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Sample records for ge-doped amorphous silica

  1. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dosimetry system and the use of Ge-doped silica optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Taufek; Abu Bakar, Noor Khairunnisa; Chandra Paul, Mukul; Bradley, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that over exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), either from sunlight or artificial sources, can cause severe biological effects including cataracts, photokeratitis and skin cancer. In this respect, there exists the need to introduce a sensitive UV dosimetric material capable of measuring radiation dose to high accuracy in order to deliver UVR safely and efficiently. Present study has focussed on the investigation of the potential thermoluminescent (TL) sensitivity of commercially available germanium (Ge)-doped silica (SiO2) optical fibres subjected to UVR. The main interest of this study is to find out whether these doped SiO2 optical fibres can be used as a sensible integrator of environmental UV exposures. In the present study, commercially available Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibres have been used with a core diameter of 11 μm (CorActive, Canada), 23 μm (Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute Kolkata, India) and 50 μm (Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute Kolkata, India) and a cladding diameter of 125±0.1 μm, irradiated over a wide range of UV dose. Results have shown that these fibres exhibit a linear dose response (with correlation coefficient better than 0.9852). The 50 μm fibre produces greater TL response than that obtained for 11- and 23 μm fibres. The TL results are compared with that of the well-established TL dosimeter material lithium fluoride.

  2. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    PubMed

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications.

  3. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, J.; Safari, M. J.; Moradi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6–10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1–5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  4. Amorphous silica-like carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A.; Bini, Roberto; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Scandolo, Sandro; Crichton, Wilson A.

    2006-06-01

    Among the group IV elements, only carbon forms stable double bonds with oxygen at ambient conditions. At variance with silica and germania, the non-molecular single-bonded crystalline form of carbon dioxide, phase V, only exists at high pressure. The amorphous forms of silica (a-SiO2) and germania (a-GeO2) are well known at ambient conditions; however, the amorphous, non-molecular form of CO2 has so far been described only as a result of first-principles simulations. Here we report the synthesis of an amorphous, silica-like form of carbon dioxide, a-CO2, which we call `a-carbonia'. The compression of the molecular phase III of CO2 between 40 and 48GPa at room temperature initiated the transformation to the non-molecular amorphous phase. Infrared spectra measured at temperatures up to 680K show the progressive formation of C-O single bonds and the simultaneous disappearance of all molecular signatures. Furthermore, state-of-the-art Raman and synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on temperature-quenched samples confirm the amorphous character of the material. Comparison with vibrational and diffraction data for a-SiO2 and a-GeO2, as well as with the structure factor calculated for the a-CO2 sample obtained by first-principles molecular dynamics, shows that a-CO2 is structurally homologous to the other group IV dioxide glasses. We therefore conclude that the class of archetypal network-forming disordered systems, including a-SiO2, a-GeO2 and water, must be extended to include a-CO2.

  5. Deposition of Ge-doped silica thin films for an integrated optic application using a matrix distributed electron cyclotron resonance PECVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Roelene; Bulkin, Pavel V.; Swart, Pieter L.

    2007-10-01

    Optical quality Ge-doped SiO2 thin films, suitable for an integrated optic version of a gain equalizer for erbium-doped fibre amplifiers (EDFAs), have been deposited using a matrix distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MDECR-PECVD) system. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry and infrared transmission spectroscopy, the optical constants and hydroxyl content of the films were calculated. Losses due to the hydroxyl overtone at 1.37 μm are found to be approximately 0.251 dB/cm. An RBS analysis determined the germanium content of the films to be in the vicinity of 4 at.%. A comparison of the atomic percentage of germanium in the films and their corresponding refractive indices with values obtained using other deposition methods is also discussed.

  6. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of wetting on modified amorphous silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jingchun; Liu, Shuyan; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-08-01

    The microscopic wetting of water on amorphous silica surfaces has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation/silanization were considered. It was observed that the hydrophobicity becomes enhanced with an increase in the degree of surface silanization. A continuous transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity can be attained for the amorphous silica surfaces through surface modification. From the simulation result, the contact angle can exceed 90° when surface silanization percentage is above 50%, showing a hydrophobic character. It is also found that when the percentage of surface silanization is above 70% on the amorphous silica surface, the water contact angle almost remains unchanged (110-120°). This phenomenon is a little different from the wetting behavior on smooth quartz plates in previous experimental report. This change in the wettability on modified amorphous silica surfaces can be interpreted in terms of the interaction between water molecules and the silica surfaces.

  8. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  9. Amorphous to crystalline transition of magnesium silicate and silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, D.; Jäger, C.; Henning, Th.; Dorschne, J.; Mutschke, H.

    2000-11-01

    Amorphous magnesium silicate and silica nanoparticles (smoke) have been transformed into the crystalline state by the process of thermal annealing. It has been shown that the magnesium silicate smoke evolves into crystalline forsterite (c- Mg2SiO4), tridymite (a crystalline modification of SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) according to the initial Mg/Si-ratio of the smoke. Crystallization took place within a few hours for the Mg2SiO4 smoke and within one day for the MgSiO3 smoke. Amorphous silica nanoparticles have been annealed at 1220 K and are characterized by distinctly lower rates of thermal evolution compared to the magnesium silicates. Silica changed into cristobalite and tridymite.

  10. Fungus-mediated biotransformation of amorphous silica in rice husk to nanocrystalline silica.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vipul; Ahmad, Absar; Sastry, Murali

    2006-11-01

    Rice husk is a cheap agro-based waste material, which harbors a substantial amount of silica in the form of amorphous hydrated silica grains. However, there have been no attempts at harnessing the enormous amount of amorphous silica present in rice husk and its room-temperature biotransformation into crystalline silica nanoparticles. In this study, we address this issue and describe how naturally deposited amorphous biosilica in rice husk can be bioleached and simultaneously biotransformed into high value crystalline silica nanoparticles. We show here that the fungus Fusarium oxysporum rapidly biotransforms the naturally occurring amorphous plant biosilica into crystalline silica and leach out silica extracellularly at room temperature in the form of 2-6 nm quasi-spherical, highly crystalline silica nanoparticles capped by stabilizing proteins; that the nanoparticles are released into solution is an advantage of this process with significant application and commercial potential. Calcination of the silica nanoparticles leads to loss of occluded protein and to an apparently porous structure often of cubic morphology. The room-temperature synthesis of oxide nanomaterials using microorganisms starting from potential cheap agro-industrial waste materials is an exciting possibility and could lead to an energy-conserving and economically viable green approach toward the large-scale synthesis of oxide nanomaterials.

  11. Sodium diffusion through amorphous silica surfaces: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Rarivomanantsoa, Michaël; Jund, Philippe; Jullien, Rémi

    2004-03-08

    We have studied the diffusion inside the silica network of sodium atoms initially located outside the surfaces of an amorphous silica film. We have focused our attention on structural and dynamical quantities, and we have found that the local environment of the sodium atoms is close to the local environment of the sodium atoms inside bulk sodo-silicate glasses obtained by quench. This is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  12. TOXICITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN MOUSE KERATINOCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Hussain, Saber

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118 and 535 nm SiO2) then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 g/mL) compare to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 g/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size-of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  13. Amorphous and nanostructured silica and aluminosilicate spray-dried microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, M.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Frentiu, B.; Tamasan, M.; Mocuta, H.; Ponta, O.; Simon, S.

    2011-08-01

    Amorphous silica and aluminosilicate microspheres with diameters in the 0.1-20 μm range were produced by spray drying method. SEM, TEM and AFM images showed the spherical shape of the obtained particles. Based on thermal analysis data, several heat treatments have been applied on the as-prepared samples in order to check the amorphous state stability of the microspheres and to develop nanosized crystalline phases. As-prepared microspheres remain amorphous up to 1400 °C. By calcination at 1400 °C, cristobalite type nanocrystals are developed on silica sample, while in aluminosilicate sample first are developed mullite type nanocrystals and only after prolonged treatment are developed also cristobalite type nanocrystals. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR results show that the local order around aluminum and silicon atoms strongly depend on the thermal history of the microspheres.

  14. Nucleation, evolution, and growth dynamics of amorphous silica nanosprings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Peter M.; Bakharev, Pavel V.; Corti, Giancarlo; McIlroy, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    The initial phases of amorphous silica nanospring formation via a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism are reported. The low temperature eutectic of Au-Si results in the formation of an asymmetrical shaped catalyst at the early stages of nanospring formation. As solid silica is formed below the Au-Si catalyst the system lowers its surface free energy and forms multiple amorphous silica nanowires beneath a common catalyst, as opposed to a single nanowire. The diameter of one of the nanowires forming the nanospring ranges between 10-20 nm. The difference in growth rates of the individual nanowires creates an asymmetry in the interfacial surface tension on the boundaries of the Au-Si catalyst/nanowires interface. Using Stokes’ theorem it is shown that there is a variable work of adhesion on the outer boundary of the Au-Si catalyst/nanowire interface of a nanospring, which is defined as an effective contact angle anisotropy. The anisotropic growth on the catalyst/nanowire boundary results in the nanowires coherently coiling into to a single, larger, helical structure with an overall diameter of 70-500 nm.

  15. Barrier Heights and Anharmonicities in a Model of Amorphous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Brian

    1998-03-01

    The low-temperature dynamics of glasses and amorphous materials are believed to be dominated by low-energy localized excitations, which are generally described as either two-level states or low-frequency localized vibrations. Recently, the existence and nature of such localized excitations in simple (fragile) model glass formers have been the subject of several simulation studies. In this work, we use a variety of techniques to analyze computer simulations of the low-temperature dynamics and structure of amorphous silica (SiO_2) using the force model of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen (BKS)[Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)]. This system is the archetypical example of a strong glass former. In particular we examine the relationship between the types of motion that lead to barrier crossing and the directions on the potential surface that are locally highly anharmonic.

  16. Influence of amorphous silica on the hydration in ultra-high performance concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Tina; Helbig, Uta; Hutter, Frank; Kletti, Holger; Sextl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica particles (silica) are used in ultra-high performance concretes to densify the microstructure and accelerate the clinker hydration. It is still unclear whether silica predominantly increases the surface for the nucleation of C–S–H phases or dissolves and reacts pozzolanically. Furthermore, varying types of silica may have different and time dependent effects on the clinker hydration. The effects of different silica types were compared in this study by calorimetric analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ X-ray diffraction and compressive strength measurements. The silica component was silica fume, pyrogenic silica or silica synthesized by a wet-chemical route (Stoeber particles). Water-to-cement ratios were 0.23. Differences are observed between the silica for short reaction times (up to 3 days). Results indicate that silica fume and pyrogenic silica accelerate alite hydration by increasing the surface for nucleation of C–S–H phases whereas Stoeber particles show no accelerating effect.

  17. Radiotherapy dosimetry and the thermoluminescence characteristics of Ge-doped fibres of differing germanium dopant concentration and outer diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, N. Mohd; Fadzil, M. S. Ahmad; Ung, N. M.; Maah, M. J.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the influence of elevated dopant concentration on the thermoluminescence characteristics of novel Ge-doped silica fibres. Basic dosimetric characteristics of the TL media were obtained, including linearity, reproducibility, energy dependence, fading, minimum detectable dose and glow curve analysis, use being made of a 60Co gamma irradiation facility (mean energy 1.25 MeV) and an electron linear accelerator producing photons at an accelerating potential of 6 and 10 MV. The 6 mol% Ge-doped fibres were found to provide TL response superior to that of 8- and 10 mol% Ge-doped fibres, both for fibres with outer diameter of 241 μm and 604 μm. Concerning reproducibility, obtained under three different test conditions, at <10% the 6 mol% Ge dopant concentration was observed to provide the superior coefficient of variation (CV). In regard to energy dependence, the 10 mol% Ge doped cylindrical fibres produced the largest gradient values at 0.364 and 0.327 for the 241 μm and 604 μm diameter cylindrical fibres respectively and thus the greatest energy dependency. Measured 33 days post irradiation; the 6 mol% Ge doped cylindrical fibres showed the least TL signal loss, at 21% for the 241 μm cylindrical fibre and <40% for the 604 μm cylindrical fibres. The results also revealed that the 6 mol% optical fibres provided the lowest minimum detectable dose, at 0.027 Gy for 6 MV photon beams. Evaluations of these characteristics are supporting development of novel Ge-doped optical fibres for dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  18. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  19. Processing pathway dependence of amorphous silica nanoparticle toxicity - colloidal versus pyrolytic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Dunphy, Darren R.; Jiang, Xingmao; Meng, Huan; Sun, Bingbing; Tarn, Derrick; Xue, Min; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Li, Ruibin; Garcia, Fred L.; Yang, Jing; Kirk, Martin L.; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We have developed structure/toxicity relationships for amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized through low temperature, colloidal (e.g. Stöber silica) or high temperature pyrolysis (e.g. fumed silica) routes. Through combined spectroscopic and physical analyses, we have determined the state of aggregation, hydroxyl concentration, relative proportion of strained and unstrained siloxane rings, and potential to generate hydroxyl radicals for Stöber and fumed silica NPs with comparable primary particle sizes (16-nm in diameter). Based on erythrocyte hemolytic assays and assessment of the viability and ATP levels in epithelial and macrophage cells, we discovered for fumed silica an important toxicity relationship to post-synthesis thermal annealing or environmental exposure, whereas colloidal silicas were essentially non-toxic under identical treatment conditions. Specifically, we find for fumed silica a positive correlation of toxicity with hydroxyl concentration and its potential to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause red blood cell hemolysis. We propose fumed silica toxicity stems from its intrinsic population of strained three-membered rings (3MRs) along with its chain-like aggregation and hydroxyl content. Hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the silanol surfaces of fumed silica aggregates with the extracellular plasma membrane cause membrane perturbations sensed by the Nalp3 inflammasome, whose subsequent activation leads to secretion of the cytokine IL-1β. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the strained 3MRs in fumed silica but largely absent in colloidal silicas may contribute to the inflammasome activation. Formation of colloidal silica into aggregates mimicking those of fumed silica had no effect on cell viability or hemolysis. This study emphasizes that not all amorphous silica is created equal and that the unusual toxicity of fumed silica compared to colloidal silica derives from its framework and surface chemistry along

  20. Silica glass structure generation for ab initio calculations using small samples of amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ginhoven, Renée M.; Jónsson, Hannes; Corrales, L. René

    2005-01-01

    Multiple small samples of amorphous silica have been generated and optimized using classical dynamics and the van Beest-Kramer-van Santen (BKS) empirical potential function. The samples were subsequently optimized and annealed using density functional theory (DFT) with both the local density and the generalized gradient approximations. A thorough analysis of the local and medium-range structure of the optimized samples obtained from the different methods was carried out. The structural characteristics obtained for the average of small systems each containing ca. 100 ions are compared for each of the different methods, and to the BKS simulation of a larger system. The differences found between the DFT and BKS simulations and the effects of volume relaxation on the structures are discussed. Fixed-volume samples are compared to neutron scattering data, with good agreement to 5Å , the length limit of the sample sizes used here. It is shown that by creating multiple small samples, it is possible to achieve a good statistical sampling of structural features consistent with larger simulated glass systems. This study also shows that multiple small samples are necessary to capture the structural distribution of silica glass, and therefore to study more complex processes in glass, such as reactions.

  1. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Juha; Norris, Scott A.; Nordlund, Kai; Aziz, Michael J.

    2011-07-01

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  2. Flat Ge-doped optical fibres for food irradiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, N. Mohd; Jusoh, M. A.; Razis, A. F. Abdull; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Exposing food to radiation can improve hygiene quality, germination control, retard sprouting, and enhance physical attributes of the food product. To provide for food safety, radiation dosimetry in irradiated food is required. Herein, fabricated germanium doped (Ge-doped) optical fibres have been used. The fibres have been irradiated using a gamma source irradiator, doses in the range 1 kGy to 10 kGy being delivered. Using Ge-doped optical fibres of variable size, type and dopant concentration, study has been made of linearity, reproducibility, and fading. The thermoluminescence (TL) yield of the fibres were obtained and compared. The fibres exhibit a linear dose response over the investigated range of doses, with mean reproducibility to within 2.69 % to 8.77 %, exceeding the dose range of all commercial dosimeters used in evaluating high doses for the food irradiation industry. TL fading of the Ge-doped flat fibres has been found to be < 13%.

  3. Flat Ge-doped optical fibres for food irradiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, N. Mohd; Jusoh, M. A.; Razis, A. F. Abdull; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-04-24

    Exposing food to radiation can improve hygiene quality, germination control, retard sprouting, and enhance physical attributes of the food product. To provide for food safety, radiation dosimetry in irradiated food is required. Herein, fabricated germanium doped (Ge-doped) optical fibres have been used. The fibres have been irradiated using a gamma source irradiator, doses in the range 1 kGy to 10 kGy being delivered. Using Ge-doped optical fibres of variable size, type and dopant concentration, study has been made of linearity, reproducibility, and fading. The thermoluminescence (TL) yield of the fibres were obtained and compared. The fibres exhibit a linear dose response over the investigated range of doses, with mean reproducibility to within 2.69 % to 8.77 %, exceeding the dose range of all commercial dosimeters used in evaluating high doses for the food irradiation industry. TL fading of the Ge-doped flat fibres has been found to be < 13%.

  4. Predicting catalyst-support interactions between metal nanoparticles and amorphous silica supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Christopher S.; Veser, Götz; McCarthy, Joseph J.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2016-10-01

    Metal-support interactions significantly affect the stability and activity of supported catalytic nanoparticles (NPs), yet there is no simple and reliable method for estimating NP-support interactions, especially for amorphous supports. We present an approach for rapid prediction of catalyst-support interactions between Pt NPs and amorphous silica supports for NPs of various sizes and shapes. We use density functional theory calculations of 13 atom Pt clusters on model amorphous silica supports to determine linear correlations relating catalyst properties to NP-support interactions. We show that these correlations can be combined with fast discrete element method simulations to predict adhesion energy and NP net charge for NPs of larger sizes and different shapes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach can be successfully transferred to Pd, Au, Ni, and Fe NPs. This approach can be used to quickly screen stability and net charge transfer and leads to a better fundamental understanding of catalyst-support interactions.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan P; Cheng, H P

    2014-08-07

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan P.; Cheng, H. P.

    2014-08-01

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions.

  7. Observations of Nucleation and Early Stage Growth of Amorphous Silica on Carboxyl-Terminated Model Biosubstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Over Earth history, organisms have developed the ability to control the nucleation and growth of a broad range of nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The formation of amorphous biosilica is of particular interest because silicifiers sequester gigatons of silica annually, and suppress dissolved silica levels in the ocean to current low levels. The ecological success of marine diatoms, which are arguably the most important silicifiers, places them alongside marine calcifiers as major players in the sequestration of organic carbon. Thus, the biologically mediated formation of amorphous silica plays a key role in the global cycling of silicon and carbon. During controlled biomineralization, nucleation typically occurs in designated locations. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that macromolecules in the cellular environment determine these locations by acting as templates to provide energetically favorable sites for the onset of mineral and amorphous material nucleation. In diatoms, silica formation is likely initiated through heterogeneous nucleation on functional portions of macromolecules inside the Silica Deposition Vesicle (SDV). Previous studies of silica nucleation have implicated multiple chemical moieties associated with the constituent amino acids and sugars of polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins as probable sites for in vivo surface nucleation and patterning. These investigations have usually employed complex macromolecules that exhibit multiple functionalities, and un-characterized solution compositions, thus rendering a quantitative analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic processes impossible. The objective of this research is to experimentally test kinetic and thermodynamic controls exercised by surface moieties on silica nucleation. Our experimental model system uses synthetic organic substrates designed to mimic key features of the interfacial regions between the surrounding cellular environment and the amorphous silica

  8. Molecular dynamics study of oil detachment from an amorphous silica surface in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxuan; Si, Hao; Chen, Wenyang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the mechanism of oil detachment from optical glass in water medium is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. At the beginning, some undecane molecules are adsorbed on the amorphous silica surface to get contaminated glass. Upon addition of 6000 water molecules, most of the undecane molecules on the substrate surface can be detached from an amorphous silica surface through three stages. The formation of different directions of water channels is vital for oil detachment. The electrostatic interaction of water substrate contributes to disturbing the aggregates of undecane molecules and the H-bonding interaction between the water molecules is helpful for the oil puddle away from the substrate. However, there is still some oil molecules residue on the substrate surface after water cleaning. The simulation results showed that the specific ring potential well of amorphous silica surface will hinder the detachment of oil molecules. We also find that the formation of the specific ring potential well is related to the number of atoms and the average radius in silica atomic rings. Increasing the upward lift force, which acts on the hydrocarbon tail of oil molecules, will be benefit to clear the oil pollution residues from the glass surface.

  9. Dielectric breakdown in silica-amorphous polymer nanocomposite films: the role of the polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Christopher A; Fillery, Scott P; Westing, Nicholas M; Chi, Changzai; Meth, Jeffrey S; Durstock, Michael F; Vaia, Richard A

    2013-06-26

    The ultimate energy storage performance of an electrostatic capacitor is determined by the dielectric characteristics of the material separating its conductive electrodes. Polymers are commonly employed due to their processability and high breakdown strength; however, demands for higher energy storage have encouraged investigations of ceramic-polymer composites. Maintaining dielectric strength, and thus minimizing flaw size and heterogeneities, has focused development toward nanocomposite (NC) films; but results lack consistency, potentially due to variations in polymer purity, nanoparticle surface treatments, nanoparticle size, and film morphology. To experimentally establish the dominant factors in broad structure-performance relationships, we compare the dielectric properties for four high-purity amorphous polymer films (polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, polyimide, and poly-4-vinylpyridine) incorporating uniformly dispersed silica colloids (up to 45% v/v). Factors known to contribute to premature breakdown-field exclusion and agglomeration-have been mitigated in this experiment to focus on what impact the polymer and polymer-nanoparticle interactions have on breakdown. Our findings indicate that adding colloidal silica to higher breakdown strength amorphous polymers (polymethyl methacrylate and polyimide) causes a reduction in dielectric strength as compared to the neat polymer. Alternatively, low breakdown strength amorphous polymers (poly-4-vinylpyridine and especially polystyrene) with comparable silica dispersion show similar or even improved breakdown strength for 7.5-15% v/v silica. At ∼15% v/v or greater silica content, all the polymer NC films exhibit breakdown at similar electric fields, implying that at these loadings failure becomes independent of polymer matrix and is dominated by silica.

  10. Amorphous silica in ultra-high performance concrete: First hour of hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Tina; Hutter, Frank; Helbig, Uta; Sextl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica in the sub-micrometer size range is widely used to accelerate cement hydration. Investigations including properties of silica which differ from the specific surface area are rare. In this study, the reactivity of varying types of silica was evaluated based on their specific surface area, surface silanol group density, content of silanol groups and solubility in an alkaline suspension. Pyrogenic silica, silica fume and silica synthesized by hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxy silanes, so-called Stoeber particles, were employed. Influences of the silica within the first hour were further examined in pastes with water/cement ratios of 0.23 using in-situ X-ray diffraction, cryo scanning electron microscopy and pore solution analysis. It was shown that Stoeber particles change the composition of the pore solution. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and silicate ions seem to react to oligomers. The extent of this reaction might be highest for Stoeber particles due to their high reactivity.

  11. Transformations induced in bulk amorphous silica by ultrafast laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Vitor; Sharma, Sahendra P; Herrero, Pilar; Vilar, Rui

    2013-12-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of nanogratings formed in bulk amorphous silica by direct writing with an ultrafast pulsed laser with a radiation wavelength of 1030 nm and pulse duration of 560 fs is presented. The results achieved show that the nanogratings are composed of planar nanostructures with an average periodicity of 250 nm and typical thickness of about 30 nm, consisting of alternating layers of heavily damaged material and layers of material where a dense precipitation of nanocrystals occurred. The crystallization of silica to form these nanocrystals can be explained by the large pressures and temperatures reached in these regions as a result of nanoplasma formation and recombination.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of the frictional properties of silica nanoparticles in an amorphous state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. I.; Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In the paper, simulation of the treatment of two silica crystals with an amorphous interlayer was carried out using the method of molecular dynamics. The three-body interatomic interaction suggested by Tersoff was used. We studied sliding behavior under two different thermal conditions: ambient and elevated temperature. The simulation results have revealed several processes realized in the contact area caused by a shear loading. Depending on temperature and value of external compression, we observed smooth sliding or stick-slip motion of silicon and oxygen atoms within amorphous interlayer. We compare the time dependencies of resistance forces for the studied specimens. In spite of loading conditions even in case of stick-slip sliding the mean value of resistance force for simulated specimens is very low. The last can explain the experimentally observed low friction properties of polymer nano-composite materials with silica nanoparticles inclusions.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of large specific surface area nanostructured amorphous silica materials.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Linares, Francisco; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando M A

    2006-04-01

    Large specific surface area materials attract wide attention because of their applications in adsorption, catalysis, and nanotechnology. In the present study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured amorphous silica materials. These materials were obtained by means of a modification of the Stobe-Fink-Bohn (SFB) method. The morphology and essential features of the synthesized materials have been studied using an automated surface area and pore size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy. The existence of a micro/mesoporous structure in the obtained materials has been established. It was also found that the obtained particle packing materials show large specific surface area up to 1,600 m2/g. (To our best knowledge, there is no any reported amorphous silica material with such a higher specific surface area.) The obtained materials could be useful in the manufacture of adsorbents, catalyst supports, and other nanotechnological applications.

  14. Coating of calcia-doped ceria with amorphous silica shell by seeded polymerization technique

    SciTech Connect

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed . E-mail: el-toni@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yin, Shu; Yabe, Shinryo; Sato, Tsugio

    2005-07-12

    Calcia-doped ceria is of potential interest as an ultraviolet (UV) radiation blocking material in personal care products. However, its high catalytic ability for oxidation of organic materials makes it difficult to use as a sunscreen material. Therefore, calcia-doped ceria was coated with amorphous silica by means of seeded polymerization technique in order to depress its oxidation catalytic ability. The catalytic ability as well as UV-shielding ability was investigated for coated particles.

  15. Origin of the second peak in the mechanical loss function of amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris R.; Trinastic, Jonathan P.; Davis, Dustin J.; Hamdan, Rashid; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2017-01-01

    The thermal noise in amorphous oxides is the limiting factor for gravitational wave detectors and other high-precision optical devices. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the thermal noise is directly connected to the internal friction (Q-1). Computational calculations of Q-1 that use a two-level system (TLS) model have previously been performed for several coating materials, facilitating the search for coatings with lower thermal noise. However, they are based on a historical approximation made within the TLS model that treats the TLS distribution as uncorrelated, which has limited the predictive power of the model. In this paper, we demonstrate that this approximation limits the physical description of amorphous oxides using the TLS model and a fully correlated distribution must be used to calculate high-temperature behavior. Not only does using a correlated distribution improve the theoretical standing of the TLS model, calculations of Q-1 using a fully correlated distribution reproduce and uncover the physical mechanisms of a second peak observed in measurements of ion-beam sputtered amorphous silica. We also explore the details of the thermal activation of TLSs and analyze the atomic transitions that contribute to Q-1 in amorphous silica.

  16. Intestinal absorption and biological effects of orally administered amorphous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although amorphous silica nanoparticles are widely used in the production of food products (e.g., as anticaking agents), there is little information available about their absorption and biological effects after oral exposure. Here, we examined the in vitro intestinal absorption and in vivo biological effects in mice of orally administered amorphous silica particles with diameters of 70, 300, and 1,000 nm (nSP70, mSP300, and mSP1000, respectively) and of nSP70 that had been surface-modified with carboxyl or amine groups (nSP70-C and nSP70-N, respectively). Analysis of intestinal absorption by means of the everted gut sac method combined with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer showed that the intestinal absorption of nSP70-C was significantly greater than that of nSP70. The absorption of nSP70-N tended to be greater than that of nSP70; however, the results were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that silica nanoparticles can be absorbed through the intestine and that particle diameter and surface properties are major determinants of the degree of absorption. We also examined the biological effects of the silica particles after 28-day oral exposure in mice. Hematological, histopathological, and biochemical analyses showed no significant differences between control mice and mice treated with the silica particles, suggesting that the silica nanoparticles evaluated in this study are safe for use in food production. PMID:25288919

  17. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-01-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties. PMID:26940294

  18. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties.

  19. Gamma irradiated thermoluminescence response of Ge-doped SiO2 fibre.

    PubMed

    Wahib, Norfadira; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua; Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Ling, Yap Seong; Abdul Sani, Siti Fairus; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Bradley, D A

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade and more, considerable interest has been shown in the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of silica-based single-mode optical fibres, in particular investigating potential ionising radiation dosimetry applications. Herein, study has been made of TL glow curve, dose response, reproducibility and fading of 6mol% Ge-doped silica, fabricated in-house and produced in the form of cylindrical fibres. Three different pairings of doped-core and silica cladding diameters were produced: (40, 241)µm, (80, 483)µm and (100, 604)µm. The TL results were compared against that of TLD-100, one of the most sensitive commercially available LiF-based TL media. For all three pairings of diameters, closely similar TL glow curve were obtained, formed of a single peaked structure with a maximum TL yield located between the temperatures 250 and 310°C. The TL yield of the fibres were linear over the range of doses investigated, from 1Gy up to 10Gy, their dose response exceeding that of TLD-100, the samples also being found to be reusable, without evidence of degradation.

  20. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  1. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g. PMID:25140120

  2. Differential toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles toward phagocytic and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malugin, Alexander; Herd, Heather; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of size and surface functionality of amorphous silica nanoparticles (SNPs) on their interaction with cultured cells. The intracellular uptake, phagocytic activity, and possible mechanisms of toxicity induced by SNPs were studied on murine alveolar macrophages and two epithelial cancer cell lines. It was found that phagocytic cells are more susceptible to amorphous SNPs than epithelial cells. SNPs with functionalized surfaces were capable to induce the formation of apoptotic cells to a higher extent than plain particles. Plain SNPs induced plasma membrane damage in phagocytic cells to a higher extent and caused cell death in a shorter period of time than surface-functionalized SNPs. The prevalence of necrotic mode of cell death was observed after treatment with plain SNPs. In the range studied surface functionality played an important role in SNPs toxicity.

  3. COHESION OF AMORPHOUS SILICA SPHERES: TOWARD A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE COAGULATION GROWTH OF SILICATE DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-10-10

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains with a radius of 0.1 μm could grow to planetesimals via coagulation in a protoplanetary disk. We argue that the coagulation growth of silicate grains in a molecular cloud is advanced either by organic mantles rather than icy mantles or, if there are no mantles, by nanometer-sized grain radius.

  4. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  5. Microstructure of a granular amorphous silica ceramic synthesized by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Röding, M; Del Castillo, L A; Nydén, M; Follink, B

    2016-12-01

    We study the microstructure of a granular amorphous silica ceramic material synthesized by spark plasma sintering. Using monodisperse spherical silica particles as precursor, spark plasma sintering yields a dense granular material with distinct granule boundaries. We use selective etching to obtain nanoscopic pores along the granule borders. We interrogate this highly interesting material structure by combining scanning electron microscopy, X-ray computed nanotomography and simulations based on random close packed spherical particles. We determine the degree of anisotropy caused by the uni-axial force applied during sintering, and our analysis shows that our synthesis method provides a means to avoid significant granule growth and to fabricate a material with well-controlled microstructure.

  6. Investigation of the micro-mechanical properties of femtosecond laser-induced phases in amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiou, Christos-Edward; Bellouard, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Femtosecond pulses used in the regime where self-organized patterns are found have two noticeable effects in amorphous silica's (a-SiO2) optical and chemical properties: The decrease of the material's refractive index as well as an enhanced etching selectivity. However, the effect on the material mechanical properties is unexplored. In this paper, we present elastic modulus measurements of fused silica exposed to femtosecond laser pulses in the regime where nanogratings are found. The measurement principle is based on the use of femtosecond laser fabricated displacement amplification mechanism combined with a discrete stiffness model. In this laser exposure regime, a significant decrease of the elastic modulus is observed. Our findings are consistent with the existence of a porous structure found within nanogratings lamellas.

  7. Realistic models of amorphous silica: A comparative study of different potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Alfthan, S.; Kuronen, A.; Kaski, K.

    2003-08-01

    The creation of realistic models of amorphous silica has been studied using the Monte Carlo based method of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire, where the bond-topology is optimized with respect to an interatomic potential model. The commonly used Keating potentials are compared and their strengths and weaknesses are assessed. The mean oxygen bond-angle obtained using these potentials turned out to be too small. A modification of the potential parameters is shown to correct this feature and thus produce better results when used with the Wooten-Winer-Weaire method.

  8. Size and spatial homogeneity of SiGe quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Pinto, Sara R. C.; Rolo, Anabela G.; Levichev, Sergey; Gomes, Maria J. M.; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Bangert, Ursel; Chahboun, Adil; Holy, Vaclav

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we present a study of structural properties of SiGe quantum dots formed in amorphous silica matrix by magnetron sputtering technique. We investigate deposition conditions leading to the formation of dense and uniformly sized quantum dots, distributed homogeneously in the matrix. X-ray and Raman spectroscopy were used to estimate the Si content. A detailed analysis based on grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering revealed the influence of the deposition conditions on quantum dot sizes, size distributions, spatial arrangement, and concentration of quantum dots in the matrix, as well as the Si:Ge content.

  9. Amorphous silica nanoparticles enhance cross-presentation in murine dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Takahashi, Hideki; Ichihashi, Ko-ichi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tochigi, Saeko; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles enhanced cross-presentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles induced endosomal release of exogenous antigens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticle-induced cross-presentation was mediated by scavenger receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-modification may enable the manufacture of safer silica nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties and innovative functions, and they are increasingly being used in a wide variety of fields. Ensuring the safety of NMs is now an urgent task. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), one of the most widely used NMs, enhance antigen-specific cellular immune responses and may therefore aggravate immune diseases. Thus, to ensure the design of safer nSPs, investigations into the effect of nSPs on antigen presentation in dendritic cells, which are central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, are now needed. Here, we show that nSPs with diameters of 70 and 100 nm enhanced exogenous antigen entry into the cytosol from endosomes and induced cross-presentation, whereas submicron-sized silica particles (>100 nm) did not. Furthermore, we show that surface modification of nSPs suppressed cross-presentation. Although further studies are required to investigate whether surface-modified nSPs suppress immune-modulating effects in vivo, the current results indicate that appropriate regulation of the characteristics of nSPs, such as size and surface properties, will be critical for the design of safer nSPs.

  10. Cellular Recognition and Trafficking of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor A

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Tan, Ruimin; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Zangar, Richard C.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2011-09-01

    The internalization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into cells is known to involve active transport mechanisms, yet the precise biological molecules involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the uptake of amorphous silica ENPs (92 nm) by macrophage cells is strongly inhibited by silencing expression of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). In addition, ENP uptake is augmented by introducing SR-A expression into human cells that are normally non-phagocytic. Confocal fluorescent microscopy analyses show that the majority of single or small clusters of silica ENPs co-localize intracellularly with SR-A and are internalized through a pathway characteristic of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In contrast, larger silica NP agglomerates (>500 nm) are poorly co-localized with the receptor, suggesting independent trafficking or internalization pathways are involved. SR-A silencing also caused decreased cellular secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to silica ENPs. As SR-A is expressed in macrophages throughout the reticulo-endothelial system, this pathway is likely an important determinant of the biodistribution of, and cellular response to ENPs.

  11. Fast response in-line gas sensor using C-type fiber and Ge-doped ring defect photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Kassani, Sahar Hosseinzadeh; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Yongmin; Kobelke, Jens; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2013-06-17

    An in-line chemical gas sensor was proposed and experimentally demonstrated using a new C-type fiber and a Ge-doped ring defect photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The C-type fiber segment served as a compact gas inlet/outlet directly spliced to PCF, which overcame previous limitations in packaging and dynamic responses. C-type fiber was prepared by optimizing drawing process for a silica tube with an open slot. Splicing conditions for SMF/C-type fiber and PCF/C-type fiber were experimentally established to provide an all-fiber sensor unit. To enhance the sensitivity and light coupling efficiency we used a special PCF with Ge-doped ring defect to further enhance the sensitivity and gas flow rate. Sensing capability of the proposed sensor was investigated experimentally by detecting acetylene absorption lines.

  12. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Md Nor, Roslan Bin; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a 60Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium. PMID:26307987

  13. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti Mat; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Nor, Roslan Bin Md; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-08-20

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a (60)Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium.

  14. Cytotoxic and genotoxic evaluation of different synthetic amorphous silica nanomaterials in the V79 cell line.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Y; Fontana, C; Chavinier, E; Terzetti, F; Gaté, L; Binet, S; Darne, C

    2016-09-01

    The nature of occupational risks and hazards in industries that produce or use synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) nanoparticles is still under discussion. Manufactured SAS occur in amorphous form and can be divided into two main types according to the production process, namely, pyrogenic silica (powder) and precipitated silica (powder, gel or colloid). The physical and chemical properties of SAS may vary in terms of particle size, surface area, agglomeration state or purity, and differences in their toxicity potential might therefore be expected. The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of representative manufactured SAS samples in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells). Five samples from industrial SAS producers were evaluated, that is, two pyrogenic SAS powders (with primary particle sizes of 20 nm and 25/70 nm), one precipitated SAS powder (20 nm) and two precipitated SAS colloids (15 and 40/80 nm). V79 cell cultures were treated with different concentrations of SAS pre-dispersed in bovine serum albumin -water medium. Pyr (pyrogenic) 20, Pre (precipitated) 20 and Col (colloid) 15 significantly decreased the cell viability after 24 h of exposure, whilst Pyr 25/70 and Col 40/80 had negligible effects. The cytotoxicity of Pyr 20, Pre 20 and Col 15 was revealed by the induction of apoptosis, and Pyr 20 and Col 15 also produced DNA damage. However, none of the SAS samples generated intracellular reactive oxidative species, micronuclei or genomic mutations in V79 cells after 24 h of exposure. Overall, the results of this study show that pyrogenic, precipitated and colloidal manufactured SAS of around 20 nm primary particle size can produce significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in V79 cells. In contrast, the coarser-grained pyrogenic and colloid SAS (approximately 50 nm) yielded negligible toxicity, despite having been manufactured by same processes as their finer-grained equivalents. To explain these differences, the influence

  15. Activation of the inflammasome by amorphous silica and TiO2 nanoparticles in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, Meike; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Hornung, Veit; Krämer, Ursula; Schins, Roel P F; Förster, Irmgard

    2011-09-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly used in various food applications. In particular, nanoparticulate amorphous SiO2 is already contained, e.g., in spices. Since intestinal dendritic cells (DC) could be critical targets for ingested particles, we compared the in vitro effects of amorphous silica nanoparticles with fine crystalline silica, and micron-sized with nano-sized TiO2 particles on DC. TiO2- and SiO2-nanoparticles, as well as crystalline silica led to an upregulation of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86 on DC. Furthermore, these particles activated the inflammasome, leading to significant IL-1β-secretion in wild-type (WT) but not Caspase-1- or NLRP3-deficient mice. Silica nanoparticles and crystalline silica induced apoptosis, while TiO2 nanoparticles led to enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since amorphous silica and TiO2 nanoparticles had strong effects on the activation-status of DC, we suggest that nanoparticles, used as food additives, should be intensively studied in vitro and in vivo, to ensure their safety for the consumer.

  16. Effect of amorphous silica nanoparticles on in vitro RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSP) have been used as a polishing agent and/or as a remineralization promoter for teeth in the oral care field. The present study investigates the effects of nSP on osteoclast differentiation and the relationship between particle size and these effects. Our results revealed that nSP exerted higher cytotoxicity in macrophage cells compared with submicron-sized silica particles. However, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the number of osteoclast cells (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells) were not changed by nSP treatment in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) at doses that did not induce cytotoxicity by silica particles. These results indicated that nSP did not cause differentiation of osteoclasts. Collectively, the results suggested that nanosilica exerts no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells, although a detailed mechanistic examination of the nSP70-mediated cytotoxic effect is needed. PMID:21777482

  17. Effect of Alkali Ions on the Amorphous to Crystalline Phase Transition of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezia, A. M.; La Parola, V.; Longo, A.; Martorana, A.

    2001-11-01

    The effect of the addition of alkali ions to commercial amorphous silica, generally used as support for heterogeneous catalysts, has been investigated from the point of view of morphological and structural changes. Samples of alkali-doped silica were prepared by impregnation and subsequent calcination at various temperatures. The structural effect of Li, Na, K, and Cs was determined by use of techniques such as wide-angle (WAXS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The WAXS diffractograms, analyzed with the Rietveld method using the GSAS program, allowed qualitative and quantitative identification of the fraction of the different silica polymorphs like quartz, tridymite, and cristobalite. SAXS measurements, using the classical method based on Porod's law, yielded the total surface area of the systems. The calculated areas were compared with the surface areas determined by the nitrogen adsorption technique using the analytical method of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. The results are explained in terms of sizes of the alkali ions and cell volume of the different crystalline phases.

  18. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe

    PubMed Central

    Gharsallah, M.; Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Nemes, N. M.; Mompeán, F. J.; Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Elhalouani, F.; Alonso, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit. PMID:27251233

  19. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe.

    PubMed

    Gharsallah, M; Serrano-Sánchez, F; Nemes, N M; Mompeán, F J; Martínez, J L; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Elhalouani, F; Alonso, J A

    2016-06-02

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit.

  20. Giant Seebeck effect in Ge-doped SnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsallah, M.; Serrano-Sánchez, F.; Nemes, N. M.; Mompeán, F. J.; Martínez, J. L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Elhalouani, F.; Alonso, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Thermoelectric materials may contribute in the near future as new alternative sources of sustainable energy. Unprecedented thermoelectric properties in p-type SnSe single crystals have been recently reported, accompanied by extremely low thermal conductivity in polycrystalline samples. In order to enhance thermoelectric efficiency through proper tuning of this material we report a full structural characterization and evaluation of the thermoelectric properties of novel Ge-doped SnSe prepared by a straightforward arc-melting method, which yields nanostructured polycrystalline samples. Ge does not dope the system in the sense of donating carriers, yet the electrical properties show a semiconductor behavior with resistivity values higher than that of the parent compound, as a consequence of nanostructuration, whereas the Seebeck coefficient is higher and thermal conductivity lower, favorable to a better ZT figure of merit.

  1. Growth mechanism of Ge-doped CZTSSe thin film by sputtering method and solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinze; Shen, Honglie; Chen, Jieyi; Li, Yufang; Yang, Jiale

    2016-10-19

    Ge-doped CZTSSe thin films were obtained by covering a thin Ge layer on CZTS precursors, followed by a selenization process. The effect of the Ge layer thickness on the morphologies and structural properties of Ge-doped CZTSSe thin films were studied. It was found that Ge doping could promote grain growth to form a compact thin film. The lattice shrank in the top-half of the film due to the smaller atomic radius of Ge, leading to the formation of tensile stress. According to thermodynamic analysis, Sn was easier to be selenized than Ge. Thus, Ge preferred to remain on the surface and increased the surface roughness when the Ge layer was thin. CZTSe was easier to form than Ge-doped CZTSe, which caused difficulty in Ge doping. These results offered a theoretical and experimental guide for preparing Ge-doped CZTSSe thin films for the potential applications in low-cost solar cells. With a 10 nm Ge layer on the top of the precursor, the conversion efficiency of the solar cell improved to 5.38% with an open-circuit voltage of 403 mV, a short-circuit current density of 28.51 mA cm(-2) and a fill factor of 46.83% after Ge doping.

  2. Molecular-dynamics simulations of thin polyisoprene films confined between amorphous silica substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, D. V.; Komarov, P. V.; Lyulin, Alexey V.

    2014-03-21

    Constant temperature–constant pressure (NpT) molecular-dynamics computer simulations have been carried out for the united-atom model of a non-crosslinked (1,4) cis-polyisoprene (PI) melt confined between two amorphous, fully coordinated silica surfaces. The Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential was implemented to describe the polymer–silica interactions. The thickness H of the produced PI–silica film has been varied in a wide range, 1 < H/R{sub g} < 8, where R{sub g} is the individual PI chain radius of gyration measured under the imposed confinement. After a thorough equilibration, the PI film stratified structure and polymer segmental dynamics have been studied. The chain structure in the middle of the films resembles that in a corresponding bulk, but the polymer-density profile shows a pronounced ordering of the polymer segments in the vicinity of silica surfaces; this ordering disappears toward the film middles. Tremendous slowing down of the polymer segmental dynamics has been observed in the film surface layers, with the segmental relaxation more than 150 times slower as compared to that in a PI bulk. This effect increases with decreasing the polymer-film thickness. The segmental relaxation in the PI film middles shows additional relaxation process which is absent in a PI bulk. Even though there are fast relaxation processes in the film middle, its overall relaxation is slower as compared to that in a bulk sample. The interpretation of the results in terms of polymer glassy bridges has been discussed.

  3. Proinflammatory Effects of Pyrogenic and Precipitated Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles in Innate Immunity Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Cristo, Luisana; Movia, Dania; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Allegri, Manfredi; Mohamed, Bashir M; Bell, Alan P; Moore, Caroline; Pinelli, Silvana; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASNP) can be synthetized via several processes, 2 of which are the thermal route (to yield pyrogenic silica) and the wet route from a solution containing silicate salts (to obtain precipitated, colloidal, mesoporous silica, or silica gel). Both methods of synthesis lead to ASNP that are applied as food additive (E551). Current food regulation does not require that production methods of additives are indicated on the product label, and, thus, the ASNP are listed without mentioning the production method. Recent results indicate, however, that pyrogenic ASNP are more cytotoxic than ASNP synthesized through the wet route. The present study was aimed at clarifying if 2 representative preparations of ASNP, NM-203 (pyrogenic) and NM-200 (precipitated), of comparable size, specific surface area, surface charge, and hydrodynamic radius in complete growth medium, had different effects on 2 murine macrophage cell lines (MH-S and RAW264.7 cells). Our results show that, when incubated in protein-rich fluids, NM-203 adsorbed on their surface more proteins than NM-200 and, once incubated with macrophages, elicited a greater oxidative stress, assessed from Hmox1 induction and ROS production. Flow cytometry and helium ion microscopy indicated that pyrogenic NM-203 interacted with macrophages more strongly than the precipitated NM-200 and triggered a more evident inflammatory response, evaluated with Nos2 induction, NO production and the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Moreover, both ASNP synergized macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with a higher effect observed for NM-203. In conclusion, the results presented here demonstrate that, compared to precipitated, pyrogenic ASNP exhibit enhanced interaction with serum proteins and cell membrane, and cause a larger oxidative stress and stronger proinflammatory effects in macrophages. Therefore, these 2 nanomaterials should not be considered biologically equivalent.

  4. Solid dispersion particles of amorphous indomethacin with fine porous silica particles by using spray-drying method.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Nagira, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2005-04-11

    The solid dispersion particles of indomethacin (IMC) were prepared with different types of silica, non-porous (Aerosil 200) or porous silica (Sylysia 350) by using spray-drying method. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis showed that IMC in solid dispersion particles is in amorphous state irrespective of the type of silica formulated. In DSC analysis, the melting peak of IMC in solid dispersion particles with Sylysia 350 shifted to lower temperature than that in solid dispersion particles with Aerosil 200 although the peak of each solid dispersion particles was much smaller than that of original IMC crystals. Dissolution property of IMC was remarkably improved by formulating the silica particles to the solid dispersion particles. In comparing the effect of the type of the silica particles, the dissolution rate of solid dispersion particles with Sylysia 350 was faster than that with Aerosil 200. The formulation amount of IMC did not affect on the amorphous state of IMC in the resultant solid dispersion particles in powder X-ray diffraction patterns. However, the area of the melting peak of IMC in the solid dispersion particles increased and an exothermic peak owing to recrystallization was observed with increasing the IMC content in the DSC patterns. The dissolution rate of IMC from the solid dispersion particles with Sylysia 350 was faster than that of Aerosil 200 irrespective of IMC content. In stability test, amorphous IMC in the solid dispersion particles with each silica particles did not crystallize under storing at severe storage conditions (40 degrees C, 75% RH) for 2 months, while amorphous IMC without silica easily crystallized under same conditions.

