of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba, we used the tool to design and execute an MRM-MS experiment in which we targeted the proteins of a well-defined and previously published standard mixture.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2837355','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2837355"><span><span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba: A Software Application for Spectral Library-Based MRM Transition List Assembly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sherwood, Carly A.; Eastham, Ashley; Lee, Lik Wee; Peterson, Amelia; Eng, Jimmy K.; Shteynberg, David; Mendoza, Luis; Deutsch, Eric W.; Risler, Jenni; Tasman, Natalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Lam, Henry; Martin, Daniel B.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) is a targeted analysis method that has been increasingly viewed as an avenue to explore proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and throughput. We have developed a software tool, called <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba, to automate the creation of explicitly defined MRM transition lists required to program triple quadrupole mass spectrometers in such analyses. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba creates MRM transition lists from downloaded or custom-built spectral libraries, restricts output to specified proteins or peptides, and filters based on precursor peptide and product ion properties. <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba can also create MRM lists containing corresponding transitions for isotopically heavy peptides, for which the precursor and product ions are adjusted according to user specifications. This open-source application is operated through a graphical user interface incorporated into the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, and it outputs the final MRM list to a text file for upload to MS instruments. To illustrate the use of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>RiMba, we used the tool to design and execute an MRM-MS experiment in which we targeted the proteins of a well-defined and previously published standard mixture. PMID:19603829</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390812','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22390812"><span>New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Z-pinch generator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.</p> <p>2014-12-15</p> <p>A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span>. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-<span class="hlt">MA</span> generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-<span class="hlt">MA</span> facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soa&pg=7&id=EJ742984','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soa&pg=7&id=EJ742984"><span>Voluntary Orienting among Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome and <span class="hlt">MA</span>-Matched Typically Developing Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Goldman, Karen J.; Flanagan, Tara; Shulman, Cory; Enns, James T.; Burack, Jacob A.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A forced-choice reaction-time (RT) task was used to examine voluntary visual orienting among children and adolescents with trisomy 21 Down syndrome and typically developing children matched at an <span class="hlt">MA</span> of approximately 5.6 years, an age when the development of orienting abilities reaches optimal adult-like efficiency. Both groups displayed faster…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965199','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/965199"><span>Fabrication Technological Development of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloy <span class="hlt">MA</span>957 for Fast Reactor Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Johnson, Gerald D.; Brown, W. F.; Paxton, Michael M.; Puigh, Raymond J.; Eiholzer, Cheryl R.; Martinez, C.; Blotter, M. A.</p> <p>2000-02-28</p> <p>A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy <span class="hlt">MA</span>957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ920511.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ920511.pdf"><span>A Content Analysis of the TEFL <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. Entrance Examinations (Case Study: Majors Courses)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Razmjoo, Seyyed Ayatollah; Heydari Tabrizi, Hossein</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">MA</span> Entrance Examinations (MAEE) held in Iran since 1990 are frequently criticized as being invalid, unstandardized exams with lots of problem in terms of principles of testing in general and test construction in particular (for instance, Jafarpur, 1996). To make sound judgments about such objections, the present study dealt with a content…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=guns&id=EJ937798','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=guns&id=EJ937798"><span>Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-529.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-529.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.529 - Surety Bond B, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-309.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.529 Surety Bond B, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-309. An..., which may be obtained form the American War Risk Agency or MARAD....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-306.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-306.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.306 - Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-242.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-242. 308.306 Section 308.306 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.306 Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-521.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-521.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.521 - Application for Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-301.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... Section 308.521 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.521 Application for Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-301. The standard form of application for a War Risk Open Cargo...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf"><span>33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.115 Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann... harbors, bays, and inlets on the east coast of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts from Portland...