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Sample records for gear damage detection

  1. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  2. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  3. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  4. Spiral Bevel Gear Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rigs. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when pitting damage occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears.

  5. Spiral-Bevel-Gear Damage Detected Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Helicopter transmission integrity is critical to helicopter safety because helicopters depend on the power train for propulsion, lift, and flight maneuvering. To detect impending transmission failures, the ideal diagnostic tools used in the health-monitoring system would provide real-time health monitoring of the transmission, demonstrate a high level of reliable detection to minimize false alarms, and provide end users with clear information on the health of the system without requiring them to interpret large amounts of sensor data. A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. (Spiral bevel gears are used in helicopter transmissions to transfer power between nonparallel intersecting shafts.) Data fusion was used to integrate two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, into a health-monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on the gears.

  6. Integrating Oil Debris and Vibration Gear Damage Detection Technologies Using Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spur gears was developed. Two different measurement technologies, wear debris analysis and vibration, were integrated into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual measurement technologies. This diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Test Rig. Experimental data were collected during experiments performed in this test rig with and without pitting. Results show combining the two measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spur gears.

  7. Application of atomic decomposition to gear damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Chu, Fulei

    2007-04-01

    Atomic decomposition can represent arbitrary signals in an overcomplete dictionary sparsely and adaptively, and it can match the local structure of signals very well. Therefore, it possesses advantages over traditional basis-expansion-based signal analysis methods, in extracting characteristic waveforms from complicated mechanical vibration signals. Periodic impulses characterize damaged gear vibration. In order to extract the transient features of gear vibration, atomic decomposition methods, including method of frames (MOF), best orthogonal basis (BOB), matching pursuit (MP) and basis pursuit (BP), are used in the analysis of vibration signals from both healthy and faulty gearboxes. With a compound dictionary specially designed to match the local structure of signals, the meshing frequency and its harmonics, impulses and transient phenomena of the damaged gear vibration signals are extracted simultaneously. Furthermore, from the time-frequency plots of atomic decomposition, the gear tooth damage is recognized easily according to the periodic impulses. By comparing with traditional time-frequency analysis methods, e.g. short time Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform, it is found that atomic decomposition is more effective in simultaneously extracting the impulses and harmonic components of damaged gear vibration signals.

  8. A Comparison of Vibration and Oil Debris Gear Damage Detection Methods Applied to Pitting Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) must provide reliable, real-time performance monitoring of helicopter operating parameters to prevent damage of flight critical components. Helicopter transmission diagnostics are an important part of a helicopter HUMS. In order to improve the reliability of transmission diagnostics, many researchers propose combining two technologies, vibration and oil monitoring, using data fusion and intelligent systems. Some benefits of combining multiple sensors to make decisions include improved detection capabilities and increased probability the event is detected. However, if the sensors are inaccurate, or the features extracted from the sensors are poor predictors of transmission health, integration of these sensors will decrease the accuracy of damage prediction. For this reason, one must verify the individual integrity of vibration and oil analysis methods prior to integrating the two technologies. This research focuses on comparing the capability of two vibration algorithms, FM4 and NA4, and a commercially available on-line oil debris monitor to detect pitting damage on spur gears in the NASA Glenn Research Center Spur Gear Fatigue Test Rig. Results from this research indicate that the rate of change of debris mass measured by the oil debris monitor is comparable to the vibration algorithms in detecting gear pitting damage.

  9. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear tooth pitting fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4) were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters performed average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant amount of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  10. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  11. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  12. Novel detection of local tooth damage in gears by the wavelet bicoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.; LaPayne, G.

    2012-01-01

    A new technique, the instantaneous wavelet bicoherence (WB) is proposed and investigated. The use of the instantaneous and locally averaged WB from vibration measurements for local damage detection in gears is investigated for the first time; these bicoherences are better adapted than the classical Fourier bicoherence to the case of non-stationary signals. A new diagnostic feature based on the integrated modulus of the WB in a specific frequency range and a methodology for feature estimation are proposed. The WB techniques are applied to detection of a multiple "like natural" pitting on a back-to-back industrial spur gearbox system and natural pitting on a gear at test rig and show the possibility of early detection of local tooth faults. The detection effectiveness is evaluated by a local Fisher criterion estimated at each angular position of gear for the unpitted and pitted cases. The proposed WB-based diagnostic feature demonstrates robust experimental performance and superior detection capabilities (i.e., effective early damage detection differentially for teeth of the gear wheel) over the conventional detection methods based on the wavelet transform. The reason for this superior effectiveness is that the WB exploits the phase couplings of the wavelet transform at different frequencies, which contain useful additional information for detection of non-linear phenomena induced by local faults. The proposed approaches are compared with the two conventional approaches based on the wavelet transform.

  13. Optimal filtering of gear signals for early damage detection based on the spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a methodology for the enhancement of small transients in gear vibration signals in order to detect local tooth faults, such as pitting, at an early stage of damage. We propose to apply the optimal denoising (Wiener) filter based on the spectral kurtosis (SK). The originality is to estimate and apply this filter to the gear residual signal, as classically obtained after removing the mesh harmonics from the time synchronous average (TSA). This presents several advantages over the direct estimation from the raw vibration signal: improved signal/noise ratio, reduced interferences from other stages of the gearbox and easier detection of excited structural resonance(s) within the range of the mesh harmonic components. From the SK-based filtered residual signal, called SK-residual, we define the local power as the smoothed squared envelope, which reflects both the energy and the degree of non-stationarity of the fault-induced transients. The methodology is then applied to an industrial case and shows the possibility of detection of relatively small tooth surface pitting (less than 10%) in a two-stage helical reduction gearbox. The adjustment of the resolution for the SK estimation appears to be optimal when the length of the analysis window is approximately matched with the mesh period of the gear. The proposed approach is also compared to an inverse filtering (blind deconvolution) approach. However, the latter turns out to be more unstable and sensitive to noise and shows a lower degree of separation, quantified by the Fisher criterion, between the estimated diagnostic features in the pitted and unpitted cases. Thus, the proposed optimal filtering methodology based on the SK appears to be well adapted for the early detection of local tooth damage in gears.

  14. Novel adaptation of the demodulation technology for gear damage detection to variable amplitudes of mesh harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel adaptive demodulation technique including a new diagnostic feature is proposed for gear diagnosis in conditions of variable amplitudes of the mesh harmonics. This vibration technique employs the time synchronous average (TSA) of vibration signals. The new adaptive diagnostic feature is defined as the ratio of the sum of the sideband components of the envelope spectrum of a mesh harmonic to the measured power of the mesh harmonic. The proposed adaptation of the technique is justified theoretically and experimentally by the high level of the positive covariance between amplitudes of the mesh harmonics and the sidebands in conditions of variable amplitudes of the mesh harmonics. It is shown that the adaptive demodulation technique preserves effectiveness of local fault detection of gears operating in conditions of variable mesh amplitudes.

  15. Investigation of Sideband Index Response to Prototype Gear Tooth Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the ability of gear condition indicators (CI) to detect contact fatigue damage on spiral bevel gear teeth. Tests were performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig on eight prototype gear sets (pinion/gear). Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Vibration data was measured during damage progression at varying torque values while varying damage modes to the gear teeth were observed and documented with inspection photos. Sideband indexes (SI) and root mean square (RMS) CIs were calculated from the time synchronous averaged vibration data. Results found that both CIs respond differently to varying torque levels, damage levels and damage modes

  16. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    standard aerospace practices. At 6000 lb-in face gear torque , the calculated AGMA contact stress index was 250 ksi and the calculated AGMA bending stress...load coupling was adjusted to produce a face- gear torque between 3000 to 5000 lb-in. The gears were then run at required speed and torque for the...performed at three load levels: 7200 lb-in face gear torque (275 ksi calculated AGMA contact stress), 8185 lb-in face gear torque (292 ksi contact

  17. Detection of Thermal Damage in X2M Gears Steel Using Barkhausen Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Victor; Sincebaugh, Patrick; Pepi, Marc; Tackitt, Kirk

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique for detecting thermal damage and to differentiate between two heat treatments for X2M steel. BNA is a nondestructive inspection method that has been shown to be sensitive to microstructural and residual stress variations in ferromagnetic materials. BNA data will be presented for X2M samples with various degrees of thermal damage, prior to and subsequent to shot peening. Microstructural analysis results will also be presented. The microstructural feature that was the distinguishing variable between the two heat treatments was the percentage of carbides present. The results clearly demonstrated that it is feasible to use BNA methods to differentiate between the two heat treatments used for the X2M steel prior to shot peening.

  18. Gear Tooth Wear Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-based condition indicators continue to be developed for Health Usage Monitoring of rotorcraft gearboxes. Testing performed at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown correlations between specific condition indicators and specific types of gear wear. To speed up the detection and analysis of gear teeth, an image detection program based on the Viola-Jones algorithm was trained to automatically detect spiral bevel gear wear pitting. The detector was tested using a training set of gear wear pictures and a blind set of gear wear pictures. The detector accuracy for the training set was 75 percent while the accuracy for the blind set was 15 percent. Further improvements on the accuracy of the detector are required but preliminary results have shown its ability to automatically detect gear tooth wear. The trained detector would be used to quickly evaluate a set of gear or pinion pictures for pits, spalls, or abrasive wear. The results could then be used to correlate with vibration or oil debris data. In general, the program could be retrained to detect features of interest from pictures of a component taken over a period of time.

  19. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  20. Investigation of Gear and Bearing Fatigue Damage Using Debris Particle Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to spur gears, spiral bevel gears, and rolling element bearings. This diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig, Spiral Bevel Gear Test Facility, and the 500hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. During each test, data from an online, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. Results indicate oil debris alone cannot discriminate between bearing and gear fatigue damage.

  1. Bending-fatigue damage-detection on notched-tooth spiral-bevel gears using the average-log-ratio, ALR, algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Jason A.; Mark, William D.

    2014-02-01

    The frequency-domain ALR (average-log-ratio) damage-detection algorithm [MSSP 24 (2010) 2807-2823] is utilized to illustrate damage detection and progression on notched-tooth spiral-bevel gears. Use of equal weighting of increases or decreases of individual rotational-harmonic amplitudes caused by damage, for early ALR detections, is substantiated. Continuously improving statistical reliability of ALR is documented by using increasing numbers of rotational-harmonic amplitude-ratios and increasing numbers of waveforms in the synchronous averaging. Sensitivity of the ALR algorithm to incipient damage is observed to be comparable to that obtained from the kurtosis-based Figure of Merit 4 (FM4). In contrast to FM4, ALR is shown to monotonically increase with increasing damage and running time. Interestingly, this diagnostic technique can be implemented with remarkably low analog-to-digital conversion rates. Computation of ALR for differing torque levels shows strong indications of weakening tooth-stiffness and increasing tooth-plastic-deformation. ALR computation utilizing tooth-rotational-location windowing also is illustrated.

  2. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  3. Inferring Gear Damage from Oil-Debris and Vibration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula

    2006-01-01

    A system for real-time detection of surface-fatigue-pitting damage to gears for use in a helicopter transmission is based on fuzzy-logic used to fuse data from sensors that measure oil-borne debris, referred to as "oil debris" in the article, and vibration signatures. A system to detect helicopter-transmission gear damage is beneficial because the power train of a helicopter is essential for propulsion, lift, and maneuvering, hence, the integrity of the transmission is critical to helicopter safety. To enable detection of an impending transmission failure, an ideal diagnostic system should provide real-time monitoring of the "health" of the transmission, be capable of a high level of reliable detection (with minimization of false alarms), and provide human users with clear information on the health of the system without making it necessary for them to interpret large amounts of sensor data.

  4. Crack Detection for Aerospace Quality Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2002-01-01

    Health and Usage Monitoring System research and development involves analysis of the vibration signals produced by a gearbox throughout its life. There are two major advantages of knowing the actual lifetime of a gearbox component: safety and cost. In this report, a technique is proposed to help extract the critical data and present it in a manner that can be easy to understand. The key feature of the technique is to make it independent of speed, torque and prior history for localized, single tooth damage such as gear cracks. This extraction technique is demonstrated on two sets of digitized vibration data from cracked spur gears. Standard vibration diagnostic parameters are calculated and presented for comparison. Several new detection algorithms are also presented. The results of this study indicate that crack detection methods examined are not robust or repeatable. The proposed techniques provide a limited improvement to existing diagnostic parameters. Current techniques show that the cracks progressed at a much faster rate than anticipated which reduced available time for detection.

  5. A strategy for detecting derelict fishing gear at sea.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Kris; Donohue, Mary J; Courtney, Catherine A; Morishige, Carey; Rivera-Vicente, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Derelict fishing gear (DFG) is a highly persistent form of marine pollution known to cause environmental and economic damage. At-sea detection of DFG would support pelagic removal of this gear to prevent and minimize impacts on marine environments and species. In 2008, experts in marine debris, oceanography, remote sensing, and marine policy outlined a strategy to develop the capability to detect and ultimately remove DFG from the open ocean. The strategy includes three interrelated components: understanding the characteristics of the targeted DFG, indirectly detecting DFG by modeling likely locations, and directly detecting pelagic DFG using remote sensing. Together, these components aim to refine the search area, increase the likelihood of detection, and decrease mitigation response time, thereby providing guidance for removal operations. Here, we present this at-sea detection strategy, relate it to relevant extant research and technology, and identify gaps that currently prevent successful at-sea detection and removal of DFG.

  6. Understanding Vibration Spectra of Planetary Gear Systems for Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the vibration spectra is very useful for any gear fault detection scheme based upon vibration measurements. The vibration measured from planetary gears is complicated. Sternfeld noted the presence of sidebands about the gear mesh harmonics spaced at the planet passage frequency in spectra measured near the ring gear of a CH-47 helicopter. McFadden proposes a simple model of the vibration transmission that predicts high spectral amplitudes at multiples of the planet passage frequency, for planetary gears with evenly spaced planets. This model correctly predicts no strong signal at the meshing frequency when the number of teeth on the ring gear is not an integer multiple of the number of planets. This paper will describe a model for planetary gear vibration spectra developed from the ideas started in reference. This model predicts vibration to occur only at frequencies that are multiples of the planet repetition passage frequency and clustered around gear mesh harmonics. Vibration measurements will be shown from tri-axial accelerometers mounted on three different planetary gear systems and compared with the model. The model correctly predicts the frequencies with large components around the first several gear mesh harmonics in measurements for systems with uniformly and nonuniformly spaced planet gears. Measurements do not confirm some of the more detailed features predicted by the model. Discrepancies of the ideal model to the measurements are believed due to simplifications in the model and will be discussed. Fault detection will be discussed applying the understanding will be discussed.

  7. Application of fault detection techniques to spiral bevel gear fatigue data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Decker, Harry J.

    1994-01-01

    Results of applying a variety of gear fault detection techniques to experimental data is presented. A spiral bevel gear fatigue rig was used to initiate a naturally occurring fault and propagate the fault to a near catastrophic condition of the test gear pair. The spiral bevel gear fatigue test lasted a total of eighteen hours. At approximately five and a half hours into the test, the rig was stopped to inspect the gears for damage, at which time a small pit was identified on a tooth of the pinion. The test was then stopped an additional seven times throughout the rest of the test in order to observe and document the growth and propagation of the fault. The test was ended when a major portion of a pinion tooth broke off. A personal computer based diagnostic system was developed to obtain vibration data from the test rig, and to perform the on-line gear condition monitoring. A number of gear fault detection techniques, which use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain, were applied to the experimental data. Among the techniques investigated, two of the recently developed methods appeared to be the first to react to the start of tooth damage. These methods continued to react to the damage as the pitted area grew in size to cover approximately 75% of the face width of the pinion tooth. In addition, information gathered from one of the newer methods was found to be a good accumulative damage indicator. An unexpected result of the test showed that although the speed of the rig was held to within a band of six percent of the nominal speed, and the load within eighteen percent of nominal, the resulting speed and load variations substantially affected the performance of all of the gear fault detection techniques investigated.

  8. Static-transmission-error vibratory-excitation contributions from plastically deformed gear teeth caused by tooth bending-fatigue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, W. D.; Reagor, C. P.

    2007-02-01

    To assess gear health and detect gear-tooth damage, the vibratory response from meshing gear-pair excitations is commonly monitored by accelerometers. In an earlier paper, strong evidence was presented suggesting that, in the case of tooth bending-fatigue damage, the principal source of detectable damage is whole-tooth plastic deformation; i.e. yielding, rather than changes in tooth stiffness caused by tooth-root cracks. Such plastic deformations are geometric deviation contributions to the "static-transmission-error" (STE) vibratory excitation caused by meshing gear pairs. The STE contributions caused by two likely occurring forms of such plastic deformations on a single tooth are derived, and displayed in the time domain as a function of involute "roll distance." Example calculations are provided for transverse contact ratios of Qt=1.4 and 1.8, for spur gears and for helical-gear axial contact ratios ranging from Qa=1.2 to Qa=3.6. Low-pass- and band-pass-filtered versions of these same STE contributions also are computed and displayed in the time domain. Several calculations, consisting of superposition of the computed STE tooth-meshing fundamental harmonic contribution and the band-pass STE contribution caused by a plastically deformed tooth, exhibit the amplitude and frequency or phase modulation character commonly observed in accelerometer-response waveforms caused by damaged teeth. General formulas are provided that enable computation of these STE vibratory-excitation contributions for any form of plastic deformation on any number of teeth for spur and helical gears with any contact ratios.

  9. Gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Gearing technology in its modern form has a history of only 100 years. However, the earliest form of gearing can probably be traced back to fourth century B.C. Greece. Current gear practice and recent advances in the technology are drawn together. The history of gearing is reviewed briefly in the Introduction. Subsequent sections describe types of gearing and their geometry, processing, and manufacture. Both conventional and more recent methods of determining gear stress and deflections are considered. The subjects of life prediction and lubrication are additions to the literature. New and more complete methods of power loss predictions as well as an optimum design of spur gear meshes are described. Conventional and new types of power transmission systems are presented.

  10. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation Via AC-29-2C Using Damage Progression Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the results of spiral bevel gear rig tests performed under a NASA Space Act Agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to support validation and demonstration of rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for maintenance credits via FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 29-2C, Section MG-15, Airworthiness Approval of Rotorcraft (HUMS) (Ref. 1). The overarching goal of this work was to determine a method to validate condition indicators in the lab that better represent their response to faults in the field. Using existing in-service helicopter HUMS flight data from faulted spiral bevel gears as a "Case Study," to better understand the differences between both systems, and the availability of the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig, a plan was put in place to design, fabricate and test comparable gear sets with comparable failure modes within the constraints of the test rig. The research objectives of the rig tests were to evaluate the capability of detecting gear surface pitting fatigue and other generated failure modes on spiral bevel gear teeth using gear condition indicators currently used in fielded HUMS. Nineteen final design gear sets were tested. Tables were generated for each test, summarizing the failure modes observed on the gear teeth for each test during each inspection interval and color coded based on damage mode per inspection photos. Gear condition indicators (CI) Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS), +/- 1 Sideband Index (SI1) and +/- 3 Sideband Index (SI3) were plotted along with rig operational parameters. Statistical tables of the means and standard deviations were calculated within inspection intervals for each CI. As testing progressed, it became clear that certain condition indicators were more sensitive to a specific component and failure mode. These tests were clustered together for further analysis. Maintenance actions during testing were also documented. Correlation coefficients were

  11. Research of Gear Fault Detection in Morphological Wavelet Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shi; Fang-jian, Shan; Bo, Cong; Wei, Qiu

    2016-02-01

    For extracting mutation information from gear fault signal and achieving a valid fault diagnosis, a gear fault diagnosis method based on morphological mean wavelet transform was designed. Morphological mean wavelet transform is a linear wavelet in the framework of morphological wavelet. Decomposing gear fault signal by this morphological mean wavelet transform could produce signal synthesis operators and detailed synthesis operators. For signal synthesis operators, it was just close to orginal signal, and for detailed synthesis operators, it contained fault impact signal or interference signal and could be catched. The simulation experiment result indicates that, compared with Fourier transform, the morphological mean wavelet transform method can do time-frequency analysis for original signal, effectively catch impact signal appears position; and compared with traditional linear wavelet transform, it has simple structure, easy realization, signal local extremum sensitivity and high denoising ability, so it is more adapted to gear fault real-time detection.

  12. Gearing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    earliest written descriptions of gears are said to (ref. 3), appear in the sketchbooks of Leonardo da Vinci , . . - have been made by Aristotle in the fourth... Vinci , Leonardo (L. Reti, transl.): The Madrid Codices. American Gear Manufacturers Association, Aug. 1966. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., 1974. 33... Leonardo da Vinci’s manuscripts, lost in the "’ ppassage attributed by some to Aristotle, in "Mechanical National Library in Madrid since 1830., were

  13. Damage Detection Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    The prototype Flexible Damage Detection System stands in a laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system uses circuits printed on thin thermal film and specialized software. The system is designed to show where damage to a surface occurs and how severe it may be. It could offer astronauts a real-time update on their spacecraft's condition during a mission without requiring a spacewalk.

  14. Damage Detection Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-10

    Martha Williams, who leads the team inventing the Flexible Damage Detection System, stands in a laboratory with a prototype at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system uses circuits printed on thin thermal film and specialized software. The system is designed to show where damage to a surface occurs and how severe it may be. It could offer astronauts a real-time update on their spacecraft's condition during a mission without requiring a spacewalk.

  15. Damage Detection Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-10

    Jamie Szafran, from left, Mark Lewis and Curtis Ihlefeld work with the prototype of the Flexible Damage Detection System in a laboratory with a prototype at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system uses circuits printed on thin thermal film and specialized software. The system is designed to show where damage to a surface occurs and how severe it may be. It could offer astronauts a real-time update on their spacecraft's condition during a mission without requiring a spacewalk.

  16. Damage Detection Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-10

    Curtis Ihlefeld, left, and Mark Lewis work with the prototype of the Flexible Damage Detection System in a laboratory with a prototype at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system uses circuits printed on thin thermal film and specialized software. The system is designed to show where damage to a surface occurs and how severe it may be. It could offer astronauts a real-time update on their spacecraft's condition during a mission without requiring a spacewalk.

  17. Damage Detection Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-11

    The complete prototype Flexible Damage Detection System stands in a laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system uses circuits printed on thin thermal film and specialized software. The system is designed to show where damage to a surface occurs and how severe it may be. It could offer astronauts a real-time update on their spacecraft's condition during a mission without requiring a spacewalk. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Damaged Arresting Gear Tapes for the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed on damaged arresting gear tapes at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility. The arrestment system uses five pairs of tapes to bring the test carriage to a halt. The procedure used to determine when to replace the tapes consists of a close evaluation of each of the 10 tapes after each run. During this evaluation, each tape is examined thoroughly and any damage observed on the tape is recorded. If the damaged tape does not pass the inspection, the tape is replaced with a new one. For the past 13 years, the most commonly seen damage types are edge fray damage and transverse damage. Tests were conducted to determine the maximum tensile strength of a damaged arresting gear tape specimen. The data indicate that tapes exhibiting transverse damage can withstand higher loads than tapes with edge fray damage.

  19. A method of gear defect intelligent detection based on transmission noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-fang; Zhao, Yun; Lin, Jia-chun; Guo, Mian

    2015-02-01

    A new approach was proposed by combing Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) algorithm and Back Propagation (BP) neural network for detection of gear through transmission noise analysis. Then feature values of the feature signals are calculated. The feature values which have a great difference for different defect types are chosen to build an eigenvector. BP neural network is used to train and learn on the eigenvector for recognition of gear defects intelligently. In this study, a comparative experiment has been performed among normal gears, cracked gears and eccentric gears with fifteen sets of different gears. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect gear defect features carried by the transmission noise effectively.

  20. Gear fault detection using customized multiwavelet lifting schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; He, Zhengjia; Zi, Yanyang

    2010-07-01

    Fault symptoms of running gearboxes must be detected as early as possible to avoid serious accidents. Diverse advanced methods are developed for this challenging task. However, for multiwavelet transforms, the fixed basis functions independent of the input dynamic response signals will possibly reduce the accuracy of fault diagnosis. Meanwhile, for multiwavelet denoising technique, the universal threshold denoising tends to overkill important but weak features in gear fault diagnosis. To overcome the shortcoming, a novel method incorporating customized (i.e., signal-based) multiwavelet lifting schemes with sliding window denoising is proposed in this paper. On the basis of Hermite spline interpolation, various vector prediction and update operators with the desirable properties of biorthogonality, symmetry, short support and vanishing moments are constructed. The customized lifting-based multiwavelets for feature matching are chosen by the minimum entropy principle. Due to the periodic characteristics of gearbox vibration signals, sliding window denoising favorable to retain valuable information as much as possible is employed to extract and identify the fault features in gearbox signals. The proposed method is applied to simulation experiments, gear fault diagnosis and normal gear detection to testify the efficiency and reliability. The results show that the method involving the selection of appropriate basis functions and the proper feature extraction technique could act as an effective and promising tool for gear fault detection.

  1. Frequency-domain assessment of gear-tooth bending-fatigue damage-progression using the average-log-ratio, ALR, algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, William D.; Hines, Jason A.

    2014-04-01

    Frequency-domain (rotational-harmonic) behavior of the average-log-ratio, ALR, gear-damage detection algorithm [MSSP 24 (2010) 2807-2823] [18] is utilized to explain behavior caused by tooth-bending-fatigue damage progression. For spur and helical gears, the strongest bending-fatigue damage contributions are typically found in the rotational-harmonic region below the tooth-meshing fundamental harmonic, where ALR increases almost monotonically with increasing damage. However, when the combined elastic/plastic deformation of a damaged tooth or teeth exceeds tooth tip/root/end relief magnitude, at tooth-contact initiation and/or termination, the lowest-order transmission-error discontinuity is changed from slope discontinuity to step discontinuity, resulting in transmission-error high-frequency (rotational-harmonic n) behavior changing from proportional to 1/n2 to proportional to 1/n, therefore indicating progression to severe damage. Decomposition of the ALR damage-detection metric into rotational-harmonic frequency bands using accelerometer recordings from a notched-tooth spiral-bevel gear test illustrates the above-described behavior, thereby showing increasing stages of damage progression prior to complete gear failure.

  2. Quantification of Gear Tooth Damage by Optimal Tracking of Vibration Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Veillette, R. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Braun, M. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for quantifying the wear or damage of gear teeth in a transmission system. The procedure developed in this study can be applied as a part of either an onboard machine health-monitoring system or a health diagnostic system used during regular maintenance. As the developed methodology is based on analysis of gearbox vibration under normal operating conditions, no shutdown or special modification of operating parameters is required during the diagnostic process. The process of quantifying the wear or damage of gear teeth requires a set of measured vibration data and a model of the gear mesh dynamics. An optimization problem is formulated to determine the profile of a time-varying mesh stiffness parameter for which the model output approximates the measured data. The resulting stiffness profile is then related to the level of gear tooth wear or damage. The procedure was applied to a data set generated artificially and to another obtained experimentally from a spiral bevel gear test rig. The results demonstrate the utility of the procedure as part of an overall health-monitoring system.

  3. Backlash Detection in Geared Mechanisms: Modeling, Simulation, and Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, N.; Ellis, R. E.; Moore, T. N.

    1997-05-01

    Backlash is a common fault that occurs in geared mechanisms, and can produce inaccuracy or uncontrollability of the mechanism. It is shown that, by modeling backlash as a microscopic impact, its presence can be detected and possibly measured using only simple sensors. The first stage of modeling establishes the need for the use of non-linear elastic sensors and damping forces in calculating the gear teeth reaction force. The second stage of modeling used a detailed digital multibody simulation to develop and test the effectiveness of the proposed detection approach. Experiments verify the efficacy of the methodology in practice. Finally, the results can be quantified for a test-bed mechanism, indicating that this methodology may be useful for condition monitoring of industrial mechanisms.

  4. Comparison of localised spalling and crack damage from dynamic modelling of spur gear vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shengxiang; Howard, Ian

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a 26 degree of freedom gear dynamic model of three shafts and two pairs of spur gears in mesh for comparison of localised tooth spalling and damage. This paper details how tooth spalling and cracks can be included in the model by using the combined torsional mesh stiffness of the gears. The FEA models developed for calculation of the torsional stiffness and tooth load sharing ratio of the gears in mesh with the spalling and crack damage are also described. The dynamic simulation results of vibration from the gearbox were obtained by using Matlab and Simulink models, which were developed from the equations of motion. The simulation results were found to be consistent with results from previously published mathematical analysis and experimental investigations. The difference and comparison between the vibration signals with the tooth crack and spalling damage are discussed by investigating some of the common diagnostic functions and changes to the frequency spectra results. The result of this paper indicates that the amplitude and phase modulation of the coherent time synchronous vibration signal average can be effective in indicating the difference between localised tooth spalling and crack damage.

  5. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Combining Test Rig Damage Progression Data with Fielded Rotorcraft Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of three reports published on the results of this project. In the first report, results were presented on nineteen tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig on spiral bevel gear sets designed to simulate helicopter fielded failures. In the second report, fielded helicopter HUMS data from forty helicopters were processed with the same techniques that were applied to spiral bevel rig test data. Twenty of the forty helicopters experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears, while the other twenty helicopters had no known anomalies within the time frame of the datasets. In this report, results from the rig and helicopter data analysis will be compared for differences and similarities in condition indicator (CI) response. Observations and findings using sub-scale rig failure progression tests to validate helicopter gear condition indicators will be presented. In the helicopter, gear health monitoring data was measured when damage occurred and after the gear sets were replaced at two helicopter regimes. For the helicopters or tails, data was taken in the flat pitch ground 101 rotor speed (FPG101) regime. For nine tails, data was also taken at 120 knots true airspeed (120KTA) regime. In the test rig, gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed while gear health monitoring data and operational parameters were measured and tooth damage progression documented. For the rig tests, the gear speed was maintained at 3500RPM, a one hour run-in was performed at 4000 in-lb gear torque, than the torque was increased to 8000 in-lbs. The HUMS gear condition indicator data evaluated included Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1(DA1), + 3 Sideband Index (SI3) and + 1 Sideband Index (SI1). These were selected based on their sensitivity in detecting contact fatigue damage modes from analytical, experimental and historical helicopter data. For this report, the helicopter dataset was reduced to

  6. A windowing and mapping strategy for gear tooth fault detection of a planetary gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xihui; Zuo, Ming J.; Liu, Libin

    2016-12-01

    When there is a single cracked tooth in a planet gear, the cracked tooth is enmeshed for very short time duration in comparison to the total time of a full revolution of the planet gear. The fault symptom generated by the single cracked tooth may be very weak. This study aims to develop a windowing and mapping strategy to interpret the vibration signal of a planetary gear at the tooth level. The fault symptoms generated by a single cracked tooth of the planet gear of interest can be extracted. The health condition of the planet gear can be assessed by comparing the differences among the signals of all teeth of the planet gear. The proposed windowing and mapping strategy is tested with both simulated vibration signals and experimental vibration signals. The tooth signals can be successfully decomposed and a single tooth fault on a planet gear can be effectively detected.

  7. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1993-06-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures.

  8. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1993-01-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures.

  9. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, D.P.; Zakrajsek, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures. 4 refs.

  10. Design rules to enhance HUMS sensitivity to spur gear faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin

    analysis and subsequent experimental validation, conventional fault metrics are used to help assess damage sensitivity to spur gear design parameters. Both simulation and experimental testing confirm that incipient crack damage using conventional fault metrics are insensitive to cracks less than the 50% of the tooth depth. Spur gear designs along with RPM variations have a significant effect on the ability of conventional fault metrics to detect gear tooth damage. Enhanced sensitivity can be achieved for most cases by increasing the diametral pitch of the gear design. However, pitting tends to be insensitive to any gear design changes.

  11. Comparative Study of Vibration Condition Indicators for Detecting Cracks in Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanadic, Nenad; Ardis, Paul; Hood, Adrian; Thurston, Michael; Ghoshal, Anindya; Lewicki, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an empirical study on the tooth breakage failure mode in spur gears. Of four dominant gear failure modes (breakage, wear, pitting, and scoring), tooth breakage is the most precipitous and often leads to catastrophic failures. The cracks were initiated using a fatigue tester and a custom-designed single-tooth bending fixture to simulate over-load conditions, instead of traditional notching using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). The cracks were then propagated on a dynamometer. The ground truth of damage level during crack propagation was monitored with crack-propagation sensors. Ten crack propagations have been performed to compare the existing condition indicators (CIs) with respect to their: ability to detect a crack, ability to assess the damage, and sensitivity to sensor placement. Of more than thirty computed CIs, this paper compares five commonly used: raw RMS, FM0, NA4, raw kurtosis, and NP4. The performance of combined CIs was also investigated, using linear, logistic, and boosted regression trees based feature fusion.

  12. The Suggestion of the Macrophoto Method for the Evaluation of the Gear Damages by Pitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiláková, Beáta; Bošanský, Miroslav; Zápotočný, Ján

    2012-12-01

    It is necessary to determine regularly the span of a damaged gear surface caused by pitting. It is an arduous task, because the size of the damage on the tooth flank depends on the number of cycles and the torque. Therefore it is needed to check continually the degree of the surface damage during the testing. When evaluating it is needed to take into account both the area of one tooth and all teeth. In the past various tedious methods with the arduous manual evaluating were used to evaluate pitting . The article deals with the analysis and evaluating of pitting by a new original macrophoto method via the electronic microscope with the computer processing. The main advantage of this method is its speed, exactness and universality.

  13. Evaluation Of Vibration-Monitoring Gear-Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental evaluation of commercial electronic system designed to monitor vibration signal from accelerometer on gear-box to detect vibrations indicative of damage to gears. System includes signal-conditioning subsystem and personal computer in which analog-to-digital converter installed. Results show system fairly effective in detecting surface fatigue pits on spur-gear teeth.

  14. Research on the gear operating state detection based on the fiber Bragg grating sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yijun; Zhang, Wenying; Jin, Zhouyi; Liu, Jiapei; Li, Mingyue; Li, Xin; Geng, Biao; Dong, Bo

    2017-09-01

    With the development of people’s production and the accelerated growth of industrial demand, industrial manufacturers continue to improve the level of real-time detection of gear requirements. In order to improve the safety of mechanical equipment and to reduce the gear failure of the economic losses, the real-time monitoring of gear running technology is of a positive meaning. Based on the existing research results of gear dynamic detection, this paper proposes a fiber-optic grating sense of the gear operating state detection system. Stress tests were performed by varying the different load torques. The experimental results show that at the load of 10Nm and the rotating speed of 70r/min, the dedendum stress reached 130.4MPa. Compared with the theoretical value, the test error was 6.66%.

  15. Dynamic response and time-frequency analysis for gear tooth crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Vibration health monitoring is a non-destructive technique which can be applied to detect cracks propagating in gear teeth. This paper studies gear tooth crack detection by investigating the natural frequencies and by performing time-frequency analysis of a 6 DOF dynamic gear model. The gear mesh stiffness used in the model was calculated analytically for different cases of crack sizes. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the model were derived for healthy and faulty cases and dynamic simulation was performed to obtain the time signal responses. A new approach involving a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied where a fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated for successive blocks with different sizes corresponding to the time segments of the varying gear mesh stiffness. The relationship between the different crack sizes and the mesh-stiffness-dependent eigenfrequencies was studied in order to detect the tooth crack and to estimate its size.

  16. Transmission Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to rolling element bearings in an OH-58 main rotor transmission. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from tests performed in the NASA Glenn 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when two unanticipated bearing failures occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears duplex ball bearings and spiral bevel pinion triplex ball bearings in a main rotor transmission.

  17. Effectiveness and Sensitivity of Vibration Processing Techniques for Local Fault Detection in Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.; Rubini, R.

    2000-05-01

    This paper deals with gear condition monitoring based on vibration analysis techniques. The detection and diagnostic capability of some of the most effective techniques are discussed and compared on the basis of experimental results, concerning a gear pair affected by a fatigue crack. In particular, the results of new approaches based on time-frequency and cyclostationarity analysis are compared against those obtained by means of the well-accepted cepstrum analysis and time-synchronous average analysis. Moreover, the sensitivity to fault severity is assessed by considering two different depths of the crack. The effect of transducer location and processing options are also shown. In the case of the experimental results considered in this paper, the power cepstrum is practically insensitive to the crack evolution. Conversely, the spectral correlation density function is able to monitor the fault development and does not seem to be significantly influenced by the transducer position. Analysis techniques of the time-synchronous average, such as the 'residual' signal and the demodulation technique, are able to localise the damaged tooth; however, the sensitivity of the demodulation technique is strongly dependent on the proper choice of the filtering band and affected by the transducer location. The wavelet transform seems to be a good tool for crack detection; it is particularly effective if the residual part of the time-synchronous averaged signal is processed.

  18. Early Detection of Gear Tooth Cracking Using the Resonance Demodulation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenyi

    2001-09-01

    The resonance demodulation technique has been extensively used for rolling bearing diagnostics. This paper presents a scheme of using the resonance demodulation technique for early detection of gear tooth cracks. The objective is to supplement the current techniques of gearbox fault diagnosis based on the synchronous signal averaging technique. The proposed scheme focuses on the fact that gear tooth crack will produce vibration impacts that would excite the structural resonances when the cracked tooth is engaged. Using this scheme, the regular gear meshing harmonics are first removed from the synchronous signal average to generate the residual signal. The residual signal is then band-pass filtered around a structural resonance within the range of gear meshing harmonics. The bandpassed residual signal is demodulated to extract the features related to the crack-induced sudden change in a complete revolution of the gear of interest. A number of statistical measures can then be used on the demodulated signal as an indicator on the existence and status of the crack. In this paper, an analytic signal model is also proposed to describe the gear meshing signal and its processing, the resonance demodulation technique is presented based on the signal model. The method is validated using numerically simulated data, test data from a gear rig, and helicopter in-flight vibration data. The results show that the resonance demodulation technique is an effective tool for the early detection of gear tooth cracks.

  19. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  20. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Snyder, Sarah J. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems may provide for a structure having a plurality of interconnected panels, wherein each panel has a plurality of detection layers separated from one another by one or more non-detection layers. The plurality of detection layers may form a grid of conductive traces. Additionally, a monitor may be coupled to each grid of conductive traces, wherein the monitor is configured to detect damage to the plurality of interconnected panels in response to an electrical property change with respect to one or more of the conductive traces. In one example, the structure is part of an inflatable space platform such as a spacecraft or habitat.

  1. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Lewis, Mark E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Snyder, Sarah J. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Parks, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems may provide for a structure having a plurality of interconnected panels, wherein each panel has a plurality of detection layers separated from one another by one or more non-detection layers. The plurality of detection layers may form a grid of conductive traces. Additionally, a monitor may be coupled to each grid of conductive traces, wherein the monitor is configured to detect damage to the plurality of interconnected panels in response to an electrical property change with respect to one or more of the conductive traces. In one example, the structure is part of an inflatable space platform such as a spacecraft or habitat.

  2. Damage and partitioned mortality of teleosts discarded from two Australian penaeid fishing gears.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Sebastian S; Broadhurst, Matt K

    2007-07-16

    Six field experiments were perfromed to (1) quantify the scale loss and partitioned (immediate and short-term) mortality of key teleosts discarded from a penaeid seiner and trawler operating in 2 estuaries in southeastern Australia, and (2) assess the utility of modified operational and/or onboard handling procedures for maximising survival. For both gears, several non-target species were caught, handled and discarded according to 2 general categories of treatment ('mild' and 'extreme') representing the plausible limits of severity of commercial operations. The mild treatments involved the shortest conventional deployments of the gears followed by the immediate sorting of catches in water-filled trays, while the extreme treatments comprised the longest conventional deployments and sorting in dry trays. Discards were examined for immediate mortalities and scale loss before sorting onboard, while live individuals of key species, along with appropriate numbers of controls, were released into sea cages and monitored for mortalities up to 5 d. For both gears, there was a trend of higher percentages of immediate mortalities in the extreme treatments, and more scale loss from dead than live seined and trawled silver biddy Gerres subfasciatus, seined tarwhine Rhabdosargus sarba and trawled yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis. Despite considerable interspecific variabilities, few intraspecific differences were detected between treatments for the short-term mortalities of live discards; however, for all species, these deaths were greater than those incurred by the controls (most of which survived). The partitioned mortality estimates were combined to provide a range of total mortalities for seined (95.97 and 99.07%, respectively) and trawled (71.74 and 97.64%) G. subfasciatus, seined R. sarba (23.95 and 100%) and trawled southern herring Herklotsichthys castelnaui (100%) and A. australis (3.40 and 35.01%). Because most deaths occurred irrespective of onboard handling

  3. Natural Fatigue Crack Initiation and Detection in High Quality Spur Gears

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Natural Fatigue Crack Initiation and Detection in High Quality Spur Gears by David “Blake” Stringer, Ph.D., Kelsen E. LaBerge, Ph.D., Cory...0383 June 2012 Natural Fatigue Crack Initiation and Detection in High Quality Spur Gears David “Blake” Stringer and Ph.D., Kelsen E. LaBerge...Quality Spur Gears 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David “Blake” Stringer, Ph.D., Kelsen E

  4. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.

  5. Analytical and Experimental Vibration Analysis of a Faulty Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Braun, M. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure was developed for predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions. A gear tooth fault model is developed to simulate the effects of pitting and wear on the vibration signal under normal operating conditions. The model uses changes in the gear mesh stiffness to simulate the effects of gear tooth faults. The overall dynamics of the gear transmission system is evaluated by coupling the dynamics of each individual gear-rotor system through gear mesh forces generated between each gear-rotor system and the bearing forces generated between the rotor and the gearbox structure. The predicted results were compared with experimental results obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. The Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) was used to give a comprehensive comparison of the predicted and experimental results. The WVD method applied to the experimental results were also compared to other fault detection techniques to verify the WVD's ability to detect the pitting damage, and to determine its relative performance. Overall results show good correlation between the experimental vibration data of the damaged test gear and the predicted vibration from the model with simulated gear tooth pitting damage. Results also verified that the WVD method can successfully detect and locate gear tooth wear and pitting damage.

  6. Evaluation of MEMS-Based Wireless Accelerometer Sensors in Detecting Gear Tooth Faults in Helicopter Transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David George; Lambert, Nicholas A.; Wagoner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostics capability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based rotating accelerometer sensors in detecting gear tooth crack failures in helicopter main-rotor transmissions was evaluated. MEMS sensors were installed on a pre-notched OH-58C spiral-bevel pinion gear. Endurance tests were performed and the gear was run to tooth fracture failure. Results from the MEMS sensor were compared to conventional accelerometers mounted on the transmission housing. Most of the four stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing and most of the CI's used gave indications of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS system performed well and lasted the entire test. All MEMS accelerometers gave an indication of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS systems performed as well, if not better, than the stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing with regards to gear tooth fault detection. For both the MEMS sensors and stationary sensors, the fault detection time was not much sooner than the actual tooth fracture time. The MEMS sensor spectrum data showed large first order shaft frequency sidebands due to the measurement rotating frame of reference. The method of constructing a pseudo tach signal from periodic characteristics of the vibration data was successful in deriving a TSA signal without an actual tach and proved as an effective way to improve fault detection for the MEMS.

  7. Analysis of the vibratory excitation of gear systems for fault detection in rotating machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, B.A.; Esat, I.I.; Badi, M.N.M.

    1997-07-01

    The concepts of model-based fault detection for vibration condition monitoring of rotating machinery are discussed and presented in this paper. The mathematical model presented and fully developed in the earlier works is further modified so it incorporates a typical gear tooth irregularity fault. This fault was simulated on the contact line of the gear model. The results obtained from this analytical model are compared with the ones obtained from a model drive-line. The drive-line consists of a number of rotating parts including an electric motor, a gear system, and a disk brake. The gear system has two meshing spur gears which is equivalent to the analytical model. The comparison of the results are very good as some vibration frequencies of the analytical results correlates with the experimental ones. it is shown that certain vibration frequencies of a real experimental model gear system can be obtained from its analytical counterpart. It is also shown that it is possible to model a typical gear tooth fault by simulating a forcing function as a shock to the modelled system.