  5. Surface complexation model for strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susan A; Roberts, Sarah K; Criscenti, Louise J; O'Day, Peggy A

    2008-01-01

    Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25°C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ complexes on the β-plane and a monodentate Sr2+complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH+ complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr2+ species on the β-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at hgh strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ carbonate surface complexes on the β-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate concentrations for the development of a robust surface

  6. Surface Complexation Model for Strontium Sorption to Amorphous Silica and Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Robers, S; Criscenti, L; O'Day, P

    2007-11-30

    Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25 C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} complexes on the {beta}-plane and a monodentate Sr{sup 2+} complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH{sup +} complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr{sup 2+} species on the {beta}-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at high strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} carbonate surface complexes on the {beta}-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate

  7. Classical molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of chemical-mechanical polishing of amorphous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagarov, Evgueni Anatolievich

    Chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) is a widely accepted process in the semiconductor industry. Despite intense theoretical and experimental research on CMP, there is a serious lack of fundamental understanding of the physical-chemical processes of polishing. The present work is intended to investigate these fundamental processes on an atomistic level. To model CMP on the atomic scale, a model of the amorphous silica is prepared by applying Design of Experiments (DOE) techniques to systematically investigate molecular dynamics preparation. These simulations yield high-quality models of amorphous silica, which are in excellent agreement with experimental results and are defect-free. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the mechanical deformation during CMP of silica for different geometries and relative velocities. The simulations clarify asperity shape evolution during the process of shear and reveal temperature distributions as a function of time. It is found that the ratio of radii of a particle and asperity strongly affects the amount of the material removed whereas the relative velocity has a weaker affect on it. During shear, a significant local temperature increase occurs. This temperature increase lasts for a short time (picoseconds), but it can have a major impact on the amount of material removed. It is found that there could be significant deposition of the material from the particle to the slab, which can fill surface trenches and thereby make the surface smoother. An analytic model is developed for describing the amount of material removed as a function of asperity and particle radii and relative velocity. Density-functional calculations of different surfaces of two silica polymorphs, alpha-quartz and beta-cristobalite, are performed. The surface energies are calculated as a function of oxygen partial pressure for several different surface reconstructions and terminations. The case of hydrogen passivation is investigated to

  8. Classical and ab-initio molecular dynamic simulation of an amorphous silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischler, C.; Kob, W.; Binder, K.

    2002-08-01

    We present the results of a classical molecular dynamic simulation as well as of an ab-initio molecular dynamic simulation of an amorphous silica surface. In the case of the classical simulation we use the potential proposed by van Beest et al. (BKS) whereas the ab-initio simulation is done with a Car-Parrinello method (CPMD). We find that the surfaces generated by BKS have a higher concentration of defects (e.g., concentration of two-membered rings) than those generated with CPMD. In addition also the distribution functions of the angles and of the distances are different for the short rings. Hence we conclude that whereas the BKS potential is able to correctly reproduce the surface on the length scale beyond ≈5 Å, it is necessary to use an ab-initio method to reliably predict the structure at small scales.

  9. Strong photoluminescence emission from GaN grown on amorphous silica substrates by gas source MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Asahi, H.; Asami, K.; Kuroiwa, R.; Gonda, S.

    1998-06-01

    GaN layers are grown on amorphous fused silica glass substrates by gas source MBE using an ion removed electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) radical cell. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that they are polycrystalline. However, they show a strong photoluminescence emission peak without deep level emission. The emission peak is red-shifted by about 150 meV from that of the excitonic emission peak of GaN grown on a sapphire substrate and has wide spectral half-width (˜250 meV at 77 K). The peak is not corresponding to the donor-acceptor pair (DAP) emission but is excitonic from the excitation power and temperature dependence of PL spectrum. These optical properties indicate that GaN layers grown on a glass substrate are promising for fabrication of large area and low cost light emitting devices and solar cells.

  10. Photo-induced changes in a hybrid amorphous chalcogenide/silica photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Markos, Christos

    2014-01-06

    Photostructural changes in a hybrid photonic crystal fiber with chalcogenide nanofilms inside the inner surface of the cladding holes are experimentally demonstrated. The deposition of the amorphous chalcogenide glass films inside the silica capillaries of the fiber was made by infiltrating the nanocolloidal solution-based As{sub 25}S{sub 75}, while the photoinduced changes were performed by side illuminating the fiber near the bandgap edge of the formed glass nanofilms. The photoinduced effect of the chalcogenide glass directly red-shifts the transmission bandgap position of the fiber as high as ∼20.6 nm at around 1600 nm wavelength, while the maximum bandgap intensity change at ∼1270 nm was −3 dB.

  11. In situ catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulose using alkali-modified amorphous silica alumina.

    PubMed

    Zabeti, M; Nguyen, T S; Lefferts, L; Heeres, H J; Seshan, K

    2012-08-01

    Canadian pinewood was pyrolyzed at 450 °C in an Infrared oven and the pyrolysis vapors were converted by passing through a catalyst bed at 450 °C. The catalysts studied were amorphous silica alumina (ASA) containing alkali metal or alkaline earth metal species including Na, K, Cs, Mg and Ca. The catalysts effectiveness to reduce the bio-oil oxygen content, to enhance the bio-oil energy density and to change the liquid and gas product distribution were evaluated using different techniques including gravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, Karl-Fischer titration, GC/MS and micro-GC analysis. According to the results K/ASA found to be the most effective catalysts for conversion of hollocellulose (hemicellulose and cellulose)-derived vapors of pinewood while Cs/ASA catalyst was the most effective catalyst for conversion of lignin-derived vapors and production of hydrocarbons.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of amorphous mesoporous silica using TEMPO-functionalized amphiphilic templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Wilke; Doerenkamp, Carsten; Zeng, Zhaoyang; de Oliveira, Marcos; Niehaus, Oliver; Pöttgen, Rainer; Studer, Armido; Eckert, Hellmut

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on amorphous mesoporous silica containing organized nitroxide radicals within its mesopores have been prepared using the micellar self-assembly of TEOS solutions containing the nitroxide functionalized amphiphile (4-(N,N-dimethyl-N-hexadecylammonium)-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-N-oxyl-iodide) (CAT-16). This template has been used both in its pure form and in various mixtures with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The samples have been characterized by chemical analysis, N2 sorption studies, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and various spectroscopic methods. While electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra indicate that the strength of the intermolecular spin-spin interactions can be controlled via the CAT-16/CTAB ratio, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data suggest that these interactions are too weak to facilitate cooperative magnetism.

  13. A computational study of x-ray emission from laser-irradiated Ge-doped foams

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Fournier, Kevin B.; May, Mark J.; Scott, Howard A.

    2010-07-15

    New advances in fabrication of low-density high-Z-doped foams have opened new windows on understanding how materials that are not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) are heated and radiate. Simulations are discussed in this paper of the x-ray spectral emissions from laser-irradiated very low-density Ge-doped silica aerogel targets using a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern non-LTE superconfiguration atomic model. Details of the computational model are presented, and it is shown that, for the long-scale-length, subcritical-density, approx2-3 keV electron temperature plasmas created in experiments at the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the simulations provide a close match to both the measured Ge L-shell emission (approx1-1.5 keV) and the measured Ge K-shell emission (approx10-11 keV), but only by accounting properly for nonlocal thermal conduction. The older average-atom atomic model is shown to be inadequate for these non-LTE plasmas.

  14. Oxidative stress induced by pure and iron-doped amorphous silica nanoparticles in subtoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Napierska, Dorota; Rabolli, Virginie; Thomassen, Leen C J; Dinsdale, David; Princen, Catherine; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Poels, Katrien L C; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique; Martens, Johan A; Hoet, Peter H

    2012-04-16

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiO₂-NPs) have found broad applications in industry and are currently intensively studied for potential uses in medical and biomedical fields. Several studies have reported cytotoxic and inflammatory responses induced by SiO₂-NPs in different cell types. The present study was designed to examine the association of oxidative stress markers with SiO₂-NP induced cytotoxicity in human endothelial cells. We used pure monodisperse amorphous silica nanoparticles of two sizes (16 and 60 nm; S16 and S60) and a positive control, iron-doped nanosilica (16 nm; SFe), to study the generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO·) in cellular-free conditions and oxidative stress in cellular systems. We investigated whether SiO₂-NPs could influence intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels, increase lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenal (HAE) concentrations), and up-regulate heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression in the studied cells. None of the particles, except SFe, produced ROS in cell-free systems. We found significant modifications for all parameters in cells treated with SFe nanoparticles. At cytotoxic doses of S16 (40-50 μg/mL), we detected weak alterations of intracellular glutathione (4 h) and a marked induction of HO-1 mRNA (6 h). Cytotoxic doses of S60 elicited similar responses. Preincubation of cells being exposed to SiO₂-NPs with an antioxidant (5 mM N-acetylcysteine, NAC) significantly reduced the cytotoxic activity of S16 and SFe (when exposed up to 25 and 50 μg/mL, respectively) but did not protect cells treated with S60. Preincubation with NAC significantly reduced HO-1 mRNA expression in cells treated with SFe but did not have any effect on HO-1 mRNA level in cell exposed to S16 and S60. Our study demonstrates that the chemical composition of the silica nanoparticles is a dominant factor in inducing oxidative stress.

  15. Timescales and mechanisms of formation of amorphous silica coatings on fresh basalts at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.

    2014-10-01

    Young basalts from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, frequently feature opaque surface coatings, 1-80 μm thick, composed of amorphous silica and Fe-Ti oxides. These coatings are the product of interaction of the basaltic surface with volcanically-derived acidic fluids. Previous workers have identified these coatings in a variety of contexts on Hawai'i, but the timescales of coating development, coating growth rates, and factors controlling lateral coating heterogeneity were largely unconstrained. We sampled and analyzed young lava flows (of varying ages, from hours to ~ 40 years) along Kīlauea's southwest and east rift zones to characterize variation in silica coating properties across the landscape. Coating thickness varies as a function of flow age, flow surface type, and proximity to acid sources like local fissure vents and regional plumes emitted from Kīlauea Caldera and Pu'u Ō'ō. Silica coatings that form in immediate proximity to acid sources are more chemically pure than those forming in higher pH environments, which contain significant Al and Fe. Incipient siliceous alteration was observed on basalt surfaces as young as 8 days old, but periods of a year or more are required to develop contiguous coatings with obvious opaque coloration. Inferred coating growth rates vary with environmental conditions but were typically 1-5 μm/year. Coatings form preferentially on flow surfaces with glassy outer layers, such as spatter ramparts, volcanic bombs, and dense pahoehoe breakouts, due to glass strain weakening during cooling. Microtextural evidence suggests that the silica coatings form both by in situ dissolution-reprecipitation and by deposition of silica mobilized in solution. Thin films of water, acidified by contact with volcanic vapors, dissolved near-surface basalt, then precipitated amorphous silica in place, mobilizing more soluble cations. Additional silica was transported to and deposited on the surface by silica-bearing altering fluids derived from the

  16. Size distributions of coastal ocean suspended particulate inorganic matter: Amorphous silica and clay minerals and their dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Stavn, Robert H.; Falster, Alexander U.; Rick, Johannes J.; Gray, Deric; Gould, Richard W.

    2017-04-01

    Particulate inorganic matter (PIM) is a key component in estuarine and coastal systems and plays a critical role in trace metal cycling. Better understanding of coastal dynamics and biogeochemistry requires improved quantification of PIM in terms of its concentration, size distribution, and mineral species composition. The angular pattern of light scattering contains detailed information about the size and composition of particles. These volume scattering functions (VSFs) were measured in Mobile Bay, Alabama, USA, a dynamic, PIM dominated coastal environment. From measured VSFs, we determined through inversion the particle size distributions (PSDs) of major components of PIM, amorphous silica and clay minerals. An innovation here is the extension of our reported PSDs significantly into the submicron range. The PSDs of autochthonous amorphous silica exhibit two unique features: a peak centered at about 0.8 μm between 0.2 and 4 μm and a very broad shoulder essentially extending from 4 μm to >100 μm. With an active and steady particle source from blooming diatoms, the shapes of amorphous silica PSDs for sizes <10 μm varied little across the study area, but showed more particles of sizes >10 μm inside the bay, likely due to wind-induced resuspension of larger frustules that have settled. Compared to autochthonous amorphous silica, the allochthonous clay minerals are denser and exhibit relatively narrower PSDs with peaks located between 1 and 4 μm. Preferential settling of larger mineral particles as well as the smaller but denser illite component further narrowed the size distributions of clay minerals as they were being transported outside the bay. The derived PSDs also indicated a very dynamic situation in Mobile Bay when a cold weather front passed through during the experiment. With northerly winds of speeds up to 15 m s-1, both amorphous silica and clay minerals showed a dramatic increase in concentration and broadening in size distribution outside the exit

  17. Differences in gene expression and cytokine production by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis), and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B) exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at non-toxic and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 106μm2/cm2). Bio-Plex analysis was also used to determine profiles of secreted cytokines and chemokines in response to both particles. Finally, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were used to comparatively assess silica particle-induced alterations in gene expression. Results Microarray analysis at 24 hours in BEAS 2B revealed 333 and 631 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite at low (75) and high (150 × 106μm2/cm2) amounts, respectively (p < 0.05/cut off ≥ 2.0-fold change). Exposure to amorphous silica micro-particles at high amounts (150 × 106μm2/cm2) induced 108 significant gene changes. Bio-Plex analysis of 27 human cytokines and chemokines revealed 9 secreted mediators (p < 0.05) induced by crystalline silica, but none were induced by amorphous silica. QRT-PCR revealed that cristobalite selectively up-regulated stress-related genes and cytokines (FOS, ATF3, IL6 and IL8) early and over time (2, 4, 8, and 24 h). Patterns of gene expression in NHBE cells were similar overall to BEAS 2B cells. At 75 × 106μm2/cm2, there were 339 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite and 42 by amorphous silica. Comparison of genes in response to cristobalite (75 × 106μm2/cm2) revealed 60 common, significant gene alterations in NHBE and BEAS 2B cells. Conclusions Cristobalite silica, as compared to synthetic amorphous silica particles at equal surface area concentrations, had comparable effects on the viability of human bronchial epithelial cells

  18. Oral hesperidin-Amorphization and improved dissolution properties by controlled loading onto porous silica.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qionghua; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2017-02-25

    The oral bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs can be improved by amorphization generated by loading into the pores of mesoporous particles (pore size 2-50nm). The main mechanisms are increased kinetic saturation solubility and dissolution velocity due to the amorphous drug state and the nano-size of the drug (=increased dissolution pressure). In this study, the maximum achievable drug loading compared to the theoretical drug loading, and the effect of drug loading degree on the dissolution properties (solubility, dissolution velocity) were investigated. Hesperidin was used as the model active (having also practical relevance for e.g. nutraceutical products), loading was performed onto AEROPERL(®) 300 Pharma. Degree of successful drug loading could be easily followed by simple light microscopy (=useful tool for formulation optimization), and was in agreement with scanning electron microscopy. Amorphous versus crystalline state was followed by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Loadings prepared were 28.6wt.%, 54.5wt.% and 60.0wt.%, the maximum theoretical loading was 72.5wt.%. Obviously the maximum drug loading is not achievable, the 54.5wt.% drug loading was the practical maximum with already some minor crystalline hesperidin on the surface. Interestingly, the maximum kinetic saturation solubility was obtained for the 54.5wt.% drug loading (941.74μg/ml in pH 6.8 PBS), versus 408.80μg/ml for the 60.0wt.% drug loading (=overloaded system). The raw drug powder had a thermodynamic solubility of only 18.40μg/ml. The fastest in vitro release was obtained with the 28.6wt.% loaded system, followed by the 54.5wt.% and 60.0wt.% loadings. The dissolution properties (solubility, dissolution velocity) can obviously be influenced by a "controlled loading". This is a simple, cost-effective technological alternative to modulating this property by chemical modification of silica, requiring a new costly regulatory approval of these chemically modified

  19. Reactive wetting of amorphous silica by molten Al-Mg alloys and their interfacial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Laixin; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Qichuan

    2016-07-01

    The reactive wetting of amorphous silica substrates by molten Al-Mg alloys over a wide composition range was studied using a dispensed sessile drop method in a flowing Ar atmosphere. The effects of the nominal Mg concentration and temperature on the wetting and interfacial microstructures were discussed. The initial contact angle for pure Al on the SiO2 surface was 115° while that for pure Mg was 35° at 1073 K. For the Al-Mg alloy drop, it decreased with increasing nominal Mg concentration. The reaction zone was characterized by layered structures, whose formation was primarily controlled by the variation in the alloy concentration due to the evaporation of Mg and the interfacial reaction from the viewpoint of thermodynamics as well as by the penetration or diffusion of Mg, Al and Si from the viewpoint of kinetics. In addition, the effects of the reaction and the evaporation of Mg on the movement of the triple line were examined. The spreading of the Al-Mg alloy on the SiO2 surface was mainly attributed to the formation of Mg2Si at the interface and the recession of the triple line to the diminishing Mg concentration in the alloy.

  20. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica.

    PubMed

    Davis, Erin Durke; Gordon, Wesley O; Wilmsmeyer, Amanda R; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2014-04-17

    Sarin and soman are warfare nerve agents that represent some of the most toxic compounds ever synthesized. The extreme risk in handling such molecules has, until now, precluded detailed research into the surface chemistry of agents. We have developed a surface science approach to explore the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding forces between these agents and a hydroxylated surface. Infrared spectroscopy revealed that both agents adsorb to amorphous silica through the formation of surprisingly strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with primarily isolated silanol groups (SiOH). Comparisons with previous theoretical results reveal that this bonding occurs almost exclusively through the phosphoryl oxygen (P═O) of the agent. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments determined that the activation energy for hydrogen bond rupture and desorption of sarin and soman was 50 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 kJ/mol, respectively. Together with results from previous studies involving other phosphoryl-containing molecules, we have constructed a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship for nerve agent hydrogen bonding at the gas-surface interface.

  1. Acute Toxicity of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles in Intravenously Exposed ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Jin, Minghua; Du, Zhongjun; Li, Yanbo; Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the acute toxicity of intravenously administrated amorphous silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in mice. The lethal dose, 50 (LD50), of intravenously administrated SNPs was calculated in mice using Dixon's up-and-down method (262.45±33.78 mg/kg). The acute toxicity was evaluated at 14 d after intravenous injection of SNPs at 29.5, 103.5 and 177.5 mg/kg in mice. A silicon content analysis using ICP-OES found that SNPs mainly distributed in the resident macrophages of the liver (10.24%ID/g), spleen (34.78%ID/g) and lung (1.96%ID/g). TEM imaging showed only a small amount in the hepatocytes of the liver and in the capillary endothelial cells of the lung and kidney. The levels of serum LDH, AST and ALT were all elevated in the SNP treated groups. A histological examination showed lymphocytic infiltration, granuloma formation, and hydropic degeneration in liver hepatocytes; megakaryocyte hyperplasia in the spleen; and pneumonemia and pulmonary interstitial thickening in the lung of the SNP treated groups. A CD68 immunohistochemistry stain indicated SNPs induced macrophage proliferation in the liver and spleen. The results suggest injuries induced by the SNPs in the liver, spleen and lungs. Mononuclear phagocytic cells played an important role in the injury process. PMID:23593469

  2. Tuning the properties of Ge-quantum dots superlattices in amorphous silica matrix through deposition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, S.; Roldan Gutierrez, Manuel A; Ramos, M. M.D.; Gomes, M.J.M.; Molina, S. I.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Varela del Arco, Maria; Buljan, M.; Barradas, N.; Alves, E.; Chahboun, A.; Bernstorff, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the structural properties of Ge quantum dot lattices in amorphous silica matrix, prepared by low-temperature magnetron sputtering deposition of (Ge+SiO{sub 2})/SiO{sub 2} multilayers. The dependence of quantum dot shape, size, separation, and arrangement type on the Ge-rich (Ge + SiO{sub 2}) layer thickness is studied. We show that the quantum dots are elongated along the growth direction, perpendicular to the multilayer surface. The size of the quantum dots and their separation along the growth direction can be tuned by changing the Ge-rich layer thickness. The average value of the quantum dots size along the lateral (in-plane) direction along with their lateral separation is not affected by the thickness of the Ge-rich layer. However, the thickness of the Ge-rich layer significantly affects the quantum dot ordering. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the multilayer average atomic composition and also the quantum dot crystalline quality on the deposition parameters.

  3. Tuning the properties of Ge-quantum dots superlattices in amorphous silica matrix through deposition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, S. R. C.; Ramos, M. M. D.; Gomes, M. J. M.; Buljan, M.; Chahboun, A.; Roldan, M. A.; Molina, S. I.; Bernstorff, S.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, S. J.; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the structural properties of Ge quantum dot lattices in amorphous silica matrix, prepared by low-temperature magnetron sputtering deposition of (Ge+SiO{sub 2})/SiO{sub 2} multilayers. The dependence of quantum dot shape, size, separation, and arrangement type on the Ge-rich (Ge + SiO{sub 2}) layer thickness is studied. We show that the quantum dots are elongated along the growth direction, perpendicular to the multilayer surface. The size of the quantum dots and their separation along the growth direction can be tuned by changing the Ge-rich layer thickness. The average value of the quantum dots size along the lateral (in-plane) direction along with their lateral separation is not affected by the thickness of the Ge-rich layer. However, the thickness of the Ge-rich layer significantly affects the quantum dot ordering. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the multilayer average atomic composition and also the quantum dot crystalline quality on the deposition parameters.

  4. Highly selective PdCu/amorphous silica-alumina (ASA) catalysts for groundwater denitration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Li, Yuping; Zhang, Yi; Crittenden, John C

    2011-05-01

    Catalytic nitrate reduction is a promising technology in groundwater purification. In this study, PdCu bimetallic catalysts supported on an industrial amorphous silica-alumina (ASA) were synthesized and used to simulate catalytic removal of nitrate in groundwater. The catalysts exhibited very high activity and the highest catalytic selectivity toward N₂O and N₂ was 90.2%. The optimal Pd/Cu weight ratio was four. Relatively low reduction temperature was found benefit the catalytic stability and 300 °C was the appropriate reduction temperature during catalyst preparation. With an average particle size 5.4 nm, the metal particles were very uniformly distributed on the catalyst surface prepared with the codeposition method. This kept the catalyst more stable than the PdCu/Al₂O₂ catalyst with larger metal particles. According to XRD, TEM, and XPS results, the metals maintained zero-valence but aggregated by about 2 nm during the denitration reaction, which caused gradual deactivation of the catalysts. Little leaching of Cu and Pd from the catalyst might also have a slightly negative impact to the stability of the catalysts. A simple treatment was found to redistribute the particles on the deactivated catalysts, and high catalytic activity was recovered after this process.

  5. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Docter, Dominic; Bantz, Christoph; Westmeier, Dana; Galla, Hajo J; Wang, Qiangbin; Kirkpatrick, James C; Nielsen, Peter; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP). Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio-nano responses. Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP) and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm). Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm) or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm) showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano-bio interface in general.

  6. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bantz, Christoph; Westmeier, Dana; Galla, Hajo J; Wang, Qiangbin; Kirkpatrick, James C; Nielsen, Peter; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP). Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio–nano responses. Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP) and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm). Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm) or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm) showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano–bio interface in general. PMID:25247121

  7. Estimated storage of amorphous silica in soils of the circum-Arctic tundra region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfredsson, H.; Clymans, W.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; Conley, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution, storage, landscape partitioning, and spatial variability of soil amorphous silica (ASi) at four different sites underlain by continuous permafrost and representative of mountainous and lowland tundra, in the circum-Arctic region. Based on a larger set of data, we present the first estimate of the ASi soil reservoir (0-1 m depth) in circum-Arctic tundra terrain. At all sites, the vertical distribution of ASi concentrations followed the pattern of either (1) declining concentrations with depth (most common) or (2) increasing/maximum concentrations with depth. Our results suggest that a set of processes, including biological control, solifluction and other slope processes, cryoturbation, and formation of inorganic precipitates influence vertical distributions of ASi in permafrost terrain, with the capacity to retain stored ASi on millennial timescales. At the four study sites, areal ASi storage (0-1 m) is generally higher in graminoid tundra compared to wetlands. Our circum-Arctic upscaling estimates, based on both vegetation and soil classification separately, suggest a storage amounting to 219 ± 28 and 274 ± 33 Tmol Si, respectively, of which at least 30% is stored in permafrost. This estimate would account for about 3% of the global soil ASi storage while occupying an equal portion of the global land area. This result does not support the hypothesis that the circum-Arctic tundra soil ASi reservoir contains relatively higher amounts of ASi than other biomes globally as demonstrated for carbon. Nevertheless, climate warming has the potential to significantly alter ASi storage and terrestrial Si cycling in the Arctic.

  8. Advanced treatment of swine wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Toda, Masaya; Kinoshita, Katsumi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Ogino, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Advanced treatment using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (M-CSH-lime) was developed and applied to swine wastewater treatment. Biologically treated wastewater and M-CSH-lime (approximately 6 w/v% slurry) were fed continuously into a column-shaped reactor from its bottom. Accumulated M-CSH-lime gradually formed a bed layer. The influent permeated this layer and contacted the M-CSH-lime, and the treatment reaction progressed. Treated liquid overflowing from the top of the reactor was neutralized with CO₂gas bubbling. The colour removal rate approximately exceeded 50% with M-CSH-lime addition rates of > 0.15 w/v%. The removal rate of PO(3⁻)(4) exceeded 80% with the addition of>0.03 w/v% of M-CSH-lime. The removal rates of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli exceeded 99.9% with > 0.1 w/v%. Accumulated M-CSH-lime in the reactor was periodically withdrawn from the upper part of the bed layer. The content of citric-acid-soluble P₂O₅ in the recovered matter was>15% when the weight ratio of influent PO(3⁻)(4) -P to added M-CSH-lime was > 0.15. This content was comparable with commercial phosphorus fertilizer. The inhibitory effect of recovered M-CSH-lime on germination and growth of leafy vegetable komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) was evaluated by an experiment using the Neubauer's pot. The recovered M-CSH-lime had no negative effect on germination and growth. These results suggest that advanced water treatment with M-CSH-lime was effective for simultaneous removal of colour, [Formula: see text] and coliform bacteria at an addition rate of 0.03-0.15 w/v%, and that the recovered M-CSH-lime would be suitable as phosphorus fertilizer.

  9. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the atomic structure of hydrous species on surface of amorphous silica and the effect of temperature and particle size on their atomic configurations are essential to understand the nature of fluids-amorphous silicates interactions and the dehydration processes in the amorphous oxides. Here, we report the 29Si, 1H MAS, and 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HetCor) NMR spectra of 7 nm and 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles—a model system for natural amorphous silica—where previously unknown details of changes in their atomic structures with varying dehydration temperature and particle size are revealed. Diverse hydroxyl groups with varying atomic configurations and molecular water apparently show distinct dehydration trends. The dehydration (i.e., removal of water) of amorphous silica nanoparticles mostly results in the increase of isolated silanol by removing water molecules from hydrogen-bonded silanols associated water molecules. With further increase in dehydration temperature, the intensity of isolated silanol peak decreases above ˜873 K, suggesting that the condensation of isolated silanol may occur mainly above ˜873 K. The entire dehydration (and dehydroxylation) process completes at ˜1473 K. Both the water (i.e., physisorbed water and hydrogen-bonded water) and hydrogen-bonded silanol species show a dramatic change in the slope of intensity variation at ˜873 K, indicating that most of silanols is hydrogen-bonded to water rather than to other silanols. The fraction of hydrogen-bonded proton species is also much smaller in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles than in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles mainly due to the presences of larger fractions of water and hydrogen-bonded silanol species. 29Si NMR results show that with increasing dehydration temperature, the fraction of Q4 species apparently increases at the expense of Q2 and Q3 species. The fractions of Q2 and Q3 structures in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles are

  10. Very strong photoluminescence emission from GaN grown on amorphous silica substrate by gas source MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, H.; Iwata, K.; Tampo, H.; Kuroiwa, R.; Hiroki, M.; Asami, K.; Nakamura, S.; Gonda, S.

    1999-05-01

    Polycrystalline GaN layers showing very strong photoluminescence (PL) intensities are successfully grown on amorphous fused silica (SiO 2) substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an ion removed electron cyclotron resonance radical cell. The PL intensity is larger than that of undoped single crystalline GaN grown on sapphire by gas source MBE and is comparable to that of Si-doped single crystalline GaN grown on sapphire by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy at Nichia Chemical. The PL peak emission is considered to be excitonic. Undoped GaN layers grown on silica substrates exhibit n-type conduction and both n- and p-type conductions are achieved by impurity doping. These results open up the area of "Polycrystalline Semiconductor Photonics".

  11. Type 1 diabetes epidemic in Finland is triggered by zinc-containing amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Junnila, S K

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D), an autoimmune disease, breaks out in some of the children who has genetic susceptibility to T1D. Besides genetic susceptibility some environmental factor(s) are required to trigger the disease. The incidence of T1D in Finland is highest in the world, so we must seek an environmental factor, that is typical for Finland and can declare many aspects of T1D epidemiology and biology. In the literature most popular trigger has been enterovirus infections. It is difficult however to find why enteroviruses would be in this role in Finland in contrary to neighbouring countries e.g. Sweden. Colloidal amorphous silica (ASi) is typical for Finnish environment in consequency of the geohistory of Finland, great part of Finland is an ancient lake and sea bottom. ASi concentrations in natural waters are high in April-June and in November, only traces can be found in the rest of months. Pure colloidal ASi is not a strong trigger for T1D, but ASi particle which has surface adsorbed tetrahedrally coordinated zinc (ASiZn) is probably the trigger which has kept it's secret up to date. Zn functions as address label which conducts the ASiZn particle to the beta cell, whose content of zinc is highest in the body. ASi particle adheres to membrane proteins distorting their tertiary structure revealing new epitopes. If the fetus has not met these epitopes at proper time during intrauterine development, the consequence is that the negative selection of lymphocytes in the thymus and bone marrow and fetal liver is not perfect. When a child later in postnatal life becomes predisposed to ASiZn particles the immune system reacts to these as to nonself proteins. As a consequence the insulin producing beta cells are destroyed. Many observations from diabetes research support the hypothesis, some to mentioned. 1. Three common autoantigens (ZnT8, ICA512/IA-2, GAD65) are membrane proteins whose function zinc regulates. 2. Geographical variation in Finland is convergent with

  12. Chrysotile asbestos detoxification with a combined treatment of oxalic acid and silicates producing amorphous silica and biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Valouma, Aikaterini; Verganelaki, Anastasia; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, Pagona; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-03-15

    This study was primarily imposed by the ever increasing need for detoxification of asbestos and asbestos containing materials (ACM), with potential application onsite. The present work investigates potential detoxification of pure chrysotile (Chr) asbestos via a combined treatment of oxalic acid dihydrate (Oxac) (Η2C2Ο4·2Η2Ο) with silicates, such as tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) (SiH20C8O4) and pure water glass (WG) (potassium silicate) (K2SiO3). These reagents used in the experimental procedure, do not cause adverse effects on the environment and are cost effective. The results of FTIR, XRD, optical and scanning microscopy coupled with EDS analyses indicated that all of the applied treatments destructed the Chr structure and yielded silica of amorphous phase and the biomaterial glushinskite from the Oxac reacted with brucite [Mg(OH)2] layer. Each of the proposed formulations can be applied for the detoxification of asbestos, according to priorities related to the specific products of the recovery treatment. Therefore, Oxac acid leaching followed by the TEOS addition is preferred in cases of glushinskite recovery; TEOS treatment of asbestos with subsequent Oxac addition produced amorphous silica production; finally Oxac acid leaching followed by WG encapsulated the asbestos fibers and can be used in cases of onsite asbestos and ACM detoxification.

  13. Cr(VI) adsorption on functionalized amorphous and mesoporous silica from aqueous and non-aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian . E-mail: isabel.sierra@urjc.es

    2007-08-07

    A mesoporous silica (SBA-15) and amorphous silica (SG) have been chemically modified with 2-mercaptopyridine using the homogeneous route. This synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyridine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane prior to immobilization on the support. The resulting material has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen gas sorption, FT-IR and MAS NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The solid was employed as a Cr(VI) adsorbent from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, metal concentration and solvent polarity) has been studied using the batch technique. The results indicate that under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption value for Cr(VI) was 1.83 {+-} 0.03 mmol/g for MP-SBA-15, whereas the adsorption capacity of the MP-SG was 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mmol/g. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically SBA-15 and SG with 2-mercaptopyridine and to use the resulting modified silicas as effective adsorbents for Cr(VI)

  14. Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Harish

    2007-02-01

    Ge-doped crystalline quartz has been examined for its thermally stimulated luminescence and has been found to exhibit TL-glow peaks at 100, 200, and 310 degree sign C. While the peaks at 100 and 310 degree sign C have already been noticed in conventionally grown quartz, the new peak at 200 degree sign C, observed in the present studies, appears to be due to the presence of Ge in quartz lattice. The radiation dependence of this peak upon irradiation at 300 K by high energy electrons (1.75 MeV) has been presented and the results have been compared and discussed in terms of the hydroxyl defects in natural, cultured, and Ge-doped cultured quartz.

  15. Adsorption of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles onto Hydroxyapatite Surfaces Differentially Alters Surfaces Properties and Adhesion of Human Osteoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Priya; Brooks, Roger A.; Kinrade, Stephen D.; Morgan, David J.; Brown, Andrew P.; Rushton, Neil; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is suggested to be an important/essential nutrient for bone and connective tissue health. Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) has silicate ions incorporated into its lattice structure and was developed to improve attachment to bone and increase new bone formation. Here we investigated the direct adsorption of silicate species onto an HA coated surface as a cost effective method of incorporating silicon on to HA surfaces for improved implant osseointegration, and determined changes in surface characteristics and osteoblast cell adhesion. Plasma-sprayed HA-coated stainless steel discs were incubated in silica dispersions of different concentrations (0–42 mM Si), at neutral pH for 12 h. Adsorbed Si was confirmed by XPS analysis and quantified by ICP-OES analysis following release from the HA surface. Changes in surface characteristics were determined by AFM and measurement of surface wettability. Osteoblast cell adhesion was determined by vinculin plaque staining. Maximum Si adsorption to the HA coated disc occurred after incubation in the 6 mM silica dispersion and decreased progressively with higher silica concentrations, while no adsorption was observed with dispersions below 6 mM Si. Comparison of the Si dispersions that produced the highest and lowest Si adsorption to the HA surface, by TEM-based analysis, revealed an abundance of small amorphous nanosilica species (NSP) of ~1.5 nm in diameter in the 6 mM Si dispersion, with much fewer and larger NSP in the 42 mM Si dispersions. 29Si-NMR confirmed that the NSPs in the 6 mM silica dispersion were polymeric and similar in composition to the larger NSPs in the 42 mM Si dispersion, suggesting that the latter were aggregates of the former. Amorphous NSP adsorbed from the 6 mM dispersion on to a HA-coated disc surface increased the surface’s water contact angle by 53°, whereas that adsorbed from the 42 mM dispersion decreased the contact angle by 18°, indicating increased and decreased

  16. Modeling the adsorption of mercury(II) on (hydr)oxides. 2: {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnissel-Gissinger, P.; Alnot, M.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; Lickes, J.P.; Behra, P.

    1999-07-15

    The surface complexation model is used to describe sorption experiments of inorganic mercury(II) in the presence of an amorphous silica, Aerosil 200, or an iron (hydr)oxide, the goethite {alpha}-FeOOH (Bayferrox 910). In the simulations, one assumes the formation of a monodentate surface complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgOH and {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl, when chlorides are present in solution. Participation of the complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl has been especially evidenced. Comparisons with other data from the literature have been made to investigate the influence of the nature of the oxide on the mechanism of mercury(II) adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the surface of the (hydr)oxides prior to adsorption and to observe when possible the mercury surface compounds.

  17. Synthesis of uniformly dispersed anatase nanoparticles inside mesoporous silica thin films via controlled breakup and crystallization of amorphous TiO2 deposited using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Dendooven, Jolien; Masschaele, Kasper; Hamed, Heidari M; Deng, Shaoren; Bals, Sara; Detavernier, Christophe; Martens, Johan A

    2013-06-07

    Amorphous titanium dioxide was introduced into the pores of mesoporous silica thin films with 75% porosity and 12 nm average pore diameter via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using alternating pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water. Calcination provoked fragmentation of the deposited amorphous TiO2 phase and its crystallization into anatase nanoparticles inside the nanoporous film. The narrow particle size distribution of 4 ± 2 nm and the uniform dispersion of the particles over the mesoporous silica support were uniquely revealed using electron tomography. These anatase nanoparticle bearing films showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation. This new synthesis procedure of the anatase nanophase in mesoporous silica films using ALD is a convenient fabrication method of photocatalytic coatings amenable to application on very small as well as very large surfaces.

  18. Synthesis of uniformly dispersed anatase nanoparticles inside mesoporous silica thin films via controlled breakup and crystallization of amorphous TiO2 deposited using atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Dendooven, Jolien; Masschaele, Kasper; Hamed, Heidari M.; Deng, Shaoren; Bals, Sara; Detavernier, Christophe; Martens, Johan A.

    2013-05-01

    Amorphous titanium dioxide was introduced into the pores of mesoporous silica thin films with 75% porosity and 12 nm average pore diameter via Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) using alternating pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water. Calcination provoked fragmentation of the deposited amorphous TiO2 phase and its crystallization into anatase nanoparticles inside the nanoporous film. The narrow particle size distribution of 4 +/- 2 nm and the uniform dispersion of the particles over the mesoporous silica support were uniquely revealed using electron tomography. These anatase nanoparticle bearing films showed photocatalytic activity in methylene blue degradation. This new synthesis procedure of the anatase nanophase in mesoporous silica films using ALD is a convenient fabrication method of photocatalytic coatings amenable to application on very small as well as very large surfaces.

  19. Changing the dose metric for inhalation toxicity studies: short-term study in rats with engineered aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Christie M; Reed, Kenneth L; Glover, Kyle P; Swain, Keith A; Ostraat, Michele L; Donner, E Maria; Warheit, David B

    2010-03-01

    Inhalation toxicity and exposure assessment studies for nonfibrous particulates have traditionally been conducted using particle mass measurements as the preferred dose metric (i.e., mg or microg/m(3)). However, currently there is a debate regarding the appropriate dose metric for nanoparticle exposure assessment studies in the workplace. The objectives of this study were to characterize aerosol exposures and toxicity in rats of freshly generated amorphous silica (AS) nanoparticles using particle number dose metrics (3.7 x 10(7) or 1.8 x 10(8) particles/cm(3)) for 1- or 3-day exposures. In addition, the role of particle size (d(50) = 37 or 83 nm) on pulmonary toxicity and genotoxicity endpoints was assessed at several postexposure time points. A nanoparticle reactor capable of producing, de novo synthesized, aerosolized amorphous silica nanoparticles for inhalation toxicity studies was developed for this study. SiO(2) aerosol nanoparticle synthesis occurred via thermal decomposition of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The reactor was designed to produce aerosolized nanoparticles at two different particle size ranges, namely d(50) = approximately 30 nm and d(50) = approximately 80 nm; at particle concentrations ranging from 10(7) to 10(8) particles/cm(3). AS particle aerosol concentrations were consistently generated by the reactor. One- or 3-day aerosol exposures produced no significant pulmonary inflammatory, genotoxic, or adverse lung histopathological effects in rats exposed to very high particle numbers corresponding to a range of mass concentrations (1.8 or 86 mg/m(3)). Although the present study was a short-term effort, the methodology described herein can be utilized for longer-term inhalation toxicity studies in rats such as 28-day or 90-day studies. The expansion of the concept to subchronic studies is practical, due, in part, to the consistency of the nanoparticle generation method.

  20. Amorphous Silica- and Carbon- rich nano-templated surfaces as model interstellar dust surfaces for laboratory astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, Natalia; Dawes, Anita; González-Posada, Fernando; Thompson, Neil; Chakarov, Dinko; Mason, Nigel J.; Fraser, Helen Jane

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on surface astrochemistry are vital to our understanding of chemical evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). Laboratory surface-astrochemists have recently begun to study chemical reactions on interstellar dust-grain mimics, ranging from graphite, HOPG and graphene (representative of PAHs or large C-grains in the ISM) to amorphous olivine (representative of silicate dust) and ablated meteoritic samples (representative of interplanetary dust). These pioneering experiments show that the nature of the surface fundamentally affects processes at the substrate surface, substrate-ice interface, and ice over-layer. What these experiments are still lacking is the ability to account for effects arising from the discrete nano-scale of ISM grains, which might include changes to electronic structure, optical properties and surface-kinetics in comparison to bulk materials. The question arises: to what extent are the chemical and optical properties of interstellar ices affected by the size, morphology and material of the underlying ISM dust?We have designed, fabricated and characterised a set of nano-structured surfaces, where nanoparticles, representative of ISM grains, are adhered to an underlying support substrate. Here we will show the nanoparticles that have been manufactured from fused-silica (FS), glassy carbon (GC) and amorphous-C (aC). Our optical characterisation data shows that the nanostructured surfaces have different absorption cross-sections and significant scattering in comparison to the support substrates, which has implications for the energetic processing of icy ISM dust. We have been able to study how water-ice growth differs on the nanoparticles in comparison to the “flat” substrates, indicating increased ice amorphicity when nanoparticles are present, and on C-rich surfaces, compared to Si-rich particles. These data will be discussed in the context of interstellar water-ice features.

  1. Simulation of Forces between Humid Amorphous Silica Surfaces: A Comparison of Empirical Atomistic Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric humidity strongly influences the interactions between dry granular particles in process containers. To reduce the energy loss in industrial production processes caused by particle agglomeration, a basic understanding of the dependence of particle interactions on humidity is necessary. Hence, in this study, molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to calculate the adhesion between silica surfaces in the presence of adsorbed water. For a realistic description, the choice of force field is crucial. Because of their frequent use and transferability to biochemical systems, the Clay and CWCA force fields were investigated with respect to their ability to describe the water–silica interface in comparison to the more advanced Reax force field, ab initio calculations, and experiments. PMID:23378869

  2. Amorphous Silica Based Nanomedicine with Safe Carrier Excretion and Enhanced Drug Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Silu

    With recent development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, a great amount of efforts have been devoted to nanomedicine development. Among various nanomaterials, silica nanoparticle (NP) is generally accepted as non-toxic, and can provide a versatile platform for drug loading. In addition, the surface of the silica NP is hydrophilic, being favorable for cellular uptake. Therefore, it is considered as one of the most promising candidates to serve as carriers for drugs. The present thesis mainly focuses on the design of silica based nanocarrier-drug systems, aiming at achieving safe nanocarrier excretion from the biological system and enhanced drug efficacy, which two are considered as most important issues in nanomedicine development. To address the safe carrier excretion issue, we have developed a special type of selfdecomposable SiO2-drug composite NPs. By creating a radial concentration gradient of drug in the NP, the drug release occurred simultaneously with the silica carrier decomposition. Such unique characteristic was different from the conventional dense SiO2-drug NP, in which drug was uniformly distributed and can hardly escape the carrier. We found that the controllable release of the drug was primarily determined by diffusion, which was caused by the radial drug concentration gradient in the NP. Escape of the drug molecules then triggered the silica carrier decomposition, which started from the center of the NP and eventually led to its complete fragmentation. The small size of the final carrier fragments enabled their easy excretion via renal systems. Apart from the feature of safe carrier excretion, we also found the controlled release of drugs contribute significantly to the drug efficacy enhancement. By loading an anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) to the decomposable SiO 2-methylene blue (MB) NPs, we achieved a self-decomposable SiO 2(MB)-Dox nanomedicine. The gradual escape of drug molecules from NPs and their enabled cytosolic release by optical

  3. Properties of amorphous silica nanoparticles colloid drug delivery system synthesized using the micelle formation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Wab, Hajarul Azwana; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Zakaria, Nor Dyana

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the formation and properties of a silica nanocolloid drug delivery system synthesized using micelle formation method. Previously, we have reported feasibility of using the same approach to entrap colorless water soluble drug (isoniazid). However, the entrapment of the drug inside nanoparticles (NPs) could not be observed due to its colorless nature. In this study, poor water soluble Rifampicin (RIF) was used as a drug model. Orange color of RIF enables observation and measurement using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Several parameters were systematically studied: reaction temperature (25-70 °C) produced 28-97 nm, amount of surfactant (4-9 g) produced 44-66 nm, butanol volume (6-18 ml) produced 50-157 nm, and drug concentration. Particle size could be tuned from 28 to 157 nm by varying synthesis parameters. NP size was highly influenced by reaction temperature and butanol. Silica nanocolloid-entrapped RIF (50 and 70 nm SiRif) were synthesized and further analyzed for biological application. The stability of SiRif in biological media, such as in 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 M NaCl solution and 5, 10, and 25 % mouse serum, was examined. RIF was successfully entrapped inside silica nanocolloids. Moreover, 50 and 70 nm SiRif exhibited almost similar stability in NaCl and mouse serum. The drug release profiles in 0.1 and 1.0 mM phosphate buffer solutions and different pH at 37 °C were examined for several days. Results indicate that 70 nm SiRif had higher drug loading and slower release profile than 50 nm SiRif. 70 nm SiRif was optimally released at pH 6.8.

  4. Release behavior of trans,trans-farnesol entrapped in amorphous silica capsules

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Horta, Sara; Santos, Magda; Rocha, Sĺlvia M.; Trindade, Tito

    2012-01-01

    Farnesol, a compound widely found in several agro-food by-products, is an important bioactive agent that can be exploited in cosmetics and pharmaceutics but the direct bioapplication of this compound is limited by its volatility. Here the entrapment of farnesol in silica capsules was investigated to control the release of this bioactive compound in the vapor phase and in ethanol solutions. The preparation of silica capsules with oil cores was obtained by employing a sol–gel method using O/W/O multiple emulsions. Two distinct chemical vehicles for farnesol have been investigated, retinol and oleic acid, that afterwards have been emulsified as internal oil phases. The volatile release of farnesol from the as-prepared SiO2 capsules was investigated by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatographic analysis (GC), and the release to ethanol was carried out by direct injection of the ethanolic fraction into the GC system. It is demonstrated that these capsules are efficient for the long controlled release of farnesol and that the respective profiles depend on the chemical parameters employed in the synthesis of the capsules. PMID:25755994

  5. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Ge-doped optical fibers with different dimensions for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Begum, Mahfuza; Rahman, A K M Mizanur; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Yusoff, Z; Begum, Mahbuba; Mat-Sharif, K A; Amin, Y M; Bradley, D A

    2015-06-01

    Important thermoluminescence (TL) properties of five (5) different core sizes Ge-doped optical fibers have been studied to develop new TL material with better response. These are drawn from same preform applying different speed and tension during drawing phase to produce Ge-doped optical fibers with five (5) different core sizes. The results of the investigations are also compared with most commonly used standard TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg,Ti) and commercial multimode Ge-doped optical fiber (Yangtze Optical Fiber, China). Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and EDX analysis of the fibers are also performed to map Ge distribution across the deposited region. Standard Gamma radiation source in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Lab (SSDL) was used for irradiation covering dose range from 1Gy to 10Gy. The essential dosimetric parameters that have been studied are TL linearity, reproducibility and fading. Prior to irradiation all samples ∼0.5cm length are annealed at temperature of 400°C for 1h period to standardize their sensitivities and background. Standard TLD-100 chips are also annealed for 1h at 400°C and subsequently 2h at 100°C to yield the highest sensitivity. TL responses of these fibers show linearity over a wide gamma radiation dose that is an important property for radiation dosimetry. Among all fibers used in this study, 100μm core diameter fiber provides highest response that is 2.6 times than that of smallest core (20μm core) optical fiber. These fiber-samples demonstrate better response than commercial multi-mode optical fiber and also provide low degree of fading about 20% over a period of fifteen days for gamma radiation. Effective atomic number (Zeff) is found in the range (13.25-13.69) which is higher than soft tissue (7.5) however within the range of human-bone (11.6-13.8). All the fibers can also be re-used several times as a detector after annealing. TL properties of the Ge-doped optical fibers indicate promising applications in ionizing radiation

  6. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Sachet, Edward; Bobea, Milena; Bryan, Zachary; Bryan, Isaac; Maria, Jon-Paul; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Nenstiel, Christian; Hoffmann, Axel

    2013-12-09

    Controllable Ge doping in GaN is demonstrated for carrier concentrations of up to 2.4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Low temperature luminescence spectra from the highly doped samples reveal band gap renormalization and band filling (Burstein-Moss shift) in addition to a sharp transition. Infrared ellipsometry spectra demonstrate the existence of electron plasma with an energy around 3500 cm{sup −1} and a surface plasma with an energy around 2000 cm{sup −1}. These findings open possibilities for the application of highly doped GaN for plasmonic devices.