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf"><span>33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.115 Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann... harbors, bays, and inlets on the east coast of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts from Portland...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf"><span>33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.115 Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann... harbors, bays, and inlets on the east coast of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts from Portland...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024613','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024613"><span>Gunbarrel mafic magmatic event: A key 780 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> time marker for Rodinia plate reconstructions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Harlan, S.S.; Heaman, L.; LeCheminant, A.N.; Premo, W.R.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Precise U-Pb baddeleyite dating of mafic igneous rocks provides evidence for a widespread and synchronous magmatic event that extended for >2400 km along the western margin of the Neoproterozoic Laurentian craton. U-Pb baddeleyite analyses for eight intrusions from seven localities ranging from the northern Canadian Shield to northwestern Wyoming-southwestern Montana are statistically indistinguishable and yield a composite U-Pb concordia age for this event of 780.3 ?? 1.4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (95% confidence level). This 780 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> event is herein termed the Gunbarrel magmatic event. The mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel event represents the largest mafic dike swarm yet identified along the Neoproterozoic margin of Laurentia. The origin of the mafic magmatism is not clear, but may be related to mantle-plume activity or upwelling asthenosphere leading to crustal extension accompanying initial breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia and development of the proto-Pacific Ocean. The mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel magmatic event at 780 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> predates the voluminous magmatism of the 723 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Franklin igneous event of the northwestern Canadian Shield by ???60 m.y. The precise dating of the extensive Neoproterozoic Gunbarrel and Franklin magmatic events provides unique time markers that can ultimately be used for robust testing of Neoproterozoic continental reconstructions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23749880','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23749880"><span>Mesothelioma and anti-<span class="hlt">Ma</span> paraneoplastic syndrome; heterogeneity in immunogenic tumours increases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Archer, Hilary Anne; Panopoulou, Aikaterini; Bhatt, Nidhi; Edey, Anthony James; Giffin, Nicola Jane</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>We present a patient with opsoclonus and diffuse cerebellar signs who had an anti-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>2 antibody-associated paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a sarcomatoid mesothelioma. This case highlights the importance of early tumour detection, instigation of therapeutic measures, and the heterogeneity of underlying malignancies in neurological paraneoplastic syndromes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=m%26a&pg=3&id=EJ830644','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=m%26a&pg=3&id=EJ830644"><span>A Model for Developing Literacy Leadership through an <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. Ed. Program in Reading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Justice-Crickmer, Janet; Thompson, E. H.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Arthur Levine's (2006) study of teacher preparation in the United States and his resulting controversial recommendations have increased the need for teacher educators in independent institutions to share insights into designing and implementing effective degree programs. To that end, this article highlights aspects of an innovative <span class="hlt">M.A</span>. Ed.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-314.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.314 - Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules for beneficiaries enrolled in <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plans. 422.314 Section 422.314 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860021654','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860021654"><span>A regional 17-18 <span class="hlt">MA</span> thermal event in Southwestern Arizona</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Brooks, W. E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A regional thermal event in southwestern Arizona 17 to 18 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> ago is suggested by discordances between fission track (FT) and K-Ar dates in Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, by the abundance of primary hydrothermal orthoclase in quenched volcanic rocks, and by the concentration of Mn, Ba, Cu, Ag, and Au deposits near detachment faults. A high condont alteration index (CAI) of 3 to 7 is found in Paleozoic rocks of southwestern Arizona. The high CAI may have been caused by this mid-Tertiary thermal event. Resetting of temperature-sensitive TF dates (2) 17 to 18 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> with respect to K-Ar dates of 24 and 20 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> has occurred in upper plate volcanic rocks at the Harcuvar and Picacho Peak detachments. Discordances between FT and K-Ar dates are most pronounced at detachment faults. However, on a regional scale Ft dates from volcanic and sedimentary rocks approach 17 to 18 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> event in areas away from known detachment faults. Effects of detachment faulting on the K-Ar system suggest that dates of correlative rocks will be younger as the detachment fault is approached.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1371551-redmagic-selecting-luminous-red-galaxies-from-des-science-verification-data','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1371551-redmagic-selecting-luminous-red-galaxies-from-des-science-verification-data"><span>red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC: Selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Abate, A.; ...