  8. Research of HCR Gearing Properties from Warm Scuffing Damage Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanović, Siniša; Rackov, Milan; Vereš, Miroslav; Krajčovič, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The issue of design and dimensioning of HCR gearing, particularly of the gearings with an internal engagement, it nowadays, especially in the design of hybrid cars drives, highly topical. This kind of gearing has many advantages in operation, but at the same time it is more complicated in stage of its design and load capacity calculation. Authors in this contribution present some results of temperature scuffing research of internal and external HCR gearing. There are given the equations for calculation of warm scuffing resistance of both external and internal HCR gearing derived according to the integral temperature criterion.

  9. Gear-box fault detection using time-frequency based methods

    SciTech Connect

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Gear-box fault monitoring and detection is important for optimization of power generation and availability of wind turbines. The current industrial approach is to use condition monitoring systems, which runs in parallel with the wind turbine control system, using expensive additional sensors. An alternative would be to use the existing measurements which are normally available for the wind turbine control system. The usage of these sensors instead would cut down the cost of the wind turbine by not using additional sensors. One of these available measurements is the generator speed, in which changes in the gear-box resonance frequency can be detected. Two different time-frequency based approaches are presented in this paper. One is a filter based approach and the other is based on a Karhunen-Loeve basis. Both of them detects the gear-box fault with an acceptable detection delay.

  10. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Ummat, Ajay; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-30

    This paper discusses about the relevance of detecting space radiations which are very harmful and pose numerous health issues for astronauts. There are many ways to detect radiations, but we present a non-invasive way of detecting them in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one such concept where we propose to detect various levels of space radiations depending on their intensity and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as 'radiation-responsive molecular assembly' (RMA) for the detection of space radiations. Our objective is to create a device which could detect space radiations by creating an environment equivalent to human cells within its structure and bio-chemically sensing the effects induced therein. For creating such an environment and further bio-chemically sensing space radiations bio-nano systems could be potentially used. These bio-nano systems could interact with radiations and signal based on the intensity of the radiations their relative biological effectiveness. Based on the energy and kind of radiation encountered, a matrix of signals has to be created which corresponds to a particular biological effect. The key advantage of such a design is its ability to interact with the radiation at e molecular scale; characterize its intensity based on energy deposition and relate it to the relative biological effectiveness based on the correspondence established through molecular structures and bond strengths of the bio-nano system.

  11. An investigation of rolling-sliding contact fatigue damage of carburized gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Patrick C.

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the differences in RSCF performance between vacuum and gas carburized steels as well as to investigate the evolution of damage (wear and microstructure changes) leading to pitting. Vacuum and gas carburizing was performed on two gear steels (4120 and 4320) at 1010°C. The carburized specimens were tested in the as-carburized condition using a RSCF machine designed and built at the Colorado School of Mines. The tests were conducted at 3.2 GPa nominal Hertzian contact stress, based on pure rolling, 100°C, and using a negative twenty percent slide ratio. Tests were conducted to pitting failure for each condition for a comparison of the average fatigue lives. Pure rolling tests were also conducted, and were suspended at the same number of cycles as the average RSCF life for a comparison of fatigue damage developed by RCF and RSCF. Incremental tests were suspended at 1,000, 10,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles for the vacuum carburized steels to evaluate the wear and damage developed during the initial cycles of RSCF testing and to relate the wear and damage to pitting resistance. Incremental damage was not investigated for gas carburizing due to the limited number of available specimens. The vacuum carburized samples showed a decreased pitting fatigue resistance over the gas carburized samples, possibly due to the presence of bainite in the vacuum carburized cases. Pitting was observed to initiate from surface micropitting and microcracking. A microstructural change induced by contact fatigue, butterflies, was shown to contribute to micropitting and microcracking. Incremental testing revealed that the formation of a microcrack preceded and was necessary for the formation of the butterfly features, and that the butterfly features developed between 10,000 and 100,000 cycles. The orientation and depth of butterfly formation was shown to be dependent upon the application of traction stresses from sliding. RSCF butterflies formed

  12. Progressive damage detection using noncontact measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatappa, Suhas; Petro, Samer H.; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents work in progress toward the development of a bridge condition assessment system. The system combines remote laser vibration sensing technology and a strain-energy- based damage detection algorithm. The results from vibration tests conducted on laboratory specimens with different degrees of damage are presented. The vibration signatures are acquired using Scanning Laser Vibrometers (SLV). The extracted mode shapes from these tests are then used in the damage detection algorithm. The preliminary results indicate that the strain energy differences are highly sensitive to damage, and can be used to locate and distinguish progressive damages. The combination of SLV technology and the damage detection algorithm makes remote sensing attractive for the monitoring and inspection of structures. Finite element simulation of a progressive damage at a single location is also presented to illustrate the sensitivity of the algorithm to increasing damages.

  13. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  14. Remote structural damage detection via substructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, William B.; Ibanez, Paul; Yessaie, George

    1988-01-01

    An approach to structural damage detection which utilizes the concept of a substructure transfer function matrix is proposed. The major advantage of this approach is that structural changes localized within a small volume can be detected by studying the changes in the transfer function for a relatively small substructure containing the damaged portion.

  15. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  16. Remote detection of forest damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Vogelmann, A. F.; Hoshizaki, T.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to discriminate, measure, and map forest damage is evaluated. TM spectal coverage, a helicopter-mounted radiometer, and ground-based surveys were utilized to examine the responses of the spruces and firs of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont to stresses, such as pollution and trace metals. The basic spectral properties of vegetation are described. Forest damage at the site was estimated as 11.8-76.0 percent for the spruces and 19-43.8 percent for the balsam firs. Shifts in the spectra of the conifers in particular in the near IR region are analyzed, and variations in the mesophyll cell anatomy and pigment content of the spruces and firs are investigated. The relations between canopy moisture and damage is studied. The TM data are compared to aircraft data and found to be well correlated.

  17. Remote detection of forest damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Vogelmann, A. F.; Hoshizaki, T.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to discriminate, measure, and map forest damage is evaluated. TM spectal coverage, a helicopter-mounted radiometer, and ground-based surveys were utilized to examine the responses of the spruces and firs of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont to stresses, such as pollution and trace metals. The basic spectral properties of vegetation are described. Forest damage at the site was estimated as 11.8-76.0 percent for the spruces and 19-43.8 percent for the balsam firs. Shifts in the spectra of the conifers in particular in the near IR region are analyzed, and variations in the mesophyll cell anatomy and pigment content of the spruces and firs are investigated. The relations between canopy moisture and damage is studied. The TM data are compared to aircraft data and found to be well correlated.

  18. Detection of insect damage in almonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soowon; Schatzki, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Pinhole insect damage in natural almonds is very difficult to detect on-line. Further, evidence exists relating insect damage to aflatoxin contamination. Hence, for quality and health reasons, methods to detect and remove such damaged nuts are of great importance in this study, we explored the possibility of using x-ray imaging to detect pinhole damage in almonds by insects. X-ray film images of about 2000 almonds and x-ray linescan images of only 522 pinhole damaged almonds were obtained. The pinhole damaged region appeared slightly darker than non-damaged region in x-ray negative images. A machine recognition algorithm was developed to detect these darker regions. The algorithm used the first order and the second order information to identify the damaged region. To reduce the possibility of false positive results due to germ region in high resolution images, germ detection and removal routines were also included. With film images, the algorithm showed approximately an 81 percent correct recognition ratio with only 1 percent false positives whereas line scan images correctly recognized 65 percent of pinholes with about 9 percent false positives. The algorithms was very fast and efficient requiring only minimal computation time. If implemented on line, theoretical throughput of this recognition system would be 66 nuts/second.

  19. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  20. Angular velocity-based structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yizheng; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Rajagopal, Ram; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    Damage detection is an important application of structural health monitoring. With the recent development of sensing technology, additional information about structures, angular velocity, has become available. In this paper, the angular velocity signals obtained from gyroscopes are modeled as an autoregressive (AR) model. The damage sensitive features (DSFs) are defined as a function of the AR coefficients. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Also, we show that the angular velocity- based AR model has a linear relationship with the acceleration-based AR model. To test the proposed damage detection method, the algorithm has been tested with the experimental data from a recent shake table test where the damage is introduced systemically. The results indicate that the change of DSF means is statistically significant, and the angular velocity-based DSFs are sensitive to damage.

  1. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis1. Whether tissues utilize other cues besides cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis via a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity. By this mechanism, cell-swelling likely functions as a pro-inflammatory intermediate. PMID:23934216

  2. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-09-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis. Whether tissues use other cues in addition to cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis through a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity, with cell swelling probably functioning as a pro-inflammatory intermediate in the process.

  3. Eigenstructure assignment approach for structural damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, David C.; Kaouk, Mohamed

    1992-01-01

    In this work, a methodology for incorporating measured modal data into an existing refined finite element model is examined with the objective of detecting and locating structural damage. The algorithm is based on the partial inverse problem, in that only partial spectral information is required. The technique utilizes a symmetric eigenstructure assignment algorithm to perform the partial spectral assignment. Algorithms to enhance mode shape assignability and to preserve sparsity in the damaged FEM are developed. The sparsity preservation is of particular importance when considering damage detection in trusslike structures. Several examples are presented to highlight the key points made within the paper.

  4. Ozone damage detection in cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone causes up to 90 percent of air pollution injury to vegetation in the United States; excess ozone affects plant growth and development and can cause undetected decrease in yields. Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than did nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants which were lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35- to 2.5 micron near-infrared water absorption waveband. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 h before the damage was visible. Sensors are available for use with aircraft and spacecraft that possibly could be used routinely to detect ozone-damaged crops.

  5. Ozone damage detection in cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone causes up to 90 percent of air pollution injury to vegetation in the United States; excess ozone affects plant growth and development and can cause undetected decrease in yields. Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than did nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants which were lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35- to 2.5 micron near-infrared water absorption waveband. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 h before the damage was visible. Sensors are available for use with aircraft and spacecraft that possibly could be used routinely to detect ozone-damaged crops.

  6. Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Lane, John; Medelius, Pedro; Snyder, Sarah; Ciarlariello, Dan; Parks, Steve; Carrejo, Danny; Rojdev, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Flat Surface Damage Detection system (FSDDS} is a sensory system that is capable of detecting impact damages to surfaces utilizing a novel sensor system. This system will provide the ability to monitor the integrity of an inflatable habitat during in situ system health monitoring. The system consists of three main custom designed subsystems: the multi-layer sensing panel, the embedded monitoring system, and the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI LABVIEW software uses a custom developed damage detection algorithm to determine the damage location based on the sequence of broken sensing lines. It estimates the damage size, the maximum depth, and plots the damage location on a graph. Successfully demonstrated as a stand alone technology during 2011 D-RATS. Software modification also allowed for communication with HDU avionics crew display which was demonstrated remotely (KSC to JSC} during 2012 integration testing. Integrated FSDDS system and stand alone multi-panel systems were demonstrated remotely and at JSC, Mission Operations Test using Space Network Research Federation (SNRF} network in 2012. FY13, FSDDS multi-panel integration with JSC and SNRF network Technology can allow for integration with other complementary damage detection systems.

  7. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  8. Immunochemical detection of oxidatively damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Sram, Radim J

    2012-04-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA is implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases as well as aging. Several methods have been developed to detect oxidatively damaged DNA. They include chromatographic techniques, the Comet assay, (32)P-postlabelling and immunochemical methods that use antibodies to detect oxidized lesions. In this review, we discuss the detection of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-29-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), the most abundant oxidized nucleoside. This lesion is frequently used as a marker of exposure to oxidants, including environmental pollutants, as well as a potential marker of disease progression. We concentrate on studies published between the years 2000 and 2011 that used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry to detect 8-oxodG in humans, laboratory animals and in cell lines. Oxidative damage observed in these organisms resulted from disease, exposure to environmental pollutants or from in vitro treatment with various chemical and physical factors.

  9. Investigation on experimental techniques to detect, locate and quantify gear noise in helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Atherton, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A robotic system to automate the detection, location, and quantification of gear noise using acoustic intensity measurement techniques has been successfully developed. Major system components fabricated under this grant include an instrumentation robot arm, a robot digital control unit and system software. A commercial, desktop computer, spectrum analyzer and two microphone probe complete the equipment required for the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System (RAIMS). Large-scale acoustic studies of gear noise in helicopter transmissions cannot be performed accurately and reliably using presently available instrumentation and techniques. Operator safety is a major concern in certain gear noise studies due to the operating environment. The man-hours needed to document a noise field in situ is another shortcoming of present techniques. RAIMS was designed to reduce the labor and hazard in collecting data and to improve the accuracy and repeatability of characterizing the acoustic field by automating the measurement process. Using RAIMS a system operator can remotely control the instrumentation robot to scan surface areas and volumes generating acoustic intensity information using the two microphone technique. Acoustic intensity studies requiring hours of scan time can be performed automatically without operator assistance. During a scan sequence, the acoustic intensity probe is positioned by the robot and acoustic intensity data is collected, processed, and stored.

  10. Structural damage detection using information fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.

    2006-07-01

    In order to precisely identify the multiple damage locations of a structure, an information fusion technique is proposed in this paper. First, the frequency data and the mode shape data are regarded as two different information sources, and local decisions can be obtained using the multiple damage location assurance criterion (MDLAC) method and the frequency change damage detection method (FCDDM), respectively. Then, the local decisions are sent to a fusion centre. In the fusion centre, three main fusion approaches are applied to integrate all the local decisions. Finally, a global decision is acquired. The measurement errors are also taken into account in the fusion process. The numerical example and analysis demonstrate that the identification results of the three information fusion methods are better than those of the MDLAC method and the frequency change damage detection method.

  11. Damage detection in a framed building structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Pines, Darryll J.

    1999-05-01

    Interest in infrastructure health monitoring and damage detection has received a considerable amount of attention over the past two decades. Previous approaches to non- destructive evaluation of structures to assess their integrity typically involved some form of human interaction. Recent advances in smart materials and structures technology has resulted in a renewed interest in developing advanced self-diagnostic capability for assessing the state of a structure without any human interaction. The goal is to reduce human interaction while at the same time monitor the integrity of a structure. With this goal in mind, many researchers have made significant strides in developing damage detection methods for civil structures based on traditional modal analysis techniques. These techniques are of the well suited for structures which can be modeled by discrete lumped-parameter elements where the presence of damage leads to some low frequency change in the global behavior of the system. On the other hand small defects such as cracks are obscured by modal approaches since such phenomena are high frequency effects not easily discovered by examining changes in modal mass, stiffness or damping parameters. This is because at high frequency modal structural models are subject to uncertainty. This uncertainty can be reduced by increasing the spatial order of discrete model, however, this increases the computational effort of modal-based damage detection schemes. On the other hand, wave propagation models of structures have higher spatial order model fidelity. Thus, they are better suited for detecting and global wave propagation models to detect damage in a discrete model of a farmed building structure, consisting of discrete structural elements. Simulated damage in the form of mass or stiffness loss is used to determine the effect on the resonant and incident wave response of the structure. Examination of the incident transfer function response of the structure reveals the

  12. Damage detection using scanning laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shen-En; Venkatappa, Suhas; Petro, Samer H.; Gangarao, Hota V.

    1998-06-01

    A damage detection algorithm based on the principle of curvature changes has been developed at CFC-WVU. However, the algorithm requires accurate mode shapes with adequate spatial density. Existing contact sensors can not provide adequate spatial density without adding excessive mass. Hence, non-contact scanning techniques, such as scanning laser vibrometer (SLV) has adequate sensitivity and accuracy is yet to be proven. The applicability of SLV on large structures is also questionable. To assess the suitability of using SLV for damage detection, a beam specimen has been tested using an existing system. The results confirm that damage detection using vibration measurements from SLV is successful. Due to more spatial density, the SLV data is shown to be more sensitive than the contact sensor test.

  13. At-sea detection of derelict fishing gear in the North Pacific: an overview.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Carey; McElwee, Kris

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous known impacts of derelict fishing gear (DFG) to marine ecosystems and safe navigation around the world. To mitigate these impacts, the preemptive detection and removal of DFG at sea are being pursued. This special issue focuses on the North Pacific Ocean because of historic and ongoing research on DFG in the area, particularly as it relates to the Hawaiian Archipelago. In order to develop an effective detection strategy, information and expertise from three disciplines must be integrated: marine debris, oceanography, and remote sensing technology. Building upon results and discussions during a workshop held in December 2008, this special issue provides both results of original research and review papers, pursuing each discipline as it relates to DFG and outlining a multi-faceted strategy to effectively detect DFG at sea. This strategy serves as a roadmap, taking us closer to realizing the goal of detecting and removing DFG at sea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  15. Automobile differential gear system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, M.; Hamada, Y.; Nimomiya, M.; Takechi, T.; Fujii, T.

    1987-01-06

    This patent describes an automobile differential gear system comprising: a differential gear including a differential gear case to which a torque of the propeller shaft is transmitted through a gear wheel, pinions mounted on the differential gear case for revolution together with the differential gear case and for rotation on their axes. The gear wheels are capable of being rotated by the composite rotative action of the rotation of the pinions and the revolution of the differential gear case; a steering angle detecting unit for detecting a steering angle; a driving speed detecting unit for detecting the revolving speed of the differential gear case; a pinion speed control unit which receives signals from the steering angle detecting unit and the driving speed detecting unit and provides a control signal corresponding to the input signals for controlling the differential rotation of the right and left gear wheels; and a pinion driving unit for rotating the pinions to control the respective revolving speed of the right and the left gear wheels according to the control signal given thereto by the pinion speed control unit.

  16. Enhancement of autoregressive model based gear tooth fault detection technique by the use of minimum entropy deconvolution filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, H.; Randall, R. B.

    2007-02-01

    This paper proposes the use of the minimum entropy deconvolution (MED) technique to enhance the ability of the existing autoregressive (AR) model based filtering technique to detect localised faults in gears. The AR filter technique has been proven superior for detecting localised gear tooth faults than the traditionally used residual analysis technique. The AR filter technique is based on subtracting a regular gearmesh signal, as represented by the toothmesh harmonics and immediately adjacent sidebands, from the spectrum of a signal from one gear obtained by the synchronous signal averaging technique (SSAT). The existing AR filter technique performs well but is based on autocorrelation measurements and is thus insensitive to phase relationships which can be used to differentiate noise from impulses. The MED technique can make a use of the phase information by means of the higher-order statistical (HOS) characteristics of the signal, in particular the kurtosis, to enhance the ability to detect emerging gear tooth faults. The experimental results presented in this paper validate the superior performance of the combined AR and MED filtering techniques in detecting spalls and tooth fillet cracks in gears.

  17. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Tate, Lanetra C. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Gibson, Tracy L. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An in-situ system for detecting damage in an electrically conductive wire. The system includes a substrate at least partially covered by a layer of electrically conductive material forming a continuous or non-continuous electrically conductive layer connected to an electrical signal generator adapted to delivering electrical signals to the electrically conductive layer. Data is received and processed to identify damage to the substrate or electrically conductive layer. The electrically conductive material may include metalized carbon fibers, a thin metal coating, a conductive polymer, carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles or a combination thereof.

  18. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Tate, Lanetra; Smith, Trent; Gibson, Tracy; Medelius, Pedro; Jolley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    An In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System (ISWDDS) has been developed that is capable of detecting damage to a wire insulation, or a wire conductor, or to both. The system will allow for realtime, continuous monitoring of wiring health/integrity and reduce the number of false negatives and false positives while being smaller, lighter in weight, and more robust than current systems. The technology allows for improved safety and significant reduction in maintenance hours for aircraft, space vehicles, satellites, and other critical high-performance wiring systems for industries such as energy production and mining. The integrated ISWDDS is comprised of two main components: (1) a wire with an innermost core conductor, an inner insulation film, a conductive layer or inherently conductive polymer (ICP) covering the inner insulation film, an outermost insulation jacket; and (2) smart connectors and electronics capable of producing and detecting electronic signals, and a central processing unit (CPU) for data collection and analysis. The wire is constructed by applying the inner insulation films to the conductor, followed by the outer insulation jacket. The conductive layer or ICP is on the outer surface of the inner insulation film. One or more wires are connected to the CPU using the smart connectors, and up to 64 wires can be monitored in real-time. The ISWDDS uses time domain reflectometry for damage detection. A fast-risetime pulse is injected into either the core conductor or conductive layer and referenced against the other conductor, producing transmission line behavior. If either conductor is damaged, then the signal is reflected. By knowing the speed of propagation of the pulse, and the time it takes to reflect, one can calculate the distance to and location of the damage.

  19. Current Status of Hybrid Bearing Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    Advances in material development and processing have led to the introduction of ceramic hybrid bearings for many applications. The introduction of silicon nitride hybrid bearings into the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, on the space shuttle main engine, led NASA to solve a highly persistent and troublesome bearing problem. Hybrid bearings consist of ceramic balls and steel races. The majority of hybrid bearings utilize Si3N4 balls. The aerospace industry is currently studying the use of hybrid bearings and naturally the failure modes of these bearings become an issue in light of the limited data available. In today s turbine engines and helicopter transmissions, the health of the bearings is detected by the properties of the debris found in the lubrication line when damage begins to occur. Current oil debris sensor technology relies on the magnetic properties of the debris to detect damage. Since the ceramic rolling elements of hybrid bearings have no metallic properties, a new sensing system must be developed to indicate the system health if ceramic components are to be safely implemented in aerospace applications. The ceramic oil debris sensor must be capable of detecting ceramic and metallic component damage with sufficient reliability and forewarning to prevent a catastrophic failure. The objective of this research is to provide a background summary on what is currently known about hybrid bearing failure modes and to report preliminary results on the detection of silicon nitride debris, in oil, using a commercial particle counter.

  20. Integrating Condition Indicators and Usage Parameters for Improved Spiral Bevel Gear Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Delgado, Irebert, R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the importance of combining Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) data with usage monitoring system data when detecting rotorcraft transmission health. Three gear sets were tested in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig. Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Damage progression was measured by debris generation and documented with inspection photos at varying torque values. A contact fatigue analysis was applied to the gear design indicating the effect temperature, load and reliability had on gear life. Results of this study illustrated the benefits of combining HUMS data and actual usage data to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears.

  1. Integrating Condition Indicators and Usage Parameters for Improved Spiral Bevel Gear Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the importance of combining Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) data with usage monitoring system data when detecting rotorcraft transmission health. Six gear sets were tested in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig. Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Damage progression was measured by debris generation and documented with inspection photos at varying torque values. A contact fatigue analysis was applied to the gear design indicating the effect temperature, load and reliability had on gear life. Results of this study illustrated the benefits of combining HUMS data and actual usage data to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears.

  2. Integrating Condition Indicators and Usage Parameters for Improved Spiral Bevel Gear Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to illustrate the importance of combining Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) data with usage monitoring system data when detecting rotorcraft transmission health. Six gear sets were tested in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig. Damage was initiated and progressed on the gear and pinion teeth. Damage progression was measured by debris generation and documented with inspection photos at varying torque values. A contact fatigue analysis was applied to the gear design indicating the effect temperature, load and reliability had on gear life. Results of this study illustrated the benefits of combining HUMS data and actual usage data to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears.

  3. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  4. Immunochemical detection of glyoxal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mistry, N; Evans, M D; Griffiths, H R; Kasai, H; Herbert, K E; Lunec, J

    1999-05-01

    The relevance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases is widely documented. Immunochemical detection of ROS DNA adducts has been developed, however, recognition of glyoxal-DNA adducts has not previously been described. We have generated a polyclonal antibody that has shown increased antibody binding to ROS-modified DNA in comparison to native DNA. In addition, dose-dependent antibody binding to DNA modified with ascorbate alone was shown, with significant inhibition by desferrioxamine, catalase, and ethanol. Minimal inhibition was observed with uric acid, 1,10-phenanthroline and DMSO. However, antibody binding in the presence of EDTA increased 3500-fold. The involvement of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in ascorbate-mediated DNA damage is consistent with ascorbate acting as a reducing agent for DNA-bound metal ions. Glyoxal is known to be formed during oxidation of ascorbate. Glyoxylated DNA, that previously had been proposed as a marker of oxidative damage, was recognised in a dose dependent manner using the antibody. We describe the potential use of our anti-ROS DNA antibody, that detects predominantly Fenton-type mediated damage to DNA and report on its specificity for the recognition of glyoxal-DNA adducts.

  5. An enhancement to the NA4 gear vibration diagnostic parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1994-01-01

    A new vibration diagnostic parameter for health monitoring of gears, NA4*, is proposed and tested. A recently developed gear vibration diagnostic parameter NA4 outperformed other fault detection methods at indicating the start and initial progression of damage. However, in some cases, as the damage progressed, the sensitivity of the NA4 and FM4 parameters tended to decrease and no longer indicated damage. A new parameter, NA4* was developed by enhancing NA4 to improve the trending of the parameter. This allows for the indication of damage both at initiation and also as the damage progresses. The NA4* parameter was verified and compared to the NA4 and FM4 parameters using experimental data from single mesh spur and spiral bevel gear fatigue rigs. The primary failure mode for the test cases was naturally occurring tooth surface pitting. The NA4* parameter is shown to be a more robust indicator of damage.

  6. Beam damage detection using computer vision technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jing; Xu, Xiangjun; Wang, Jialai; Li, Gong

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a new approach for efficient damage detection in engineering structures is introduced. The key concept is to use the mature computer vision technology to capture the static deformation profile of a structure, and then employ profile analysis methods to detect the locations of the damages. By combining with wireless communication techniques, the proposed approach can provide an effective and economical solution for remote monitoring of structure health. Moreover, a preliminary experiment is conducted to verify the proposed concept. A commercial computer vision camera is used to capture the static deformation profiles of cracked cantilever beams under loading. The profiles are then processed to reveal the existence and location of the irregularities on the deformation profiles by applying fractal dimension, wavelet transform and roughness methods, respectively. The proposed concept is validated on both one-crack and two-crack cantilever beam-type specimens. It is also shown that all three methods can produce satisfactory results based on the profiles provided by the vision camera. In addition, the profile quality is the determining factor for the noise level in resultant detection signal.

  7. Using multiple gears to assess acoustic detectability and biomass of fish species in lake superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yule, D.L.; Adams, J.V.; Stockwell, J.D.; Gorman, O.T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent predator demand and prey supply studies suggest that an annual daytime bottom trawl survey of Lake Superior underestimates prey fish biomass. A multiple-gear (acoustics, bottom trawl, and midwater trawl) nighttime survey has been recommended, but before abandoning a long-term daytime survey the effectiveness of night sampling of important prey species must be verified. We sampled three bottom depths (30, 60, and 120 m) at a Lake Superior site where the fish community included all commercially and ecologically important species. Day and night samples were collected within 48 h at all depths during eight different periods (one new and one full moon period during both early summer and late summer to early fall over 2 years). Biomass of demersal and benthic species was higher in night bottom trawl samples than in day bottom trawl samples. Night acoustic collections showed that pelagic fish typically occupied water cooler than 15°C and light levels less than 0.001 lx. Using biomass in night bottom trawls and acoustic biomass above the bottom trawl path, we calculated an index of acoustic detectability for each species. Ciscoes Coregonus artedi, kiyis C. kiyi, and rainbow smeltOsmerus mordax left the bottom at night, whereas bloaters C. hoyi stayed nearer the bottom. We compared the biomass of important prey species estimated with two survey types: day bottom trawls and night estimates of the entire water column (bottom trawl biomass plus acoustic biomass). The biomass of large ciscoes (>200 mm) was significantly greater when measured at night than when measured during daylight, but the differences for other sizes of important species did not vary significantly by survey type. Nighttime of late summer is a period when conditions for biomass estimation are largely invariant, and all important prey species can be sampled using a multiple-gear approach.

  8. Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bornn, Luke; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

  9. Hybrid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.

  10. Wavenumber Imaging For Damage Detection and Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogge, Matthew D.; Johnson, Pat H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for analyzing ultrasonic wavefield data using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) applied in the spatial domain. Unlike data obtained by sparse arrays of transducers, full wavefield data contains information local to the structure and can be used to obtain more detailed measurements of damage type, location, size, etc. By calculating the CWT of the wavefield in the spatial domain, the wavenumber spectrum is determined for the inspected locations. Because wavenumber is affected by the local geometry and material properties of the structure through which Lamb waves propagate, the wavenumber spectrum can be analyzed to assess the location, severity, and size of damage. The technique is first applied to experimental wavefield data obtained using a laser Doppler vibrometer and automated positioning stage. The out-of-plane velocity along the length of a composite stringer was measured to detect the presence of delaminations within the composite overwrap. Next, simulated corrosion is detected and measured within an aluminum plate using the two dimensional CWT. The experimental results show the usefulness of the technique for vehicle structure inspection applications.

  11. Wavenumber imaging for damage detection and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, M. D.; Johnston, P. H.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for analyzing ultrasonic wavefield data using the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) applied in the spatial domain. Unlike data obtained by sparse arrays of transducers, full wavefield data contains information local to the structure and can be used to obtain more detailed measurements of damage type, location, size, etc. By calculating the CWT of the wavefield in the spatial domain, the wavenumber spectrum is determined for the inspected locations. Because wavenumber is affected by the local geometry and material properties of the structure through which Lamb waves propagate, the wavenumber spectrum can be analyzed to assess the location, severity, and size of damage. The technique is first applied to experimental wavefield data obtained using a laser Doppler vibrometer and automated positioning stage. The out-of-plane velocity along the length of a composite stringer was measured to detect the presence of delaminations within the composite overwrap. Next, simulated corrosion is detected and measured within an aluminum plate using the two dimensional CWT. The experimental results show the usefulness of the technique for vehicle structure inspection applications.

  12. Rapid detection of microbial DNA by a novel isothermal genome exponential amplification reaction (GEAR) assay.

    PubMed

    Prithiviraj, Jothikumar; Hill, Vincent; Jothikumar, Narayanan

    2012-04-20

    In this study we report the development of a simple target-specific isothermal nucleic acid amplification technique, termed genome exponential amplification reaction (GEAR). Escherichia coli was selected as the microbial target to demonstrate the GEAR technique as a proof of concept. The GEAR technique uses a set of four primers; in the present study these primers targeted 5 regions on the 16S rRNA gene of E. coli. The outer forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are complementary to each other at their 5' end, whereas their 3' end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The GEAR assay was performed at a constant temperature 60 °C and monitored continuously in a real-time PCR instrument in the presence of an intercalating dye (SYTO 9). The GEAR assay enabled amplification of as few as one colony forming units of E. coli per reaction within 30 min. We also evaluated the GEAR assay for rapid identification of bacterial colonies cultured on agar media directly in the reaction without DNA extraction. Cells from E. coli colonies were picked and added directly to GEAR assay mastermix without prior DNA extraction. DNA in the cells could be amplified, yielding positive results within 15 min.

  13. Vibration-Based Damage Detection in Rotating Machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.

    1999-06-28

    Damage detection as determined from changes in the vibration characteristics of a system has been a popular research topic for the last thirty years. Numerous damage identification algorithms have been proposed for detecting and locating damage in structural and mechanical systems. To date, these damage-detection methods have shown mixed results. A particular application of vibration-based damage detection that has perhaps enjoyed the greatest success is that of damage detection in rotating machinery. This paper summarizes the state of technology in vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery. The review interprets the damage detection process in terms of a statistical pattern recognition paradigm that encompasses all vibration-based damage detection methods and applications. The motivation for the study reported herein is to identify the reasons that vibration-based damage detection has been successfully applied to rotating machinery, but has yet to show robust applications to civil engineering infrastructure. The paper concludes by comparing and contrasting the vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery with large civil engineering infrastructure applications.

  14. Application of spectral kurtosis for detection of a tooth crack in the planetary gear of a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barszcz, Tomasz; Randall, Robert B.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the application of the spectral kurtosis technique for detection of a tooth crack in the planetary gear of a wind turbine. The work originated from a real case of catastrophic gear failure on a wind turbine, which was not detected by currently applied methods. Nevertheless, several sets of complete vibration data were recorded and analyzed. The authors explored a number of methods commonly applied in online vibration monitoring and diagnostic systems. Those methods did not react to the failure until a few minutes before the failure. Then the method of time domain averaging of the meshing vibration is investigated. In this case, however, averaging does not detect any trace of the tooth crack, primarily because of the extreme frequency range (>four decades) of the fault symptoms. The application of the method is shown, and then the limitations of the averaging in such a case are presented and discussed. Finally, the authors propose a method based on spectral kurtosis, which yields good results. This method was able to detect the existence of the tooth crack several weeks before the gear failure.

  15. Gear Fault Signal Detection based on an Adaptive Fractional Fourier Transform Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Shao, Yimin; Zhen, Dong; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Vibration-based fault diagnosis is widely used for gearbox monitoring. However, it often needs considerable effort to extract effective diagnostic feature signal from noisy vibration signals because of rich signal components contained in a complex gear transmission system. In this paper, an adaptive fractional Fourier transform filter is proposed to suppress noise in gear vibration signals and hence to highlight signal components originated from gear fault dynamic characteristics. The approach relies on the use of adaptive filters in the fractional Fourier transform domain with the optimised fractional transform order and the filter parameters, while the transform orders are selected when the signal have the highest energy gathering and the filter parameters are determined by evolutionary rules. The results from the simulation and experiments have verified the performance of the proposed algorithm in extracting the gear failure signal components from the noisy signals based on a multistage gearbox system.

  16. Using Vibration Monitoring for Local Fault Detection on Gears Operating Under Fluctuating Load Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stander, C. J.; Heyns, P. S.; Schoombie, W.

    2002-11-01

    Gearboxes often operate under fluctuating load conditions during service. Conventional techniques for monitoring vibration are based on the assumption that changes in the measured structural response are caused by deterioration in the condition of the gearbox. However, this assumption is not valid for fluctuating load conditions. To find a methodology that could deal with such conditions, experiments were conducted on a gearbox test rig with different levels of tooth damage severity and the capability of applying fluctuating loads to the gear system. Different levels of fluctuation in constant loads as well as in sinusoidal, step and chirp loads were considered. The test data were order tracked and time synchronously averaged with the rotation of the shaft in order to compensate for the variation in rotational speed induced by the fluctuating loads. A pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution was then applied to the test data, in order to identify the influence of the fluctuating load conditions. In this work, a vibration waveform normalisation approach is presented, which enables the use of the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution to indicate deteriorating fault conditions under fluctuating load conditions. Statistical parameters and various other features were extracted from the distribution in order to indicate the linear separation of the values for various fault conditions, after applying the vibration waveform normalisation approach. Feature vectors were compiled for the various fault and load conditions. Mahalanobis distances were calculated between the various feature vectors and an average feature vector was compiled from data measured on the undamaged gearbox. It was proved that the Mahalanobis distance could be used as a single parameter, which can readily be monotonically trended to indicate the progression of a fault condition under fluctuating load conditions. It was shown that a single layer perceptron network could be trained with the perceptron learning rule

  17. Time reversal for damage detection in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yujie; Harley, Joel; Garrett, James H., Jr.; Jin, Yuanwei; Moura, José M. F.; O'Donoughue, Nicholas; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Soibelman, Lucio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring the structural integrity of vast natural gas pipeline networks requires continuous and economical inspection technology. Current approaches for inspecting buried pipelines require periodic excavation of sections of pipe to assess only a couple of hundred meters at a time. These inspection systems for pipelines are temporary and expensive. We propose to use guided-wave ultrasonics with Time Reversal techniques to develop an active sensing and continuous monitoring system. Pipe environments are complex due to the presence of multiple modes and high dispersion. These are treated as adverse effects by most conventional ultrasonic techniques. However, Time Reversal takes advantage of the multi-modal and dispersive behaviors to improve the spatial and temporal wave focusing. In this paper, Time Reversal process is mathematically described and experimentally demonstrated through six laboratory experiments, providing comprehensive and promising results on guided wave focusing in a pipe with/without welded joint, with/without internal pressure, and detection of three defects: lateral, longitudinal and corrosion-like. The experimental results show that Time Reversal can effectively compensate for multiple modes and dispersion in pipes, resulting in an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and effective damage detection ability. As a consequence, Time Reversal shows benefits in long-distance and lowpower pipeline monitoring, as well as potential for applications in other infrastructures.

  18. Structural damage detection using active members and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.

    1994-06-01

    The detection of damage in structures is a topic which has considerable interest in many fields. In the past many methods for detecting damage in structures has relied on finite element model refinement methods. This note presents a structural damage methodology in which only active member transfer function data are used in conjunction with an artificial neural network to detect damage in structures. Specifically, the method relies on training a neural network using active member transfer function pole/zero information to classify damaged structure measurements and to predict the degree of damage in the structure. The method differs from many of the past damage detection algorithms in that no attempt is made to update a finite element model or to match measured data with new finite element analyses of the structure in a damaged state.

  19. Damage Detection in Electrically Conductive Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Todd A.

    2002-12-01

    High-technology systems are in need of structures that perform with increased functionality and a reduction in weight, while simultaneously maintaining a high level of performance and reliability. To accomplish this, structural elements must be designed more efficiently and with increased functionality, thereby creating multifunctional structures (MFS). Through the addition of carbon fibers, nanotubes, or particles, composite structures can be made electrically conductive while simultaneously increasing their strength and stiffness to weight ratios. Using the electrical properties of these structures for the purpose of damage detection and location for health and usage monitoring is of particular interest for aerospace structures. One such method for doing this is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). With EIT, an electric current is applied through a pair of electrodes and the electric potential is recorded at other monitoring electrodes around the area of study. An inverse solution of the governing Maxwell equations is then required to determine the conductivities of discrete areas within the region of interest. However, this method is nearly ill-posed and computationally intensive as it focuses on imaging small changes in conductivity within the region of interest. For locating damage in a medium with an otherwise homogeneous conductivity, an alternative approach is to search for parameters such as the damage location and size. Towards those ends, this study develops an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to determine the state of an electrically conductive region based on applied reference current and electrical potentials at electrodes around the periphery of the region. A significant benefit of the ANN approach is that once trained, the solution of an inverse problem does not require costly computations of the inverse problem. This method also takes advantage of the pattern recognition abilities of neural networks and is a robust solution method in the presence

  20. Damage Detection Sensor System for Aerospace and Multiple Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M.; Lewis, M.; Gibson, T.; Medelius, P.; Lane, J.

    2017-01-01

    The damage detection sensory system is an intelligent damage detection ‘skin’ that can be embedded into rigid or flexible structures, providing a lightweight capability for in-situ health monitoring for applications such as spacecraft, expandable or inflatable structures, extravehicular activities (EVA) suits, smart wearables, and other applications where diagnostic impact damage monitoring might be critical. The sensor systems can be customized for detecting location, damage size, and depth, with velocity options and can be designed for particular environments for monitoring of impact or physical damage to a structure. The operation of the sensor detection system is currently based on the use of parallel conductive traces placed on a firm or flexible surface. Several detection layers can be implemented, where alternate layers are arranged in orthogonal direction with respect to the adjacent layers allowing for location and depth calculations. Increased flexibility of the damage detection sensor system designs will also be introduced.

  1. Rotor health monitoring and damage detection utilizing a disk spin simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a unique, disk spin simulation system currently being utilized at NASA Glenn Research Center. The system allows for precision controlled spin tests that can facilitate the application of various sensing technologies for in-situ detection of rotor damage. In addition, the disk spin simulation system has the capability for elevated temperatures up to 540°C (1000°F). The current rotor used to simulate a bladed disk consists of a 46 cm(18 in.) diameter, titanium disk with 30 machined gear teeth. The gear design imitates the blades of a compressor or turbine disk. Operating speeds for the system can reach 1000 revolutions per minute. This allows the system to achieve circumferential velocities paralleling those seen in actual aircraft engines. For this study, a new, innovative capacitive sensing system was used to monitor blade tip clearance (i.e., gear tooth clearance). In turn, the sensor information was employed to calculate the change in the center of mass of the rotor system. T he capacitive sensor and corresponding software were analyzed by attaching a localized weight at numerous positions on the disk. Upon calculating the change in the center of mass, the sensitivities of the sensor and software were established. In the end, it is hoped that by studying the motion and position of blades as well as the change in the center of mass of a rotor system, it may be feasible to identify alterations due to damage (e.g., cracks) eitehr in the blades or the disk itself.

  2. Electrochemical DNA Sensors for Detection of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Diculescu, Victor Constantin; Paquim, Ana-Maria Chiorcea; Brett, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical devices have received particular attention due to their rapid detection and great sensitivity for the evaluation of DNA-hazard compounds interaction mechanisms. Several types of bioanalytical method use nucleic acids probes to detect DNA damage. This article reviews current directions and strategies in the development and applications of electrochemical DNA sensors for the detection of DNA damage.

  3. Effects on Diagnostic Parameters After Removing Additional Synchronous Gear Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2003-01-01

    Gear cracks are typically difficult to diagnose with sufficient time before catastrophic damage occurs. Significant damage must be present before algorithms appear to be able to detect the damage. Frequently there are multiple gear meshes on a single shaft. Since they are all synchronous with the shaft frequency, the commonly used synchronous averaging technique is ineffective in removing other gear mesh effects. Carefully applying a filter to these extraneous gear mesh frequencies can reduce the overall vibration signal and increase the accuracy of commonly used vibration metrics. The vibration signals from three seeded fault tests were analyzed using this filtering procedure. Both the filtered and unfiltered vibration signals were then analyzed using commonly used fault detection metrics and compared. The tests were conducted on aerospace quality spur gears in a test rig. The tests were conducted at speeds ranging from 2500 to 5000 revolutions per minute and torques from 184 to 228 percent of design load. The inability to detect these cracks with high confidence results from the high loading which is causing fast fracture as opposed to stable crack growth. The results indicate that these techniques do not currently produce an indication of damage that significantly exceeds experimental scatter.

  4. Differential gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiya, S.

    1986-07-29

    A differential for motor vehicles is described and the like comprising, an input drive shaft, a pair of coaxially spaced drive gears simultaneously driven by the input shaft in a same direction at a same speed of rotation about a common axis of rotation, a driven gear driven peripherally by the pair of drive gears for transmission of power from the input drive shaft, two coaxial opposed bevel sun gears having an axis of rotation concentric with an axis of rotation of the driven gear, two planetary gears disposed between the sun gears for differential driving thereof during turns of the vehicle to the right and to the left of each meshing with the sun gears for driving the suns gears. Each planetary gear has a separate axis of rotation carried by the driven gear disposed therein radially and symmetrically relative to the axis of rotation of the sun gears, and each sun gear having a respective power output shaft connected thereto for rotation therewith.

  5. New procedure for gear fault detection and diagnosis using instantaneous angular speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Xining; Wu, Jili

    2017-02-01

    Besides the extreme complexity of gear dynamics, the fault diagnosis results in terms of vibration signal are sometimes easily misled and even distorted by the interference of transmission channel or other components like bearings, bars. Recently, the research field of Instantaneous Angular Speed (IAS) has attracted significant attentions due to its own advantages over conventional vibration analysis. On the basis of IAS signal's advantages, this paper presents a new feature extraction method by combining the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Autocorrelation Local Cepstrum (ALC) for fault diagnosis of sophisticated multistage gearbox. Firstly, as a pre-processing step, signal reconstruction is employed to address the oversampled issue caused by the high resolution of the angular sensor and the test speed. Then the adaptive EMD is used to acquire a number of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). Nevertheless, not all the IMFs are needed for the further analysis since different IMFs have different sensitivities to fault. Hence, the cosine similarity metric is introduced to select the most sensitive IMF. Even though, the sensitive IMF is still insufficient for the gear fault diagnosis due to the weakness of the fault component related to the gear fault. Therefore, as the final step, ALC is used for the purpose of signal de-noising and feature extraction. The effectiveness and robustness of the new approach has been validated experimentally on the basis of two gear test rigs with gears under different working conditions. Diagnosis results show that the new approach is capable of effectively handling the gear fault diagnosis i.e., the highlighted quefrency and its rahmonics corresponding to the rotary period and its multiple are displayed clearly in the cepstrum record of the proposed method.