  7. Macrophages participate in local and systemic inflammation induced by amorphous silica nanoparticles through intratracheal instillation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Man; Jing, Li; Wang, Ji; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lige; Zhang, Lianshuang; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) are amongst the most commonly used materials in the field of nanomedicine and, therefore, their influence on organisms has drawn increasing attention in recent years. Most reports have focused on the single tissue reactions induced by SiNPs. Herein, the reaction of primary organs to SiNPs following intratracheal instillation in mice was analyzed by histopathology and ultrastructure observation. Following elucidation of the role of macrophages in local and systemic inflammation, the underlying mechanisms were explored using a macrophage cell line in vitro. The results suggest that macrophages swallow the SiNPs and secrete inflammatory factors by activating the NLRP3 inflammasome, thus participating in local and systemic inflammation. PMID:27920528

  8. Genotoxicity evaluation of nanosized titanium dioxide, synthetic amorphous silica and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Ana M; Louro, Henriqueta; Antunes, Susana; Quarré, Stephanie; Simar, Sophie; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Verleysen, Eveline; Mast, Jan; Jensen, Keld A; Norppa, Hannu; Nesslany, Fabrice; Silva, Maria João

    2014-02-01

    Toxicological characterization of manufactured nanomaterials (NMs) is essential for safety assessment, while keeping pace with innovation from their development and application in consumer products. The specific physicochemical properties of NMs, including size and morphology, might influence their toxicity and have impact on human health. The present work aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity of nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2), synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), in human lymphocytes. The morphology and size of those NMs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, while the hydrodynamic particle size-distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering. Using a standardized procedure to ensure the dispersion of the NMs and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (without metabolic activation), we observed significant increases in the frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBCs) for some TiO2 NMs and for two MWCNTs, although no clear dose-response relationships could be disclosed. In contrast, all forms of SAS analyzed in this study were unable to induce micronuclei. The present findings increase the weight of evidence towards a genotoxic effect of some forms of TiO2 and some MWCNTs. Regarding safety assessment, the differential genotoxicity observed for closely related NMs highlights the importance of investigating the toxic potential of each NM individually, instead of assuming a common mechanism and equal genotoxic effects for a set of similar NMs.

  9. Simultaneous removal of colour, phosphorus and disinfection from treated wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Ogino, Akifumi; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    An agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (CSH-lime) was investigated for its ability to simultaneously remove the colour, phosphorus and disinfection from the effluents from wastewater treatment plants on swine farms. CSH-lime removed the colour and phosphate from the effluents, with the colour-removal effects especially high at pH 12, and phosphorous removal was more effective in strongly alkaline conditions (pH > 10). Colour decreased from 432 +/-111 (mean +/- SD) to 107 +/- 41 colour units and PO4(3-)P was reduced from 45 +/- 39 mg/L to undetectable levels at the CSH-lime dose of 2.0% w/v. Moreover, CSH-lime reduced the total organic carbon from 99.0 to 37.9 mg/L at the dose of 2.0% w/v and was effective at inactivating total heterotrophic and coliform bacteria. However, CSH-lime did not remove nitrogen compounds such as nitrite, nitrate and ammonium. Colour was also removed from dye solutions by CSH-lime, at the same dose.

  10. Amorphous silica modeled with truncated and screened Coulomb interactions: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Antoine; Berthier, Ludovic; Horbach, Jürgen; Ispas, Simona; Kob, Walter

    2007-09-01

    We show that finite-range alternatives to the standard long-range pair potential for silica by van Beest et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] might be used in molecular dynamics simulations. We study two such models that can be efficiently simulated since no Ewald summation is required. We first consider the Wolf method, where the Coulomb interactions are truncated at a cutoff distance rc such that the requirement of charge neutrality holds. Various static and dynamic quantities are computed and compared to results from simulations using Ewald summations. We find very good agreement for rc≈10Å. For lower values of rc, the long-range structure is affected which is accompanied by a slight acceleration of dynamic properties. In a second approach, the Coulomb interaction is replaced by an effective Yukawa interaction with two new parameters determined by a force fitting procedure. The same trend as for the Wolf method is seen. However, slightly larger cutoffs have to be used in order to obtain the same accuracy with respect to static and dynamic quantities as for the Wolf method.

  11. Optical properties of uniform, porous, amorphous Ta2O5 coatings on silica: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghinolfi, L.; Prato, M.; Chtanov, A.; Gross, M.; Chincarini, A.; Neri, M.; Gemme, G.; Canepa, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) results, in the 0.75-5 eV spectral range, obtained on highly uniform Ta2O5 coatings deposited on high-quality silica substrates by ion sputtering. The study was motivated mainly by issues related to the exploitation of Ta2O5-SiO2 λ/4 multilayers in detectors of gravitational waves. Two sets of samples with nominal thicknesses of 40 and 500 nm were considered. A sub-set of samples was treated with post-growth annealing in air for several hours at temperatures Tann up to 600 °C. The SE data were complemented with photothermal common-path interferometry measurements at 1064 nm providing data about absorption losses in the 1-4 ppm range. SE data, taken at room temperature, were analysed by exploiting three different three-phase (substrate/film/surface) models (Cody-Lorentz, Tauc-Lorentz and Herzinger-Johs) of the fundamental absorption edge. Following the literature (Stenzel 2009 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 055312) the simulations exploited a graded nano-porosity inside the coating, testing both the shape and composition of the pores. The best simulation of data was obtained using the Cody-Lorentz approach and a quasi-uniform density (6-7.5%) of empty spherical pores, slowly degrading from the substrate/film interface towards the film/ambient interface. A comparison with the literature indicated a high stoichiometric quality of the coatings. The analysis of samples annealed to increasingly higher Tann showed (i) a slight blue-shift of the energy gap (ii) an increase in the pore volume fraction, (iii) an increase (1-2%) in the coating thickness, (iv) a small (less than 1%) reduction in the index of refraction in the transparency region and (v) a limited increase in absorption losses. These findings were interpreted in terms of a release of the compressive strain inherent to the deposition process.

  12. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  13. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5mg/kg) treatment at 28days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis.

  14. Discrete Slip, Amorphous Silica and Pore Structure of Slickensided Gouge Layers in 2004-2006 Mt. St. Helens Lava Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.; Kennedy, L. A.; Russell, J. K.; Friedlander, B.

    2012-12-01

    Spines of dacite lava formed during the 2004-2006 Mt. St. Helens (MSH) effusion event are enveloped by extrusion gouges created during upward movement of crystallized magma. Multiple slickenside sets form one of the most distinctive feature types within this gouge carapace. Macroscopically, slickenside surfaces are seen to be composite features composed of discrete slip surfaces in Y- and R-shear orientations. In general, the spacing between the slip surfaces decreases toward the outer, exposed slickensided surface until they appear to coalesce. Slickensides are formed in association with all MSH spines, unlike some other fault rock fabrics within the gouge; therefore, their morphology can be inferred to be independent of syn-faulting residence time. As a significant record of the extrusion process, the MSH slickensides have been characterized by analytical scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to elucidate the mechanisms of energy dissipation and material transport. At the scale of these observations, the individual surfaces within a slickenside set comprise comminution bands (10-20 μm wide), each bounded by a discrete slip surface. The internal structure of these shear bands consists of a consistent sense of decreasing grain size toward the slip surface away and away from the spire core; grain size is routinely less than 100nm within the bands. The 1-5 μm wide slip layers that bound comminution bands are variously composed of amorphous silica or polycrystalline aggregates of sub-100nm grain size plagioclase, k-feldspar and quartz. Grain aggregates in the slip layer form an extended fabric parallel to the displacement direction, creating a "flow" foliation at edges of the shears. Specific to the slip bands are nano-scale pores, often silica-filled, whose circular cross-sections indicate the presence of fluids throughout slickenside formation. It is contended that the development of discrete slip surfaces is consistent with formation of the gouge by

  15. Size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles determine their effects on the activity of human CYP3A4 in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Shunji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Uji, Miyuki; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Because of their useful chemical and physical properties, nanomaterials are widely used around the world - for example, as additives in food and medicines - and such uses are expected to become more prevalent in the future. Therefore, collecting information about the effects of nanomaterials on metabolic enzymes is important. Here, we examined the effects of amorphous silica particles with various sizes and surface modifications on cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity by means of two different in vitro assays. Silica nanoparticles with diameters of 30 and 70 nm (nSP30 and nSP70, respectively) tended to inhibit CYP3A4 activity in human liver microsomes (HLMs), but the inhibitory activity of both types of nanoparticles was decreased by carboxyl modification. In contrast, amine-modified nSP70 activated CYP3A4 activity. In HepG2 cells, nSP30 inhibited CYP3A4 activity more strongly than the larger silica particles did. Taken together, these results suggest that the size and surface characteristics of the silica particles determined their effects on CYP3A4 activity and that it may be possible to develop silica particles that do not have undesirable effects on metabolic enzymes by altering their size and surface characteristics.

  16. Rapid transport and high accumulation of amorphous silica in the Congo deep-sea fan: A preliminary budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimonet, Mélanie; Ragueneau, Olivier; Jacques, Vincent; Corvaisier, Rudolph; Moriceau, Brivaëla; Khripounoff, Alexis; Pozzato, Lara; Rabouille, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the transfer and retention of silicon (Si) along continental margins are poorly understood, but play a major role in the functioning of coastal ecosystems and the oceanic biological pump of carbon. Deep-sea fans are well recognized as carbon sink spots, but we lack knowledge about the importance of the fans in the global Si cycle. Here, we provide a first estimate of the role played by the Congo deep-sea fan, one of the biggest in the world, in the Si cycle. Sediment cores sampled in the deep-sea fan were analyzed to build a Si mass balance. An exceptionally high accumulation rate of amorphous silica aSiO2 (2.29 ± 0.58 mol Si m- 2 y- 1) was found, due to a high sedimentation rate and the presence of aluminum in the sediments. Although favored by bioirrigation, recycling fluxes remained low (0.3 mol Si m- 2 y- 1) and reconstructed input fluxes could only be explained by lateral inputs coming from the canyon. Preliminary calculations show that the rapid transport of aSiO2 through the canyon and the excellent preservation efficiency in the sediments imply that 50% of aSiO2 river inputs from the Congo River accumulate annually in the deep-sea fan. Si:C ratios in deep-sea fan sediments were very low (0.2) and only three times as high as those measured in the river itself, which suggests that material from the river and the continental shelf was delivered directly through the canyon, with very little time for Si and C cycle decoupling to take place.

  17. Irradiation temperature effects on the induced point defects in Ge-doped optical fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, A.; Reghioua, I.; Girard, S.; Agnello, S.; Di Francesca, D.; Martin-Samos, L.; Marcandella, C.; Richard, N.; Cannas, M.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.

    2017-02-01

    We present an experimental investigation on the combined effects of temperature and irradiation on Ge-doped optical fibers. Our samples were X-ray (10 keV) irradiated up to 5 kGy with a dose rate of 50 Gy(SiO2)/s changing the irradiation temperature in the range 233-573 K. After irradiation we performed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and confocal microscopy luminescence (CML) measurements. The recorded data prove the generation of different Ge related paramagnetic point defects and of a red emission, different from that of the Ge/Si Non-Bridging Oxygen Hole center. Furthermore, by comparing the behaviour of the EPR signal of the Ge(1) as a function of the irradiation temperature with the one of the red emission we can exclude that this emission is originated by the Ge(1).

  18. Assessing the amorphousness and periodicity of common domain boundaries in silica bilayers on Ru(0 0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Büchner, Christin; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Domain boundaries are hypothesized to play a role in the crystalline to amorphous transition. Here we examine domain boundary structures in comparison to crystalline and amorphous structures in bilayer silica grown on Ru(0 0 0 1). Atomically resolved scanning probe microscopy data of boundaries in crystalline bilayer films are analyzed to determine structural motifs. A rich variety of boundary structures including rotational, closed-loop, antiphase, and complex boundaries are identified. Repeating units with ring sizes of 558 and 57 form the two most common domain boundary types. Quantitative metrics are utilized to assess the structural composition and degree of order for the chemically equivalent crystalline, domain boundary, and amorphous structures. It is found that domain boundaries in the crystalline phase show similarities to the amorphous phase in their ring statistics and, in some cases, in terms of the observed ring neighborhoods. However, by assessing order and periodicity, domain boundaries are shown to be distinct from the glassy state. The role of the Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate in influencing grain boundary structure is also discussed.

  19. Photocatalytic performance of highly amorphous titania-silica aerogels with mesopores: The adverse effect of the in situ adsorption of some organic substrates during photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázár, István; Kalmár, József; Peter, Anca; Szilágyi, Anett; Győri, Enikő; Ditrói, Tamás; Fábián, István

    2015-11-01

    Titania-silica composite aerogels with 16-29% Ti-content by the mass were synthesized by the sol-gel method from different Ti-precursors, and calcined at 500 °C. These aerogels are highly amorphous as no crystalline TiO2 phase can be detected in them by X-ray diffraction methods, and show the dominating presence of either mesopores or macropores. The incorporation of Ti into the silica structure is shown by the appearance of characteristic IR transitions of Sisbnd Osbnd Ti vibrations. The characteristic band-gap energies of the different aerogels are estimated to be between 3.6 and 3.9 eV from UV reflection spectra. Band-gap energy decreases with decreasing pore-size. When suspended in solution, even these highly amorphous aerogels accelerate the photodegradation of salicylic acid and methylene blue compared to simple photolysis. Kinetic experiments were conducted under illumination, and also in the dark to study the adsorption of the substrates onto the suspended aerogels. We assume that the fast in situ adsorption of the organic substrates mask the suspended aerogel particles from UV photons, which reduces the rate of photocatalysis. We managed to mathematically separate the parallel processes of photocatalysis and adsorption, and develop a simple kinetic model to describe the reaction system.

  20. Thermoluminescence response of Ge-doped SiO2 fibres to electrons, X- and γ-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Maah, J.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    For doses from 10 cGy to 80 Gy, we investigate the thermoluminescence (TL) response of tailor-made Ge-doped SiO2 fibres for accelerated electrons (6, 12 and 20 MeV), megavoltage X-rays (6, 10 MV) and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, delivered by a linear accelerator (LINAC) and a Co-60 irradiator respectively. Fibres of various dimensions were fabricated, obtained with doping concentrations from 6% to 10% Ge. The fibres are observed to provide a linear response with radiation dose, an overall reproducibility of 1-5%, and inappreciable dependence on energy, field-size and angular variation. For fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the response increases with core size, the 6% Ge-doped fibres providing the greatest TL yield. The fibres exhibit uniformity of response and provide the basis of a promising TL system for radiotherapy applications, offering high spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  1. Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jon; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The overall valorization of rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) has been studied in a two-step process. Thus, silica has been recovered in a first step and the remaining carbon material has been subjected to steam activation. The char samples used in this study have been obtained by continuous flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor at 500°C. Extraction with Na2CO3 allows recovering 88% of the silica contained in the rice husk char. Activation of the silica-free rice husk char has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 800°C using steam as activating agent. The porous structure of the activated carbons produced includes a combination of micropores and mesopores, with a BET surface area of up to 1365m(2)g(-1) at the end of 15min.

  2. Biocompatibility of core@shell particles: cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human osteosarcoma cells of colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, A L; Arnal, P M; Maisuls, I

    2014-08-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of novel colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia (SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) or SiO2@ZrO2(am)) have been studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63), after 24 h exposure. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) and SiO2@ZrO2(am) had mean diameters of 782±19 and 891±34 nm, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) exposure reduced cell viability, with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio. The comet and micronucleus (MN) assays detected DNA damage at 5 and 25 μg/mL, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(am) induced genotoxic action only at 10 and 50 μg/mL (comet and MN assays), along with a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio at 50 μg/mL. Both particles were found inside the cells, forming vesicles; however, none of them entered the nucleus. Our findings show that crystallization of the shell of the amorphous ZrO2 increases both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  3. Specific features of erbium ion photoluminescence in structures with amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoclusters in silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dyakov, S. A. Zhigunov, D. M.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2010-04-15

    Photoluminescence properties of the structures of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoclusters with average sizes no larger than 4 nm in an erbium-doped silicon dioxide matrix were studied. It was found that the photoluminescence lifetime of Er{sup 3+} ions at a wavelength of 1.5 {mu}m decreases from 5.7 to 2.0 ms and from 3.5 to 1.5 ms in samples with amorphous nanoclusters and with nanocrystals, respectively, as the Er{sup 3+} concentration increases from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The decrease in the erbium photoluminescence lifetime with the ion concentration is attributed to the effects of concentration-related quenching and residual implantation-induced defects. The difference between lifetimes for samples with amorphous and crystalline nanoclusters is interpreted as the effect of different probabilities of energy back transfer from Er{sup 3+} ions to the solid-state matrix in the structures under consideration.

  4. Quantifying Silica Reactivity in Subsurface Environments: An Integrated Experimental Study of Quartz and Amorphous Silica to Establish a Baseline for Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, Patricia

    2003-06-10

    An immediate EM science need is a reliable kinetic model that predicts long-term waste glass performance. A framework for which the kinetics of mineral-solution reactions can be used to interpret complex silicate glass properties is required to accurately describe the current and future behavior of glasses as synthetic monoliths or natural analogs. Reaction rates and mechanisms are essential elements in deciphering mineral/material reactivity trends within a compositional series or across a matrix of complex solution compositions. An essential place to start, and the goal of this research, is to quantify the reactivity of crystalline and amorphous SiO2 phases in the complex fluids of natural systems.

  5. Quantifying Silica Reactivity in Subsurface Environments: An Integrated Experimental Study of Quartz and Amorphous Silica to Establish a Baseline for Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, Patricia M.

    2001-06-15

    An immediate EM science need is a reliable kinetic model that predicts long-term waste glass performance. A framework for which the kinetics of mineral-solution reactions can be used to interpret complex silicate glass properties is required to accurately describe the current and future behavior of glasses as synthetic monoliths or natural analogs. Reaction rates and mechanisms are essential elements in deciphering mineral/material reactivity trends within a compositional series or across a matrix of complex solution compositions. An essential place to start, and the goal of this research, is to quantify the reactivity of crystalline and amorphous SiO2 phases in the complex fluids of natural systems.

  6. Ultrahigh Vacuum Studies of the Fundamental Interactions of Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants with Amorphous Silica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-14

    platen and manipulator. The labeled components are: (1) silica coated 1” Au slide sample, (2) unsecured thermocouple tab, (3) finger tabs that secure...chloroethyl) sulfide HV High vacuum IR Infrared KF Quick connect LN2 Liquid nitrogen MCT Mercury-cadmium-telluride MDCP Methyl...conversion, health care, and environmental protection , among many others.1-4 However, despite the importance of chemistry occurring at the interface

  7. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wittig, Anja; Gehrke, Helge; Del Favero, Giorgia; Fritz, Eva-Maria; Al-Rawi, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Sami, Haider; Ogris, Manfred; Marko, Doris

    2017-01-13

    Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways-both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs) were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the concentration

  8. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Anja; Gehrke, Helge; Del Favero, Giorgia; Fritz, Eva-Maria; Al-Rawi, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Sami, Haider; Ogris, Manfred; Marko, Doris

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways—both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs) were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the concentration

  9. Preliminary results on the photo-transferred thermoluminescence from Ge-doped SiO2 optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkepely, Nurul Najua; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Md Nor, Roslan; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah; Wahib, Nur Fadira

    2015-12-01

    A study is made of photo-transferred thermoluminescence (PTTL), the TL being induced by transferring charge carriers from deeper to more superficial traps through energetic light exposure. Potential applications include dose reassessment in radiation dosimetry and also as a useful tool for dating. With incomplete emptying of deep traps following first readout, subsequent UV exposure is shown to lead to charge transfer to more shallow traps. Using Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibers exposed to 60Co gamma rays, the PTTL from the medium has been characterized in terms of the stimulation provided by exposure to a UV lamp and duration of exposure, maximum read-out temperature and pre-gamma irradiation dose. Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibers of flat cross-sectional shape have been used in this study. The efficiency of dose reassessment was compared to that of the highly popular phosphor-based TL detector TLD-100. Results show the maximum temperature of readout to have no measurable effect on the PTTL signal. For doses from 20 to 500 cGy, the method is shown to be effective using a UV lamp of wavelength 254 nm, also being indicative of potential application for doses on either side of the range currently investigated. A study was also made of the effect of UV exposure time on PTTL, seeking to determine the greatest accessible sensitivity and lowest measurable dose.

  10. The role of Al in the formation of secondary Ni precipitates on pyrophyllite, gibbsite, talc, and amorphous silica: a DRS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinost, Andreas C.; Ford, Robert G.; Sparks, Donald L.

    1999-10-01

    Formation of secondary Ni precipitates is an important mechanism of Ni retention in neutral and alkaline clay/water systems. However, the structure and composition of these secondary phases, and their stability is still disputable. Using existing structure refinement data and new ab-initio FEFF 7 calculations we show that Ni-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy alone may not be able to unequivocally discriminate four possible candidate compounds: α-Ni(OH)2, the isostructural but Al-substituted layered double hydroxide (Ni-Al LDH), and 1:1 and 2:1 Ni-containing phyllosilicates. Hence, we investigated the potential of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in determining in situ the Ni phase forming in the presence of four sorbents, pyrophyllite, talc, gibbsite, and amorphous silica. The 3A2g → 3T1g(F) band (ν2) of octahedrally coordinated Ni2+ could be reliably extracted from the reflectance spectra of wet pastes. In the presence of the Al-free talc and amorphous silica, the ν2 band was at ≈14,900 cm-1, but shifted to 15,300 cm-1 in the presence of Al-containing pyrophyllite and gibbsite. This shift suggests that Al is dissolved from the sorbent and substitutes for Ni in brucite-like hydroxide layers of the newly forming precipitate phase, causing a decrease of the Ni-O distances and, in turn, an increase of the crystal-field splitting energy. Comparison with Ni model compounds showed that the band at 14,900 cm-1 is a unique fingerprint of α-Ni(OH)2, and the band at 15,300 cm-1 of Ni-Al LDH. Although the complete transformation of α-Ni(OH)2 into a Ni phyllosilicate causes a significant contraction of the Ni hydroxide sheet as indicated by band positions intermediate to those of α-Ni(OH)2 and Ni-Al LDH, incipient states of silication do not influence Ni-O distances and cannot be detected by DRS. The first evidence for the formation of a precipitate was obtained after 5 min (pyrophyllite), 7 hr (talc), 24 hr (gibbsite), and 3 days (amorphous

  11. Five-day inhalation toxicity study of three types of synthetic amorphous silicas in Wistar rats and post-exposure evaluations for up to 3 months.

    PubMed

    Arts, Josje H E; Muijser, Hans; Duistermaat, Evert; Junker, Karin; Kuper, C Frieke

    2007-10-01

    Evidence suggests that short-term animal exposures to synthetic amorphous silicas (SAS) and crystalline silica can provide comparable prediction of toxicity to those of 90-day studies, therefore providing the opportunity to screen these types of substances using short-term rather than 90-day studies. To investigate this hypothesis, the inhalation toxicity of three SAS, precipitated silica Zeosil 45, silica gel Syloid 74, and pyrogenic silica Cab-O-Sil M5 was studied in Wistar rats. Rats were exposed nose-only to concentrations of 1, 5 or 25mg/m(3) of one of the SAS 6h a day for five consecutive days. Positive controls were exposed to 25mg/m(3) crystalline silica (quartz dust), negative controls to clean air. Animals were necropsied the day after the last exposure or 1 or 3 months later. All exposures were tolerated without serious clinical effects, changes in body weight or food intake. Differences in the effects associated with exposure to the three types of SAS were limited and almost exclusively confined to the 1-day post-exposure time point. Silicon levels in tracheobronchial lymph nodes were below the detection limit in all groups at all time points. Silicon was found in the lungs of all high concentration SAS groups 1-day post-exposure, and was cleared 3 months later. Exposure to all three SAS at 25mg/m(3) induced elevations in biomarkers of cytotoxicity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), increases in lung and tracheobronchial lymph node weight and histopathological lung changes 1-day post-exposure. Exposure to all three SAS at 5mg/m(3) induced histopathological changes and changes in BALf only. With all three SAS these effects were transient and, with the exception of slight histopathological lung changes at the higher exposure levels, were reversible during the 3-month recovery period. No adverse changes were observed in animals exposed to any of the SAS at 1mg/m(3). In contrast, with quartz-exposed animals the presence of silicon in the lungs was

  12. Track formation in two amorphous insulators, vitreous silica and diamond like carbon: Experimental observations and description by the inelastic thermal spike model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, C.; Pawlak, F.; Khalfaoui, N.; Dufour, C.; Perrière, J.; Laurent, A.; Stoquert, J. P.; Lebius, H.; Toulemonde, M.

    2012-02-01

    Vitreous silica thin film (a-SiO 2) and mixed deuterated and hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin film (a-C:D,H), grown or deposited, respectively, on silicon, have been irradiated at GANIL in the MeV/u energy range with ions between C and U in order to reach electronic energy loss between 0.7 and 25 keV/nm. The evolution of Si-O bonds and C-D bonds contents was determined by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Complementary physico-chemical characterization was performed for a-C:D,H using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). For a-SiO 2, the band at 1076 cm -1 decreases with the appearance of a band at 1046 cm -1. In the case of the diamond like amorphous carbon, the main effects due to MeV/u ion irradiations are the decrease of sp 3 bonding content and of deuterium relative concentration (D/C atomic ratio) as a function of fluence with the appearance of the sp 1 bond. The cylinder radii in which these physical phenomena are confined can be deduced from a statistical analysis. Using the inelastic thermal spike model (i-TS) these track radii can be described using the electron-phonon mean free path which takes values equal to 3 and 0.9 nm for a-SiO 2 and a-C:D, respectively. Extrapolation to low energy range (˜1 MeV in total or ˜0.02 MeV/u) will be made.

  13. Advanced treatment technique for swine wastewater using two agents: Thermally polymerized amorphous silica and hydrated lime for color and phosphorus removal and sulfur for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Teruaki; Kurose, Yohei; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2017-04-12

    The efficacy of advanced treatment of swine wastewater using thermally polymerized, modified amorphous silica and hydrated lime (M-CSH-lime) for color and phosphorus removal and sulfur for nitrogen removal was examined with a demonstration-scale treatment plant. The color removal rate was approximately 78% at M-CSH-lime addition rates of > 0.055 wt/v%. The PO43--P removal rate exceeded 99.9% with > 0.023 wt/v%. pH of the effluent from the M-CSH-lime reactor increased with the addition rate till a maximum value of 12.7, which was effective in disinfection. The recovered M-CSH-lime would be suitable as a phosphorus fertilizer because the total P2 O5 content was approximately 10%. The nitrogen oxide (NOx-N) removal rate by sulfur denitrification increased to approximately 80% when the NOx-N loading rate was around 0.1 kg-N/ton-S/day. It was suggested that the combination of the two processes would be effective in the advanced treatment of swine wastewater.

  14. Importance of agglomeration state and exposure conditions for uptake and pro-inflammatory responses to amorphous silica nanoparticles in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Maurizio; Skuland, Tonje; Iversen, Tore-Geir; Låg, Marit; Schwarze, Per; Bilaničová, Dagmar; Pojana, Giulio; Refsnes, Magne

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs, 30 and 50 nm) and rhodamine-coated SiNPs (50 nm) were examined for their ability to induce pro-inflammatory responses and cytotoxicity in BEAS-2B cells under different experimental conditions. The SiNPs formed micrometre-sized agglomerates in the absence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the culture medium, whereas with BSA (0.1%) they were much less agglomerated. All the SiNPs induced IL-6 and IL-8 responses, as measured by ELISA and real-time PCR. The responses were more marked without BSA and higher for the rhodamine SiNPs than the plain ones. Rhodamine SiNPs were not taken up by cells during a 3-h exposure, even though cytokine mRNAs were up-regulated. In conclusion, agglomerated SiNPs induced more potent cytokine responses than the non-agglomerated ones; either due to the agglomeration state per se or more conceivably to a change in surface reactivity against cellular targets due to BSA. Furthermore, cytokine expression was up-regulated independently of SiNP uptake.

  15. Ge doping of β-Ga2O3 films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Koksaldi, Onur S.; Kaun, Stephen W.; Oshima, Yuichi; Short, Dane B.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.

    2017-04-01

    The Ge doping of β-Ga2O3(010) films was investigated using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy as the growth method. The dependences of the amount of Ge incorporated on the substrate temperature, Ge-cell temperature, and growth regime were studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The electron concentration and mobility were investigated using Van der Pauw Hall patterns. Hall measurement confirmed that Ge acts as an n-dopant in β-Ga2O3(010) films. These results were compared with similar films doped by Sn. The Hall data showed an improved electron mobility for the same electron concentration when Ge is used instead of Sn as the dopant.

  16. Calculation of amorphous silica solubilities at 25° to 300°C and apparent cation hydration numbers in aqueous salt solutions using the concept of effective density of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Williams, Marshall L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of amorphous silica in aqueous salt solutions at 25° to 300°C can be calculated using information on its solubility in pure water and a model in which the activity of water in the salt solution is defined to equal the effective density. pe, of “free” water in that solution. At temperatures of 100°C and above, pe closely equals the product of the density of the solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution. At 25°C, a correction parameter must be applied to pe that incorporates a term called the apparent cation hydration number, h. Because of the many assumptions and other uncertainties involved in determining values of h, by the model used here, the reported numbers are not necessarily real hydration numbers even though they do agree with some published values determined by activity and diffusion methods. Whether or not h is a real hydration number, it would appear to be useful in its inclusion within a more extensive activity coefficient term that describes the departure of silica solubilities in concentrated salt solutions from expected behavior according to the model presented here. Values of h can be calculated from measured amorphous silica solubilities in salt solutions at 25°C provided there is no complexing of dissolved silica with the dissolved salt, or if the degree of complexing is known. The previously postulated aqueous silica-sulfate complexing in aqueous Na2SO4 solutions is supported by results of the present effective density of water model

  17. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of aligned Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4} coated ZnO nanorods and Ge doped ZnO nanocombs

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yong; Meng Xia Chen Yiqing; Li Sen; Zhou Qingtao; Liang Xuemei; Feng Yi

    2008-07-01

    Aligned Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4} coated ZnO nanorods and Ge doped ZnO nanocombs were synthesized on a silicon substrate by a simple thermal evaporation method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nanostructure were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The growth of aligned Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4} coated ZnO nanorods and Ge doped ZnO nanocombs follows a vapor-solid (VS) process. Photoluminescence properties were also investigated at room temperature. The photoluminescence spectrum reveals the nanostructures have a sharp ultraviolet luminescence peak centered at 382 nm and a broad green luminescence peak centered at about 494 nm.

  18. Application of silica nanoparticles for increased silica availability in maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriyaprabha, R.; Karunakaran, G.; Yuvakkumar, R.; Prabu, P.; Rajendran, V.; Kannan, N.

    2013-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles were extracted from rice husk and characterised comprehensively. The synthesised silica powders were amorphous in size with 99.7% purity (20-40 nm). Nanosilica was amended with red soil at 15 kg ha-1 along with micron silica. The influence of nanoscale on silica uptake, accumulation and nutritional variations in maize roots were evaluated through the studies such as root sectioning, elemental analysis and physiological parameters (root length and silica content) and compared with micron silica and control. Nanosilica treated soil reveals enhanced silica uptake and elongated roots which make the plant to resist in stress conditions like drought.

  19. Microstructure and conduction behavior of BiFeO3 thin film deposited on Ge-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Chinnambedu Murugesan; Choi, Ji Ya; Kim, Sang Su

    2017-02-01

    BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films were deposited on a Ge-doped ZnO (GZO)/Si(100) and a Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si(100) using a pulsed laser deposition technique. An improved crystal growth property was observed for the BFO thin film deposited on the GZO/Si(100). The BFO thin film, which was deposited on the (00 l) textured GZO/Si(100), exhibited preferred ( l00) orientated grains, while randomly orientated grains were observed for the thin film deposited on the Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si(100). When compared with the Pt/BFO/Pt capacitor, the GZO/BFO/GZO capacitor exhibited improved conduction behaviors, such as a low leakage current density and high stability against electrical breakdown. From the J-E curves, conduction of the GZO/BFO/GZO and the Pt/BFO/Pt capacitors was found to be dominated by Ohmic and space charge limited conductions at low and high electric field, respectively.

  20. Study of point defects in as-drawn and irradiated Ge-doped optical fibers using cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reghioua, I.; Girard, S.; Alessi, A.; Di Francesca, D.; Marin, E.; Morana, A.; Fanetti, M.; Martin-Samos, L.; Richard, N.; Raine, M.; Valant, M.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.

    2017-02-01

    In the present paper, we report an experimental investigation of Ge-doped Optical Fibers (OFs) which were investigated by Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. We followed the evolution, under 10 keV electron exposure, of the emissions present in three different samples: the first one was the as-drawn fiber (pristine), the second one was irradiated with a CW UV laser at 244 nm and the last one was irradiated at the dose of 9 MGy (SiO2) by γ-rays. Moreover, taking advantage of the employed experimental set-up, which allows to perform spatially-resolved (<1μm) CL measures, we were able to investigate the emission evolution in two differently doped zones of the fiber. Our data indicate that (i) the CL spectra of our three samples are dominated by the 400 nm emission band related to the Germanium Lone Pair Center (GLPC), (ii) the spatial distribution of this defect differs in the three fibers and (iii) the electron exposure decreases the GLPC concentration in all samples (pristine, UV and γ irradiated). A comparison between the CL and photoluminescence (PL) measurements shows comparable results.

  1. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  2. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  3. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  4. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (i) Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica: Not less than 99.0 percent silicon dioxide after ignition... dichlorodimethylsilane. (ii) Precipated hydrophobic silica: Not less than 94.0 percent silicon dioxide after...

  5. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A.

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  6. A study of the alumina-silica gel adsorbent for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water: increase in adsorption capacity of the adsorbent due to formation of amorphous aluminosilicate by adsorption of silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takushi; Ueda, Akira; Kato, Koichi; Mogi, Katsumi; Matsuo, Shorin

    2002-08-01

    Two kinds of adsorbents (Si adsorbent and Al adsorbent) for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water to retard the formation of silica scales were prepared using silicic acid contained in geothermal water. The Si adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water, and the Al adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water after the addition of aluminum chloride. The specific surface area of the Si adsorbent was small and it's adsorption capacity of silicic acid was low. Although the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent was also small, it was significantly increased by the adsorption of silicic acid and it's adsorption capacity was high. Based on the change in the local structure of aluminum ion by the adsorption of silicic acid, the Al adsorbent was considered to be silica particles covered with crystalline aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, it was concluded that the increase in the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent and the decrease in the zeta potential were due to the formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate with a large surface area and a negative charge (one 4-coordinated Al) by the reaction between aluminum ions and silicic acids.

  7. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    2003-01-01

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  8. A novel solid-state NMR method for the investigation of trivalent lanthanide sorption on amorphous silica at low surface loadings.

    PubMed

    Mason, H E; Begg, J D; Maxwell, R S; Kersting, A B; Zavarin, M

    2016-07-13

    The modelling of radionuclide transport in the subsurface depends on a comprehensive understanding of their interactions with mineral surfaces. Spectroscopic techniques provide important insight into these processes directly, but at high concentrations are sometimes hindered by safety concerns and limited solubilities of many radionuclides, especially the actinides. Here we use Eu(iii) as a surrogate for trivalent actinide species, and study Eu(iii) sorption on the silica surface at pH 5 where sorption is fairly limited. We have applied a novel, surface selective solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to provide information about Eu binding at the silica surface at estimated surface loadings ranging from 0.1 to 3 nmol m(-2) (<0.1% surface loading). The NMR results show that inner sphere Eu(iii) complexes are evenly distributed across the silica surface at all concentrations, but that at the highest surface loadings there are indications that precipitates may form. These results illustrate that this NMR technique may be applied in solubility-limited systems to differentiate between adsorption and precipitation to better understand the interactions of radionuclides at solid surfaces.

  9. Difference in the behavior of oxygen deficient defects in Ge-doped silica optical fiber preforms under ArF and KrF excimer laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essid, M.; Brebner, J. L.; Albert, J.; Awazu, K.

    1998-10-01

    Photobleaching of optical absorption bands in the 5 eV region and the creation of others at higher and lower energy have been examined in the case of ArF (6.4 eV) and KrF (5 eV) excimer laser irradiation of 3GeO2:97SiO2 glasses. We report a difference in the transformation process of the neutral oxygen monovacancy and also of the germanium lone pair center (GLPC) into electron trap centers associated with fourfold coordinated Ge ions and Ge-E' centers when we use one or the other laser. Correlations between absorption bands and electron spin resonance signals were made after different steps of laser irradiation. It was found that the KrF laser generates twice as many Ge-E' centers as the ArF laser for the same dose of energy delivered. The main reason for this difference is found to be the more efficient bleaching of the GLPC (5.14 eV) by the KrF laser compared to that by the ArF laser.

  10. The investigations of nanoclusters and micron-sized periodic structures created at the surface of the crystal and amorphous silica by resonant CO2 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedgalieva, A. F.; Bondar, A. M.; Svedov, I. M.; Kononov, M. A.; Laptev, V. B.; Novikova, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    The creation of nanoclasters and micrometer sized periodical structures at the surface of silica (crystal quartz and fused quartz) by action of pulsed CO2 laser radiation (pulse energy of 1 J, pulse time of 70 ns) have been investigated. The laser action on the surface of samples lead to appearance of two kind of structures - periodical micron-sized structures with the period length close to wave length of CO2 laser irradiation and nanoclusters with size close to 50-100 nanometers. This creation connects with the intensive ablation of matter at the maxima of standing waves which are a results of the interference of falling and surfaces waves. This connects with the resonant absorption of infrared laser radiation by silicate minerals.

  11. Removal of dissolved and colloidal silica

    DOEpatents

    Midkiff, William S.

    2002-01-01

    Small amorphous silica particles are used to provide a relatively large surface area upon which silica will preferentially adsorb, thereby preventing or substantially reducing scaling caused by deposition of silica on evaporative cooling tower components, especially heat exchange surfaces. The silica spheres are contacted by the cooling tower water in a sidestream reactor, then separated using gravity separation, microfiltration, vacuum filtration, or other suitable separation technology. Cooling tower modifications for implementing the invention process have been designed.

  12. Co-exposure to amorphous silica nanoparticles and benzo[a]pyrene at low level in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Shi, Yanfeng; Asweto, Collins Otieno; Feng, Lin; Yang, Xiaozhe; Zhang, Yannan; Hu, Hejing; Duan, Junchao; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-11-01

    Both ultrafine particles (UFP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely present in the environment, thus increasing their chances of exposure to human in the daily life. However, the study on the combined toxicity of UFP and PAHs on respiratory system is still limited. In this study, we examined the potential interactive effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). Cells were exposed to SiNPs and B[a]P alone or in combination for 24 h. Co-exposure to SiNPs and B[a]P enhanced the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities significantly, while the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation had a slight increase in the exposed groups compared to the control but not statistically significant. Cell cycle arrest induced by the co-exposure showed a significant percentage increase in G2/M phase cells and a decrease in G0/G1 phase cells. In addition, there was a significant increase in BEAS-2B cells multinucleation as well as DNA damage. Cellular apoptosis was markedly increased even at the low-level co-exposure. Our results suggest that co-exposure to SiNPs and B[a]P exerts synergistic and additive cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  13. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  14. Ultrafast crystallization and thermal stability of In-Ge doped eutectic Sb{sub 70}Te{sub 30} phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Meiling; Miao Xiangshui; Ting Leehou; Shi Luping

    2008-02-15

    Effect of In and Ge doping in the form of In{sub 2}Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 85}Te{sub 5} on optical and thermal properties of eutectic Sb{sub 70}Te{sub 30} alloys was investigated. Crystalline structure of In{sub 2}Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 85}Te{sub 5} phase change material consists of a mixture of phases. Thermal analysis shows higher crystallization temperature and activation energy for crystallization. Isothermal reflectivity-time measurement shows a growth-dominated crystallization mechanism. Ultrafast crystallization speed of 30 ns is realized upon irradiation by blue laser beam. The use of ultrafast and thermally stable In{sub 2}Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 85}Te{sub 5} phase change material as mask layer in aperture-type super-resolution near-field phase change disk is realized to increase the carrier-to-noise ratio and thermal stability.

  15. Ice sheets as a missing source of silica to the polar oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, Jon R.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Benning, Liane G.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Tranter, Martyn; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Raiswell, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Ice sheets play a more important role in the global silicon cycle than previously appreciated. Input of dissolved and amorphous particulate silica into natural waters stimulates the growth of diatoms. Here we measure dissolved and amorphous silica in Greenland Ice Sheet meltwaters and icebergs, demonstrating the potential for high ice sheet export. Our dissolved and amorphous silica flux is 0.20 (0.06-0.79) Tmol year-1, ~50% of the input from Arctic rivers. Amorphous silica comprises >95% of this flux and is highly soluble in sea water, as indicated by a significant increase in dissolved silica across a fjord salinity gradient. Retreating palaeo ice sheets were therefore likely responsible for high dissolved and amorphous silica fluxes into the ocean during the last deglaciation, reaching values of ~5.5 Tmol year-1, similar to the estimated export from palaeo rivers. These elevated silica fluxes may explain high diatom productivity observed during the last glacial-interglacial period.

  16. The world ocean silica cycle.

    PubMed

    Tréguer, Paul J; De La Rocha, Christina L

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, we have realized that the silica cycle is strongly intertwined with other major biogeochemical cycles, like those of carbon and nitrogen, and as such is intimately related to marine primary production, the efficiency of carbon export to the deep sea, and the inventory of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. For nearly 20 years, the marine silica budget compiled by Tréguer et al. (1995) , with its exploration of reservoirs, processes, sources, and sinks in the silica cycle, has provided context and information fundamental to study of the silica cycle. Today, the budget needs revisiting to incorporate advances that have notably changed estimates of river and groundwater inputs to the ocean of dissolved silicon and easily dissolvable amorphous silica, inputs from the dissolution of terrestrial lithogenic silica in ocean margin sediments, reverse weathering removal fluxes, and outputs of biogenic silica (especially on ocean margins and in the form of nondiatomaceous biogenic silica). The resulting budget recognizes significantly higher input and output fluxes and notes that the recycling of silicon occurs mostly at the sediment-water interface and not during the sinking of silica particles through deep waters.

  17. Water-Silica Force Field for Simulating Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silica is an inorganic material that is central for many nanotechnology appplications, such as nanoelectronics, microfluidics, and nanopore technology. In order to use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the behavior of biomolecules with silica, we developed a force field for amorphous silica surfaces based on their macroscopic wetting properties that is compatible with the CHARMM force field and TIP3P water model. The contact angle of a water droplet with silica served as a criterion to tune the intermolecular interactions. The resulting force field was used to study the permeation of water through silica nanopores, illustrating the influence of the surface topography and the intermolecular parameters on permeation kinetics. We find that minute modeling of the amorphous surface is critical for MD studies, since the particular arrangement of surface atoms controls sensitively electrostatic interactions between silica and water. PMID:17064100

  18. Photoluminescence decay dynamics of transparent silica glass prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoko; Uchino, Takashi

    2005-08-22

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) decays are measured for transparent amorphous silica prepared from solid-phase sintering of nanometer-sized silica particles, which has recently been shown to exhibit a unique white PL emission under ultraviolet excitation [T. Uchino and T. Yamada, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 1164 (2004)]. Unlike usual PL processes observed in normal silica glass, it is shown that the present PL results from trapping-controlled migration of photoexcited carriers and their radiative recombination.

  19. Photoluminescence decay dynamics of transparent silica glass prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomoko; Uchino, Takashi

    2005-08-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) decays are measured for transparent amorphous silica prepared from solid-phase sintering of nanometer-sized silica particles, which has recently been shown to exhibit a unique white PL emission under ultraviolet excitation [T. Uchino and T. Yamada, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 1164 (2004)]. Unlike usual PL processes observed in normal silica glass, it is shown that the present PL results from trapping-controlled migration of photoexcited carriers and their radiative recombination.

  20. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  1. Positron probing of gamma-irradiated Ge doped with P, As, Sb, and Bi: Changes in atomic structures of defects due to n→ p conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.

    2009-12-01

    The emission of the high-momentum annihilation radiation from the subvalent ion core shells and electron density around a positron localized at a vacancy-group-V-impurity atom complexes produced in oxygen-lean Ge doped with P, As, Sb, and Bi by irradiation with 60Co gamma-rays at room temperature have been investigated with the help of the angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) before and after n→p conversion. The probability of positron annihilation in the subvalent shells of atoms incorporated in dominant radiation centers was found to be dependent on the ratio of the ion core radii ri(P5+, As5+)/ri(Ge4+)<1 and ri(Sb5+, Bi5+)/ri(Ge4+)>1, respectively. In passing from P to As impurity atoms the activation energy ΔEe of electron emission to be detected by DLTS measurements is increased by (+0.017 eV) vs. the increase of the electron density parameter to be reconstructed by ACAR data, Δr‧s=r‧s(As)-r‧s(P)≈0.029 a.u. On the contrary, in passing from Sb to Bi impurity atoms, ΔEe value is decreased by (-0.028 eV) whereas the electron density parameter rises by Δr‧s=r‧s(Bi)-r‧s(Sb)≈0.04 a.u. After n→p conversion a marked decrease in both the electron density and the number of ion cores around the positron points to the fact that the radiation-produced complexes with group-V-impurity atoms (P, As, Sb, Bi) are of a multi-vacancy character. The deep acceptor states in the forbidden gap (Ev+0.1), (Ev+0.12), (Ev+0.16) eV to be attributed to the P-, As-, Sb-, and Bi-containing multi-vacancy centers, respectively, were found to contribute to lessening the electron density around the trapped positron. It is argued that a close similarity of the As5+ and Ge4+ ion cores results in a small (but marked) augmentation in the electron density around the positron in As-containing multi-vacancy centers after n→p conversion. A trend for inward relaxation of the ion cores is observed in all radiation-produced centers studied.

  2. Differences in both matrix metalloproteinase 9 concentration and zymographic profile between plasma and serum with clot activators are due to the presence of amorphous silica or silicate salts in blood collection devices.

    PubMed

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Tanus-Santos, Jose E; Meschiari, Cesar A; Tonti, Gaetana A

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are promising diagnostic tools, and blood sampling/handling alters MMP concentrations between plasma and serum and between serum with and without clot activators. To explain the higher MMP-9 expression in serum collected with clot accelerators relative to serum with no additives and to plasma, we analyzed the effects of increasing amounts of silica and silicates (components of clot activators) in citrate plasma, serum, and buffy coats collected in both plastic and glass tubes from 50 healthy donors, and we analyzed the effects of silica and silicate on cultured leukemia cells. The levels of MMP-2 did not show significant changes between glass and plastic tubes, between serum and plasma, between serum with and without clot accelerators, or between silica and silicate treatments. No modification of MMP-9 expression was obtained by the addition of silica or silicate to previously separated plasma and serum. Increasing the amounts of nonsoluble silica and soluble silicate added to citrate and empty tubes prior to blood collection resulted in increasing levels of MMP-9 relative to citrate plasma and serum. Silica and silicate added to buffy coats and leukemia cells significantly induced MMP-9 release/secretion, demonstrating that both silica and silicate induce the release of pro- and complexed MMP-9 forms. We recommend limiting the misuse of serum and avoiding the interfering effects of clot activators.

  3. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (μ) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ≤1 μm powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 μm clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub

  4. Fracture-induced amorphization of polycrystalline SiO2 stishovite: a potential platform for toughening in ceramics.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Wakai, Fumihiro; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Tamenori, Yusuke; Murata, Hidenobu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Matsushita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Manabu; Kulik, Eleonora; Yoshida, Kimiko; Wada, Kouhei; Bednarcik, Jozef; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2014-10-09

    Silicon dioxide has eight stable crystalline phases at conditions of the Earth's rocky parts. Many metastable phases including amorphous phases have been known, which indicates the presence of large kinetic barriers. As a consequence, some crystalline silica phases transform to amorphous phases by bypassing the liquid via two different pathways. Here we show a new pathway, a fracture-induced amorphization of stishovite that is a high-pressure polymorph. The amorphization accompanies a huge volume expansion of ~100% and occurs in a thin layer whose thickness from the fracture surface is several tens of nanometers. Amorphous silica materials that look like strings or worms were observed on the fracture surfaces. The amount of amorphous silica near the fracture surfaces is positively correlated with indentation fracture toughness. This result indicates that the fracture-induced amorphization causes toughening of stishovite polycrystals. The fracture-induced solid-state amorphization may provide a potential platform for toughening in ceramics.