</p> <p>2016-05-30</p> <p>Here, we introduce red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC, an automated algorithm for selecting luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was specifically developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC achieves this by self-training the colour cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sample of constant comoving density. We demonstrate that red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine learning-based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC catalogue sampling themore » redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10–3 (h–1 Mpc)–3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec – zphoto) and scatter (σz/(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017, respectively. The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4 per cent. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1 per cent level.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-53.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.53 - Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an <span class="hlt">MA</span> plan for senior housing facility residents. 422.53 Section 422.53 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-54.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-54.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.54 - Continuation of enrollment for <span class="hlt">MA</span> local plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continuation of enrollment for <span class="hlt">MA</span> local plans. 422.54 Section 422.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-54.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-54.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.54 - Continuation of enrollment for <span class="hlt">MA</span> local plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continuation of enrollment for <span class="hlt">MA</span> local plans. 422.54 Section 422.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Eligibility, Election,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-103.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title42-vol3-sec422-103.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benefits under an <span class="hlt">MA</span> MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422.103 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits and Beneficiary Protections §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28079116','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28079116"><span>Katanin p80, Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and cytoplasmic dynein cooperate to control microtubule dynamics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jin, Mingyue; Pomp, Oz; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Toba, Shiori; Torisawa, Takayuki; Furuta, Ken'ya; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Yasunaga, Takuo; Kitagawa, Daiju; Matsumura, Shigeru; Miyata, Takaki; Tan, Thong Teck; Reversade, Bruno; Hirotsune, Shinji</p> <p>2017-01-12</p> <p>Human mutations in KATNB1 (p80) cause severe congenital cortical malformations, which encompass the clinical features of both microcephaly and lissencephaly. Although p80 plays critical roles during brain development, the underlying mechanisms remain predominately unknown. Here, we demonstrate that p80 regulates microtubule (MT) remodeling in combination with Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) and cytoplasmic dynein. We show that p80 shuttles between the nucleus and spindle pole in synchrony with the cell cycle. Interestingly, this striking feature is shared with Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. Importantly, p80 is essential for aster formation and maintenance in vitro. siRNA-mediated depletion of p80 and/or Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> induced abnormal mitotic phenotypes in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and aberrant neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the mouse embryonic brain. Importantly, these results were confirmed in p80-mutant harboring patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and brain organoids. Taken together, our findings provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of severe microlissencephaly, in which p80 and Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> delineate a common pathway for neurogenesis and neuronal migration via MT organization at the centrosome/spindle pole.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.4049P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.4049P"><span>Paleomagnetism of the 1210 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Gnowangerup-Fraser dyke swarm, Western Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pisarevsky, S. A.; Li, Z. X.; Wingate, M. T. D.; Tohver, E.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The Gnowangerup-Fraser mafic dyke swarm is part of the Marnda Moorn LIP and subparallel to the southern and southeastern margins of the Yilgarn Craton. Some dykes become progressively recrystallized towards the craton margin and others are strongly deformed within the orogen, implying that at least some dykes were emplaced prior to the youngest deformation in the Albany-Fraser Orogen. Five dykes have previously yielded U-Pb ages between 1203 and 1218 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and the primary nature of the magnetic directions in a 1212 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Fraser dyke is supported by a positive baked-contact test. We collected paleomagnetism samples from 19 dykes, along the Phillips and Fitzgerald Rivers, and near Ravensthorpe. AF demagnetisation revealed a stable bipolar remanence in 13 dykes. The mean paleomagnetic pole is almost identical to the VGP of the 1212 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Fraser dyke. The combined robust paleopole places the West Australian Craton in a near-polar position at 1210 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>. Comparison with coeval Laurentian paleopoles indicates that Laurentia and Australia were widely separated at that time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-549.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol8-sec308-549.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.549 - Application for appointment of Cargo Underwriting Agent, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-319.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iv-General § 308.549 Application for appointment of Cargo Underwriting Agent, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-319. Any domestic insurance company authorized to do a marine insurance business in any State of the United States may apply for appointment as a Cargo Underwriting...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-549.