  6. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  7. Gear shift controller for automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, T.

    1987-01-20

    A gear shift controller is described for an automatic transmission having a gear shift, comprising: a hydraulic torque converter; a gear change group, having a plurality of gears, each gear providing a different transmission ratio for the transmission of power from the hydraulic torque converter to the output of the transmission, each of the gears comprising a gear train; a one-way clutch interposed in at least one of the gear trains; a plurality of clutch means operatively connected with the gear trains for actuating each of the gear trains selectively; a gear change determination circuit operatively connected with the clutch means to control the operation of each of the clutch means according to a predetermined gear shifting program for engaging a gear train selected by the program; a coasting detection circuit for detecting a car in the coasting state; a gear shift limiting circuit, operatively connected with the gear change determination circuit and with the coasting detection circuit. The circuit is for actuating only the gear train in which the one-way clutch is interposed immediately, regardless of the selected gear train and of the operation of the gear change determination circuit, when the coasting detection circuit has determined the car to be coasting; and an operation transfer control system including a brake operation detecting means and a mode selector switch means for transferring the operation of the gear shift limiting circuit. The operation transfer control system is adapted to stop, upon detection of one of the brake operation and a reset state of the mode selector switch, the operation of the gear shift limiting circuit and to place the plurality of clutch means under the control of the gear change determination circuit.

  8. Subsurface damage detection and damage mechanism analysis of chemical-mechanical polished optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yang, Wei; Bi, Guo; Yang, Ping; Guo, Yinbiao

    2014-09-01

    Detection of the subsurface damage depth in optical elements has significance on the subsequent material removal amount and improving element surface quality. The paper focuses on the subsurface damage of chemical-mechanical polished K9 specimen, and analyses the chemical-mechanical polishing mechanism and the cause of subsurface damage. A most suitable etchant is chosen and the step-by-step etching method is applied to measure the subsurface damage depth. A microscope is used to detect the damage morphology and the variation trend at different depth. Research shows that the subsurface damage caused by chemical-mechanical polishing is Hertz scratch, and the scratch quantity below surface presents a variation of zero-more-less-disappeared. The K9 specimen is polished for 3 min under the pressure of 2.5 Kgf and the spindle speed of 43139 r/min, thus resulting in a subsurface damage depth 15.3μm.

  9. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  10. Heat induced damage detection in composite materials by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, Maciej; Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2015-03-01

    In recent years electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) radiation or T-ray has been increasingly used for nondestructive evaluation of various materials such as polymer composites and porous foam tiles in which ultrasonic waves cannot penetrate but T-ray can. Most of these investigations have been limited to mechanical damage detection like inclusions, cracks, delaminations etc. So far only a few investigations have been reported on heat induced damage detection. Unlike mechanical damage the heat induced damage does not have a clear interface between the damaged part and the surrounding intact material from which electromagnetic waves can be reflected back. Difficulties associated with the heat induced damage detection in composite materials using T-ray are discussed in detail in this paper. T-ray measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure of composite specimens.

  11. Gear Tooth Scoring Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    C. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication 20 D. Boundary Lubrication 23 E. Lubrication-Limited Gear Performance 24 F. Impact of Gear Mechanics 25...III. SPUR GEAR MECHANICS 28 A. Spur Gear Kinematics 28 B. Spur Gear Statics 31 C. Spur Gear Dynamics 38 IV. HELICAL GEAR MECHANICS 46 A...Helical Gear Kinematics 46 B. Helical Gear Statics 48 C. Helical Gear Dynamics 50 V. SPIRAL BEVEL GEAR MECHANICS 53 A. Spiral Bevel Gear

  12. Visual endpoint detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using isothermal Genome Exponential Amplification Reaction (GEAR) assay and malachite green.

    PubMed

    Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-03-01

    Rapid and specific detection methods for bacterial agents in drinking water are important for disease prevention and responding to suspected contamination events. In this study, an isothermal Genome Exponential Amplification Reaction (GEAR) assay for Escherichia coli O157:H7 was designed specifically to recognize a 199-bp fragment of the lipopolysaccharide gene (rfbE) for rapid testing of water samples. The GEAR assay was found to be specific for E. coli O157:H7 using 10 isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and a panel of 86 bacterial controls. The GEAR assay was performed at a constant temperature of 65°C using SYTO 9 intercalating dye. Detection limits were determined to be 20 CFU for the GEAR assay. When SYTO 9 fluorescence was measured using a real-time PCR instrument, the assay had the same detection limit as when malachite green was added to the reaction mix and a characteristic blue color was visually observed in positive reactions. The study also found that 50 and 20 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 seeded into 100-liter of tap water could be detected by the GEAR assays after the sample was concentrated by hollow-fiber ultrafiltration (HFUF) and approximately 10% of HFUF concentrate was cultured using trypticase soy broth-novobiocin. When applied to 19 surface water samples collected from Tennessee and Kentucky, the GEAR assay and a published real-time PCR assay both detected E. coli O157:H7 in two of the samples. The results of this study indicate that the GEAR assay can be sensitive for rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7 in water samples using fluorometric instruments and visual endpoint determination.

  13. Damage detection of an in-service condensation pipeline joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, Julie; Rezaei, Davood; Taheri, Farid

    2010-04-01

    The early detection of damage in structural or mechanical systems is of vital importance. With early detection, the damage may be repaired before the integrity of the system is jeopardized, resulting in monetary losses, loss of life or limb, and environmental impacts. Among the various types of structural health monitoring techniques, vibration-based methods are of significant interest since the damage location does not need to be known beforehand, making it a more versatile approach. The non-destructive damage detection method used for the experiments herein is a novel vibration-based method which uses an index called the EMD Energy Damage Index, developed with the aim of providing improved qualitative results compared to those methods currently available. As part of an effort to establish the integrity and limitation of this novel damage detection method, field testing was completed on a mechanical pipe joint on a condensation line, located in the physical plant of Dalhousie University. Piezoceramic sensors, placed at various locations around the joint were used to monitor the free vibration of the pipe imposed through the use of an impulse hammer. Multiple damage progression scenarios were completed, each having a healthy state and multiple damage cases. Subsequently, the recorded signals from the healthy and damaged joint were processed through the EMD Energy Damage Index developed in-house in an effort to detect the inflicted damage. The proposed methodology successfully detected the inflicted damages. In this paper, the effects of impact location, sensor location, frequency bandwidth, intrinsic mode functions, and boundary conditions are discussed.

  14. Application of Damage Detection Techniques Using Wind Turbine Modal Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Rumsey, M.; Simmermacher, T.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-12-17

    As any structure ages, its structural characteristics will also change. The goal of this work was to determine if modal response data fkom a wind turbine could be used in the detection of damage. The input stimuli to the wind turbine were from traditional modal hammer input and natural wind excitation. The structural response data was acquired using accelerometers mounted on the rotor of a parked and undamaged horizontal-axis wind turbine. The bolts at the root of one of the three blades were then loosened to simulate a damaged blade. The structural response data of the rotor was again recorded. The undamaged and damage-simulated datasets were compared using existing darnage detection algorithms. Also, a novel algorithm for combining the results of different damage detection algorithms was utilized in the assessment of the data. This paper summarizes the code development and discusses some preliminary damage detection results.

  15. Damage-detection system for LNG carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastandrea, J. R.; Scherb, M. V.

    1978-01-01

    System utilizes array of acoustical transducers to detect cracks and leaks in liquefied natural gas (LNG) containers onboard ships. In addition to detecting leaks, device indicates location and leak rate.

  16. Detection of Naturally Occurring Gear and Bearing Faults in a Helicopter Drivetrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Drive System test team at the Naval Air Warfare Center. In particular, the authors would like to thank facility engineer Logan Haney for his help in...Fractional load was applied to the main rotor output shaft by two water dynamometers mounted to the facility’s speed-increasing gearbox. The tail rotor...kHz. Though accelerated by exposure to loading in excess of design loads, the gear and bearing faults discovered after testing were naturally

  17. Damage diagnosis algorithm using a sequential change point detection method with an unknown distribution for damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hae Young; Rajagopal, Ram; Kiremidjian, Anne S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper introduces a damage diagnosis algorithm for civil structures that uses a sequential change point detection method for the cases where the post-damage feature distribution is unknown a priori. This algorithm extracts features from structural vibration data using time-series analysis and then declares damage using the change point detection method. The change point detection method asymptotically minimizes detection delay for a given false alarm rate. The conventional method uses the known pre- and post-damage feature distributions to perform a sequential hypothesis test. In practice, however, the post-damage distribution is unlikely to be known a priori. Therefore, our algorithm estimates and updates this distribution as data are collected using the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian methods. We also applied an approximate method to reduce the computation load and memory requirement associated with the estimation. The algorithm is validated using multiple sets of simulated data and a set of experimental data collected from a four-story steel special moment-resisting frame. Our algorithm was able to estimate the post-damage distribution consistently and resulted in detection delays only a few seconds longer than the delays from the conventional method that assumes we know the post-damage feature distribution. We confirmed that the Bayesian method is particularly efficient in declaring damage with minimal memory requirement, but the maximum likelihood method provides an insightful heuristic approach.

  18. Local Regularity Analysis with Wavelet Transform in Gear Tooth Failure Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissilä, Juhani

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosing gear tooth and bearing failures in industrial power transition situations has been studied a lot but challenges still remain. This study aims to look at the problem from a more theoretical perspective. Our goal is to find out if the local regularity i.e. smoothness of the measured signal can be estimated from the vibrations of epicyclic gearboxes and if the regularity can be linked to the meshing events of the gear teeth. Previously it has been shown that the decreasing local regularity of the measured acceleration signals can reveal the inner race faults in slowly rotating bearings. The local regularity is estimated from the modulus maxima ridges of the signal's wavelet transform. In this study, the measurements come from the epicyclic gearboxes of the Kelukoski water power station (WPS). The very stable rotational speed of the WPS makes it possible to deduce that the gear mesh frequencies of the WPS and a frequency related to the rotation of the turbine blades are the most significant components in the spectra of the estimated local regularity signals.

  19. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  20. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  1. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  2. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  3. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  4. Structural damage detection by fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Samuel; Dias Júnior, Milton; Lopes Junior, Vicente; Brennan, Michael J.

    2008-10-01

    The development of strategies for structural health monitoring (SHM) has become increasingly important because of the necessity of preventing undesirable damage. This paper describes an approach to this problem using vibration data. It involves a three-stage process: reduction of the time-series data using principle component analysis (PCA), the development of a data-based model using an auto-regressive moving average (ARMA) model using data from an undamaged structure, and the classification of whether or not the structure is damaged using a fuzzy clustering approach. The approach is applied to data from a benchmark structure from Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. Two fuzzy clustering algorithms are compared: fuzzy c-means (FCM) and Gustafson-Kessel (GK) algorithms. It is shown that while both fuzzy clustering algorithms are effective, the GK algorithm marginally outperforms the FCM algorithm.

  5. Oxidative base damage in RNA detected by reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Y; Valentine, M R; Termini, J

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative base damage in DNA and metabolic defects in the recognition and removal of such damage play important roles in mutagenesis and human disease. The extent to which cellular RNA is a substrate for oxidative damage and the possible biological consequences of RNA base oxidation, however, remain largely unexplored. Since oxidatively modified RNA may contribute to the high mutability of retroviral genomic DNA, we have been interested in developing methods for the sequence specific detection of such damage. We show here that a primer extension assay using AMV reverse transcriptase (RT) can be used to reveal oxidatively damaged sites in RNA. This finding extends the currently known range of RNA modifications detectable with AMV reverse transcriptase. Analogous assays using DNA polymerases to detect base damage in DNA substrates appear to be restricted to lesions at thymine. Oxidative base damage in the absence of any detectable chain breaks was produced by dye photosensitization of RNA. Six out of 20 dyes examined were capable of producing RT detectable lesions. RT stops were seen predominantly at purines, although many pyrimidine sites were also detected. Dye specific photofootprints revealed by RT analysis suggests differential dye binding to the RNA substrate. Some of the photoreactive dyes described here may have potential utility in RNA structural analysis, particularly in the identification of stem-loop regions in complex RNAs. Images PMID:7545285

  6. Damage detection and health monitoring of operational structures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Reese, G.

    1994-09-01

    Initial damage detection/health monitoring experiments have been performed on three different operational structures: a fracture critical bridge, a composite wind turbine blade, and an aging aircraft. An induced damage test was performed on the Rio Grande/I40 bridge before its demolition. The composite wind turbine test was fatgued to failure with periodic modal testing performed throughout the testing. The front fuselage of a DC-9 aircraft was used as the testbed for an induced damage test. These tests have yielded important insights into techniques for experimental damage detection on real structures. Additionally, the data are currently being used with current damage detection algorithms to further develop the numerical technology. State of the art testing technologies such as, high density modal testing, scanning laser vibrometry and natural excitation testing have also been utilized for these tests.

  7. Vibration characteristics and damage detection in a suspension bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Wasanthi R.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Nguyen, Theanh

    2016-08-01

    Suspension bridges are flexible and vibration sensitive structures that exhibit complex and multi-modal vibration. Due to this, the usual vibration based methods could face a challenge when used for damage detection in these structures. This paper develops and applies a mode shape component specific damage index (DI) to detect and locate damage in a suspension bridge with pre-tensioned cables. This is important as suspension bridges are large structures and damage in them during their long service lives could easily go un-noticed. The capability of the proposed vibration based DI is demonstrated through its application to detect and locate single and multiple damages with varied locations and severity in the cables of the suspension bridge. The outcome of this research will enhance the safety and performance of these bridges which play an important role in the transport network.

  8. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; ...

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numericalmore » cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.« less

  9. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; Cao, M. S.

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numerical cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.

  10. Large amplitude vibrations and damage detection of rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoach, Emil; Trendafilova, Irina

    2008-08-01

    In this work, geometrically nonlinear vibrations of fully clamped rectangular plates are used to study the sensitivity of some nonlinear vibration response parameters to the presence of damage. The geometrically nonlinear version of the Mindlin plate theory is used to model the plate behaviour. Damage is represented as a stiffness reduction in a small area of the plate. The plate is subjected to harmonic loading with a frequency of excitation close to the first natural frequency leading to large amplitude vibrations. The plate vibration response is obtained by a pseudo-load mode superposition method. The main results are focussed on establishing the influence of damage on the vibration response of the plate and the change in the time-history diagrams and the Poincaré maps caused by the damage. Finally, a criterion and a damage index for detecting the presence and the location of the damage is proposed. The criterion is based on analysing the points in the Poincaré sections of the damaged and healthy plate. Numerical results for large amplitude vibrations of damaged and healthy rectangular and square plates are presented and the proposed damage index for the considered cases is calculated. The criterion demonstrates quite good abilities to detect and localize damage.

  11. On-line damage detection in rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhalifa, Tareq Jawad

    This work is concerned with a set of techniques to detect internal defects in uniform circular discs (rotors). An internal defect is intentionally manufactured in stereolithographic discs by a rapid prototyping process using cured resin SL 5170 material. The analysis and results presented here are limited to a uniform circular disc, with internal defects, mounted on a uniform flexible circular shaft. The setup is comprised of a Bently Nevada rotor kit connected to a data acquisition system. The rotor consists of a disc and shaft that is supported by journal bearings and is coupled to a motor by a rubber joint. Damage produces localized changes in the strain energy, which is quantified to characterize the damage. Based on previous research, the Strain Energy Damage Index (SEDI) is utilized to localize the damage due to strain energy differences between damaged and undamaged modes. To accomplish the objective, this work covers three types of analysis: finite element analysis, vibration analysis, and experimental modal analysis. Finite element analysis (using SDRC Ideas software) is performed to develop a multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) rotor system with internal damage, and its dynamic characteristics are investigated. The analysis is performed for two different types damage cases: radial damage and circular damage. Parametric study for radial damage and random noise to undamaged disc have been investigated to predict the effect of noise in the damage detection. The developed on-line damage detection technique for rotating equipment incorporates and couples both vibration analysis and experimental modal analysis. The dynamic investigation of the rotating discs (with and without defect) is conducted by vibration signal analysis (using proximity sensors, data acquisition and LabView). The vibration analysis provides a unique vibration signature for the damaged disc, which indicates the existence of the damage. The vibration data are acquired at different running speeds

  12. Dynamic modelling of a one-stage spur gear system and vibration-based tooth crack detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti; Aidanpää, Jan-Olov

    2015-03-01

    For the purpose of simulation and vibration-based condition monitoring of a geared system, it is important to model the system with an appropriate number of degrees of freedom (DOF). In earlier papers several models were suggested and it is therefore of interest to evaluate their limitations. In the present study a 12 DOF gear dynamic model including a gyroscopic effect was developed and the equations of motions were derived. A one-stage reduction gear was modelled using three different dynamic models (with 6, 8 and 8 reduced to 6 DOF), as well as the developed model (with 12 DOF), which is referred as the fourth model in this paper. The time-varying mesh stiffness was calculated, and dynamic simulation was then performed for different crack sizes. Time domain scalar indicators (the RMS, kurtosis and the crest factor) were applied for fault detection analysis. The results of the first model show a clearly visible difference from those of the other studied models, which were made more realistic by including two more DOF to describe the motor and load. Both the symmetric and the asymmetric disc cases were studied using the fourth model. In the case of disc symmetry, the results of the obtained response are close to those obtained from both the second and third models. Furthermore, the second model showed a slight influence from inter-tooth friction, and therefore the third model is adequate for simulating the pinion's y-displacement in the case of the symmetric disc. In the case of the asymmetric disc, the results deviate from those obtained in the symmetric case. Therefore, for simulating the pinion's y-displacement, the fourth model can be considered for more accurate modelling in the case of the asymmetric disc.

  13. Damage detection in beams based on redistribution of dead load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenton, Harry W., III; Hu, Xiaofeng

    2001-08-01

    A method is presented for detecting damage in a clamped-clamped beam based on redistribution of dead load in the member. The approach is based on measuring static strains due to dead load only, at three locations on the beam. In the event of damage (modeled as a local reduction in flexural stiffness at a single location in the beam) the bending moment in the beam redistributes and is no longer symmetric. Using the measured strains, a genetic optimization algorithm is used to determine the location and severity of damage in the beam. Four different damage scenarios are tested, these include: no damage (to test for false positive results); varying levels of damage near mid-span; equal levels of damage near the support, quarter point and mid-span; and damage near the support with 'noisy' measurement data. The technique is found to work well under a broad range of circumstances: the accuracy and success of the method depends on the damage location and the level of measurement noise in the data. Damage near the support and center of the beam can be identified with good accuracy. As one might expect, damage at or near to the point of inflection in the beam is more difficult to identify because the dead load strain in this vicinity is small. The technique is found to work well even with measurement noise on the order of 3 to 5%.

  14. Minimizing Load Effects on NA4 Gear Vibration Diagnostic Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2001-01-01

    NA4 is a vibration diagnostic parameter, developed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, for health monitoring of gears in helicopter transmissions. The NA4 reacts to the onset of gear pitting damage and continues to react to the damage as it spreads. This research also indicates NA4 reacts similarly to load variations. The sensitivity of NA4 to load changes will substantially affect its performance on a helicopter gearbox that experiences continuously changing load throughout its flight regimes. The parameter NA4 has been used to monitor gear fatigue tests at constant load. At constant load, NA4 effectively detects the onset of pitting damage and tracks damage severity. Previous research also shows that NA4 reacts to changes in load applied to the gears in the same way it reacts to the onset of pitting damage. The method used to calculate NA4 was modified to minimize these load effects. The modified NA4 parameter was applied to four sets of experimental data. Results indicate the modified NA4 is no longer sensitive to load changes, but remains sensitive to pitting damage.

  15. Structural damage detection via impediographic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liuxian; Yang, Jie; Wang, K. W.; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the use of impediographic tomography to achieve high sensitivity and high resolution damage identification in plate-like structures. The impediographic approach exploits the coupled piezo-resistive and electrostatic response of the host structure to generate high sensitivity and high resolution maps of its internal electrical conductivity. Focused acoustic waves are used to generate localized electrical conductivity perturbations that allow a drastic improvement in the conditioning of the inverse problem. The localized acoustic perturbations are obtained by exploiting the concept of Frequency Selective Structures (FSS) in which intentional mistuning of periodically distributed structural features, such as thin notches, enables self-focusing and vibration localization by using a single ultrasonic transducer. The impediographic reconstruction is achieved by using two different methods: the 0-Laplacian and the Levenberg-Marquardt. Both methodologies are compared in terms of accuracy of the reconstructed electrical conductivity and of their ability to deal with important practical issues such as limited view and limited perturbation data. Numerical results show that, although both approaches perform well in terms of damage identification, localization, and sizing, the LM technique allows higher flexibility in handling imperfect data.

  16. Automatic Damage Detection for Sensitive Cultural Heritage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerra, D.; Tian, J.; Lysandrou, V.; Plank, S.

    2016-06-01

    The intentional damages to local Cultural Heritage sites carried out in recent months by the Islamic State (IS) have received wide coverage from the media worldwide. Earth Observation data is an important tool to assess these damages in such non-accessible areas: If a fast response is desired, automated image processing techniques would be needed to speed up the analysis. This paper shows the first results of applying fast and robust change detection techniques to sensitive areas. A map highlighting potentially damaged buildings is derived, which could help experts at timely assessing the damages to the Cultural Heritage sites in the observed images.

  17. Structural damage identification using multifunctional Bragg grating sensors: II. Damage detection results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Daniel C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian

    2006-10-01

    Damage detection is an important issue in structural health monitoring. Lamb waves are the most widely used acousto-ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection. This paper gives the results of experiments carried out to study the identification of damage using Bragg grating sensors as ultrasonic receivers of Lamb waves. The experiments involve a rectangular aluminium plate. Damage was introduced into the plate by drilling a hole into the centre of the plate. In order to obtain different severity of damage, the hole diameter was increased step by step. Several signal processing tools are presented and then applied to the Lamb wave signals in order to find a parameter that corresponds to the severity of damage. The parameter that serves as the damage index has to have small cross-sensitivity to other physical parameters, e.g. temperature. Therefore, additional experiments have been carried out to study the temperature dependence of the Lamb wave signals. In order to determine the influence of the temperature on the damage detection results, the cross-sensitivity is studied within this paper.

  18. Damage detection of bridgelike structures using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentin-Sivico, Javier; Rao, Vittal S.; Samanthula, Vasudha

    1998-06-01

    It is well known that the static and dynamic structural response of materials can indirectly indicate the health of structural systems. The changes in natural frequencies, mode shapes, and stiffness matrices due to damage are utilized for determination of occurrence, location and extent of damages. In recent years, many researchers have developed global damage detection algorithms using structural modal response. However most of these methods are off-line techniques based on frequency domain data. In this paper we have proposed real- time damage detection methods based on time domain data. In this method damages in the structure can be detected while the structure is kept on its regular use. The algorithm determines reduction in stiffness and/or damping of the structural elements, while assuming that the mass of the structure does not vary due to damage. This algorithm is based on the state space representation of the structure, which is identified from the time domain data. We have also determined a linear transformation matrix for converting the identified model into a state space representation based on physical coordinates of the structural system. The self-organization and learning capabilities of neural networks can be effectively used for structural damage detection purpose. In this paper a hybrid method for the damage detection has been proposed by combining the features of best achievable eigenvector method and neural network classification techniques for detection of location and extent of damage in the structural systems. The feasibility of the proposed method is verified by using simple three-bar truss structure and a cantilever beam test article.

  19. Damage Detection in Bridges Using Modal Curvatures: Application to a Real Damage Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABDEL WAHAB, M. M.; DE ROECK, G.

    1999-09-01

    Damage detection in civil engineering constructions using the dynamic system parameters has become an important research topic. A direct, fast and inexpensive method is therefore required to evaluate and localize damage using the change in dynamic parameters between the intact and damage states. This paper investigates the application of the change in modal curvatures to detect damage in a prestressed concrete bridge. To establish the method simply supported and continuous beams containing damaged parts at different locations are tested using simulated data. Some important conclusions concerning the computation of the modal curvatures are drawn. A damage indicator called “curvature damage factor” is introduced, in which the difference in curvature mode shape for all modes can be summarized in one number for each measured point. The technique is further applied to a real structure, namely bridge Z24 which lies between the villages Koppigen and Utzenstorf and crosses the highway A1 between Bern and Zurich in Switzerland. In the framework of a Brite-Euram project, the bridge is used as a full-scale specimen and subjected to different damage scenarios in order to introduce damage.

  20. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  1. Damage detection in concrete structures with smart piezoceramic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, Akshay S. K.; Bhalla, Suresh

    2003-10-01

    Detection of damages and progressive deterioration in structures is a critical issue. Visual inspections are tedious and unreliable. Incipient damages are often not discernible by low frequency dynamic response and other NDE techniques. Smart piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) transducers are emerging as an effective alternative in health monitoring of structures. The electro-mechanical impedance method employs the self-actuating and sensing characteristics of the PZT, without having to use actuators and sensors separately. When excited by an ac source, the PZT transducers bonded to the host structure activates the higher modes of vibration locally. Changes in the admittance response of the transducer serves as an indicator of damage around the transducer. In this paper, the effectiveness of PZT transducers for characterizing damages in concrete, in terms of the damage extent and location, is experimentally examined. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index, adopted to quantify the changes in the admittance signatures, correlates with the damage extent. The damages on the surface that is not mounted by the PZT are also discernible. An array of transducers proves effective in detecting the damaged zone. The progressive incipient crack can be detected much before it actually becomes visible to the naked eye.

  2. Open Circuit Resonant Sensors for Composite Damage Detection and Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, John J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Under the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) program work was begun to investigate the feasibility of sensor systems for detecting and diagnosing damage to aircraft composite structures and materials. Specific interest for this study was in damage initiated by environmental storm hazards and the direct effect of lightning strikes on the material structures of a composite aircraft in flight. A series of open circuit resonant sensors was designed, fabricated, characterized, and determined to be a potentially viable means for damage detection and diagnosis of composite materials. The results of this research and development effort are documented in this report.

  3. An integrated electro-mechanical model of motor-gear units—Applications to tooth fault detection by electric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feki, N.; Clerc, G.; Velex, Ph.

    2012-05-01

    Fault diagnosis in geared transmissions is traditionally based on vibration monitoring but, in a number of cases, sensor implementation and signal transfer from rotary to stationary parts can cause problems. This paper presents an original integrated electro-mechanical model aimed at testing the possibility and the interest of tooth fault detection based on electric measurements on the motor stator. The motor is simulated using Kron's transformation while the mechanical transmission is accounted for by a lumped parameter model. Tooth defects are assimilated to distributions of initial separations between the mating flanks whose positions and shapes are controlled. A unique non-linear parametrically excited differential system is obtained, which provides direct access to both the electrical and mechanical variables. A number of results are presented, which illustrate the possibility of tooth fault detection by stator current measurements with regard to the position and dimensions of the defect.

  4. Detection of moisture damage in buildings using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyberg, Mats D.; Mattsson, Mats; Sundberg, Jorgen

    1990-03-01

    The verification of moisture in building envelopes has traditionally been carried out by testing procedures where one quantitatively determines the moisture content of the building component. Most methods have the drawback that it may take several days before the result is known. For some materials, these methods are also destructive testing procedures. Here is presented a qulitative testing procedure using thermographic methods. In buildings subjected to moisture damage, inspections have been carried out using JR-techniques. It has been investigated whether moisture damages can be detected from the interior as well as from the exterior of the buildings, whether previously verified moisture damages can be detected, whether JR-techniques can locate moisture damages other than those already detected, whether the extension of the damage can be estimated by JR-techniques, and to what extent the thermal image can explain the cause of a damage. Also, a cost comparison has been made, and operational conditions have been compared. It is concluded that JR-techniques provide an efficient way of detecting, verifying and evaluating moisture damages at a low cost.

  5. Embedded linear classifiers on wireless sensor networks for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckens, Courtney A.; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2013-04-01

    Damage detection on engineered systems is a challenging task that has been explored by numerous researchers. In recent years wireless sensors systems have arisen as a vehicle for low-power, low-cost, and localized damage detection that can be applied to various structural systems. Such sensors, however, are limited in their computational capacity and as a result, careful consideration must be taken as to which algorithms can be effectively embedded so as to balance energy constraints with computational efficiency. In this study, two classifier algorithms (least squares classifier and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis) are explored for detecting damage on a cooling system test bed. In particular, the algorithms are used to determine the valve configuration of the system and to verify if damage exists within the valves. To validate the efficiency of the algorithms in the embedded domain, the algorithms are implemented on a wireless sensing network and used to classify the system state of the test bed.

  6. Gear transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, A.

    1987-08-11

    A gear transmission is provided with a first rotary shaft, a first non-circular gear fixed thereto, a second rotary shaft, and a second non-circular gear fixed thereto, the first non-circular gear and the second non-circular gear being continuously engageably rotated, thereby transmitting a rotational driving force between the first rotary shaft and the second rotary shaft. The gear transmission is characterized in that when the absolute value vertical bar..omega..2/..omega..1vertical bar of a ratio of an angular velocity of ..omega..2 of the second rotary shaft with respect to an angular velocity of ..omega..1 of the first rotary shaft is represented by F(theta) as the function of the angular displacement theta of the first rotary shaft, an engageably rotary portion where a differential value K given in a differential equation as to the angular displacement thetaK=d log F(theta)/dtheta presents a positive or negative constant value in continuation is provided in the shape of intermeshing pitch curves of the first non-circular gear and the second non-circular gear.

  7. Damage detection using modal frequency curve and squared residual wavelet coefficients-based damage indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the frequency-based damage detection method has been presented in this paper. Based on the eigenvalue problem and perturbation assumption of defect in modal response, the theoretical basis of the modal frequency curve method is established. The extraction of defect characteristics from the modal frequency curve via discrete wavelet transform is illustrated. The above background leads to the development of a new multiple-mode damage indicator for damage localisation and a damage estimator for size prediction. Then, the proposed method has been applied to aluminium samples with pre-defined damage sections. Finite element modelling and experimental testing results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the method. Additionally, detectability with respect to the various mass ratios is investigated to support the ability of the method in real applications. The numerical and experimental results suggest that the use of the damage indicator provides a more robust and unambiguous damage identification than the sole use of the wavelet coefficients of the modes investigated. In addition, the damage estimator predicts the defect size to a satisfactory level.

  8. Damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koichi; Teshigawara, Masaomi; Isoda, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Takuji; Mita, Akira

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents damage detection tests of five-story steel frame with simulated damages. We discuss pre-analytical study and results of experiments. Fiber brag grating (FBG) sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges and laser displacement meters are installed in this test frame. We assume damages by removing studs from only one story, loosening bolts of beams, cutting part of beams and extracting braces from only one story. From the results of pre-analytical study, we can estimate which story is damaged from the change of natural period and mode shape to some extent. We applied flexibility method which is one of a damage identification methods using modal properties. We also apply flexibility method to results of experiments. In some cases we can estimate which story is damaged, and in other cases we cannot. We also applied a method using multiple natural frequency shifts. Making use of the change in five natural frequencies due to damage, the location of damaged stories can be pinpointed. In both methods, we cannot identify damaged story in some cases. Some methods other than methods using modal properties have to be tried to apply in such cases.

  9. Threshold Assessment of Gear Diagnostic Tools on Flight and Test Rig Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Mosher, Marianne; Huff, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    A method for defining thresholds for vibration-based algorithms that provides the minimum number of false alarms while maintaining sensitivity to gear damage was developed. This analysis focused on two vibration based gear damage detection algorithms, FM4 and MSA. This method was developed using vibration data collected during surface fatigue tests performed in a spur gearbox rig. The thresholds were defined based on damage progression during tests with damage. The thresholds false alarm rates were then evaluated on spur gear tests without damage. Next, the same thresholds were applied to flight data from an OH-58 helicopter transmission. Results showed that thresholds defined in test rigs can be used to define thresholds in flight to correctly classify the transmission operation as normal.

  10. Covariance of dynamic strain responses for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Wang, L. X.; Law, S. S.; Nie, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    A new approach to address the practical problems with condition evaluation/damage detection of structures is proposed based on the distinct features of a new damage index. The covariance of strain response function (CoS) is a function of modal parameters of the structure. A local stiffness reduction in structure would cause monotonous increase in the CoS. Its sensitivity matrix with respect to local damages of structure is negative and narrow-banded. The damage extent can be estimated with an approximation to the sensitivity matrix to decouple the identification equations. The CoS sensitivity can be calibrated in practice from two previous states of measurements to estimate approximately the damage extent of a structure. A seven-storey plane frame structure is numerically studied to illustrate the features of the CoS index and the proposed method. A steel circular arch in the laboratory is tested. Natural frequencies changed due to damage in the arch and the damage occurrence can be judged. However, the proposed CoS method can identify not only damage happening but also location, even damage extent without need of an analytical model. It is promising for structural condition evaluation of selected components.

  11. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  12. Damage modeling and damage detection for structures using a perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Akash

    non-contact Laser-Doppler Vibrometer sensors. Assuming the damaged structure to be a linear system, the response is expressed as the summation of the responses of the corresponding undamaged structure and the response (negative response) of the damage alone. If the second part of the response is isolated, it forms what can be regarded as the damage signature. The damage signature gives a clear indication of the damage. In this thesis, the existence of the damage signature is investigated when the damaged structure is excited at one of its natural frequencies and therefore it is called "partial mode contribution". The second damage detection method is based on this new physical parameter as determined using the partial mode contribution. The physical reasoning is verified analytically, thereupon it is verified using finite element models and experiments. The limits of damage size that can be determined using the method are also investigated. There is no requirement of having a baseline data with this damage detection method. Since the partial mode contribution is a local parameter, it is thus very sensitive to the presence of damage. The parameter is also shown to be not affected by noise in the detection ambience.

  13. Using chaotic forcing to detect damage in a structure.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.; Trickey, S.; Seaver, M.; Pecora, D.; Pecora, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we develop a numerical test for Holder continuity and apply it and another test for continuity to the difficult problem of detecting damage in structures. We subject a thin metal plate with incremental damage to the plate changes, its filtering properties, and therefore the phase space trajectories of the response chaotic excitation of various bandwidths. Damage to the plate changes its filtering properties and therefore the phase space of the response. Because the data are multivariate (the plate is instrumented with multiple sensors) we use a singular value decomposition of the set of the output time series to reduce the embedding dimension of the response time series. We use two geometric tests to compare an attractor reconstructed from data from an undamaged structure to that reconstructed from data from a damaged structure. These two tests translate to testing for both generalized and differentiable synchronization between responses. We show loss of synchronization of responses with damage to the structure.

  14. Nonlinear damage detection and localization using a time domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Calla, D.-B.; Malfense Fierro, G.-P.; Ciampa, F.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a damage detection and localization technique based on nonlinear elastic waves propagation in a damage composite laminate. The proposed method relies on the time of arrival estimation of the second harmonic nonlinear response obtained with second order phase symmetry analysis filtering and burst excitation. The Akaike Information Criterion approach was used to estimate the arrival times measured by six receiver transducers. Then, a combination of Newton's method and unconstrained optimization was employed to solve a system of nonlinear equations in order to obtain the material damage coordinates. To validate this methodology, experimental tests were carried out on a damaged composite plate. The results showed that the technique allows calculating the damage position with high accuracy (maximum error ~5 mm).

  15. Differential gear

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, K.; Hamada, T.; Masuda, K.; Shimada, K.

    1989-05-02

    A differential gear for permitting a difference in rotational speed between two output shafts is described, the differential gear including an input shaft and two output shafts. The improvement consists of means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the rotational speed of the input shaft, the rotational speed limiting means comprising a differential casing coupled to the input shaft and adapted to be rotated by the input shaft, a differential pinion shaft radially extending within the differential casing and rotatably mounted at its opposite ends in the differential casing. A plurality of differential pinion gears rotatably mounted on the differential pinion shaft is also included, and also a pair of side gears having a rotational axis common to that of the differential casing, wherein the side gears mesh with the differential pinion gears and the two output shafts are fixed to the side gears, the means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts comprising a weight means radially movable in the differential casing, the weight means limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the centrifugal force applied to the weight means, the weight means being slidably mounted on the differential pinion shaft and being biased radially inwardly.

  16. Information-theoretical noninvasive damage detection in bridge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudu Ambegedara, Amila; Sun, Jie; Janoyan, Kerop; Bollt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Damage detection of mechanical structures such as bridges is an important research problem in civil engineering. Using spatially distributed sensor time series data collected from a recent experiment on a local bridge in Upper State New York, we study noninvasive damage detection using information-theoretical methods. Several findings are in order. First, the time series data, which represent accelerations measured at the sensors, more closely follow Laplace distribution than normal distribution, allowing us to develop parameter estimators for various information-theoretic measures such as entropy and mutual information. Second, as damage is introduced by the removal of bolts of the first diaphragm connection, the interaction between spatially nearby sensors as measured by mutual information becomes weaker, suggesting that the bridge is "loosened." Finally, using a proposed optimal mutual information interaction procedure to prune away indirect interactions, we found that the primary direction of interaction or influence aligns with the traffic direction on the bridge even after damaging the bridge.

  17. Information-theoretical noninvasive damage detection in bridge structures.

    PubMed

    Sudu Ambegedara, Amila; Sun, Jie; Janoyan, Kerop; Bollt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Damage detection of mechanical structures such as bridges is an important research problem in civil engineering. Using spatially distributed sensor time series data collected from a recent experiment on a local bridge in Upper State New York, we study noninvasive damage detection using information-theoretical methods. Several findings are in order. First, the time series data, which represent accelerations measured at the sensors, more closely follow Laplace distribution than normal distribution, allowing us to develop parameter estimators for various information-theoretic measures such as entropy and mutual information. Second, as damage is introduced by the removal of bolts of the first diaphragm connection, the interaction between spatially nearby sensors as measured by mutual information becomes weaker, suggesting that the bridge is "loosened." Finally, using a proposed optimal mutual information interaction procedure to prune away indirect interactions, we found that the primary direction of interaction or influence aligns with the traffic direction on the bridge even after damaging the bridge.

  18. Study on an auto-correlation-function-based damage index: Sensitivity analysis and structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2015-12-01

    The damage index based on the auto correlation function to detect the damage of the structure under white noise excitation is studied in detail in this paper. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals (displacement, velocity and acceleration) from different measurement points of the structure are collected and formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV), which is expressed as a weighted combination of the Hadamard product of two mode shapes. AMV is normalized by its root mean square value so that the influence of the excitation can be eliminated. Sensitivity analysis for the different parts of the normalized AMV shows that the sensitivity of the normalized AMV to the local stiffness is dependent most on the sensitivity of the Hadamard product of the two lower order mode shapes to the local stiffness, which has a sudden change of the value around the local stiffness change position. The sensitivity of the normalized AMV has the similar shape and same trend that shows it is a very good damage indicator even for the very small damage. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage occurs in the structure is adopted as the damage index to show the damage location. Several examples of the stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story shear frame structure are utilized to validate the results in sensitivity analysis, illustrate the effectiveness and anti-noise ability of the AMV-based damage detection method and compare the effect of the response type on the detectability of the normalized AMV.

  19. A Bevel Gear Quality Inspection System Based on Multi-Camera Vision Technology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhong, Dexing; Lyu, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Surface defect detection and dimension measurement of automotive bevel gears by manual inspection are costly, inefficient, low speed and low accuracy. In order to solve these problems, a synthetic bevel gear quality inspection system based on multi-camera vision technology is developed. The system can detect surface defects and measure gear dimensions simultaneously. Three efficient algorithms named Neighborhood Average Difference (NAD), Circle Approximation Method (CAM) and Fast Rotation-Position (FRP) are proposed. The system can detect knock damage, cracks, scratches, dents, gibbosity or repeated cutting of the spline, etc. The smallest detectable defect is 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm and the precision of dimension measurement is about 40–50 μm. One inspection process takes no more than 1.3 s. Both precision and speed meet the requirements of real-time online inspection in bevel gear production. PMID:27571078

  20. A Bevel Gear Quality Inspection System Based on Multi-Camera Vision Technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhong, Dexing; Lyu, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang

    2016-08-25

    Surface defect detection and dimension measurement of automotive bevel gears by manual inspection are costly, inefficient, low speed and low accuracy. In order to solve these problems, a synthetic bevel gear quality inspection system based on multi-camera vision technology is developed. The system can detect surface defects and measure gear dimensions simultaneously. Three efficient algorithms named Neighborhood Average Difference (NAD), Circle Approximation Method (CAM) and Fast Rotation-Position (FRP) are proposed. The system can detect knock damage, cracks, scratches, dents, gibbosity or repeated cutting of the spline, etc. The smallest detectable defect is 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm and the precision of dimension measurement is about 40-50 μm. One inspection process takes no more than 1.3 s. Both precision and speed meet the requirements of real-time online inspection in bevel gear production.

  1. Detecting damage in steel with scanning SQUID microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Clatterbuck, David; Morris Jr., J.W.; Shaw, T.J.; McDermott R.; Clarke, John

    2001-09-04

    A ''Holy Grail'' of NDE research is a non-destructive method for measuring fatigue damage prior to crack initiation. High-Tc scanning SQUID microscopy may be a useful tool. Because of the exceptional magnetic sensitivity of this technique, fatigue damage can be detected well before microcrack initiation, and in the absence of other obvious microstructure or property changes. Given the spatial resolution of the technique, undamaged material can be located and used to set internal standards.

  2. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a multidisciplinary nondestructive evaluation approach for impact damage detection in composite structures can be used to produce a more efficient inspection. The multidisciplinary NDE approach relies on fast large area thermographic inspections along with detailed ultrasonic volumetric imaging. The thermal inspection technique rapidly identifies the impact damage. The ultrasonic volumetric imaging quantifies the impact generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  3. Rapid detection and quantification of impact damage in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Farley, Gary; Smith, Barry T.

    1991-01-01

    NDE results from thermographic and volumetric ultrasonic techniques are presented to illustrate the multidisciplinary NDE approach to impact-damage detection in such composite structures as are increasingly prevalent in helicopters. Attention is given to both flat-panel and 'y-stiffened' panel specimens; these were fabricated either with kevlar or carbon fiber through-the-thickness reinforcements. While thermal inspection identifies impact damage, volumetric imaging quantifies the impact-generated delaminations through the volume of the structure.

  4. Embedded Carbon Nanotube Networks for Damage Precursor Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    create a distributed conductive network within the material. As damage occurs within these materials, the electrical properties of this network change...damage precursor detection. The specimens were under cyclic fatigue loading as the electrical response was monitored. A four-point probe method was used...List of Symbols, Abbreviations, and Acronyms 12 Distribution List 13 iv List of Figures Figure 1. Solidworks rendering of inverted cast

  5. Optimization of control laws for damage detection in smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Laura R.; Marini, Solomon

    2000-06-01

    A prevalent method of damage detection is based on identifying changes in modal characteristics due to damage induced variations in stiffness or mass along a structure. It is known that modal frequencies can be insensitive to damage, and the open-loop sensitivity itself depends on modal properties and damage location. Here, we develop methods of designing control laws that enhance the sensitivity of modal characteristics to damage. Sensitivity enhancing control exploits the relationship between control gains and closed-loop dynamics in order to increase the observability of damage. The design methods are based on optimization of cost functions that involve the dependence of classic measures of sensitivity on design variables, which include placement of sensors and actuators and state feedback control gains. Due to the size of the design space and the unknown nature of the cost surface, genetic algorithms are used to find control laws that maximize sensitivity to specific damage types subject to control effort and stability constraints. Optimized control laws designed for sensitivity enhancement of stiffness damage in a cantilevered beam are demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  6. Gear Damage Detection Integrating Oil Debris and Vibration Measurement Technologies Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekeyeski, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2001-01-01

    The development of highly reliable health-monitoring systems is one technology area recommended for reducing the number of helicopter accidents. Helicopter transmission diagnostics are an important part of a helicopter health-monitoring system because helicopters depend on the power train for propulsion, lift, and flight maneuvering. One technique currently being tested for increasing the reliability and decreasing the false alarm rate of current transmission diagnostic tools is the replacement of simple single-sensor limits with multisensor systems integrating different measurement technologies.