  5. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  6. Improvements in geothermal electric power and silica production

    DOEpatents

    Hill, J.H.; Fulk, M.M.

    Electricity is generated from hot geothermal solution by extracting heat therefrom, mineral solids which form in a so cooled geothermal solution are separated to recover minerals and facilitate reinjection of the solution into the ground. The separated solids are treated to recover silica by addition of an acid (amorphous silica precipitates) or a base (other minerals precipitate and soulble silicates are formed which are subsequently precipitated by acid neutralization). If desired, after silica is separated, other minerals can be separated and recovered.

  7. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  8. Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

    1995-01-01

    Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

  9. Transport in Thermally Grown Silica on Silicon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    catalyze the crvstallization of amorphous silica to cristobalite . 4 "" rhc activation ener- 4ies for oxidation when cristobalite forms increase but...categories. These are 65 kcal (due to formation of cristobalite ); " 40 kcal (in dry oxygen); and 30 kcal or less (in moist oxygen). S TU’ARY Based on

  10. Earthquake lubrication and healing explained by amorphous nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Lamothe, K. G.; Rempe, M.; Andrews, M.; Mitchell, T. M.; Di Toro, G.; White, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake slip and rupture propagation require fault strength to decrease during slip. Extreme shear weakening observed in laboratory friction experiments on silica-rich rocks has been explained by the formation of a hydrated amorphous 'silica gel' on the slip surface, but the mode of formation and deformation behavior of this material are not known. In addition, the wear material displays time-dependent strengthening on timescales of hours to days. We performed shearing experiments on chert rocks and analyzed the wear material formed at a range of slip rates from 10-4 - 10-1 m/s. We show by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction that silica lubrication is the result of the formation of amorphous nanopowder rather than a gel. The nanopowder has distinct structure and properties when compared to commercially available amorphous silica nanoparticles, which result from the degree and distribution of hydration and the style of bond strain within particles (observed by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR). The lubrication effect is due to intra-particle plasticity, even at low temperature and interparticle lubrication caused by trapping of water layers between hydrated surfaces. The hours to days timescale of healing may be explained by the natural time-dependent sintering between the hydrated surfaces of the nanopowder. Formation of amorphous silica nanopowders during slip can explain the general characteristics of earthquake ruptures, including the timescales of coseismic weakening and post-seismic healing.

  11. Three-dimensional fabrication and characterisation of core-shell nano-columns using electron beam patterning of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Jinschek, Joerg R.; Ou Haiyan; Verbeeck, Jo; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2012-06-25

    A focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to create arrays of core-shell structures in a specimen of amorphous SiO{sub 2} doped with Ge. The same electron microscope is then used to measure the changes that occurred in the specimen in three dimensions using electron tomography. The results show that transformations in insulators that have been subjected to intense irradiation using charged particles can be studied directly in three dimensions. The fabricated structures include core-shell nano-columns, sputtered regions, voids, and clusters.

  12. The formation and deposition of primary silica granules - A new model of early Archean silica deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefurak, E. J.; Lowe, D. R.; Zentner, D.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    In the modern silica cycle, biologically-mediated silica precipitation provides the dominant sink for dissolved silica in seawater, with additional smaller sinks in the form of authigenic phyllosilicates and silica cements. Fundamental questions remain about the mechanics of the processes responsible for removing silica from seawater prior to the evolution of silica biomineralization in late Proterozoic time, with important implications for the chemistry of seawater on the early Earth, including alkalinity budgets and the efficiency of the silicate weathering feedback. The degree to which dissolved silica leaves seawater as authigenic phyllosilicates instead of amorphous silica is important because these 'reverse weathering' reactions do not consume CO2. The abundant presence of siliceous sedimentary rocks in Archean sequences, mainly in the form of chert, reinforces the inference that abiotic silica precipitation played a more significant role during Archean time. Previous authors hypothesized that these cherts formed as primary marine precipitates, but were unable to identify a specific mode of sedimentation. Here we present sedimentologic, petrographic, and geochemical evidence that some and perhaps many Archean cherts were deposited exclusively or in large part as primary, sub-spherical, structureless, sand-sized silica grains, here termed silica granules, which precipitated within marine waters. This mode of silica deposition appears to be unique to Archean time and provides evidence that primary abiotic silica precipitation indeed occurred in Archean oceans. Furthermore, the apparent early cementation of some granules indicates that the rate of silica precipitation was rapid under certain environmental conditions, which could provide insight into microfossil preservation via early silicification.

  13. Silica substrate or portion formed from oxidation of monocrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Ellis, Robert V.

    2003-07-15

    A method is disclosed for forming an inclusion-free silica substrate using a monocrystalline silicon substrate as the starting material and oxidizing the silicon substrate to convert it entirely to silica. The oxidation process is performed from both major surfaces of the silicon substrate using a conventional high-pressure oxidation system. The resulting product is an amorphous silica substrate which is expected to have superior etching characteristics for microfabrication than conventional fused silica substrates. The present invention can also be used to convert only a portion of a monocrystalline silicon substrate to silica by masking the silicon substrate and locally thinning a portion the silicon substrate prior to converting the silicon portion entirely to silica. In this case, the silica formed by oxidizing the thinned portion of the silicon substrate can be used, for example, as a window to provide optical access through the silicon substrate.

  14. Comparison of methods for the measurement of radiation dose distributions in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy: Ge-doped optical fiber, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} radiochromic plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A. L.; Di Pietro, P.; Alobaidli, S.; Issa, F.; Doran, S.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distribution measurement in clinical high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is challenging, because of the high dose gradients, large dose variations, and small scale, but it is essential to verify accurate treatment planning and treatment equipment performance. The authors compare and evaluate three dosimetry systems for potential use in brachytherapy dose distribution measurement: Ge-doped optical fibers, EBT3 Gafchromic film with multichannel analysis, and the radiochromic material PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign} with optical-CT readout. Methods: Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibers with 6 {mu}m active core and 5.0 mm length were sensitivity-batched and their thermoluminescent properties used via conventional heating and annealing cycles. EBT3 Gafchromic film of 30 {mu}m active thickness was calibrated in three color channels using a nominal 6 MV linear accelerator. A 48-bit transmission scanner and advanced multichannel analysis method were utilized to derive dose measurements. Samples of the solid radiochromic polymer PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, 60 mm diameter and 100 mm height, were analyzed with a parallel beam optical CT scanner. Each dosimetry system was used to measure the dose as a function of radial distance from a Co-60 HDR source, with results compared to Monte Carlo TG-43 model data. Each system was then used to measure the dose distribution along one or more lines through typical clinical dose distributions for cervix brachytherapy, with results compared to treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Purpose-designed test objects constructed of Solid Water and held within a full-scatter water tank were utilized. Results: All three dosimetry systems reproduced the general shape of the isolated source radial dose function and the TPS dose distribution. However, the dynamic range of EBT3 exceeded those of doped optical fibers and PRESAGE{sup Registered-Sign }, and the latter two suffered from unacceptable noise and artifact. For the experimental

  15. Theory of amorphous ices

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2014-01-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens. PMID:24858957

  16. NiO gate GaN-based enhancement-mode hetrojunction field-effect transistor with extremely low on-resistance using metal organic chemical vapor deposition regrown Ge-doped layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Asamira; Choe, Songbeak; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a normally-off GaN-based transistor with an extremely low on-resistance (R on) fabricated by using a Ge-doped n++-GaN layer for ohmic contacts. We developed a novel GaN regrowth technique using Ge as a dopant, which achieved an extremely high doping concentration of 1 × 1020 cm-3, and thereby the lowest specific contact resistance of 1.5 × 10-6 Ω·cm2. The NiO gate fabricated using an atomic layer deposition technique reduced the spacing between the source and drain electrodes. The fabricated device showed the record-breaking R on of 0.95 Ω·mm with the maximum drain current and transconductance of 1.1 A/mm and 490 mS/mm, respectively. Note that the obtained threshold voltage was 0.55 V. This extremely low R on characteristic indicates the great potential of NiO-gate GaN-based heterojunction field-effect transistors.

  17. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  18. New transformations between crystalline and amorphous ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Chen, L. C.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    High-pressure optical and spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain directly the ice I(h) - hda-ice transformation in a diamond-anvil cell, and the stability of the amorphous form is examined as functions of pressure and temperature. It is demonstrated that hda-ice transforms abruptly at 4 GPa and 77 K to a crystalline phase close in structure to orientationally disordered ice-VII and to a more highly ordered, ice-VIII-like structure at higher temperatures. This is the first time that an amorphous solid is observed to convert to a crystalline solid at low temperatures by compression alone. Phase transitions of this type may be relevant on icy planetary satellites, and there may also be implications for the high-pressure behavior of silica.

  19. Generation of crystalline silica from sugarcane burning.

    PubMed

    Le Blond, Jennifer S; Horwell, Claire J; Williamson, Ben J; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2010-07-08

    Sugarcane leaves contain amorphous silica, which may crystallise to form crystalline silica polymorphs (cristobalite or quartz), during commercial sugarcane harvesting where sugarcane plants are burned. Respirable airborne particulate containing these phases may present an occupational health hazard. Following from an earlier pilot study (J. S. Le Blond, B. J. Williamson, C. J. Horwell, A. K. Monro, C. A. Kirk and C. Oppenheimer, Atmos. Environ., 2008, 42, 5558-5565) in which experimental burning of sugarcane leaves yielded crystalline silica, here we report on actual conditions during sugarcane burning on commercial estates, investigate the physico-chemical properties of the cultivated leaves and ash products, and quantify the presence of crystalline silica. Commercially grown raw sugarcane leaf was found to contain up to 1.8 wt% silica, mostly in the form of amorphous silica bodies (with trace impurities e.g., Al, Na, Mg), with only a small amount of quartz. Thermal images taken during several pre-harvest burns recorded temperatures up to 1056 degrees C, which is sufficient for metastable cristobalite formation. No crystalline silica was detected in airborne particulate from pre-harvest burning, collected using a cascade impactor. The sugarcane trash ash formed after pre-harvest burning contained between 10 and 25 wt% SiO(2), mostly in an amorphous form, but with up to 3.5 wt% quartz. Both quartz and cristobalite were identified in the sugarcane bagasse ash (5-15 wt% and 1-3 wt%, respectively) formed in the processing factory. Electron microprobe analysis showed trace impurities of Mg, Al and Fe in the silica particles in the ash. The absence of crystalline silica in the airborne emissions and lack of cristobalite in trash ash suggest that high temperatures during pre-harvest burning were not sustained long enough for cristobalite to form, which is supported by the presence of low temperature sylvite and calcite in the residual ash. The occurrence of quartz and

  20. Amorphous silica nanoparticles trigger vascular endothelial cell injury through apoptosis and autophagy via reactive oxygen species-mediated MAPK/Bcl-2 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Caixia; Yang, Man; Jing, Li; Wang, Ji; Yu, Yang; Li, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zhou, Xianqing; Li, Yanbo; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Environmental exposure to silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) is inevitable due to their widespread application in industrial, commercial, and biomedical fields. In recent years, most investigators focus on the evaluation of cardiovascular effects of SiNPs in vivo and in vitro. Endothelial injury and dysfunction is now hypothesized to be a dominant mechanism in the development of cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to explore interaction of SiNPs with endothelial cells, and extensively investigate the exact effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the signaling molecules and cytotoxicity involved in SiNPs-induced endothelial injury. Significant induction of cytotoxicity as well as oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy was observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells following the SiNPs exposure (P<0.05). The oxidative stress was induced by ROS generation, leading to redox imbalance and lipid peroxidation. SiNPs induced mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by membrane potential collapse, and elevated Bax and declined bcl-2 expression, ultimately leading to apoptosis, and also increased number of autophagosomes and autophagy marker proteins, such as LC3 and p62. Phosphorylated ERK, PI3K, Akt, and mTOR were significantly decreased, but phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were increased in SiNPs-exposed endothelial cells. In contrast, all of these stimulation phenomena were effectively inhibited by N-acetylcysteine. The N-acetylcysteine supplement attenuated SiNPs-induced endothelial toxicity through inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy via MAPK/Bcl-2 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, as well as suppression of intracellular ROS property via activating antioxidant enzyme and Nrf2 signaling. In summary, the results demonstrated that SiNPs triggered autophagy and apoptosis via ROS-mediated MAPK/Bcl-2 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in endothelial cells, and subsequently disturbed the endothelial homeostasis and impaired endothelium. Our findings may provide

  1. Ice sheets as a missing source of silica to the polar oceans

    PubMed Central

    Hawkings, Jon R.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Benning, Liane G.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Tranter, Martyn; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Raiswell, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Ice sheets play a more important role in the global silicon cycle than previously appreciated. Input of dissolved and amorphous particulate silica into natural waters stimulates the growth of diatoms. Here we measure dissolved and amorphous silica in Greenland Ice Sheet meltwaters and icebergs, demonstrating the potential for high ice sheet export. Our dissolved and amorphous silica flux is 0.20 (0.06–0.79) Tmol year−1, ∼50% of the input from Arctic rivers. Amorphous silica comprises >95% of this flux and is highly soluble in sea water, as indicated by a significant increase in dissolved silica across a fjord salinity gradient. Retreating palaeo ice sheets were therefore likely responsible for high dissolved and amorphous silica fluxes into the ocean during the last deglaciation, reaching values of ∼5.5 Tmol year−1, similar to the estimated export from palaeo rivers. These elevated silica fluxes may explain high diatom productivity observed during the last glacial–interglacial period. PMID:28120824

  2. Using Nucleation Theory to Understand the Dissolution Kinetics of Vitreous and Biogenic Silica: The Paradox of the Silica Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, N.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies of the global biogeochemistry are refocusing on the demineralization kinetics of biogenic silicas—amorphous silicas produced by marine phytoplankton, sponges and terrestrial plants. Amorphous silica lacks the crystalline order that can be studied with classical terrace, ledge, and kink-based models of crystal growth and dissolution. Despite variations in Si-O-Si bond lengths and angles, all of these materials share the same fundamental chemical unit, silica tetrahedron. Silica tetrahedra on quartz surfaces have distinct hydration chemistries with two predominant types of sites available for reaction with water: gamma species have a higher degree of connectivity with the mineral surface via binding to three bridging oxygens while beta groups are bonded to two bridging oxygens. Surface groups of amorphous silica have the same coordinations as gamma and beta species in quartz. Support for the idea that crystalline and amorphous SiO2 exhibit similar dissolution and growth reaction pathways are found in rate data reported for the synthetic and biogenic amorphous silicas and quartz. Previous studies show that the `bulk' rate of silica production by quartz and amorphous silica is enhanced 50- 100 fold when alkaline or alkaline earth cations are introduced to otherwise pure solutions. Our recent study of quartz dissolution found this `salt effect' arises by a transition from dissolution at preexisting step edges and dislocation defects (detachment of beta species) to the homogeneous nucleation of vacancy islands across the entire surface (plucking of gamma species) in CaCl2 and NaCl solutions. This transition to homogeneous nucleation results in an exponential dependence of quartz dissolution rate on increasing chemical driving force (undersaturation) that is explained by the classical nucleation theory that was developed for crystal growth. We pose the question of why amorphous silica should also be enhanced 100-fold by electrolytes. From a mechanistic

  3. Irradiation-induced amorphization of AlPO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeram, A. N.; Hobbs, L. W.; Bordes, N.; Ewing, R. C.

    1996-08-01

    AlPO 4, in the mineral form berlinite, is isostructural with α-quartz. We have investigated the irradiation-induced amorphization of hydrothermally-grown berlinite and found that — like quartz and other silicas but unlike most other phosphates — it undergoes solid-state radiolyis, with an efficiency fifty times that of quartz at room temperature, and amorphizes at an absorbed ionization dose of about 1 GGy. High-resolution TEM revealed that — unlike quartz in which small amorphous inclusions nucleate — electron-irradiated AlPO 4 proceeds uniformly to an aperiodic state, much as do cristobalite and tridymite, and 20 times faster. It was found also to amorphize under 1.5 MeV Kr + ion irradiation at a collisional energy density (10 eV/atom) similar to that for quartz and in keeping with the degree of structural freedom afforded by its tetrahedral network structure. The critical ion fluence for amorphization was found to increase by a factor of 5 between 300 and 600 K. Radial distribution functions derived from energy-filtered electron diffraction patterns from regions amorphized by electrons resemble those of electron-amorphized quartz with some additional features.

  4. Trehalose amorphization and recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2008-10-13

    The stability of the amorphous trehalose prepared by using several procedures is presented and discussed. Amorphization is shown to occur by melting (T(m)=215 degrees C) or milling (room temperature) the crystalline anhydrous form TRE-beta. Fast dehydration of the di-hydrate crystalline polymorph, TRE-h, also produces an amorphous phase. Other dehydration procedures of TRE-h, such as microwave treatment, supercritical extraction or gentle heating at low scan rates, give variable fractions of the polymorph TRE-alpha, that undergo amorphization upon melting (at lower temperature, T(m)=130 degrees C). Additional procedures for amorphization, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying or evaporation of trehalose solutions, are discussed. All these procedures are classified depending on the capability of the undercooled liquid phase to undergo cold crystallization upon heating the glassy state at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (T(g)=120 degrees C). The recrystallizable amorphous phase is invariably obtained by the melt of the polymorph TRE-alpha, while other procedures always give an amorphous phase that is unable to crystallize above T(g). The existence of two different categories is analyzed in terms of the transformation paths and the hypothesis that the systems may exhibit different molecular mobilities.

  5. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  6. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Izvekov, Sergei Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O–Si–O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O–O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O–O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  7. Atomistic Modeling of Mechanical Loss in Amorphous Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical and optical loss in amorphous solids, described by the internal friction and light scattering susceptibility are investigated using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. We implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software. These methods were used to locate the different local potential energy minima that a system visits through an MD trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. From the distributions of the barrier height and asymmetry, and the relaxation time of the different transition states we calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and mixed oxides. Acknowledgment: NSF/PHYS

  8. Size- and structure-dependent toxicity of silica particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Miyaoi, Kenichi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Nano- and micro-particulates firmly attach with the surface of various biological systems. In some chronic pulmonary disease such as asbestosis and silicosis, causative particulates will induce chronic inflammatory disorder, followed by poor prognosis diseases. However, nano- and micro-scale specific toxicity of silica particulates is not well examined enough to recognize the risk of nano- and micro-particulates from the clinical aspect. To clarify the effect of the size and structure of silica particulates on the cellular damage and the biological response, we assessed the cytotoxicity of the various kinds of silica particles including amorphous and crystalline silica, in mouse alveolar macrophage culture, focusing on the fibrotic and inflammatory response. Our study showed that the cytotoxicity, which depends on the particle size and surface area, is correlated with their inflammatory response. By contrast, production of TGF-β, which is one of the fibrotic agents in lung, by addition of crystal silica was much higher than that of amorphous silica. We conclude that fibrosis and inflammation are induced at different phases and that the size- and structure-differences of silica particulates affect the both biological responses, caused by surface activity, radical species, and so on.

  9. Synthesis of stable ACC using mesoporous silica gel as a support

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate supported by mesoporous silica gel was successfully synthesized. The silica gel support is prepared through the hydrolytic polycondensation of ethyl silicate under suitable conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) observations reveal that the morphology of the products is branched with cruciform-like and flower-like structure. Raman spectroscopic analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation of the products confirm the combination of stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles and mesoporous silica gel. A possible growth mechanism for the branched structure has been proposed. Results indicate potential application of this work to ACC storage, crystal engineering, biomimetic synthesis, etc. PMID:25246865

  10. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  11. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  12. Postsynthetic processing of copper hydroxide-silica tubes.

    PubMed

    Roszol, Laszlo; Makki, Rabih; Steinbock, Oliver

    2013-06-28

    Using reaction conditions far from equilibrium, we produce hollow tubes of silica-supported Cu(OH)2. The samples are then processed postsynthetically without compromising the macroscopic tubular structure. We specifically induce an amorphous-crystalline transition and demonstrate the sequential conversion of Cu(OH)2 to CuO, Cu2O, and metallic copper using thermal treatment and wet chemistry.

  13. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  14. Inexpensive approach for production of high-surface-area silica nanoparticles from rice hulls biomass.

    PubMed

    Palanivelu, Rajagounder; Padmanaban, Periasamy; Sutha, Sadhasivam; Rajendran, Venkatachalam

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we prepared amorphous and crystalline silica nanoparticles from rice hulls biomass using pyrolysis technique at different processing temperatures such as 923, 973, 1023, 1073, 1123 and 1173 K. X-ray fluorescence studies show that the purity of all the synthesised silica nanoparticles is in the range of 98-99.7%. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that amorphous silica nanoparticles are formed at 923-1023 K, whereas crystalline particles at 1073-1173 K. Morphology and microstructure of silica nanoparticles are studied by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Silica nanoparticles obtained at different processing temperatures yield particle size in the range of 6-100 nm. Chemical composition and surface functionalities of the particles are examined by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies. The developed method effectively uses rice hulls biomass as a green natural source in the synthesis of amorphous and crystalline silica nanoparticles with high-specific surface area. The optimised processing temperature (1023 K) enables amorphous silica nanoparticles to have high-specific surface area of 538 m(2)g(-1).

  15. Origin of organism-dependent biogenic silica quartz formation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kiminori

    2011-12-15

    Organism-dependent biogenic quartz formation in the steady-state environment is a phenomenon that can address the global environmental issues such as diagenetic evolution, biogeochemical cycling, and reservoir formation, but detailed studies have not been performed so far. Here, steady-state quartz formation is studied for amorphous silica of different biogenic origin on the basis of the recently established mechanistic model [Sato et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 2011, 115, 18131]. Amorphous silica originated from rice husks possesses angstrom-scale pores larger by 1.3 Å than those originated from diatom algae. The slight difference of pore size dramatically reduces activation energies of water diffusion by 78% and reactions of water molecules at pore surfaces by 47%, resulting in the reduction of activation energy of biogenic quartz formation by 64%. The present findings evidence that angstrom-scale pores intrinsically residing in the amorphous matrix are the organism-dependent origin of steady-state biogenic quartz formation.

  16. In vitro comet and micronucleus assays do not predict morphological transforming effects of silica particles in Syrian Hamster Embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Darne, Christian; Coulais, Catherine; Terzetti, Francine; Fontana, Caroline; Binet, Stéphane; Gaté, Laurent; Guichard, Yves

    2016-01-15

    Crystalline silica particles and asbestos have both been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, because of the limited data available, amorphous silica was not classifiable. In vitro, the carcinogenic potential of natural crystalline and amorphous silica particles has been revealed by the Syrian Hamster Embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay. On the other hand, the genotoxic potential of those substances has not been investigated in SHE cells. And yet, genotoxicity assays are commonly used for hazard evaluation and they are often used as in vitro assays of reference to predict a possible carcinogenic potential. The main objective of this study was to compare the genotoxic potential and the carcinogenic potential of different crystalline and amorphous silica particles in SHE cells. Three silica samples of different crystallinity were used: natural amorphous silica, partially crystallized silica and quartz silica particles. Their genotoxicity were tested through the in vitro micronucleus assay and the comet assay in SHE, and their carcinogenic potential through the SHE transformation assay. In addition, silica samples were also tested with the same genotoxicity assays in V79 hamster-lung cells, a common in vitro model for particle exposure. Results obtained in the micronucleus and the comet assays show that none of the silica was capable of inducing genotoxic effects in SHE cells and only the amorphous silica induced genotoxic effects in V79 cells. However in the SHE cell transformation assays, the partially crystallized and quartz silica were able to induce morphological cell transformation. Together, these data suggest that, in vitro, the short-term genotoxic assays alone are not sufficient to predict the hazard and the carcinogenic potential of this type of particles; SHE transformation assay appears a more reliable tool for this purpose and should be included in the "in vitro battery assays" for hazard

  17. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    PubMed

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose.

  18. Molecular imprinting of bulk, microporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Alexander; Davis, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular imprinting aims to create solid materials containing chemical functionalities that are spatially organized by covalent or non-covalent interactions with imprint (or template) molecules during the synthesis process. Subsequent removal of the imprint molecules leaves behind designed sites for the recognition of small molecules, making the material ideally suited for applications such as separations, chemical sensing and catalysis. Until now, the molecular imprinting of bulk polymers and polymer and silica surfaces has been reported, but the extension of these methods to a wider range of materials remains problematic. For example, the formation of substrate-specific cavities within bulk silica, while conceptually straightforward, has been difficult to accomplish experimentally. Here we describe the imprinting of bulk amorphous silicas with single aromatic rings carrying up to three 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane side groups; this generates and occupies microporosity and attaches functional organic groups to the pore walls in a controlled fashion. The triethoxysilane part of the molecules' side groups is incorporated into the silica framework during sol-gel synthesis, and subsequent removal of the aromatic core creates a cavity with spatially organized aminopropyl groups covalently anchored to the pore walls. We find that the imprinted silicas act as shape-selective base catalysts. Our strategy can be extended to imprint other functional groups, which should give access to a wide range of functionalized materials.

  19. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  20. Characterization of zirconia- and niobia-silica mixture coatings produced by ion-beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Melninkaitis, Andrius; Tolenis, Tomas; Mazule, Lina; Mirauskas, Julius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Mangote, Benoit; Fu Xinghai; Zerrad, Myriam; Gallais, Laurent; Commandre, Mireille; Kicas, Simonas; Drazdys, Ramutis

    2011-03-20

    ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} mixture coatings as well as those of pure zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) deposited by ion-beam sputtering were investigated. Refractive-index dispersions, bandgaps, and volumetric fractions of materials in mixed coatings were analyzed from spectrophotometric data. Optical scattering, surface roughness, nanostructure, and optical resistance were also studied. Zirconia-silica mixtures experience the transition from crystalline to amorphous phase by increasing the content of SiO{sub 2}. This also results in reduced surface roughness. All niobia and silica coatings and their mixtures were amorphous. The obtained laser-induced damage thresholds in the subpicosecond range also correlates with respect to the silica content in both zirconia- and niobia-silica mixtures.

  1. Evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity after topical exposure for 90 days

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seong, Nak-won; So, Byoung Joon; Seo, Heung-sik; Kim, Jun-ho; Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Seo, Mu Yeb; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Maeng, Eun Ho; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Silica is a very common material that can be found in both crystalline and amorphous forms. Well-known toxicities of the lung can occur after exposure to the crystalline form of silica. However, the toxicities of the amorphous form of silica have not been thoroughly studied. The majority of in vivo studies of amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) were performed using an inhalation exposure method. Since silica NPs can be commonly administered through the skin, a study of dermal silica toxicity was necessary to determine any harmful effects from dermal exposures. The present study focused on the results of systemic toxicity after applying 20 nm colloidal silica NPs on rat skin for 90 days, in accordance with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guideline 411 with a good laboratory practice system. Unlike the inhalation route or gastrointestinal route, the contact of silica NPs through skin did not result in any toxicity or any change in internal organs up to a dose of 2,000 mg/kg in rats. PMID:25565831

  2. Pressure-Induced Transformations in Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingma, Kathleen Jane

    Polymorphic phase transitions in the silica minerals alpha-quartz and stishovite have been investigated using diamond-anvil cell techniques at room temperature. Structural and vibrational properties of these materials were monitored as a function of pressure using in situ Raman scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and optical microscopy. Pressure-quenched samples were characterized at ambient conditions using Raman spectroscopy, electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, backscattered and secondary electron imaging, and optical microscopy. Solid-state amorphization of alpha -quartz has been found to begin with formation of crystallographically controlled planar defects, followed by growth of amorphous silica at these defect sites. Characteristic microstructures (planar defects and amorphous lamellae) are found in quartz upon quasihydrostatic and nonhydrostatic compression and from comminution, suggesting that there is a common mechanism for solid-state amorphization of silicates in static and shock compression experiments, meteorite impact, and deformation by tectonic processes. A new crystalline-crystalline transformation has been discovered in alpha-quartz at 21 GPa, documented by abrupt changes in the synchrotron x-ray diffraction pattern and the Raman spectrum. Upon decompression, the high-pressure phase reverts to a quartz -like structure in an unusual twinned state. The Raman spectrum of samples recovered from hydrostatic compression closely resembles spectra of both dynamically shocked quartz and quartz that has experienced extensive grinding; each shows significant deviations from the spectrum of pristine quartz. The transformation from rutile-structured silica (stishovite) to the CaCl_2-structured form has been documented by high-pressure Raman scattering at 51 GPa. At this pressure, the pressure dependence of the soft B_{1rm g} vibrational mode changes sign, and the stishovite E _{rm g} mode splits, as predicted for the transformation

  3. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  4. Ordered nanoporous silica as carriers for improved delivery of water insoluble drugs: a comparative study between three dimensional and two dimensional macroporous silica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Qinfu; Hu, Yanchen; Sun, Lizhang; Bai, Ling; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the drug release properties and stability of the nanoporous silica with different pore architectures as a matrix for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs. For this purpose, three dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) silica with 3D continuous and interconnected macropores of different sizes (200 nm and 500 nm) and classic mesoporous silica (ie, Mobil Composition of Matter [MCM]-41 and Santa Barbara Amorphous [SBA]-15) with well-ordered two dimensional (2D) cylindrical mesopores were successfully fabricated and then loaded with the model drug indomethacin (IMC) via the solvent deposition method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to systematically characterize all IMC-loaded nanoporous silica formulations, evidencing the successful inclusion of IMC into nanopores, the reduced crystallinity, and finally accelerated dissolution of IMC. It was worth mentioning that, in comparison to 2D mesoporous silica, 3DOM silica displayed a more rapid release profile, which may be ascribed to the 3D interconnected pore networks and the highly accessible surface areas. The results obtained from the stability test indicated that the amorphous state of IMC entrapped in the 2D mesoporous silica (SBA-15 and MCM-41) has a better physical stability than in that of 3DOM silica. Moreover, the dissolution rate and stability of IMC loaded in 3DOM silica was closely related to the pore size of macroporous silica. The colorimetric 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assays in combination with direct morphology observations demonstrated the good biocompatibility of nanoporous silica, especially for 3DOM silica and SBA-15. The present work encourages further study of the drug release properties and stability of drug entrapped in different pore architecture of silica in order to realize

  5. Presence of nano-sized silica during in vitro digestion of foods containing silica as a food additive.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruud; Kramer, Evelien; Oomen, Agnes G; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Oegema, Gerlof; Tromp, Peter C; Fokkink, Remco; Rietveld, Anton; Marvin, Hans J P; Weigel, Stefan; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2012-03-27

    The presence, dissolution, agglomeration state, and release of materials in the nano-size range from food containing engineered nanoparticles during human digestion is a key question for the safety assessment of these materials. We used an in vitro model to mimic the human digestion. Food products subjected to in vitro digestion included (i) hot water, (ii) coffee with powdered creamer, (iii) instant soup, and (iv) pancake which either contained silica as the food additive E551, or to which a form of synthetic amorphous silica or 32 nm SiO(2) particles were added. The results showed that, in the mouth stage of the digestion, nano-sized silica particles with a size range of 5-50 and 50-500 nm were present in food products containing E551 or added synthetic amorphous silica. However, during the successive gastric digestion stage, this nano-sized silica was no longer present for the food matrices coffee and instant soup, while low amounts were found for pancakes. Additional experiments showed that the absence of nano-sized silica in the gastric stage can be contributed to an effect of low pH combined with high electrolyte concentrations in the gastric digestion stage. Large silica agglomerates are formed under these conditions as determined by DLS and SEM experiments and explained theoretically by the extended DLVO theory. Importantly, in the subsequent intestinal digestion stage, the nano-sized silica particles reappeared again, even in amounts higher than in the saliva (mouth) digestion stage. These findings suggest that, upon consumption of foods containing E551, the gut epithelium is most likely exposed to nano-sized silica.

  6. Multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Victor Shang-Yi; Tsai, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hung-Ting; Pruski, Marek; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides bifunctional silica mesoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles ("MSN"), having pores modified with diarylammonium triflate and perfluoroaryl moieties, that are useful for the acid-catalyzed esterification of organic acids with organic alcohols.

  7. Mesoporous silica coated silica-titania spherical particles: from impregnation to core-shell formation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Takei, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2016-11-22

    The coating of solid surfaces with inorganic materials is a promising approach not only to impart various functionalities but also to modify physicochemical properties that are affected by the geometry/structure of the coating. In this study, a silica-hexadecyltrimethylammonium (silica-CTA) hybrid layer was deposited on monodispersed spherical particles composed of titania and octadecylamine (titania-ODA) by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethoxysilane in aqueous CTA/ammonia/methanol solution. The formation of the coating was confirmed by SEM and TEM observations. The coating thickness varied from a few nm to 100 nm depending on the Si/Ti ratio. We found that Si/Ti = 0.68 resulted in the formation of microporous silica-titania particles with the pore size of 0.7 nm as revealed by nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Because the titania-ODA particles can be converted to mesoporous titania particles after removing ODA by acid/base treatment, the silica species can be impregnated into the titania particles and replace ODA under basic conditions. By increasing the Si/Ti molar ratio up to 1.4, silica-titania particles with non-porous structures were obtained. An amorphous to anatase transition occurred at around 800 °C, indicating the complete impregnation of silica inside the titania particles. Further increases of the Si/Ti molar ratio (to 3.4 and 6.8) led to the formation of the silica-CTA shell on the core particles, and the shell was converted to mesoporous silica layers with a pore size of 2 nm after calcination at 550 °C for 5 h. Non-linear control of the pore size/structure is presented for the first time; this will be useful for the precise design of diverse hybrid materials for optical, catalytic and biomedical applications.

  8. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  9. Silica extraction from geothermal water

    DOEpatents

    Bourcier, William L; Bruton, Carol J

    2014-09-23

    A method of producing silica from geothermal fluid containing low concentration of the silica of less than 275 ppm includes the steps of treating the geothermal fluid containing the silica by reverse osmosis treatment thereby producing a concentrated fluid containing the silica, seasoning the concentrated fluid thereby producing a slurry having precipitated colloids containing the silica, and separating the silica from the slurry.

  10. Single-layer honeycomb like structure of silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahangirov, Seymur; Ozcelik, V. Ongun; Ciraci, Salim

    2014-03-01

    Silica or SiO2, the main constituent of earth's rocks has several 3D complex crystalline and amorphous phases, but it does not have a graphite like layered structure in 3D. Our theoretical analysis and numerical calculations from the first-principles predict that silica can have stable, suspended, single-layer honeycomb like allotrope, h α-silica (silicatene), which can be viewed to be derived from the oxidation of silicene and it has intriguing atomic structure with re-entrant angles in hexagons. It is a wide band gap semiconductor, which attains remarkable electromechanical properties showing geometrical changes under external electric field. In particular, it is an auxetic nanomaterial with negative Poisson's ratio and has high piezoelectric coefficient. Coverage of foreign adatoms can attribute new functionalities to h α-silica such that by oxidation it turns into to a wide band gap insulator like the parent quartz.

  11. Amorphous material in high strain experimental fault gouges

    SciTech Connect

    Yund, R.A.; Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D. )

    1990-09-10

    The microstructures of gouges produced in room temperature, rotary shear sliding experiments were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Gouges were produced by sliding on ground surfaces of granite, quartzite, or marble except for one experiment in which a 1-mm-thick simulated gouge layer was used. Water was added to the sliding surfaces of all but one sample. Crystal plastic processes play no role in the granite and quartzite gouges and a minor role in the marbles. All of the gouges consist of mostly submicron crystalline fragments; in addition, the granite gouges contain 5-60% amorphous material, and the quartzite gouge contains {approximately}50% amorphous material. In the granite samples the composition of the amorphous material commonly lies between K-rich and Na, Ca-rich feldspars, although portions may be silica-rich. The microstructural relations suggest that the amorphous material forms by comminution of fragments rather than by melting. The amount of amorphous material increases, and the size of the largest crystalline fragments decreases, with an increase in average shear strain, although the microstructure is nearly uniform throughout each granite gouge layer. These observations suggest that after slip becomes localized on Y shear surfaces and/or R{sub 1} Riedel shears the entire gouge layer must continue to undergo deformation. It is suggested that cyclic deformation in the gouge must occur to accommodate the passage of geometric irregularities on the active slip surfaces.

  12. Inhomogeneous Elastic Response of Silica Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonforte, F.; Tanguy, A.; Wittmer, J. P.; Barrat, J.-L.

    2006-08-01

    Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the properties of the nonaffine displacement field induced by macroscopic uniaxial deformation of amorphous silica, a strong glass according to Angell’s classification. We demonstrate the existence of a length scale ξ characterizing the correlations of this field (corresponding to a volume of about 1000 atoms), and compare its structure to the one observed in a standard fragile model glass. The “boson-peak” anomaly of the density of states can be traced back in both cases to elastic inhomogeneities on wavelengths smaller than ξ where classical continuum elasticity becomes simply unapplicable.

  13. Preparation of Potassium-Posphate-embedded Amorphous Silicate Material from Rice Straw Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Permatasari, N.; Sucahya, T. N.; Purwanti, S. T.; Munawaroh, H. S. H.; Abdullah, A. G.; Hasanah, L.

    2017-03-01

    Rice straw is one of the agricultural wastes that increased every year. Since rice straw ash contains 74.6% of silica, this material is potentially used to produce silica. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility process for generating potassium-phosphate-embedded amorphous silica material. To extract silica from rice straw waste, we used potassium hydroxide solution followed by an acid precipitation treatment. Based on the experimental results, the proposed method is potential to be used as an alternative technique for getting silica material. In addition, the method has a positive impact on the environment because this is potential for reducing the amount of rice straw waste, whereas at the same time this provides an added value to the rice straw waste itself.

  14. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  17. Amorphous metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Veazey, Chris; Johnson, William L.

    2003-01-01

    The bulk glass forming alloy Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is processed into a low-density amorphous metallic foam. Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is mixed with hydrated B2O3, which releases gas at elevated temperature and/or low pressure. Very homogeneous foams are achieved due to the high viscosity of the alloy even at its liquidus temperature. By processing at the liquidus temperature and decreasing the pressure to 10-2 mbar, well-distributed bubbles expand to foam the material. Foam densities as low as 1.4×103 kg/m3 were obtained, corresponding to a bubble volume fraction of 84%. The bubble diameter ranges between 2×10-4 and 1×10-3 m. Thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry confirms the amorphous nature of the foam. Furthermore, it reveals that the foam's thermal stability is comparable to the bulk material.

  18. Defects in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    this map with a similar plot of the experimental data. An experimental deformation data map for Pd-based amorphous al- loys is shown in fig. 10. In the...Masumoto. I Mat. Sci. 12 (1977) 1927, [IgI T M Ha.es. J. W Allen. J. Tauc . B. C. Giessen and J. J. Hauser. Phys. Re. Lett. 41 i197s) 1282 [191 J

  19. Enhanced stab resistance of armor composites with functionalized silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Clements, Floria; Rangari, Vijaya; Dhanak, Vinod; Beamson, Graham

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally shear thickening fluid (STF) reinforced with Kevlar has been used to develop flexible armor. At the core of the STF-Kevlar composites is a mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and silica particles. This mixture is often known as STF and is consisted of approximately 45 wt % PEG and 55 wt % silica. During rheological tests, STF shows instantaneous spike in viscosity above a critical shear rate. Fabrication of STF-Kevlar composites requires preparation of STF, dilution with ethanol, and then impregnation with Kevlar. In the current approach, nanoscale silica particles were dispersed directly into a mixture of PEG and ethanol through a sonic cavitation process. Two types of silica nanoparticles were used in the investigation: 30 nm crystalline silica and 7 nm amorphous silica. The admixture was then reinforced with Kevlar fabric to produce flexible armor composites. In the next step, silica particles are functionalized with a silane coupling agent to enhance bonding between silica and PEG. The performance of the resulting armor composites improved significantly. As evidenced by National Institute of Justice spike tests, the energy required for zero-layer penetration (i.e., no penetration) jumped twofold: from 12 to 25 J cm2/g. The source of this improvement has been traced to the formation of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds between silica and PEG and superior coating of Kevlar filaments with particles. Fourier transform infrared, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy studies were performed to examine chemical bonds, elemental composition, and particle dispersion responsible for such improvement. In summary, our experiments have demonstrated that functionalization of silica particles followed by direct dispersion into PEG resulted in superior Kevlar composites having much higher spike resistance.

  20. Fabrication of monodisperse hollow silica spheres and effect on water vapor permeability of polyacrylate membrane.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Yang, Yongqiang; Ma, Jianzhong

    2013-10-01

    Polystyrene/silica core-shell spheres were fabricated using polystyrene as templates by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate through a sol-gel process, in which polystyrene was synthesized by emulsion polymerization. Then, hollow silica spheres were obtained after selective removal of the organic polystyrene core from the polystyrene/silica core-shell spheres by tetrahydrofuran etching. The effect of hollow silica spheres on water vapor permeability, mechanical property, and water uptake of polyacrylate membrane were investigated. The microstructure analysis shows that the mean size and wall thickness of hollow silica spheres are 170 nm and 20 nm, respectively. The silica shells consist of amorphous silica seed assembly with a broad size distribution, which roughen the surfaces of hollow silica spheres greatly. The specific surface area of hollow silica spheres is bigger than that of polystyrene/silica core-shell spheres. Hollow silica spheres can significantly improve water vapor permeability of polyacrylate membrane, but lead to the reduction in mechanical property.

  1. Hierarchical structures of amorphous solids characterized by persistent homology

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takenobu; Hirata, Akihiko; Escolar, Emerson G.; Matsue, Kaname; Nishiura, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a topological method that extracts hierarchical structures of various amorphous solids. The method is based on the persistence diagram (PD), a mathematical tool for capturing shapes of multiscale data. The input to the PDs is given by an atomic configuration and the output is expressed as 2D histograms. Then, specific distributions such as curves and islands in the PDs identify meaningful shape characteristics of the atomic configuration. Although the method can be applied to a wide variety of disordered systems, it is applied here to silica glass, the Lennard-Jones system, and Cu-Zr metallic glass as standard examples of continuous random network and random packing structures. In silica glass, the method classified the atomic rings as short-range and medium-range orders and unveiled hierarchical ring structures among them. These detailed geometric characterizations clarified a real space origin of the first sharp diffraction peak and also indicated that PDs contain information on elastic response. Even in the Lennard-Jones system and Cu-Zr metallic glass, the hierarchical structures in the atomic configurations were derived in a similar way using PDs, although the glass structures and properties substantially differ from silica glass. These results suggest that the PDs provide a unified method that extracts greater depth of geometric information in amorphous solids than conventional methods. PMID:27298351

  2. The Stabilization of Amorphous Zopiclone in an Amorphous Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Milne, Marnus; Liebenberg, Wilna; Aucamp, Marique

    2015-10-01

    Zopiclone is a poorly soluble psychotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize an amorphous form of zopiclone as well as the characterization and performance of a stable amorphous solid dispersion. The amorphous form was prepared by the well-known method of quench-cooling of the melt. The solid dispersion was prepared by a solvent evaporation method of zopiclone, polyvinylpyrrolidone-25 (PVP-25), and methanol, followed by freeze-drying. The physico-chemical properties and stability of amorphous zopiclone and the solid dispersion was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), solubility, and dissolution studies. The zopiclone amorphous solid-state form was determined to be a fragile glass; it was concluded that the stability of the amorphous form is influenced by both temperature and water. Exposure of amorphous zopiclone to moisture results in rapid transformation of the amorphous form to the crystalline dihydrated form. In comparison, the amorphous solid dispersion proved to be more stable with increased aqueous solubility.

  3. Silica-Ceria Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Baer, Donald R.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2012-04-25

    A new hybrid material system that consists of ceria attached silica nanoparticles has been developed. Because of the versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and antioxidant properties of ceria nanoparticles, this material system is ideally suited for biomedical applications. The silica particles of size ~50nm were synthesized by the Stöber synthesis method and ceria nanoparticles of size ~2-3nm was attached to the silica surface using a hetrocoagulation method. The presence of silanol groups on the surface of silica particles mediated homogenous nucleation of ceria which were attached to silica surface by Si-O-Ce bonding. The formations of silica-ceria hybrid nanostructures were characterized by X-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM image confirms the formation of individual crystallites of ceria nanoparticles attached to the silica surface. The XPS analysis indicates that ceria nanoparticles are chemically bonded to surface of silica and possess mixture of +3 and +4 chemical states.

  4. Spherical ordered mesoporous silicas and silica monoliths as stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Iapichella, Julien; Brunel, Daniel; Fajula, François; Bayram-Hahn, Zöfre; Unger, Klaus; Puy, Guillaume; Demesmay, Claire; Rocca, Jean-Louis

    2006-04-01

    Ordered mesoporous silicas such as micelle-templated silicas (MTS) feature unique textural properties in addition to their high surface area (approximately 1000 m2/g): narrow mesopore size distributions and controlled pore connectivity. These characteristics are highly relevant to chromatographic applications for resistance to mass transfer, which has never been studied in chromatography because of the absence of model materials such as MTS. Their synthesis is based on unique self-assembly processes between surfactants and silica. In order to take advantage of the perfectly adjustable texture of MTS in chromatographic applications, their particle morphology has to be tailored at the micrometer scale. We developed a synthesis strategy to control the particle morphology of MTS using the concept of pseudomorphic transformation. Pseudomorphism was recognized in the mineral world to gain a mineral that presents a morphology not related to its crystallographic symmetry group. Pseudomorphic transformations have been applied to amorphous spherical silica particles usually used in chromatography as stationary phases to produce MTS with the same morphology, using alkaline solution to dissolve progressively and locally silica and reprecipitate it around surfactant micelles into ordered MTS structures. Spherical beads of MTS with hexagonal and cubic symmetries have been synthesized and successfully used in HPLC in fast separation processes. MTS with a highly connected structure (cubic symmetry), uniform pores with a diameter larger than 6 nm in the form of particles of 5 microm could compete with monolithic silica columns. Monolithic columns are receiving strong interest and represent a milestone in the area of fast separation. Their synthesis is a sol-gel process based on phase separation between silica and water, which is assisted by the presence of polymers. The control of the synthesis of monolithic silica has been systematically explored. Because of unresolved yet

  5. Silazine to silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1993-01-01

    Thin film silica and/or methyl silicone were detected on most external surfaces of the retrieved LDEF. Both solar ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen can convert silicones to silica. Known sources of silicone in or on the LDEF appear inadequate to explain the ubiquitous presence of the silica and silicone films. Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) was used as the Challenger tile waterproofing compound for the Challenger/LDEF deployment mission. HMDS is both volatile and chemically reactive at STP. In addition, HMDS releases NH3 which depolymerizes silicone RTV's. Polyurethanes are also depolymerized. Experiments are reported that indicate much of the silicone and silica contamination of LDEF resulted directly or indirectly from HMDS.

  6. Sonochemical synthesis of silica and silica sulfuric acid nanoparticles from rice husk ash: a new and recyclable catalyst for the acetylation of alcohols and phenols under heterogeneous conditions.

    PubMed

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Javidi, Jaber

    2012-11-01

    Silica nanoparticles were synthesized from rice husk ash at room temperature by sonochemical method. The feeding rate of percipiteting agent and time of sonication were investigated. The nanostructure of the synthesized powder was realized by the FE-SEM photomicrograph, FT-IR spectroscopy, XRD and XRF analyses. These analytical observations have revealed that the nano-sized amorphous silica particles are formed and they are spheroidal in shape. The average particle size of the silica powders is found to be around 50 nm. The as-synthesized silica nanoparticles were subsequently modified with chlorosulfonic acid and prepared silica sulfuric acid nanoparticles, which were employed as an efficient catalyst for the acylation of alcohols and phenols with acetic anhydride in excellent yields under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. This reported method is simple, mild, and environmentally viable and catalyst can be simply recovered and reused over 9 times without any significant loss of its catalytic activity.

  7. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  8. Physical processes of quartz amorphization due to friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.; Miura, T.; Arakawa, I.; Shimizu, I.