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-549.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.549 - Application for appointment of Cargo Underwriting Agent, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-319.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iv-General § 308.549 Application for appointment of Cargo Underwriting Agent, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-319. Any domestic insurance company authorized to do a marine insurance business in any State of the United States may apply for appointment as a Cargo Underwriting...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RScI...81bA705Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RScI...81bA705Z"><span>Experimental study for 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp sourcea)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Tianjue; Jia, Xianlu; Lv, Yinlong; Zou, Jian; Guan, Fengping; Wu, Longcheng; Pan, Gaofeng; Liu, Gengshou; Lin, Jun; Ge, Tao; Yao, Hongjuan; Wang, Zhenhui; An, Shizhong</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Recently, a new H- source and test stand was developed at CIAE. The design of this new source is based on the experience on our previous 10-15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> H- ion source and the source at TRIUMF. Major efforts include the study of the virtual filter magnetic field, confining magnetic field, filament shape and location, the vacuum improvement on the extracting area, the extraction optics, new control and interlock system of the power supplies. More than 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> of H-beam was obtained for 36 h with stability of ±0.5%. The normalized emittance of 0.48π mm mrad (4 rms normalized emittance) were measured with ˜8 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc beam. Further experimental studies are proceeding in an effort to reach 20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> with reasonable emittance at this moment. More study plans are conducted, e.g., building a longer source body and using cesium injection to get better emittance, which will be presented as a separate paper at this conference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192375','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192375"><span>Experimental study for 15-20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc H- multicusp source.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Tianjue; Jia, Xianlu; Lv, Yinlong; Zou, Jian; Guan, Fengping; Wu, Longcheng; Pan, Gaofeng; Liu, Gengshou; Lin, Jun; Ge, Tao; Yao, Hongjuan; Wang, Zhenhui; An, Shizhong</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Recently, a new H- source and test stand was developed at CIAE. The design of this new source is based on the experience on our previous 10-15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> H(-) ion source and the source at TRIUMF. Major efforts include the study of the virtual filter magnetic field, confining magnetic field, filament shape and location, the vacuum improvement on the extracting area, the extraction optics, new control and interlock system of the power supplies. More than 15 <span class="hlt">mA</span> of H-beam was obtained for 36 h with stability of +/-0.5%. The normalized emittance of 0.48pi mm mrad (4 rms normalized emittance) were measured with approximately 8 <span class="hlt">mA</span> dc beam. Further experimental studies are proceeding in an effort to reach 20 <span class="hlt">mA</span> with reasonable emittance at this moment. More study plans are conducted, e.g., building a longer source body and using cesium injection to get better emittance, which will be presented as a separate paper at this conference.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec100-113.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec100-113.pdf"><span>33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 100.113 Section 100.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.113 Provincetown Harbor...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec100-116.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec100-116.pdf"><span>33 CFR 100.116 - Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 100.116 Section 100.116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.116 Swim Buzzards Bay...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035970','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035970"><span>Functional Equivalence of Retroviral <span class="hlt">MA</span> Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rye-McCurdy, Tiffiny; Olson, Erik D.; Liu, Shuohui; Binkley, Christiana; Reyes, Joshua-Paolo; Thompson, Brian R.; Flanagan, John M.; Parent, Leslie J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA) even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ) element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (<span class="hlt">MA</span>) domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a <span class="hlt">MA</span>-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV <span class="hlt">MA</span> domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV <span class="hlt">MA</span> domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity. PMID:27657107</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gun&id=EJ937798','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gun&id=EJ937798"><span>Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23055230','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23055230"><span>Direct and airborne contact dermatitis in a beekeeper from the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>łopolska region.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Basista, Katarzyna</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The paper describes an atypical case of simultaneous airborne and direct contact dermatitis in a beekeeper from the <span class="hlt">Ma</span>łopolska region. This is the third such case described in a beekeeper in the world and the first in Poland. I suggest that propolis should be regarded as both a direct and airborne contact allergen in beekeepers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5228124','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5228124"><span>Katanin p80, Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> and cytoplasmic dynein cooperate to control microtubule dynamics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jin, Mingyue; Pomp, Oz; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Toba, Shiori; Torisawa, Takayuki; Furuta, Ken’ya; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Yasunaga, Takuo; Kitagawa, Daiju; Matsumura, Shigeru; Miyata, Takaki; Tan, Thong Teck; Reversade, Bruno; Hirotsune, Shinji</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Human