  7. Structure damage detection based on random forest recursive feature elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qifeng; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Fan; Luo, Linkai

    2014-05-01

    Feature extraction is a key former step in structural damage detection. In this paper, a structural damage detection method based on wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) and random forest recursive feature elimination (RF-RFE) is proposed. In order to gain the most effective feature subset and to improve the identification accuracy a two-stage feature selection method is adopted after WPD. First, the damage features are sorted according to original random forest variable importance analysis. Second, using RF-RFE to eliminate the least important feature and reorder the feature list each time, then get the new feature importance sequence. Finally, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm, as a benchmark classifier, is used to evaluate the extracted feature subset. A four-storey steel shear building model is chosen as an example in method verification. The experimental results show that using the fewer features got from proposed method can achieve higher identification accuracy and reduce the detection time cost.

  8. Integrated impedance and guided wave based damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Recently, impedance and guided wave based damage detection techniques have been widely used for structural health monitoring (SHM) and Nondestructive testing (NDT) due to their sensitivity to small structural changes. Each of these techniques has its own technical merits, making them complementary to each other. For example, the guided wave technique typically has a larger sensing range than the impedance technique while the latter has better applicability to more complex structures. In this study, a new damage detection technique, which is named as integrated impedance and guided wave (IIG) based damage detection, is developed by utilizing impedance and guided wave signals simultaneously obtained from surface-mounted piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) to enhance the performance and reliability of damage diagnosis especially under varying temperature conditions. The proposed IIG technique first divides the measured impedance signal into two parts: passive impedance only sensitive to temperature variation and active impedance closely related to the mechanical property of the host structure. Then, the temperature effects on the active impedance and guided wave signals are minimized using the passive impedance. Finally, improved damage diagnosis is performed using both impedance and guided wave signals. The applicability of the proposed IIG technique to the detection of (1) bolt loosening in a steel lap joint, (2) a notch in an aluminum specimen with a complex geometry and (3) delamination in a composite wing mock-up specimen with stringers is experimentally investigated under varying temperatures.

  9. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  10. Bicoupled Contrarotating Epicyclic Gears.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-14

    gear 16 (preferably a double- helical 5 sun gear ) connected to a rotating input shaft 18; an internally- toothed ring gear 20 concentric with and...axially collocated with sun gear 16; a plurality of externally- toothed planet gears 22 (preferably double- helical planet gears ), each of which...stage epicyclic gear 14 includes a central, externally- toothed sun gear 26 (preferably a double- helical sun gear ) connected

  11. Machine learning algorithms for damage detection: Kernel-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Adam; Figueiredo, Eloi; Silva, M. F. M.; Sales, C. S.; Costa, J. C. W. A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents four kernel-based algorithms for damage detection under varying operational and environmental conditions, namely based on one-class support vector machine, support vector data description, kernel principal component analysis and greedy kernel principal component analysis. Acceleration time-series from an array of accelerometers were obtained from a laboratory structure and used for performance comparison. The main contribution of this study is the applicability of the proposed algorithms for damage detection as well as the comparison of the classification performance between these algorithms and other four ones already considered as reliable approaches in the literature. All proposed algorithms revealed to have better classification performance than the previous ones.

  12. ASR damage detection in concrete from ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Patton, Mark E.; Greve, David W.; Harley, Joel B.; Junker, Warren R.; Liu, Chang; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2014-03-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a chemical reaction that can occur between alkaline components in cement paste and reactive forms of silica in susceptible aggregates when sufficient moisture is present. The ASR product, known as ASR gel, can cause expansion and cracking that damages the structure. We pass ultrasonic signals through concrete laboratory specimens and use three different ultrasonic methods to detect the onset of ASR damage, or the presence of ASR damage while still at the microscale. Our test specimens are fabricated with aggregate known to be reactive and are then exposed to an aggressive environment to accelerate ASR development. We use swept-sine excitations and obtain pitch-catch records from specimens that have been exposed to the accelerated environment. From this data, we demonstrate an ultrasonic passband method shows high frequency components diminish faster than low frequency components, and therefore the ultrasonic passband shifts to the low frequency side due to ASR damage. The test results also show that the ultrasonic passband is logically related to specimen size. We also demonstrate a stretching factor method is able to track the progress of ASR damage in concrete very well. These methods are shown to be more reliable than attenuation spectrum or attenuation methods that do not detect the ASR damage in concrete at early stages.

  13. Damage detection using modal strain energy and laser vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, Andrew W.; Liu, Pengxiang; Rao, Vittal S.; Koval, Leslie R.

    2000-06-01

    Structural health monitoring for complex systems can contribute significantly to reduced life cycle costs. Many damage detection algorithms have been proposed in the literature for investigating the structural integrity of systems. Changes in modal strain energy have been used to detect the location and extent of damage in structures. In the previous studies, the stiffness matrix is analytically derived and assumed constant even after damage. This paper reports a study on the sensitivity of the modal strain energy method to the stiffness matrix and its accuracy in detecting the location and extent of damage. The modal strain energies for each element of the undamaged structure are computed for each mode using the original analytical matrix and measured modal data. Modal data from the damaged case is used to update the stiffness matrix by a simplified matrix update scheme. This updated matrix is used to correct the elemental matrices for the damaged system. Two case studies are presented in this work. The first is an experimental and analytical model of a cantilever beam and the second, a truss model of the European Space Agency. In the first case three identical aluminum cantilever beams are used. Damage is simulated on two of them by milling 1-inch long slots at two different locations on the beams. Modal data are obtained from experiment using Scanning Laser Vibrometer (SLV) and STAR software to extract the mode shape vectors from the experimental results. These are also compared with finite element simulations of the beams. The second case is an analytical example in which damage is simulated by reducing the area of one of the truss elements hypothetically by 50%. Results from these studies show a slight improved accuracy in determining the location of damage using an updated elemental stiffness matrix. For experimental results however, modal strain energy change method does not give an accurate location of the damages. There is need for further analysis of the

  14. Tapered Roller Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Kreider, Gary; Fichter, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage of tapered roller bearings. Tapered roller bearings are used in helicopter transmissions and have potential for use in high bypass advanced gas turbine aircraft engines. A diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from failure progression tests conducted using health monitoring hardware. Failure progression tests were performed with tapered roller bearings under simulated engine load conditions. Tests were performed on one healthy bearing and three pre-damaged bearings. During each test, data from an on-line, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor and three accelerometers were monitored and recorded for the occurrence of bearing failure. The bearing was removed and inspected periodically for damage progression throughout testing. Using data fusion techniques, two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. The data fusion diagnostic tool was evaluated during bearing failure progression tests under simulated engine load conditions. This integrated system showed improved detection of fatigue damage and health assessment of the tapered roller bearings as compared to using individual health monitoring technologies.

  15. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  16. Impact detection for smart automotive damage mitigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peelamedu, Saravanan M.; Ciocanel, Constantin; Naganathan, Nagi G.

    2004-10-01

    Occupant safety and severity of vehicle damage are important factors in automotive vehicle design. Smart automobiles of the future could potentially use distributed smart material sensors and actuators in order to identify impact and take appropriate evasive or mitigative actions. This provides the motivation for this study. The first part of this study is focused on detecting the location and magnitude of impact, particularly for the case where the automotive structure is subjected to minimal damage. This is accomplished by developing a generalized algorithm using the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory, the Rayleigh-Ritz energy approach, and the Lagrangian-Hamilton principle. The level of performance of this methodology is demonstrated for impacts on a simply supported rectangular plate. Different case studies for static as well as impact loading with point as well as area contacts are presented. An algorithm using deconvolution for identifying impact location and magnitude has been developed and implemented. Additionally, the influence of damage on the structural vibratory content is studied via a frequency analysis. Modal analyses for undamaged and damaged plates, with nine different damage locations and six different damage sizes, are performed. Changes in frequency and mode shapes are observed as regards the severity of the damage.

  17. Impact detection for smart automotive damage mitigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peelamedu, Saravanan M.; Naganathan, Ganapathy

    2000-06-01

    Occupant safety and severity of vehicle damage are important factors in automotive vehicle design. Smart automobiles of the future could potentially use distributed smart material sensors and actuators in order to identify impact and take appropriate evasive or mitigative actions. This provides the motivation for this study. The first part of this study is focused on detecting the location and magnitude of impact, particularly for the case where the automotive structure is subjected to minimal damage. This is accomplished by developing a generalized algorithm using the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory, the Rayleigh-Ritz energy approach, and the Lagrangian-Hamilton principle. The level of performance of this methodology is demonstrated for impacts on a simply supported rectangular plate. Different case studies for static as well as impact loading with point as well as area contacts are presented. An algorithm using deconvolution for identifying impact location and magnitude has been developed and implemented. Additionally, the influence of damage on the structural vibratory content is studied via a frequency analysis. The modal analysis for undamaged and damaged plates, with nine different damage locations and six different damage sizes are performed. Changes in frequency and mode shapes are observed in regard to the severity of the damage.

  18. Detection of osmotic damages in GRP boat hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstulović-Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.; Garafulić, E.

    2013-09-01

    Infrared thermography as a tool of non-destructive testing is method enabling visualization and estimation of structural anomalies and differences in structure's topography. In presented paper problem of osmotic damage in submerged glass reinforced polymer structures is addressed. The osmotic damage can be detected by a simple humidity gauging, but for proper evaluation and estimation testing methods are restricted and hardly applicable. In this paper it is demonstrated that infrared thermography, based on estimation of heat wave propagation, can be used. Three methods are addressed; Pulsed thermography, Fast Fourier Transform and Continuous Morlet Wavelet. An additional image processing based on gradient approach is applied on all addressed methods. It is shown that the Continuous Morlet Wavelet is the most appropriate method for detection of osmotic damage.

  19. Heat Induced Damage Detection by Terahertz (THz) Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahani, Ehsan Kabiri; Kundu, Tribikram; Wu, Ziran; Xin, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) and sub-terahertz imaging and spectroscopy are becoming increasingly popular nondestructive evaluation techniques for damage detection and characterization of materials. THz radiation is being used for inspecting ceramic foam tiles used in TPS (Thermal Protection System), thick polymer composites and polymer tiles that are not good conductors of ultrasonic waves. Capability of THz electromagnetic waves in detecting heat induced damage in porous materials is investigated in this paper. Porous pumice stone blocks are subjected to long time heat exposures to produce heat induced damage in the block. The dielectric properties extracted from THz TDS (Time Domain Spectroscopy) measurements are compared for different levels of heat exposure. Experimental results show noticeable and consistent change in dielectric properties with increasing levels of heat exposure, well before its melting point.

  20. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  1. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are used to primary structures. The...tough CFRP yields small fiber breakages when delamination crack is made in many cases. This requires a detection system of fiber breakages at low cost for

  2. Detecting Damage Using Electric Field Measurements: A Computational Sensitivity Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-06

    on a range or in the Physical Scale Model ( PSM ) environment, the smallest area of damage that is detectable would depend upon measurement...sensitivities or errors along with the ability to physically create small pieces of bare metal on the PSM model. Figure 6-4. Comparison of calculated

  3. A review of damage detection methods for wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ho, Siu-Chun M.; Song, Gangbing; Ren, Liang; Li, Hongnan

    2015-03-01

    Wind energy is one of the most important renewable energy sources and many countries are predicted to increase wind energy portion of their whole national energy supply to about twenty percent in the next decade. One potential obstacle in the use of wind turbines to harvest wind energy is the maintenance of the wind turbine blades. The blades are a crucial and costly part of a wind turbine and over their service life can suffer from factors such as material degradation and fatigue, which can limit their effectiveness and safety. Thus, the ability to detect damage in wind turbine blades is of great significance for planning maintenance and continued operation of the wind turbine. This paper presents a review of recent research and development in the field of damage detection for wind turbine blades. Specifically, this paper reviews frequently employed sensors including fiber optic and piezoelectric sensors, and four promising damage detection methods, namely, transmittance function, wave propagation, impedance and vibration based methods. As a note towards the future development trend for wind turbine sensing systems, the necessity for wireless sensing and energy harvesting is briefly presented. Finally, existing problems and promising research efforts for online damage detection of turbine blades are discussed.

  4. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  5. High-sensitivity damage detection based on enhanced nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epureanu, Bogdan I.; Yin, Shih-Hsun; Derriso, Mark M.

    2004-07-01

    One of the most important aspects of detecting damage in the work-frame of structural health monitoring is increasing the sensitivity of the monitored feature to the presence, location, and extent of damage. Distinct from previous techniques of obtaining information about the monitored structure - such as measuring frequency response functions - the approach proposed herein is based on an active interrogation of the system. This interrogation approach allows for the embedding of the monitored system within a larger system by means of a nonlinear feedback excitation. The dynamics of the larger system is then analyzed in state space, and the shape of the attractor of its dynamics is used as a complex geometric feature which is very sensitive to damage. The proposed approach is implemented for monitoring the structural integrity of a panel forced by transverse loads and undergoing limit cycle oscillations and chaos. The nonlinear von Karman plate theory is used to obtain a model for the panel combined with a nonlinear feedback excitation. The presence of damage is modeled as a loss of stiffness in a portion of the plate. The sensitivity of the proposed approach to parametric changes is shown to be an effective tool in detecting damages.

  6. High-sensitivity damage detection based on enhanced nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epureanu, Bogdan I.; Yin, Shih-Hsun; Derriso, Mark M.

    2005-04-01

    One of the most important aspects of detecting damage in the framework of structural health monitoring is increasing the sensitivity of the monitored feature to the presence, location, and extent of damage. Distinct from previous techniques of obtaining information about the monitored structure—such as measuring frequency response functions—the approach proposed herein is based on an active interrogation of the system. This interrogation approach allows for the embedding of the monitored system within a larger system by means of a nonlinear feedback excitation. The dynamics of the larger system is then analyzed in state space, and the shape of the attractor of its dynamics is used as a complex geometric feature which is very sensitive to damage. The proposed approach is implemented for monitoring the structural integrity of a panel forced by transverse loads and undergoing limit cycle oscillations and chaos. The nonlinear von Karman plate theory is used to obtain a model for the panel combined with a nonlinear feedback excitation. The presence of damage is modeled as loss of stiffness of various levels in a portion of the plate at various locations. The sensitivity of the proposed approach to parametric changes is shown to be an effective tool in detecting damages. An earlier version was presented at the SPIE 11th International Symposium on Smart Structures and Materials.

  7. Damage detection in composite materials using Lamb wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Soutis, Constantinos

    2002-04-01

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for in situ damage detection of composite materials. Experimental results are presented for the application of Lamb wave techniques to quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy test specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Linear wave scans were performed on narrow laminated specimens and sandwich beams with various cores by monitoring the transmitted waves with piezoceramic sensors. Optimal actuator and sensor configurations were devised through experimentation, and various types of driving signal were explored. These experiments provided a procedure capable of easily and accurately determining the time of flight of a Lamb wave pulse between an actuator and sensor. Lamb wave techniques provide more information about damage presence and severity than previously tested methods (frequency response techniques), and provide the possibility of determining damage location due to their local response nature. These methods may prove suitable for structural health monitoring applications since they travel long distances and can be applied with conformable piezoelectric actuators and sensors that require little power.

  8. Geared power transmission technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    The historical path of the science and art of gearing is reviewed. The present state of gearing technology is discussed along with examples of some of the NASA-sponsored contributions to gearing technology. Future requirements in gearing are summarized.

  9. Ultrasonic Techniques for Baseline-Free Damage Detection in Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debaditya

    This research presents ultrasonic techniques for baseline-free damage detection in structures in the context of structural health monitoring (SHM). Conventional SHM methods compare signals obtained from the pristine condition of a structure (baseline signals) with those from the current state, and relate certain changes in the signal characteristics to damage. While this approach has been successful in the laboratory, there are certain drawbacks of depending on baseline signals in real field applications. Data from the pristine condition are not available for most existing structures. Even if they are available, operational and environmental variations tend to mask the effect of damage on the signal characteristics. Most important, baseline measurements may become meaningless while assessing the condition of a structure after an extreme event such as an earthquake or a hurricane. Such events may destroy the sensors themselves and require installation of new sensors at different locations on the structure. Baseline-free structural damage detection can broaden the scope of SHM in the scenarios described above. A detailed discussion on the philosophy of baseline-free damage detection is provided in Chapter 1. Following this discussion, the research questions are formulated. The organization of this document and the major contributions of this research are also listed in this chapter. Chapter 2 describes a fully automated baseline-free technique for notch and crack detection in plates using a collocated pair of piezoelectric wafer transducers for measuring ultrasonic signals. Signal component corresponding to the damage induced mode-converted Lamb waves is extracted by processing the originally measured ultrasonic signals. The damage index is computed as a function of this mode-converted Lamb wave signal component. An over-determined system of Lamb wave measurements is used to find a least-square estimate of the measurement errors. This error estimate serves as the

  10. Detection of damage in welded structure using experimental modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Husain, N.; Ouyang, H.

    2011-07-01

    A typical automotive structure could contain thousands of spot weld joints that contribute significantly to the vehicle's structural stiffness and dynamic characteristics. However, some of these joints may be imperfect or even absent during the manufacturing process and they are also highly susceptible to damage due to operational and environmental conditions during the vehicle lifetime. Therefore, early detection and estimation of damage are important so necessary actions can be taken to avoid further problems. Changes in physical parameters due to existence of damage in a structure often leads to alteration of vibration modes; thus demonstrating the dependency between the vibration characteristics and the physical properties of structures. A sensitivity-based model updating method, performed using a combination of MATLAB and NASTRAN, has been selected for the purpose of this work. The updating procedure is regarded as parameter identification which aims to bring the numerical prediction to be as closely as possible to the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes data of the damaged structure in order to identify the damage parameters (characterised by the reductions in the Young's modulus of the weld patches to indicate the loss of material/stiffness at the damage region).

  11. Rapid and Robust Damage Detection using Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Owen, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Under ARIA (Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis) project at JPL and Caltech, we developed a prototype algorithm and data system to rapidly detect surface change caused by natural or man-made damage using a radar remote sensing technique of InSAR coherence. We tested the algorithm with a building demolition site in the City of Pasadena, California. The results show clear signal at the demolition site, with about 150% SNR improvement compared to conventional approach. Out of fourteen strongest detected signals, we confirmed that at least eleven of them were associated with real demolition and construction projects. We applied the algorithm to the February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand, which killed 185 people and caused financial damage of US $16-24 billion. We produced a damage proxy map (DPM) using radar data from ALOS satellite (Figure A), where red pixels identify regions where there may have been earthquake induced building damage, landslides, and liquefaction. The distribution of the red regions agrees well with the post-earthquake assessment performed on the ground by inspectors from the New Zealand government and summarized in their damage assessment zone map (Figure B). The DPM was derived from radar data acquired 3 days after the earthquake, whereas the ground truth zone map was first published 4 months after the earthquake. In addition to all-weather and day-and-night capability of radar, the sensitivity of radar signal to surface property change is high enough for reliable damage assessment. Current and future satellite and airborne missions should keep the expected composite data acquisition latency within a day. Rapidly produced accurate damage assessment maps will help saving people, assisting effective prioritization of rescue operations at early stage of response, and significantly improve timely situational awareness for emergency management and national / international assessment for response and recovery.

  12. Vibration Monitoring Techniques Applied to Detect Damage in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2002-01-01

    Rotor health monitoring and online damage detection are increasingly gaining the interest of the manufacturers of aircraft engines. This is primarily due to the need for improved safety during operation as well as the need for lower maintenance costs. Applied techniques for detecting damage in and monitoring the health of rotors are essential for engine safety, reliability, and life prediction. The goals of engine safety are addressed within the NASA-sponsored Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). AvSP provides research and technology products needed to help the Federal Aviation Administration and the aerospace industry improve aviation safety. The Nondestructive Evaluation Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center is addressing propulsion health management and the development of propulsion-system-specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe.

  13. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  14. A damage detection technique for reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ai-Lun; Yang, Jann N.; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2012-04-01

    Civil engineering structures, such as reinforced concrete frames, exhibit nonlinear hysteretic behavior when subject to dynamic loads, such as earthquakes. The ability to detect damages in structures after a major earthquake will ensure their reliability and safety. Innovative analysis techniques for damage detection of structures have been extensively studied recently. However, practical and effective damage identification techniques remain to be developed for nonlinear structures, in particular hysteretic reinforced concrete (RC) structures. In this paper, a smooth hysteretic model with stiffness and strength degradations and with the pinching effect is used to represent the dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete (RC) frames. A system identification method capable of detecting damages in nonlinear structures, referred to as the adaptive quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (AQSSE-UI), is used to detect damages in hysteretic RC frames. The performance of the AQSSE-UI technique is demonstrated by the experimental data. A 1/3 scale 2-story RC frame has been tested experimentally on the shake table at NCREE, Taiwan. This 2-story RC frame was subject to different levels of ground excitations back to back. The RC frame is firstly considered as a linear model with rotational springs and the tracking of the degradation of the stiffness parameters is carried out using the AQSSE-UI technique. Then the same RC frame is considered as a nonlinear structure with plastic hinges following a smooth hysteretic model. Experimental results show that the AQSSE-UI technique is quite effective for tracking of : (i) the stiffness degradation of linear structures, and (ii) the non-linear hysteretic parameters with stiffness and strength degradations.

  15. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  16. Transmission gearing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Klemen, D.

    1987-08-04

    A gearing arrangement is described for an automotive power transmission comprising: an input shaft and an output shaft; first, second, and third simple planetary gear sets. Each has a sun gear, a ring gear, and a planet gears meshing with the sun and the ring gears and rotatably supported on a planet carrier; means rigidly interconnecting the ring gear of the third gear set and the carrier of the second gear set; means rigidly interconnecting the ring gear of the second gear set and the carrier of the first gear set; means rigidly connecting the output shaft and the carrier of the third gear set; a first intermediate shaft rigidly interconnecting the sun gears of the second and the third gear sets for unitary rotation; a second intermediate shaft rigidly connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a third intermediate shaft continuously connected to the input shaft and to the sun gear of the first gear set; first, second, and third brake means operative to selectively brake rotation of the ring gears of the first, the second, and the third gear sets, respectively; a first rotating clutch selectively operable to connect the input shaft and the first intermediate shaft for unitary rotation; a second rotating clutch selectively operable to connect the input shaft and the second intermediate shaft for unitary rotation; a fourth simple planetary gear set including a sun gear and a ring gear and planet gears meshing with the sun and the ring gears and rotatably supported on a planet carrier; means rigidly connecting the sun gear of the fourth gear set to the third intermediate shaft; means rigidly connecting the ring gear of the fourth gear set to the carrier of the first gear set; and a fourth brake means selectively operable to brake the carrier of the fourth gear set. The nine forward ratios are obtainable while preserving a single transition shifting over the entire nine forward ratios.

  17. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  18. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  19. Detection Of Tornado Damage Tracks With EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Nair, Udaysankar; Haines, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (path length and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explored the possibility of using near real-time medium and high-resolution satellite imagery from the NASA EOS satellites to provide additional information for the surveys. MODIS and ASTER data were used to study the damage tracks from three tornadic storms; the La Plata, Maryland storm of 28 April 2002 and the Carter-Butler Counties and Madison County Missouri storms of 24 April 2002. These storms varied in intensity (from F0-F4) and occurred over regions with different land use. It was found that, depending on the nature of land use, tornado damage tracks from intense storms (F2 or greater) may be evident in both ASTER and MODIS satellite imagery. In areas of dense vegetation the scar patterns show up very clearly, while in areas of grassland and regions with few trees, scar patterns are not at all obvious in the satellite imagery. The detection of previously unidentified segments of a damage track caused by the 24 April 2004 Madison County, Missouri tornado demonstrates the utility of satellite imagery for damage surveys. However, the capability to detect tornado tracks in satellite imagery appears to be as much dependent on the nature of the underlying surface and land use as on the severity of the tornadic storm. The imaging sensors on the NPOESS operational satellites to be launched in 2006 will continue the unique observing capabilities of the EOS instruments.

  20. Detection Of Tornado Damage Tracks With EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Nair, Udaysankar; Haines, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (path length and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explored the possibility of using near real-time medium and high-resolution satellite imagery from the NASA EOS satellites to provide additional information for the surveys. MODIS and ASTER data were used to study the damage tracks from three tornadic storms; the La Plata, Maryland storm of 28 April 2002 and the Carter-Butler Counties and Madison County Missouri storms of 24 April 2002. These storms varied in intensity (from F0-F4) and occurred over regions with different land use. It was found that, depending on the nature of land use, tornado damage tracks from intense storms (F2 or greater) may be evident in both ASTER and MODIS satellite imagery. In areas of dense vegetation the scar patterns show up very clearly, while in areas of grassland and regions with few trees, scar patterns are not at all obvious in the satellite imagery. The detection of previously unidentified segments of a damage track caused by the 24 April 2004 Madison County, Missouri tornado demonstrates the utility of satellite imagery for damage surveys. However, the capability to detect tornado tracks in satellite imagery appears to be as much dependent on the nature of the underlying surface and land use as on the severity of the tornadic storm. The imaging sensors on the NPOESS operational satellites to be launched in 2006 will continue the unique observing capabilities of the EOS instruments.

  1. Image Science and Analysis Group Spacecraft Damage Detection/Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, Ira M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This project consisted of several tasks that could be served by an intern to assist the ISAG in detecting damage to spacecrafts during missions. First, this project focused on supporting the Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) damage detection and assessment for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using imagery from the last two HST Shuttle servicing missions. In this project, we used coordinates of two windows on the Shuttle Aft flight deck from where images were taken and the coordinates of three ID points in order to calculate the distance from each window to the three points. Then, using the specifications from the camera used, we calculated the image scale in pixels per inch for planes parallel to and planes in the z-direction to the image plane (shown in Table 1). This will help in the future for calculating measurements of objects in the images. Next, tabulation and statistical analysis were conducted for screening results (shown in Table 2) of imagery with Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) damage. Using the Microsoft Excel CRITBINOM function and Goal Seek, the probabilities of detection of damage to different shuttle tiles were calculated as shown in Table 3. Using developed measuring tools, volume and area measurements will be created from 3D models of Orion TPS damage. Last, mathematical expertise was provided to the Photogrammetry Team. These mathematical tasks consisted of developing elegant image space error equations for observations along 3D lines, circles, planes, etc. and checking proofs for minimal sets of sufficient multi-linear constraints. Some of the processes and resulting equations are displayed in Figure 1.

  2. Application of RMS for damage detection by guided elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzieński, M.; Doliński, Ł.; Krawczuk, M.; dot Zak, A.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents certain results of an experimental study related with a damage detection in structural elements based on deviations in guided elastic wave propagation patterns. In order to excite guided elastic waves within specimens tested piezoelectric transducers have been applied. As excitation signals 5 sine cycles modulated by Hanning window have been used. Propagation of guided elastic waves has been monitored by a scanning Doppler laser vibrometer. The time signals recorded during measurement have been utilised to calculate the values of RMS. It has turned out that the values of RMS differed significantly in damaged areas from the values calculated for the healthy ones. In this way it has become possible to pinpoint precisely the locations of damage over the entire measured surface. All experimental investigations have been carried out for thin aluminium or composite plates. Damage has been simulated by a small additional mass attached on the plate surface or by a narrow notch cut. It has been shown that proposed method allows one to localise damage of various shapes and sizes within structural elements over the whole area under investigation.

  3. Using chaotic forcing to detect damage in a structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.; Trickey, S.; Seaver, M.; Pecora, D.; Pecora, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we develop a numerical test for Holder continuity and apply it and another test for continuity to the difficult problem of detecting damage in structures. We subject a thin metal plate with incremental damage to the plate changes, its filtering properties, and therefore the phase space trajectories of the response chaotic excitation of various bandwidths. Damage to the plate changes its filtering properties and therefore the phase space of the response. Because the data are multivariate (the plate is instrumented with multiple sensors) we use a singular value decomposition of the set of the output time series to reduce the embedding dimension of the response time series. We use two geometric tests to compare an attractor reconstructed from data from an undamaged structure to that reconstructed from data from a damaged structure. These two tests translate to testing for both generalized and differentiable synchronization between responses. We show loss of synchronization of responses with damage to the structure. ?? 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  5. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  6. Multilayer perceptron in damage detection of bridge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P. C.; Barai, S. V.

    1995-02-01

    Recent developments in artificial neural networks (ANN) have opened up new possibilities in the domain of structural engineering. For inverse problems like structural identification of large civil engineerlng structures such as bridges and buildings where the in situ measured data are expected to be imprecise and often incomplete, the ANN holds greater promise. The detection of structural damage and identification of damaged element in a large complex structure is a challenging task indeed. This paper presents an application of multilayer perceptron in the damage detection of steel bridge structures. The ssues relating to the design of network and learning paradigm are addressed and network architectures have been developed with reference to trussed bridge structures. The training patterns are generated for multiple damaged zones in a structure and performance of the networks with one and two hidden layers are examined. It has been observed that the performance of the network with two hidden layers was better than that of a single-layer architecture in general. The engineering importance of the whole exercise is demonstrated from the fact that measured input at only a few locations in the structure is needed in the identification process using the ANN.

  7. Wind turbine blade damage detection using an active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jiabiao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2014-10-01

    The wind energy sector is one of the fastest growing parts of the clean energy industry. As the wind energy sector grows, so does an increasing concern for the damage detection of wind turbine blades. This paper proposes an active sensing approach by utilizing piezoceramic transducers as actuators and sensors. The influence of the crack quantity, location, length and depth on the wave propagation was experimentally studied. Sweep sine signals ranging from 1 khz to 50 khz were used as input signals for active sensing. The change in the energy that propagated through the cracks was verified as feasible in detecting crack-related damage. An innovative polar plot analysis method based on Fast Fourier transform was developed to compare the minuscule difference between the damage signals and the baseline signal. The polar plot was able to make apparent differences in both the magnitude and the phase of the signals, which could be correlated to crack depth and plane geometry, respectively, based on the observation of the damage.

  8. A simple damage detection indicator using operational deflection shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, R. P. C.; Maia, N. M. M.; Almeida, R. A. B.; Urgueira, A. P. V.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophic structural failure of aircrafts, bridges, buildings and other structures in modern societies has always been of primary concern because of the loss of human lifes and of negative economic impact. The aging of the structures, the growing dependency on their role in our networks of transportation, energy and comunications, the smaller construction tolerances, the bigger power demanded and the media and society awardness to catastrophic events are sufficient motivations for the growing field of structural health monitoring, which aims at assessing the actual condition of a structure and to identify incipient damage. Damage identification can be considered as a two step process, the detection and the diagnosis. The former, and fundamental step, is the confirmation of an efective damage existence. When the response is affirmative, the latter step begins with the diagnosis, and then the questions are: where?, how much?, what type?, when will it fail? In this paper the authors propose a simple method to detect and relatively quantify structural damage by using measured vibrations data, specifically the operational deflections shapes. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are presented to validate the proposed method.

  9. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  10. Data Fusion Tool for Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Antolick, Lance J.; Branning, Jeremy S.; Thomas, Josiah

    2014-01-01

    Tests were performed on two spiral bevel gear sets in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig to simulate the fielded failures of spiral bevel gears installed in a helicopter. Gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed on two or more gear or pinion teeth. During testing, gear health monitoring data was collected with two different health monitoring systems. Operational parameters were measured with a third data acquisition system. Tooth damage progression was documented with photographs taken at inspection intervals throughout the test. A software tool was developed for fusing the operational data and the vibration based gear condition indicator (CI) data collected from the two health monitoring systems. Results of this study illustrate the benefits of combining the data from all three systems to indicate progression of damage for spiral bevel gears. The tool also enabled evaluation of the effectiveness of each CI with respect to operational conditions and fault mode.

  11. Gear optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Ning-Tian

    1988-01-01

    The use of formal numerical optimization methods for the design of gears is investigated. To achieve this, computer codes were developed for the analysis of spur gears and spiral bevel gears. These codes calculate the life, dynamic load, bending strength, surface durability, gear weight and size, and various geometric parameters. It is necessary to calculate all such important responses because they all represent competing requirements in the design process. The codes developed here were written in subroutine form and coupled to the COPES/ADS general purpose optimization program. This code allows the user to define the optimization problem at the time of program execution. Typical design variables include face width, number of teeth and diametral pitch. The user is free to choose any calculated response as the design objective to minimize or maximize and may impose lower and upper bounds on any calculated responses. Typical examples include life maximization with limits on dynamic load, stress, weight, etc. or minimization of weight subject to limits on life, dynamic load, etc. The research codes were written in modular form for easy expansion and so that they could be combined to create a multiple reduction optimization capability in future.

  12. Synthesized Synchronous Sampling Technique for Bearing Damage Detection Preprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    monitoring of rolling element bearings by the high-frequency resonance technique - a review,” Tribology International 17(1), 3-10, 1984. 2 I. Howard...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4139 SYNTHESIZED SYNCHRONOUS SAMPLING TECHNIQUE FOR BEARING DAMAGE DETECTION (PREPRINT) Huageng Luo, Hai Qiu...George Ghanime, Melinda Hirz and Geo Van Der Merwe Metals Branch Metals, Ceramics and NDE Division MARCH 2009 Approved for

  13. Outlier Detection and Correction for the Deviations of Tooth Profiles of Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianfu, Han; Changfeng, Fu; Jun, Wang; Wenyan, Tang

    2013-04-01

    To decrease the influence of outlier on the measurement of tooth profiles, this paper proposes a method of outlier detection and correction based on the grey system theory. After studying the characteristics of outliers from the deviations of tooth profiles, this paper proposes a preprocessing method for the modeling data which include abnormal value, and establishes an outlier detection and correction model for the deviations of tooth profiles. Simulation results show that the precision of ONDGM(1,1)(one order and one variable non-homogenous discrete grey model whose outlier is processed by the preprocessing method proposed in this paper) is higher than that of NDGM(1,1)(one order and one variable non-homogenous discrete grey model), and the ONDGM(1,1) is more suitable than the NDGM(1,1) for dealing with the outliers from the deviations of tooth profiles. The experiment results show that the outlier detection and correction model detects and corrects the outliers from the deviations of tooth profiles, and the correction value of the outlier is basically in accordance with the actual deviation. Therefore, the method of outlier detection and correction decreases the influence of outlier and improves the precision in the measurement of tooth profiles.

  14. Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Studies of the acoustic signals originating from impact damage on Space Shuttle components were undertaken. Sprayed on foam insulation and small aluminum spheres were used as impactors. Shuttle reinforced carbon-carbon panels, panels with Shuttle thermal protection tiles, and Shuttle main landing gear doors with tiles were targets. Ballistic speed and hypervelocity impacts over a wide range of impactor sizes, energies, and angles were tested. Additional tests were conducted to correlate the acoustic response of the test articles to actual Shuttle structures.

  15. Detection of Gear Failures via Vibration and Acoustic Signals Using Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, N.; Ball, A.

    2003-07-01

    Vibration analysis is widely used in machinery diagnostics and the wavelet transform has also been implemented in many applications in the condition monitoring of machinery. In contrast to previous applications, this paper examines whether acoustic signal can be used effectively along vibration signal to detect the various local faults in gearboxes using the wavelet transform. Two commonly encountered local faults, tooth breakage and tooth crack, were simulated. The results from acoustic signals were compared with vibration signals. The results suggest that acoustic signals are very affective for the early detection of faults and may provide a powerful tool to indicate the various types of progressing faults in gearboxes.

  16. Cable Damage Detection System and Algorithms Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A; Robbins, C L; Wade, K A; Souza, P R

    2009-03-24

    This report describes the hardware system and the set of algorithms we have developed for detecting damage in cables for the Advanced Development and Process Technologies (ADAPT) Program. This program is part of the W80 Life Extension Program (LEP). The system could be generalized for application to other systems in the future. Critical cables can undergo various types of damage (e.g. short circuits, open circuits, punctures, compression) that manifest as changes in the dielectric/impedance properties of the cables. For our specific problem, only one end of the cable is accessible, and no exemplars of actual damage are available. This work addresses the detection of dielectric/impedance anomalies in transient time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements on the cables. The approach is to interrogate the cable using time domain reflectometry (TDR) techniques, in which a known pulse is inserted into the cable, and reflections from the cable are measured. The key operating principle is that any important cable damage will manifest itself as an electrical impedance discontinuity that can be measured in the TDR response signal. Machine learning classification algorithms are effectively eliminated from consideration, because only a small number of cables is available for testing; so a sufficient sample size is not attainable. Nonetheless, a key requirement is to achieve very high probability of detection and very low probability of false alarm. The approach is to compare TDR signals from possibly damaged cables to signals or an empirical model derived from reference cables that are known to be undamaged. This requires that the TDR signals are reasonably repeatable from test to test on the same cable, and from cable to cable. Empirical studies show that the repeatability issue is the 'long pole in the tent' for damage detection, because it is has been difficult to achieve reasonable repeatability. This one factor dominated the project. The two-step model-based approach is

  17. Wireless vibration monitoring for damage detection of highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Matthew J.; Gangone, Michael V.; Janoyan, Kerop D.; Jha, Ratneshwar

    2008-03-01

    The development of low-cost wireless sensor networks has resulted in resurgence in the development of ambient vibration monitoring methods to assess the in-service condition of highway bridges. However, a reliable approach towards assessing the health of an in-service bridge and identifying and localizing damage without a priori knowledge of the vibration response history has yet to be formulated. A two-part study is in progress to evaluate and develop existing and proposed damage detection schemes. The first phase utilizes a laboratory bridge model to investigate the vibration response characteristics induced through introduction of changes to structural members, connections, and support conditions. A second phase of the study will validate the damage detection methods developed from the laboratory testing with progressive damage testing of an in-service highway bridge scheduled for replacement. The laboratory bridge features a four meter span, one meter wide, steel frame with a steel and cement board deck composed of sheet layers to regulate mass loading and simulate deck wear. Bolted connections and elastomeric bearings provide a means for prescribing variable local stiffness and damping effects to the laboratory model. A wireless sensor network consisting of fifty-six accelerometers accommodated by twenty-eight local nodes facilitates simultaneous, real-time and high-rate acquisition of the vibrations throughout the bridge structure. Measurement redundancy is provided by an array of wired linear displacement sensors as well as a scanning laser vibrometer. This paper presents the laboratory model and damage scenarios, a brief description of the developed wireless sensor network platform, an overview of available test and measurement instrumentation within the laboratory, and baseline measurements of dynamic response of the laboratory bridge model.

  18. Detection of Incipient Tooth Defect in Helical Gears Using Multivariate Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, N.; Chen, Q.; Ball, A.; Kruger, U.

    2001-03-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques have been successfully used for monitoring process plants and their associated instrumentation. These techniques effectively detect disturbances related to individual measurement sources and consequently provide diagnostic information about the process input. This paper investigates and explores the use of multivariate statistical techniques in a two-stage industrial helical gearbox, to detect localised faults by using vibration signals. The vibration signals, obtained from a number of sensors, are synchronously averaged and then the multivariate statistics, based on principal components analysis, is employed to form a normal (reference) condition model. Fault conditions, which are deviations from a reference model, are detected by monitoring Q - and T2-statistics. Normal operating regions or confidence bounds, based on kernel density estimation (KDE) is introduced to capture the faulty conditions in the gearbox. It is found that Q - and T2-statistics based on PCA can detect incipient local faults at an early stage. The confidence regions, based on KDE can also reveal the growing faults in the gearbox.

  19. On-line fan blade damage detection using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberholster, A. J.; Heyns, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for monitoring the on-line condition of axial-flow fan blades with the use of neural networks. In developing this methodology, the first stage was to utilise neural networks trained on features extracted from on-line blade vibration signals measured on an experimental test structure. Results from a stationary experimental modal analysis of the structure were used for identifying global blade mode shapes and their corresponding frequencies. These in turn were used to assist in identifying vibration-related features suitable for neural network training. The features were extracted from on-line blade vibration and strain signals which were measured using a number of sensors. The second stage in the development of the methodology entails utilising neural networks trained on numerical Frequency Response Function (FRF) features obtained from a Finite Element Model (FEM) of the test structure. Frequency domain features obtained from on-line experimental measurements were used to normalise the numerical FRF features prior to neural network training. Following training, the networks were tested using experimental frequency domain features. This approach makes it unnecessary to damage the structure in order to train the neural networks. The paper shows that it is possible to classify damage for several fan blades by using neural networks with on-line vibration measurements from sensors not necessarily installed on the damaged blades themselves. The significance of this is that it proves the possibility to perform on-line fan blade damage classification using less than one sensor per blade. Even more significant is the demonstration that an on-line damage detection system for a fan can be developed without having to damage the actual structure.

  20. Evaluation of Standard Gear Metrics in Helicopter Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Pryor, A. H.; Huff, E. M.

    2002-01-01

    Each false alarm made by a machine monitoring system carries a high price tag. The machine must be taken out of service, thoroughly inspected with possible disassembly, and then made ready for service. Loss of use of the machine and the efforts to inspect it are costly. In addition, if a monitoring system is prone to false alarms, the system will soon be turned off or ignored. For aircraft applications, one growing concern is that the dynamic flight environment differs from the laboratory environment where fault detection methods are developed and tested. Vibration measurements made in flight are less stationary than those made in a laboratory, or test facility, and thus a given fault detection method may produce more false alarms in flight than might be anticipated. In 1977. Stewart introduced several metrics, including FM0 and FM4, for evaluating the health of a gear. These metrics are single valued functions of the vibration signal that indicate if the signal deviates from an ideal model of the signal. FM0 is a measure of the ratio of the peak-to-peak level to the harmonic energy in the signal. FM4 is the kurtosis of the signal with the gear mesh harmonics and first order side bands removed. The underlying theory is that a vibration signal from a gear in good condition is expected to be dominated by a periodic signal at the gear mesh frequency. If one or a small number of gear teeth contain damage or faults, the signal will change, possibly showing increased amplitude, local phase changes or both near the damaged region of the gear. FM0 increases if a signal contains a local increase in amplitude. FM4 increases if a signal contains a local increase in amplitude or local phase change in a periodic signal. Over the years, other single value metrics were also introduced to detect the onset and growth of damage in gears. These various metrics have detected faults in several gear tests in experimental test rigs. Conditions in these tests have been steady state in the

  1. Detecting ATM-dependent chromatin modification in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lopa; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage.

  2. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  3. Detection of gear wear on the 757/767 internal drive generator using higher order spectral analysis and wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Van Hoy, B.W.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    The 757/767 internal drive generator (IDG), which provides 400 Hz/120 volt ac power to the aircraft cabin experiences failures due to seizure of the scavenger drive pump and/or axial gears on the main drive shaft of the unit. These generators are an integral part of the aircraft`s engines sitting outboard, inside the engine cowling. The seizure of gears represents a significant loss with gear replacement estimated at $17,000 and unit replacement costs at $250,000. One of the U.S. commercial airline companies engaged Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a brief study to determine if a methodology could be developed to interrogate and diagnose gear wear with the ultimate goal of deploying an instrument for test stand and flight line use. Through a structured analysis it was determined that accelerometers mapped with higher order spectral analysis (HOSA) and/or wavelets could provide an analytic approach and basis for a diagnostic sensor/system capable of assessing IDG gear wear on the aircraft or the test stand.