    2011-12-01

    Solid state amorphization of minerals occurs in indentations, in shock experiments, and in high pressure metamorphic quartz rock. A production of amorphous material is also reported in experimentally created silicate gouges (Yund et al., 1990), and in San Andreas Fault core samples (Janssen et al., 2010). Rotary-shear friction experiments of quartz rocks imply dynamic weakening at seismic rates (Di Toro et al., 2004). These experiments have suggested that weakening is caused by formation and thixotropic behavior of a silica gel layer which comprises of very fine particles of hydrated amorphous silica on fault gouges (Goldsby & Tullis, 2002; Hayashi & Tsutsumi, 2010). Therefore, physical processes of amorphization are important to better understand weakening of quartz bearing rocks. In this study, we conducted a pin-on-disk friction experiment to investigate details of quartz amorphization (Muto et al, 2007). Disks were made of single crystals of synthetic and Brazilian quartz. The normal load F and sliding velocity V were ranged from 0.01 N to 1 N and from 0.01 m/s to 2.6 m/s, respectively. The friction was conducted using quartz and diamond pins (curvature radii of 0.2 ~ 3 mm) to large displacements (> 1000 m) under controlled atmosphere. We analyzed experiment samples by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. Raman spectroscopy (excitation wavelength 532.1 nm) provides lattice vibration modes, and was used to investigate the degree of amorphization of samples. Raman spectra of friction tracks on the disk show clear bands at wavenumbers of 126, 204, 356, 394, and 464 cm-1, characteristic of intact α-quartz. Remarkably, in experiments using diamond pins (F = 0.8 N, normal stress σr calculated by contact area = 293 ~ 440 MPa, V = 0.12 ~ 0.23 m/s), the bands at 204 and 464 cm-1 gradually broaden to reveal shoulders on the higher-wavenumber sides of these peaks. Especially, two distinguished peaks at 490 and 515 cm-1 and a weak broad peak at 606 cm-1 appear sporadically on

  9. First-principles study of the amorphization of stishovite by isotropic volume expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Masaaki; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    Simple synthesis of ceramics with high hardness and high toughness from Earth-abundant materials is one of the most important issues in materials science. Nishiyama et al. synthesized nano-crystalline stishovite with extremely high toughness and high hardness via compression and decompression of silica, and proposed fracture-induced amorphization mechanisms for the toughning. Furthermore, it was shown that the toughening mechanisms are effective even in nanoscale order. Our first-principles molecular dynamics simulations have shown rapid amorphization of stishovite within picoseconds under increasing volume, thus substantiating the proposed amorphization mechanisms. Furthermore, we have calculated the critical stress, energy difference, and energy barrier for the crystalline-to-amorphous structural transition.

  10. Resolving amorphous solid-liquid interfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Gura, Leonard; Kell, Burkhard; Büchner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian L.; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in liquid atomic force microscopy make it an ideal technique for probing the structure of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present a structural study of a two-dimensional amorphous silica bilayer immersed in an aqueous solution utilizing liquid atomic force microscopy with sub-nanometer resolution. Structures show good agreement with atomically resolved ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained on the same sample system, owing to the structural stability of the silica bilayer and the imaging clarity from the two-dimensional sample system. Pair distance histograms of ring center positions are utilized to develop quantitative metrics for structural comparison, and the physical origin of pair distance histogram peaks is addressed by direct assessment of real space structures.

  11. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of biocomposites based on chitosan and geothermal silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumastuti, Yuni; Petrus, Himawan Tri Bayu Murti; Yohana, Fiska; Buwono, Agung Tri; Zaqina, Radinda Bian

    2017-03-01

    With the amount of about 3000 ton per year of precipitate silica, Dieng's geothermal power plant possesses potential to utilize the precipitate silica. This material is a result of silica scaling mitigation that reduces the geothermal power plant productivity to the point of 40% within a year. In this study, the precipitated silica which is mostly in the amorphous state has potential uses for biomaterial such as bone graft composite. In order to obtain best of geothermal quality, purification was conducted using dry washing method to reach 95.65% of SiO2 purity. The silica was mixed in gel phase with 17.11% of water content. The geothermal silica was mixed with composition of chitosan/gelatin/geothermal silica (C/G/GS) and chitosan/pectin/geothermal silica (C/P/GS) biocomposites with certain ratio. Those two biocomposites were characterized and compared in order to determine the effect of geothermal silica addition into the matrix. From the observation, in general, it was obtained that the swelling ratio of C/P/GS is higher than C/G/GS. However, in comparison to the sample without geothermal silica addition, the swelling ratio of silica added biocomposites at various composition is lower. In term of Young's modulus at 1:1:1 ratio, silica addition into C/P biocomposite decreased the value while addition of silica into C/G biocomposite increased Young's modulus value. In general, no interaction was observed significantly between Young's modulus and swelling ratio. The interaction between the functional group of chitosan, pectin or gelatin and geothermal silica in the composite was also revealed by FTIR spectra analysis.

  13. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  14. Ammonia hardening of porous silica antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleville, Philippe F.; Floch, Herve G.

    1994-10-01

    The adhesion of sol-gel antireflective porous silica coatings on vitreous optical substrates has been dramatically improved by exposure to ammonia vapors or a dip in basic solutions. The approximately 70 to 270-nm thick coatings consisted of monolayers of spherical, 20-nm diameter amorphous silica particles deposited from ethanolic colloidal suspensions by conventional liquid coating techniques. Although, the as-deposited coatings had only low adhesion and were easily damaged when cleaned by standard drag-wiping procedures, coatings exposed over 5 hours to ammonia vapors passed both adhesive-tape and moderate abrasive- resistance tests. The increase in strength was accompanied by a roughly 20% shrinkage of the original coating thickness but the antireflective properties were retained. Our explanation of this chemical effect is a base-catalyzed phenomenon leading to surface silanol condensation and hydrogen-bonding of neighbor silica particles. In addition, since this basic treatment enhanced the laser damage resistance, such strengthened antireflective coatings have been successfully evaluated on flashlamps used on Phebus, Europe's most powerful laser. This allows an increase of the laser-disk pumping efficiency.

  15. Size and distribution controllable silica microballs fabricated by electrospraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bojing; Wu, Pan; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Wenhua

    2015-10-01

    Silica microballs have a wide range of applications in the field of optics, electronics, biotechnology chemical industry, and so on. In this work, a new approach, electrospraying, was used to coat the silica microballs onto the glass substrate, and the coating results were compared to spin-coating and dip-coating. Good microball size control could be achieved using the electrospraying method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed that amorphous silica microballs were obtained. From Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images, we can see that uniform microball size was achieved. In general, the results are better than what can be achieved by spin-coating, and comparable to that of dip-coating. However, electrospraying has great potential in mass production, especially for large-area fabrication.

  16. Solid State Electrolytes Prepared from PEO (360) Silanated Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maitra, P.; Ding, J.; Liu, B.; Wunder, S. L.; Lin, H.-P.; Chua, D.; Salomon, M.

    2002-01-01

    All solid state composite electrolytes were prepared using fumed silica (SiO2) silanated with an oligomeric polyethylene oxide (PEO) silane containing 6-9 ethylene oxide repeat units, a PEO matrix and LiClO4 (8/1 O/Li). The PEO-silane covalently attached to the silica was amorphous, with a T(sub g) that increased from -90 C to -53 C after attachment. The conductivity of films prepared using the PEO-silanated silica increased to approx. 6 x 10(exp -5) S/cm at RT compared with approx. 1 x 10(-5) S/cm for films prepared with unsilanated SiO2.

  17. Mesoporous silicas with tunable morphology for the immobilization of laccase.

    PubMed

    Gascón, Victoria; Díaz, Isabel; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Blanco, Rosa M

    2014-05-30

    Siliceous ordered mesoporous materials (OMM) are gaining interest as supports for enzyme immobilization due to their uniform pore size, large surface area, tunable pore network and the introduction of organic components to mesoporous structure. We used SBA-15 type silica materials, which exhibit a regular 2D hexagonal packing of cylindrical mesopores of uniform size, for non-covalent immobilization of laccase. Synthesis conditions were adjusted in order to obtain supports with different particle shape, where those with shorter channels had higher loading capacity. Despite the similar isoelectric points of silica and laccase and the close match between the size of laccase and the pore dimensions of these SBA-15 materials, immobilization was achieved with very low leaching. Surface modification of macro-/mesoporous amorphous silica by grafting of amine moieties was proved to significantly increase the isoelectric point of this support and improve the immobilization yield.

  18. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  19. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  20. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  1. Shock-wave equation-of-state measurements in fused silica up to 1600 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; ...

    2016-06-02

    The properties of silica are important to geophysical and high-pressure equation of state research. The most prevalent crystalline form, α-quartz, has been extensively studied to TPa pressures. Recent experiments with amorphous silica, commonly referred to as fused silica, provided Hugoniot and reflectivity data up to 630 GPa using magnetically-driven aluminum impactors. This article presents measurements of the fused silica Hugoniot over the range from 200 to 1600 GPa using laser-driven shocks with a quartz standard. These results extend the measured Hugoniot of fused silica to higher pressures, but more importantly, in the 200-600 GPa range, the data are very goodmore » agreement with those obtained with a different driver and standard material. As a result, a new shock velocity-particle velocity relation is derived to fit the experimental data.« less

  2. Shock-wave equation-of-state measurements in fused silica up to 1600 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-06-02

    The properties of silica are important to geophysical and high-pressure equation of state research. The most prevalent crystalline form, α-quartz, has been extensively studied to TPa pressures. Recent experiments with amorphous silica, commonly referred to as fused silica, provided Hugoniot and reflectivity data up to 630 GPa using magnetically-driven aluminum impactors. This article presents measurements of the fused silica Hugoniot over the range from 200 to 1600 GPa using laser-driven shocks with a quartz standard. These results extend the measured Hugoniot of fused silica to higher pressures, but more importantly, in the 200-600 GPa range, the data are very good agreement with those obtained with a different driver and standard material. As a result, a new shock velocity-particle velocity relation is derived to fit the experimental data.

  3. Ball milling synthesis of silica nanoparticle from rice husk ash for drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Javidi, Jaber; Dadkhah, Mahnaz

    2013-07-01

    Silica nanoparticles were synthesized from rice husk ash at room temperature by using high energy planetary ball mill. The milling time and mill rotational speed were varied in four levels. The morphology of the synthesized powders was investigated by the FE-SEM and TEM image as well as XRD patterns. The results have revealed that the nano-sized amorphous silica particles are formed after about 6 h ball milling and they are spherical in shape. The average particle size of the silica powders is found to be around 70 nm which decreases with increasing ball milling time or mill rotational speed. The as-synthesized silica nanoparticles were subsequently employed as drug carrier to investigate in vitro release behavior of Penicillin-G in simulated body fluid. UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to determine the amount of Penicillin-G released from the carrier. Penicillin-G release profile from silica nanoparticles exhibited a delayed release effect.

  4. Silica deposits on Mars with features resembling hot spring biosignatures at El Tatio in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Steven W.; Farmer, Jack D.

    2016-11-01

    The Mars rover Spirit encountered outcrops and regolith composed of opaline silica (amorphous SiO2.nH2O) in an ancient volcanic hydrothermal setting in Gusev crater. An origin via either fumarole-related acid-sulfate leaching or precipitation from hot spring fluids was suggested previously. However, the potential significance of the characteristic nodular and mm-scale digitate opaline silica structures was not recognized. Here we report remarkably similar features within active hot spring/geyser discharge channels at El Tatio in northern Chile, where halite-encrusted silica yields infrared spectra that are the best match yet to spectra from Spirit. Furthermore, we show that the nodular and digitate silica structures at El Tatio that most closely resemble those on Mars include complex sedimentary structures produced by a combination of biotic and abiotic processes. Although fully abiotic processes are not ruled out for the Martian silica structures, they satisfy an a priori definition of potential biosignatures.

  5. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  6. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  7. Paleozoic and Mesozoic silica-rich seawater: Evidence from hematitic chert (jasper) deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenne, Tor; Slack, John F.

    2003-04-01

    Laterally extensive beds of highly siliceous, hematitic chert (jasper) are associated with many volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits of Late Cambrian to Early Cretaceous age, yet are unknown in analogous younger (including modern) settings. Textural studies suggest that VMS-related jaspers in the Ordovician Løkken ophiolite of Norway were originally deposited as Si- and Fe-rich gels that precipitated from hydrothermal plumes as colloidal silica and iron-oxyhydroxide particles. Rare earth element patterns and Ge/Si ratios of the jaspers reflect precipitation from plumes having seawater dilution factors of 103 to 104, similar to modern examples. We propose that silica in the ancient jaspers is not derived from submarine hydrothermal fluids—as suggested by previous workers—but instead was deposited from silica-rich seawater. Flocculation and precipitation of the silica were triggered inorganically by the bridging effect of positively charged iron oxyhydroxides in the hydrothermal plume. A model involving amorphous silica (opal-A) precursors to the jaspers suggests that silica contents of Cambrian Early Cretaceous oceans were at least 110 mg/L SiO2, compared to values of 40 60 mg/L SiO2 estimated in other studies. The evolution of ancient silica-rich to modern Fe-rich precipitates in submarine-hydrothermal plumes reflects a changeover from silica-saturated to silica-depleted seawater through Phanerozoic time, due mainly to ocean-wide emergence of diatoms in the Cretaceous.

  8. Electrochemical Sensors: Functionalized Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-03-24

    This chapter summarizes recent devellopment of electrochemical sensors based on functionlized mesoporous silica materials. The nanomatrials based sensors have been developed for sensitive and selective enrironmental detection of toxic heavy metal and uranium ions.

  9. Cellulose-silica aerogels.

    PubMed

    Demilecamps, Arnaud; Beauger, Christian; Hildenbrand, Claudia; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana

    2015-05-20

    Aerogels based on interpenetrated cellulose-silica networks were prepared and characterised. Wet coagulated cellulose was impregnated with silica phase, polyethoxydisiloxane, using two methods: (i) molecular diffusion and (ii) forced flow induced by pressure difference. The latter allowed an enormous decrease in the impregnation times, by almost three orders of magnitude, for a sample with the same geometry. In both cases, nanostructured silica gel was in situ formed inside cellulose matrix. Nitrogen adsorption analysis revealed an almost threefold increase in pores specific surface area, from cellulose aerogel alone to organic-inorganic composite. Morphology, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties under uniaxial compression were investigated. Thermal conductivity of composite aerogels was lower than that of cellulose aerogel due to the formation of superinsulating mesoporous silica inside cellulose pores. Furthermore, composite aerogels were stiffer than each of reference aerogels.

  10. Stability and migration of small copper clusters in amorphous dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, David M.; Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-05-21

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the thermodynamic stability and migration of copper ions and small clusters embedded in amorphous silicon dioxide. We perform the calculations over an ensemble of statistically independent structures to quantify the role of the intrinsic atomic-level variability in the amorphous matrix affect the properties. The predicted formation energy of a Cu ion in the silica matrix is 2.7 ± 2.4 eV, significantly lower the value for crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, we find that Cu clusters of any size are energetically favorable as compared to isolated ions; showing that the formation of metallic clusters does not require overcoming a nucleation barrier as is often assumed. We also find a broad distribution of activation energies for Cu migration, from 0.4 to 1.1 eV. This study provides insights into the stability of nanoscale metallic clusters in silica of interest in electrochemical metallization cell memories and optoelectronics.

  11. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  12. Crystalline Silica Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    substance and will present a nontechnical overview of the techniques used to measure crystalline silica. Because this primer is meant to be a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about crystalline silica, a list of selected readings and other resources is included. The detailed glossary, which defines many terms that are beyond the scope of this publication, is designed to help the reader move from this presentation to a more technical one, the inevitable next step.

  13. Class H cement hydration at 180 °C and high pressure in the presence of added silica

    SciTech Connect

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P.

    2008-10-06

    Under deep oil-well conditions of elevated temperature and pressure, crystalline calcium silicate hydrates are formed during Portland cement hydration. The use of silica rich mineral additives leads to the formation of crystalline hydrates with better mechanical properties than those formed without the additive. The effects of silica flour, silica fume (amorphous silica), and a natural zeolite mixture on the hydration of Class H cement slurries at 180 C under externally applied pressures of 7 and 52 MPa are examined in real time using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. For some compositions examined, but not all, pressure was found to have a large effect on the kinetics of crystalline hydrate formation. The use of silica fume delayed both C{sub 3}S hydration and the formation of crystalline silicate hydrates compared to what was seen with other silica sources.

  14. Class H cement hydration at 180 deg. C and high pressure in the presence of added silica

    SciTech Connect

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P. Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P.

    2008-05-15

    Under deep oil-well conditions of elevated temperature and pressure, crystalline calcium silicate hydrates are formed during Portland cement hydration. The use of silica rich mineral additives leads to the formation of crystalline hydrates with better mechanical properties than those formed without the additive. The effects of silica flour, silica fume (amorphous silica), and a natural zeolite mixture on the hydration of Class H cement slurries at 180 deg. C under externally applied pressures of 7 and 52 MPa are examined in real time using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. For some compositions examined, but not all, pressure was found to have a large effect on the kinetics of crystalline hydrate formation. The use of silica fume delayed both C{sub 3}S hydration and the formation of crystalline silicate hydrates compared to what was seen with other silica sources.

  15. Amorphous and Ultradisperse Crystalline Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book sums up experimental and theoretical findings on amorphous and ultradisperse crystalline materials , massive and film types. Present-day... crystalline materials of metallic systems are presented. Emphasis is placed on inorganic film materials.

  16. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  17. Silica, hybrid silica, hydride silica and non-silica stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Borges, Endler M

    2015-04-01

    Free silanols on the surface of silica are the "villains", which are responsible for detrimental interactions of those compounds and the stationary phase (i.e., bad peak shape, low efficiency) as well as low thermal and chemical stability. For these reasons, we began this review describing new silica and hybrid silica stationary phases, which have reduced and/or shielded silanols. At present, in liquid chromatography for the majority of analyses, reversed-phase liquid chromatography is the separation mode of choice. However, the needs for increased selectivity and increased retention of hydrophilic bases have substantially increased the interest in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Therefore, stationary phases and this mode of separation are discussed. Then, non-silica stationary phases (i.e., zirconium oxide, titanium oxide, alumina and porous graphitized carbon), which afford increased thermal and chemical stability and also selectivity different from those obtained with silica and hybrid silica, are discussed. In addition, the use of these materials in HILIC is also reviewed.

  18. Evolution of Morphology and Crystallinity of Silica Minerals Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Silica minerals are quite common mineral species in surface environment of the terrestrial planets. They are good indicator of terrestrial processes including hydrothermal alteration, diagenesis and soil formation. Hydrothermal quartz, metastable low temperature cristobalite and amorphous silica show characteristic morphology and crystallinity depending on their formation processes and kinetics under wide range of temperature, pressure, acidity and thermal history. In this study, silica minerals produced by acidic hydrothermal alteration related to volcanic activities and hydrothermal crystallization experiments from diatom sediment are examined with crystallographic analysis and morphologic observations. Low temperature form of cistobalite is a metastable phase and a common alteration product occured in highly acidic hydrothermal environment around fumaroles in geothermal / volcanic areas. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree of whole rock is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Detailed powder XRD analysis show that the primary diffraction peak of cristobalite composed with two or three phases with different d-spacing and FWHM by peak profile fitting analysis. Shorter d-spacing and narrower FWHM cristobalite crystallize from precursor materials with less-crystallized, longer d-spacing and wider FWHM cristobalite. Textures of hydrothermal cristobalite in altered rock shows remnant of porphylitic texture of the host rock, pyroxene-amphibole andesite. Diatom has amorphous silica shell and makes diatomite sediment. Diatomite found in less diagenetic Quarternary formation keeps amorphous silica diatom shells. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of amorphous silica diatomite sediment are carried out from 300 °C to 550 °C. Mineral composition of run products shows crystallization of cristobalite and quartz progress depending on temperature and run durations. Initial crystallization product, cristobalite grains occur as characteristic lepispheres and

  19. Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter '2 Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys' with the content:

  20. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  1. Kinetics of silica deposition from simulated geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Mesmer, R.E.; Berlinski, P.

    1980-03-01

    Supersaturated brines were passed through columns packed with several forms of silica (crystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, polycrystalline ..cap alpha.. quartz, and porous Vycor). Also, silica deposition on ThO/sub 2/ microspheres and titanium powder was studied under controlled conditions of supersaturation, pH, temperature, and salinity. The residence time was varied by adjustments of flow rate and column length. The silica contents of the input and effluent solutions were determined colorimetrically by a molybdate method which does not include polymers without special pretreatment. Essentially identical deposition behavior was observed once the substrate was thoroughly coated with amorphous silica and the BET surface area of the coated particles was taken into account. The reaction rate is not diffusion limited in the columns. The silica deposition is a function of the monomeric Si(OH)/sub 4/ concentration in the brine. The deposition on all surfaces examined was spontaneously nucleated. The dependence on the supersaturation concentration, hydroxide ion concentration, surface area, temperature and salinity were examined. Fluoride was shown to have no effect at pH 5.94 and low salinity. The empirical rate law which describes the data in 1 m NaCl in the pH range 5-7 and temperatures from 60 to 120/sup 0/C is given.

  2. The radiolysis and radioracemization of amino acids on silica surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Lemmon, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of experiments on the radioracemization of amino acids in the presence of silica surfaces such as may have been found on the prebiotic earth. L-leucine and a DL-leucine mixture deposited on samples of 1-quartz and an amorphous silica preparation (Syloid 63) was subjected to Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation, then analyzed by gas chromatography to determine the radiolysis and racemization rates. The quartz surface is found to have a marginal efficacy in enhancing radiolysis when compared with a crystalline L-leucine control, although enhancing radioracemization symmetrically by a factor of two. Both the radiolysis and radioracemization of L-leucine and DL-leucine on a Syloid-63 silica surface are observed to increase with increasing radiation dose, and to be substantially greater than in the crystalline controls. Additional experiments with the nonprotein amino acid isovaline deposited on Syloid 63 confirm the greater radiolysis susceptibility of amino acids deposited on silica with respect to the crystalline state, although racemization is not observed. The observations suggest that the presence of a silica surface would have a deleterious effect on any mechanism for the origin of molecular chirality relying on stereoselective beta-radiolysis.

  3. Silica Transport, Deposition and Porosity Evolution in a Fracture : Insights from Hydrothermal Flow-through Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Yamada, R.; Saishu, H.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2014-12-01

    Geofluids contain a large amount of silica, which solubility changes depending on temperature and pressure. Ubiquitous occurrences of various silica deposits (quartz veins, silica sinter, scales) suggest that silica precipitation plays an important role on temporal and spatial variation of hydrological properties of the Earth's crusts. A pressure drop, for example, induced by seismicity, is one of the driving forces for silica precipitation within the crusts. In spite of the importance of silica depositions in fractures, how porosity and permeability evolution during silica precipitation is still poorly understood. In this study, we conducted the hydrothermal experiments for silica precipitation from supersaturated solutions in vapor (370˚C, 20 MPa) and supercritical (420 ˚C, 30 MPa) conditions with flow rate of 1 g/min. After the experiments, we analyzed the 3-D porosity structures by X-ray CT, and then by making thin section. We developed a tube-in-tube vessel, which is composed of main vessel (made of SUS316), and inner alumina tube (6 mm inner diameter), to make a horizontal flow path. We did not used rock/mineral substrates, and alumina balls (1 mm diameter) are closely packed in the inner tube. In both situations, a significant amount of silica deposited within a week, showing contrasting porosity structures between vapor and supercritical conditions. In vapor conditions, the precipitates are fine-grained quartz aggregate, and the most deposited at around 38 mm from the inlet. The pores were filled from the bottom to the top in the tube. In contrast, in the supercritical conditions, the precipitates are composites of amorphous silica and quartz; which accumulated around the alumina balls uniformly. Quartz grains are formed in amorphous silica layers, and the most porosity reduction occurred at around 25 mm from the inlet. A simple model of cellular automaton involving particle flow, adsorption, settling and deposition reveals that the relative magnitude of

  4. Diatomite releases silica during spirit filtration.

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Gil, M L A; de la Rosa-Fox, N; Alguacil, M

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether diatomite is an inert filter aid during spirit filtration. Surely, any compound with a negative effect on the spirit composition or the consumer's health could be dissolved. In this study different diatomites were treated with 36% vol. ethanol/water mixtures and the amounts and structures of the extracted compounds were determined. Furthermore, Brandy de Jerez was diatomite- and membrane-filtered at different temperatures and the silicon content was analysed. It was found that up to 0.36% by weight of diatomite dissolved in the aqueous ethanol and amorphous silica, in the form of hollow spherical microparticles, was the most abundant component. Silicon concentrations in Brandy de Jerez increased by up to 163.0% after contact with diatomite and these changes were more marked for calcined diatomite. In contrast, reductions of more than 30% in silicon concentrations were achieved after membrane filtration at low temperatures.

  5. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  6. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  7. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P.; Drazic, G.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V.

    2009-08-10

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  8. Heat of immersion of silica gel in normal alkanes and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinin, M.M.; Isirikyan, A.A.; Nikolaev, K.M.; Polyakov, N.S.; Tatarinova, L.I.

    1986-12-20

    In order to differentiate phenomena on a smooth surface from those related to surface curvature, they must, strictly speaking, study these phenomena separately on completely nonporous and porous adsorbents of the same chemical nature. However, it is virtually impossible to obtain a completely nonporous adsorbent with a sufficiently developed surface. Thus, a permissible compromise for solving this problem lies in the selection of a porous adsorbent such that, on one hand, the effect of surface curvature is excluded due to wide pores and, on the other hand, reliable quantitative data for the properties of this surface with virtually zero curvature are obtained due to the development of the surface. For these purposes, they used a modification of their previous method and obtained silica gel (SG) with a developed surface s = 218 m/sup 2//g and broad pores D/sub max/ = 20 nm. They found that mesoporous silica gel with 20 nm pore diameter may be taken as a practical model of nonporous amorphous silica, according to the liquid immersion heats. The heats of wetting of the hydrated amorphous silica surface by normal aliphatic alcohols and hydrocarbons are independent of the number of carbon atoms in the molecules and are 220 and 65 mJ/m/sup 2/, respectively. The interphase (liquid-solid) surface layer or normal alcohol molecules on silica gel is a Langmuir palisade with the OH alcohol groups directed toward the silica surface.

  9. In-situ grown silica sinters in Icelandic geothermal areas.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Dominique J; Stefánsson, Andri; Benning, Liane G

    2008-12-01

    Field in-situ sinter growth studies have been carried out in five geochemically very different Icelandic geothermal areas with the aim to quantify the effects of water chemistry, (e.g. silica content (250 to 695 p.p.m. SiO(2)), salinity (meteoric to seawater), pH (7.5 to 10)), temperature (42-96 degrees C) and microbial abundance (prevalence, density) on the growth rates, textures and structures of sinters forming within and around geothermal waters. At each location, sinter growth was monitored over time periods between 30 min and 25 months using glass slides that acted as precipitation substrates from which sinter growth rates were derived. In geothermal areas like Svartsengi and Reykjanes, subaqueous sinters developed rapidly with growth rates of 10 and 304 kg year(-1 )m(-2), respectively, and this was attributed primarily to the near neutral pH, high salinity and medium to high silica content within these geothermal waters. The porous and homogeneous precipitates that formed at these sites were dominated by aggregates of amorphous silica and they contained few if any microorganisms. At Hveragerdi and Geysir, the geothermal waters were characterized by slightly alkaline pH, low salinity and moderate silica contents, resulting in substantially lower rates of sinter growth (0.2-1.4 kg year(-1 )m(-2)). At these sites sinter formation was restricted to the vicinity of the air-water interface (AWI) where evaporation and condensation processes predominated, with sinter textures being governed by the formation of dense and heterogeneous crusts with well-defined spicules and silica terraces. In contrast, the subaqueous sinters at these sites were characterized by extensive biofilms, which, with time, became fully silicified and thus well preserved within the sinter edifices. Finally, at Krafla, the geothermal waters exhibited high sinter growth rates (19.5 kg year(-1 )m(-2)) despite being considerably undersaturated with respect to amorphous silica. However, the bulk of

  10. Silica fractionation and reactivity in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzué Belmonte, Dácil; Barão, Lúcia; Vandevenne, Floor; Schoelynck, Jonas; Struyf, Eric; Meire, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    550°C burnings. The first results showed differences in silica fractions between treatments and between soil types. This project is a close collaboration with University of Dresden. -Fertilization. Humans use fertilizers to increase crops growth and to avoid plagues affecting soil biogeochemistry. We set up a greenhouse experiment where olivine (a relatively easily weatherable silicate mineral) fertilization is applied to two crops (barley and wheat), at two rain application regimes (daily rain and weekly heavy rain) and with different fertilizer grain sizes. The aim of this project is to investigate how olivine application affects Si fractionation and reactivity in the soil profile. Barão, L., Clymans, W., Vandevenne, F., Meire, P., Conley, D.J. and Struyf, E. Pedogenic and biogenic amorphous Si distribution along a temperate land use gradient. Submitted, European Journal of Soil Science, 2013. Koning, E., Epping, E., and Van Raaphorst, W.: Determining bio- genic silica in marine samples by tracking silicate and aluminium concentrations in alkaline leaching solutions, Aquat. Geochem., 8, 37-67, 2002. Vandevenne, F.I., Struyf, E., Clymans, W. & Meire, P. 2012. Agricultural silica harvest: have humans created a new and important loop in the global silica cycle? Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 243-248.

  11. Allotropic composition of amorphous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrebov, S. G. Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    Using the concept of an inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines of the basic oscillators responsible for forming the spectrum, the experimental dependences of the dispersion of the imaginary part of permittivity are analyzed for amorphous carbon. It turned out that four types of oscillators contribute to this dependence. The first three types represent the electron transitions from the energy-spectrum ground state for {pi} and {sigma} electrons of amorphous carbon to an excited state. The fourth type is related to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by free charge carriers. The absolute values of squared plasma frequencies of oscillators are estimated, and, using them, the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms forming the amorphous-carbon skeleton is calculated. This estimate agrees closely with the theoretical predictions for amorphous carbon of the same density as the material under study. The dependence of the relative fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded atoms contained in amorphous hydrogenised carbon on annealing temperature is determined. The developed method is also applied to the analysis of the normalized curve for the light extinction in the interstellar medium. The contribution to the extinction of two varieties of interstellar matter is detected.

  12. Paleozoic and Mesozoic silica-rich seawater: Evidence from hematitic chert (jasper) deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grenne, Tor; Slack, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Laterally extensive beds of highly siliceous, hematitic chert (jasper) are associated with many volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits of Late Cambrian to Early Cretaceous age, yet are unknown in analogous younger (including modern) settings. Textural studies suggest that VMS-related jaspers in the Ordovician Løkken ophiolite of Norway were originally deposited as Si- and Fe-rich gels that precipitated from hydrothermal plumes as colloidal silica and iron-oxyhydroxide particles. Rare earth element patterns and Ge/Si ratios of the jaspers reflect precipitation from plumes having seawater dilution factors of 103 to 104, similar to modern examples. We propose that silica in the ancient jaspers is not derived from submarine hydrothermal fluids-as suggested by previous workers-but instead was deposited from silic-rich sea-water. Flocculation and precipitation of the silica were triggered inorganically by the bridging effect of positively charged iron oxyhydroxides in the hydrothermal plume. A model involving amorphous silica (opal-A) precursors to the jaspers suggests that silica contents of Cambrian-Early Cretaceous oceans were at least 110 mg/L SiO2, compared to values of 40-60 mg/L SiO2 estimated in other studies. The evolution of ancient silica-rich to modern Fe-rich precipitates in submarine-hydrothermal plumes reflects a changeover from silica-saturated to silica-depleted seawater through Phanerozoic time, due mainly to ocean-wide emergence of diatoms in the Cretaceous.

  13. Dissolution-rate enhancement of fenofibrate by adsorption onto silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sanganwar, Ganesh P; Gupta, Ram B

    2008-08-06

    Dissolution rate of a poorly water-soluble drug, fenofibrate, is increased by adsorbing the drug onto silica. The adsorption is achieved by first dissolving the drug in supercritical carbon dioxide and then depressurizing the solution onto silica. Loadings of up to 27.5 wt.% drug onto silica are obtained. Since solvents are not used in the loading process, the fenofibrate/silica formulation is free of any residual solvent, and carbon dioxide is freely removed upon depressurization. The formulation is characterized using infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Based on in vitro dissolution study, a significant increase in the dissolution rate (approximately 80% drug release in 20 min) of drug-silica formulation is observed as compared to micronized fenofibrate (approximately 20% drug release in 20 min), which can be attributed to increase in the surface area and decrease in the crystallinity of drug after adsorption onto silica. Two different formulations are compared: (A) amorphous fenofibrate/silica and (B) slightly crystalline fenofibrate/silica. The second formulation is found to be more stable on storage.

  14. Effect of silica forms in rice husk ash on the properties of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Le Anh-Tuan; Chen, Chun-Tsun; Hwang, Chao-Lung; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    The strength and durability properties of concrete with or without three types of rice husk ash (RHA), namely, amorphous, partial crystalline, and crystalline RHA, were investigates. The three types of RHA were added into concrete at a 20% replacement level. Consequently, the pozzolanic reactivity of amorphous RHA was higher than that of partial crystalline and crystalline RHA. Concrete added with amorphous RHA showed excellent characteristics in its mechanical and durability properties. The results showed that the higher the amount of crystalline silica in RHA, the lower the concrete resistivity value became. When compared with each other, concretes with 20% of the cement replaced with these types of RHA achieved similar ultrasonic pulse velocity values, but all were lower than that of the control concrete. The incorporation of these kinds of RHA significantly reduced chloride penetration. The results not only encourage the use of amorphous materials, they also support the application of crystalline or partial crystalline RHA as mineral and pozzolanic admixtures for cement.

  15. Effect of Silica-Particle Characteristics on Impact/Usual Fatigue Properties and Evaluation of Mechanical Characteristics of Silica-Particle Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Isamu; Higashihara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Toshiro

    The structure (crystalline or amorphous) and shape (globular or irregular) of silica fillers were varied and their effects on the impact fatigue and usual fatigue properties in the particle-filled epoxy resins were investigated. The fatigue crack extension process was discussed in terms of initiation and propagation processes. Furthermore, the mechanical characteristics of the material were evaluated by considering the tensile properties, fatigue resistance and the fracture behavior. It has been found that the epoxy resin filled with irregular crystalline silica-particles possessed the best combination of mechanical properties.

  16. Synthesis and adsorption of silica gel modified 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) from corn cobs against Cu(II) in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Agung; Yusmaniar, Ferdiani, Fatmawati; Damayanti, Rachma

    2017-03-01

    Silica gel modified APTS was synthesized from silica gel which was obtained from corn cobs via sol-gel process. Silica gel was synthesized from corn cobs and then chemically modified with silane coupling agent which has an amine group (NH2). This process resulting modified silica gel 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). Characterization of silica gel modified APTS by SEM-EDX showed that the size of the particles of silica gel modified APTS was 20µm with mass percentage of individual elements were nitrogen (N) 15.56%, silicon (Si) 50.69% and oxygen (O) 33.75%. In addition, silica gel modified APTS also showed absorption bands of functional groups silanol (Si-OH), siloxane (Si-O-Si), and an aliphatic chain (-CH2-), as well as amine (NH2) from FTIR spectra. Based on the characterization of XRD, silica gel 2θ of 21.094° and 21.32° respectively. It indicated that both material were amorphous. Determination of optimum pH and contact time on adsorption of silica gel 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) against Cu(II). The optimum pH and contact time was measured by using AAS. Optimum pH of adsorption silica gel modified APTS against metal Cu(II) could be obtained at pH 6 while optimum contact time was at 30 minutes, with the process of adsorption metal Cu(II) occured based on the model Freundlich isotherm.

  17. Silica Precipitation and Lithium Sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Renew

    2015-09-20

    This file contains silica precipitation and lithium sorption data from the project. The silica removal data is corrected from the previous submission. The previous submission did not take into account the limit of detection of the ICP-MS procedure.

  18. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  19. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  20. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  1. Shock-wave equation-of-state measurements in fused silica up to 1600 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    The properties of silica are important to geophysical and high-pressure equation-of-state research. Its most-prevalent crystalline form, α-quartz, has been extensively studied to TPa pressures. This article presents Hugoniot measurements on amorphous silica, commonly referred to as fused silica, over a range from 200 to 1600 GPa using laser-driven shocks and an α-quartz standard. These results extend the measured Hugoniot of fused silica to higher pressures. In the 200- to 600-GPa range, the data are in very good agreement with those obtained by Qi et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 062706 (2015)] using magnetically driven aluminum impactors and aluminum as a standard material. A new shock velocity/particle velocity relation is derived to fit the experimental data.

  2. Comparison of analytical methods for the determination of silica in geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chemerys, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The silica concentration of 26 Guatemalan geothermal waters were analyzed colorimetrically (spectrophotometrically) and by atomic absorption. Results by the atomic absorption method were less affected by polymerization and precipitation of silica from supersaturated solutions. Shaking the samples prior to analysis improves the accuracy of the atomic absorption results. The advantages of colorimetric analysis over atomic absorption are better sensitivity and precision. However, for accurate colorimetric results, geothermal samples must be sufficiently diluted in the field, which ensures that no further polymerization occurs and that amorphous silica that may be present will redissolve. If the samples are not diluted in the field they should be diluted in the laboratory and left standing for at least a month to allow the silica to redissolve. If analyzed immediately the diluted samples should be made alkaline and heated overnight in a 90?? oven. ?? 1983.

  3. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  4. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  5. The mechanism of growth of quartz crystals into fused silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Hays, J. F.; Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1980-01-01

    It is proposed that the growth of quartz crystals into fused silica is effected by a mechanism involving the breaking of an Si-O bond and its association with an OH group, followed by cooperative motion of the nonbridging oxygen and the hydroxyl group which results in the crystallization of a row of several molecules along a crystalline-amorphous interfacial ledge. This mechanism explains, at least qualitatively, all the results of the earlier experimental study of the dependence of quartz crystal growth upon applied pressure: large negative activation volume; single activation enthalpy below Si-O bond energy; growth velocity constant in time, proportional to the hydroxyl and chlorine content, decreasing with increasing degree of reduction, and enhanced by nonhydrostatic stresses; lower pre-exponential for the synthetic than for the natural silica.

  6. 78 FR 14540 - Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Cyromazine, Silica Silicates (Silica Dioxide and Silica Gel), Glufosinate Ammonium, Dioctyl Sodium... ammonium, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS) and undecylenic acid (UDA) and opens a public comment period...-HQ-OPP-2006-0108... Kelly Ballard, (703) 305-8126, Ballard.kelly@epa.gov . Dioctyl...

  7. Silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions: classifications, preparations, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Shah, Zameer Hussain; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2014-04-01

    Silica-based nanocomposites with amorphous silica as the matrix or carrier along with a functional component have been extensively investigated. These nanocomposites combine the advantages of both silica and the functional components, demonstrating great potential for various applications. To synthesize such composites, one of the most frequently used methods is reverse microemulsion due to its convenient control over the size, shape, and structures. The structures of the composites have a decisive significance for their properties and applications. In this review, we tried to categorize the silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions based on their structures, discussed the syntheses individually for each structure, summarized their applications, and made some perspectives based on the current progress of this field.Silica-based nanocomposites with amorphous silica as the matrix or carrier along with a functional component have been extensively investigated. These nanocomposites combine the advantages of both silica and the functional components, demonstrating great potential for various applications. To synthesize such composites, one of the most frequently used methods is reverse microemulsion due to its convenient control over the size, shape, and structures. The structures of the composites have a decisive significance for their properties and applications. In this review, we tried to categorize the silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions based on their structures, discussed the syntheses individually for each structure, summarized their applications, and made some perspectives based on the current progress of this field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The structures of all the surfactants included in this review are listed. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06025j

  8. Vis-NIR Spectroscopy of Mineral Mixtures with Montmorillonite and Silica: Implications for Detecting Alteration Products on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    Introduction. A variety of secondary silicates have been identified on Mars using Vis-NIR spectroscopic data from the Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l’Eau, les Glaces et l’Activite (OMEGA) on Mars Express and the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, including smectite, chlorite, kaolinite, and illite clay minerals and hydrous amorphous silica [1-4]. The detection of these materials is significant because they provide important information about past aqueous environments on Mars. Vis-NIR spectra of specific secondary silicates can be distinguished by the positions and shapes of hydration features. Here, we investigate the detection of secondary silicates by vis-NIR spectroscopy of mixtures with basaltic igneous minerals and either hydrous amorphous silica or montmorillonite. Experimental Procedure. Minor amounts of <2 μm amorphous silica or montmorillonite clay (2.5, 5, 10, and 20 wt%) were physically mixed with augite, andesine, or olivine (75-106 μm). A portion of each mixture was compressed into a pellet. Vis-NIR spectra (0.32-2.55 μm) of particulate and pellet mixtures were measured at RELAB at Brown University, and each spectrum was visually inspected to determine detection limits of secondary silicates based on hydration features. Preliminary Results. Absorptions at 1.4 and 1.9 μm (OH stretch overtone and H2O bend and stretch, respectively) occur in almost all mixture spectra; however, the strength, shape, and position are dependent on the igneous mineral and secondary silicate abundance in the mixture. The morphology of absorptions at ~2.2 μm (from metal-OH bonds) differs between amorphous silica and montmorillonite [3,4], so we use these absorptions to determine the detection limits of amorphous silica and montmorillonite. The 2.2 μm absorption is present in all montmorillonite-mixture spectra, indicating the montmorillonite detection limit is <2.5 wt%; however, the 2.2 μm absorption is

  9. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  10. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  11. Amorphous rare earth magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.; Lewis, L.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-08-01

    Gas atomization (GA) processing does not generally have a high enough cooling rate to produce the initial amorphous microstructure needed to obtain optimal magnetic properties in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B alloys. Phase separation and an underquenched microstructure result from detrimental {alpha}-Fe precipitation, and the resulting magnetic domain structure is very coarse. Additionally, there is a dramatic dependence of the magnetic properties on the cooling rate (and therefore the particle size) and the powders can be sensitive to environmental degradation. Alloy compositions designed just for GA (as opposed to melt spinning) are necessary to produce an amorphous structure that can be crystallized to result in a fine structure with magnetic properties which are independent of particle size. The addition of titanium and carbon to the melt has been found to change the solidification process sufficiently to result in an ``overquenched`` state in which most of the powder size fractions have an amorphous component. Crystallization with a brief heat treatment produces a structure which has improved magnetic properties, in part due to the ability to use compositions with higher Fe contents without {alpha}-Fe precipitation. Results from magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray analyses will be used to contrast the microstructure, domain structure, and magnetic properties of this new generation of amorphous powders with their multiphase predecessors.

  12. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  13. Simultaneous utilization of soju industrial waste for silica production and its residue ash as effective cationic dye adsorbent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soju industrial waste is an important biomass resource. The present study is aimed to utilize soju industrial waste for silica extraction, and residual ash as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution. High percentage of pure amorphous nanosilica was obtained ...

  14. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  15. Stable single-layer honeycomblike structure of silica.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, V Ongun; Cahangirov, S; Ciraci, S

    2014-06-20

    Silica or SiO(2), the main constituent of Earth's rocks has several 3D complex crystalline and amorphous phases, but it does not have a graphitelike layered structure in 3D. Our theoretical analysis and numerical calculations from the first principles predict a single-layer honeycomblike allotrope, hα silica, which can be viewed to be derived from the oxidation of silicene and it has intriguing atomic structure with reentrant bond angles in hexagons. It is a wide band gap semiconductor, which attains remarkable electromechanical properties showing geometrical changes under an external electric field. In particular, it is an auxetic metamaterial with a negative Poisson's ratio and has a high piezoelectric coefficient. While it can form stable bilayer and multilayer structures, its nanoribbons can show metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on their chirality. Coverage of dangling Si orbitals by foreign adatoms can attribute new functionalities to hα silica. In particular, Si(2)O(5), where Si atoms are saturated by oxygen atoms from top and bottom sides alternatingly can undergo a structural transformation to make silicatene, another stable, single layer structure of silica.

  16. Stable Single-Layer Honeycomblike Structure of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özçelik, V. Ongun; Cahangirov, S.; Ciraci, S.

    2014-06-01

    Silica or SiO2, the main constituent of Earth's rocks has several 3D complex crystalline and amorphous phases, but it does not have a graphitelike layered structure in 3D. Our theoretical analysis and numerical calculations from the first principles predict a single-layer honeycomblike allotrope, hα silica, which can be viewed to be derived from the oxidation of silicene and it has intriguing atomic structure with reentrant bond angles in hexagons. It is a wide band gap semiconductor, which attains remarkable electromechanical properties showing geometrical changes under an external electric field. In particular, it is an auxetic metamaterial with a negative Poisson's ratio and has a high piezoelectric coefficient. While it can form stable bilayer and multilayer structures, its nanoribbons can show metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on their chirality. Coverage of dangling Si orbitals by foreign adatoms can attribute new functionalities to hα silica. In particular, Si2O5, where Si atoms are saturated by oxygen atoms from top and bottom sides alternatingly can undergo a structural transformation to make silicatene, another stable, single layer structure of silica.

  17. In vitro efficacies of oils, silicas and plant preparations against the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Veronika; Perler, Erika; Heckendorn, Felix

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of physically acting substances (oils and silicas) and plant preparations for the control of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer 1778). Reproduction and survival of fed D. gallinae females were evaluated in vitro for a total of 168 h using the "area under the survival curve" (AUC) to compare survival of the mites between treatments. Four oils (two plant oils, one petroleum spray oil and diesel), one soap, three silicas (one synthetic amorphous silica, one diatomaceous earth (DE) and one DE with 2% pyrethrum extract) and seven plant preparations (derived from Chrysanthemum cineariaefolium, Allium sativum, Tanacetum vulgare, Yucca schidigera, Quillaja saponaria, Dryopteris filix-mas, and Thuja occidentalis) were tested at various concentrations. All the oils, diesel and soap significantly reduced D. gallinae survival. All silicas tested inhibited reproduction. DE significantly reduced mite survival, but amorphous silica was less effective in vitro. Except for pure A. sativum juice and the highest concentration of C. cineariaefolium extract, the plant preparations tested resulted in statistically insignificant control of D. gallinae.

  18. A thermodynamic and kinetic model for paste–aggregate interactions and the alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, George D. Carey, J. William

    2015-10-15

    A new conceptual model is developed for ASR formation based on geochemical principles tied to aqueous speciation, silica solubility, kinetically controlled mineral dissolution, and diffusion. ASR development is driven largely by pH and silica gradients that establish geochemical microenvironments between paste and aggregate, with gradients the strongest within the aggregate adjacent to the paste boundary (i.e., where ASR initially forms). Super-saturation of magadiite and okenite (crystalline ASR surrogates) occurs in the zone defined by gradients in pH, dissolved silica, Na{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2} {sup +}. This model provides a thermodynamic rather than kinetic explanation of why quartz generally behaves differently from amorphous silica: quartz solubility does not produce sufficiently high concentrations of H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} to super-saturate magadiite, whereas amorphous silica does. The model also explains why pozzolans do not generate ASR: their fine-grained character precludes formation of chemical gradients. Finally, these gradients have interesting implications beyond the development of ASR, creating unique biogeochemical environments.

  19. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Andrew L; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Hélder A; Strachan, Clare

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals, including poorly water-soluble drugs, by allowing the incorporation of drug into nanometer-sized pores. In this work, the loading of two poorly water-soluble model drugs, itraconazole and griseofulvin, in MCM-41 silica microparticles is characterized qualitatively, using the novel approach of CARS microscopy, which has advantages over other analytical approaches used to date and is non-destructive, rapid, label free, confocal and has chemical and physical specificity. The study investigated the effect of two solvent-based loading methods, namely immersion and rotary evaporation, and microparticle size on the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of the two loaded drugs. Additionally, hyperspectral CARS microscopy was used to confirm the amorphous nature of the loaded drugs. Z-stacked CARS microscopy suggested that the drug, but not the loading method or particle size range, affected 3-D drug distribution. Hyperspectral CARS confirmed that the drug loaded in the MCM-41 silica microparticles was in an amorphous form. The results show that CARS microscopy and hyperspectral CARS microscopy can be used to provide further insights into the structural nature of loaded mesoporous silica microparticles as biomaterials.