mutations in KATNB1 (p80) cause severe congenital cortical malformations, which encompass the clinical features of both microcephaly and lissencephaly. Although p80 plays critical roles during brain development, the underlying mechanisms remain predominately unknown. Here, we demonstrate that p80 regulates microtubule (MT) remodeling in combination with Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) and cytoplasmic dynein. We show that p80 shuttles between the nucleus and spindle pole in synchrony with the cell cycle. Interestingly, this striking feature is shared with Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. Importantly, p80 is essential for aster formation and maintenance in vitro. siRNA-mediated depletion of p80 and/or Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> induced abnormal mitotic phenotypes in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and aberrant neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the mouse embryonic brain. Importantly, these results were confirmed in p80-mutant harboring patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and brain organoids. Taken together, our findings provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of severe microlissencephaly, in which p80 and Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> delineate a common pathway for neurogenesis and neuronal migration via MT organization at the centrosome/spindle pole. PMID:28079116</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1223232','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1223232"><span>red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC: selecting luminous red galaxies from the DES Science Verification data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rozo, E.</p> <p>2016-05-30</p> <p>We introduce red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC, an automated algorithm for selecting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC achieves this by self-training the color-cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sam- ple of constant comoving density. Additionally, we demonstrate that red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine-learning based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a red<span class="hlt">Ma</span>GiC catalog sampling the redshift range z ϵ [0.2,0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10<sup>-3</sup> (h<sup>-1</sup>Mpc)<sup>-3</sup>, and a median photo-z bias (z<sub>spec</sub> z<sub>photo</sub>) and scatter (σ<sub>z</sub>=(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017 respectively.The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4%. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8) and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1% level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22914528B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AAS...22914528B"><span>Cold Gas in Quenched Dwarf Galaxies using HI-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bonilla, Alaina</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA (Mapping of Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey fourth generation (SDSS-IV) project that will obtain integral field spectroscopy of a catalogue of 10,000 nearby galaxies. In this study, we explore the properties of the passive dwarf galaxy sample presented in Penny et al. 2016, making use of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA IFU (Integral Field Unit) data to plot gas emission, stellar velocity, and flux maps. In addition, HI-<span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA, a legacy radio-survey of <span class="hlt">Ma</span>NGA, collects single dish HI data retrieved from the GBT (Green Bank Telescope), which we use to study the the 21cm emission lines present in HI detections. Studying the HI content of passive dwarves will help us reveal the processes that are preventing star formation, such as possible AGN feedback. This work was supported by the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, which is funded by a grant from the Sloan Foundation to the Astrophysical Research Consortium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-02/pdf/2012-7782.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-02/pdf/2012-7782.pdf"><span>77 FR 19573 - Safety Zone; Wedding Fireworks Display, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-02</p> <p>... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Wedding Fireworks Display, Boston Inner... in the vicinity of Anthony's Pier 4, Boston, <span class="hlt">MA</span> for a wedding fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17..349N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17..349N"><span>A-type stratoid granites of Madagascar: evidence of Rodinia rifting at ca 790 <span class="hlt">Ma</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nedelec, Anne; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Bouchez, Jean-Luc</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The so-called stratoid granites are sheet-like granites emplaced as conformable sills in the Precambrian basement of central Madagascar. Most of them have A-type affinities (Nédélec et al. 1995). They are everywhere characterized by the same structural pattern evidencing two stages of deformation. The first one (foliations mildly dipping to the west and lineations trending WSW) is regarded as the consequence of synkinematic magma emplacement. The second stage, characterized by interference folds, steeply dipping foliations and subhorizontal lineations trending to the north, corresponds to a more or less pronounced reworking in ductile conditions, regarded as the result of Late Pan-African transcurrent tectonics. To the north of Antananarivo, the stratoid granites are associated with comagmatic quartz-syenites. New U-Pb zircons ages obtained by in situ analyses reveal two group of ages: upper intercept ages of ca 790 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>, and younger ages of ca 550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> corresponding to crystal rims. These new data question the geological significance of former TIMS ages of ca 630 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> formerly obtained from the same rocks (Paquette & Nédélec 1998). It is suggested that the stratoid granites and syenites were emplaced during a crustal thinning event corresponding to an early Rodinia rifting stage. The Pan-African imprint on these rocks is therefore limited to reheating, tectonic reworking and deep fluid transfer in the vicinity of Late-Neoproterozoic shear zones at ca 550 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (Nédélec et al. 2014).