  4. Feasibility of detecting fatigue damage in composites with coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livings, Richard; Dayal, Vinay; Barnard, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Coda waves are the late arriving portion of bulk or guided waves, and are the result of scattering of the waves due to heterogeneities in the material. Since these waves interact with a region multiple times, the effect of otherwise undetectable changes in material and/or stress state accumulates and becomes detectable. This work examines the feasibility of detecting incipient fatigue damage in CFRP sample with coda wave analysis. Specimens are subjected to low cycle fatigue in a four-point bend set-up. Ultrasonic measurements are periodically taken perpendicular to the direction of loading during the fatiguing process after removing all loads. Detection and reception sensitivity of coda waves in composites are studied. Also studied are the effects of the coupling between the transducer and sample for a reliable and repeatable measurement.

  5. Real-Time Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Gear Train Systems Using Instantaneous Angular Speed (IAS) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sait, Abdulrahman S.

    This dissertation presents a reliable technique for monitoring the condition of rotating machinery by applying instantaneous angular speed (IAS) analysis. A new analysis of the effects of changes in the orientation of the line of action and the pressure angle of the resultant force acting on gear tooth profile of spur gear under different levels of tooth damage is utilized. The analysis and experimental work discussed in this dissertation provide a clear understating of the effects of damage on the IAS by analyzing the digital signals output of rotary incremental optical encoder. A comprehensive literature review of state of the knowledge in condition monitoring and fault diagnostics of rotating machinery, including gearbox system is presented. Progress and new developments over the past 30 years in failure detection techniques of rotating machinery including engines, bearings and gearboxes are thoroughly reviewed. This work is limited to the analysis of a gear train system with gear tooth surface faults utilizing angular motion analysis technique. Angular motion data were acquired using an incremental optical encoder. Results are compared to a vibration-based technique. The vibration data were acquired using an accelerometer. The signals were obtained and analyzed in the phase domains using signal averaging to determine the existence and position of faults on the gear train system. Forces between the mating teeth surfaces are analyzed and simulated to validate the influence of the presence of damage on the pressure angle and the IAS. National Instruments hardware is used and NI LabVIEW software code is developed for real-time, online condition monitoring systems and fault detection techniques. The sensitivity of optical encoders to gear fault detection techniques is experimentally investigated by applying IAS analysis under different gear damage levels and different operating conditions. A reliable methodology is developed for selecting appropriate testing

  6. 50 CFR 622.46 - Prevention of gear conflicts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prevention of gear conflicts. 622.46... Management Measures § 622.46 Prevention of gear conflicts. (a) No person may knowingly place in the Gulf EEZ any article, including fishing gear, that interferes with fishing or obstructs or damages fishing...

  7. Flex-Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Lung-Wen; Peritt, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    Flex-Gears are being developed as an alternative to brushes and slip rings to conduct electricity across a rotating joint. Flex-Gears roll in the annulus of sun and ring gears for electrical contact while maintaining their position by using a novel application of involute gears. A single Flex-Gear is predicted to transfer up to 2.8 amps, thereby allowing a six inch diameter device, holding 30 Flex-Gears, to transfer over 80 amps. Semi-rigid Flex-Gears are proposed to decrease Flex-Gear stress and insure proper gear meshing.

  8. Detection of gear cracks in a complex gearbox of wind turbines using supervised bounded component analysis of vibration signals collected from multi-channel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhixiong; Yan, Xinping; Wang, Xuping; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-06-01

    In the complex gear transmission systems, in wind turbines a crack is one of the most common failure modes and can be fatal to the wind turbine power systems. A single sensor may suffer with issues relating to its installation position and direction, resulting in the collection of weak dynamic responses of the cracked gear. A multi-channel sensor system is hence applied in the signal acquisition and the blind source separation (BSS) technologies are employed to optimally process the information collected from multiple sensors. However, literature review finds that most of the BSS based fault detectors did not address the dependence/correlation between different moving components in the gear systems; particularly, the popular used independent component analysis (ICA) assumes mutual independence of different vibration sources. The fault detection performance may be significantly influenced by the dependence/correlation between vibration sources. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a new method based on the supervised order tracking bounded component analysis (SOTBCA) for gear crack detection in wind turbines. The bounded component analysis (BCA) is a state of art technology for dependent source separation and is applied limitedly to communication signals. To make it applicable for vibration analysis, in this work, the order tracking has been appropriately incorporated into the BCA framework to eliminate the noise and disturbance signal components. Then an autoregressive (AR) model built with prior knowledge about the crack fault is employed to supervise the reconstruction of the crack vibration source signature. The SOTBCA only outputs one source signal that has the closest distance with the AR model. Owing to the dependence tolerance ability of the BCA framework, interfering vibration sources that are dependent/correlated with the crack vibration source could be recognized by the SOTBCA, and hence, only useful fault information could be preserved in

  9. Expansion of epicyclic gear dynamic analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda Smith; Pike, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple mesh/single stage dynamics program is a gear tooth analysis program which determines detailed geometry, dynamic loads, stresses, and surface damage factors. The program can analyze a variety of both epicyclic and single mesh systems with spur or helical gear teeth including internal, external, and buttress tooth forms. The modifications refine the options for the flexible carrier and flexible ring gear rim and adds three options: a floating Sun gear option; a natural frequency option; and a finite element compliance formulation for helical gear teeth. The option for a floating Sun incorporates two additional degrees of freedom at the Sun center. The natural frequency option evaluates the frequencies of planetary, star, or differential systems as well as the effect of additional springs at the Sun center and those due to a flexible carrier and/or ring gear rim. The helical tooth pair finite element calculated compliance is obtained from an automated element breakup of the helical teeth and then is used with the basic gear dynamic solution and stress postprocessing routines. The flexible carrier or ring gear rim option for planetary and star spur gear systems allows the output torque per carrier and ring gear rim segment to vary based on the dynamic response of the entire system, while the total output torque remains constant.

  10. Damage Detection in Concrete Elements with Surface Wave Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Unlimited ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, Captain, USAF Executive Officer DTTC S ELECTE JUL 0 9 1992 33 Au 92-17924 188 DAMAGE DETECTION IN CONCRETE ELEMENTS WITH...RECOMMENDATIONS ON WIDOW LENGTH 2.7 PARAMETERS INVOLVED 3. ANALYTICAL FORMULATION 37 3.1 MODAL ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE SUPPORTED BEAM USING BEAM THEORY 3.1.1...4 1.0c ooo O S . ... - - --. ............. 4".?... 02 0 2.000 le~ 4.000 le~ 6.000 le~ 3.000 le~ 1.000 2C0 FnEQ1UENC-y (HZ) Fiur .1-2 rssPoe SetrmPhse

  11. Investigation of Current Methods to Identify Helicopter Gear Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Le, Dy D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of current vibration methods used to identify the health of helicopter transmission gears. The gears are critical to the transmission system that provides propulsion, lift and maneuvering of the helicopter. This paper reviews techniques used to process vibration data to calculate conditions indicators (CI s), guidelines used by the government aviation authorities in developing and certifying the Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS), condition and health indicators used in commercial HUMS, and different methods used to set thresholds to detect damage. Initial assessment of a method to set thresholds for vibration based condition indicators applied to flight and test rig data by evaluating differences in distributions between comparable transmissions are also discussed. Gear condition indicator FM4 values are compared on an OH58 helicopter during 14 maneuvers and an OH58 transmission test stand during crack propagation tests. Preliminary results show the distributions between healthy helicopter and rig data are comparable and distributions between healthy and damaged gears show significant differences.

  12. Investigation of Current Methods to Identify Helicopter Gear Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Le, Dy D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of current vibration methods used to identify the health of helicopter transmission gears. The gears are critical to the transmission system that provides propulsion, lift and maneuvering of the helicopter. This paper reviews techniques used to process vibration data to calculate conditions indicators (CI's), guidelines used by the government aviation authorities in developing and certifying the Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS), condition and health indicators used in commercial HUMS, and different methods used to set thresholds to detect damage. Initial assessment of a method to set thresholds for vibration based condition indicators applied to flight and test rig data by evaluating differences in distributions between comparable transmissions are also discussed. Gear condition indicator FM4 values are compared on an OH58 helicopter during 14 maneuvers and an OH58 transmission test stand during crack propagation tests. Preliminary results show the distributions between healthy helicopter and rig data are comparable and distributions between healthy and damaged gears show significant differences.

  13. Gear box assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Harrod, L.R.; Siebern, M.R.

    1989-04-25

    This patent describes a gearbox assembly for a vehicle which includes a driven axle shaft extending transversely of the vehicle having wheels secured thereto: a drive gear concentric with the axle shaft nonrotatably connected to the shaft, the drive gear having an integral hub on each of opposite sides thereof, a pinion gear shiftably mounted above the drive gear having one position engaging the drive gear and shiftable laterally to disengage from the drive gear, a shift lever mounted in a position projecting upwardly from the pinion gear actuatable to shift the pinion gear, an electric motor with output shaft mounted with the output shaft paralleling the axle shaft and having a driving gear mounted thereon, a multiple gear gear train mounted so as to establish a driving connection between the driving gear and the pinion gear, and a transmission housing enclosing the driving gar, gear train, pinion gear and drive gear, the housing including sleeve portions rotatably receiving the hubs of the drive gear and thus rotatably mounting the drive gear and the axle shaft connected to the drive gear.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of an auto-correlation-function-based damage index and its application in structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2014-12-01

    Structural damage detection using time domain vibration responses has advantages such as simplicity in calculation and no requirement of a finite element model, which attracts more and more researchers in recent years. In present paper, a new approach to detect the damage based on the auto correlation function is proposed. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals from different measurement points are formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector, AMV for short. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage is used as the damage index to locate the damage. Sensitivity analysis of the normalized AMV with respect to the local stiffness shows that the normalized AMV has a sharp change around the local stiffness change location, which means the normalized AMV is a good indicator to detect the damage even when the damage is very small. Stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story frame structure is provided to illustrate the validity, effectiveness and the anti-noise ability of the proposed method. Comparison of the normalized AMV and the other correlation-function-based damage detection method shows the normalized AMV has a better detectability.

  15. On damage detection in wind turbine gearboxes using outlier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, Ifigeneia; Manson, Graeme; Dervilis, Nikolaos; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Worden, Keith

    2012-04-01

    The proportion of worldwide installed wind power in power systems increases over the years as a result of the steadily growing interest in renewable energy sources. Still, the advantages offered by the use of wind power are overshadowed by the high operational and maintenance costs, resulting in the low competitiveness of wind power in the energy market. In order to reduce the costs of corrective maintenance, the application of condition monitoring to gearboxes becomes highly important, since gearboxes are among the wind turbine components with the most frequent failure observations. While condition monitoring of gearboxes in general is common practice, with various methods having been developed over the last few decades, wind turbine gearbox condition monitoring faces a major challenge: the detection of faults under the time-varying load conditions prevailing in wind turbine systems. Classical time and frequency domain methods fail to detect faults under variable load conditions, due to the temporary effect that these faults have on vibration signals. This paper uses the statistical discipline of outlier analysis for the damage detection of gearbox tooth faults. A simplified two-degree-of-freedom gearbox model considering nonlinear backlash, time-periodic mesh stiffness and static transmission error, simulates the vibration signals to be analysed. Local stiffness reduction is used for the simulation of tooth faults and statistical processes determine the existence of intermittencies. The lowest level of fault detection, the threshold value, is considered and the Mahalanobis squared-distance is calculated for the novelty detection problem.

  16. "Bearingless" Bull Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, J.; Webb, G.

    1991-01-01

    Concept for mounting bull gear eliminates need for heavy bull-gear shaft and its supporting bearings otherwise required to react large loads. Three pairs of pinion gears supply torque to bull gear. Provides lateral support, eliminating need for bull-gear shaft and its bearing. Supporting rings with outer surfaces meeting at pitch circles react lateral loads. Intended primarily for application in helicopter in which bull gear on shaft turning rotor combines driving torques from three or more engines.

  17. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  18. Detection of Incipient Thermal Damage in Polymer Matrix Composites (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Polymer matrix composite mechanical properties have been shown to decrease significantly with the presence of thermal damage. For aerospace applications, this type of damage typically occurs as a result of exposure to elevated temperatures from localized heating, such as lightning strikes, exhaust wash, or improper maintenance/repair procedures. Mechanical testing has shown that this type of damage, known as incipient damage, is present even when no visible damage is observable and can cause significant reduction in mechanical properties. Incipient damage is not

  19. Fukunaga-Koontz feature transformation for statistical structural damage detection and hierarchical neuro-fuzzy damage localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    Considering jointly damage sensitive features (DSFs) of signals recorded by multiple sensors, applying advanced transformations to these DSFs and assessing systematically their contribution to damage detectability and localisation can significantly enhance the performance of structural health monitoring systems. This philosophy is explored here for partial autocorrelation coefficients (PACCs) of acceleration responses. They are interrogated with the help of the linear discriminant analysis based on the Fukunaga-Koontz transformation using datasets of the healthy and selected reference damage states. Then, a simple but efficient fast forward selection procedure is applied to rank the DSF components with respect to statistical distance measures specialised for either damage detection or localisation. For the damage detection task, the optimal feature subsets are identified based on the statistical hypothesis testing. For damage localisation, a hierarchical neuro-fuzzy tool is developed that uses the DSF ranking to establish its own optimal architecture. The proposed approaches are evaluated experimentally on data from non-destructively simulated damage in a laboratory scale wind turbine blade. The results support our claim of being able to enhance damage detectability and localisation performance by transforming and optimally selecting DSFs. It is demonstrated that the optimally selected PACCs from multiple sensors or their Fukunaga-Koontz transformed versions can not only improve the detectability of damage via statistical hypothesis testing but also increase the accuracy of damage localisation when used as inputs into a hierarchical neuro-fuzzy network. Furthermore, the computational effort of employing these advanced soft computing models for damage localisation can be significantly reduced by using transformed DSFs.

  20. Detection of early endothelial damage in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Gualtierotti, Roberta; Ingegnoli, Francesca; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Cugno, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) can be the first manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc) or other connective tissue diseases (CTDs), often preceding an overt disease by years. It is not known if markers of endothelial damage are detectable in those RP patients who subsequently develop a CTD. We studied 82 RP patients at their first evaluation to correlate the levels of endothelial markers with the subsequent development of an overt disease 36months later. We measured plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and von Willebrand factor (vWF), two markers of endothelial damage, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Thirty sex- and age-matched healthy subjects (HS) served as controls. At baseline, 67 patients showed capillaroscopic normal pattern (CNP) and 15 patients, of which 11 were very early SSc, had capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (CSP). Plasma levels of t-PA, vWF and IL-6 were higher in patients with CNP (p=0.0001) than in HS and even much higher in patients with CSP (p=0.0001). In patients with CNP and RP of recent onset (<18months), vWF plasma levels were higher when autoantibodies were present (p=0.020). After 36months, among 48 RP patients with CNP who remained in follow-up, 24 were diagnosed as primary and 24 as secondary RP. In secondary RP, basal levels of t-PA, IL-6 and particularly vWF were higher than in primary RP (p=0.005, p=0.004, p=0.0001 respectively) and HS (p=0.0001 for all). Our findings indicate that markers of endothelial damage are elevated in RP patients who subsequently develop SSc or other CTDs, even in the absence of capillaroscopic abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Planetary gear train

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1988-10-04

    A planetary gear train is described comprising: an input member; an output member; a first planetary gear set including a first sun gear, a first ring gear, and a first pinion carrier rotatably supporting first planet pinions; a secondary planetary gear set including a second sun gear, and second ring gear and a second pinion carrier rotatably supporting second planet pinions; first drive means for connecting the input member with the first ring gear; second drive means for connecting the input member with the first sun gear; third drive means for constantly connecting the first sun gear with the second sun gear and establishing a force transmitting positive drive from the first sun gear to the second sun gear, whereby the first sun gear rotates at a speed different from the second sun gear; first brake means for braking the second sun gear; second brake means for braking the second pinion carrier; fourth drive means for connecting the second ring gear with the output member and providing a first speed ratio therebetween; and fifth drive means for connecting the first pinion carrier with the output member and providing a second speed ratio therebetween, the second speed ratio being different from the first speed ratio.

  2. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M. S.; Ostachowicz, W.; Bai, R. B.; Radzieński, M.

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  3. Agglomerative concentric hypersphere clustering applied to structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Moisés; Santos, Adam; Santos, Reginaldo; Figueiredo, Eloi; Sales, Claudomiro; Costa, João C. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    The present paper proposes a novel cluster-based method, named as agglomerative concentric hypersphere (ACH), to detect structural damage in engineering structures. Continuous structural monitoring systems often require unsupervised approaches to automatically infer the health condition of a structure. However, when a structure is under linear and nonlinear effects caused by environmental and operational variability, data normalization procedures are also required to overcome these effects. The proposed approach aims, through a straightforward clustering procedure, to discover automatically the optimal number of clusters, representing the main state conditions of a structural system. Three initialization procedures are introduced to evaluate the impact of deterministic and stochastic initializations on the performance of this approach. The ACH is compared to state-of-the-art approaches, based on Gaussian mixture models and Mahalanobis squared distance, on standard data sets from a post-tensioned bridge located in Switzerland: the Z-24 Bridge. The proposed approach demonstrates more efficiency in modeling the normal condition of the structure and its corresponding main clusters. Furthermore, it reveals a better classification performance than the alternative ones in terms of false-positive and false-negative indications of damage, demonstrating a promising applicability in real-world structural health monitoring scenarios.

  4. Early Damage Detection in Composites during Fabrication and Mechanical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Neha; Sanchez, Daniel Martinez; Soutis, Constantinos; Gresil, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Fully integrated monitoring systems have shown promise in improving confidence in composite materials while reducing lifecycle costs. A distributed optical fibre sensor is embedded in a fibre reinforced composite laminate, to give three sensing regions at different levels through-the-thickness of the plate. This study follows the resin infusion process during fabrication of the composite, monitoring the development of strain in-situ and in real time, and to gain better understanding of the resin rheology during curing. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors and electrical strain gauges are bonded to the plate after fabrication. This is followed by progressive loading/unloading cycles of mechanical four point bending. The strain values obtained from the optical fibre are in good agreement with strain data collected by surface mounted strain gauges, while the sensing regions clearly indicate the development of compressive, neutral, and tensile strain. Acoustic emission event detection suggests the formation of matrix (resin) cracks, with measured damage event amplitudes in agreement with values reported in published literature on the subject. The Felicity ratio for each subsequent loading cycle is calculated to track the progression of damage in the material. The methodology developed here can be used to follow the full life cycle of a composite structure, from manufacture to end-of-life. PMID:28773048

  5. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2010-03-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  6. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  8. Ultrasonic imaging in liquid sodium: topological energy for damages detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeigt, E.; Gobillot, G.; Mensah, S.; Chaix, J.F.; Rakotonarivo, S.

    2015-07-01

    Under-sodium imaging at high temperature is an important requirement in sodium cooled fast reactors during structural inspection. It aims at checking the integrity of immersed structures and assessing component degradation. The work presented in this paper focuses on designing an advanced ultrasound methodology for detecting damages such as deep crack defects. For that purpose, a topological imaging approach was implemented. This method takes advantage of all available prior knowledge about the environment through the integration of differential imaging and time reversal techniques. The quality of the topological energy distribution (the image) is further enhanced by applying a time gating related to each reconstructed pixel. Numerical and experimental results are presented using this method in order to confirm its reliability. These images are compared to a B-scan to emphasize the localization performances of this method. (authors)

  9. A continuous sensor for damage detection in bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Ghoshal, Anindya; Schulz, Mark J.

    2002-08-01

    The concept of a continuous sensor for detecting vibration and stress waves in bars is investigated in this paper. This type of sensor is a long tape with a number of sensing nodes that are electrically connected together to form a single sensor with one channel of data output. The spacing of the sensor nodes can be designed such that the sensor is capable of detecting acoustic emissions (AEs) occurring at any point along the length of the sensor. An active fiber composite material or piezoceramic wafers can be used as the active element of the sensor. The characteristics of this new type of sensor were investigated by a simplified simulation and through experiments. The scope of the simulation is primarily to determine the characteristics of the new type of sensor that is proposed and the simulation is not intended to model the complex dispersion characteristics of guided waves in bars. The sensor was modeled as being integrated within a uniform cantilever bar to measure longitudinal stress wave propagation. Damping was included in the model to attenuate the wave as it travels. The sensor was connected to an electrical tuning circuit to examine the capability to filter out undesirable noise due to ambient vibration that would occur in practice. The elastic response of the bar was computed in closed form, and the coupled piezoelectric constitutive equations and electric circuit equations were solved using the Newmark-Beta numerical integration method. Strain, vibration, and wave propagation responses were simulated and results indicate that damage to the bar can be detected by recognizable changes in the sensor output as the wave propagates along the bar and passes over each sensor node. Experiments were performed to verify the concept of the continuous sensor on a composite bar. The testing showed the continuous sensor can replace four or more individual sensors to detect AEs and thus may be a practical method for structural health monitoring.

  10. Antibacklash gears including rack and pinion gears

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkoff, E.F.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a meshing gear construction comprising a first gear having a plurality of fixed teeth extending therefrom. The teeth alternatingly separated by a plurality of roots each having a radial centerline, faces on either side of each fixed tooth, each root being a continuation of a pair of faces of two adjacent teeth, a second gear having a plurality of rollers thereon rotatable relative to the second gear. The rollers meshing with the fixed teeth of the first gear. The meshing comprising rolling contact of at least two rollers with one first gear fixed tooth at all instants of motion. Wherein the rollers comprise cylindrical rollers and the faces of the fixed teeth comprise circular arcs in profile and wherein a radial centers of fixed tooth circular arc face lies outside a pitch circle of the first gear and between the circular arc face and the radial centerline of an adjacent root.

  11. Numerical simulation of damage detection using laser-generated ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peipei; Nazirah, Ab Wahab; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques have been widely investigated due to its high spatial resolution and capacity for remote and noncontact measurement. In this study, the laser induced ultrasonic wave on an aluminum plate is simulated, and a nonlinear feature is used to detect a micro crack introduced in the plate model. A multi-physics simulation is conducted and optimized considering the effect of thermal diffusion. A nonlinear feature, called Bhattacharyya Distance (BD), is calculated to show the crack-induced geometric difference among the state space attractors obtained from closely spaced measurement points near the crack. First, a 3D model is built, and its simulation result is compared with an experiment performed using a noncontact laser ultrasonic measurement system. Then, by creating a micro crack in the model, BD is extracted and the crack is successfully detected and visualized. Finally, the effects of BD parameters, such as embedding dimension and frequency band, on damage visualization are investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.; Peeters, B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bladed wheels and the fluid distributed by the stator vanes results in cyclic loading of the rotating components. Compressors and turbines wheels are subject to vibration and fatigue issues, especially when resonance conditions are excited. Even if resonance conditions can be often predicted and avoided, high cycle fatigue failures can occur, causing safety issues and economic loss. Rigorous maintenance programs are then needed, forcing the system to expensive shut-down. Blade crack detection methods are beneficial for condition-based maintenance. While contact measurement systems are not always usable in exercise conditions (e.g. high temperature), non-contact methods can be more suitable. One (or more) stator-fixed sensor can measure all the blades as they pass by, in order to detect the damaged ones. The main drawback in this situation is the short acquisition time available for each blade, which is shortened by the high rotational speed of the components. A traditional Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis would result in a poor frequency resolution. A Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis (NHFA) can be executed with an arbitrary frequency resolution instead, allowing to obtain frequency information even with short-time data samples. This paper shows an analytical investigation of the NHFA method. A data processing algorithm is then proposed to obtain frequency shift information from short time samples. The performances of this algorithm are then studied by experimental and numerical tests.

  13. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  14. Carbon dots based FRET for the detection of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Richtera, Lukas; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Hynek, David; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-09

    Here, we aimed our attention at the synthesis of carbon dots (C-dots) with the ability to interact with DNA to suggest an approach for the detection of DNA damage. Primarily, C-dots modified with amine moieties were synthesized using the one-step microwave pyrolysis of citric acid in the presence of diethylenetriamine. The C-dots showed strong photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 4%. In addition, the C-dots (2.8±0.8nm) possessed a good colloidal stability and exhibited a positive surface charge (ζ=36mV) at a neutral pH. An interaction study of the C-dots and the DNA fragment of λ bacteriophage was performed, and the DNA binding resulted in changes to the photoluminescent and absorption properties of the C-dots. A binding of the C-dots to DNA was also observed as a change to DNA electrophoretic mobility and a decreased ability to intercalate ethidium bromide (EtBr). Moreover, the Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the C-dots and EtBr was studied, in which the C-dots serve as an excitation energy donor and the EtBr serves as an acceptor. When DNA was damaged using ultraviolet (UV) radiation (λ=254nm) and hydroxyl radicals, the intensity of the emitted photoluminescence at 612nm significantly decreased. The concept was proved on analysis of the genomic DNA from PC-3 cells and DNA isolated from melanoma tissues.

  15. Mechanistically-informed damage detection using dynamic measurements: Extended constitutive relation error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Prabhu, S.; Atamturktur, S.; Cogan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Model-based damage detection entails the calibration of damage-indicative parameters in a physics-based computer model of an undamaged structural system against measurements collected from its damaged counterpart. The approach relies on the premise that changes identified in the damage-indicative parameters during calibration reveal the structural damage in the system. In model-based damage detection, model calibration has traditionally been treated as a process, solely operating on the model output without incorporating available knowledge regarding the underlying mechanistic behavior of the structural system. In this paper, the authors propose a novel approach for model-based damage detection by implementing the Extended Constitutive Relation Error (ECRE), a method developed for error localization in finite element models. The ECRE method was originally conceived to identify discrepancies between experimental measurements and model predictions for a structure in a given healthy state. Implementing ECRE for damage detection leads to the evaluation of a structure in varying healthy states and determination of discrepancy between model predictions and experiments due to damage. The authors developed an ECRE-based damage detection procedure in which the model error and structural damage are identified in two distinct steps and demonstrate feasibility of the procedure in identifying the presence, location and relative severity of damage on a scaled two-story steel frame for damage scenarios of varying type and severity.

  16. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth.

    PubMed

    Hood, Adrian A; Pines, Darryll J

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency.

  17. Feasibility of a phased acoustic array for monitoring acoustic signatures from meshing gear teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Adrian A.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2002-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A planar phased acoustic array is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting spatially filtered acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, the use of beam focusing and steering to monitor individual tooth mesh dynamics is analyzed taking into consideration the constraints of the array/gearbox geometry and the spectral content of typical gear noise. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and spatial acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the planar array can be used to track the acoustic signatures at higher harmonics of the gear mesh frequency.

  18. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, R.; Clarke, A.; Eaton, M. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Holford, K. M.

    2012-08-01

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  19. A Novel 3D Building Damage Detection Method Using Multiple Overlapping UAV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, H.; Tu, J.; Song, Z.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is presented that applies multiple overlapping UAV imagesto building damage detection. Traditional building damage detection method focus on 2D changes detection (i.e., those only in image appearance), whereas the 2D information delivered by the images is often not sufficient and accurate when dealing with building damage detection. Therefore the detection of building damage in 3D feature of scenes is desired. The key idea of 3D building damage detection is the 3D Change Detection using 3D point cloud obtained from aerial images through Structure from motion (SFM) techniques. The approach of building damage detection discussed in this paper not only uses the height changes of 3D feature of scene but also utilizes the image's shape and texture feature. Therefore, this method fully combines the 2D and 3D information of the real world to detect the building damage. The results, tested through field study, demonstrate that this method is feasible and effective in building damage detection. It has also shown that the proposed method is easily applicable and suited well for rapid damage assessment after natural disasters.

  20. Damage detection of structures identified with deterministic-stochastic models using seismic data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chih; Wang, Yen-Po; Chang, Ming-Lian

    2014-01-01

    A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV) is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s) with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems.

  1. Shuttle Rudder/Speed Brake Power Drive Unit (PDU) Gear Scuffing Tests With Flight Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Oswald, Fred B.; Krants, Timothy L.

    2005-01-01

    Scuffing-like damage has been found on the tooth surfaces of gears 5 and 6 of the NASA space shuttle rudder/speed brake power drive unit (PDU) number 2 after the occurrence of a transient back-driving event in flight. Tests were conducted using a pair of unused spare flight gears in a bench test at operating conditions up to 2866 rpm and 1144 in.-lb at the input ring gear and 14,000 rpm and 234 in.-lb at the output pinion gear, corresponding to a power level of 52 hp. This test condition exceeds the maximum estimated conditions expected in a backdriving event thought to produce the scuffing damage. Some wear marks were produced, but they were much less severe than the scuffing damaged produced during shuttle flight. Failure to produce scuff damage like that found on the shuttle may be due to geometrical variations between the scuffed gears and the gears tested herein, more severe operating conditions during the flight that produced the scuff than estimated, the order of the test procedures, the use of new hydraulic oil, differences between the dynamic response of the flight gearbox and the bench-test gearbox, or a combination of these. This report documents the test gears, apparatus, and procedures, summarizes the test results, and includes a discussion of the findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

  2. Damage Detection in Cryogenic Composites for Space Applications Using Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    arrays of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) bonded to a structure to both transmit and sense ultrasonic elastic waves for damage detection...Table 1. Table 1. Summary of PWAS damage detection methods. Wave Propagation Standing Wave Method amage D Pitch-Catch Pulse-echo Phased - Array ...conditions, and stress conditions. Results from these experiments indicate that a PWAS based array is capable of detecting low velocity impact damage

  3. Experimental validation of a structural damage detection method based on marginal Hilbert spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, Srishti; Roy, Timir B.; Sabamehr, Ardalan; Bagchi, Ashutosh

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) using dynamic characteristics of structures is crucial for early damage detection. Damage detection can be performed by capturing and assessing structural responses. Instrumented structures are monitored by analyzing the responses recorded by deployed sensors in the form of signals. Signal processing is an important tool for the processing of the collected data to diagnose anomalies in structural behavior. The vibration signature of the structure varies with damage. In order to attain effective damage detection, preservation of non-linear and non-stationary features of real structural responses is important. Decomposition of the signals into Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and application of Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) addresses the time-varying instantaneous properties of the structural response. The energy distribution among different vibration modes of the intact and damaged structure depicted by Marginal Hilbert Spectrum (MHS) detects location and severity of the damage. The present work investigates damage detection analytically and experimentally by employing MHS. The testing of this methodology for different damage scenarios of a frame structure resulted in its accurate damage identification. The sensitivity of Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) is assessed with varying frequencies and damage locations by means of calculating Damage Indices (DI) from the Hilbert spectrum curves of the undamaged and damaged structures.

  4. Gear tooth topological modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Isabelle, Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The topology of parallel axis gears, such as spur and helical gears is modified to produce quieter and more smoothly operating gear sets with more uniform load distribution. A finite element analysis of the gear in its operating mode is made to produce a plot of radial and tangential deflections of the pinion and gear tooth surfaces which will occur when the gears are loaded during operation. The resultant plot is then inverted to produce a plot, or set of coordinates, which will define the path of travel of the gear tooth grinding wheel, which path is a mirror image of the plot of the finite element analysis. The resulting gears, when subjected to operating loads, will thus be deflected tangentially and radially to their optimum operating, or theoretical true involute, positions so as to produce quieter, smoother, and more evenly loaded gear trains.

  5. A novel damage index for fatigue damage detection in a laminated composites using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Daigo

    A well-established structural health monitoring (SHM) technique, the Lamb wave based approach, is used for fatigue damage identification in a laminated composite. A novel damage index, 'normalized correlation moment' (NCM) which is composed of the nth moment of the cross correlation of the baseline and comparison waves, was used as damage index for monitoring damage in composites and compared with the signal difference coefficient (SDC) which is one of the most commonly used damage indices. Composite specimens were fabricated by the hand layup method by followed by compression. Piezo electric disks mounted on composite specimens were used as actuators and sensors. Three point bending fatigue tests were carried out on an intact composite laminate and a delaminated composite laminate with [06/904/06] orientation. Finite element analysis was performed to test the validity of SDC and NCM for fatigue damage.

  6. Pansharpening Techniques to Detect Mass Monument Damaging in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocchi, V.; Bianchi, A.; Maddaluno, C.; Vidale, M.

    2017-05-01

    The recent mass destructions of monuments in Iraq cannot be monitored with the terrestrial survey methodologies, for obvious reasons of safety. For the same reasons, it's not advisable the use of classical aerial photogrammetry, so it was obvious to think to the use of multispectral Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite imagery. Nowadays VHR satellite images resolutions are very near airborne photogrammetrical images and usually they are acquired in multispectral mode. The combination of the various bands of the images is called pan-sharpening and it can be carried on using different algorithms and strategies. The correct pansharpening methodology, for a specific image, must be chosen considering the specific multispectral characteristics of the satellite used and the particular application. In this paper a first definition of guidelines for the use of VHR multispectral imagery to detect monument destruction in unsafe area, is reported. The proposed methodology, agreed with UNESCO and soon to be used in Libya for the coastal area, has produced a first report delivered to the Iraqi authorities. Some of the most evident examples are reported to show the possible capabilities of identification of damages using VHR images.

  7. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold–Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified. PMID:27706067

  8. Signal processing for damage detection using two different array transducers.

    PubMed

    El Youbi, F; Grondel, S; Assaad, J

    2004-04-01

    This work describes an investigation into the development of a new health monitoring system for aeronautical applications. The health monitoring system is based on the emission and reception of Lamb waves by multi-element piezoelectric transducers (i.e., arrays) bonded to the structure. The emitter array consists of three different elementary bar transducers. These transducers have the same thickness and length but different widths. The receiver array has 32 same elements. This system offers the possibility to understand the nature of the generated waves and to determine the sensitivity of each mode to possible damage. It presents two principal advantages: Firstly, by exciting all elements in phase, it is possible to generate several Lamb modes in the same time. Secondly, the two-dimensional fourier transform (2D-FT) of the received signal can be easily computed. Experimental results concerning an aluminum plate with different hole sizes will be shown. The A0-, S0-, A1-, S1- and S2-modes are generated at the same time. This study shows that the A0 mode seems particularly interesting to detect flaws of this geometrical type.

  9. Lightning detection network averts damage and speeds restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, R.; Samm, R.; Cummins, K.; Pyle, R.; Tuel, J.

    1996-04-01

    This article describes new tools to track thunderstorms for advance warning, enabling utilities to reduce damage and shorten repair time. Based on an extensive survey of US power utilities, lightning is the single largest cause of outages on distribution and transmission systems in lightning prone areas. But now with the aid of a network of electromagnetic sensors, computer systems, and satellite communications, the National Lightning Detection Network{trademark} (NLDN) helps utilities prepare for storms. Utilities in the path of intense lightning storms can prepare for storms, alert repair crews, and arrange for help from neighboring utilities. Real-time lightning data has been shown to reduce maintenance costs by shortening the thunder-storm-watch period and to improve reliability by allowing prepositioning of repair crews. Also, using line failure history, designers can analyze the lightning and line historical data and prioritize line upgrades to protect them from future storms by employing additional protection. Documented evidence available from the NLDN system helps utilities prove the time and location of lightning strikes, quickly resolving insurance claims. This network is a product of two EPRI research projects (RP3669 and RP2741).

  10. Damage Detection in Concrete Using Diffuse Ultrasound Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroo, Frederik; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Sabra, Karim

    2010-02-01

    Heterogeneities in concrete caused by the random distribution of aggregate in the cement-paste matrix lead to strong scattering of ultrasonic waves at wavelengths on the order of the aggregate. Use of these high frequencies is necessary to detect damage at an early stage, something that is not possible with conventional ultrasonic methods. The ultrasound energy density in that regime can be described by the diffusion equation. The objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of the effects of additional scattering sources, such as small cracks in the cement-paste matrix, on the parameters of the diffusion equation; these parameters are the diffusion and the dissipation coefficients. Applying diffusion theory, the diffusivity and dissipation coefficients are experimentally determined as functions of frequency using ultrasonic waves. The cuboid shaped samples employed are made of a Portland cement-paste matrix and regular aggregate, such as gravel and sand. The results provide a basic understanding of repeatability and consistency of diffusion measurements, with an emphasis on the nondestructive evaluation of concrete.

  11. Amplitude Dispersion Compensation for Damage Detection Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Huang, Liping; Zhao, Ming

    2016-09-30

    Besides the phase and group velocities, the amplitude of guided wave mode is also frequency dependent. This amplitude dispersion also influences the performance of guided wave methods in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). In this paper, the effects of amplitude dispersion to the spectrum and waveform of a propagating wave-packet are investigated. It is shown that the amplitude dispersion results in distortion in the spectrum of guided wave response, and thus influences the waveform of the wave-packet. To remove these effects, an amplitude dispersion compensation method is established on the basis of Vold-Kalman filter and Taylor series expansion. The performance of that method is then investigated by experimental examples. The results show that with the application of the amplitude dispersion compensation, the time reversibility could be preserved, which ensures the applicability of the time reversal method for damage detection. Besides, through amplitude dispersion compensation, the testing resolution of guided waves could be improved, so that the structural features located in the close proximity may be separately identified.

  12. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  13. System Would Detect Foreign-Object Damage in Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed data-fusion system, to be implemented mostly in software, would further process the digitized and preprocessed outputs of sensors in a turbofan engine to detect foreign-object damage (FOD) [more precisely, damage caused by impingement of such foreign objects as birds, pieces of ice, and runway debris]. The proposed system could help a flight crew to decide what, if any, response is necessary to complete a flight safely, and could aid mechanics in deciding what post-flight maintenance action might be needed. The sensory information to be utilized by the proposed system would consist of (1) the output of an accelerometer in an engine-vibration-monitoring subsystem and (2) features extracted from a gas path analysis. ["Gas path analysis" (GPA) is a term of art that denotes comprehensive analysis of engine performance derived from readings of fuel-flow meters, shaft-speed sensors, temperature sensors, and the like.] The acceleration signal would first be processed by a wavelet-transform-based algorithm, using a wavelet created for the specific purpose of finding abrupt FOD-induced changes in noisy accelerometer signals. Two additional features extracted would be the amplitude of vibration (determined via a single- frequency Fourier transform calculated at the rotational speed of the engine), and the rate of change in amplitude due to an FOD-induced rotor imbalance. This system would utilize two GPA features: the fan efficiency and the rate of change of fan efficiency with time. The selected GPA and vibrational features would be assessed by two fuzzy-logic inference engines, denoted the "Gas Path Expert" and the "Vibration Expert," respectively (see Figure 1). Each of these inference engines would generate a "possibility" distribution for occurrence of an FOD event: Each inference engine would assign, to its input information, degrees of membership, which would subsequently be transformed into basic probability assignments for the gas path and vibration

  14. Modular gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  15. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  16. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  17. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  18. Using reflectance and photography to detect ozone damage to cantaloupe plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Escobar, D. E.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Thomas, C. E.; Bowen, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Laboratory and field reflectance measurements showed that ozone-damaged cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L.) leaves had lower water contents and higher reflectance than nondamaged leaves. Cantaloupe plants with lightly, severely, and very severely ozone-damaged leaves were distinguishable from nondamaged plants by reflectance measurements in the 1.35-2.5-micron near-IR water absorption band. Ozone-damaged leaf areas were detected photographically 16 hours before the damage was visible.

  19. Magnetic gear backup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shefke, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    Backup clutch for magnetic gear operates only in case of slippage. Contacting a pin arrangement in the driven gear, the clutch provides extra force for continuing output. It does not interfere with normal, noncontact action.

  20. Concentric differential gearing arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiger, R. J.; Gerdts, J. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Two input members and two concentric rotatable output members are interconnected by a planetary gear arrangement. The first input drives directly the first output. The second input engages a carrier having the planetary gears affixed thereto. Rotation of the carriage causes rotation of the central sun gear of the planetary gear system. The sun gear is journaled to the carriage and is drivingly connected to the second output through a direction reversing set of bevel gears. The first input drive member includes a ring gear drivingly connected to the planetary gears for driving the second output member in the same direction and by the same amount as the first output member. Motion of the first input results in equal motion of the two outputs while input motion of the second input results in movement of the second output relative to the first output. This device is useful where non-interacting two-axis control of remote gimbaled systems is required.

  1. Fast Detection of Seeds and Freeze Damage of Mandarines Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Min; Milczarek, Rebecca; McCarthy, Michael

    Fast detection of seeds and freeze damage in mandarine citrus fruit was performed using magnetic resonance imaging. A 1 T industrial grade permanent magnet was used to acquire the image data. The spatial resolution of the image was 550 μm. A fast spin echo pulse sequence was used to detect freeze damage and seeds. The signal intensity of seeds and freeze damaged regions was weaker than normal tissue. Threshold based image analysis has proven successful in detecting seeds and quantifying freeze damage.

  2. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  3. Investigation of the effects of manufacturing variations and materials on fatigue crack detection methods in gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheitner, Jeffrey A.; Houser, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    The fatigue life of a gear tooth can be thought of as the sum of the number of cycles required to initiate a crack, N(sub i), plus the number of cycles required to propagate the crack to such a length that fracture occurs, N(sub p). The factors that govern crack initiation are thought to be related to localized stress or strain at a point, while propagation of a fatigue crack is a function of the crack tip parameters such as crack shape, stress state, and stress intensity factor. During a test there is no clear transition between initiation and propagation. The mechanisms of initiation and propagation are quite different and modeling them separately produces a higher degree of accuracy, but then the question that continually arises is 'what is a crack?' The total life prediction in a fracture mechanics model presently hinges on the assumption of an initial crack length, and this length can significantly affect the total life prediction. The size of the initial crack is generally taken to be in the range of 0.01 in. to 0.2 in. Several researchers have used various techniques to determine the beginning of the crack propagation stage. Barhorst showed the relationship between dynamic stiffness changes and crack propagation. Acoustic emissions, which are stress waves produced by the sudden movement of stressed materials, have also been successfully used to monitor the growth of cracks in tensile and fatigue specimens. The purpose of this research is to determine whether acoustic emissions can be used to define the beginning of crack propagation in a gear using a single-tooth bending fatigue test.

  4. Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) Technique for the Rapid Detection of Earthquake-Induced Damages Using SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ram C.; Tateishi, Ryutaro; Hara, Keitarou; Nguyen, Hoan Thanh; Gharechelou, Saeid; Nguyen, Luong Viet

    2017-01-01

    The damage of buildings and manmade structures, where most of human activities occur, is the major cause of casualties of from earthquakes. In this paper, an improved technique, Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) is presented for the rapid detection of earthquake damage using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The EDV is based on the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence change method. The normalized difference between the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherences, and vice versa, are used to calculate the forward (from pre-seismic to co-seismic) and backward (from co-seismic to pre-seismic) change parameters, respectively. The backward change parameter is added to visualize the retrospective changes caused by factors other than the earthquake. The third change-free parameter uses the average values of the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence maps. These three change parameters were ultimately merged into the EDV as an RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) composite imagery. The EDV could visualize the earthquake damage efficiently using Horizontal transmit and Horizontal receive (HH), and Horizontal transmit and Vertical receive (HV) polarizations data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Its performance was evaluated in the Kathmandu Valley, which was hit severely by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake. The cross-validation results showed that the EDV is more sensitive to the damaged buildings than the existing method. The EDV could be used for building damage detection in other earthquakes as well. PMID:28134796

  5. Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) Technique for the Rapid Detection of Earthquake-Induced Damages Using SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ram C; Tateishi, Ryutaro; Hara, Keitarou; Nguyen, Hoan Thanh; Gharechelou, Saeid; Nguyen, Luong Viet

    2017-01-27

    The damage of buildings and manmade structures, where most of human activities occur, is the major cause of casualties of from earthquakes. In this paper, an improved technique, Earthquake Damage Visualization (EDV) is presented for the rapid detection of earthquake damage using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The EDV is based on the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence change method. The normalized difference between the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherences, and vice versa, are used to calculate the forward (from pre-seismic to co-seismic) and backward (from co-seismic to pre-seismic) change parameters, respectively. The backward change parameter is added to visualize the retrospective changes caused by factors other than the earthquake. The third change-free parameter uses the average values of the pre-seismic and co-seismic coherence maps. These three change parameters were ultimately merged into the EDV as an RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) composite imagery. The EDV could visualize the earthquake damage efficiently using Horizontal transmit and Horizontal receive (HH), and Horizontal transmit and Vertical receive (HV) polarizations data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Its performance was evaluated in the Kathmandu Valley, which was hit severely by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake. The cross-validation results showed that the EDV is more sensitive to the damaged buildings than the existing method. The EDV could be used for building damage detection in other earthquakes as well.