  20. Nanoporous silica-based protocells at multiple scales for designs of life and nanomedicine

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Jie; Jakobsson, Eric; Wang, Yingxiao; ...

    2015-01-19

    In this study, various protocell models have been constructed de novo with the bottom-up approach. Here we describe a silica-based protocell composed of a nanoporous amorphous silica core encapsulated within a lipid bilayer built by self-assembly that provides for independent definition of cell interior and the surface membrane. In this review, we will first describe the essential features of this architecture and then summarize the current development of silica-based protocells at both micro- and nanoscale with diverse functionalities. As the structure of the silica is relatively static, silica-core protocells do not have the ability to change shape, but their interiormore » structure provides a highly crowded and, in some cases, authentic scaffold upon which biomolecular components and systems could be reconstituted. In basic research, the larger protocells based on precise silica replicas of cells could be developed into geometrically realistic bioreactor platforms to enable cellular functions like coupled biochemical reactions, while in translational research smaller protocells based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles are being developed for targeted nanomedicine. Ultimately we see two different motivations for protocell research and development: (1) to emulate life in order to understand it; and (2) to use biomimicry to engineer desired cellular interactions.« less

  1. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  2. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-10-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica.

  3. Characterisation of silica derived from rice husk (Muar, Johor, Malaysia) decomposition at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, M. A.; Ismail, N. A. A.; Rizamarhaiza, M.; W. M. Hasif. A. A., K.; Taib, H.

    2016-07-01

    Rice husk was thermally decomposed to yield powder composed of silica (SiO2). Temperatures of 700°C and 1000°C were chosen as the decomposition temperatures. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Florescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analyses were conducted on a synthetic silica powder (SS-SiO2) and the rice husk ash as for the comparative characterisation study. XRD analyses clearly indicated that the decomposed rice husk yielded silica of different nature which are Crystalline Rice Husk Silica (C-RHSiO2) and Amorphous Rice Husk Silica (A-RHSiO2). Moreover, it was found that SS-SiO2 was of Quartz phase, C-RHSiO2 was of Trydimite and Cristobalite. Through XRF detection, the highest SiO2 purity was detected in SS-SiO2 followed by C-RHSiO2 and A-RHSiO2 with purity percentages of 99.60%, 82.30% and 86.30% respectively. FTIR results clearly indicated silica (SiO2) bonding 1056, 1064, 1047, 777, 790 and 798 cm-1) increased as the crystallinity silica increased. The Cristobalite phase was detected in C-RH SiO2 at the wavelength of 620 cm-1. Morphological features as observed by FESEM analyses confirmed that, SS-SiO2 and C-RH SiO2 showed prominent coarse granular morphology.

  4. Nanoporous silica-based protocells at multiple scales for designs of life and nanomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Jakobsson, Eric; Wang, Yingxiao; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2015-01-19

    In this study, various protocell models have been constructed de novo with the bottom-up approach. Here we describe a silica-based protocell composed of a nanoporous amorphous silica core encapsulated within a lipid bilayer built by self-assembly that provides for independent definition of cell interior and the surface membrane. In this review, we will first describe the essential features of this architecture and then summarize the current development of silica-based protocells at both micro- and nanoscale with diverse functionalities. As the structure of the silica is relatively static, silica-core protocells do not have the ability to change shape, but their interior structure provides a highly crowded and, in some cases, authentic scaffold upon which biomolecular components and systems could be reconstituted. In basic research, the larger protocells based on precise silica replicas of cells could be developed into geometrically realistic bioreactor platforms to enable cellular functions like coupled biochemical reactions, while in translational research smaller protocells based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles are being developed for targeted nanomedicine. Ultimately we see two different motivations for protocell research and development: (1) to emulate life in order to understand it; and (2) to use biomimicry to engineer desired cellular interactions.

  5. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression.

    PubMed

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-10-15

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young's modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica.

  6. The deposition of boron nitride and carbon films on silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.; Rye, R.R.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical vapor deposition technique is used to produce amorphous boron nitride and carbon thin films on high strength silica glass fibers. In this method, the fiber is drawn under ultra high vacuum conditions and low pressure process gases, in the presence of a hot tungsten filament, are used to grow films at low substrate temperatures. Films deposited with this technique do not degrade the intrinsic pristine strength of the silica fibers under dry conditions and, when stressed in chemically aggressive environments, act as effective barrier coatings.

  7. Physical characteristics of chitosan-silica composite of rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumarni, Woro; Sri Iswari, Retno; Marwoto, Putut; Rahayu, Endah F.

    2016-02-01

    Some previous studies showed that the characteristics of chitosan membranes have a very rigid and non-porous structure so that its utilization is not maximized, particularly in the filtration process. Hence, it needs modification to improve the quality of the chitosan membranes. Adding the silica into the chitosan membranes is one of the offered solutions to overcome the problems of physical and mechanical properties of chitosan. This study aims to investigate the effect of variations in the silica composition to the physical characteristics of the chitosan-silica membranes of rice husk ash that were synthesized. The chitosan used is derived from the chitin of Vannamei shrimps’ shell with 82% degree of de-acetylation, while the silica was synthesized from rice husk ash with rendering of silica (SiO2) by 5% and the results of XRD analysis showed an amorphous phase. Membrane synthesis was performed using the phase inversion method with chitosan-silica mass ratios of rice husk ash, which were 1:0.0; 1:0.5; 1:1.0; 1:1.5 and 1:2.0. The results showed that the addition of silica increases the swelling index and the membrane permeability. The results of the analysis, FTIR spectra, obtained a new functional group after the addition of silica, they are Si-OH, Si-O-Si, and CO- NH2. The morphology test using CCD Microscope MS-804 results in the very tight chitosan membranes without the silica surface, it has no pores, smooth and homogeneous, while the chitosan-silica composite membrane of rice husk ash obviously has cracks and small cavities that seemed to spread out.

  8. Strain-modulated electronic and thermal transport properties of two-dimensional O-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Qin, Guangzhao; Jungemann, Christoph; Hu, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Silica is one of the most abundant materials in the Earth’s crust and is a remarkably versatile and important engineering material in various modern science and technology. Recently, freestanding and well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) silica monolayers with octahedral (O-silica) building blocks were found to be theoretically stable by (Wang G et al 2015 J. Phys. Chem. C 119 15654-60). In this paper, by performing first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the electronic and thermal transport properties of 2D O-silica and also studied how these properties can be tuned by simple mechanical stretching. Unstrained 2D O-silica is an insulator with an indirect band gap of 6.536 eV. The band gap decreases considerably with bilateral strain up to 29%, at which point a semiconductor-metal transition occurs. More importantly, the in-plane thermal conductivity of freestanding 2D O-silica is found to be unusually high, which is around 40 to 50 times higher than that of bulk α-quartz and more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous silica. The thermal conductivity of O-silica decreases by almost two orders of magnitude when the bilateral stretching strain reaches 10%. By analyzing the mode-dependent phonon properties and phonon-scattering channel, the phonon lifetime is found to be the dominant factor that leads to the dramatic decrease of the lattice thermal conductivity under strain. The very sensitive response of both band gap and phonon transport properties to the external mechanical strain will enable 2D O-silica to easily adapt to the different environment of realistic applications. Our study is expected to stimulate experimental exploration of further physical and chemical properties of 2D silica systems, and offers perspectives on modulating the electronic and thermal properties of related low-dimensional structures for applications such as thermoelectric, photovoltaic, and optoelectronic devices.

  9. A hydrothermal peroxo method for preparation of highly crystalline silica-titania photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Krivtsov, Igor; Ilkaeva, Marina; Avdin, Viacheslav; Khainakov, Sergei; Garcìa, Jose R; Ordòñez, Salvador; Dìaz, Eva; Faba, Laura

    2015-04-15

    A new completely inorganic method of preparation of silica-titania photocatalyst has been described. It has been established that the addition of silica promotes crystallinity of TiO2 anatase phase. Relative crystallinity and TiO2 crystal size in the silica-titania particles increase with the silica content until SiO2/TiO2 molar ratio of 0.9, but at higher molar ratios they start to decrease. The single-source precursor containing peroxo titanic (PTA) and silicic acids has been proved to be responsible for high crystallinity of TiO2 encapsulated into amorphous silica. It has been proposed that peroxo groups enhance rapid formation of crystalline titania seeds, while silica controls their growth. It has been concluded from the TEM that the most morphologically uniform anatase crystallites covered with SiO2 particles are prepared at SiO2/TiO2 molar ratio of 0.4. This sample, according to (29)Si NMR, also shows the high content of hydroxylated silica Q(3) and Q(2) groups, and it is the most photocatalytically active in UV-assisted decomposition of methylene blue among the tested materials. It has been determined that the increase in the amount of the condensed Q(4) silica in the mixed oxides leads to the decrease in photocatalytic performance of the material, despite its better crystallinity. High crystallinity, low degree of incorporation of Ti atoms in SiO2 in the mixed oxide and adsorption of methylene blue in the vicinity of photoactive sites on the hydroxylated silica have been considered as the main factors determining the high degradation degree of methylene blue in the presence of silica-titania.

  10. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  11. Phonon interference in crystalline and amorphous confined nanoscopic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Wilson, Thomas E.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2017-02-01

    Using molecular dynamics phonon wave packet simulations, we study phonon transmission across hexagonal (h)-BN and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) nanoscopic thin films sandwiched by two crystalline leads. Due to the phonon interference effect, the frequency-dependent phonon transmission coefficient in the case of the crystalline film (Si|h-BN|Al heterostructure) exhibits a strongly oscillatory behavior. In the case of the amorphous film (Si|a-SiO2|Al and Si|a-SiO2|Si heterostructures), in spite of structural disorder, the phonon transmission coefficient also exhibits oscillatory behavior at low frequencies (up to ˜1.2 THz), with a period of oscillation consistent with the prediction from the two-beam interference equation. Above 1.2 THz, however, the phonon interference effect is greatly weakened by the diffuse scattering of higher-frequency phonons within an a-SiO2 thin film and at the two interfaces confining the a-SiO2 thin film.

  12. Low-temperature thermal expansion of amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, David Alan

    1982-01-01

    For most amorphous materials at temperatures below approx. = 1 K, the magnitudes and temperature dependences of specific heat, thermal conductivity and ultrasonic dispersion are qualitatively similar, independent of chemical composition. It has been suggested that thermal expansion also exhibits this universal behavior. The development of a dilatometer capable of resolving sample strains as small as 10/sup -12/ has permitted measurement of the linear thermal expansion of various glasses below 1 K. These investigations have demonstrated, however, that the low-temperature thermal expansion coefficient of glasses can be positive, negative, large or small. Analysis of measurements performed on two types of vitreous silica, two amorphous polymers, As/sub 2/S/sub 3/ and ZrO/sub 2/:Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is presented in the context of the phenomenological tunneling-states model. Consistency in explanation of thermal expansion and ultrasonic behavior is maintained by assuming a broad, weakly energy-dependent distribution of coupling strengths between phonons and the localized excitations thought to be characteristic of the glassy state.

  13. Multifractal and mechanical analysis of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Adler, Camille; Teleki, Alexandra; Kuentz, Martin

    2017-03-09

    The formulation of lipophilic and hydrophobic compounds is a challenge for the pharmaceutical industry and it requires the development of complex formulations. Our first aim was to investigate hot-melt extrudate microstructures by means of multifractal analysis using scanning electron microscopy imaging. Since the microstructure can affect solid dosage form performance such as mechanical properties, a second objective was to study the influence of the type of adsorbent and of the presence of an amorphous compound on extrudate hardness. β-Carotene (BC) was chosen as poorly water-soluble model compound. Formulations containing a polymer, a lipid and two different silica based inorganic carriers were produced by hot-melt extrusion. Based on scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the obtained images were analyzed using multifractal formalism. The breaking force of the strands was assessed by a three point bending test. Multifractal analysis and three point bending results showed that the nature of interparticle interactions in the inorganic carrier as well as the presence of amorphous BC had an influence on the microstructure and thus on the mechanical performance. The use of multifractal analysis and the study of the mechanical properties were complementary to better characterize and understand complex formulations obtained by hot-melt extrusion.

  14. Petrography study on altered flint aggregate by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulteel, D. . E-mail: bulteel@ensm-douai.fr; Rafai, N.; Degrugilliers, P.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2004-11-15

    The aim of our study is to improve our understanding of an alkali-silica reaction (ASR) via petrography. We used a chemical concrete subsystem: flint aggregate, portlandite and KOH. The altered flint aggregate is followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after acid treatment at different intervals. After acid treatment, the observations showed an increase in aggregate porosity and revealed internal degradation of the aggregate. This degradation created amorphous zones. Before acid treatment, the analyses on polished sections by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} penetration into the aggregate. The appearance of amorphous zones and penetration of positive ions into the aggregate are correlated with the increase in the molar fraction of silanol sites. This degradation is specific to the alkali-silica reaction.

  15. Rare earth modified silica-aluminas as supports for bifunctional catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, S.L.; McVicker, G.; Miseo, S.

    1996-12-31

    We have explored rare earth oxide-modified amorphous silica-aluminas as {open_quotes}permanent{close_quotes} intermediate strength acids used as supports for bifunctional catalysts. The addition of well dispersed weakly basic rare earth oxides {open_quotes}titrates{close_quotes} the stronger acid sites of amorphous silica-alumina and lowers the acid strength to the level shown by halided aluminas. Physical and chemical probes, as well as model olefin and paraffin isomerization reactions show that acid strength can be adjusted close to that of chlorided and fluorided aluminas. Metal activity is inhibited relative to halided alumina catalysts, which limits the direct metal-catalyzed dehydrocyclization reactions during paraffin reforming but does not interfere with hydroisomerization reactions.

  16. Cellular uptake, evolution, and excretion of silica nanoparticles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Huang, Yuanjie; Tao, Qian; Li, Quan

    2011-08-01

    A systematic study on the interaction of silica nanoparticles (NPs) with human cells has been carried out in the present work. Endocytosis and exocytosis are identified as major pathways for NPs entering, and exiting the cells, respectively. Most of the NPs are found to be enclosed in membrane bounded organelles, which are fairly stable (against rupture) as very few NPs are released into the cytoplasm. The nanoparticle-cell interaction is a dynamic process, and the amount of NPs inside the cells is affected by both the amount and morphology (degree of aggregation) of NPs in the medium. These interaction characteristics determine the low cytotoxicity of SiO2 NPs at low feeding concentration.A systematic study on the interaction of silica nanoparticles (NPs) with human cells has been carried out in the present work. Endocytosis and exocytosis are identified as major pathways for NPs entering, and exiting the cells, respectively. Most of the NPs are found to be enclosed in membrane bounded organelles, which are fairly stable (against rupture) as very few NPs are released into the cytoplasm. The nanoparticle-cell interaction is a dynamic process, and the amount of NPs inside the cells is affected by both the amount and morphology (degree of aggregation) of NPs in the medium. These interaction characteristics determine the low cytotoxicity of SiO2 NPs at low feeding concentration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Low magnification TEM image of 400 nm amorphous silica NPs; TEM images depicting the evolution process of 50 nm silica NPs inside cells; Confocal microscopy images showing the interaction of silica NPs with cells; ζ potential of NPs in dispersion with different pH value; MTT results of H1299 and NE083 cells incubated with 400 nm and 10-20 nm amorphous silica NPs and light microscopy images of H1299 cells treated with 50 nm silica NPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10499c

  17. Spectral Evidence for Silica in Eos Chasma, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) data in Eos Chasma have revealed spatially small areas, typically mounds or knobs, with materials having significant (>~35%) fractions of silica in one or more as-of-yet unidentified phases [1]. Silica, SiO2, occurs geologically in both crystalline (e.g., quartz) and amorphous (e.g., opal, glass) forms. The identification of associated minerals and the specific silica phase(s) observed in the thermal infrared data is critical to constraining the abundance estimate further. New results from THEMIS multispectral data show that if the silica is present as quartz or one of its polymorphs (e.g., tridymite, cristobalite, coesite), it is probably equal to or less than ~35% of the modal mineralogy. If the silica is present in an amorphous form with different spectral character, such as opal, this number could increase by several tens of percent. Cherts, which are quartz in rock form, exhibit a variety of microscopic textures (e.g., microcrystalline, fibrous, and "megaquartz") [2] and contain contaminating phases that produce variations in their spectra; we have identified several chert samples that also are candidate components and could be present at abundances of several tens of percent or greater. Primary and secondary silica phases are formed by a wide array of geologic processes, many of which include interactions with ambient or hydrothermal fluids and some of which are well-known preservers of biomarkers on Earth. Thus, silica enrichments on the Martian surface are likely to be important recorders of aqueous processes, and possibly biomarkers as well. As such, an area in Eos Chasma adjacent to silica-bearing deposits has been proposed as a landing site for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory rover [3]. The majority of silica-bearing deposits are a few hundred m2 in size, and there is a paucity of high- resolution visible images with which they can be investigated. A 3-m/pixel Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image of a relatively

  18. Spectroscopy of silica and the remote detection of astrobiologically rich environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Kraft, M. D.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-04-01

    Fundamental to the exploration of Mars and other solid planets for astrobiology is the desire to locate sites where rocks have been aqueously altered or where aqueous sediments exist. One material that is common and abundant on Earth, and that is likely to occur in any environment where silicate rocks have interacted with water, is silica. Silica is an important material for astrobiology because of its long crustal residence time and relative abundance on Earth, and because most of the early terrestrial microfossils are entombed in it. Presumably, if opaline deposits or microcrystalline silica are discovered on Mars, they will be high priority sites for further investigation. Not only is silica important in preserving biological materials directly, it is also an important mineralogical indicator of geological environment. For example, remote detection of the high temperature polymorphs tridymite or cristobalite would be suggestive of volcanic or hydrothermal-fumarolic activity. Discovery of various silica polymorphs on Mars would be important for understanding the geologic context of deposits, as well as for identification of astrobiologically interesting materials. Given the availability of thermal infrared spectra of Mars from the NASA TES and THEMIS experiments, and the anticipated results of Mini-TES from the surface of Mars, an investigation of the thermal emission spectra of silica minerals and siliceous materials is timely. We present results of a thermal infrared spectral analysis of silica polymorphs and some siliceous rocks. The spectral effects of crystal structure, crystallinity, composition, and surface roughness are examined. All amorphous forms, including silica glass, hyalite (opal-AN), and opal (A), exhibit very similar emission spectra. Partially crystalline silica, such as opal-CT is distinguishable from amorphous forms by the depth and shape of the major reststrahlen feature. Spectra of cristobalite and tridymite bear unique Si-O vibrational

  19. Application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicate in oral amorphous drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ken K; Bogner, Robin H

    2012-02-01

    Aqueous solubility of an active pharmaceutical ingredient is an important consideration to ensure successful drug development. Mesoporous materials have been investigated as an amorphous drug delivery system owing to their nanosized capillaries and large surface areas. The complex interactions of crystalline compounds with mesoporous media and their implication in drug delivery are not well understood. Molecules interacting with porous media behave very differently than those in bulk phase. Their altered dynamics and thermodynamics play an important role in the properties and product performance of the amorphous system. In this review, application of mesoporous silicon dioxide and silicates in drug amorphization is the main focus. First, as background, the nature of gas-porous media interactions is summarized. The synthesis of various types of mesoporous silica, which are used by many investigators in this field, is described. Second, the behavior of molecules confined in mesopores is compared with those in bulk, crystalline phase. The molecular dynamics of compounds due to confinement, analyzed using various techniques, and their consequences in drug delivery are discussed. Finally, the preparation and performance of drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica are examined.

  20. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  1. Alkoxy-Siloxide Metal Complexes: Precursors to Metal Silica, Metal Oxide Silica, and Metal Silicate Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Karl William

    The alkoxy-siloxide complexes M (OSi(O ^{rm t}Bu)_3 ]_4 (M = Ti(1), Zr(2), Hf(3)), were prepared by reaction with their respective metal diethylamides. These compounds readily undergo low-temperature decomposition to their respective metal oxide silica materials rm(MO_2{cdot}4SiO_2). The volatile products of the thermolysis of 2 (ca. 200 ^circC) were isobutylene (11.7 equiv) and water (5.4 equiv). The rm ZrO _2{cdot}4SiO_2 material from the decomposition of 2 at 400^circ C was amorphous until ca. 1100^ circC where crystallization of t-ZrO _2 occurred. After thermolysis to 1500 ^circC, t-ZrO_2 and cristobalite were the major products with minor amounts of m-ZrO_2. The rm HfO_2{cdot}4SiO_2 material from the decomposition of 3 at 400^ circC was amorphous until ca. 1000 ^circC where crystallization of c/t -HfO_2 was observed. Thermolysis to 1460^circC yielded c/t -HfO_2, m-HfO_2, and minor amounts of cristobalite. The crystallization of anatase in the rm TiO_2{cdot }4SiO_2 material from decomposed 1 at 400^circC was apparent after thermolysis to 1000^circC. Thermolysis to 1400^circC gave a mixture of anatase, rutile, and cristobalite. Compound 2 was decomposed in xylenes and yielded a transparent gel which was isolated as a white powder upon drying in vacuuo. The compounds [ Me _2AlOSi(O^{t}Bu)_3] _2 (4) and [( ^{t}BuO)MeAlOSi(O^{t}Bu) _3]_2 (5) were structurally characterized and contain bent and planar rm Al_2O_2 four membered rings, respectively. Both 4 and 5 yield isobutylene upon thermolysis (ca. 200 ^circC) and the crystallization of mullite occurs at 1034^circC and 1017^circC, respectively (by DTA). The solution thermolysis of 4 in refluxing toluene yields an opaque white gel. The crystallization of mullite occurs at 1029^circC (by DTA). The compounds [ CuOSi(O ^{t}Bu)_3]_{n } (6) and [ CuOSi(O ^{t}Bu)_2Ph]_4 (7) were prepared by reaction with [ CuO^{t}Bu]_4. The thermolysis of 6 at 1000^circ C under argon gave Cu^circ and amorphous silica and thermolysis under

  2. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  3. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  4. Characteristics, distribution, origin, and significance of opaline silica observed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruff, S.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Calvin, W.M.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Morris, R.V.; Rice, M.S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F.; Christensen, P.R.; Squyres, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of outcrops and soil (regolith) rich in opaline silica (???65-92 wt % SiO2) in association with volcanic materials adjacent to the "Home Plate" feature in Gusev crater is evidence for hydrothermal conditions. The Spirit rover has supplied a diverse set of observations that are used here to better understand the formation of silica and the activity, abundance, and fate of water in the first hydrothermal system to be explored in situ on Mars. We apply spectral, chemical, morphological, textural, and stratigraphic observations to assess whether the silica was produced by acid sulfate leaching of precursor rocks, by precipitation from silica-rich solutions, or by some combination. The apparent lack of S enrichment and the relatively low oxidation state of the Home Plate silica-rich materials appear inconsistent with the originally proposed Hawaiian analog for fumarolic acid sulfate leaching. The stratiform distribution of the silica-rich outcrops and their porous and brecciated microtextures are consistent with sinter produced by silica precipitation. There is no evidence for crystalline quartz phases among the silica occurrences, an indication of the lack of diagenetic maturation following the production of the amorphous opaline phase. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  6. Amorphous-Amorphous Phase Separation in API/Polymer Formulations.

    PubMed

    Luebbert, Christian; Huxoll, Fabian; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2017-02-15

    The long-term stability of pharmaceutical formulations of poorly-soluble drugs in polymers determines their bioavailability and therapeutic applicability. However, these formulations do not only often tend to crystallize during storage, but also tend to undergo unwanted amorphous-amorphous phase separations (APS). Whereas the crystallization behavior of APIs in polymers has been measured and modeled during the last years, the APS phenomenon is still poorly understood. In this study, the crystallization behavior, APS, and glass-transition temperatures formulations of ibuprofen and felodipine in polymeric PLGA excipients exhibiting different ratios of lactic acid and glycolic acid monomers in the PLGA chain were investigated by means of hot-stage microscopy and DSC. APS and recrystallization was observed in ibuprofen/PLGA formulations, while only recrystallization occurred in felodipine/PLGA formulations. Based on a successful modeling of the crystallization behavior using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), the occurrence of APS was predicted in agreement with experimental findings.

  7. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2009-08-26

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  8. Silica Fillers for elastomer Reinforement

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, D.J.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2012-09-10

    This article summarizes recent work on the structure of precipitated silica used in the reinforcement of elastomers. Silica has a unique morphology, consisting of multiple structural levels that can be controlled through processing. The ability to control and characterize the multiple structures of precipitated silica is an example of morphological engineering for reinforcement applications. In this summary of some recent research efforts using precipitated silica, small-angle scattering techniques are described and their usefulness for determining the morphology of silica in terms of primary particles, aggregates, and agglomerates are discussed. The structure of several different precipitated silica powders is shown as well as the mechanical properties of elastomers reinforced with these silica particles. The study of the mechanical properties of filled elastomer systems is a challenging and exciting topic for both fundamental science and industrial application. It is known that the addition of hard particulates to a soft elastomer matrix results in properties that do not follow a straightforward rule of mixtures. Research efforts in this area have shown that the properties of filled elastomers are influenced by the nature of both the filler and the matrix, as well as the interactions between them. Several articles have reviewed the influence of fillers like silica and carbon black on the reinforcement of elastomers. In general, the structure-property relationships developed for filled elastomers have evolved into the following major areas: Filler structure, hydrodynamic reinforcement, and interactions between fillers and elastomers.

  9. Martian Hot Springs? Silica deposits in the Nili Patera Caldera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skok, J. R.; Mustard, J. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Murchie, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    The caldera of the Syrtis Major volcanic complex shows evidence of a late-stage, chemically evolved eruption that emplaced a volcanic cone and an evolved dacitic lava flow. This cone and flow contain several light-toned deposits, spectrally defined, with the CRISM instrument, by a broad asymmetrical absorption centered at 2.21 μm that is characteristic of a Si-OH bond. Additional weak 1.4 and 1.9 μm OH- and H2O related absorption features were detected that combined with the 2.21 μm feature confirms the detection of hydrated silica (SiO2 nH2O). The deposits are expressed morphologically as low mounds in stereo HiRISE data that superpose and post-date the volcanic flows. This mineral detection and volcanic context is consistent with several formation mechanisms, notably volcanic outgassing leading to fumarole surface alteration or silica deposition in volcanically driven hot springs. Since current orbital observations do not allow conclusive determination of precise mechanism, we here focus on the hot spring silica depositional hypothesis and investigate what the current observations tell us about such a system. These deposits would occur as post-eruption volcanic heat-driven hydrothermal convection of ground and possibly magmatic waters. Convecting, heated water would dissolve the igneous minerals in the basalt that forms the majority of the caldera mobilizing significant silica. Silica saturated fluids that reach the surface cool and deposit amorphous silica as the silica solubility in the fluids decreases. The large size and mound building nature of individual deposits require a significant and sustained fluid source for deposition. That amorphous silica deposits were detected in several distinct regions illustrates the prevalence of this process in this volcanic complex. The largest deposit is located on the southern flank of the cone and forms a fan-shaped morphology as the material is sourced from a vent and flows downslope. Another small deposit was

  10. Amine modification of nonporous silica nanoparticles reduces inflammatory response following intratracheal instillation in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angie S; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehman, Sean E; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Thorne, Peter S; Larsen, Sarah C; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-22

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique material properties that make them ideal for many different applications. However, the impact of these materials on human and environmental health needs to be established. We investigated nonporous silica NPs both bare and modified with amine functional groups (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)) in order to evaluate the effect of surface chemistry on biocompatibility. In vitro data showed there to be little to no cytotoxicity in a human lung cancer epithelial cell line (A549) for bare silica NPs and amine-functionalized NPs using doses based on both mass concentration (below 200μg/mL) and exposed total surface area (below 14m(2)/L). To assess lung inflammation, C57BL/6 mice were administered bare or amine-functionalized silica NPs via intra-tracheal instillation. Two doses (0.1 and 0.5mg NPs/mouse) were tested using the in vivo model. At the higher dose used, bare silica NPs elicited a significantly higher inflammatory response, as evidence by increased neutrophils and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared to amine-functionalized NPs. From this study, we conclude that functionalization of nonporous silica NPs with APTES molecules reduces murine lung inflammation and improves the overall biocompatibility of the nanomaterial.

  11. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Fused Silica Ceramics Prepared by Gelcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Wei; Huang, Chun-e.; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Jinzhen; Qiu, Tai

    2014-07-01

    Fused silica ceramics were fabricated by gelcasting, by use of a low-toxicity N' N-dimethylacrylamide gel system, and had excellent properties compared with those obtained by use of the low-toxicity 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and toxic acrylamide systems. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure, mechanical and dielectric properties, and thermal shock resistance of the fused silica ceramics was investigated. The results showed that sintering temperature has a critical effect. Use of an appropriate sintering temperature will promote densification and improve the strength, thermal shock resistance, and dielectric properties of fused silica ceramics. However, excessively high sintering temperature will greatly facilitate crystallization of amorphous silica and result in more cristobalite in the sample, which will cause deterioration of these properties. Fused silica ceramics sintered at 1275°C have the maximum flexural strength, as high as 81.32 MPa, but, simultaneously, a high coefficient of linear expansion (2.56 × 10-6/K at 800°C) and dramatically reduced residual flexural strength after thermal shock (600°C). Fused silica ceramics sintered at 1250°C have excellent properties, relatively high and similar flexural strength before (67.43 MPa) and after thermal shock (65.45 MPa), a dielectric constant of 3.34, and the lowest dielectric loss of 1.20 × 10-3 (at 1 MHz).

  12. Modulus-density scaling behaviour and framework architecture of nanoporous self-assembled silicas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongyou; Hartshorn, Christopher; Buchheit, Thomas; Tallant, David; Assink, Roger; Simpson, Regina; Kissel, Dave J; Lacks, Daniel J; Torquato, Salvatore; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Natural porous materials such as bone, wood and pith evolved to maximize modulus for a given density. For these three-dimensional cellular solids, modulus scales quadratically with relative density. But can nanostructuring improve on Nature's designs? Here, we report modulus-density scaling relationships for cubic (C), hexagonal (H) and worm-like disordered (D) nanoporous silicas prepared by surfactant-directed self-assembly. Over the relative density range, 0.5 to 0.65, Young's modulus scales as (density)n where n(C)silicas exhibit a structure-specific hierarchy of modulus values Dsilica framework of self-assembled silica to contain a higher portion of small, stiff rings than found in other forms of amorphous silica. The nanostructure-specific hierarchy and systematic increase in framework modulus we observe, when decreasing the silica framework thickness below 2 nm, provides a new ability to maximize mechanical properties at a given density needed for nanoporous materials integration.

  13. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 {mu}m) and thick (>30{mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  15. Structural study of amorphous polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laridjani, M.; Pouget, J. P.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Epstein, A. J.

    1992-06-01

    Many materials, especially polymers, have a substantial volume fraction with no long range crystalline order. Through these regions are often termed amorphous, they frequently have a specific local order. We describe and use here a method, base on a non-energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, to obtain good quality interference functions and, by Fourier transform, radial distribution functions of the amorphous structure of polymers. We apply this approach to members of a family of electronic polymers of current interest : polyaniline emeraldine bases. We show that the local order exhibits significant differences in type I and type II materials, precipitated as salt and base respectively. These studies demonstrate the importance of sample preparation in evaluating the physical properties of polyaniline, and provide a structural origin for memory effects observed in the doping-dedoping processes. Beaucoup de matériaux, spécialement les polymères, ont une importante fraction de leur volume sans ordre cristallin à longue portée. Bien que ces régions soient souvent appelées amorphes, elles présentent fréquemment un ordre local caractéristique. Nous décrivons et utilisons dans ce papier une méthode, basée sur une technique de diffraction de rayons X non dispersive en énergie, pour obtenir des fonctions d'interférence de bonne qualité et, par transformée de Fourier, la fonction de distribution radiale des polymères amorphes. Nous appliquons cette technique à plusieurs éléments d'une même famille de polymères électroniques d'intérêt actuel : les polyanilines éméraldine bases. Nous montrons que l'ordre local présente d'appréciables différences dans les matériaux de type I et II, préparés respectivement sous forme de sel et de base. Cette étude démontre l'importance des conditions de préparation sur les propriétés physiques du polyaniline et donne une base structurale aux effets observés dans les processus de dopage-dédopage de

  16. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  17. Chemical interactions of aluminum with aqueous silica at 25 degrees Celsius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, John David; Roberson, C.E.; Lind, Carol J.; Polxer, W.L.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions containing from 10 -5 to 10 -2 moles per liter of aluminum and dissolved silica in various ratios were aged at pH levels between 4 and 10 at 25?C. A colloidal amorphous product having the composition of halloysite was produced in most solutions. It had a consistent and reversible equilibrium solubility equivalent to a standard free energy of formation of -8974 ? 1.0 kcal per mole for the formula A12Si2O5(OH)4. Some aging times were longer than 4 years, but most solutions gave consistent solubilities after only a few months of aging. Where silica concentrations were below about 10 -4 molar, microcrystalline gibbsite was formed below pH 6.0 and crystalline bayerite above pH 7.0, but only after much longer aging than was required for crystallization in silica-free solutions. Electron micrographs and diffraction patterns of the synthesized material indicate some crystallinity in the aluminosilicate, but no X-ray diffraction patterns could be obtained even in the material aged 4 years. Solubility relationships for solutions containing fluoride as well as silica and aluminum are explainable by using cryolite stabilities determined in previous work. Aluminum contents of 51 samples of water analyzed for other purposes are in reasonable agreement with the assumption of equilibrium with amorphous clay mineral species similar to the material synthesized in this work. Solubility calculations are summarized graphically for solutions of ionic strength of 0.01 and 0.10.

  18. Altered Gene Transcription in Human Cells Treated with Ludox® Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fede, Caterina; Millino, Caterina; Pacchioni, Beniamina; Celegato, Barbara; Compagnin, Chiara; Martini, Paolo; Selvestrel, Francesco; Mancin, Fabrizio; Celotti, Lucia; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Mognato, Maddalena; Cagnin, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have found extensive applications in industrial manufacturing, biomedical and biotechnological fields. Therefore, the increasing exposure to such ultrafine particles requires studies to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects in order to provide exhaustive information to assess the impact of nanomaterials on human health. The understanding of the biological processes involved in the development and maintenance of a variety of pathologies is improved by genome-wide approaches, and in this context, gene set analysis has emerged as a fundamental tool for the interpretation of the results. In this work we show how the use of a combination of gene-by-gene and gene set analyses can enhance the interpretation of results of in vitro treatment of A549 cells with Ludox® colloidal amorphous silica nanoparticles. By gene-by-gene and gene set analyses, we evidenced a specific cell response in relation to NPs size and elapsed time after treatment, with the smaller NPs (SM30) having higher impact on inflammatory and apoptosis processes than the bigger ones. Apoptotic process appeared to be activated by the up-regulation of the initiator genes TNFa and IL1b and by ATM. Moreover, our analyses evidenced that cell treatment with Ludox® silica nanoparticles activated the matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP10 and MMP9. The information derived from this study can be informative about the cytotoxicity of Ludox® and other similar colloidal amorphous silica NPs prepared by solution processes. PMID:25170680

  19. Hydrated silica exterior produced by biomimetic silicification confers viral vaccine heat-resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Zhou, Hangyu; Nian, Qing-Gong; Song, Zhiyong; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Tang, Ruikang

    2015-01-27

    Heat-lability is a key roadblock that strangles the widespread applications of many biological products. In nature, archaeal and extremophilic organisms utilize amorphous silica as a protective biomineral and exhibit considerable thermal tolerance. Here we present a bioinspired approach to generate thermostable virus by introducing an artificial hydrated silica exterior on individual virion. Similar to thermophiles, silicified viruses can survive longer at high temperature than their wild-type relatives. Virus inactivation assays showed that silica hydration exterior of the modified virus effectively prolonged infectivity of viruses by ∼ 10-fold at room temperature, achieving a similar result as that obtained by storing native ones at 4 °C. Mechanistic studies indicate that amorphous silica nanoclusters stabilize the inner virion structure by forming a layer that restricts molecular mobility, acting as physiochemical nanoanchors. Notably, we further evaluate the potential application of this biomimetic strategy in stabilizing clinically approved vaccine, and the silicified polio vaccine that can retain 90% potency after the storage at room temperature for 35 days was generated by this biosilicification approach and validated with in vivo experiments. This approach not only biomimetically connects inorganic material and living virus but also provides an innovative resolution to improve the thermal stability of biological agents using nanomaterials.

  20. Alkali-silica reaction products: Comparison between samples from concrete structures and laboratory test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sachlova, Sarka Prikryl, Richard; Pertold, Zdenek

    2010-12-15

    Alkali-silica gels (ASG) were investigated in concrete from bridge structures (constructed from the 1920s to 2000), as well as in experimental specimens; employing optical microscopy, petrographic image analysis, and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The main differences were found in the chemical composition and morphology of the ASGs. ASGs which had formed in older concrete samples (50-80 years old) show a partly crystalline structure and higher Ca{sup 2+} content, indicating their aging and maturation. Younger concrete samples and experimental test specimens exhibit the presence of amorphous ASG. The chemistry of ASG from experimental specimens reflects the chemical composition of accelerating solutions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of alkali-silica gels {yields} Comparison of ASR in experimental conditions with ASR in bridge structures {yields} Investigation of factors affecting alkali-silica reaction {yields} Investigation of ASR of different types of aggregates.

  1. Structure and stability of several high-pressure crystalline polymorphs of silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, John S.; Klug, Dennis D.; Allan, Douglas C.

    1995-06-01

    The structure and stability of several proposed high-pressure crystalline polymorphs of silica have been studied with a first-principles pseudopotential total-energy method within the local-density approximation. The monoclinic I2/a phase predicted recently from molecular-dynamics calculations on highly compressed amorphous silica or α quartz [J.S. Tse, D.D. Klug, and Y. LePage, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 3647 (1992)] is shown to be energetically competitive with the well-known stishovite structure and is substantially lower in energy than the cubic fluorite Pa3¯ structure up to 170 GPa. The results are in full accordance with previous molecular-dynamics calculations thus confirming that the empirical potential proposed by van Beest et al. is applicable to the study of the structure and dynamics of high-pressure phases of silica.

  2. Anisotropic surroundings effects on photo absorption of partially embedded Au nanospheroids in silica glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xuan; Shibayama, Tamaki Watanabe, Seiichi; Yu, Ruixuan; Ishioka, Junya

    2015-02-15

    The influence of a directly adjacent or an anisotropic surrounding medium alters the plasmonic properties of a nanoparticle because it provides a mechanism for symmetry breaking of the scattering. Given the success of ion irradiation induced embedment of rigid metallic nanospheroids into amorphous substrate, it is possible to examine the effect of the silica glass substrate on the plasmonic properties of these embedded nanospheroids. In this work presented here, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations for the Au nanospheroids’ optical properties were performed based on 3–dimensional (3D) configuration extracted from planar SEM micrographs and cross–sectional TEM micrographs of the Au nanospheroids partially embedded in the silica glass, and the well–matched simulations with respect to the experimental measurements could demonstrate the dielectric constant at the near surface of silica glass decreased after Ar–ion irradiation.

  3. Silica Deposits Within Gusev Crater: Clear Evidence for Martian Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, A.; Ming, D.; Morris, R.; Clark, B.; Gellert, R.; Hurowitz, J.; Athena Science Team

    2007-12-01

    dominated by silica. This alternative is supported by the association with Ti, as acid-sulfate weathered analogs from Kilauea Volcano (Hawaii) are enriched in both amorphous silica and anatase. It is likely that a combination of these processes, both of which involve localized aqueous interactions, have been active along the eastern margin of Home Plate.

  4. Silaffins in Silica Biomineralization and Biomimetic Silica Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Carolin C.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Biomineralization processes leading to complex solid structures of inorganic material in biological systems are constantly gaining attention in biotechnology and biomedical research. An outstanding example for biomineral morphogenesis is the formation of highly elaborate, nano-patterned silica shells by diatoms. Among the organic macromolecules that have been closely linked to the tightly controlled precipitation of silica in diatoms, silaffins play an extraordinary role. These peptides typically occur as complex posttranslationally modified variants and are directly involved in the silica deposition process in diatoms. However, even in vitro silaffin-based peptides alone, with and without posttranslational modifications, can efficiently mediate biomimetic silica precipitation leading to silica material with different properties as well as with encapsulated cargo molecules of a large size range. In this review, the biomineralization process of silica in diatoms is summarized with a specific focus on silaffins and their in vitro silica precipitation properties. Applications in the area of bio- and nanotechnology as well as in diagnostics and therapy are discussed. PMID:26295401

  5. Silica-tin nanotubes prepared from rice husk ash by sol-gel method: Characterization and its photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Farook; Appaturi, Jimmy Nelson; Thankappan, Radhika; Nawi, Mohd Asri Mohd

    2010-11-01

    Silica-tin material has been synthesized by simple sol-gel method using rice husk ash as the source of silica and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant at room temperature. Calcination of the material at 500 °C for 5 h gave nanotubes with external diameter of 2-4 nm and an internal diameter of 1-2 nm. The BET specific surface area was found to be 607 m 2 g -1. Nitrogen sorption analysis exhibits a type IV isotherm with H3 hysteresis loop. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the material is amorphous. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material was studied towards degradation of methylene blue under UV-irradiation. According to the experimental results the silica-tin nanotubes exhibit high photocatalytic activity compared to pure rice husk silica.

  6. Specific Interactions of Neutral Side Chains of an Adsorbed Protein with the Surface of α-Quartz and Silica Gel.

    PubMed

    Odinokov, Alexey V; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-16

    Many key features of the protein adsorption on the silica surfaces still remain unraveled. One of the open questions is the interaction of nonpolar side chains with siloxane cavities. Here, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for the detailed investigation of the binding of several hydrophobic and amphiphilic protein side chains with silica surface. These interactions were found to be a possible driving force for protein adsorption. The free energy gain was larger for the disordered surface of amorphous silica gel as compared to α-quartz, but the impact depended on the type of amino acid. The dependence was analyzed from the structural point of view. For every amino acid an enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior was observed. These results confirm a hypothesis of an essential role of hydrophobic interactions in protein unfolding and irreversible adsorption on the silica surface.

  7. Graphene as a transparent electrode for amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaianella, F. Rosolen, G.; Maes, B.

    2015-06-28

    The properties of graphene in terms of transparency and conductivity make it an ideal candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) in a transparent conducting electrode. However, graphene is not always as good as ITO for some applications, due to a non-negligible absorption. For amorphous silicon photovoltaics, we have identified a useful case with a graphene-silica front electrode that improves upon ITO. For both electrode technologies, we simulate the weighted absorption in the active layer of planar amorphous silicon-based solar cells with a silver back-reflector. The graphene device shows a significantly increased absorbance compared to ITO-based cells for a large range of silicon thicknesses (34.4% versus 30.9% for a 300 nm thick silicon layer), and this result persists over a wide range of incidence angles.

  8. Is Mg-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate a homogeneous mixture of amorphous magnesium carbonate and amorphous calcium carbonate?

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Lin, Cang-Jie; Huang, Shing-Jong; Chan, Jerry C C

    2016-10-04

    We find two types of carbonate ions in Mg stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC), whose short-range orders are identical to those of ACC and amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC). Mg-ACC comprises a homogeneous mixture of the nano-clusters of ACC and AMC. Their relative amount varies systematically at different pH.

  9. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  10. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite {+-} tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  11. Petrologic Constraints on Amorphous and Crystalline Magnesium Silicates: Dust Formation and Evolution in Selected Herbig Ae/Be Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and "amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry" around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting "astronomical nomenclature" and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the "Principle of Actualism" that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite ± tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  12. Study on Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and SiO2 nanoshells coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes/silica gel-glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chan; Chen, Wenzhe; Ye, Xiaoyun

    2012-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with crystalline Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and amorphous SiO2 nanoshells, to represent conductors, semiconductors, and insulators, respectively, were embedded in transparent silica gel-glass. The coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses were prepared by the sol-gel technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/Vis spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and pore structure measurements were used to investigate the morphology, structure, and texture properties of the coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses. The hardness and elastic modulus of the silica gel-glasses were characterized using a Nanoindenter and found to depend on the coating materials. Coating the MWCNTs with crystalline Au nanoparticles, TiO2 nanoclusters, and amorphous SiO2 nanoshells leads to an increase in the hardness and elastic modulus, despite the higher specific surface area and pore volume of the coated MWCNT/silica gel-glasses. Consequently, we can conclude that the mechanical properties of coated MWCNT/silica gel-glass might be greatly dependent on the guest MWCNTs rather than the silica gel matrix.

  13. Silica heat shield sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbesmeyer, L. H.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of silica heat shield requirements to gap width, tile edge radius, and heat transfer distribution within tile gaps was investigated. A two-dimensional thermal model was modified and used to determine the effect of two dimensional heat transfer distributions at high temperature reusable surface insulation edges on shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) requirements. The sensitivity of TPS requirements to coating thickness, emissivity, substructure thickness, and changes in gap heating for several locations on shuttle was also studied. An inverse solution technique was applied to temperature data obtained in the Ames 20 MW turbulent duct in order to examine the effect of tile edge radius on TPS requirements. The derived heating values were then used to predict TPS requirements. Results show that increasing tile radius reduces TPS requirements.

  14. Ge doping of GaN beyond the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, A.; Schörmann, J.; Jiménez-Rodriguez, M.; Lim, C. B.; Walther, F.; Rohnke, M.; Mouton, I.; Amichi, L.; Bougerol, C.; Den Hertog, M. I.; Eickhoff, M.; Monroy, E.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of germanium as n-type dopant in wurtzite GaN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, reaching carrier concentrations of up to 6.7  ×  1020 cm-3 at 300 K, well beyond the Mott density. The Ge concentration and free carrier density were found to scale linearly with the Ge flux in the studied range. All the GaN:Ge layers present smooth surface morphology with atomic terraces, without trace of pits or cracks, and the mosaicity of the samples has no noticeable dependence on the Ge concentration. The variation of the GaN:Ge band gap with the carrier concentration is consistent with theoretical calculations of the band gap renormalization due to electron-electron and electron-ion interaction, and Burstein-Moss effect.

  15. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  16. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  17. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  18. Co amorphous systems: A product development perspective.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahul B; Thipparaboina, Rajesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-12-30

    Solubility is one of the major problems associated with most of the new chemical entities that can be reasonably addressed by drug amorphization. However, being a high-energy form, it usually tends to re-crystallize, necessitating new formulation strategies to stabilize amorphous drugs. Polymeric amorphous solid dispersion (PASD) is one of the widely investigated strategies to stabilize amorphous drug, with major limitations like limited polymer solubility and hygroscopicity. Co amorphous system (CAM), a new entrant in amorphous arena is a promising alternative to PASD. CAMs are multi component single phase amorphous solid systems made up of two or more small molecules that may be a combination of drugs or drug and excipients. Excipients explored for CAM preparation include amino acids, carboxylic acids, nicotinamide and saccharine. Advantages offered by CAM include improved aqueous solubility and physical stability of amorphous drug, with a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy. This review attempts to address different aspects in the development of CAM as drug products. Criterion for co-former selection, various methods involved in CAM preparation, characterization tools, stability, scale up and regulatory requirements for the CAM product development are discussed.

  19. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  20. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  1. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; ...

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  2. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  3. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  4. Amorphization of sugar hydrates upon milling.

    PubMed

    Willart, J F; Dujardin, N; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2010-07-19

    The possibility to amorphize anhydrous crystalline sugars, like lactose, trehalose and glucose, by mechanical milling was previously reported. We test here the possibility to amorphize the corresponding crystalline hydrates: lactose monohydrate, trehalose dihydrate and glucose monohydrate using fully identical milling procedures. The results show that only the first hydrate amorphizes while the other two remain structurally invariant. These different behaviours are attributed to the plasticizing effect of the structural water molecules which can decrease the glass transition temperature below the milling temperature. The results reveal clearly the fundamental role of the glass transition in the solid-state amorphization process induced by milling, and they also explain why crystalline hydrates are systematically more difficult to amorphize by milling than their anhydrous counterpart. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction.