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-01/pdf/2010-16012.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-01/pdf/2010-16012.pdf"><span>75 FR 38128 - Sensata Technologies <span class="hlt">MA</span>, Inc., Power Controls Division, Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland, Including Employees of Sensata Technologies <span class="hlt">MA</span>, Inc., Power Controls Division Formerly Known As Airpax Corp., Cambridge, Maryland Working Off-Site in Falmouth... known as Airpax Corporation, Cambridge, Maryland. The notice will soon be published in the Federal...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=workshop+AND+practice&pg=3&id=EJ1096587','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=workshop+AND+practice&pg=3&id=EJ1096587"><span>Place-Based Learning: Action Learning in <span class="hlt">MA</span> Program for Educational Practitioners</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glassner, Amnon; Eran-Zoran, Yael</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The study presents a new pedagogical idea and practice for educational practitioners. The practice was developed as a workshop of <span class="hlt">MA</span> program in order to change and expand the meaning of education for the wellbeing of the community. The "place-based learning" workshop combined action learning (AL) with project-based learning (PBL). The…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1639..102K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AIPC.1639..102K"><span>New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Z-pinch generator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span> Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources - planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 <span class="hlt">MA</span>. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-<span class="hlt">MA</span> generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-<span class="hlt">MA</span> facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.9245B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.9245B"><span>First evidence of Renlandian (c. 950 <span class="hlt">Ma</span>) orogeny in Mainland Scotland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bird, Anna; Cutts, Kathryn; Thirlwall, Matthew; Strachan, Rob; Hand, Martin</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Central problems in the interpretation of the Neoproterozoic geology of the North Atlantic region arise from uncertainties in the ages of, and tectonic drivers for, Tonian orogenic events recorded in areas such as East Greenland, Svalbard, Norway and Shetland. The identification and interpretation of these events is often problematic because the rock units that record Tonian orogenesis of this age were later strongly reworked at amphibolite facies during the Caledonian orogeny. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd geochronology and metamorphic modelling carried out on garnets from the Meadie Pelite in the Moine Nappe of the northern Scottish Caledonides indicate prograde metamorphism at c. 950 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> at pressures of 6-7 kbar and temperatures of 600°C. Similar-aged 'Renlandian' orogenic activity has been recognised previously in East Greenland and Shetland, and our results significantly extend its geographic extent along the palaeo-Laurentian margin. The Meadie Pelite is believed to be part of the Morar Group within the Moine Supergroup. If this is correct: 1) the Morar Group was deposited between 980 ± 4 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (age of the youngest detrital zircon (Peters, 2001)) and c. 950 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> (age of regional metamorphism reported here), 2) an orogenic unconformity must separate the Morar Group from the <920 <span class="hlt">Ma</span> Glenfinnan and Loch Eil groups, and 3) the term 'Moine Supergroup' may no longer be useful.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4229712','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4229712"><span>Enhanced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Using Nanopatterned PEG-Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-HA Hydrogels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nemeth, Cameron L.; Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Yuan, Alex E.; Dennis, James E.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We have examined the effects of surface nanotopography and hyaluronic acid (HA) on in vitro chondrogenesis of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Ultraviolet-assisted capillary force lithography was employed to fabricate well-defined nanostructured scaffolds of composite PEG-Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-HA hydrogels that consist of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA), methacrylated gelatin (Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>), and HA. Using this microengineered platform, we first demonstrated that DPSCs formed three-dimensional spheroids, which provide an appropriate environment for in vitro chondrogenic differentiation. We also found that DPSCs cultured on nanopatterned PEG-Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-HA scaffolds showed a significant upregulation of the chondrogenic gene markers (Sox9, Alkaline phosphatase, Aggrecan, Procollagen type II, and Procollagen type X), while downregulating the pluripotent stem cell gene, Nanog, and epithelial–mesenchymal genes (Twist, Snail, Slug) compared with tissue culture polystyrene-cultured DPSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed more extensive deposition of collagen type II in DPSCs cultured on the nanopatterned PEG-Gel<span class="hlt">MA</span>-HA scaffolds. These findings suggest that nanotopography and HA provide important cues for promoting chondrogenic differentiation of DPSCs. PMID:24749806</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-458.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title42-vol3-sec422-458.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.458 - Risk sharing with regional <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for 2006 and 2007.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... that count toward allowable costs. Target amount means, with respect to an <span class="hlt">MA</span> regional plan offered by...) Adjustment of payment—(1) No adjustment if allowable costs within 3 percent of target amount. If the... target amount for the plan and year, there will be no payment adjustment under this section for the plan...