  6. Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage Detection of Periodic Structures with Piezoelectric Networking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) December 15. 2006 to May 3 1. 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage...localization characteristics of such periodic structures to enhance damage detection sensitivity and robustness through piezoelectric circuitry...ANSI Sid Z39 18 Adobe Professional 7.0 Highly Sensitive and Robust Damage Detection of Periodic Structures with Piezoelectric Networking GRANT

  7. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  8. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  9. Autoregressive model-based gear shaft fault diagnosis using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiyang; Makis, Viliam

    2009-11-01

    Vibration behavior induced by gear shaft crack is different from that induced by gear tooth crack. Hence, a fault indicator used to detect tooth damage may not be effective for monitoring shaft condition. This paper proposes an autoregressive model-based technique to detect the occurrence and advancement of gear shaft cracks. An autoregressive model is fitted to the time synchronously averaged signal of the gear shaft in its healthy state. The order of the autoregressive model is selected using Akaike information criterion and the coefficient estimates are obtained by solving the Yule-Walker equations with the Levinson-Durbin recursion algorithm. The established autoregressive model is then used as a linear prediction filter to process the future signal. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is applied on line for the prediction of error signals. The calculated distance is used as a fault indicator and its capability to diagnose shaft crack effectively is demonstrated using a full lifetime gear shaft vibration data history. The other frequently used statistical measures such as kurtosis and variance are also calculated and the results are compared with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.

  10. Gear visual inspection system and application in logarithmic spiral bevel gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Yi; Yan, Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    The system uses machine vision technology to inspect logarithmic spiral bevel gears. This is a new non-contact measurement technique with high precision and efficiency. Use two cameras in a different location to shoot two images of gear, and collect gear images into the computer. Use correspondence between feature points of two images and optical imaging geometric model to solve three-dimensional coordinates of the tooth surface points. Then, discriminate the tooth shape by comparing to ideal surface point parameters. This kind of inspection method flexibility and provides technical support for processing, detection and correction of logarithmic spiral bevel gears.

  11. Gear visual inspection system and application in logarithmic spiral bevel gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Yi; Yan, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    The system uses machine vision technology to inspect logarithmic spiral bevel gears. This is a new non-contact measurement technique with high precision and efficiency. Use two cameras in a different location to shoot two images of gear, and collect gear images into the computer. Use correspondence between feature points of two images and optical imaging geometric model to solve three-dimensional coordinates of the tooth surface points. Then, discriminate the tooth shape by comparing to ideal surface point parameters. This kind of inspection method flexibility and provides technical support for processing, detection and correction of logarithmic spiral bevel gears.

  12. Vibration-based damage detection for filament wound pressure vessel filled with fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Wu, Z.; Li, H.

    2008-03-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels have been extensively used in industry and engineering. The existing damage detection and health monitoring methods for these vessels, such as X-ray and ultrasonic scan, can not meet the requirement of online damage detection; moreover optical grating fibre can only sense the local damage, but not the damage far away from the location of sensors. Vibration-based damage detection methods have the potential to meet such requirements. There methods are based on the fact that damages in a structure results in a change in structural dynamic characteristics. A damage detection method based on a residual associated with output-only subspace-based modal identification and global or focused chi^2-tests built on that residual has been proposed and successfully experimented on a variety of test cases. The purpose of this work is to describe the damage detection method and apply this method to assess the composite structure filled with fluid. The results of identification and damage detection will be presented.

  13. Output-Based Structural Damage Detection by Using Correlation Analysis Together with Transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongyou; Liu, Quanmin; Wahab, Magd Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Output-based structural damage detection is becoming increasingly appealing due to its potential in real engineering applications without any restriction regarding excitation measurements. A new transmissibility-based damage detection approach is presented in this study by combining transmissibility with correlation analysis in order to strengthen its performance in discriminating damaged from undamaged scenarios. From this perspective, damage detection strategies are hereafter established by constructing damage-sensitive indicators from a derived transmissibility. A cantilever beam is numerically analyzed to verify the feasibility of the proposed damage detection procedure, and an ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) benchmark is henceforth used in the validation for its application in engineering structures. The results of both studies reveal a good performance of the proposed methodology in identifying damaged states from intact states. The comparison between the proposed indicator and the existing indicator also affirms its applicability in damage detection, which might be adopted in further structural health monitoring systems as a discrimination criterion. This study contributed an alternative criterion for transmissibility-based damage detection in addition to the conventional ones. PMID:28773218

  14. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of spur gear in altered tooth-sum gearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachidananda, H. K.; Gonsalvis, Joseph; Prakash, H. R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the contact stress, power loss, and pitting of spur gear tooth in altered tooth-sum gearing for a tooth-sum of 100 teeth when altered by ±4% tooth-sum. Analytical and experimental methods were performed to investigate and compare the altered tooth-sum gearing against the standard tooth-sum gearing. The experiments were performed using a power recirculating type test rig. The tooth loads for the experimental investigations were determined considering the surface durability of gears. A clear picture of the surface damage was obtained using a scanning electron microphotograph. The negative alteration in the tooth-sum performed better than the positive alteration in a tooth-sum operating between specified center distances.

  15. Structural damage detection by a new iterative regularization method and an improved sensitivity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezami, Alireza; Shariatmadar, Hashem; Sarmadi, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    A new sensitivity-based damage detection method is proposed to identify and estimate the location and severity of structural damage using incomplete noisy modal data. For these purposes, an improved sensitivity function of modal strain energy (MSE) based on Lagrange optimization problem is derived to adapt the initial sensitivity formulation of MSE to damage detection problem with the aid of new mathematical approaches. In the presence of incomplete noisy modal data, the sensitivity matrix is sparse, rectangular, and ill-conditioned, which leads to an ill-posed damage equation. To overcome this issue, a new regularization method named as Regularized Least Squares Minimal Residual (RLSMR) is proposed to solve the ill-posed damage equation. This method relies on Krylov subspace and exploits bidiagonalization and iterative algorithms to solve linear mathematical systems. For the majority of Krylov subspace methods, conventional direct methods for the determination of an optimal regularization parameter may not be proper. To cope with this limitation, a hybrid technique is introduced that depends on the residual of RLSMR method, the number of iterations, and the bidiagonalization algorithm. The accuracy and performance of the improved and proposed methods are numerically examined by a planner truss by incorporating incomplete noisy modal parameters and finite element modeling errors. A comparative study on the initial and improved sensitivity functions is conduced to investigate damage detectability of these sensitivity formulations. Furthermore, the accuracy and robustness of RLSMR method in detecting damage are compared with the well-known Tikhonov regularization method. Results show that the improved sensitivity of MSE is an efficient tool for using in the damage detection problem due to a high sensitivity to damage and reliable damage detectability in comparison with the initial sensitivity function. Additionally, it is observed that the RLSMR method with the aid

  16. Structural Damage Detection Using Changes in Natural Frequencies: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, K.; Zhu, W. D.

    2011-07-01

    A vibration-based method that uses changes in natural frequencies of a structure to detect damage has advantages over conventional nondestructive tests in detecting various types of damage, including loosening of bolted joints, using minimum measurement data. Two major challenges associated with applications of the vibration-based damage detection method to engineering structures are addressed: accurate modeling of structures and the development of a robust inverse algorithm to detect damage, which are defined as the forward and inverse problems, respectively. To resolve the forward problem, new physics-based finite element modeling techniques are developed for fillets in thin-walled beams and for bolted joints, so that complex structures can be accurately modeled with a reasonable model size. To resolve the inverse problem, a logistical function transformation is introduced to convert the constrained optimization problem to an unconstrained one, and a robust iterative algorithm using a trust-region method, called the Levenberg-Marquardt method, is developed to accurately detect the locations and extent of damage. The new methodology can ensure global convergence of the iterative algorithm in solving under-determined system equations and deal with damage detection problems with relatively large modeling error and measurement noise. The vibration-based damage detection method is applied to various structures including lightning masts, a space frame structure and one of its components, and a pipeline. The exact locations and extent of damage can be detected in the numerical simulation where there is no modeling error and measurement noise. The locations and extent of damage can be successfully detected in experimental damage detection.

  17. Damage detection of structures with detrended fluctuation and detrended cross-correlation analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Fajri, Haikal

    2017-03-01

    Recently, fractal analysis has shown its potential for damage detection and assessment in fields such as biomedical and mechanical engineering. For its practicability in interpreting irregular, complex, and disordered phenomena, a structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) is proposed. First, damage conditions can be swiftly detected by evaluating ambient vibration signals measured from a structure through DFA. Damage locations can then be determined by analyzing the cross correlation of signals of different floors by applying DCCA. A damage index is also proposed based on multi-scale DCCA curves to improve the damage location accuracy. To verify the performance of the proposed SHM system, a four-story numerical model was used to simulate various damage conditions with different noise levels. Furthermore, an experimental verification was conducted on a seven-story benchmark structure to assess the potential damage. The results revealed that the DFA method could detect the damage conditions satisfactorily, and damage locations can be identified through the DCCA method with an accuracy of 75%. Moreover, damage locations can be correctly assessed by the damage index method with an improved accuracy of 87.5%. The proposed SHM system has promising application in practical implementations.

  18. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  19. Damage detection by a FE model updating method using power spectral density: Numerical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Masoud; Esfandiari, Akbar; Khedmati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates the viability of damage detection using power spectral density (PSD) of structural response both numerically and experimentally. The paper establishes a sensitivity based damage detection method to use PSD. The advantages of PSD as a model updating metric are explained and its challenges are addressed. An approximate frequency response function of damaged model is used to redeem the method for the effect of incomplete measurement. The robust solution of the developed sensitivity equation is achieved through a least-squares error minimization scheme, and the challenging issues are discussed. The ability of the method in localizing and quantifying the damage and its robustness against measurement and modeling errors is investigated by a numerical example. Experimental vibration test data of a laboratory concrete beam with various level of distributed damage is used to probe the method in practical conditions. The results show that PSD of response can be used to detect damages in lower frequency ranges with acceptable accuracy.

  20. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  2. Gear mesh stiffness and load sharing in planetary gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.; August, R.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computerized analysis was developed for determining load sharing among planetary gears. The load sharing is established as a function of transmitted torque, degree of sun gear fixity, component flexibility, gear tooth quality, and phasing of individual planet gears. A nonlinear variable gear tooth mesh stiffness model was used to simulate the sun/plant and planet/ring gear meshes. The determined load sharing and gear mesh stiffness parameters then can be used for the subsequent assessment of dynamic load factors.

  3. The biospeckle method for early damage detection of fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Jiaxin; Men, Sen

    2017-07-01

    In the field of fruits damage assessment, biospeckle activity is considered relevant to quality properties of plants, such us damage, aging, or diseases. In this paper, biospeckle technique was applied to identify the early bruising of apples. Then a total of 50 undamaged apples were determined to be artificially bruised as samples. Three methods (Fujii, GD, and LSTCA) were used to extract effective information from these speckle images for measuring the intensity of biospeckle activity. The results showed that for all of three methods, the biospeckle activities of the undamaged areas in apple were similar; after the hit, the damaged area showed a lower biospeckle activity. It can be concluded that early bruising can be identified by biospeckle technique.

  4. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  5. A Hybrid Change Detection Approach for Damage Detection and Recovery Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Alwis Pitts, Dilkushi; Wieland, Marc; Wang, Shifeng; So, Emily; Pittore, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Following a disaster, change detection via pre- and post-event very high resolution remote sensing images is an essential technique for damage assessment and recovery monitoring over large areas in complex urban environments. Most assessments to date focus on detection, destruction and recovery of man-made objects that facilitate shelter and accessibility, such as buildings, roads, bridges, etc., as indicators for assessment and better decision making. Moreover, many current change-detection mechanisms do not use all the data and knowledge which are often available for the pre-disaster state. Recognizing the continuous rather than dichotomous character of the data-rich/data-poor distinction permits the incorporation of ancillary data and existing knowledge into the processing flow. Such incorporation could improve the reliability of the results and thereby enhance the usability of robust methods for disaster management. This study proposes an application-specific and robust change detection method from multi-temporal very high resolution multi-spectral satellite images. This hybrid indicator-specific method uses readily available pre-disaster GIS data and integrates existing knowledge into the processing flow to optimize the change detection while offering the possibility to target specific types of changes to man-made objects. The indicator-specific information of the GIS objects is used as a series of masks to treat the GIS objects with similar characteristics similarly for better accuracy. The proposed approach is based on a fusion of a multi-index change detection method based on gradient, texture and edge similarity filters. The change detection index is flexible for disaster cases in which the pre-disaster and post-disaster images are not of the same resolution. The proposed automated method is evaluated with QuickBird and Ikonos datasets for abrupt changes soon after disaster. The method could also be extended in a semi-automated way for monitoring

  6. Modelling polymer draft gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Yang, Xiangjian; Cole, Colin; Luo, Shihui

    2016-09-01

    This paper developed a new and simple approach to model polymer draft gears. Two types of polymer draft gears were modelled and compared with experimental data. Impact characteristics, in-train characteristics and frequency responses of these polymer draft gears were studied and compared with those of a friction draft gear. The impact simulations show that polymer draft gears can withstand higher impact speeds than the friction draft gear. Longitudinal train dynamics simulations show that polymer draft gears have significantly longer deflections than friction draft gears in normal train operations. The maximum draft gear working velocities are lower than 0.2 m/s, which are significantly lower than the impact velocities during shunting operations. Draft gears' in-train characteristics are similar to their static characteristics but are very different from their impact characteristics; this conclusion has also been reached from frequency response simulations. An analysis of gangway bridge plate failures was also conducted and it was found that they were caused by coupler angling behaviour and long draft gear deflections.

  7. SAR Remote Sensing for Urban Building Earthquake-Damage Detection and Assessment: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lixia; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Rong

    2014-11-01

    Urban building damage detection and assessment after earthquake is crucial for effective post disaster relief actions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a key sensor to provide vital information due to its ability to map the affected areas independently of weather conditions, day and night. Under the condition of medium resolution SAR image, change detection is usually applied to identify damaged building by comparing post-seismic to pre-seismic images based on the intensity correlation and interferometric coherence. However, the new high resolution on-orbit SAR sensors (e.g. Radarsat-2, TerraSAR-X/ TanDEM-X, COSMO-SkyMed etc.) have renewed interest in extraction information for monitoring the damage. Intensity, phase and polarimetric information are usually adopted for the damage detection and assessment. The present paper reviews the theoretical background and applications of SAR remote sensing techniques to the study of urban building damage detection and assessment by earthquake.

  8. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location.

  9. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  10. Phase-Oriented Gear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Phase-oriented gear systems are differential planetary transmissions in which each planet gear has two sets of unequal numbers of teeth indexed at prescribed relative angles (phases). The figure illustrates an application of the phase-oriented gearing concept to a relatively simple speed-reducing differential planetary transmission that includes a sun gear, an idler gear, three identical planet gears, a ground internal ring gear, and an output internal ring gear. Typically, the ground internal ring gear and output internal ring gear have different numbers of teeth, giving rise to a progressive and periodic phase shift between the corresponding pairs of teeth engaged by each successive planet gear. To accommodate this phase shift, it is necessary to introduce a compensating phase shift between the ground-gear-engaging and output-gearengaging sections of each planet gear. This is done by individually orienting each planet gear

  11. Satellite Radar Detects Damage from Sept. 2017 Chiapas, Mexico Quake

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-19

    The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Caltech, also in Pasadena, created this Damage Proxy Map (DPM) depicting areas of Southern Mexico that are likely damaged (shown by red and yellow pixels) from the magnitude 8.1 Chiapas earthquake of Sept. 7, 2017 (near midnight local time, early morning on Sept. 8 UTC). The map is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1A and Sentinel-1B satellites, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). The images were taken before (Sept. 7, 2017 UTC) and after (Sept. 13, 2017 UTC) the earthquake. The map covers an area of 155 by 106 miles (250 by 170 kilometers). Each pixel measures about 33 yards (30 meters) across. The color variation from yellow to red indicates increasingly more significant ground surface change. Preliminary validation was done by comparing the SAR images to optical satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe. This damage proxy map should be used as guidance to identify damaged areas, and may be less reliable over vegetated areas. Sentinel-1 data were accessed through the Copernicus Open Access Hub. The image contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA and analyzed by the NASA-JPL/Caltech ARIA team. This research was carried out at JPL under a contract with NASA. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21956

  12. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  13. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  14. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  15. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  16. Detection of pear thrips damage using satellite imagery data

    Treesearch

    James E. Vogelmann; Barrett N. Rock

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of measuring, mapping and monitoring sugar maple damage caused by pear thrips in southern Vermont and northwestern Massachusetts using satellite imagery data. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were obtained during a major thrips infestation in June 1988, and were compared with satellite data acquired during June 1984 (before pear...

  17. Sequential structural damage diagnosis algorithm using a change point detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, H.; Rajagopal, R.; Kiremidjian, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper introduces a damage diagnosis algorithm for civil structures that uses a sequential change point detection method. The general change point detection method uses the known pre- and post-damage feature distributions to perform a sequential hypothesis test. In practice, however, the post-damage distribution is unlikely to be known a priori, unless we are looking for a known specific type of damage. Therefore, we introduce an additional algorithm that estimates and updates this distribution as data are collected using the maximum likelihood and the Bayesian methods. We also applied an approximate method to reduce the computation load and memory requirement associated with the estimation. The algorithm is validated using a set of experimental data collected from a four-story steel special moment-resisting frame and multiple sets of simulated data. Various features of different dimensions have been explored, and the algorithm was able to identify damage, particularly when it uses multidimensional damage sensitive features and lower false alarm rates, with a known post-damage feature distribution. For unknown feature distribution cases, the post-damage distribution was consistently estimated and the detection delays were only a few time steps longer than the delays from the general method that assumes we know the post-damage feature distribution. We confirmed that the Bayesian method is particularly efficient in declaring damage with minimal memory requirement, but the maximum likelihood method provides an insightful heuristic approach.

  18. Test analysis of detection of damage to a complicated spatial model structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Long-He; Li, Zhong-Xian; Qian, Jia-Ru

    2011-06-01

    A two-stage damage detection approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a complicated spatial model structure with a limited number of measurements. In the experiment, five known damage patterns, including 3 brace damage cases and 2 joint damage cases, were simulated by removing braces and weakening beam-column connections in the structure. The limited acceleration response data generated by hammer impact were used for system identification, and modal parameters were extracted by using the eigensystem realization algorithm. In the first stage, the possible damaged locations are determined by using the damage index and the characteristics of the analytical model itself, and the extent of damage for those substructures identified at stage I is estimated in the second stage by using a second-order eigen-sensitivity approximation method. The main contribution of this paper is to test the two-stage method by using the real dynamic data of a complicated spatial model structure with limited sensors. The analysis results indicate that the two-stage approach is able to detect the location of both damage cases, only the severity of brace damage cases can be assessed, and the reasonable analytical model is critical for successful damage detection.

  19. A New Approach to Overcoming Spatial Aliasing in Structural Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.; Naser, Ahmad S.; Thyagarajan, Sunil K.; Mickens, Travluss; Pai, Frank

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft, reusable launch vehicles,unmanned aircraft, and other advanced structures are being built using lightweight composite materials/metals with design safety factors as low as 1.25. These advanced structures operate in uncertain and severe environments and are susceptible to damage such as delamination, fiber/matrix damage, hydrothermal strain in composite materials, and fatigue and cracking in metals. To ensure human safety and load-bearing integrity these structures must be inspected to detect and locate often invisible damage and faults before they become catastrophic. Conventional methods of non-destructive evaluation sometimes miss significant damage and are time consuming and expensive to perform. In contrast, vibrometry or vibration signature techniques are a global method of structural integrity monitoring that potentially can efficiently detect damage on large structures, including damage that is away from sensor locations, and in the interior of structures. However, a barrier problem in damage detection using vibration measurements is the need to measure the vibration response at a large number of points on the structure. Typically, model reduction or expansion procedures such as Guyan reduction or dynamic expansion are attempted to overcome the problem of insufficient measurements or spatial aliasing. These approaches depend on using information from the healthy model, and thus put error into the reduction used to represent the damaged structure. In this paper, a Frequency Response Function technique is used to detect damage to a fixed-free beam. The technique uses measured frequency response functions from the healthy structure as reference data, and then monitors vibration measurements during the life of the structure to detect damage. In an analytical simulation using a finite-element model of a beam, damage was located using only sparse measurements because the technique uses both rotation and translation measurements from the damaged structure.

  20. A study of concrete slab damage detection based on the electromechanical impedance method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianyan; Zhu, Hongping; Wang, Dansheng

    2014-10-23

    Piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is being gradually applied into practice as a new intelligent material for structural health monitoring. In order to study the damage detection properties of PZT on concrete slabs, simply supported reinforced concrete slabs with piezoelectric patches attached to their surfaces were chosen as the research objects and the Electromechanical Impedance method (EMI) was adopted for research. Five kinds of damage condition were designed to test the impedance values at different frequency bands. Consistent rules are found by calculation and analysis. Both the root mean square deviation (RMSD) and the correlation coefficient deviation (CCD) damage indices are capable of detecting the structural damage. The newly proposed damage index Ry/Rx can also predict the changes well. The numerical and experimental studies verify that the Electromechanical Impedance method can accurately predict changes in the amount of damage in reinforced concrete slabs. The damage index changes regularly with the distance of damages to the sensor. This relationship can be used to determine the damage location. The newly proposed damage index Ry/Rx is accurate in determining the damage location.

  1. Time series-based damage detection and localization algorithm with application to the ASCE benchmark structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. Krishnan; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Law, Kincho H.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a time series algorithm is presented for damage identification and localization. The vibration signals obtained from sensors are modeled as autoregressive moving average (ARMA) time series. A new damage-sensitive feature, DSF, is defined as a function of the first three auto regressive (AR) components. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Thus, a hypothesis test involving the t-test is used to obtain a damage decision. Two damage localization indices LI 1 and LI 2, are introduced based on the AR coefficients. At the sensor locations where damage is introduced, the values of LI 1 and LI 2 appear to increase from their values obtained at the undamaged baseline state. The damage detection and localization algorithms are valid for stationary signals obtained from linear systems. To test the efficacy of the damage detection and localization methodologies, the algorithm has been tested on the analytical and experimental results of the ASCE benchmark structure. In contrast to prior pattern classification and statistical signal processing algorithms that have been able to identify primarily severe damage and have not been able to localize the damage effectively, the proposed algorithm is able to identify and localize minor to severe damage as defined for the benchmark structure.

  2. Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Gan-jun; Xie, Wei-ping

    2014-01-01

    The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited. PMID:24991647

  3. How automatic is manual gear shifting?

    PubMed

    Shinar, D; Meir, M; Ben-Shoham, I

    1998-12-01

    Manual gear shifting is often used as an example of an automated (vs. controlled) process in driving. The present study provided an empirical evaluation of this assumption by evaluating sign detection and recall performance of novice and experienced drivers driving manual shift and automatic transmission cars in a downtown area requiring frequent gear shifting. The results showed that manual gear shifting significantly impaired sign detection performance of novice drivers using manual gears compared with novice drivers using an automatic transmission, whereas no such differences existed between the two transmission types for experienced drivers. The results clearly demonstrate that manual gear shifting is a complex psychomotor skill that is not easily (or quickly) automated and that until it becomes automated, it is an attention-demanding task that may impair other monitoring aspects of driving performance. Actual or potential applications of this research include a reevaluation of the learning process in driving and the need for phased instruction in driving from automatic gears to manual gears.

  4. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  5. Probability of Detection Study on Impact Damage to Honeycomb Composite Structure using Thermographic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Walker, James L., II

    2008-01-01

    A probability of detection study was performed for the detection of impact damage using flash heating infrared thermography on a full scale honeycomb composite structure. The honeycomb structure was an intertank structure from a previous NASA technology demonstration program. The intertank was fabricated from IM7/8552 carbon fiber/epoxy facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The intertank was impacted in multiple locations with a range of impact energies utilizing a spherical indenter. In a single blind study, the intertank was inspected with thermography before and after impact damage was incurred. Following thermographic inspection several impact sites were sectioned from the intertank and cross-sectioned for microscopic comparisons of NDE detection and actual damage incurred. The study concluded that thermographic inspection was a good method of detecting delamination damage incurred by impact. The 90/95 confidence level on the probability of detection was close to the impact energy that delaminations were first observed through cross-sectional analysis.

  6. Detection of Localized Heat Damage in a Polymer Matrix Composite by Thermo-Elastic Method (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-437 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) John Welter...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) 5c...Include Area Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 1 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY

  7. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  8. Comparative study of performance of neutral axis tracking based damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, R.; Malinowski, P.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of a novel SHM technique for damage isolation. The performance of the Neutral Axis (NA) tracking based damage detection strategy is compared to other popularly used vibration based damage detection methods viz. ECOMAC, Mode Shape Curvature Method and Strain Flexibility Index Method. The sensitivity of the novel method is compared under changing ambient temperature conditions and in the presence of measurement noise. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of the DTU 10 MW Wind Turbine was conducted to compare the local damage identification capability of each method and the results are presented. Under the conditions examined, the proposed method was found to be robust to ambient condition changes and measurement noise. The damage identification in some is either at par with the methods mentioned in the literature or better under the investigated damage scenarios.

  9. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  10. Toward dynamic model-based prognostics for transmission gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenyi

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a novel methodology for the diagnosis and prognosis of crucial gear faults, such as gear tooth fatigue cracking. Currently, an effective detection of tooth cracking can be achieved by using the autoregressive (AR) modeling approach, where the gear vibration signal is modeled by an AR model and gear tooth cracking is detected by identifying the sudden changes in the model's error signal. The model parameters can be estimated under the criteria of minimum power or maximum kurtosis of model errors. However, these model parameters possess no physical meaning about the monitored gear system. It is proposed that the AR model be replaced by a gear dynamics model (GDM) that contains physically meaningful parameters, such as mass, damping and stiffness. By identifying and tracking the changes in the parameters, it is possible to make diagnosis and prognosis of gear faults. For example, a reduction in mesh stiffness may indicate cracking of a gear tooth. Towards physical model-based prognosis, an adaptive (or optimization) strategy has been developed for approximating a gear signal using a simplified gear signal model. Preliminary results show that this strategy provides a feasible adaptive process for updating model parameters based on measured gear signal.

  11. Vibrometric Detection of Beam Damage Due to Inclusions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    fatigue cracks, thermal exposure, overstressing, etc. The central focus of SHM is to identify the presence of a change in structural integrity as...vibration monitoring for damage presence began with rotor cracking in machinery and railroad equipment, as presented by Dimaroganas (1970) and Nagy...Dousis, and Finch (1978). The latter work has been noted to explain that “the presence of cracks [in railroad wheels] causes some resonance

  12. Detection of localized fatigue damage in steel by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medgenberg, Justus; Ummenhofer, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Fatigue damage of unalloyed steels in the high cycle regime is governed by localized cyclic plastic deformations and subsequent crack initiation. The extent of early microplastic deformations depends on the applied stress level, stress concentration at macroscopic notches, surface treatment, residual stresses etc. The onset of a nonlinear material response can be regarded as an early indicator of fatigue damage. During fatigue loading thermoelastic coupling and thermoplastic dissipation cause characteristic temperature variations in tested specimens which have been assessed by a highly sensitive infrared camera. A specialized data processing method in the time domain has been developed which allows to separate the different contributions to the measured temperature signal. In contrast to other methods - as e.g. measuring the rise of mean temperature during fatigue loading - the proposed methodology is based on measurements during the stabilized temperature regimen and offers very high spatial resolution of localized phenomena. Investigations have been made on mildly notched cylindrical and also on welded specimens. The results confirm the close relation between the local temperature signal and typical fatigue phenomena. The new methodology allows for a much better localization and quantification of effects as cyclic plasticity, crack initiation, crack growth etc. The following paper presents considerations and experimental results of an application of thermography to the local assessment of fatigue damage.

  13. An experimental study on distributed damage detection algorithms for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Madhuka; Zhu, Xinqun; Liyanapathirana, Ranjith

    2011-07-01

    Distributed structural damage detection has become the subject of many recent studies in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). Development of smart sensor nodes has facilitated the growth of this concept enabling decentralized data processing capabilities of nodes whose sole responsibility once was acquisition of data. An experimental study has been carried out on a two span reinforced concrete slab in this paper. Different crack damages are created by the static loads and the impact tests that are carried out on the slab. Two damage detection and localization methods, one based on Auto Correlation Function-Cross Correlation Function (ACF-CCF) and the other on Auto Regressive (AR) time series model are used to detect damage from measured responses. The results from the two methods are compared in order to determine which method has been more effective and reliable in determining the damage to the concrete structure.

  14. Feasibility of damage detection of Tsing Ma Bridge using vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jan Ming; Ni, Yi-Qing; Chan, Hung-tin Tommy

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, we study the feasibility of vibration-based damage identification methods for the instrumented Tsing Ma Suspension Bridge with a main span of 1377 m. Emphasis is placed on how to deal with the noise-corrupted/uncertain measurement data and how to use the series data from the on- line monitoring system for damage detection. Numerical simulation studies of using the noisy series measurement modal data for damage occurrence detection with the auto-associative neural network and for damage localization with the probabilistic neural network are presented. Five neural network based novelty detectors using only natural frequencies of the intact and damaged structure are first developed for the detection of damage occurrence in the Tsing Ma Bridge. The noisy/uncertain measurement data are produced by polluting the analytical natural frequencies with random noise. Numerical simulations of a series of damage scenarios show that when the maximum frequency change caused by damage exceeds a certain threshold, the occurrence of damage can be unambiguously flagged with the novelty detectors. A probabilistic neural network using noisy modal data (natural frequencies and incomplete modal vectors) is then constructed for the localization of damage occurring at the Tsing Ma Bridge deck. The main-span deck is divided into 16 segments and the damage in each segment is defined as a pattern class. The analytical modal data for each pattern class are artificially corrupted with random noise and then used as training samples to establish a three-layer probabilistic neural network for damage localization. A preliminary investigation shows that the damage to deck members can be localized only when the level of the corrupted noise is low.

  15. A system for the non-intrusive detection of damage in underground power cables: Damage modeling and sensor system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgen, Marvin Alexander

    A system for non-intrusive sensing of underground power cable impedance is presented. The impedance sensor is used for the detection of damage to underground power cables. The system is capable of taking measurements without the need to interrupt power service. To isolate the impedance measurement from the effects of customer loading, a blocking unit is proposed which presents an open circuit to the impedance sensor in the transmission line at the point where the blocker is clamped onto the cable. Both of the proposed devices are prototyped and evaluated. The impedance sensor is demonstrated to be capable of accurate impedance measurements within a 2% error over a range from 50 to 1000 Ohms. The blocker is demonstrated to provide approximately 30 dB of attenuation over the designed ranged of measurement frequencies. The system can detect impedance changes resulting from corrosion or damage in underground power cables.

  16. Evaluation of ikonos satellite imagery for detecting ice storm damage to oak forests in Eastern Kentucky

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab; Tracy Roof

    2006-01-01

    Ice storms are a recurring landscape-scale disturbance in the eastern U.S. where they may cause varying levels of damage to upland hardwood forests. High-resolution Ikonos imagery and semiautomated detection of ice storm damage may be an alternative to manually interpreted aerial photography. We evaluated Ikonos multispectral, winter and summer imagery as a tool for...

  17. A new EEMD-based scheme for detection of insect damaged wheat kernels using impact acoustics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Internally feeding insects inside wheat kernels cause significant, but unseen economic damage to stored grain. In this paper, a new scheme based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) using impact acoustics is proposed for detection of insect-damaged wheat kernels, based on its capability t...

  18. Using electrolyte leakage tests to determine lifting windows and detect tissue damage

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Tinus

    2002-01-01

    Physiological testing is rapidly coming into use as a means to determine the condition of nursery stock and predict how it will respond to treatment or use. One such test, the electrolyte leakage test, can be used to measure cold hardiness and detect tissue damage. The principle of this test is that when cell membranes are damaged, electrolytes leak out into the water...

  19. Acoustic impact testing and waveform analysis for damage detection in glued laminated timber

    Treesearch

    Feng Xu; Xiping Wang; Marko Teder; Yunfei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Delamination and decay are common structural defects in old glued laminated timber (glulam) buildings, which, if left undetected, could cause severe structural damage. This paper presents a new damage detection method for glulam inspection based on moment analysis and wavelet transform (WT) of impact acoustic signals. Acoustic signals were collected from a glulam arch...

  20. Gearing Up for Mountain Biking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Examines the gear system of a mountain bike to discover any redundancy in the many gear settings available to the cyclist. Suggests a best strategy for changing up through the gears on a typical 21-gear system and an adjustment to the available gears that would result in a smoother change. (Author/ASK)

  1. Damage detection in aircraft structures using dynamically measured static flexibility matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.A.; Peterson, L.D.; James, G.H.; Doebling, S.W.

    1996-02-01

    Two methods for detecting the location of structural damage in an aircraft fuselage using modal test data are presented. Both methods use the dynamically measured static flexibility matrix, which is assembled from a combination of measured modal vectors, frequencies, and driving point residual flexibilities. As a consequence, neither method requires a mode-to-mode correlation, and both avoid tedious modal discrimination and selection. The first method detects damage as a softening in the point flexibility components, which are the diagonal entries in the flexibility matrix. The second method detects damage from the disassembled elemental stiffnesses as determined using a presumed connectivity. Vibration data from a laser vibrometer is used to measure the modal mechanics of a DC9 aircraft fuselage before and after induced weakening in a longitudinal stringer. Both methods are shown to detect the location of the damage, primarily because the normal stiffness of the reinforced shell of the fuselage is localized to a few square centimeters.

  2. Detection and assessment of damage in 2D structures using measured modal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Mohammad Reza; Mehdi-pour, Yousef

    2007-10-01

    Motivated by one of the concepts in the field of health monitoring for structural systems, a damage detection procedure is developed. In order to perform the system health monitoring, structural health along with sensor and actuator malfunction must be continuously checked. As a step toward developing a system health-monitoring scheme, this paper investigated structural damage detection, using a constrained eigenstructure assignment. The proposed damage detection method is constructed based on a concept of control theory and subspace rotation for two-dimensional (2D)-structural systems. To demonstrate the capabilities of the developed damage detection algorithm, the behavior of a simulated degraded braced-frame structure is studied. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the performance of the approach is evaluated. It shows that the proposed algorithm is potentially promising for application to real cases.

  3. Simulation of Detecting Damage in Composite Stiffened Panel Using Lamb Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Ross, Richard W.; Huang, Guo L.; Yuan, Fuh G.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb wave damage detection in a composite stiffened panel is simulated by performing explicit transient dynamic finite element analyses and using signal imaging techniques. This virtual test process does not need to use real structures, actuators/sensors, or laboratory equipment. Quasi-isotropic laminates are used for the stiffened panels. Two types of damage are studied. One type is a damage in the skin bay and the other type is a debond between the stiffener flange and the skin. Innovative approaches for identifying the damage location and imaging the damage were developed. The damage location is identified by finding the intersection of the damage locus and the path of the time reversal wave packet re-emitted from the sensor nodes. The damage locus is a circle that envelops the potential damage locations. Its center is at the actuator location and its radius is computed by multiplying the group velocity by the time of flight to damage. To create a damage image for estimating the size of damage, a group of nodes in the neighborhood of the damage location is identified for applying an image condition. The image condition, computed at a finite element node, is the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) of the time-reversed incident wave signal and the time reversal wave signal from the sensor nodes. This damage imaging process is computationally efficient since only the ZLCC values of a small amount of nodes in the neighborhood of the identified damage location are computed instead of those of the full model.

  4. Damage detection in composite structures using vibration response under stochastic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhichun; Wang, Le; Wang, Hui; Ding, Yan; Dang, Xiaojuan

    2009-09-01

    The investigations in damage detection methods based on vibration response are reviewed according to two categories, i.e. model-based damage detection method (MBDDM) and non-model-based damage detection method (NMBDDM). Then a new concept of inner product vector (IPV) is introduced using the cross correlation function of the measured vibration responses of the structure, and the corresponding damage detection method is proposed based on this vector. It is theoretically proved that the elements in IPV of a structure is the inner product of the time domain vibration responses of corresponding measurement points, and this vector can be directly calculated using the measured time domain vibration responses. Under white noise excitation the IPV of a structure is a weighted summation of mode shapes of the structure, and the weighted factors of the summation only depend on modal parameters of the structure. The effect of measurement noise on IPV is also considered, and the effect can be eliminated by the definition of IPV and an interpolation technique. The difference of IPVs between the intact and damaged structure is adopted as the damage index, and damage location is determined by the abrupt change in the difference of IPV. In order to distinguish the abrupt change caused by structural damage and measurement noise, two thresholds are proposed to classify the damaged and intact structures. Numerical simulation results of damage detection of single-location and multi-location delamination in a composite laminate beam demonstrate the effectiveness and veracity of the proposed method, even though measurement noise is considered in the vibration responses.

  5. The study of target damage assessment system based on image change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Fan; Feng, Xinxi

    2009-10-01

    Target Damage Assessment (TDA) system is an important component of the intelligent command and control system. The method of building TDA based on Image Change Detection can greatly improve the system efficiency and accuracy, thus get a fast and precise assessment results. This paper firstly analyzes the structure of TDA system. Then studies the key technology in this system. Finally, gives an evaluation criteria based on image change detection of the target damage assessment system.

  6. Damage Detection Response Characteristics of Open Circuit Resonant (SansEC) Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Smith, Laura J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Wang, Chuantong; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The capability to assess the current or future state of the health of an aircraft to improve safety, availability, and reliability while reducing maintenance costs has been a continuous goal for decades. Many companies, commercial entities, and academic institutions have become interested in Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) and a growing effort of research into "smart" vehicle sensing systems has emerged. Methods to detect damage to aircraft materials and structures have historically relied on visual inspection during pre-flight or post-flight operations by flight and ground crews. More quantitative non-destructive investigations with various instruments and sensors have traditionally been performed when the aircraft is out of operational service during major scheduled maintenance. Through the use of reliable sensors coupled with data monitoring, data mining, and data analysis techniques, the health state of a vehicle can be detected in-situ. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing a composite aircraft skin damage detection method and system based on open circuit SansEC (Sans Electric Connection) sensor technology. Composite materials are increasingly used in modern aircraft for reducing weight, improving fuel efficiency, and enhancing the overall design, performance, and manufacturability of airborne vehicles. Materials such as fiberglass reinforced composites (FRC) and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) are being used to great advantage in airframes, wings, engine nacelles, turbine blades, fairings, fuselage structures, empennage structures, control surfaces and aircraft skins. SansEC sensor technology is a new technical framework for designing, powering, and interrogating sensors to detect various types of damage in composite materials. The source cause of the in-service damage (lightning strike, impact damage, material fatigue, etc.) to the aircraft composite is not relevant. The sensor will detect damage independent of the cause

  7. The environmental impacts of three different queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) fishing gears.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Hilmar; Murray, Lee G; Malcolm, Fraser R; Kaiser, Michel J

    2012-02-01

    The negative impact of demersal fishing gears on the marine environment may be mitigated by utilizing less damaging fishing gears. Within this context three queen scallop fishing gears were tested for their catch efficiencies and their environmental impact on benthos: a traditional 'Newhaven' dredge, a new dredge design with a rubber lip instead of the traditional teeth as its main new design feature and an otter trawl. Both, the new dredge and the otter trawl showed high catches and relatively low by-catches. Catches made with the traditional dredge were lower and contained larger amounts of non-target species. Both dredges primarily caught invertebrate species, while by-catches of the otter trawl were dominated by demersal fish. The impact of these gears on the benthic biota demonstrated that while no effects were detected for the otter trawl both dredges showed similar negative effects. Clear negative effects were evident for the brittlestar Ophiura ophiura while positive trends for the common starfish Asterias rubens and the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus indicated scavenging effects. Due to its higher catch efficiency the new dredge caused less damage per unit catch compared to the traditional dredge, yet compared to the otter trawl it appears less environmentally friendly. However, the new dredge may be an alternative to the otter trawls for fisheries where the by-catch of demersal fish has been identified as a significant problem.

  8. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  9. Damage detection in plates using the electromechanical impedance technique based on decoupled measurements of piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Hector A.; Robledo-Callejas, Leonardo; Marulanda, Dairon J.; Serpa, Alberto L.

    2016-12-01

    Electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique plays an important role in the monitoring of structures with piezoelectric transducers (PT). According to the EMI technique, diagnosis and prognosis can be carried out to detect structural modifications in an operative state. However, to develop an efficient methodology for damage detection; damage metrics and patterns should be defined using indices to quantify changes in the signals. In this study, a new approach is proposed considering the electrical impedance (EI) of PT as an array of coupled electrical impedances. It means that when a PT is bonded to a structure, the EI is governed by an electrical circuit that is assumed to be parallel and composed by electrical contributions of both, the structure and the PT. In our perspective, each free PT presents unique mechanical characteristics and those differences may influence the measured electrical signals, therefore the electrical contributions generated by each piezo-transducer are taken into account. To evaluate the electrical decoupling, two methodologies of damage detection are proposed to identify and locate an induced damage. In these methodologies, the damage metrics are based on ellipses of Gaussian confidence. Four experimental tests were performed to evaluate the methodologies, applying two damage intensities. The results show that the partial process of identification of a damage type is a feasible and applicable procedure, moreover the proposed method was able to evidence the damage location..

  10. Lamb-wave-based damage detection using wave signal demodulation and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Guo, Ningqun; Huang, Weimin; Subramanian, Saravanan

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between Lamb wave and damage will modify the response wave signal from which information related to damage can be extracted for automated damage detection. However, the interpretation of the response wave signal is not easy due to the complex nature of the wave-damage interaction. This paper discusses a damage detection algorithm based on wave signal demodulation and artificial neural networks (ANNs). The response wave signal is considered as a low-frequency signal modulated by a high-frequency carrier signal. After baseline subtraction, frequency domain convolution and filtering, the original signal is demodulated and transformed into a new simplified signal related to the energy change due to damage. Subsequently feature extraction is carried out by finding the local maxima in the new signal and the obtained peak values and locations are used as inputs into the ANNs for damage characterization. The validity of this damage detection algorithm is then verified using a finite element (FE) model of a composite laminate with notch defects. The response wave signals of different notch depths and locations are acquired from the simulations and used as the training and testing samples. Finally the assessment of the network's accuracy and generalization ability is performed and the result is satisfactory.