  5. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  6. Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Danny; Stepanian, Christopher J.; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    Aerogels that consist, variously, of neat silica/polymer alloys and silica/polymer alloy matrices reinforced with fibers have been developed as materials for flexible thermal-insulation blankets. In comparison with prior aerogel blankets, these aerogel blankets are more durable and less dusty. These blankets are also better able to resist and recover from compression . an important advantage in that maintenance of thickness is essential to maintenance of high thermal-insulation performance. These blankets are especially suitable as core materials for vacuum- insulated panels and vacuum-insulated boxes of advanced, nearly seamless design. (Inasmuch as heat leakage at seams is much greater than heat leakage elsewhere through such structures, advanced designs for high insulation performance should provide for minimization of the sizes and numbers of seams.) A silica/polymer aerogel of the present type could be characterized, somewhat more precisely, as consisting of multiply bonded, linear polymer reinforcements within a silica aerogel matrix. Thus far, several different polymethacrylates (PMAs) have been incorporated into aerogel networks to increase resistance to crushing and to improve other mechanical properties while minimally affecting thermal conductivity and density. The polymethacrylate phases are strongly linked into the silica aerogel networks in these materials. Unlike in other organic/inorganic blended aerogels, the inorganic and organic phases are chemically bonded to each other, by both covalent and hydrogen bonds. In the process for making a silica/polymer alloy aerogel, the covalent bonds are introduced by prepolymerization of the methacrylate monomer with trimethoxysilylpropylmethacrylate, which serves as a phase cross-linker in that it contains both organic and inorganic monomer functional groups and hence acts as a connector between the organic and inorganic phases. Hydrogen bonds are formed between the silanol groups of the inorganic phase and the

  7. Studying the pseudomorphic replacement of olivine by silica at acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Helen E.; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Silicification is an important reaction occurring in volcanic environments that aids the neutralisation of the extremely acidic fluids produced. Replacement of the original minerals by silica results in the reacting fluid becoming enriched in cations that can be subsequently transported through the hydrothermal system (Varekamp et al., 2000). In some examples olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts within the reacted layers are pseudomorphically replaced by silica (Africano and Bernard, 2000). We have performed unstirred batch experiments using sulphuric acid and whole olivine crystals to explore the parameters that control phase precipitation and the pseudomorphic replacement of forsteritic olivine. The experiments were conducted in Teflon-lined steel autoclaves at temperatures between 80 and 120 ° C. In lower temperature experiments the reaction of olivine with 0.1 M sulphuric acid produced a red precipitate coating the olivine surface. The red phase was too low in concentration to be identified but is expected to be hematite (Fe2O3). In contrast, experiments conducted in sulphuric acid between 1 and 3.6 M produced an amorphous silica pseudomorph of olivine. The dependence of phase precipitation on pH was tested using a sulphuric acid solution neutralised to pH 2 with a resulting ionic strength equivalent to 1 M. At low temperatures the olivine reacted to produce amorphous silica and a yellow fluid indicating that Fe remained in solution, possibly as a complex with sulphate. Higher temperatures allowed the iron to be liberated from the fluid and precipitated as hematite in association with amorphous silica. Elemental content microprobe data for the olivine and silica rim from pseudomorphic replacement reactions suggests that the majority of cations from olivine dissolution remained in solution. This observation was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy, which showed a high content of Mg and Fe in the fluid. The variation of replacement products at

  8. Structural and Microwave Properties of Silica Xerogel Glass-Ceramic Sintered by Sub-millimeter Wave Heating using a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, S.; Prima, E. S.; Sudiana, I. N.; Tani, S.; Sako, K.; Fujii, Y.; Saito, T.; Idehara, T.; Sano, S.; Sunendar, B.; Sabchevski, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of silica glass-ceramics, produced from amorphous silica xerogel extracted from sago waste ash. As a radiation source for a microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of the amorphous silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 1200 °C. Microwave absorbing properties of the sintered samples were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and the reflection loss at different frequencies in the interval from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. Furthermore, the characteristics of the formation process for producing silica glass-ceramics were studied using a Raman Spectroscopy and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the samples sintered at 1200 °C are characterized by lower reflection losses and a better transparency due to the formation of a fully crystallized silica glass- ceramic at sufficiently high temperature.

  9. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  10. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  11. Biologically formed amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Steve; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Raz, Sefi; Addadi, Lia

    2003-01-01

    Many organisms from a wide variety of taxa produce amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), despite the fact that it is inherently unstable and relatively soluble in its pure state. These properties also make it difficult to detect and characterize ACC. Raman spectroscopy is a particularly useful method for investigating ACC because the sample can be examined wet, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis can provide detailed information on the short-range order. Other methods for characterizing ACC include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron and X-ray diffraction. Because of the difficulties involved, we suspect that ACC is far more widely distributed than is presently known, and a comparison of EXAFS spectra shows that different biogenic ACC phases have different short-range order structures. We also suspect that ACC fulfils many different functions, including as a transient precursor phase during the formation of crystalline calcium carbonate.

  12. A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT OF CRYSTALLINE SILICA IN RETURNED COMETARY SAMPLES: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN ASTROPHYSICAL AND METEORITICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Leroux, Hugues

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline silica (SiO{sub 2}) is recurrently identified at the percent level in the infrared spectra of protoplanetary disks. By contrast, reports of crystalline silica in primitive meteorites are very unusual. This dichotomy illustrates the typical gap existing between astrophysical observations and meteoritical records of the first solids formed around young stars. The cometary samples returned by the Stardust mission in 2006 offer an opportunity to have a closer look at a silicate dust that experienced a very limited reprocessing since the accretion of the dust. Here, we provide the first extended study of silica materials in a large range of Stardust samples. We show that cristobalite is the dominant form. It was detected in 5 out of 25 samples. Crystalline silica is thus a common minor phase in Stardust samples. Furthermore, olivine is generally associated with this cristobalite, which put constraints on possible formation mechanisms. A low-temperature subsolidus solid–solid transformation of an amorphous precursor is most likely. This crystallization route favors the formation of olivine (at the expense of pyroxenes), and crystalline silica is the natural byproduct of this transformation. Conversely, direct condensation and partial melting are not expected to produce the observed mineral assemblages. Silica is preserved in cometary materials because they were less affected by thermal and aqueous alterations than their chondritic counterparts. The common occurrence of crystalline silica therefore makes the cometary material an important bridge between the IR-based mineralogy of distant protoplanetary disks and the mineralogy of the early solar system.

  13. A Significant Amount of Crystalline Silica in Returned Cometary Samples: Bridging the Gap between Astrophysical and Meteoritical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Leroux, Hugues

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline silica (SiO2) is recurrently identified at the percent level in the infrared spectra of protoplanetary disks. By contrast, reports of crystalline silica in primitive meteorites are very unusual. This dichotomy illustrates the typical gap existing between astrophysical observations and meteoritical records of the first solids formed around young stars. The cometary samples returned by the Stardust mission in 2006 offer an opportunity to have a closer look at a silicate dust that experienced a very limited reprocessing since the accretion of the dust. Here, we provide the first extended study of silica materials in a large range of Stardust samples. We show that cristobalite is the dominant form. It was detected in 5 out of 25 samples. Crystalline silica is thus a common minor phase in Stardust samples. Furthermore, olivine is generally associated with this cristobalite, which put constraints on possible formation mechanisms. A low-temperature subsolidus solid-solid transformation of an amorphous precursor is most likely. This crystallization route favors the formation of olivine (at the expense of pyroxenes), and crystalline silica is the natural byproduct of this transformation. Conversely, direct condensation and partial melting are not expected to produce the observed mineral assemblages. Silica is preserved in cometary materials because they were less affected by thermal and aqueous alterations than their chondritic counterparts. The common occurrence of crystalline silica therefore makes the cometary material an important bridge between the IR-based mineralogy of distant protoplanetary disks and the mineralogy of the early solar system.

  14. Silica-supported biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    The hybridization of lipid membranes with inorganic silica-based framework results in mechanically stable biomembrane mimics. This account describes three types of silica-based biomimetic membranes. As the first example, a Langmuir monolayer of dialkylalkoxysilane was polymerized and immobilized onto a porous glass plate. Permeability through the monolayer-immobilized glass was regulated by phase transition of the immobilized monolayer. In the second example, spherical vesicles covalently attached to a silica cover layer (Cerasome) were prepared. The Cerasome was stable enough to be assembled into layer-by-layer films without destruction of its vesicular structure. This material could be an example of the multicellular assembly. Mesoporous silica films densely filling peptide assemblies (Proteosilica) are introduced as the third example. The Proteosilica was synthesized as a transparent film through template sol-gel reaction using amphiphilic peptides.

  15. Multi-Length Scale Analysis of the Effect of Fused-Silica Pre-shocking on its Tendency for Devitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that impact-induced devitrification of fused silica, or more specifically formation of high-density stishovite, can significantly improve ballistic-penetration resistance of fused silica, the material which is used in transparent armor. The studies have also shown that in order for stishovite to form during a ballistic impact event, very high projectile kinetic energy normalized by the projectile/fused-silica target-plate contact area must accompany such an event. Otherwise fused-silica devitrification, if taking place, does not substantially improve the material ballistic-penetration resistance. In the present work, all-atom molecular-level computations are carried out in order to establish if pre-shocking of fused-silica target-plates (to form stishovite) and subsequent unloading (to revert stishovite to the material amorphous structure) can increase fused silica's propensity for stishovite formation during a ballistic impact. Towards that end, molecular-level computational procedures are developed to simulate both the pre-shocking treatment of the fused-silica target-plate and its subsequent impact by a solid right-circular cylindrical projectile. The results obtained clearly revealed that when strong-enough shockwaves are used in the fused-silica target-plate pre-shocking procedure, the propensity of fused silica for stishovite formation during the subsequent ballistic impact is increased, as is the associated ballistic-penetration resistance. To rationalize these findings, a detailed post-processing microstructural analysis of the pre-shocked material is employed. The results obtained suggest that fused silica pre-shocked with shockwaves of sufficient strength retain some memory/embryos of stishovite, and these embryos facilitate stishovite formation during the subsequent ballistic impact.

  16. Silica coatings in the Ka'u Desert, Hawaii, a Mars analog terrain: A micromorphological, spectral, chemical, and isotopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Arvidson, Raymond E.

    2010-04-01

    High-silica materials have been observed on Mars, both from orbit by the CRISM spectrometer and in situ by the Spirit rover at Gusev Crater. These observations potentially imply a wet, geologically active Martian surface. To understand silica formation on Mars, it is useful to study analogous terrestrial silica deposits. We studied silica coatings that occur on the 1974 Kilauea flow in the Ka'u Desert, Hawaii. These coatings are typically composed of two layers: a ˜10 μm layer of amorphous silica, capped by a ˜1 μm layer of Fe-Ti oxide. The oxide coating is composed of ˜100 nm spherules, suggesting formation by chemical deposition. Raman spectroscopy indicates altered silica glass as the dominant phase in the silica coating and anatase and rutile as dominant phases in the Fe-Ti coating; jarosite also occurs within the coatings. Oxygen isotopic contents of the coatings were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (Cameca 7f and NanoSIMS). The measured values, δ18OFe-Ti = 14.6 ± 2.1‰, and δ18Osilica = 12.1 ± 2.2‰ (relative to SMOW), are enriched in 18O relative to the basalt substrate. The observations presented are consistent with a residual formation mechanism for the silica coating. Acid-sulfate solutions leached away divalent and trivalent cations, leaving a silica-enriched layer behind. Micrometer-scale dissolution and reprecipitation may have also occurred within the coatings. Chemical similarities between the Hawaiian samples and the high-silica deposits at Gusev suggest that the Martian deposits are the product of extended periods of similar acid-sulfate leaching.

  17. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  18. Laser irradiation to produce amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Titapiwatanakun, Varin; Tankul, Junlathip; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-11-30

    Using a high-power CO2 laser to irradiate powder beds, it was possible to induce phase transformation to the amorphous state. Irradiation of a model drug, indometacin, resulted in formation of a glass. Varying the settings of the laser (power and raster speed) was shown to change the physicochemical properties of the glasses produced and all irradiated glasses were found to be more stable than a reference glass produced by melt-quenching. Irradiation of a powder blend of paracetamol and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 was found to produce a solid amorphous dispersion. The results suggest that laser-irradiation might be a useful method for making amorphous pharmaceuticals.

  19. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  20. Characterization of mechanical heterogeneity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Li, M. Z.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-07-01

    The structural geometry and size distribution of the local atomic rearrangements induced by external stress in amorphous solids are investigated by molecular dynamics studies. We find that the size distribution exhibits a generic power-law behavior and their structural geometry shows fractal feature. This indicates that the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids are self-organized during deformation. A simple theoretical model based on the interaction of the heterogeneous elastic field sources is proposed which predicts the power-law scaling and characterizes the properties of the local atomic rearrangements in amorphous solids.

  1. Origin of Magnetic Properties in Amorphous Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Magnetic Properties of Fe-Ni-B Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann , IEEE Trans. on Magnetics MAG-15, 909 (1979). Also GE...Report 78CRD132. 2. "Formation and Magnetic Properties of Fe-B-Si Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky, J. J. Becker, J. L. Walter, and H. H. Liebermann ...Amorphous Alloys," F. E. Luborsky and H. H. Liebermann , J. Appl. Phys., to appear. Also GE Report 79CRD177. 4. "The Effect of Temperature on Magnetic

  2. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  3. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications.

  4. Insights into microstructure and chemistry of active fiber core material produced by the granulated silica method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, H.; Etissa, D.; Romano, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of special fibers relies on new methods and materials to incorporate new functionalities into optical fibers by virtues of dopants and structure. In particular, the granulated silica method allows to rapidly produce active fibers with high dopant content and with virtually any microstructure. The implementation of this production method requires a multitude of process steps at various temperatures and temperature gradients that can significantly influence the optical properties of the produced preforms and fibers. To better understand and optimize the processes of active material production and fiber drawing parameters we have done a thorough analysis of microstructure, phase development, crystallinity and chemical mapping of active fiber cores produced by a combination of sol-gel process and granulated silica method with and without employment of a CO2 laser treatment. The microstructure of fibers have been analyzed with a diverse suite of techniques in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), revealing formation of various silica polymorphs and distribution of active elements (i.e. Yb and P) into the core structure. Our results show the presence of another polymorph of silica with low crystallinity dispersed in the main amorphous polymorph (i.e. quartz). We conclude that in spite of importance of homogeneous distribution of Yb and P into the core, the formation of various silica polymorphs resulting from materials processing has to be considered.

  5. Effect of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber and silica masterbatch for tyre application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Verasamy, D.; Kamal, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The availability of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber (ENR-LC) has provided a better opportunity for using epoxidised natural rubber (ENR) with silica to reinforce natural rubber for tyre application. ENR-LC mixed directly with silica to rubber by high speed stirrer without using any coupling agent. Some rubber compounds were prepared by mixing a large amount of precipitated amorphous white silica with natural rubber. The silica was prepared in aqueous dispersion and the filler was perfectly dispersed in the ENR-LC. The performance of the composites was evaluated in this work for the viability of ENR-LC/Si in tyre compounding. Compounding was carried out on a two roll mill, where the additives and curing agents was later mixed. Characterization of these composites was performed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for dispersion as well as mechanical testing. C-ENR/Si showed efficient as primary reinforcing filler in ENR with regard to modulus and tensile strength, resulting on an increase in the stiffness of the rubbers compared to ENR latex. Overall improvement in the mechanical properties for the ENR-LC over the control crosslinked rubber sample was probably due to synergisms of silica reinforcement and crosslinking of the polymeric matrix phase.

  6. Silica deposits on Mars with features resembling hot spring biosignatures at El Tatio in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Steven W; Farmer, Jack D

    2016-11-17

    The Mars rover Spirit encountered outcrops and regolith composed of opaline silica (amorphous SiO2·nH2O) in an ancient volcanic hydrothermal setting in Gusev crater. An origin via either fumarole-related acid-sulfate leaching or precipitation from hot spring fluids was suggested previously. However, the potential significance of the characteristic nodular and mm-scale digitate opaline silica structures was not recognized. Here we report remarkably similar features within active hot spring/geyser discharge channels at El Tatio in northern Chile, where halite-encrusted silica yields infrared spectra that are the best match yet to spectra from Spirit. Furthermore, we show that the nodular and digitate silica structures at El Tatio that most closely resemble those on Mars include complex sedimentary structures produced by a combination of biotic and abiotic processes. Although fully abiotic processes are not ruled out for the Martian silica structures, they satisfy an a priori definition of potential biosignatures.

  7. How is Physical Depositional Setting Related to Silica Chemistry in the Platte River, USA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Orsdel, Z. R.; Mohr, R. C.; Ford, E.; Wagner, Z.; Kettenring, K. M.; Triplett, L.

    2013-12-01

    Beginning in 2003, a non-native subspecies of Phragmites australis, a wetland grass, invaded the Platte River in Nebraska, USA. The plants' dense root and rhizome structures caused channel narrowing and increased deposition of fine sediment. We hypothesized that a significant proportion of the fine sediment was comprised of biogenic silica particles including terrestrial plant phytoliths. In this study, we determined a relationship between particle size and biogenic silica content in Platte River sediments to help characterize when and where silica is sequestered in the riparian areas of rivers. Historically a wide, braided, largely unvegetated sand-bed river, the Platte has undergone several major changes since the early 1900s. The main anthropogenic impact on the Platte has been a ~75 percent reduction in flow, leading to channel narrowing and more vegetation occupying riparian areas. Phragmites is particularly effective at building islands and extending river banks because its roots add cohesion to sediment. We suspect that the presence of Phragmites in the Platte River has resulted in a reduction of bioavailable silica (dissolved and particulate amorphous particles) being exported to the downstream receiving waters, ultimately including the Gulf of Mexico. We want to better understand silica sequestration in riverine environments, because silicon is often a limiting nutrient for some phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms and radiolaria) in coastal oceans. In the Platte, lower water levels and increased vegetation density cause reduced flow velocity, allowing more silica particles to settle out of suspension. We hypothesized that silica content in the riparian sediments of the Platte River negatively correlate with particle size, and that the non-native subspecies of Phragmites uses more silica than the native variety. In order to quantify the effect Phragmites is having on the Platte's silica load, plant and sediment samples were prepared using a timed NaOH digestion

  8. Effects of Al on mineralogy and kinetics of precipitation of silica minerals under crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saishu, H.; Okamoto, A.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2011-12-01

    Silica is a dominant component in the Earth's crust. Dissolution and precipitation processes of silica minerals play significant roles on the spatial and temporal distributions of fluids and rock strength in the crusts. Quartz veins occur ubiquitously in the vicinity of seismogenic zones. However the rate equation of silica precipitation is important to consider the sealing of fractures by quartz on the earthquake cycle, it has not been determined except for precipitation rates on surface reactions (Rimstidt and Barnes, 1980) because of the following reasons: cristobalite and amorphous silica occur in the geothermal areas (Alekseyev et al., 2009) whereas quartz is stable in the crust, precipitation of silica minerals occurs not only on quartz surfaces but also via nucleation processes in fluids, and trace elements including Al, Na and K in solutions affect on the species and kinetics of silica precipitation (Okamoto et al., 2010). In the crust, feldspars are dominant constituents, thus the effects of these minor components are crucial for considering the silica precipitation. We conducted the hydrothermal flow-through experiments to investigate the overall precipitation rate of silica minerals and the effects of Al in the solutions under crustal conditions (430 °C and 31 MPa). The experimental apparatus is similar to that in Okamoto et al. (2010). A blank vessel without any rock/mineral substrates was used for precipitation of silica minerals. The Si-supersaturated solutions (C/Ceq = 3-3.5) were prepared by dissolution of quartz at 350 °C, and the concentration of Al in the input solution was controlled from 0 to 7 ppm by dissolution of albite with different temperatures. The experiments in pure Si solution revealed that the precipitation via nucleation in fluids was approximated as the third-order reaction whereas the precipitation on the pre-existing quartz surfaces was determined as the first-order reaction in Rimstidt and Barnes (1980). Activation energy of

  9. Silica-rich deposits and hydrated minerals at Gusev Crater, Mars: Vis-NIR spectral characterization and regional mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, M.S.; Bell, J.F.; Cloutis, E.A.; Wang, A.; Ruff, S.W.; Craig, M.A.; Bailey, D.T.; Johnson, J. R.; De Souza, P.A.; Farrand, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit has discovered surprisingly high concentrations of amorphous silica in soil and nodular outcrops in the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills. In Pancam multispectral observations, we find that an absorption feature at the longest Pancam wavelength (1009 nm) appears to be characteristic of these silica-rich materials; however, spectral analyses of amorphous silica suggest that the ???1009 nm spectral feature is not a direct reflection of their silica-rich nature. Based on comparisons with spectral databases, we hypothesize that the presence of H2O or OH, either free (as water ice), adsorbed or bound in a mineral structure, is responsible for the spectral feature observed by Pancam. The Gertrude Weise soil, which is nearly pure opaline silica, may have adsorbed water cold-trapped on mineral grains. The origin of the ???1009 nm Pancam feature observed in the silica-rich nodular outcrops may result from the presence of additional hydrated minerals (specific sulfates, halides, chlorides, sodium silicates, carbonates or borates). Using the ???1009 nm feature with other spectral parameters as a "hydration signature" we have mapped the occurrence of hydrated materials along the extent of Spirit's traverse across the Columbia Hills from West Spur to Home Plate (sols 155-1696). We have also mapped this hydration signature across large panoramic images to understand the regional distribution of materials that are spectrally similar to the silica-rich soil and nodular outcrops. Our results suggest that hydrated materials are common in the Columbia Hills. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Constraints on abundance, composition, and nature of X-ray amorphous components of soils and rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehouck, Erwin; McLennan, Scott M.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Cousin, Agnès.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of the three samples analyzed by Curiosity's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument during the first year of the Mars Science Laboratory mission—the Rocknest sand, and the John Klein and Cumberland drill fines, both extracted from the Sheepbed mudstone—show evidence for a significant amorphous component of unclear origin. We developed a mass balance calculation program that determines the range of possible chemical compositions of the crystalline and amorphous components of these samples within the uncertainties of mineral abundances derived from CheMin data. In turn, the chemistry constrains the minimum abundance of amorphous component required to have realistic compositions (all oxides ≥ 0 wt %): 21-22 wt % for Rocknest and 15-20 wt % for Cumberland, in good agreement with estimates derived from the diffraction patterns (~27 and ~31 wt %, respectively). Despite obvious differences between the Rocknest sand and the Sheepbed mudstone, the amorphous components of the two sites are chemically very similar, having comparable concentrations of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Cr2O3, FeOT, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5. MgO tends to be lower in Rocknest, although it may also be comparable between the two samples depending on the exact composition of the smectite in Sheepbed. The only unambiguous difference is the SO3 content, which is always higher in Rocknest. The observed similarity suggests that the two amorphous components share a common origin or formation process. The individual phases possibly present within the amorphous components include: volcanic (or impact) glass, hisingerite (or silica + ferrihydrite), amorphous sulfates (or adsorbed SO42-), and nanophase ferric oxides.

  11. Amorphous to Amorphous Form Transitions of Water Ice and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have combined Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and cryogenic techniques in an instrumental configuration that allows observing the structure of vapor deposited ice as it evolves during warmup. The ice is deposited in-situ inside an Hitachi H-500 H transmission electron microscope at a base pressure of 1-5 x 10(exp -7) torr on a thin amorphous carbon substrate at 15K or 86K and warmed up at a rate of 1-2 K/min. We find a progression of amorphous forms and well defined amorphous to amorphous transitions. Apart from the well known low-density form of ice, we confirm the presence of a high-density form and find a third amorphous form that coexists with cubic ice. We will report too on the amorphous to crystalline transition and the implications of these results for radical diffusion and gas retention observed in laboratory analog studies of interstellar and cometary ices.

  12. Morphological and textural characterization of functionalized particulate silica xerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miranda, Lazaro A.; Mohallem, Nelcy D. S.; de Magalhães, Welington F.

    2006-03-01

    The functionalization of xerogels for use in chromatography and catalysis was carried out by solubilization of amorphous silica using a soxhlet extractor. Xerogels were prepared by sol-gel method using tetraethoxysilane, TEOS, ethanol, and water in a 1/3/10 molar ratio with HCl and HF as catalysts. The samples were prepared in monolithic form and dried at 70 °C and 550 °C for 1 h each. After functionalization, changes in textural and morphological characteristics of xerogels were investigated by means of nitrogen gas adsorption, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As the analysis methods are based on different physical principles, the results are complementary, leading to a good knowledge of the texture of the samples studied.

  13. Vibrational Properties of a Two-Dimensional Silica Kagome Lattice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Kagome lattices are structures possessing fascinating magnetic and vibrational properties, but in spite of a large body of theoretical work, experimental realizations and investigations of their dynamics are scarce. Using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, we study the vibrational properties of two-dimensional silica (2D-SiO2), which has a kagome lattice structure. We identify the signatures of crystalline and amorphous 2D-SiO2 structures in Raman spectra and show that, at finite temperatures, the stability of 2D-SiO2 lattice is strongly influenced by phonon–phonon interaction. Our results not only provide insights into the vibrational properties of 2D-SiO2 and kagome lattices in general but also suggest a quick nondestructive method to detect 2D-SiO2. PMID:28024359

  14. Vibrational Properties of a Two-Dimensional Silica Kagome Lattice.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Torbjörn; Skakalova, Viera; Kurasch, Simon; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Jannik C; Smet, Jurgen H; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V

    2016-12-27

    Kagome lattices are structures possessing fascinating magnetic and vibrational properties, but in spite of a large body of theoretical work, experimental realizations and investigations of their dynamics are scarce. Using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations, we study the vibrational properties of two-dimensional silica (2D-SiO2), which has a kagome lattice structure. We identify the signatures of crystalline and amorphous 2D-SiO2 structures in Raman spectra and show that, at finite temperatures, the stability of 2D-SiO2 lattice is strongly influenced by phonon-phonon interaction. Our results not only provide insights into the vibrational properties of 2D-SiO2 and kagome lattices in general but also suggest a quick nondestructive method to detect 2D-SiO2.

  15. High damage threshold anti-reflectors by physical vapor deposited amorphous fluoropolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Spragge, M.K.; Loomis, G.E.; Thomas, I.M.; Rainer, F.; Ward, R.L.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    High laser-resistant anti-reflective coatings were made from an amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon AF2400) material by physical vapor deposition. Single layers of Teflon AF2400 were thermally deposited in a vacuum chamber. Refractive index and adhesion of the coatings were determined as a function of deposition rate (2 to 20 {Angstrom}/s), substrate temperature (20 to 200C), and glow-discharge bias potential ({minus}1500 to 1500 V). An anti-reflective coating of an amorphous fluoropolymer (Teflon AF2400) had a laser resistance of > 47 J/cm{sup 2} (1.06 {mu}m, 3-ns pulselength) and is transparent from 200 nm to 1600 nm. The majority of the coatings had a 1.30 refractive index, similar to that of the bulk material. Scanning electron microscopy and preliminary nuclear magnetic resonance observations indicated that morphological changes caused the variations in the refractive index rather than compositional changes. The coatings adhered to fused silica and silicon wafers under normal laboratory handling conditions. Scotch tape with 12.6 gr/mm tension was sufficient to pull off every coating from fused silica substrates.

  16. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  17. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  18. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  19. Influence of polyols on the formation of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite inside silica matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoia, Marcela; Barvinschi, Paul; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Bunoiu, Mădălin

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized nickel ferrite/silica nanocomposites, using a modified sol-gel method that combines the sol-gel processing with the thermal decomposition of metal-organic precursors, leading to a homogenous dispersion of ferrite nanoparticles within the silica matrix and a narrow size distribution. We used as starting materials tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as source of silica, Fe(III) and Ni(II) nitrates as sources of metal cations, and polyols as reducing agent (polyvinyl alcohol, 1,4-butanediol and their mixture). TG/DTA coupled technique evidenced the redox interaction between the polyol and the mixture of metal nitrates during the heating of the gel, with formation of nickel ferrite precursors in the pores of the silica-gels. FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of metal carboxylates inside the silica-gels and the interaction of the polyols with the Si-OH groups of the polysiloxane network. X-ray diffractometry evidenced that in case of nanocomposites obtained by using a single polyol, nickel ferrite forms as single crystalline phase inside the amorphous silica matrix, while in case of using a mixture of polyols the nickel oxide appears as a secondary phase. TEM microscopy and elemental mapping evidenced the fine nature of the obtained nickel ferrite nanoparticles that are homogenously dispersed within the silica matrix. The obtained nanocomposites exhibit magnetic behavior very close to superparamagnetism slightly depending on the presence and nature of the organic compounds used in synthesis; the magnetization reached at 5 kOe magnetic field was 7 emu/g for all composites.

  20. High-pressure infrared sepctra of alpha-quartz, coesite, stishovite and silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Q.; Hemley, R. J.; Kruger, M. B.; Jeanloz, R.

    1993-01-01

    High-pressure infrared absorption spectra of alpha-quatz, coesite, stishovite, and SiO2 glass are consistent with the primary compression mechanism of the initially tetrahedrally bonded phases being the bending of the Si-O-Si angle at pressures less than 10-20 GPa. At higher pressures, up to 40 GPa, we observe a decline in the intensity of the infrared SiO4 asymmetric-stretching vibrations of all three phases, with an increase in the relative amplitude between 700 and 900/cm. This change in intensities is attributed to an increase in the average coordination number of silicon through extreme distortion of tetrahedra. At pressures above approximately 20 GPa, the low-pressure crystalline polymorphs gradually become amorphous, and the infrared spectra provide evidence for an increase in silicon coordination in these high-density amorphous phases. The pressure-amorphized samples prepared from quartz and coesite differ structurally both from each other and from silica glass that has been compressed, and the high pressure spectra indicate that these materials are considerably more disordered than stishovite under comparable pressure conditions. Average mode Grueneisen parameters calculated for quartz, stishovite and fused silica from both infrared and Raman spectra are compatible with the corresponding thermodynamic value of the Grueneisen parameter, however, that of coesite is significantly discrepant.

  1. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  2. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  3. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  4. Picosecond Electronic Relaxations In Amorphous Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauc, Jan

    1983-11-01

    Using the pump and probe technique the relaxation processes of photogenerated carriers in amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses in the time domain from 0.5 Ps to 1.4 ns have been studied. The results obtained on the following phenomena are reviewed: hot carrier thermalization in amorphous silicon; trapping of carriers in undoped a-Si:H; trapping of carriers in deep traps produced by doping; geminate recombination in As2S3-xSex glasses.

  5. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  6. Visualization of fracture precursors in vitreous silica: study of under- and over coordinated ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Frank; Ochoa, Romulo; Knox, Deborah

    2009-03-01

    We have conducted classical molecular dynamics fracture studies of vitreous silica. A new visualization program was designed to observe the fracture process of the sample as a whole. The program also allows users to highlight and focus on the under- and over coordinated oxygen and silicon ions. A BKS potential was utilized to model the ionic interactions. DL-POLY* was the program used to perform simulations. Amorphous silica samples were generated at high temperatures; through a series of quenching and equilibration periods vitreous silica was obtained at room temperature. This method resulted in samples having, initially, a number of under- and over coordinated ions (less than one percent of all ions) that were randomly distributed. Radial distributions functions were obtained to verify the amorphous structure of the samples. Stress was applied by uniaxially straining the samples at various rates. As a sample was strained there was an increase in under coordinated ions with seemingly no correlation to the region where the sample would break. In all our simulations the under coordinated ions concentrated in the vicinity of the breakage region a few picoseconds before fracture occurred. *CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, UK

  7. Infrared spectra of silica polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Noguchi, R.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. We investigate the annealing conditions of α-cristobalite, and further prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic or commercial samples. We compare the results to previous studies and find that α-cristobalite synthesized at higher temperature than annealed silica. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where αcristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for αcristobalite is especially very broad and strong, and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp, and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The peak positions of 16 and 69-μm band due to α-cristobalite can become index for temperature of silica dust. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  8. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  9. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  10. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  11. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  12. Repetitive Dosing of Fumed Silica Leads to Profibrogenic Effects through Unique Structure–Activity Relationships and Biopersistence in the Lung

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; ...

    2016-08-02

    Contrary to the notion that the use of fumed silica in consumer products can “generally (be) regarded as safe” (GRAS), the high surface reactivity of pyrogenic silica differs from other forms of synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), including the capacity to induce membrane damage and acute proinflammatory changes in the murine lung. Additionally, the chain-like structure and reactive surface silanols also allow fumed silica to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β production. This pathway is known to be associated with subchronic inflammation and profibrogenic effects in the lung by α-quartz and carbon nanotubes. Different from the latter materials, bolus dosemore » instillation of 21 mg/kg fumed silica did not induce sustained IL-1β production or subchronic pulmonary effects. In contrast, the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway was continuously activated by repetitive-dose administration of 3 × 7 mg/kg fumed silica, 1 week apart. We also found that while single-dose exposure failed to induce profibrotic effects in the lung, repetitive dosing can trigger increased collagen production, even at 3 × 3 mg/kg. The change between bolus and repetitive dosing was due to a change in lung clearance, with recurrent dosing leading to fumed silica biopersistence, sustained macrophage recruitment, and activation of the NLRP3 pathway. These subchronic proinflammatory effects disappeared when less surface-reactive titanium-doped fumed silica was used for recurrent administration. Finally, these data indicate that while fumed silica may be regarded as safe for some applications, we should reconsider the GRAS label during repetitive or chronic inhalation exposure conditions.« less

  13. Repetitive Dosing of Fumed Silica Leads to Profibrogenic Effects through Unique Structure–Activity Relationships and Biopersistence in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Pokhrel, Suman; Ku, Justine; Liu, Xiangsheng; Wang, Meiying; Dunphy, Darren R.; Li, Ruibin; Meng, Huan; Mädler, Lutz; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Nel, André E.; Xia, Tian

    2016-08-02

    Contrary to the notion that the use of fumed silica in consumer products can “generally (be) regarded as safe” (GRAS), the high surface reactivity of pyrogenic silica differs from other forms of synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), including the capacity to induce membrane damage and acute proinflammatory changes in the murine lung. Additionally, the chain-like structure and reactive surface silanols also allow fumed silica to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β production. This pathway is known to be associated with subchronic inflammation and profibrogenic effects in the lung by α-quartz and carbon nanotubes. Different from the latter materials, bolus dose instillation of 21 mg/kg fumed silica did not induce sustained IL-1β production or subchronic pulmonary effects. In contrast, the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway was continuously activated by repetitive-dose administration of 3 × 7 mg/kg fumed silica, 1 week apart. We also found that while single-dose exposure failed to induce profibrotic effects in the lung, repetitive dosing can trigger increased collagen production, even at 3 × 3 mg/kg. The change between bolus and repetitive dosing was due to a change in lung clearance, with recurrent dosing leading to fumed silica biopersistence, sustained macrophage recruitment, and activation of the NLRP3 pathway. These subchronic proinflammatory effects disappeared when less surface-reactive titanium-doped fumed silica was used for recurrent administration. Finally, these data indicate that while fumed silica may be regarded as safe for some applications, we should reconsider the GRAS label during repetitive or chronic inhalation exposure conditions.

  14. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  15. Structural manipulation of colloidal silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Jesse; Rischka, Klaus; Thiel, Karsten; Hartwig, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Structural properties of the nanosized silica Ludox TMA with novel functionalizations have been investigated. Silica is stabilized in aqueous solution at a pH value higher than the pKa of silicic acid. A surface modification consisting of poly(p-benzamide)s functionalized with derivatized nucleobases on the C-terminus and cationic pyridinium functions on the N-terminus of the polymer chain was carried out. Due to the negatively charged surface, strong physisorption of the cationic pyridinium functions occurs. It is possible to stabilize diluted solutions of silica without agglomeration in solvents with various polarities by using pyridinium cations. Defined structures could be created according to the hydrogen donor/acceptor potential of the introduced nucleobase. Surprisingly the interactions between the same nucleobases are already sufficient for strong particle-particle interactions. Dramatic effects on the structural behavior are characterized by PCS, (S)TEM and EFTEM.

  16. Evaluation of Three Amorphous Drug Delivery Technologies to Improve the Oral Absorption of Flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Vialpando, Monica; Smulders, Stefanie; Bone, Scott; Jager, Casey; Vodak, David; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Verheyen, Loes; Backx, Katrien; Boeykens, Peter; Brewster, Marcus E; Ceulemans, Jens; Novoa de Armas, Hector; Van Geel, Katrien; Kesselaers, Emma; Hillewaert, Vera; Lachau-Durand, Sophie; Meurs, Greet; Psathas, Petros; Van Hove, Ben; Verreck, Geert; Voets, Marieke; Weuts, Ilse; Mackie, Claire

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates 3 amorphous technologies to improve the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of flubendazole (FLU). The selected approaches are (1) a standard spray-dried dispersion with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) E5 or polyvinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate 64, both with Vitamin E d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate; (2) a modified process spray-dried dispersion (MPSDD) with either HPMC E3 or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-M); and (3) confining FLU in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS). The physicochemical stability and in vitro release of optimized formulations were evaluated following 2 weeks of open conditions at 25°C/60% relative humidity (RH) and 40°C/75% RH. All formulations remained amorphous at 25°C/60% RH. Only the MPSDD formulation containing HPMCAS-M and 3/7 (wt./wt.) FLU/OMS did not crystallize following 40°C/75% RH exposure. The OMS and MPSDD formulations contained the lowest and highest amount of hydrolyzed degradant, respectively. All formulations were dosed to rats at 20 mg/kg in suspension. One FLU/OMS formulation was also dosed as a capsule blend. Plasma concentration profiles were determined following a single dose. In vivo findings show that the OMS capsule and suspension resulted in the overall highest area under the curve and Cmax values, respectively. These results cross-evaluate various amorphous formulations and provide a link to enhanced biopharmaceutical performance.

  17. Densification of a continuous random network model of amorphous SiO2 glass.

    PubMed

    Li, Neng; Sakidja, Ridwan; Aryal, Sitaram; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated the mechanism of densification of a nearly perfect continuous random network (CRN) model of amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) glass with 1296 atoms and periodic boundary conditions. The model has no under- or over-coordinated atoms and small bond length and bond angle distributions. This near-perfect model is systematically densified up to a pressure of 80 GPa using ab initio constant-pressure technique. By assessing a full spectrum of properties including atomic structure, bonding characteristics, effective charges, bond order values, electron density of states, localization of wave functions, elastic and mechanical properties, and interband optical absorption at each pressure, we reveal the pertinent details on the structural, mechanical and optical characteristics of the glass model under pressure. They all confirm the central theme that amorphous to amorphous phase transformation (AAPT) from a low-density state to a high-density state is at a pressure between 20 and 35 GPa in this nearly ideal a-SiO2 network. This pressure range represents an upper limit for such a transition in vitreous silica. The phase transformation roots from the change of Si-O bonding from a mixture of ionic and covalent nature at low pressure to a highly covalent bonding under high pressure. In addition, the calculated theoretical refractive index of the glass model as a function of the pressure is reported for the first time and in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  18. Physisorbed Water on Silica at Mars Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Sriwatanapongse, W.; Quinn, R.; Klug, C.; Zent, A.

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in probing water interactions on silica at Mars temperatures is discussed. Results indicate that two types of water occur with silica at Mars temperatures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Analysis of silica fume produced by zircon desilication.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D N; Carter, J

    2003-07-27

    Novel chemical methods have been developed to allow for the determination of the components of silica fume produced by zircon desilication. Hitherto, no methods have been described for the analysis of this material. The amorphous silica is first removed by treatment with sodium hydroxide. The residue from the hydroxide treatment may then be subjected to a suite of reagents to determine the zircon, the total zirconia, the monoclinic zirconia and the tetragonal zirconia content of the fume. The zircon content of the fume is determined by treatment of the hydroxide residue with concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF). The total zirconia content of the fume is determined by digestion of the hydroxide residue with fuming sulphuric acid (oleum), while the relative amounts of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia may be found by treatment of the hydroxide residue with 10%w/v HF, which attacks the less stable tetragonal phase. Both X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis were used to validate the steps in the analytical procedure. An explanation of the presence of tetragonal zirconia in the fume is proposed. A greater understanding of the composition of the fume led to the installation of a separator in the company's production line to remove the zircon. Australian Fused Materials (AFM) now produces a vastly superior grade of fume marketed under the code SF-98.

  20. Sub-chronic toxicity study in rats orally exposed to nanostructured silica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic Amorphous Silica (SAS) is commonly used in food and drugs. Recently, a consumer intake of silica from food was estimated at 9.4 mg/kg bw/day, of which 1.8 mg/kg bw/day was estimated to be in the nano-size range. Food products containing SAS have been shown to contain silica in the nanometer size range (i.e. 5 – 200 nm) up to 43% of the total silica content. Concerns have been raised about the possible adverse effects of chronic exposure to nanostructured silica. Methods Rats were orally exposed to 100, 1000 or 2500 mg/kg bw/day of SAS, or to 100, 500 or 1000 mg/kg bw/day of NM-202 (a representative nanostructured silica for OECD testing) for 28 days, or to the highest dose of SAS or NM-202 for 84 days. Results SAS and NM-202 were extensively characterized as pristine materials, but also in the feed matrix and gut content of the animals, and after in vitro digestion. The latter indicated that the intestinal content of the mid/high-dose groups had stronger gel-like properties than the low-dose groups, implying low gelation and high bioaccessibility of silica in the human intestine at realistic consumer exposure levels. Exposure to SAS or NM-202 did not result in clearly elevated tissue silica levels after 28-days of exposure. However, after 84-days of exposure to SAS, but not to NM-202, silica accumulated in the spleen. Biochemical and immunological markers in blood and isolated cells did not indicate toxicity, but histopathological analysis, showed an increased incidence of liver fibrosis after 84-days of exposure, which only reached significance in the NM-202 treated animals. This observation was accompanied by a moderate, but significant increase in the expression of fibrosis-related genes in liver samples. Conclusions Although only few adverse effects were observed, additional studies are warranted to further evaluate the biological relevance of observed fibrosis in liver and possible accumulation of silica in the spleen in the NM-202

  1. Silica Materials for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vallet-Regí, María; Balas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The two main applications of silica-based materials in medicine and biotechnology, i.e. for bone-repairing devices and for drug delivery systems, are presented and discussed. The influence of the structure and chemical composition in the final characteristics and properties of every silica-based material is also shown as a function of the both applications presented. The adequate combination of the synthesis techniques, template systems and additives leads to the development of materials that merge the bioactive behavior with the drug carrier ability. These systems could be excellent candidates as materials for the development of devices for tissue engineering. PMID:19662110

  2. Optothermal nonlinearity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Fleming, Adam; Samuels, Michiel C.; Di Falco, Andrea; Conti, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    We report on the characterization of silica aerogel thermal optical nonlinearity, obtained by z-scan technique. The results show that typical silica aerogels have nonlinear optical coefficient similar to that of glass (≃10-12 m2/W), with negligible optical nonlinear absorption. The nonlinear coefficient can be increased to values in the range of 10-10 m2/W by embedding an absorbing dye in the aerogel. This value is one order of magnitude higher than that observed in the pure dye and in typical highly nonlinear materials like liquid crystals.

  3. The properties of silica-gelatin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinskaya, O. N.; Laguta, I. V.

    2010-06-01

    Silica-gelatin composites with various silica-to-gelatin ratios were obtained. The influence of high-dispersity silica on the swelling of composites in water and desorption of pyridoxine and thiamine vitamins incorporated into the material was studied. The addition of silica to gelatin was shown to increase the time of the dissolution of the materials in aqueous medium and decelerate the desorption of vitamins.

  4. Interactions and Binding Energies of Dimethyl Methylphosphonate and Dimethyl Chlorophosphate with Amorphous Silica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-10

    Phys. 2007, 127, 184708. (17) Palmero, A.; Aldao, C. M. Readsorption and Diffusion-Limited TPD of Water from Zeolite Linde 4A. Thermochim. Acta 1998...319, 177−184. (18) Palmero, A.; Loffler, D. G. Kinetics of Water Desorption from Pelletized 4A and 5A Zeolites . Thermochim. Acta 1990, 159, 171−176

  5. Computed tomography features of liparitosis: a pneumoconiosis due to amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, S; Gaeta, M; Costa, C; Ascenti, G; Barbaro Martino, L; Spatari, G; Settineri, N; Barbaro, M

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the radiological features of pleural, parenchymal and mediastinal damage due to occupational inhalation of pumice. In total, 31 workers were evaluated for annual follow-up. Spiral computed tomography (CT) was obtained in the three patients with evident parenchymal abnormalities at chest radiograph. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed in the remaining 28 subjects with no radiographical evidence of pleuropulmonary damage or evidence of pleural plaques, in order to exclude parenchymal involvement. Pumice samples were analysed by radiograph diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Spiral CT showed parahilar conglomerate masses containing fine reticular calcifications in three of 31 (9.7%) patients. HRCT showed several bilateral pleural plaques, without any parenchymal lesion in eight of 28 (28.6%) cases. Statistical analysis indicated correlation between CT findings and pulmonary function, as well as exposure to pumice. The analysis of pumice excluded the presence of asbestos. The findings from this study suggest that pleural plaque may be the only sign of disease in patients with a history of pumice inhalation. However, conglomerate parahilar masses are probably due to exposure to massive amounts of heated pumice, and seem to have different pathogenesis and histopathological characteristics to silicosis.

  6. Gas adsorption surface analysis of silane-coated fused amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, A.F.

    1996-12-31

    Certain types of high frequency electrical circuit substrates consist of copper foil clad PTFE (poly(tetrafluoroethylene)) composite dielectric material that is highly filled (>50 vol.%) with various ceramic powders. The ceramic powders are chosen primarily to modify the dielectric constant of the composite, but also function to reduce the composite`s coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The ceramic powders are frequently treated with organosilane coupling agents to reduce the composite water absorption. To be effective, the coupling agents must not significantly degrade at the high processing temperature of PTFE (>350{degrees}C). Phenyl-trimethoxysilane (PTMS) or silane mixtures containing a high fraction of PTMS are often used.

  7. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-17

    2014 Figure 1. The structures of the CWAs sarin (red) and soman ( blue ) and five of the most common simulants (black) used to help predict agent chemistry...small transfer chamber located within the confines of a CWA-certified surety fume hood. Within the main chamber, the sample was mounted on a molybdenum ...above 45 kJ/mol, for both agents. In fact, the desorption energy for soman ( blue ) approaches 60 kJ/mol at the lowest coverages. The high activation

  8. Measurement of the acoustic properties of amorphous silica above 4.5 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaretski, E.; Merithew, R. D.; Pohl, R. O.; Parpia, J. M.

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of speed of sound and internal friction of a-SiO2 were extended down to ≈4mK (sample temperature) in a cryostat shielded with lead against γ radiation. We conclude that the sample starts to thermally decouple below 8mK primarily due to internal heat release. Down to 10mK , the speed of sound is shown to be compatible with the predictions of the tunneling model, with no evidence seen for a low energy cut-off of the tunnel splitting, contrary to our earlier claims.

  9. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer-Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo-Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann-Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  10. Adhesion of Bacterial EPS to Goethite and Silica Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.; Omoike, A.

    2003-12-01

    Bacterial adhesion to mineral surfaces is mediated by cell surface macromolecules including lipopolysaccharides, lipoteichoic acids, surface proteins and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPS, a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids that occur in both cell-bound (capsular) and free form, are thought to mediate cell adhesion through modification of cell surface chemistry and formation of conditioning films, but molecular-scale interactions are not well known. We isolated EPS from the exponential and stationary growth phases of Bacillus subtilis, a common soil bacterium, and characterized them using spectroscopy (XPS, FTIR, NMR) and high pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Attenuated total reflectance (ATR)- FTIR was employed to probe EPS adsorption from aqueous solution to goethite and amorphous silica colloids that were coated onto a Ge internal reflectance element. Relative intensity of IR bands characteristic of protein, polysaccharides and nucleic acids were dependent on growth phase and type of EPS (free or cell-bound). Proton complexation at acidic functional groups resulted in protein conformational changes; alpha-helical conformation was observed at pH < 4 and random coil (unordered) conformation at pH > 6. The apparent molecular mass estimated by HPSEC ranged from 0.42-132 kDa and peak elution times exhibited significant dependence on aqueous chemistry reflecting changes in conformation. EPS exhibited higher affinity for goethite than for silica but sorption to both solids resulted in molecular changes that were detectable by FTIR. We observed an increase in amide II band intensity and an amide I band shift to higher wavenumbers, suggesting changes in EPS secondary structure of proteins upon adsorption. Silica-sorbed EPS exhibited weak polysaccharide bands whereas sorption to goethite showed polysaccharide fractionation. Distinct spectral features indicative of the formation of P-O-Fe bonds were observed in

  11. Silica coating and photochemical properties of layered double hydroxide/4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2006-01-15

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) rays absorbents have been used as sunscreen materials, but they may pose a safety problem when used at high concentration. In order to prevent direct contact of organic UV rays absorbent to the human skin, a typical organic UV-absorbent, 4,4(')-diaminostilbene-2,2(')-disulfonic acid (DASDSA), was intercalated into Zn(2)Al layered double hydroxide (Zn(2)Al-LDH) by coprecipitation reaction. However, deintercalation of DASDSA from Zn(2)Al-LDH, by the anion exchange reaction with carbonate ion, was observed. Therefore, Zn(2)Al-LDH/DASDSA was directly coated with silica by means of polymerization technique based on the Stöber method. Silica coating effectively depressed the deintercalation of DASDSA from Zn(2)Al-LDH. The amorphous silica was confirmed by XRD, SEM, TEM and FT-IR. The deintercalation behaviors as well as UV-shielding properties were investigated for coated particles.