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0472.photos.363605p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ri0472.photos.363605p/"><span>46. Quincy, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>46. Quincy, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior view of elevator system with overhead doors in open position and hydraulic shaft in left foreground VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-02-15/pdf/2011-3256.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-02-15/pdf/2011-3256.pdf"><span>76 FR 8768 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-02-15</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-26/pdf/2011-18830.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-07-26/pdf/2011-18830.pdf"><span>76 FR 44606 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-26</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory.... 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on September...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-25/pdf/2011-27595.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-25/pdf/2011-27595.pdf"><span>76 FR 66082 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-25</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-17/pdf/2010-14580.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-17/pdf/2010-14580.pdf"><span>75 FR 34479 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-06-17</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on July...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-02-03/pdf/2010-2233.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-02-03/pdf/2010-2233.pdf"><span>75 FR 5622 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-02-03</p> <p>... Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission AGENCY.... App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March 22, 2010 at 1...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-14/pdf/2010-31309.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-14/pdf/2010-31309.pdf"><span>75 FR 77900 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-12-14</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-18/pdf/2010-26134.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-18/pdf/2010-26134.pdf"><span>75 FR 63854 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-18</p> <p>... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28787609','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28787609"><span>Cell Division: Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span> Bears the Load in the Spindle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maiato, Helder; Pereira, António J</p> <p>2017-08-07</p> <p>The mitotic spindle bears the load of chromosomes during mitosis, but how this load is distributed across the spindle is unclear. A new study shows that load distribution in the spindle is confined and requires the microtubule cross-linking protein Nu<span class="hlt">MA</span>. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-03/pdf/2010-13213.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-06-03/pdf/2010-13213.pdf"><span>75 FR 31511 - Peoples Federal Bancshares, Inc., Brighton, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Approval of Conversion Application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-06-03</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Peoples Federal Bancshares, Inc., Brighton, <span class="hlt">MA</span>; Approval of Conversion... application of Peoples Federal MHC and Peoples Federal Savings Bank, Brighton, Massachusetts, to convert to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/43587','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/43587"><span>Chronic N-amended soils exhibit an altered bacterial community structure in Harvard Forest, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Swathi A. Turlapati; Rakesh Minocha; Premsai S. Bhiravarasa; Louise S. Tisa; William K. Thomas; Subhash C. Minocha</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>At the Harvard Forest, Petersham, <span class="hlt">MA</span>, the impact of 20 years of annual ammonium nitrate application to the mixed hardwood stand on soil bacterial communities was studied using 16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing. Amplification of 16S rRNA genes was done using DNA extracted from 30 soil samples (three treatments x two horizons x five subplots) collected from untreated (...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-458.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title42-vol3/pdf/CFR-2012-title42-vol3-sec422-458.pdf"><span>42 CFR 422.458 - Risk sharing with regional <span class="hlt">MA</span> organizations for 2006 and 2007.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 2007. (a) Terminology. For purposes of this section— Allowable costs means, with respect to an <span class="hlt">MA</span> regional plan offered by an organization for a year, the total amount of costs that the organization... defined in this paragraph, reduced by the portion of those costs attributable to administrative...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title33-vol1-sec80-115.pdf"><span>33 CFR 80.115 - Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portland Head, ME to Cape Ann, <span class="hlt">MA</span>. 80.115 Section 80.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.115 Portland Head, ME to Cape...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-521.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol8-sec308-521.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.521 - Application for Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-301.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... Section 308.521 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.521 Application for Open Cargo Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-301. The standard form of application for a War Risk Open Cargo...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol8-sec308-534.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.534 - Certificate to be attached to closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certificate to be attached to closing report, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-313-A. 308.534 Section 308.534 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Open Policy War Risk Cargo Insurance §...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-306.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol8-sec308-306.pdf"><span>46 CFR 308.306 - Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-242.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form <span class="hlt">MA</span>-242. 308.306 Section 308.306 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.306 Second Seamen's War Risk Policy, Form...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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