  11. Lamb-wave-based damage detection using wave signal demodulation and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Guo, Ningqun; Huang, Weimin; Subramanian, Saravanan

    2009-12-01

    The interaction between Lamb wave and damage will modify the response wave signal from which information related to damage can be extracted for automated damage detection. However, the interpretation of the response wave signal is not easy due to the complex nature of the wave-damage interaction. This paper discusses a damage detection algorithm based on wave signal demodulation and artificial neural networks (ANNs). The response wave signal is considered as a low-frequency signal modulated by a high-frequency carrier signal. After baseline subtraction, frequency domain convolution and filtering, the original signal is demodulated and transformed into a new simplified signal related to the energy change due to damage. Subsequently feature extraction is carried out by finding the local maxima in the new signal and the obtained peak values and locations are used as inputs into the ANNs for damage characterization. The validity of this damage detection algorithm is then verified using a finite element (FE) model of a composite laminate with notch defects. The response wave signals of different notch depths and locations are acquired from the simulations and used as the training and testing samples. Finally the assessment of the network's accuracy and generalization ability is performed and the result is satisfactory.

  12. Structural damage detection using auto correlation functions of vibration response under sinusoidal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger; Markert, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Structural damage detection using time domain vibration responses has attracted more and more researchers in recent years because of its simplicity in calculation and no requirement of a finite element model. This paper proposes a new approach to locate the damage using the auto correlation function of vibration response signals under sinusoidal excitation from different measurement points of the structure, based on which a vector named Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV) is formulated. A sensitivity analysis of the normalized AMV with respect to the local stiffness shows that under several specific frequency excitations, the normalized AMV has a sharp change around the local stiffness change location, which means that even when the damage is very small, the normalized AMV is a good indicator for the damage. In order to locate the damage, a damage index is defined as the relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage. Several example cases in stiffness reduction detection of a frame structure valid the results of the sensitivity analysis, demonstrate the efficiency of the normalized AMV in damage localization and the effect of the excitation frequency on its detectability.

  13. Damage Detection of Structures Identified with Deterministic-Stochastic Models Using Seismic Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Chih; Wang, Yen-Po; Chang, Ming-Lian

    2014-01-01

    A deterministic-stochastic subspace identification method is adopted and experimentally verified in this study to identify the equivalent single-input-multiple-output system parameters of the discrete-time state equation. The method of damage locating vector (DLV) is then considered for damage detection. A series of shaking table tests using a five-storey steel frame has been conducted. Both single and multiple damage conditions at various locations have been considered. In the system identification analysis, either full or partial observation conditions have been taken into account. It has been shown that the damaged stories can be identified from global responses of the structure to earthquakes if sufficiently observed. In addition to detecting damage(s) with respect to the intact structure, identification of new or extended damages of the as-damaged counterpart has also been studied. This study gives further insights into the scheme in terms of effectiveness, robustness, and limitation for damage localization of frame systems. PMID:25165749

  14. 12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL william E. Barrett, photographer, 1973 (copy negative) - Thomas Shepherd's Grist Mill, High Street Vicinity, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, WV

  15. Detection and damage assessment of citrus tree losses with aerial color infrared photography /ACIR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W., Jr.; Edwards, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detection and disease damage assessment of citrus tree losses in a Florida citrus grove were made by establishing a registration (grove site location) coordinate system, developing a damage assessment system, and testing sequential aerial color infrared (ACIR) photography at the scale of 1 in. = 333 ft (2.5 cm = 100 m) during the winter, spring, and summer seasons of 1978 and spring of 1979. Spring photography was the easiest to photo interpret, showed the greatest differences between healthy and diseased trees, and had the least shadow and background interference for photo interpretation. Trees showing slight disease damage were detected in ACIR before they were found in ground surveys.

  16. Simulation Based Investigation of Hidden Delamination Damage Detection in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave (GW) based damage detection methods have shown promise in structural health monitoring (SHM) and hybrid SHM-nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Much previous GW work in the aerospace field has been primarily focused on metallic materials, with a growing focus on composite materials. The work presented in this paper demonstrates how realistic three-dimensional (3D) GW simulations can aid in the development of GW based damage characterization techniques for aerospace composites. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique is implemented to model GW interaction with realistic delamination damage. A local wavenumber technique is applied to simulation data in order to investigate the detectability of hidden delamination damage to enable accurate characterization of damage extent.

  17. Evolutionary Algorithms Approach to the Solution of Damage Detection Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Pinto, Pedro Yoajim; Begambre, Oscar

    2010-09-01

    In this work is proposed a new Self-Configured Hybrid Algorithm by combining the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The aim of the proposed strategy is to increase the stability and accuracy of the search. The central idea is the concept of Guide Particle, this particle (the best PSO global in each generation) transmits its information to a particle of the following PSO generation, which is controlled by the GA. Thus, the proposed hybrid has an elitism feature that improves its performance and guarantees the convergence of the procedure. In different test carried out in benchmark functions, reported in the international literature, a better performance in stability and accuracy was observed; therefore the new algorithm was used to identify damage in a simple supported beam using modal data. Finally, it is worth noting that the algorithm is independent of the initial definition of heuristic parameters.

  18. Impact damage detection in filament wound tubes utilizing embedded optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Anthony R.; Hayes, Simon A.; Fernando, Gerard F.; Hale, Ken F.

    1995-04-01

    Filament wound tubes are currently being used extensively in service because of their superior specific properties and the relatively simple manufacturing technique involved in their properties. However, the reinforcing fibers can suffer from low velocity impact damage (approximately 10 ms-1) during service. Such damage can result in poor post- impact properties which in certain applications can reduce the burst strength below safe working levels. This paper discusses the use of optical fiber sensors, embedded during the filament winding process, to provide information on specified levels of impact damage incurred by the tube during service. The sensors being developed use silica based optical fibers in composites made from E-glass reinforcing fibers and high temperature cure epoxy resins. Various methods of damage detection are being evaluated to select the optimum sensor arrangement. These systems detect changes in the transmission characteristics of the optical fiber. The objective being to produce a working damage detection system which provides sensitive, cheap, accurate and reliable information about the levels of impact damage sustained by the tube. This paper presents initial results from the impact damage detection systems being evaluated for use in filament wound tubes. Issues relating to chemical compatibility between optical fiber sensors and the epoxy resin system were also investigated as part of this study. These results aid selection of the correct optical fiber properties to achieve reliable and sensitive systems. The advantages of using a new profile sensor compared to an optical fiber are also discussed.

  19. Detection and characterization of impact damage in composite panels using multiple ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2015-03-01

    Abrupt impacts to solid laminate composite panels often produce internal damage that is not visible on the impacted surface. It is important that such damage be promptly detected since it can compromise the strength of composite structures. Ultrasonic C-scan imaging has been extensively used to detect and characterize impact damage using both pulse-echo and through-transmission methods. More recently developed guided wave imaging methods, such as sparse array imaging with baseline subtraction and wavefield imaging, have also been used to successfully detect damage in composite panels; however, their performance is generally not comparable to that achieved with bulk wave C-scans. For this study, various force impacts were used to create defect conditions ranging from barely detectable damage to extensive damage that was visible on the impact surface. Guided wave signals were recorded from an attached sparse transducer array before and after the impacts, and panels were scanned using both conventional ultrasonic C-scan methods and acoustic wavefield imaging. For each method, imaging results are presented and compared in terms of their ability to locate and characterize impact damage.

  20. Detection of damaged urban areas using interferometric SAR coherence change with PALSAR-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Thapa, Rajesh Bahadur; Ohsumi, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Yonezawa, Chinatsu; Tomii, Naoya; Suzuki, Sinichi

    2016-07-01

    The interferometric SAR coherence-change technique with coherence filter and polarization (HH and HV) has been used to detect the parts of buildings damaged by the 2015 Gorkha Earthquake. A survey of the building damage was conducted in every house to evaluate the detection accuracy in the Khokana and Sankhu urban areas in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal. The damaged parts of the urban area were adequately detected using coherence-change (∆ γ) values obtained before the earthquake ( γ pre) and during the inter-seismic stage of the earthquake ( γ int). The use of a coherence filter effectively increased overall accuracy by ~2.1 to 7.0 % with HH polarization. The incorporation of HV polarization marginally increased the accuracy (~0.9 to 1.2 %). It was confirmed that road damage due to liquefaction was also observed using the interferometric SAR coherence-change detection technique. The classification accuracy was lower (27.1-35.1 %) for areas that were damaged. However, higher accuracy (97.8-99.2 %) was achieved for areas that were damage-free, in ∆ γ obtained from HH and HV polarization with a coherence filter. This helped to identify the damaged urban areas (using this technique) immediately after occurrence of an earthquake event.

  1. Lymphocyte DNA damage in Turkish asphalt workers detected by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bacaksiz, Aysegul; Kayaalti, Zeliha; Soylemez, Esma; Tutkun, Engin; Soylemezoglu, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt has a highly complex structure and it contains several organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds. In this study, comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage in blood lymphocytes of 30 workers exposed to asphalt fumes and 30 nonexposed controls. This is the first report on Turkish asphalt workers' investigated DNA damage using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The DNA damage was evaluated by the percentage of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) for each cell. According to our results, workers exposed to asphalt fumes had higher DNA damage than the control group (p < 0.01). The present study showed that asphalt fumes caused a significant increase in DNA damage and the comet assay is a suitable method for determining DNA damage in asphalt workers.

  2. Detailed Vibration Analysis of Pinion Gear with Time-Frequency Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne; Pryor, Anna H.; Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the authors show a detailed analysis of the vibration signal from the destructive testing of a spiral bevel gear and pinion pair containing seeded faults. The vibration signal is analyzed in the time domain, frequency domain and with four time-frequency transforms: the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Wigner-Ville Distribution with the Choi-Williams kernel (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet' Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels and damage conditions, are analyzed using these methods. A new metric for automatic anomaly detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the time-frequency transforms, as well as time and frequency representations, on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects changes in the signal at low torque levels not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic anomaly detection and to develop fault detection methods for the metric.

  3. Early detection of fungi damage in citrus using NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, Jose; Ortiz, Coral; Sabater, Maria D.; Molto, Enrique

    2000-12-01

    Early detection of defects and diseases in fruit helps to correctly classify them and make more adequate decisions about the destination of the product: internal market, export or industry. An early fungi infection detection is especially important because a few infected fruits can disseminate the infection to a whole batch, causing great economic losses and affecting to further exports. Ensure products with excellent quality and absolute absence of fungi infections is particularly important in those batches for long conservation or to be exported. The main objective of this work is to detect the fungi infections before they can be visible. Near Infrared spectroscopy has been employed in this work, because it is a non-destructive technique and can be easily implemented on line due to the high speed and simplicity of the process.

  4. Tool Life Detecting System Using Damage Sensor-Integrated Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Katsuhiko; Yamane, Yasuo; Torimoto, Ayumu

    In-process tool life detecting system has been developed. In order to detect tool life, we monitored breakage of an electrical conductive thin film band of titanium nitride (TiN) on flank faces of a ceramic insert that was an insulation material. The conductive band was parallel to the cutting edge and was broken by fracture of the cutting edge or excessive tool wear. A coil and a capacitor were connected in series to the band on an insert to make a series resonance circuit in a tool holder for turning, or in an arbor for face milling. A detecting coil with high frequency oscillator was coupled to the coil in the holder/arbor electromagnetically. An electromagnetic induction between two coils was used to take the signal from the insert. The system developed in this study showed good stability against electric noises radiated from electrical devices of machine tools.

  5. Optimizing the damage detection cycle of the spare parts based on the failure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianjun; Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Liqin; Xue, Yong

    2017-08-01

    In order to prepare for the launch mission, some spare parts for consumption are stored in the spaceport. The spare parts are regularly detected so that all of them can be kept in good condition, but detection may cause some damage. In this paper, the optimization of detection cycle to the spare parts is studied. Firstly, the life model of spare parts is created, which is on the condition of damage detection, in order to estimate the failure rate during the period of storage and the failure probability of the spare parts for each detection. Secondly, the model of optimizing the detection cycle is established so that the detection cycle can be optimized. At last, a numerical example is given and a simulated experiment is designed at the same time. The results show that the method proposed in this paper can be used to calculate the best detection cycle to the spare parts and the availability of the spare parts.

  6. Liquid rocket engine turbopump gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Design and fabrication of gear drives for rocket engine turbopumps are described in the sequence encountered during the design process as follows: (1) selection of overall arrangement; (2) selection of gear type; (3) preliminary sizing; (4) lubrication system design; (5) detail tooth design; (6) selection of gear materials; and (7) gear fabrication and testing as it affects the design. The description is oriented towards the use of involute spur gears, although reference material for helical gears is also cited.

  7. Detection of fungal damaged popcorn using image property covariance features

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Covariance-matrix-based features were applied to the detection of popcorn infected by a fungus that cause a symptom called “blue-eye.” This infection of popcorn kernels causes economic losses because of their poor appearance and the frequently disagreeable flavor of the popped kernels. Images of ker...

  8. Damage Detection Based on Static Strain Responses Using FBG in a Wind Turbine Blade

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shaohua; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Xie, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The damage detection of a wind turbine blade enables better operation of the turbines, and provides an early alert to the destroyed events of the blade in order to avoid catastrophic losses. A new non-baseline damage detection method based on the Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in a wind turbine blade is developed in this paper. Firstly, the Chi-square distribution is proven to be an effective damage-sensitive feature which is adopted as the individual information source for the local decision. In order to obtain the global and optimal decision for the damage detection, the feature information fusion (FIF) method is proposed to fuse and optimize information in above individual information sources, and the damage is detected accurately through of the global decision. Then a 13.2 m wind turbine blade with the distributed strain sensor system is adopted to describe the feasibility of the proposed method, and the strain energy method (SEM) is used to describe the advantage of the proposed method. Finally results show that the proposed method can deliver encouraging results of the damage detection in the wind turbine blade. PMID:26287200

  9. Damage Detection Based on Static Strain Responses Using FBG in a Wind Turbine Blade.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaohua; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Xie, Yong

    2015-08-14

    The damage detection of a wind turbine blade enables better operation of the turbines, and provides an early alert to the destroyed events of the blade in order to avoid catastrophic losses. A new non-baseline damage detection method based on the Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in a wind turbine blade is developed in this paper. Firstly, the Chi-square distribution is proven to be an effective damage-sensitive feature which is adopted as the individual information source for the local decision. In order to obtain the global and optimal decision for the damage detection, the feature information fusion (FIF) method is proposed to fuse and optimize information in above individual information sources, and the damage is detected accurately through of the global decision. Then a 13.2 m wind turbine blade with the distributed strain sensor system is adopted to describe the feasibility of the proposed method, and the strain energy method (SEM) is used to describe the advantage of the proposed method. Finally results show that the proposed method can deliver encouraging results of the damage detection in the wind turbine blade.

  10. Planetary gear train ring gear and support structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valco, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Most helicopter transmissions utilize a planetary gear train as the final speed reduction stage. Due to weight constraints these transmissions have high power-to-weight ratios and relatively flexible structures. This investigation addresses the analysis of planetary gear trains with the ring gear mounted on a flexible support structure. The approach utilizes recent advances in automated contact methods for nonlinear finite element analysis. Rather than using a line of action spring to model gear pair mesh stiffness, finite element models of complete gears are developed, and the elastic gear members are engaged and rolled through mesh. The procedure includes detailed gear tooth geometry with profile modifications. A nonlinear approach is required due to large displacements associated with gear rotation and nonlinear boundary conditions associated with the gear tooth surface contact. The updated Lagrangian formulation and the MARC K-4.1 automated contact features are applied in the analysis. The ring gear support structure is modeled by an elastic foundation linking the ring gear to a rigid support. Calculation of gear pair deflections, stresses, transmission error, and mesh stiffness through the gear meshing cycle are demonstrated for external and internal spur gear pairs and a planetary gear train. Issues relating to the accuracy of the nonlinear finite element contact method, gear mesh stiffness, transmission error, and the planetary gear train elastic support structure are discussed.

  11. Detection of bearing damage by statistic vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The condition of bearings, which are essential components in mechanisms, is crucial to safety. The analysis of the bearing vibration signal, which is always contaminated by certain types of noise, is a very important standard for mechanical condition diagnosis of the bearing and mechanical failure phenomenon. In this paper the method of rolling bearing fault detection by statistical analysis of vibration is proposed to filter out Gaussian noise contained in a raw vibration signal. The results of experiments show that the vibration signal can be significantly enhanced by application of the proposed method. Besides, the proposed method is used to analyse real acoustic signals of a bearing with inner race and outer race faults, respectively. The values of attributes are determined according to the degree of the fault. The results confirm that the periods between the transients, which represent bearing fault characteristics, can be successfully detected.

  12. Passive Impact Damage Detection of Fiber Glass Composite Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-19

    absorbing composite materials can potentially be lighter than steel or aluminum for the same threat level and therefore can reduce fuel requirements...that manufacturing using multilayer composite materials is significantly more expensive than using traditional materials such as steel . Thus one of the...sensors with a triangulation technique applied to aluminum honeycomb panels were used to detect impact locations for impacts in the hypervelocity range

  13. Airplane landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiorca, Salvatore

    1931-01-01

    This report presents an investigation of the design and construction of various types of landing gears. Some of the items discussed include: chassises, wheels, shock absorbers (rubber disk and rubber cord), as well as oleopneumatic shock absorbers. Various types of landing gears are also discussed such as the Messier, Bendix, Vickers, and Bleriot.

  14. Adjusting the Chain Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloc, Z.; Korf, J.; Kavan, P.

    The adjustment (modification) deals with gear chains intermediating (transmitting) motion transfer between the sprocket wheels on parallel shafts. The purpose of the adjustments of chain gear is to remove the unwanted effects by using the chain guide on the links (sliding guide rail) ensuring a smooth fit of the chain rollers into the wheel tooth gap.

  15. Offline and online detection of damage using autoregressive models and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; de Lautour, Oliver R.

    2007-04-01

    Developed to study long, regularly sampled streams of data, time series analysis methods are being increasingly investigated for the use of Structural Health Monitoring. In this research, Autoregressive (AR) models are used in conjunction with Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for damage detection, localisation and severity assessment. In the first reported experimental exercise, AR models were used offline to fit the acceleration time histories of a 3-storey test structure in undamaged and various damaged states when excited by earthquake motion simulated on a shake table. Damage was introduced into the structure by replacing the columns with those of a thinner thickness. Analytical models of the structure in both damaged and undamaged states were also developed and updated using experimental data in order to determine structural stiffness. The coefficients of AR models were used as damage sensitive features and input into an ANN to build a relationship between them and the remaining structural stiffness. In the second, analytical exercise, a system with gradually progressing damage was numerically simulated and acceleration AR models with exogenous inputs were identified recursively. A trained ANN was then required to trace the structural stiffness online. The results for the offline and online approach showed the efficiency of using AR coefficient as damage sensitive features and good performance of the ANNs for damage detection, localization and quantification.

  16. Simplified qPCR method for detecting excessive mtDNA damage induced by exogenous factors.

    PubMed

    Gureev, Artem P; Shaforostova, Ekaterina A; Starkov, Anatoly A; Popov, Vasily N

    2017-05-01

    Damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a meaningful biomarker for evaluating genotoxicity of drugs and environmental toxins. Existing PCR methods utilize long mtDNA fragments (∼8-10kb), which complicates detecting exact sites of mtDNA damage. To identify the mtDNA regions most susceptible to damage, we have developed and validated a set of primers to amplify ∼2kb long fragments, while covering over 95% of mouse mtDNA. We have modified the detection method by greatly increasing the enrichment of mtDNA, which allows us solving the problem of non-specific primer annealing to nuclear DNA. To validate our approach, we have determined the most damage-susceptible mtDNA regions in mice treated in vivo and in vitro with rotenone and H2O2. The GTGR-sequence-enriched mtDNA segments located in the D-loop region were found to be especially susceptible to damage. Further, we demonstrate that H2O2-induced mtDNA damage facilitates the relaxation of mtDNA supercoiled conformation, making the sequences with minimal damage more accessible to DNA polymerase, which, in turn, results in a decrease in threshold cycle value. Overall, our modified PCR method is simpler and more selective to the specific sites of damage in mtDNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of potato beetle damage using remote sensing from small unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond; Rondon, Silvia I.

    2017-04-01

    Colorado potato beetle (CPB) adults and larvae devour leaves of potato and other solanaceous crops and weeds, and may quickly develop resistance to pesticides. With early detection of CPB damage, more options are available for precision integrated pest management, which reduces the amount of pesticides applied in a field. Remote sensing with small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) has potential for CPB detection because low flight altitudes allow image acquisition at very high spatial resolution. A five-band multispectral sensor and up-looking incident light sensor were mounted on a six-rotor sUAS, which was flown at altitudes of 60 and 30 m in June 2014. Plants went from visibly undamaged to having some damage in just 1 day. Whole-plot normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the number of pixels classified as damaged (0.70≤NDVI≤0.80) were not correlated with visible CPB damage ranked from least to most. Area of CPB damage estimated using object-based image analysis was highly correlated to the visual ranking of damage. Furthermore, plant height calculated using structure-from-motion point clouds was related to CPB damage, but this method required extensive operator intervention for success. Object-based image analysis has potential for early detection based on high spatial resolution sUAS remote sensing.

  18. Damage Detection in Bridge Structure Using Vibration Data under Random Travelling Vehicle Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, C. H.; Hung, T. Y.; Chen, S. F.; Hsu, W. T.

    2015-07-01

    Due to the random nature of the road excitation and the inherent uncertainties in bridge-vehicle system, damage identification of bridge structure through continuous monitoring under operating situation become a challenge problem. Methods for system identification and damage detection of a continuous two-span concrete bridge structure in time domain is presented using interaction forces from random moving vehicles as excitation. The signals recorded in different locations of the instrumented bridge are mixed with signals from different internal and external (road roughness) vibration sources. The damage structure is also modelled as the stiffness reduction in one of the beam element. For the purpose of system identification and damage detection three different output-only modal analysis techniques are proposed: The covariance-driven stochastic subspace identification (SSI-COV), the blind source separation algorithms (called Second Order Blind Identification) and the multivariate AR model. The advantages and disadvantages of the three algorithms are discussed. Finally, the null-space damage index, subspace damage indices and mode shape slope change are used to detect and locate the damage. The proposed approaches has been tested in simulation and proved to be effective for structural health monitoring.

  19. Multi-stage approach for structural damage detection problem using basis pursuit and particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerist, Saleheh; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to solve structural damage detection problem, a multi-stage method using particle swarm optimization is presented. First, a new spars recovery method, named Basis Pursuit (BP), is utilized to preliminarily identify structural damage locations. The BP method solves a system of equations which relates the damage parameters to the structural modal responses using the sensitivity matrix. Then, the results of this stage are subsequently enhanced to the exact damage locations and extents using the PSO search engine. Finally, the search space is reduced by elimination of some low damage variables using micro search (MS) operator embedded in the PSO algorithm. To overcome the noise present in structural responses, a method known as Basis Pursuit De-Noising (BPDN) is also used. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated by three numerical examples: a cantilever beam, a plane truss and a portal plane frame. The frequency response is used to detect damage in the examples. The simulation results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method in detecting multiple damage cases and exhibit its robustness regarding noise and its advantages compared to other reported solution algorithms.

  20. Two-dimensional wavelet mapping techniques for damage detection in structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amizic, Bruno; Amaravadi, Venkat; Rao, Vittal S.; Derriso, Mark M.

    2002-07-01

    Application of the wavelet transforms on the measured vibration data provides a new tool for the damage detection analysis of the two-dimensional structural systems. In this paper, a novel two-dimensional wavelet mapping technique for damage detection based on the wavelet transforms and residual mode shapes are proposed. After vibration data was collected, wavelet de-noising shrinkage was performed in order to reduce measurement noise. By performing wavelet decomposition of the residuals of mode shapes and by taking only detail coefficients, wavelet energy maps are constructed for all decomposition levels. The orthogonal property of the wavelet transforms has bee utilized to correlate energy at decomposition levels with the measured vibrational energy. After wavelet maps of interest are determined, they are mapped on top of each other to figure out damaged areas of the two-dimensional structural systems. The energy segmentation procedure is performed by using minimum homogeneity and uncertainty based thresholding methods. It has been shown that the proposed method can clearly locate the multiple damage locations on the two- dimensional structures. This method requires few sampling points, robust and independent of the type of damage or the material damaged. The proposed method is applied to detect multiple damage locations on a two-dimensional plate. The results are very satisfactory.

  1. Enhancement of the Feature Extraction Capability in Global Damage Detection Using Wavelet Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Ponnaluru, Gopi Krishna

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the specific capabilities of the defect energy parameter technique for global damage detection developed by Saleeb and coworkers. The feature extraction is the most important capability in any damage-detection technique. Features are any parameters extracted from the processed measurement data in order to enhance damage detection. The damage feature extraction capability was studied extensively by analyzing various simulation results. The practical significance in structural health monitoring is that the detection at early stages of small-size defects is always desirable. The amount of changes in the structure's response due to these small defects was determined to show the needed level of accuracy in the experimental methods. The arrangement of fine/extensive sensor network to measure required data for the detection is an "unlimited" ability, but there is a difficulty to place extensive number of sensors on a structure. Therefore, an investigation was conducted using the measurements of coarse sensor network. The white and the pink noises, which cover most of the frequency ranges that are typically encountered in the many measuring devices used (e.g., accelerometers, strain gauges, etc.) are added to the displacements to investigate the effect of noisy measurements in the detection technique. The noisy displacements and the noisy damage parameter values are used to study the signal feature reconstruction using wavelets. The enhancement of the feature extraction capability was successfully achieved by the wavelet theory.

  2. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  3. Occupancy models for monitoring marine fish: a bayesian hierarchical approach to model imperfect detection with a novel gear combination.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Lewis G; Bacheler, Nathan M; Gwinn, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy models using incidence data collected repeatedly at sites across the range of a population are increasingly employed to infer patterns and processes influencing population distribution and dynamics. While such work is common in terrestrial systems, fewer examples exist in marine applications. This disparity likely exists because the replicate samples required by these models to account for imperfect detection are often impractical to obtain when surveying aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. We employ simultaneous sampling using fish traps and novel underwater camera observations to generate the requisite replicate samples for occupancy models of red snapper, a reef fish species. Since the replicate samples are collected simultaneously by multiple sampling devices, many typical problems encountered when obtaining replicate observations are avoided. Our results suggest that augmenting traditional fish trap sampling with camera observations not only doubled the probability of detecting red snapper in reef habitats off the Southeast coast of the United States, but supplied the necessary observations to infer factors influencing population distribution and abundance while accounting for imperfect detection. We found that detection probabilities tended to be higher for camera traps than traditional fish traps. Furthermore, camera trap detections were influenced by the current direction and turbidity of the water, indicating that collecting data on these variables is important for future monitoring. These models indicate that the distribution and abundance of this species is more heavily influenced by latitude and depth than by micro-scale reef characteristics lending credence to previous characterizations of red snapper as a reef habitat generalist. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneous sampling devices, including camera traps, in aquatic environments to inform occupancy models and account for imperfect detection when describing factors

  4. Occupancy Models for Monitoring Marine Fish: A Bayesian Hierarchical Approach to Model Imperfect Detection with a Novel Gear Combination

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Lewis G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Gwinn, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy models using incidence data collected repeatedly at sites across the range of a population are increasingly employed to infer patterns and processes influencing population distribution and dynamics. While such work is common in terrestrial systems, fewer examples exist in marine applications. This disparity likely exists because the replicate samples required by these models to account for imperfect detection are often impractical to obtain when surveying aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. We employ simultaneous sampling using fish traps and novel underwater camera observations to generate the requisite replicate samples for occupancy models of red snapper, a reef fish species. Since the replicate samples are collected simultaneously by multiple sampling devices, many typical problems encountered when obtaining replicate observations are avoided. Our results suggest that augmenting traditional fish trap sampling with camera observations not only doubled the probability of detecting red snapper in reef habitats off the Southeast coast of the United States, but supplied the necessary observations to infer factors influencing population distribution and abundance while accounting for imperfect detection. We found that detection probabilities tended to be higher for camera traps than traditional fish traps. Furthermore, camera trap detections were influenced by the current direction and turbidity of the water, indicating that collecting data on these variables is important for future monitoring. These models indicate that the distribution and abundance of this species is more heavily influenced by latitude and depth than by micro-scale reef characteristics lending credence to previous characterizations of red snapper as a reef habitat generalist. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneous sampling devices, including camera traps, in aquatic environments to inform occupancy models and account for imperfect detection when describing factors

  5. Gear noise origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    Each pair of meshing gears in a transmission gives rise to a source of vibratory excitation that can result in the radiation of sound. Each such source is most conveniently characterized as a displacement form of excitation generally referred to as the static transmission error of the gear pair. Contributions to the frequency spectrum of the static transmission error of spur and helical gears arising from tooth and gear body elastic deformations and from deviations of tooth surfaces from perfect involute surfaces are considered. Tooth surface deviations are decomposed into contributions giving rise to tooth meshing harmonic excitations and rotational harmonic or sideband excitations. Various types of gear tooth errors are defined and the contributions of these errors to different parts of the frequency spectrum are described. The attenuating effect on the static transmission error spectrum arising from the smoothing action of multiple tooth contact is explained.

  6. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  7. Final reduction gear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Y.; Hori, H.

    1987-04-21

    A final reduction gear apparatus is described comprising: a differential carrier which houses a gear assembly; an oil seal attached to a side gear shaft opening in the differential carrier, the oil seal having a main lip which may contact a periphery of a side gear shaft; and a guide member located outside of the oil seal at the side gear shaft opening, the guide member being formed as a member separate from the oil seal, the guide member having a slightly larger inner diameter than that of the main lip of the oil seal, and having guide surface concentric to the main lip, wherein 1/2 of the difference between the inner diameter of the guide member and the inner diameter of the main lip of the oil seal is within the limit of the elastic deformability of the main lip.

  8. Hyperspectral near-infrared imaging for the detection of physical damages of pear

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bruise damage on pears is one of the most crucial internal quality factors, which needs to be detected in postharvest quality sorting processes. Thus, a reliable non-destructive detection method for the fruit defects including bruises is necessary to ensure accurate quality assessment. Infra-red ima...

  9. Infra-red imaging technology for detection of bruise damages of Shingo pear

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bruise damage on pears is one of the most crucial internal quality factors that needs to be detected in postharvest quality sorting processes. Development of sensitive detection methods for the defects including fruit bruise is necessary to ensure accurate quality assessment. Infra-red imaging tech...

  10. Multiscale Models of Multifunctional Composites for On-Board Damage Detection and Failure Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-08

    2 n = 3 n = 4 n = 5 S C ck lin g S tra in S B u 9 IV. Publications 1. Z. Xia and W. A. Curtin, “Modeling of Mechanical Damage Detection in...CFRPs via Electrical Resistance”, Comp. Sci. Tech. 67, 1518 -1529 (2007). 2. Z. Xia and W. A. Curtin, “Detection of Penetration and Delamination

  11. Detection of early cartilage damage using targeted nanosomes in a post-traumatic osteoarthritis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Pinkhassik, Eugene; David, Valentin; Stuart, John M; Hasty, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability in the US. A problem with early intervention is that it is very difficult to detect OA before irreversible damage has already occurred. This study characterizes a novel method of early OA detection in a mouse model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) using fluorescent nanosomes. In this investigation, knee injury was induced in mice by compressive loading. Nanosomes encapsulating fluorescent dye and conjugated to collagen type II antibody were utilized to detect cartilage damage in vivo. Cartilage damage and OA progression were detected by the use of fluorescence-imaging (IVIS) and histopathology. Histopathology analyses showed that mild osteoarthritic changes had occurred. This corresponded with a higher fluorescence on IVIS imaging due to more nanosome binding. These results suggest that theragnostic nanosomes may be useful for detection of early PTOA as well as for targeted delivery of interventional agents. With the aging population, osteoarthritis now poses a significant problem worldwide. Early detection may help slow the progression of the disease. In this study, the authors described the use of fluorescent nanosomes to detect early cartilage damage in a mouse model of osteoarthritis. This detection method may also prove to be useful for targeted delivery of drugs in the future. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Application of electromagnetic waves in damage detection of concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Maria Q.; De Flaviis, Franco; Kim, Yoo J.; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2000-04-01

    Jacketing technology using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is being applied for seismic retrofit of reinforced concrete (RC) columns designed and constructed under older specifications. In this study, the authors develop an electromagnetic (EM) imaging technology for detecting voids and debonding between the jacket and the column, which may significantly weaken the structural performance of the column otherwise attainable by jacketing. This technology is based on the reflection analysis of a continuous EM wave sent toward and reflected from layered FRP-adhesive-concrete medium: Poor bonding conditions including voids and debonding will generate air gaps which produce additional reflections of the EM wave. In this study, dielectric properties of various materials involved in the FRP-jacketed RC column were first measured. Second, the measured properties were used for a computer simulation of the proposed EM imaging technology. The simulation demonstrated the difficulty in detecting imperfect bonding conditions by using plane waves, as the scattering contribution from the voids and debonding is very small compared to that from the jacketed column. Third, in order to alleviate this difficulty, a special dielectric lens was designed and fabricated to focus the EM wave on the bonding interface. Furthermore, the time gating technique is used in order to reduce the noise resulting from various uncertainties associated with the jacketed columns. Finally, three concrete columns were constructed and wrapped with glass-FRP jackets with various voids and debonding condition artificially introduced in the bonding interface. Using the proposed EM imaging technology with the lens especially designed and installed, these voids and debonding condition were successfully detected.

  13. Detection of DNA damage induced by space radiation in Mir and space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Ohnishi, Ken; Takahashi, Akihisa; Taniguchi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Masaru; Nakano, Tamotsu; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2002-12-01

    Although physical monitoring of space radiation has been accomplished, we aim to measure exact DNA damage as caused by space radiation. If DNA damage is caused by space radiation, we can detect DNA damage dependent on the length of the space flight periods by using post-labeling methods. To detect DNA damage caused by space radiation, we placed fixed human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in the Russian Mir space station for 40 days and in an American space shuttle for 9 days. After landing, we labeled space-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by enzymatic incorporation of [3H]-dATP with terminal deoxyribo-nucleotidyl transferase (TdT). We detected DNA damage as many grains on fixed silver emulsion resulting from beta-rays emitted from 3H-atoms in the nuclei of the cells placed in the Mir-station (J/Mir mission, STS-89), but detected hardly any in the ground control sample. In the space shuttle samples (S/MM-8), the number of cells having many grains was lower than that in the J/Mir mission samples. These results suggest that DNA damage is caused by space radiation and that it is dependent on the length of the space flight.

  14. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  15. Signal processing and damage detection in a frame structure excited by chaotic input force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvino, Liming W.; Pines, Darryll J.; Todd, Michael D.; Nichols, Jonathan

    2003-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a general time-frequency data analysis method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert Spectrum, and its application to structural health monitoring. The focus of this work is on feature extraction from structural response time series data. This is done by tracking unique characteristics of the adaptive decomposition components and developing a damage index based on previously introduced fundamental relationships connecting the instantaneous phase of a measured time series to the structural mass and stiffness parameters. Damage detection applications are investigated for a laboratory experiment of a simple frame (a model of a multi-story building) where damage is incurred by removing bolts at various locations. The frame is excited by a low dimensional deterministic chaos input as well as by broadband random signal. The time series output of the frame response is then analyzed with the EMD method. The time-frequency features and instantaneous phase relationships are extracted and examined for changes which may occur due to damage. These results are compared to results from other newly developed detection algorithms based on geometric properties of a chaotic attractor. Our results illustrate that the EMD and instantaneous phase detection approach, based on time-frequency analysis along with simple physics-based models, can be used to determine the presence and location of structural damage and permits the development of a reliable damage detection methodology.

  16. Damage detection for health monitoring of ground vehicle through active probing of vehicle response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Alan A.; Adams, Douglas E.

    2011-04-01

    While semi-active suspension systems have been shown to be effective in the real-time optimization of vehicle ride and handling, these systems also present a means for system interrogation and damage detection. This research demonstrates the ability to monitor the condition of a ground vehicle by utilizing a passively tunable suspension system to systematically alter the suspension parameters in order to probe the system response. By modulating the suspension parameters at a particular corner of the vehicle, or combinations of corners, selected operational modes of the sprung and unsprung masses can be probed providing an increased ability to detect and locate damage in certain vehicle components. The experimental data presented demonstrates that the ability to detect damage was increased by 16.3% and 22.5% for the two simulated damage conditions using the suspension probing technique. A major benefit of the active probing method described in this paper is that the associated damage index is based only on one specific vehicle's response over time. A massive database of historical data from similar vehicles is not required. The active probing method also benefits from transducers already integrated for the control of a typical semi-active suspension system. The benefits of an on-board health monitoring system can be realized with minimal added cost, by adding only a small number of additional sensors. The ability to detect vehicle damage during operation can be extremely advantageous in terms of safety and condition-based maintenance.

  17. A Protection And Detection Surface (PADS) for damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Prasad, Chunchu B.; Biggers, Sherrill B.

    1990-01-01

    A protection and detection surface (PADS) concept was studied for application to composite primary aircraft structures. A Kevlar-epoxy woven face sheet with a Rohacell foam core was found to be the most effective PADS configuration among the configurations evaluated. The weight of the PADS configuration was estimated to be approximately 17 pct of the structural weight. The PADS configuration was bonded to graphite-epoxy base laminates, and up to a 70 pct improvement in compression-after-impact failure strains was observed.

  18. Regularized discriminant analysis for multi-sensor decision fusion and damage detection with Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Spandan; Vanli, O. Arda; Huffer, Fred W.; Jung, Sungmoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we propose a regularized linear discriminant analysis approach for damage detection which does not require an intermediate feature extraction step and therefore more efficient in handling data with high-dimensionality. A robust discriminant model is obtained by shrinking of the covariance matrix to a diagonal matrix and thresholding redundant predictors without hurting the predictive power of the model. The shrinking and threshold parameters of the discriminant function (decision boundary) are estimated to minimize the classification error. Furthermore, it is shown how the damage classification achieved by the proposed method can be extended to multiple sensors by following a Bayesian decision-fusion formulation. The detection probability of each sensor is used as a prior condition to estimate the posterior detection probability of the entire network and the posterior detection probability is used as a quantitative basis to make the final decision about the damage.

  19. Comparison of Four Sampling Gears in Detecting Invasive Invertebrates in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, Oral Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is important to conduct non-indigenous species assessments in areas at risk, such as ecosystems associated with Great Lakes harbors, both for the detection of new species and to determine the spread of existing ones. In addition to direct impacts on harbor ecosystems, addition...

  20. Comparison of Four Sampling Gears in Detecting Invasive Invertebrates in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, Oral Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is important to conduct non-indigenous species assessments in areas at risk, such as ecosystems associated with Great Lakes harbors, both for the detection of new species and to determine the spread of existing ones. In addition to direct impacts on harbor ecosystems, addition...

  1. Automatic detection and classification of damage zone(s) for incorporating in digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudipta; Deb, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a technique developed for monitoring surface deformation/displacement of an object under loading conditions. This method is further refined to make it capable of handling discontinuities on the surface of the sample. A damage zone is referred to a surface area fractured and opened in due course of loading. In this study, an algorithm is presented to automatically detect multiple damage zones in deformed image. The algorithm identifies the pixels located inside these zones and eliminate them from FEM-DIC processes. The proposed algorithm is successfully implemented on several damaged samples to estimate displacement fields of an object under loading conditions. This study shows that displacement fields represent the damage conditions reasonably well as compared to regular FEM-DIC technique without considering the damage zones.

  2. Damage detection via closed-form sensitivity matrix of modal kinetic energy change ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjian Shahri, A. H.; Ghorbani-Tanha, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a new damage detection method based on a damage sensitive feature parameter named Modal Kinetic Energy Change Ratio has been proposed. The sensitivity matrix for the damage identification procedure is calculated by making use of the closed-form sensitivity of eigenvalues of the structure. Numerical simulations and experimental tests were carried out on a beam-like structure in order to examine the reliability and feasibility of the proposed method. System Equivalent Reduction Expansion Technique is employed to omit rotational degrees of freedom of the model. It is demonstrated that this method locates and quantifies structural damage(s) with acceptable accuracy. The best advantage of the proposed method comparing to the ones which are based on modal strain energy is that it is not sensitive to mode shape noise and yields favorable results under moderate noise in natural frequencies.

  3. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  4. Damage detection of simply supported reinforced concrete beam by S transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Xi, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xuebing; Liu, Zhenzhou

    2017-08-01

    Signal processing is the key component of vibration-based structural damage detection. The S transform is variable window of short time Fourier transform (STFT) or an extension of wavelet transform (WT). The goal of using S transform is to extract subtle changes in the vibration signals in order to detect and quantify the damage in the structure. This paper presents the concentrated load is applied to the simply supported reinforced concrete beam and adopting the stepwise loading method, the vibration signals of each loading and unloading state is obtained by using the hammer impact. Then the vibration data of the reinforced concrete beam pre-damage and post-damage is analysed by S transform. Experimental result shows the potential ability of S transform in identifying peak energy changes and multiple reflections with different loading force state.

  5. A technique for autonomous structural damage detection with smart wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Y.; Mao, Y. K.; Tang, Y. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a distributed structural damage detection approach is proposed for large size structures under limited input and output measurements. A large size structure is decomposed into small size substructures based on its finite element formulation. Interaction effect between adjacent substructures is considered as 'additional unknown inputs' to each substructure. By sequentially utilizing the extended Kalman estimator for the extended state vector and the least squares estimation for the unmeasured inputs, the approach can not only estimate the 'additional unknown inputs' based on their formulations but also identify structural dynamic parameters, such as the stiffness and damping of each substructure. Local structural damage in the large size structure can be detected by tracking the changes in the identified values of structural dynamic parameters at element level, e.g., the degrading of stiffness parameters. Numerical example of detecting structural local damages in a large-size plane truss bridge illustrates the efficiency of the proposed approach. A new smart wireless sensor network is developed by the authors to combine with the proposed approach for autonomous structural damage detection of large size structures. The distributed structural damage detection approach can be embedded into the smart wireless sensor network based on its two-level cluster-tree topology architecture and the distributed computation capacity of each cluster head.

  6. Feasibility of PZT ceramics for impact damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Gerges; Koricho, Ermias; Karpenko, Oleksii; Haq, Mahmood; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic composites are becoming widely used in vehicles and airframe structures due to their high strength to weight ratio. However unlike metals, the multilayered composite structures are more susceptible to damage mechanisms such as disbonds and delaminations due to impacts. It is often difficult to visually detect the damage. Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) thin films are becoming popular for in-situ structural health monitoring due to their small size, high piezoelectric coupling coefficient, and ease of surface-mounting and/or embedding in composite structures. A network of such transducers could be utilized for damage detection using guided wave techniques, impedance techniques, or passive impact detection techniques. However, the PZT films are subject to the same impact probabilities that the structure encounters. If the transducers fail due to the subjected impacts, they can result in false readings and ultimately failing to correctly detect damage in the structure. This paper presents a feasibility study using the guided wave S0 mode for detecting impact damage. The health of the structure is quantified using guided wave measurements, and the PZT health is monitored using impedance methods.

  7. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  8. Design of Gear Drives With High Gear Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Vecchiato, Daniele; Gonzalez-Perez, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    A three part paper to describe the results of several gear drive types with a high gear ratio is presented. A single stage planetary gear train with double helical gears is described with methods to reduce transmission errors and improve load distribution by regulating backlash during assembly. A new arrangement for face gear is also described. This new mechanism can perform rotations between axes that are collinear and intersected. Finally the design and simulation of an isostatic planetary gear train is presented. Conditions that can lead to noise and vibration of the planetary gear drive are described.