  12. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  13. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  14. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  15. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  16. Hydrodynamically mediated macrophyte silica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schoelynck, J; Bal, K; Puijalon, S; Meire, P; Struyf, E

    2012-11-01

    In most aquatic ecosystems, hydrodynamic conditions are a key abiotic factor determining species distributions and abundance of aquatic plants. Resisting stress and keeping an upright position often relies on investment in tissue reinforcement, which is costly to produce. Silica could provide a more economical alternative. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the response of two submerged species, Egeria densa Planch. and Limnophila heterophylla (Roxb.) Benth., to dissolved silicic acid availability and exposure to hydrodynamic stress. The results were verified with a third species in a field study (Nuphar lutea (L.) Smith). Biogenic silica (BSi) concentration in both stems and leaves increases with increasing dissolved silica availability but also with the presence of hydrodynamic stress. We suggest that the inclusion of extra silica enables the plant to alternatively invest its energy in the production of lignin and cellulose. Although we found no significant effects of hydrodynamic stress on cellulose or lignin concentrations either in the laboratory or in the field, BSi was negatively correlated with cellulose concentration and positively correlated with lignin concentration in samples collected in the field study. This implies that the plant might perform with equal energy efficiency in both standing and running water environments. This could provide submerged species with a tool to respond to abiotic factors, to adapt to new ecological conditions and hence potentially colonise new environments.

  17. Silica Nanoparticles as Substrates for Chelator-free Labeling of Oxophilic Radioisotopes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chelator-free nanoparticles for intrinsic radiolabeling are highly desirable for whole-body imaging and therapeutic applications. Several reports have successfully demonstrated the principle of intrinsic radiolabeling. However, the work done to date has suffered from much of the same specificity issues as conventional molecular chelators, insofar as there is no singular nanoparticle substrate that has proven effective in binding a wide library of radiosotopes. Here we present amorphous silica nanoparticles as general substrates for chelator-free radiolabeling and demonstrate their ability to bind six medically relevant isotopes of various oxidation states with high radiochemical yield. We provide strong evidence that the stability of the binding correlates with the hardness of the radioisotope, corroborating the proposed operating principle. Intrinsically labeled silica nanoparticles prepared by this approach demonstrate excellent in vivo stability and efficacy in lymph node imaging. PMID:25559467

  18. Characterizing structural and vibrational properties of nanoparticles embedded in silica with XAS, SAXS and auxiliary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Leandro L.; Kluth, Patrick; Giulian, Raquel; Sprouster, David J.; Ridgway, Mark C.; Johannessen, Bernt; Foran, Garry J.; Cookson, David J.

    2009-01-29

    Synchrotron-based techniques were combined with conventional analysis methods to probe in detail the structural and vibrational properties of nanoparticles grown in a silica matrix by ion implantation and thermal annealing, as well as the evolution of such properties as a function of nanoparticle size. This original approach was successfully applied for several elemental nanoparticles (Au, Co, Cu, Ge, Pt) and the outcomes for Ge are reported here, illustrating the power of this combined methodology. The thorough analysis of XANES, EXAFS, SAXS, TEM and Raman data for Ge nanoparticles with mean diameters between 4 and 9 nm revealed that the peculiar properties of embedded Ge nanoparticles, like the existence of amorphous Ge layers between the silica matrix and the crystalline nanoparticle core, are strongly dependent on particle size and mainly governed by the variation in the surface area-to-volume ratio. Such detailed information provides valuable input for the efficient planning of technological applications.

  19. Characterization of molybdenum monomeric oxide species supported on hydroxylated silica: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Hazar; Gryboś, Robert; Handzlik, Jarosław; Tielens, Frederik

    2014-09-14

    Periodic DFT calculations have been performed on molybdenum(VI) oxide species supported on the hydroxylated amorphous silica surface. The Mo grafting site has been investigated systematically for the type of silanol (geminate, vicinal, isolated or in a nest) accessible on the surface, as well as its effect on H-bond formation and stabilization, with the Mo-oxide species. Different grafting geometries, combined with different degrees of hydration of the Mo species are investigated using atomistic thermodynamics. The most stable Mo(VI) oxide species resulting from these calculations are confronted with experiment. Finally, calculated vibrational frequencies confirm the experimental evidence of the dominant presence of di grafted di-oxo Mo(VI) species on silica up to 700 K.

  20. Crystallization behavior of three-dimensional silica fiber reinforced silicon nitride composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Gongjin; Zhang, Changrui; Hu, Haifeng; Cao, Feng; Wang, Siqing; Jiang, Yonggang; Li, Bin

    2005-10-01

    The crystallization behavior of a new type of ceramic matrix composites, three-dimensional silica fiber reinforced silicon nitride matrix composite prepared by perhydropolysilazane infiltration and pyrolysis, was investigated by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. With the post-annealing treatment of the amorphous as-received composite at elevated tempertures of 1400 and 1600 °C in nitrogen atmosphere, there was remarkable suppression of the crystallization of polymer-derived silicon nitride ceramic matrix into α-Si 3N 4 and silica fibers into α-cristobalite, which was probably attributed to the phase of silicon oxynitrides originating from the strong fiber/matrix interfacial chemical reaction.

  1. Silica nanoparticles as substrates for chelator-free labeling of oxophilic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Travis M; Wall, Matthew A; Harmsen, Stefan; Longo, Valerie A; Drain, Charles Michael; Kircher, Moritz F; Grimm, Jan

    2015-02-11

    Chelator-free nanoparticles for intrinsic radiolabeling are highly desirable for whole-body imaging and therapeutic applications. Several reports have successfully demonstrated the principle of intrinsic radiolabeling. However, the work done to date has suffered from much of the same specificity issues as conventional molecular chelators, insofar as there is no singular nanoparticle substrate that has proven effective in binding a wide library of radiosotopes. Here we present amorphous silica nanoparticles as general substrates for chelator-free radiolabeling and demonstrate their ability to bind six medically relevant isotopes of various oxidation states with high radiochemical yield. We provide strong evidence that the stability of the binding correlates with the hardness of the radioisotope, corroborating the proposed operating principle. Intrinsically labeled silica nanoparticles prepared by this approach demonstrate excellent in vivo stability and efficacy in lymph node imaging.

  2. Preparation of single-site catalyst inside the functionalized nanopore of silica and its ethylene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Yun; Ko, Young Soo

    2013-06-01

    Amorphous silica have been functionalized with organo-silane, and (n-BuCp)2ZrCI2 and methylaluminoxane (MAO) were subsequently immobilized on the functionalized silica for the further evaluation as a catalyst of ethylene polymerization. Four organo-silanes such as 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (1NS), N-[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (2NS), N1-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (3NS), and 4-(triethoxysilyl)butyronitrile (1NCy), were employed for this study. The Zr content and polymerization activity of the supported catalysts were strongly dependent on the kind and structure of organo-silane. 2NS showed the highest Zr content with higher activity, indicating the more Zr could be captured due to a stronger interaction between (n-BuCp)2ZrCl2 and amine group.

  3. Effect of inorganic additives on the growth of silica-carbonate biomorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, Elias; Rendina, Ryan; Palui, Goutam; Steinbock, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Silica-barium carbonate biomorphs are complex precipitate microstructures that form by purely inorganic processes. They display life-like morphologies with smoothly curved surfaces that are not restricted to crystallographic symmetries. We investigate the morphogenetic influence of inorganic dopants that compete with the barium carbonate precipitation. Trace deposition of alkaline earth or transition metal additives causes significant changes to the crystal morphologies. In the case of Pb2+ and Ag+ ions, biomorph growth is disrupted by the formation of competing precipitates. Similarly, the addition of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ induces the rapid crystallization of witherite or amorphous silica-carbonate aggregates at enhanced growth rates. By comparison, the addition of strontium ions results in the assembly of classic biomorphs such as cardioid sheets and helices. The procedures reported here exemplify the use of co-depositing agents to influence the compositional and crystallographic properties in a manner similar to magnesium-doped biogenic calcites.

  4. Yb-doped silica glass and photonic crystal fiber based on laser sintering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Jiale; Zhou, Guiyao; Xia, Changming; Liu, Jiantao; Tian, Hongchun; Liang, Wanting; Hou, Zhiyun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabricating method for Yb3+-doped silica glass and double-cladding large mode area photonic crystal fiber (LMA PCF) based on laser sintering technology combined with a liquid phase doping method. The doped material prepared shows the amorphous property and the hydroxyl content is approximately 40 ppm. The attenuation of the fabricated LMA PCF is 14.2 dB m-1 at 976 nm, and the lowest value is 0.25 dB m-1 at 1200 nm. The laser slope efficiency is up to 70.2%.

  5. Methods for Controlling Effects of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    calcium hydroxide with water showed the reactivity of the fume and identified a well crystallized calcium silicate (CSH-I) as the reaction product. 9...tridymite High- and low-temperature Minor cristobalite I i %’I There was probably also some amorphous material. Similar work with a separate hand sample...8217 "."".’ " ".’""., combinations of silica fume and CH with water resulted in the formation of h well crystallized calcium silicate hydrate-I (CSH-I

  6. Intracellularly Biodegradable Polyelectrolyte/Silica Composite Microcapsules as Carriers for Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Goriacheva, Olga A; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2016-04-20

    Microcapsules that can be efficiently loaded with small molecules and effectively released at the target area through the degradation of the capsule shells hold great potential for treating diseases. Traditional biodegradable polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules can be degraded by cells and eliminated from the body but fail to encapsulate drugs with small molecular weight. Here, we report a poly-l-arginine hydrochloride (PARG)/dextran sulfate sodium salt (DEXS)/silica (SiO2) composite capsule that can be destructed in cells and of which the in situ formed inorganic SiO2 enables loading of small model molecules, Rhodamine B (Rh-B). The composite capsules were fabricated based on the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and the hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Capsules composed of nondegradable PEs and SiO2, polyllamine hydrochloride (PAH)/poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/silica (the control sample), were prepared and briefly compared with the degradable composite capsules. An intracellular degradation study of both types of composite capsules revealed that PARG/DEXS/silica capsules were degraded into fragments and lead to the release of model molecules in a relatively short time (2 h), while the structure of PAH/PSS/silica capsules remained intact even after 3 days incubation with B50 cells. Such results indicated that the polymer components played a significant role in the degradability of the SiO2. Specifically, PAH/PSS scaffolds blocked the degradation of SiO2. For PARG/DEXS/silica capsules, we proposed the effects of both hydrolytic degradation of amorphous silica and enzymatic degradation of PARG/DEXS polymers as a cell degradation mechanism. All the results demonstrated a new type of functional composite microcapsule with low permeability, good biocompatibility, and biodegradability for potential medical applications.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of dense zirconia and zirconia-silica ceramic nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoming; Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare dense zirconia-yttria (ZY), zirconia-silica (ZS) and zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) nanofibers as reinforcing elements for dental composites. Zirconium (IV) propoxide, yttrium nitrate hexahydrate, and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were used as precursors for the preparation of zirconia, yttria, and silica sols. A small amount (1-1.5 wt%) of polyethylene oxide (PEO) was used as a carry polymer. The sols were preheated at 70 degrees C before electrospinning and their viscosity was measured with a viscometer at different heating time. The gel point was determined by viscosity-time (eta-t) curve. The ZY, ZS and ZYS gel nanofibers were prepared using a special reactive electrospinning device under the conditions near the gel point. The as-prepared gel nanofibers had diameters between 200 and 400 nm. Dense (nonporous) ceramic nanofibers of zirconia-yttria (96/4), zirconia-silica (80/20) and zirconia-yttria-silica (76.8/3.2/20) with diameter of 100-300 nm were obtained by subsequent calcinations at different temperatures. The gel and ceramic nanofibers obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM micrograph revealed that ceramic ZY nanofibers had grained structure, while ceramic ZS and ZYS nanofibers had smooth surfaces, both showing no visible porosity under FE-SEM. Complete removal of the polymer PEO was confirmed by TGA/DSC and FT-IR. The formation of tetragonal phase of zirconia and amorphous silica was proved by XRD. In conclusion, dense zirconia-based ceramic nanofibers can be fabricated using the new reactive sol-gel electrospinning technology with minimum organic polymer additives.

  8. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  9. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-06-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  10. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  11. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Killian, Christopher E.; Olson, Ian C.; Appathurai, Narayana P.; Amasino, Audra L.; Martin, Michael C.; Holt, Liam J.; Wilt, Fred H.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline biominerals do not resemble faceted crystals. Current explanations for this property involve formation via amorphous phases. Using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), here we examine forming spicules in embryos of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchins, and observe a sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC·H2O) → dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) → calcite. Unexpectedly, we find ACC·H2O-rich nanoparticles that persist after the surrounding mineral has dehydrated and crystallized. Protein matrix components occluded within the mineral must inhibit ACC·H2O dehydration. We devised an in vitro, also using XANES-PEEM, assay to identify spicule proteins that may play a role in stabilizing various mineral phases, and found that the most abundant occluded matrix protein in the sea urchin spicules, SM50, stabilizes ACC·H2O in vitro. PMID:22492931

  12. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  13. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  14. Preparation and optical properties of silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell composite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jianhui Liu Huaiyong; Wang Zhenlin; Ming Naiben

    2007-04-15

    The silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell composite colloids have been successfully synthesized by an electroless plating approach to explore the possibility of modifying the plasmon resonance at the nanoshell surface by varying the metal nanoshell composition for the first time. The surface plasmon resonance of the composite colloids increases in intensity and shifts towards longer, then shorter wavelengths as the Cu/Ag ratio in the alloy shell is increased. The variations in intensity of the surface plasmon resonance with the Cu/Ag ratio obviously affect the Raman bands of the silica colloid core. The report here may supply a new technique to effectively modify the surface plasmon resonance. - Graphical abstract: The silica Ag-Cu alloy core-shell colloids have been successfully synthesized to explore the possibility of modifying the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by varying the metal nanoshell composition for the first time. Varying the Cu/Ag ratio of the alloy nanoshell has obvious influences on the SPR of the composite colloids and the Raman bands of the amorphous silica core.

  15. Anomalous surface states modify the size-dependent mechanical properties and fracture of silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous silica nanowires under tension were analyzed for size and surface stress effects on mechanical properties and for structural modifications via bond angle distributions. Their fracture behavior was also investigated beyond the elastic limit. The Young’s moduli of silica nanowires were predicted to be about 75-100 GPa, depending on the nanowire size. The ultimate strength was calculated to be ˜10 GPa, depending on the diameter, which is in excellent agreement with the experiments. The dependence of the Young’s modulus on nanowire diameter is explained in terms of surface compressive stress effects. The fracture behavior of nanowires was also found to be influenced by surface compressive stresses. Bond angle distribution analysis of various nanowires reveals significant compressive surface states, as evidenced by the appearance of a secondary peak in the Si-O-Si bond angle distribution at ˜97°, which is absent in bulk silica. The strain rate was found to have a negligible effect on the Young’s modulus of the silica nanowires, but it has a critical role in determining their fracture mode.

  16. Electrooxidation of nitrite on a silica-cerium mixed oxide carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Gustavo; de Morais, Andréia; Villis, Paulo César Mendes; Maroneze, Camila Marchetti; Gushikem, Yoshitaka; Lucho, Alzira Maria Serpa; Pissetti, Fábio Luiz

    2012-03-01

    A silica-cerium mixed oxide (SiCe) was prepared by the sol-gel process, using tetraethylorthosilicate and cerium nitrate as precursors and obtained as an amorphous solid possessing a specific surface area of 459 m(2) g(-1). Infrared spectroscopy of the SiCe material showed the formation of the Si-O-Ce linkage in the mixed oxide. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy indicated that the cerium oxide particles were homogenously dispersed on the matrix surface. X-ray diffraction and (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance implied non-crystalline silica matrices with chemical environments that are typical for silica-based mixed oxides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ce was present in approximately equal amounts of both the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states. Cyclic voltammetry data of electrode prepared from the silica-cerium mixed oxide showed a peak for oxidation of Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) at 0.76 V and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy equivalent circuit indicated a porous structure with low charge transfer resistance. In the presence of nitrite, the SiCe electrode shows an anodic oxidation peak at 0.76 V with a linear response as the concentration of the analyte increases from 3×10(-5) at 3.9×10(-3) mol L(-1).

  17. Chemical analysis of silica doped hydroxyapatite biomaterials consolidated by a spark plasma sintering method.

    PubMed

    Xu, J L; Khor, K A

    2007-02-01

    Silica (SiO(2)) and the silicate-based biomaterials play an important role due to their in vitro and in vivo biological response. The present study synthesized a novel nano-structured amorphous silica doped hydroxyapatite (HA) via an aqueous precipitation route. HA was prepared with 0, 1, 3 and 5 wt% silica, which are comparable to the measured silicon content of natural bone. After spray drying into micron sized powders, the silica doped HA (SiHA) powders were consolidated at 1000 degrees C with a dwell time of 3 min using a spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a main apatite phase with minor secondary beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) was observed in the as-consolidated SiHA compacts. Substitution of PO(4)(3-) by SiO(4)(4-) in the apatite structure resulting in a small increase in the lattice parameters in both a-axis and c-axis of the unit cell were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) analysis and Raman spectrometer investigation. The cell culture in vitro investigation demonstrated that the presence of silicon in the SPS consolidated compacts contributed to the relatively high cell proliferation ability when compared with phase pure HA.

  18. Strain-induced structural modifications and size-effects in silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the structural transformations and properties of silica glass nanowires under tensile loading via molecular dynamics simulations using the BKS (Beest-Kramer-Santen) interatomic potential. Surface states of the elongated nanowires were quantified using radial density distributions, while structural transformations were evaluated via ring size distribution analysis. The radial density distributions indicate that the surface states of these silica nanowires are significantly different than those of their interior. Ring size analysis shows that the ring size distributions remain mainly unchanged within the elastic region during tensile deformation, however they vary drastically beyond the onset of plastic behavior and reach plateaus when the nanowires break. The silica nanowires undergo structural changes which correlate with strain energy and ring size distribution variations. It is also found that the ring size distribution (and strain energy) variations are dependent on the diameter of the silica nanowires. Interestingly, for ultrathin nanowires (diameters < 5 .0 nm), the variation of ring size distributions shows a distinct trend with respect to tensile strain, indicating that the surface states play a key role in both modifying the mechanical properties and structural characteristics. These results for ultrathin nanowires are consistent with prior theoretical and simulation predictions. The overall findings in this study provide key insights into the novel properties of nano-sized amorphous materials, and are aimed to inspire further experiments.

  19. Superhydrophobicity of silica nanoparticles modified with polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. L.; Fan, Z. P.; Zhang, L. D.; Wang, L.; Wei, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Liu, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Polystyrene/silica nanoparticles were prepared by radical polymerization of silica nanoparticles possessing vinyl groups and styrene with benzoyl peroxide. The resulting vinyl silica nanoparticles, polystyrene/silica nanoparticles were characterized by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results indicated that polystyrene had been successfully grafted onto vinyl silica nanoparticles via covalent bond. The morphological structure of polystyrene/silica nanoparticles film, investigated by scanning electron microscopy, showed a characteristic rough structure. Surface wetting properties of the polystyrene/silica nanoparticles film were evaluated by measuring water contact angle and the sliding angle using a contact angle goniometer, which were measured to be 159° and 2°, respectively. The excellent superhydrophobic property enlarges potential applications of the superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-06-03

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  1. The silica supersaturated waters of northern Evia and eastern central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, G.; Gartzos, E.

    1999-12-01

    The area of north Evia and eastern central Greece is characterized by strong geomorphological contrast and is built up mainly of consolidated rocks. Unconsolidated young sediments of Pleistocene to Holocene age cover the valley and basin flats, forming the most productive aquifers in this area. However, two more types of aquifers can be distinguished within the consolidated rock area. The first one is associated with karstified limestones and the second with strongly tectonized ultramafic rocks. The schist-chert formation, with intercalations of shales and cherts, seals the ultramafic masses underneath.Surface and spring waters associated with ultramafic rocks in north Evia and eastern central Greece were studied. Two types of water can be distinguished: (1) high Mg2+ and SiO2 , bicarbonate as the dominant anion, pH 7·4-9·2, temperature 9·5-16·3 °C, low TDS (total dissolved solutes) (459-1037 mg/l), found both in peridotite and serpentinite areas, classified as Mg-HCO3 type; (2) high Ca2+, low Mg2+ and SiO2 , hydroxyl ion as the major anion, pH 11·2, temperature 28 °C, very low TDS (122 mg/l), found in peridotite areas, classified as Ca-OH type. The studied waters are highly supersaturated with respect to quartz, amorphous silica, brucite and most low temperature magnesium silicates (antigorite, sepiolite, talc, etc.). These waters show relatively narrow SiO2 concentration ranges and a trend parallel to the amorphous silica saturation surface. The silica supersaturated waters have the potential to precipitate silica and consequently could affect the people of the local communities that use it as drinking water, causing health problems (kidney stones).

  2. High-resolution proton magnetic resonance and catalytic studies concerning brønsted centers of amorphous Al 2O 3-SiO 2 solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, M.; Freude, D.; Pfeifer, H.; Bremer, H.; Jank, M.; Wendlandt, K. P.

    1983-08-01

    By application of the magic angle spinning (MAS) technique it was possible to observe highly resolved proton NMR spectra of the OH groups of amorphous silica-alumina. The spectra exhibit two lines at 2 and 7 ppm. The former line must be ascribed to non-acidic OH groups since it also occurs for silica and alumina. The latter line shows a maximum of intensity in the range of 20-30 wt% Al 2O 3. It must be due to acidic hydroxyl groups since the catalytic activity of the silica-aluminas measured by the cracking rate of cumene shows quantitatively the same behaviour with respect to the number of OH groups at 7 ppm.

  3. A silica-supported solid dispersion of bifendate using supercritical carbon dioxide method with enhanced dissolution rate and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Cuifang; Liu, Muhua; Li, Yun; Guo, Bei; Chang, Hui; Zhang, Xiangrong; Yang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to enhance the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of bifendate, a silica-supported solid dispersion (SD) of bifendate was prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO2) technology. The properties of bifendate-silica SD were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (X-RD) and scanning electron microscopy. The pharmacokinetic study was carried out in beagle dogs using commercial bifendate dropping pills as a reference which is a conventional SD formulation of bifendate and PEG6000. A novel method of Ultra Performance Convergence Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPC(2)™-MS/MS) method was applied to determine bifendate concentration in plasma. The amorphous state of bifendate in bifendate-silica SD was revealed in X-RD and DSC when the ratios of bifendate and silica were 1:15 and 1:19, respectively. In vitro dissolution rate was significantly improved with cumulative release of 67% within 20 min relative to 8% for the physical mixture of bifendate and silica, and which was also higher than the commercial dropping pill of 52%. After storage at 75% relative humidity (RH) for 10 d, no recrystallization was found and reduced dissolution rate was obtained due to the absorption of moisture. In pharmacokinetic study, Cmax and AUC0-t for bifendate-silica SD were 153.1 ng/ml and 979.8 ng h/ml, respectively. AUC0-t of bifendate-silica SDs was ∼1.6-fold higher than that of the commercial dropping pills. These results suggest that adsorbing bifendate onto porous silica via ScCO2 technique could be a feasible method to enhance oral bioavailability together with a higher dissolution rate.

  4. Interactions of amines with silicon species in undersaturated solutions leads to dissolution and/or precipitation of silica.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Tilburey, Graham E; Perry, Carole C

    2011-12-20

    The biogeochemical silicon cycle is the focus for many researchers studying the dissolution of silicon species from quartz, amorphous, and biogenic silica. Furthermore, the precipitation of biogenic silica by diatoms, radiolarian, sponges, and plants is also a popular focus for research. The ornate silica structures created by these species has attracted interest from biomaterial scientists and biochemists who have studied mineral formation in an attempt to understand how biogenic silica is formed, often in the presence of proteins and long chain polyamines. This article is at the interface of these seemingly distinct research areas. Here we investigate the effect of a range of amines in globally undersaturated silicon environments. Results are presented on the effect of amine-containing molecules on the formation of silica from undersaturated solutions of orthosilicic acid and globally undersaturated silicon environments. We sought to address two questions: can silica be precipitated/harvested from undersaturated solutions, and can we identify the silicon species that are most active in silica formation? We demonstrate that none of the bioinspired additives investigated here (e.g., poly(allylamine hydrochloride), pentaethylenehexamine, and propylamines) have any influence on orthosilicic acid at undersaturated concentrations. However, under globally undersaturated silicon concentrations, small molecules and polymers containing amine groups were able to interact with oligomers of silicic acid to either generate aggregated materials that can be isolated from solution or increase rates of oligomer dissolution back to orthosilicic acid. Additional outcomes of this study include an extended understanding of how polyelectrolytes and small molecules can promote and/or inhibit silica dissolution and a new method to explore how (bio)organic molecules interact with a forming mineral phase.

  5. New insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    microscopy with elements of modern materials chemistry, to directly measure the rate of amorphous silica nucleation on COOH, NH3+, and COOH / NH3+-terminated surfaces under controlled solution conditions. Our results provide new insights into the molecular-level control of silica mineralization in diatoms. We show that differences between substrate-specific nucleation rates are controlled largely by kinetic factors rather than thermodynamic drivers, and that amine-terminated surfaces are not capable of triggering the onset of silica deposition without the synergistic activity of neighboring negatively charged species on the surface or in solution (e.g. carboxyl or phosphoryl groups). In light of this result we conclude that sites on the organic matrix that have phosphate and amine moieties in close proximity serve not only as contact points between the constituent macromolecules in the matrix, but also as initial sites of silica deposition.

  6. Atomic Bond Deficiency Defects in Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aiwu; Shiflet, Gary J.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2012-10-01

    Atomic bond deficiency (BD) is considered to be characteristic structural defects in amorphous metals. They are the necessary feature of local atomic configurations that facilitate various atomic transports under different driving forces. Compared with vacancies in crystalline solids, they are "small" in terms of their formation energies, volume costs, and elementary steps involved in atomic transport. This article reviews the authors' recent efforts made to analyze how various local configurations containing BD are related to amorphous metal's unique characteristics, such as glass transition, diffusion, shear flow, and structural relaxation.

  7. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  8. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  9. Dosimetric characteristics of fabricated silica fibre for postal radiotherapy dose audits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzil, M. S. Ahmad; Ramli, N. N. H.; Jusoh, M. A.; Kadni, T.; Bradley, D. A.; Ung, N. M.; Suhairul, H.; Mohd Noor, N.

    2014-11-01

    Present investigation aims to establish the dosimetric characteristics of a novel fabricated flat fibre TLD system for postal radiotherapy dose audits. Various thermoluminescence (TL) properties have been investigated for five sizes of 6 mol% Ge-doped optical fibres. Key dosimetric characteristics including reproducibility, linearity, fading and energy dependence have been established. Irradiations were carried out using a linear accelerator (linac) and a Cobalt-60 machine. For doses from 0.5 Gy up to 10 Gy, Ge-doped flat fibres exhibit linearity between TL yield and dose, reproducible to better than 8% standard deviation (SD) following repeat measurements (n = 3). For photons generated at potentials from 1.25 MeV to 10 MV an energy-dependent response is noted, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 40% over the range of energies investigated. For 6.0 mm length flat fibres 100 μm thick × 350 pm wide, the TL fading loss following 30 days of storage at room temperature was < 8%. The Ge-doped flat fibre system represents a viable basis for use in postal radiotherapy dose audits, corrections being made for the various factors influencing the TL yield.

  10. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  11. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.

  12. Date palm waste-derived biochar composites with silica and zeolite: synthesis, characterization and implication for carbon stability and recalcitrant potential.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Munir; Ahmad, Mahtab; Usman, Adel R A; Al-Faraj, Abdullah S; Abduljabbar, Adel; Ok, Yong Sik; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I

    2017-03-23

    Engineered organo-mineral composites were synthesized from date palm waste biochar and silica or zeolite via mechanochemical treatments. Date palm tree rachis (leaves) waste biomass was pre-treated with silica or zeolite minerals via ball milling and sonication prior to pyrolysis at 600 °C. The resultant organo-mineral composites and pristine materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric-differential thermal (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscope analyses and surface area and porosity analyzer to investigate the variations in physiochemical and structural characteristics. Compared to the resultant composites derived from non-milled date palm biomass, ball milling increased surface area, while decreased crystallinity index and effective particle size of the biochar composites. Silica composited biochars were located near origin in the van Krevelen diagram indicating lowest H/C and O/C molar ratios, thus suggesting higher aromaticity and lower polarity compared to other biochars. TGA thermograms indicated highest thermal stability of silica composited biochars. Ash and moisture corrected TGA thermograms were used to calculate recalcitrance index (R 50) of the materials, which speculated high degradability of biomass (R 50 < 0.4), minimal degradability of biochars and zeolite composited biochars (0.5 < R 50 < 0.7) and high recalcitrant nature of silica composited biochars (R 50 > 0.7). Silica composited biochars exhibited highest carbon sequestration potential (64.17-95.59%) compared to other biochars. Highest recalcitrance and carbon sequestration potential of silica composited biochars may be attributed to changes in structural arrangements in the silica-biochar complex. Encapsulations of biochar particles with amorphous silica via Si-C bonding may have prevented thermal degradation, subsequently increasing recalcitrance potential of silica composited biochars.

  13. Organically modified silicas on metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Dean, Stacey L; Stapleton, Joshua J; Keating, Christine D

    2010-09-21

    Organically modified silica coatings were prepared on metal nanowires using a variety of silicon alkoxides with different functional groups (i.e., carboxyl groups, polyethylene oxide, cyano, dihydroimidazole, and hexyl linkers). Organically modified silicas were deposited onto the surface of 6-μm-long, ∼300-nm-wide, cylindrical metal nanowires in suspension by the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon alkoxides. Syntheses were performed at several ratios of tetraethoxysilane to an organically modified silicon alkoxide to incorporate desired functional groups into thin organosilica shells on the nanowires. These coatings were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. All of the organically modified silicas prepared here were sufficiently porous to allow the removal of the metal nanowire cores by acid etching to form organically modified silica nanotubes. Additional functionality provided to the modified silicas as compared to unmodified silica prepared using only tetraethoxysilane precursors was demonstrated by chromate adsorption on imidazole-containing silicas and resistance to protein adsorption on polyethyleneoxide-containing silicas. Organically modified silica coatings on nanowires and other nano- and microparticles have potential application in fields such as biosensing or nanoscale therapeutics due to the enhanced properties of the silica coatings, for example, the prevention of biofouling.

  14. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  15. TRANSIENT AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE IN FORMING ENAMEL

    PubMed Central

    Beniash, Elia; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Lam, Raymond S.K.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel, the hardest tissue in the body, begins as a three-dimensional network of nanometer size mineral particles, suspended in a protein gel. This mineral network serves as a template for mature enamel formation. To further understand the mechanisms of enamel formation we characterized the forming enamel mineral at an early secretory stage using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectromicroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FTIR microspectroscopy and polarized light microscopy. We show that the newly formed enamel mineral is amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which eventually transforms into apatitic crystals. Interestingly, the size, shape and spatial organization of these amorphous mineral particles and older crystals are essentially the same, indicating that the mineral morphology and organization in enamel is determined prior to its crystallization. Mineralization via transient amorphous phases has been previously reported in chiton teeth, mollusk shells, echinoderm spicules and spines, and recent reports strongly suggest the presence transient amorphous mineral in forming vertebrate bones. The present finding of transient ACP in murine tooth enamel suggests that this strategy might be universal. PMID:19217943

  16. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  17. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  18. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  19. Structural modeling of amorphous conducting carbon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Pati, Swapan K.; Subramanyam, S. V.

    1998-04-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films are prepared using plasma assisted polymerization process. SEM and TEM shows random aggregate of globular clusters of micron size inside the samples. Electrical measurements indicate a near metallic nature. A tendency of saturation of resistivity at low temperature is observed. From spectroscopic analysis we find some unusual features. Based on these observations a structural model of this carbon is proposed.

  20. Low temperature internal friction of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Metcalf, Thomas; Jernigan, Glenn; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Kearney, Brian; Culberston, James

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunnelling systems (TLS), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. Using the double-paddle oscillator internal friction measurement technique, we have shown that TLS can be made to almost completely disappear in e-beam deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) as the growth temperature increased to 400°C. However, there is a mysterious broad maximum in internal friction at 2-3K, which we suspect to come from metallic contamination of our oscillators and is not related to a-Si. Our new result of a-Si, deposited in a different UHV system and on oscillators with a different type of metallic electrodes, confirms our suspicion. This lowers the upper bound of possible TLS content in a-Si, in terms of tunnelling strength, to below 10-6. Our results offer an encouraging opportunity to use growth temperature to improve the structure order of amorphous thin films and to develop high quality amorphous dielectrics for applications, such as in modern quantum devices. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  2. Amorphous Molecular Organic Solids for Gas Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; McGrail, B. Peter; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2009-07-06

    We show that molecular organic compounds with large accessible internal cavities, as part of their rigid molecular structure, display exceptional ability for gas storage and separation in the amorphous solid state. This finding suggests for the first time that long-range molecular order is not a prerequisite for organic molecules to be engineered as porous materials

  3. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    relief from the symptoms of inflammation and pain Silica-IMERs 10 and is the mode of action of drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen .[61] Serotonin...supports and using the enantiomeric selectivity of the enzyme to resolve racemic mixtures.[100] Immobilization onto supports with various pore sizes and...activity (~37%) and used as a packed- bed IMER to catalyze the racemic resolution of (S)-ketoprofen from its constituent enantiomers . The optically pure (S

  4. Chemical substitution in silica polymorph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.; Steele, I. M.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron probe analyses are presented for trace elements (Al, Na, K, Li, Ti) in quartz, tridymite, cristobalite and melanophlogite. Quartz and melanophlogite show low levels of trace elements relative to tridymite and cristobalite. The previously determined alpha-beta inversion temperature decreases as the Al content of quartz increases. For all silica polymorphs, Al is greater than or equal to Na + K + Li on an atom basis, with the excess Al probably balanced by H.

  5. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, and ionizing radiation. In 1989 a painful macular skin lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. By 1992 he developed gross hematuria and dyspnea. Blood laboratory results revealed a serum creatinine concentration of 2.1 mg/dL, ethrythrocyte sedimentation rate of 61 mm/hr, negative cANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody cytoplasmic pattern), positive pANCA (ANCA perinuclear pattern), and antiglomerular basement membrane negative. Renal biopsy showed proliferative (crescentric) and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. The patient's diagnoses included microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and glomerulonephritis. Environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of an idiopathic expression of systemic autoimmune disease. Crystalline silica exposure has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and some of the small vessel vasculitides. DOE workers are currently able to apply for compensation under the federal Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP). However, the only diseases covered by EEOICP are cancers related to radiation exposure, chronic beryllium disease, and chronic silicosis. PMID:14644669

  6. The Southern Ocean silica cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréguer, Paul J.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Ocean is a major opal sink and plays a key role in the silica cycle of the world ocean. So far however, a complete cycle of silicon in the Southern Ocean has not been published. On one hand, Southern Ocean surface waters receive considerable amounts of silicic acid (dissolved silica, DSi) from the rest of the world ocean through the upwelling of the Circumpolar Deep Water, fed by contributions of deep waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. On the other hand, the Southern Ocean exports a considerable flux of the silicic acid that is not used by diatoms in surface waters through the northward pathways of the Sub-Antarctic Mode Water, of the Antarctic Intermediate Water, and of the Antarctic Bottom Water. Thus the Southern Ocean is a source of DSi for the rest of the world ocean. Here we show that the Southern Ocean is a net importer of DSi: because there is no significant external input of DSi, the flux of DSi imported through the Circumpolar Deep Water pathway compensates the sink flux of biogenic silica in sediments.

  7. Synchrotron WAXS and XANES studies of silica (SiO2) powders synthesized from Indonesian natural sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchlis, Khairanissa; Aini Fauziyah, Nur; Soontaranon, Siriwat; Limpirat, Wanwisa; Pratapa, Suminar

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated polymorphic silica (SiO2) powders using, Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) and X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), laboratory X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) instruments. The WAXS and XANES spectra were collected using synchrotron radiation at Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI), Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. The silica powders were obtained by processing silica sand from Tanah Laut, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Purification process of silica sand was done by magnetic separation and immersion with HCl. The purification step was needed to reduce impurity or undesirable non Si elements. Three polymorphs of silica were produced, i.e. amorphous phase (A), quartz (B), and cristobalite (C). WAXS profile for each phase was presented in terms of intensity vs. 2θ prior to analyses. Both XRD (λCuKα=1.54056 Å) and WAXS (λ=1.09 Å) patttern show that (1) A sample contains no crystallites, (2) B sample is monophasic, contains only quartz, and (3) C sample contains cristobalite and trydimite. XRD quantitative analysis using Rietica gave 98,8 wt% cristobalite, while the associated WAXS data provided 98.7 wt% cristobalite. Si K-edge XANES spectra were measured at energy range 1840 to 1920 eV. Qualitatively, the pre-edge and edge features for all phases are similar, but their main peaks in the post-edge region are different.

  8. All-Atom Molecular-Level Analysis of the Ballistic-Impact-Induced Densification and Devitrification of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Barsoum, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    All-atom molecular-level computations are carried out to infer the dynamic response and material microstructure/topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the microstructural changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline allotropic modifications (in particular, α-quartz and stishovite). The microstructural changes in question were determined by carrying out a post-processing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of stishovite (and perhaps α-quartz) within fused silica during ballistic impact. To rationalize the findings obtained, the all-atom molecular-level computational analysis is complemented by a series of quantum-mechanics density functional theory (DFT) computations. The latter computations enable determination of the relative potential energies of the fused silica, α-quartz, and stishovite under ambient pressure (i.e., under their natural densities) as well as under imposed (as high as 50 GPa) pressures (i.e., under higher densities) and shear strains. In addition, the transition states associated with various fused-silica devitrification processes were identified. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with their respective experimental counterparts.

  9. Precise size control over ultrafine rutile titania nanocrystallites in hierarchical nanotubular silica/titania hybrids with efficient photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanqing; Huang, Jianguo

    2013-08-12

    Hierarchical-structured nanotubular silica/titania hybrids incorporated with particle-size-controllable ultrafine rutile titania nanocrystallites were realized by deposition of ultrathin titania sandwiched silica gel films onto each nanofiber of natural cellulose substances (e.g., common commercial filter paper) and subsequent flame burning in air. The rapid flame burning transforms the initially amorphous titania into rutile phase titania, and the silica gel films suppress the crystallite growth of rutile titania, thereby achieving nano-precise size regulation of ultrafine rutile titania nanocrystallites densely embedded in the silica films of the nanotubes. The average diameters of these nanocrystallites are adjustable in a range of approximately 3.3-16.0 nm by a crystallite size increment rate of about 2.4 nm per titania deposition cycle. The silica films transfer the electrons activated by crystalline titania and generate catalytic reactive species at the outer surface. The size-tuned ultrafine rutile titania nanocrystallites distributed in the unique hierarchical networks significantly improve the photocatalytic performance of the rutile phase titania, thereby enabling a highly efficient photocatalytic degradation of the methylene blue dye under ultraviolet light irradiation, which is even superior to the pure anatase-titania-based materials. The facile stepwise size control of the rutile titania crystallites described here opens an effective pathway for the design and preparation of fine-nanostructured rutile phase titania materials to explore potential applications.

  10. Silica Extraction at Mammoth Lakes, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier, W; Ralph, W; Johnson, M; Bruton, C; Gutierrez, P

    2006-06-07

    The purpose of this project is to develop a cost-effective method to extract marketable silica (SiO{sub 2}) from fluids at the Mammoth Lakes, California geothermal power plant. Silica provides an additional revenue source for the geothermal power industry and therefore lowers the costs of geothermal power production. The use of this type of ''solution mining'' to extract resources eliminates the need for acquiring these resources through energy intensive and environmentally damaging mining technologies. We have demonstrated that both precipitated and colloidal silica can be produced from the geothermal fluids at Mammoth Lakes by first concentrating the silica to over 600 ppm using reverse osmosis (RO). The RO permeate can be used in evaporative cooling at the plant; the RO concentrate is used for silica and potentially other resource extraction (Li, Cs, Rb). Preliminary results suggest that silica recovery at Mammoth Lakes could reduce the cost of geothermal electricity production by 1.0 cents/kWh.

  11. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  12. Surface patterning for brittle amorphous material using nanoindenter-based mechanochemical nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chae Moon; Choi, Soo Chang; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Deug Woo

    2008-02-27

    This paper demonstrates a micro/nanoscale surface patterning technology for brittle material using mechanical and chemical processes. Fused silica was scratched with a Berkovich tip under various normal loads from several mN to several tens of mN with various tip rotations. The scratched substrate was then chemically etched in hydrofluoric solution to evaluate the chemical properties of the different deformed layers produced under various mechanical scratching conditions. Our results showed that either protruding or depressed patterns could be generated on the scratched surface after chemical etching by controlling the tip rotation, the normal load and the etching condition. In addition, the mask effect of amorphous material after mechanical scratching was controlled by conventional mechanical machining conditions such as contact area, chip formation, plastic flow and material removal.

  13. Interaction between silica and hydrophobic cations.

    PubMed Central

    Depasse, J

    1978-01-01

    The interactions between silica and some molecules which have a high affinity for its surface have been studied. The hydrophobic properties and the positive charge of these molecules are likely to be responsible for their strong adsorption on to silica. These observations should be useful in research into new inhibitors of the effects of silica. One of the cations tested, chloroquine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of the haemolytic activity of quartz. PMID:204326

  14. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  15. Shock compression of silica gel as the analog experiments of hydrous comet and meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Arai, Shoji; Okudera, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The studies for structural changes of hydrous silica materials by shock compression are important to obtain the information for compression behaviors of comet and meteorite made of silicate material, ice and hydroxyl on the impact event. In this study, TEOS-derived synthetic silica gels for the analog material of hydrous amorphous silica minerals were compressed under shock pressures of 11, 13, 17, 21, 27, and 31 GPa using a single-stage propellant gun. All recovered samples have been investigated by XRD measurements, Raman and IR spectroscopies, in order to elucidate the shock compression behavior of silica gel. Pressure variation of first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) positions of samples was estimated from measured XRD patterns. FSDP position of as-prepared sample was smaller than silica glass. It indicates that medium range structure of silica gel, i.e. ring structure of SiO4 tetrahedra, is smaller than that of silica glass. FSDP positions showed negative shift with increasing pressure and approached that of silica glass at 31 GPa. It suggests that medium range structure of silica gel approached to silica glass by shock compression. Raman spectrum of as-prepared sample showed an intense D1 band at 480 cm-1 and a broad band at around 450 cm-1. The former is attributed to the oxygen-breathing mode of the four-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra and the latter to the symmetrical Si-O-Si stretching mode. The presence of strong D1 band of as-prepared sample indicates that the sample might contain considerable amount of four-membered rings in the structure. Shocked sample showed that the broad band around 450 cm-1 became prominent above 21 GPa, whereas D1 band became much less intense. These indicate that medium range structure of shocked sample above 21 GPa approached to that of silica glass. Furthermore, IR spectrum of shocked silica gel at 21 GPa indicates that the center part of sample showed development of vitrification as compared with the extremity part of the

  16. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, γ-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that γ-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  17. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  18. Incorporation, oxidation and pyrolysis of ferrocene into porous silica glass: a route to different silica/carbon and silica/iron oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Mariane C; Mangrich, Antônio S; Macedo, Waldemar A A; Ardisson, José D; Zarbin, Aldo J G

    2006-12-25

    This work reports the incorporation of ferrocene into a porous silica glass under ambient temperature and atmosphere. After or during the ferrocene incorporation, the spontaneous formation of ferricinium ions was observed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), UV-visible, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and 57Fe Mössbauer measurements. It was shown that the oxidation of ferrocene molecules to ferricinium ions was promoted by air and that the Si-O- groups on the surface of the pores act as counteranions. Pyrolysis of the porous glass/ferricinium material under argon atmosphere and variable temperature yields different glass/carbon nanocomposites, which were subsequently treated with an HF solution in order to remove the glassy fraction. The resulting insoluble carbon materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, and EPR spectroscopy and consisted of amorphous carbon when the pyrolysis was carried out at 900 or 1000 degrees C and of a mixture of carbon nanotubes and carbonaceous materials at a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C. When the pyrolysis was conducted under air, the incorporated ferricinium forms alpha-Fe2O3, and the resulting material is a transparent and highly homogeneous glass/iron oxide nanocomposite.

  19. A Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Silica and Kerogen Biosignatures in ~1.9 Ga Gunflint Microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, John W.; Sharp, Thomas G.

    2004-06-01

    Microfossils preserved in chert from the ~1.9 Ga Gunflint Formation (Schreiber Beach, Ontario, Canada) were studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and analytical TEM (ATEM). Our goals were to uncover the style of silicification relative to the distribution of organic matter, and to evaluate the distribution and evolution of organic matter, at submicroscopic spatial scales. Petrographically the microfossils typically display filamentous or coccoidal morphologies, and consist of quartz crystals surrounded by kerogen along grain boundaries. ATEM analysis revealed that quartz associated with kerogen consists of 200-500nm-sized, round crystallites, whereas the chert matrix is comprised of randomly oriented, polygonal microquartz (5-10 μm). Silica spheroids found within some fossils consist of quartz subgrains in an amorphous to poorly crystalline matrix, suggesting that precipitation of opaline silica on organic matter occurred with subsequent but incomplete transformation to quartz. Some coccoidal microfossils surround large euhedral quartz crystals (up to 5 μm in diameter) that appeared to have influenced the distribution of kerogen during crystal growth. These euhedral quartz crystals commonly contain elongated (50-100 nm) iron-rich crystallites. Energy-loss, near-edge structure analysis of kerogen associated with a coccoidal microfossil showed that it is composed of amorphous carbon with no evidence of graphitization. TEM results revealed significant differences in the style of silicification between microbe-shaped microfossils and their surrounding chert matrix, as well as the presence of amorphous kerogen.

  20. Nanoscale control over phase separation in conjugated polymer blends using mesoporous silica spheres.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Timothy L; Yano, Kazuhisa; Wolf, Michael O

    2010-01-05

    A method of preparing blended conjugated polymer microparticles using mesoporous silica spheres is described. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was blended with poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) by a sequential infiltration-polymerization approach. The materials were evaluated by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy and are shown to retain the overall spherical structure of the silica template. The filling of the mesopores and the polymer distribution within individual particles were determined by a combination of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption. The results suggest that when PEDOT is added to the silica host, followed by PFA, the phase separation of the two immiscible polymers is constrained by the dimensions of the silica mesopores, ensuring nanoscale contact between the two phases. The silica template can be removed by etching with 25% hydrofluoric acid, leaving behind a blended polymer microparticle. The etched microparticles exhibit macroporous morphologies different from that of pure PEDOT particles prepared by a similar route. The blended microparticles also appear to undergo limited phase separation; no evidence for distinct polymer domains was observed. Conductivity measurements indicate that the blended particles are above the percolation threshold and support the conclusion that the phase domains are extremely small. Importantly, when PFA is added to the host first, followed by PEDOT, there is a striking difference to the final composition and morphology of the particles. This reversal of the blending order results in a more amorphous, phase-separated material. These results demonstrate the preparation of conjugated polymer blends with engineered nanoscale phase separation and may allow for future improvements in organic device architecture and performance.