  9. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  10. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  11. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  12. Feasibility of a linear phased acoustic array for health monitoring of gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Adrian A.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2001-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of sensing damage emanating from rotating drivetrain elements such as bearings, gear teeth, and drive shafts via airborne paths. A linear phased acoustic array of microphones is evaluated as a potential fault detection scheme for detecting acoustic signatures radiating from gearbox components. Specifically, this paper discusses the minimum spot size for a given linear array geometry and its sensitivity to acoustic sources. In addition, the use of beam focusing and beam steering to track individual tooth mesh dynamics are analyzed. Experimental results for a linear array are presented to illustrate the concepts of adaptive beam steering and acoustic filtering. This feasibility study indicates that the linear array can be used to track the acoustic signatures of gear mesh dynamics at higher harmonics of the mesh frequency.

  13. Global trends, potential mechanisms and early detection of organ damage in SLE.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anselm; Isenberg, David A; Lau, Chak-Sing

    2013-05-01

    Increased longevity of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) leads to chronic organ damage accrual, which reduces the possibility of further survival improvement in patients with the disease. Observations from lupus centres worldwide revealed that the prevalence of damage occurring in the cardiovascular system in patients with SLE has increased over the past four decades. The results of a meta-analysis involving over 70 observational studies demonstrated that lupus-related organ damage involving the neuropsychiatric and renal systems also remains a major factor that limits survival improvement in patients with this disease. While efforts to halt acute lupus-related injury are continuing, through early diagnosis and effective use of immunosuppressive agents, a concomitant strategy to improve survival of patients with SLE would be early detection and timely treatment of lupus-related organ damage with meticulous monitoring. This Review discusses the pattern and trend of organ damage in patients with SLE worldwide, the potential serological and genetic mechanisms of organ damage, and the advances in research on potential tools for early detection of lupus-related organ damage, such as functional brain imaging techniques, measurement of endothelial function, identification of biomarkers from body fluids, and development of risk calculation models.

  14. An Experimental Study of DLV Method in Damage Detection of Frame Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yen-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2010-05-01

    A structural damage detection method integrating the damage locating vector (DLV) method and ARX model for system identification of frame structures from seismic acceleration responses has been explored in this paper. The concept of the DLV method is to identify the members with zero stress under some specific loading patterns derived from the changes in flexibility matrix of the structure before and after the damage state. Success of the DLV method requires clear identification of the flexibility matrix for at least the first few dominant modes. In this study, a five-storey steel frame with diagonal bracings is considered as the objective building. The damage condition of the structure is simulated by partially removing some of the diagonals. With the flexibility matrices of both the intact and damaged structure identified from seismic structural responses via shaking table tests, results indicate that the damaged locations can be successfully identified by the DLV method if sufficient modes of vibration are taken into account in the realization of the flexibility matrices. The feasibility of using DLV method for damage detection of frame structures using seismic response data is confirmed.

  15. Preliminary Results of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Detection with Object-Based Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Uca Avci, Z. D.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Earthquakes are the most destructive natural disasters, which result in massive loss of life, infrastructure damages and financial losses. Earthquake-induced building damage detection is a very important step after earthquakes since earthquake-induced building damage is one of the most critical threats to cities and countries in terms of the area of damage, rate of collapsed buildings, the damage grade near the epicenters and also building damage types for all constructions. Van-Ercis (Turkey) earthquake (Mw= 7.1) was occurred on October 23th, 2011; at 10:41 UTC (13:41 local time) centered at 38.75 N 43.36 E that places the epicenter about 30 kilometers northern part of the city of Van. It is recorded that, 604 people died and approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or seriously damaged by the earthquake. In this study, high-resolution satellite images of Van-Ercis, acquired by Quickbird-2 (Digital Globe Inc.) after the earthquake, were used to detect the debris areas using an object-based image classification. Two different land surfaces, having homogeneous and heterogeneous land covers, were selected as case study areas. As a first step of the object-based image processing, segmentation was applied with a convenient scale parameter and homogeneity criterion parameters. As a next step, condition based classification was used. In the final step of this preliminary study, outputs were compared with streetview/ortophotos for the verification and evaluation of the classification accuracy.

  16. Metal-mediated DNA damage and cell death: mechanisms, detection methods, and cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Angelé-Martínez, Carlos; Goodman, Craig; Brumaghim, Julia

    2014-08-01

    The redox activity of metal ions can lead to the formation of highly reactive species that damage DNA, producing different oxidation products and types of damage depending upon the redox potentials of the DNA bases, formation of intermediate adducts, and identity of the reactive species. Other factors are also important in determining the degree of metal-mediated DNA damage, such as localization and redox chemistry of the metal ions or complexes and lifetimes of the reactive oxygen species generated. This review examines the types of DNA damage mediated by first-row transition metals under oxidative stress conditions, with emphasis on work published in the past ten years. Similarities and differences between DNA damage mechanisms of the first-row transition metals in vitro and in E. coli and human cells are compared and their relationship to disease development are discussed. Methods to detect this metal-mediated DNA damage, including backbone breakage, base oxidation, inter- and intra-strand crosslinking, and DNA-protein crosslinking are also briefly reviewed, as well as detection methods for reactive oxygen species generated by these metal ions. Understanding the conditions that cause metal-mediated DNA damage and metal generation of reactive oxygen species in vitro and in cells is required to develop effective drugs to prevent and treat chronic disease.

  17. Colorimetric detection of DNA damage by using hemin-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, D. M.; Yin, L. H.; Pu, Y. P.; Liu, S. Q.

    2013-04-01

    A colorimetric method for detection of DNA damage was developed by using hemin-graphene nanosheets (H-GNs). H-GNs were skillfully synthesized by adsorping of hemin on graphene through π-π interactions. The as-prepared H-GNs possessed both the ability of graphene to differentiate the damage DNA from intact DNA and the catalytic action of hemin. The damaged DNA made H-GNs coagulated to different degrees from the intact DNA because there were different amount of negative charge exposed on their surface, which made a great impact on the solubility of H-GNs. As a result, the corresponding centrifugal supernatant of H-GNs solution showed different color in the presence of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2, which could be discriminated by naked eyes or by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometer. Based on this, the damaged effects of styrene oxide (SO), NaAsO2 and UV radiation on DNA were studied. Results showed that SO exerted most serious damage effect on DNA although all of them damaged DNA seriously. The new method for detection of DNA damage showed good prospect in the evaluation of genotoxicity of new compounds, the maximum limit of pesticide residue, food additives, and so on, which is important in the fields of food science, pharmaceutical science and pesticide science.

  18. Detection of glaucomatous damage in patients with osteo-odontokeratoprosthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Falcinelli, G C; Falsini, B; Taloni, M; Piccardi, M; Falcinelli, G

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Osteo-odontokeratoprosthesis (OOKP) is an autologous transplantation procedure in which the cornea is replaced by an optical cylinder glued to a biological support. Patients undergoing OOKP surgery may develop a secondary glaucoma whose diagnosis, by means of standard diagnostic procedures, is often doubtful. METHODS--In the present study pattern electroretinograms (PERGs), visual evoked potentials (VEPs), contrast sensitivity, and automated threshold perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) were evaluated in 19 OOKP treated patients with postoperative visual acuities > or = 0.8. Nine patients had had a preoperative secondary glaucoma, while the remaining 10 had no history of glaucoma and normal posterior pole. RESULTS--Results were compared with those obtained from either normal control subjects or from ordinary glaucoma patients. PERG amplitudes and contrast and perimetric sensitivities were reduced in both groups of OOKP patients when compared with normal controls. However, these losses were significantly greater in OOKP patients with glaucoma compared with those with normal posterior pole. VEPs were reduced, compared with controls, only in OOKP patients with glaucoma. These VEP losses were similar to those found in ordinary glaucoma patients. CONCLUSION--Among the tests employed, VEPs showed the best accuracy (79%) in discriminating between glaucomatous and non-glaucomatous OOKP treated eyes. The present results suggest a possible use of the VEP technique for detecting glaucomatous dysfunction after OOKP. Images PMID:7696231

  19. Nondestructive methods for early detection of damage to living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateyeva, Natalya L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.; Shul'gina, Lidia A.

    2004-10-01

    As a result of the accomplish experiments determine, that by a method of a laser-induced fluorescence of chlorophyll it is possible to spot for cedar an early stage of the stressful factor, bound with presence in ground <>. In our case the laboratory researches provided learning a quantitative contents chlorophyll for plants found in normal and stressful conditions on a basis spectrophotometrical of a method. Natural measurement the observations behind dynamics of a photosynthetic state means of wood plants in vivo enable. For an estimation of this state the fluorescence of chlorophyll on wavelength 685 and 740 nm was used. The optical model of a green leaf was developed for methods of a laser-induced fluorescence of chlorophyll. A experiments series on remote research of processes violation of mineral power supply and exchange in plants is carried spent. Was considered the change of the ratios of intensity of a fluorescence of chlorophyll and carotenoids at deficiency. Was designed technique for detection infringement processes of mineral nutrition and change surveyed acidity grounds on laser-induce fluorescent responses of deciduous plants.

  20. Active sensing and damage detection using piezoelectric zinc oxide-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Frederick N.; Loh, Kenneth J.; Dodds, John S.; Baltazar, Arturo

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the design and performance of piezoelectric nanocomposite-based interdigitated transducers (IDTs) for active sensing and damage detection. First, thin films that are highly piezoelectric and mechanically flexible were designed by embedding zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) piezo-polymer matrix. Second, the suspended nanoparticle solutions were then spin coated onto patterned comb electrodes to fabricate the IDTs. The films were then poled to align their electric domains and to increase their permanent piezoelectricity. Upon IDT fabrication, its sensing and actuation of Lamb waves on an aluminum pipe was validated. These results were also compared to data obtained from commercial Macro Fiber Composite IDT transducers. In the last phase of this work, damage detection was demonstrated by mounting these nanocomposite sensors and actuators (using a pitch-catch setup) onto an aluminum pipe and plate. Damage was simulated by tightening a band clamp around the pipe and by drilling holes in the plate. A damage index calculation was used to compare results corresponding to different levels of damage applied to the plate (i.e., different drilled hole depths), and good correlation was observed. Thus, ZnO/PVDF-TrFE transducers were shown to have the potential for use as piezoelectric transducers for structural health monitoring and damage detection.

  1. Active sensing and damage detection using piezoelectric zinc oxide-based nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Frederick N; Loh, Kenneth J; Dodds, John S; Baltazar, Arturo

    2013-05-10

    This study investigated the design and performance of piezoelectric nanocomposite-based interdigitated transducers (IDTs) for active sensing and damage detection. First, thin films that are highly piezoelectric and mechanically flexible were designed by embedding zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) piezo-polymer matrix. Second, the suspended nanoparticle solutions were then spin coated onto patterned comb electrodes to fabricate the IDTs. The films were then poled to align their electric domains and to increase their permanent piezoelectricity. Upon IDT fabrication, its sensing and actuation of Lamb waves on an aluminum pipe was validated. These results were also compared to data obtained from commercial Macro Fiber Composite IDT transducers. In the last phase of this work, damage detection was demonstrated by mounting these nanocomposite sensors and actuators (using a pitch-catch setup) onto an aluminum pipe and plate. Damage was simulated by tightening a band clamp around the pipe and by drilling holes in the plate. A damage index calculation was used to compare results corresponding to different levels of damage applied to the plate (i.e., different drilled hole depths), and good correlation was observed. Thus, ZnO/PVDF-TrFE transducers were shown to have the potential for use as piezoelectric transducers for structural health monitoring and damage detection.

  2. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Damage detection in membrane structures using non-contact laser excitation and wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Feblil; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Hosoya, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a vibration testing and health monitoring system based on an impulse response excited by laser is proposed to detect damage in membrane structures. A high power Nd: YAG pulse laser is used to supply an ideal impulse to a membrane structure by generating shock waves via laser-induced breakdown in air. A health monitoring apparatus is developed with this vibration testing system and a damage detecting algorithm which only requires the vibration mode shape of the damaged membrane. Artificial damage is induced in membrane structure by cutting and tearing the membrane. The vibration mode shapes of the membrane structure extracted from vibration testing by using the laser-induced breakdown and laser Doppler vibrometer are then analyzed by 2-D continuous wavelet transformation. The location of damage is determined by the dominant peak of the wavelet coefficient which can be seen clearly by applying a boundary treatment and the concept of an iso-surface to the 2-D wavelet coefficient. The applicability of the present approach is verified by finite element analysis and experimental results, demonstrating the ability of the method to detect and identify the positions of damage induced on the membrane structure.

  4. Implementation of damage detection algorithms for the Alfred Zampa Memorial Suspension Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebinejad, I.; Sedarat, H.; Emami-Naeini, A.; Krimotat, A.; Lynch, Jerome

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated a number of different damage detection algorithms for structural health monitoring of a typical suspension bridge. The Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge, a part of the Interstate 80 in California, was selected for this study. The focus was to implement and validate simple damage detection algorithms for structural health monitoring of complex bridges. Accordingly, the numerical analysis involved development of a high fidelity finite element model of the bridge in order to simulate various structural damage scenarios. The finite element model of the bridge was validated based on the experimental modal properties. A number of damage scenarios were simulated by changing the stiffness of different bridge components including suspenders, main cable, bulkheads and deck. Several vibration-based damage detection methods namely the change in the stiffness, change in the flexibility, change in the uniform load surface and change in the uniform load surface curvature were employed to locate the simulated damages. The investigation here provides the relative merits and shortcomings of these methods when applied to long span suspension bridges. It also shows the applicability of these methods to locate the decay in the structure.

  5. Damage detection using the signal entropy of an ultrasonic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, E.; Baltazar, A.; Loh, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic sensors used to propagate guided waves can potentially be implemented to inspect large areas in engineering structures. However, the inherent dispersion and noise of guided acoustic signals, multiple echoes in the structure, as well as a lack of an approximate or exact model, limit their use as a continuous structural health monitoring system. In this work, the implementation of a network of piezoelectric sensors randomly placed on a plate-like structure to detect and locate artificial damage is studied. A network of macro fiber composite (MFC) sensors working in a pitch-catch configuration was set on an aluminum thin plate 1.9 mm in thickness. Signals were analyzed in the time-scale domain using the discrete wavelet transform. The objectives of this work were threefold, namely to first develop a damage index based on the entropy distribution using short time wavelet entropy of the ultrasonic waves generated by a sensor network, second to determine the performance of an array of spare MFC sensors to detect artificial damage, and third to implement a time-of-arrival (TOA) algorithm on the gathered signals for damage location of an artificial circular discontinuity. Our preliminary test results show that the proposed methodology provides sufficient information for damage detection, which, once combined with the TOA algorithm, allows localization of the damage.

  6. Engine starter gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, P.F.

    1986-09-16

    An engine starter gearing is described for selectively starting an engine having a starting gear, the engine starter gearing comprising: a power shaft; a sleeve slidably, but non-rotatably, secured to the power shaft, the sleeve having external helical splines formed on one extremity thereof; a pinion gear slidably journalled to the power shaft for axial movement relative thereto, the pinion gear being adapted for movement into and out of engagement with the starting gear of the engine to be started; a driven clutch member secured to the pinion gear for movement therewith; a circular recess formed in the driven clutch member; a driving clutch member slidably mounted on the helical splines of the sleeve, the driving and driven clutch members having complementary mutually engageable inclined teeth for transmitting torque there between in one direction of rotation; and a barrel housing having an open end, the barrel housing being slidably supported on the sleeve and spatially encompassing the driving and driven clutch members.

  7. Jerky loads on surface-hardened gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rettig, H.; Wirth, X.

    1978-01-01

    Damage occurs again and again in practice in the form of transmissions with surface hardened gears which break after a very long operating time (explained by seldom occurring jerky loads). Gear drives are frequently exposed to jerky stresses which are greater than their fatigue limit. These stresses are considered in gear calculations, first, by shock factors when the transmission is to be designed as high endurance with regard to overloads and, second, in the form of operating ratios when the design is to be time enduring with regard to overloads. The size of the operating ratio depends not only on torque characteristics, drive and processing machine, but also on the material and heat treatment.

  8. A modified alkaline Comet assay for in vivo detection of oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A K; Pragya, P; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2011-12-24

    Modifications to the alkaline Comet assay by using lesion-specific endonucleases, such as formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (ENDOIII, also known as Nth), can detect DNA bases with oxidative damage. This modified assay can be used to assess the genotoxic/carcinogenic potential of environmental chemicals. The goal of this study was to validate the ability of this modified assay to detect oxidative stress-induced genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)). In this study, we used three well known chemical oxidative stress inducers: hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) and copper sulfate (CuSO(4)). Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed various concentrations of the test chemicals (50-200μM) mixed with a standard Drosophila food for 24h. Alkaline Comet assays with and without the FPG and ENDOIII enzymes were performed with midgut cells that were isolated from the control and treated larvae. Our results show a concentration-dependent increase (p<0.05-0.001) in the migration of DNA from the treated larvae. ENDOIII treatment detected more oxidative DNA damage (specifically pyrimidine damage) in the H(2)O(2) exposed larvae compared to FPG or no enzyme treatment (buffer only). In contrast, FPG treatment detected more oxidative DNA damage (specifically purine damage) in CuSO(4) exposed larvae compared to ENDOIII. Although previously reported to be a potent genotoxic agent, CdCl(2) did not induce more oxidative DNA damage than the other test chemicals. Our results show that the modified alkaline Comet assay can be used to detect oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in D. melanogaster and thus may be applicable for in vivo genotoxic assessments of environmental chemicals.

  9. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  10. Gear assembly for automobile transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ikemoto, K.; Tera Kura, Y.; Miyake, T.

    1986-03-25

    This patent describes a gear assembly including a pair of driving and driven gears permanently in meshing engagement with each other to provide a torque transmission therebetween. The driven gear is formed at one side thereof with a boss portion, and an additional gear axially slidable and rotatable on the boss portion of the driven gear and is permanently in meshing engagement with the driving gear to rotate at a gear ratio different from that of the driving and driven gears, additional gear is also resiliently in contact with a synchronizer mechanism assembled adjaecnt to the additional gear and having a spline piece fixed to the boss portion of the driven gear. The improvement wherein a toothed portion of the driven gear is formed at one end thereof with an annual stepped portion for provision of a predetermined annular gap between the additional gear and the one end face of the toothed portion of the driven gear. The resilient means is a waveshaped ring spring arranged in surrounding relationship with the boss portion of the driven gear and is engaged at its one end face with the additional gear and at its other end face with the spline piece of the synchronizer mechanism.

  11. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  12. On impact damage detection and quantification for CFRP laminates using structural response data only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M. T. H.; Worden, K.; Pierce, S. G.; Hickey, D.; Staszewski, W. J.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Hodzic, A.

    2011-11-01

    The overall purpose of the research is to detect and attempt to quantify impact damage in structures made from composite materials. A study that uses simplified coupon specimens made from a Carbon Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) prepreg with 11, 12 and 13 plies is presented. PZT sensors were placed at three separate locations in each test specimen to record the responses from impact events. To perform damaging impact tests, an instrumented drop-test machine was used and the impact energy was set to cover a range of 0.37-41.72 J. The response signals captured from each sensor were recorded by a data acquisition system for subsequent evaluation. The impacted specimens were examined with an X-ray technique to determine the extent of the damaged areas and it was found that the apparent damaged area grew monotonically with impact energy. A number of simple univariate and multivariate features were extracted from the sensor signals recorded during impact by computing their spectra and calculating frequency centroids. The concept of discordancy from the statistical discipline of outlier analysis is employed in order to separate the responses from non-damaging and damaging impacts. The results show that the potential damage indices introduced here provide a means of identifying damaging impacts from the response data alone.

  13. Detection and localization of damage using empirical mode decomposition and multilevel support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushyanth, N. D.; Suma, M. N.; Latte, Mrityanjaya V.

    2016-03-01

    Damage in the structure may raise a significant amount of maintenance cost and serious safety problems. Hence detection of the damage at its early stage is of prime importance. The main contribution pursued in this investigation is to propose a generic optimal methodology to improve the accuracy of positioning of the flaw in a structure. This novel approach involves a two-step process. The first step essentially aims at extracting the damage-sensitive features from the received signal, and these extracted features are often termed the damage index or damage indices, serving as an indicator to know whether the damage is present or not. In particular, a multilevel SVM (support vector machine) plays a vital role in the distinction of faulty and healthy structures. Formerly, when a structure is unveiled as a damaged structure, in the subsequent step, the position of the damage is identified using Hilbert-Huang transform. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated in both simulation and experimental tests on a 6061 aluminum plate with dimensions 300 mm × 300 mm × 5 mm which accordingly yield considerable improvement in the accuracy of estimating the position of the flaw.

  14. Robust structural damage detection and localization based on joint approximate diagonalization technique in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shancheng; Ouyang, Huajiang

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristic deflection shapes (CDS’s) such as mode shapes and operational deflection shapes are highly sensitive to structural damage in beam- or plate-type structures. Nevertheless, they are vulnerable to measurement noise and could result in unacceptable identification errors. In order to increase the accuracy and noise robustness of damage identification based on CDS’s using vibration responses of random excitation, joint approximate diagonalization (JAD) technique and gapped smoothing method (GSM) are combined to form a sensitive and robust damage index (DI), which can simultaneously detect the existence of damage and localize its position. In addition, it is possible to apply this approach to damage identification of structures under ambient excitation. First, JAD method which is an essential technique of blind source separation is investigated to simultaneously diagonalize a set of power spectral density matrices corresponding to frequencies near a certain natural frequency to estimate a joint unitary diagonalizer. The columns of this joint diagonalizer contain dominant CDS’s. With the identified dominant CDS’s around different natural frequencies, GSM is used to extract damage features and a robust damage identification index is then proposed. Numerical and experimental examples of beams with cracks are used to verify the validity and noise robustness of JAD based CDS estimation and the proposed DI. Furthermore, damage identification using dominant CDS’s estimated by JAD method is demonstrated to be more accurate and noise robust than by the commonly used singular value decomposition method.

  15. Application of frequency domain ARX models and extreme value statistics to damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Sohn, Hoon; Farrar, Charles R.

    2003-08-01

    In this study, the applicability of an auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs (ARX) in the frequency domain to structural health monitoring (SHM) is explored. Damage sensitive features that explicitly consider the nonlinear system input/output relationships produced by damage are extracted from the ARX model. Furthermore, because of the non-Gaussian nature of the extracted features, Extreme Value Statistics (EVS) is employed to develop a robust damage classifier. EVS is useful in this case because the data of interest are in the tails (extremes) of the damage sensitive feature distribution. The suitability of the ARX model, combined with EVS, to nonlinear damage detection is demonstrated using vibration data obtained from a laboratory experiment of a three-story building model. It is found that the current method, while able to discern when damage is present in the structure, is unable to localize the damage to a particular joint. An impedance-based method using piezoelectric (PZT) material as both an actuator and a sensor is then proposed as a possible solution to the problem of damage localization.

  16. Application of statistical pattern classification methods for damage detection to field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Carlos; Cheung, Allen; Sarabandi, Pooya; Nair, K. Krishnan; Kiremidjian, Anne

    2007-04-01

    The field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has received considerable attention for its potential applications to monitoring civil infrastructure. However, the damage detection algorithms that form the backbone of these systems have primarily been tested on simulated data instead of full-scale structures because of the scarcity of real structural acceleration data. In response to this deficiency in testing, we present the performance of two damage detection algorithms used with ambient acceleration data collected during the staged demolition of the fullscale Z24 Bridge in Switzerland. The algorithms use autoregressive coefficients as features of the acceleration data and hypothesis testing and Gaussian Mixture Modeling to detect and quantify damage. While experimental or numerically simulated data have provided consistently positive results, field data from real structures, the Z24 Bridge, show that there can be significant false positives in the predictions. Difficulties with data collection in the field are also revealed pointing to the need for careful signal conditioning prior to algorithm application.

  17. Baseline Signal Reconstruction for Temperature Compensation in Lamb Wave-Based Damage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqiang; Xiao, Yingchun; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Gexue

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations have significant effects on propagation of Lamb wave and therefore can severely limit the damage detection for Lamb wave. In order to mitigate the temperature effect, a temperature compensation method based on baseline signal reconstruction is developed for Lamb wave-based damage detection. The method is a reconstruction of a baseline signal at the temperature of current signal. In other words, it compensates the baseline signal to the temperature of current signal. The Hilbert transform is used to compensate the phase of baseline signal. The Orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to compensate the amplitude of baseline signal. Experiments were conducted on two composite panels to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method could effectively work for temperature intervals of at least 18 °C with the baseline signal temperature as the center, and can be applied to the actual damage detection. PMID:27529245

  18. Early damage detection in epoxy matrix using cyclobutane-based polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jin; Liu, Yingtao; Shan, Bohan; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Dai, Lenore L.

    2014-09-01

    Identification of early damage in polymer composites is of great importance. We have incorporated cyclobutane-containing cross-linked polymers into an epoxy matrix, studied the effect on thermal and mechanical properties, and, more importantly, demonstrated early damage detection through mechanically induced fluorescence generation. Two cinnamate derivatives, 1,1,1-tris(cinnamoyloxymethyl) ethane (TCE) and poly(vinyl cinnamate) (PVCi), were photoirradiated to produce cyclobutane-containing polymer. The effects on the thermal and mechanical properties with the addition of cyclobutane-containing polymer into epoxy matrix were investigated. The emergence of cracks was detected by fluorescence at a strain level just beyond the yield point of the polymer blends, and the fluorescence intensified with accumulation of strain. Overall, the results show that damage can be detected through fluorescence generation along crack propagation.

  19. Baseline Signal Reconstruction for Temperature Compensation in Lamb Wave-Based Damage Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Xiao, Yingchun; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Gexue

    2016-08-11

    Temperature variations have significant effects on propagation of Lamb wave and therefore can severely limit the damage detection for Lamb wave. In order to mitigate the temperature effect, a temperature compensation method based on baseline signal reconstruction is developed for Lamb wave-based damage detection. The method is a reconstruction of a baseline signal at the temperature of current signal. In other words, it compensates the baseline signal to the temperature of current signal. The Hilbert transform is used to compensate the phase of baseline signal. The Orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to compensate the amplitude of baseline signal. Experiments were conducted on two composite panels to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method could effectively work for temperature intervals of at least 18 °C with the baseline signal temperature as the center, and can be applied to the actual damage detection.

  20. Microfluidic array for simultaneous detection of DNA oxidation and DNA-adduct damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Boya; Shen, Min; Jiang, Di; Malla, Spundana; Mosa, Islam M; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Rusling, James F

    2016-10-21

    Exposure to chemical pollutants and pharmaceuticals may cause health issues caused by metabolite-related toxicity. This paper reports a new microfluidic electrochemical sensor array with the ability to simultaneously detect common types of DNA damage including oxidation and nucleobase adduct formation. Sensors in the 8-electrode screen-printed carbon array were coated with thin films of metallopolymers osmium or ruthenium bipyridyl-poly(vinylpyridine) chloride (OsPVP, RuPVP) along with DNA and metabolic enzymes by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly. After a reaction step in which test chemicals and other necessary reagents flow over the array, OsPVP selectively detects oxidized guanines on the DNA strands, and RuPVP detects DNA adduction by metabolites on nucleobases. We demonstrate array performance for test chemicals including 17β-estradiol (E2), its metabolites 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), catechol, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). Results revealed DNA-adduct and oxidation damage in a single run to provide a metabolic-genotoxic chemistry screen. The array measures damage directly in unhydrolyzed DNA, and is less expensive, faster, and simpler than conventional methods to detect DNA damage. The detection limit for oxidation is 672 8-oxodG per 10(6) bases. Each sensor requires only 22 ng of DNA, so the mass detection limit is 15 pg (∼10 pmol) 8-oxodG.

  1. Detection of transport and age induced damages on artwork: an advanced concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawitz, M.; Hein, N.; Alexeenko, I.; Wilke, M.; Pedrini, G.; Krekel, C.; Osten, W.

    2013-05-01

    For the society it is of great interest to make cultural heritage accessible to the general public. The subsequent increase of museum loan services increases the risk of accelerated degeneration. Hence, in addition to the age related deterioration, transportation can be another source of damage. Despite modern packaging technologies, vibrations and environmental climate change can add up and damage the transported object. Besides obvious mechanical influencing quantities, a main concern is the detection of climate induced damages. Changes in the relative humidity cause inner strain, which may lead to defect formations and damages. White light fringe projection was applied to detect object changes due to variations of the relative humidity. First measurements indicated a sensitivity down to a relative humidity change of 6 %. Recently, the Stuppach Madonna, a painting by Matthias Grunewald (painted 1514 - 1516), was investigated with shearography after the return from an exhibition. The obtained shearograms revealed a variety of defects like bubbles, delaminations and tunnels caused by wood worms. Even the planking of the wooden panel and existing putty could be detected. This paper describes the first steps of a project with the aim of investigating and implementing a method to detect and classify transport related damages on works of art.

  2. Neural network approach to damage detection in a building from ambient vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuru; Masri, Sami F.; Chassiakos, A. G.; Caughey, T. K.

    1998-04-01

    A neural network-based approach is presented for the detection of changes in the characteristics of structure- unknown systems. The approach relies on the use of vibration measurements from a `healthy' system to train a neural network for identification purposes. Subsequently, the trained network is fed comparable vibration measurements from the same structure under different episodes of response in order to monitor the health of the structure. It is shown, through simulation studies with linear as well as nonlinear models typically encountered in the applied mechanics field, that the proposed damage detection methodology is capable of detecting relatively small changes in the structural parameters. The methodology is applied to actual data obtained from ambient vibration measurements on a steel building structure, which was damaged under strong seismic motion during the Hyogo-Ken Nanbu Earthquake of January 17, 1995. The measurements were done before and after repairs to the damaged frame were made. A neural network is trained with data after the repairs, which represents `healthy' condition of the building. The trained network, which is subsequently fed data before the repairs, successfully identified the difference between damaged story and undamaged story. Through this study, it is shown that the proposed approach has the potential of being a practical tool for damage detection methodology, which leads to smart civil structures.

  3. Strain measurement of spiral bevel gear using optical fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nianyun; Wang, Yiming; Zhou, Zude; Lou, Ping

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a spiral bevel gear strain measurement using optical fiber gratings. High-speed and heavy-duty spiral bevel gear (SBG) is the key component of the power transmission of intersection axes. Its dynamic mechanical properties greatly influence the working performance of the machine. By building a strain detecting system based on FBG demodulation, we carried out real-time measurements of the distributed strain in the SBG with different torques and different rotation speed. The experimental results show a complete strain waveform from gear-in to gear-out, verifying the feasibility of measuring the strain of SBG using optical fiber gratings.

  4. An Experimental Study of Fretting of Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study fretting of gears. The gears were made from case-carburized AISI 9310 alloy to match the material of a flight actuator gearbox of interest. The objective of the testing was to produce damage representative of that observed on flight hardware. The following correlations and observations were noted. The amplitude of dithering motion very strongly influenced the type and magnitude of damage. Sliding amounts on the order of 30% of the width of the line contact were judged to most readily produce fretting damage. There was observed an incubation period on the order of tens-of-thousands of cycles, and the incubation period was influenced by surface roughness, torque, and the motion extent. Fretting damage could be produced for any of the torques tested, and the severity of damage increased slightly with torque. Gear teeth having surface roughness of 0.7-0.8 micrometer were somewhat more resistant to fretting than were smoother surfaces.

  5. A comparative assessment of different frequency based damage detection in unidirectional composite plates using MFC sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Ricardo; Sartorato, Murilo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2016-11-01

    The basic concept of the vibration based damage identification methods is that the dynamic behaviour of a structure can change if damage occurs. Damage in a structure can alter the structural integrity, and therefore, the physical properties like stiffness, mass and/or damping may change. The dynamic behaviour of a structure is a function of these physical properties and will, therefore, directly be affected by the damage. The dynamic behaviour can be described in terms of time, frequency and modal domain parameters. The changes in these parameters (or properties derived from these parameters) are used as indicators of damage. Hence, this work has two main objectives. The first one is to provide an overview of the structural vibration based damage identification methods. For this purpose, a fundamental description of the structural vibration based damage identification problem is given, followed by a short literature overview of the damage features, which are commonly addressed. The second objective is to create a damage identification method for detection of the damage in composite structures. To aid in this process, two basic principles are discussed, namely the effect of the potential damage case on the dynamic behaviour, and the consequences involved with the information reduction in the signal processing. Modal properties from the structural dynamic output response are obtained. In addition, experimental and computational results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to composite specimens with and without damage. The excitation of the structures is performed using an impact hammer and, for measuring the output data, accelerometers as well as piezoelectric sensors. Finite element models are developed by shell elements, and numerical results are compared to experimental data, showing good correlation for the response of the specimens in some specific frequency range. Finally, FRFs are analysed using suitable metrics, including a

  6. Towards a More Efficient Detection of Earthquake Induced FAÇADE Damages Using Oblique Uav Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D.; Nex, F.; Kerle, N.; Vosselman, G.

    2017-08-01

    Urban search and rescue (USaR) teams require a fast and thorough building damage assessment, to focus their rescue efforts accordingly. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are able to capture relevant data in a short time frame and survey otherwise inaccessible areas after a disaster, and have thus been identified as useful when coupled with RGB cameras for façade damage detection. Existing literature focuses on the extraction of 3D and/or image features as cues for damage. However, little attention has been given to the efficiency of the proposed methods which hinders its use in an urban search and rescue context. The framework proposed in this paper aims at a more efficient façade damage detection using UAV multi-view imagery. This was achieved directing all damage classification computations only to the image regions containing the façades, hence discarding the irrelevant areas of the acquired images and consequently reducing the time needed for such task. To accomplish this, a three-step approach is proposed: i) building extraction from the sparse point cloud computed from the nadir images collected in an initial flight; ii) use of the latter as proxy for façade location in the oblique images captured in subsequent flights, and iii) selection of the façade image regions to be fed to a damage classification routine. The results show that the proposed framework successfully reduces the extracted façade image regions to be assessed for damage 6 fold, hence increasing the efficiency of subsequent damage detection routines. The framework was tested on a set of UAV multi-view images over a neighborhood of the city of L'Aquila, Italy, affected in 2009 by an earthquake.

  7. Nondestructive Structural Damage Detection in Flexible Space Structures Using Vibration Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricles, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft are susceptible to structural damage over their operating life from impact, environmental loads, and fatigue. Structural damage that is not detected and not corrected may potentially cause more damage and eventually catastrophic structural failure. NASA's current fleet of reusable spacecraft, namely the Space Shuttle, has been flown on several missions. In addition, configurations of future NASA space structures, e.g. Space Station Freedom, are larger and more complex than current structures, making them more susceptible to damage as well as being more difficult to inspect. Consequently, a reliable structural damage detection capability is essential to maintain the flight safety of these structures. Visual inspections alone can not locate impending material failure (fatigue cracks, yielding); it can only observe post-failure situations. An alternative approach is to develop an inspection and monitoring system based on vibration characterization that assesses the integrity of structural and mechanical components. A methodology for detecting structural damage is presented. This methodology is based on utilizing modal test data in conjunction with a correlated analytical model of the structure to: (1) identify the structural dynamic characteristics (resonant frequencies and mode shapes) from measurements of ambient motions and/or force excitation; (2) calculate modal residual force vectors to identify the location of structural damage; and (3) conduct a weighted sensitivity analysis in order to assess the extent of mass and stiffness variations, where structural damage is characterized by stiffness reductions. The approach is unique from other existing approaches in that varying system mass and stiffness, mass center locations, the perturbation of both the natural frequencies and mode shapes, and statistical confidence factors for structural parameters and experimental instrumentation are all accounted for directly.

  8. Sensitivity of PZT Impedance Sensors for Damage Detection of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Hu, Yuhang; Lu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Piezoelectric ceramic Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) has been successfully applied to various engineering systems. However, fundamental research work on the sensitivity of the PZT impedance sensors for damage detection is still in need. In the traditional EMI method, the PZT electro-mechanical (EM) admittance (inverse of the impedance) is used as damage indicator, which is difficult to specify the effect of damage on structural properties. This paper uses the structural mechanical impedance (SMI) extracted from the PZT EM admittance signature as the damage indicator. A comparison study on the sensitivity of the EM admittance and the structural mechanical impedance to the damages in a concrete structure is conducted. Results show that the SMI is more sensitive to the damage than the EM admittance thus a better indicator for damage detection. Furthermore, this paper proposes a dynamic system consisting of a number of single-degree-of-freedom elements with mass, spring and damper components to model the SMI. A genetic algorithm is employed to search for the optimal value of the unknown parameters in the dynamic system. An experiment is carried out on a two-storey concrete frame subjected to base vibrations that simulate earthquake. A number of PZT sensors are regularly arrayed and bonded to the frame structure to acquire PZT EM admittance signatures. The relationship between the damage index and the distance of the PZT sensor from the damage is studied. Consequently, the sensitivity of the PZT sensors is discussed and their sensing region in concrete is derived. PMID:27879711

  9. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent. PMID:22412347

  10. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  11. PZT-based active damage detection techniques for steel bridge components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Yun, Chung-Bang; Roh, Yongrae; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT)-based active damage detection techniques for nondestructive evaluations (NDE) of steel bridge components. PZT patches offer special features suitable for real-time in situ health monitoring systems for large and complex steel structures, because they are small, light, cheap, and useful as built-in sensor systems. Both impedance and Lamb wave methods are considered for damage detection of lab-size steel bridge members. Several damage-sensitive features are extracted: root mean square deviations (RMSD) in the impedances and wavelet coefficients (WC) of Lamb waves, and the times of flight (TOF) of Lamb waves. Advanced signal processing and pattern recognition techniques such as continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and support vector machine (SVM) are used in the current system. Firstly, PZT patches were used in conjunction with the impedance and Lamb waves to detect the presence and growth of artificial cracks on a 1/8 scale model for a vertical truss member of Seongsu Bridge, Seoul, Korea, which collapsed in 1994. The RMSD in the impedances and WC of Lamb waves were found to be good damage indicators. Secondly, two PZT patches were used to detect damage on a bolt-jointed steel plate, which was simulated by removing bolts. The correlation of the Lamb wave transmission data with the damage classified by in and out of the wave path was investigated by using the TOF and WC obtained from the Lamb wave signals. The SVM was implemented to enhance the damage identification capability of the current system. The results from the experiments showed the validity of the proposed methods.

  12. Computing Stresses In Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, F. B.; Lin, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic Analysis of Spur Gear Transmissions (DANST) developed as easy-to-use program for static and dynamic analysis of spur-gear systems. Used for parametric studies to predict effects of operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile on dynamic loads and tooth-bending stresses in spur gears. Performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. Simulates gear systems with contact ratios ranging from one to three. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Gear Fatigue Diagnostics and Prognostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    one for single gear tooth fatigue, and one for gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ) we have been collecting crack initiation and crack propagation...fatigue tester ); and torque, angular speed, vibration, temperature, and crack-propagation (gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ). The main outcome...Description The test consists of two set of tests on a dynamometer and one set of test on the fatigue tester and some additional activities. Fig

  14. A review of dynamics modelling of friction draft gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Luo, Shihui; Spiryagin, Maksym

    2014-06-01

    Longer and heavier trains mean larger in-train forces and more complicated force patterns. Practical experience indicates that the development of fatigue failure of coupling systems in long heavy trains may differ from conventional understanding. The friction-type draft gears are the most widely used draft gears. The ever developing heavy haul transport environment requires further or new understanding of friction draft gear behaviour and its implications for train dynamics as well as fatigue damage of rolling stock. However, modelling of friction draft gears is a highly nonlinear question. Especially the poor predictability, repeatability and the discontinuity of friction make this task more challenging. This article reviews current techniques in dynamics modelling of friction draft gears to provide a starting point that can be used to improve existing or develop new models to achieve more accurate force amplitude and pattern predictions.

  15. 50 CFR 622.188 - Required gear, authorized gear, and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO..., sea bass pot, and spearfishing gear. (c) Unauthorized gear. All gear types other than those specified... unauthorized gear on board may not be transferred at sea, regardless of where such transfer takes place,...

  16. 50 CFR 622.188 - Required gear, authorized gear, and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO..., sea bass pot, and spearfishing gear. (c) Unauthorized gear. All gear types other than those specified... unauthorized gear on board may not be transferred at sea, regardless of where such transfer takes place,...

  17. Detection of damaged supports under railway track based on frequency shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng Tjhen

    2017-03-01

    In railway transportation systems, the tracks are usually fastened on sleepers which are supported by the ballast. A lot of research has been conducted to guarantee the safety of railway track because of its importance, and more concern is expressed about monitoring of track itself such as railway level and alignment. The ballast and fasteners which provide strong support to the railway track are important as well whereas the detection of loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast mainly relies on visual inspection. Although it is reliable when the fastener is missing and the damaged ballast is on the surface, it provides less help if the fastener is only loose and the damaged ballast is under the sleepers, which are however frequently observed in practice. This paper proposes an approach based on frequency shift to identify the damaged supports including the loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast. In this study, the rail-sleeper-ballast system is modeled as an Euler beam evenly supported by a series of springs, the stiffness of which are reduced when the fastener is loose or missing and the ballast under the sleepers is damaged. An auxiliary mass is utilized herein and when it is mounted on the beam, the natural frequencies of the whole system will change with respect to the location of the auxiliary mass. The auxiliary mass induced frequency shift is analyzed and it is found the natural frequencies change periodically when the supports are undamaged, whereas the periodicity will be broken due to damaged supports. In fact, the natural frequencies drop clearly when the auxiliary mass moves over the damaged support. A special damage index only using the information of the damaged states is proposed and both numerical and experimental examples are carried out to validate the proposed method.

  18. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  19. Differential controlling device for differential gear

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, M.

    1989-04-18

    A differential controlling device is described for controlling a rotational speed differential generated to shafts respectively connected to a pair of side gears in cooperation with a differential case comprising: a means for operating the limiting means; a sensor for detecting a braking condition of a vehicle; a sensor for detecting the steering angle; and a controller for receiving signals from both sensors and controlling the operating means to limit the rotational speed differential generated from the differential speed differential generated from the differential gear when the vehicle is braked and turned with a steering angle exceeding a predetermined value.

  20. Hybrid geared traction transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasvytis, A. L.; White, G.

    1983-01-01

    The basic configuration of geared traction drives, geometric and structural factors to be considered in their construction, and current work on hybrid helicopter transmissions rated at 500 and 3000 hp are discussed.

  1. Planetary gear unit

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a planetary gear unit for the transmission of a motor vehicle, comprising: a first planetary gear unit which includes a pinion shaft, a planet pinion rotatably mounted on the pinion shaft, a sun gear engaging the planet pinion, and an arm member supporting the pinion shaft and having an extending portion extending to a point adjacent the sun gear; a thrust washer contacting the arm member, the thrust washer having radiating conduit means formed on a contacting surface thereof so as to communicate an inner circumference of the extending portion of the arm member with the pinion shaft, the pinion shaft having a conduit formed therein so as to communicate with the radiating conduit means with an inner surface of the planet pinion wherein the radiating conduit means further comprises uniform spaced bevel surfaces and grooves in communication with the bevel surfaces.

  2. Experimental damage detection in a wind turbine blade model using principal components of response correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, S.; Omenzetter, P.

    2015-07-01

    The utilization of vibration signals for structural damage detection (SDD) is appealing due to the strong theoretical foundation of such approaches, ease of data acquisition and processing efficiency. Different methods are available for defining damage sensitive features (DSFs) based on vibrations, such as modal analysis or time series methods. The present paper proposes the use of partial autocorrelation coefficients of acceleration responses as DSFs. Principal component (PC) analysis is used to transform the initial DSFs to scores. The resulting scores from the healthy and damaged states are used to select the PCs which are most sensitive to damage. These are then used for making decisions about the structural state by means of statistical hypothesis testing conducted on the scores. The approach is applied to experiments with a laboratory scale wind turbine blade (WTB) made of glass-fibre reinforced epoxy composite. Damage is non-destructively simulated by attaching small masses and the WTB is excited with the help of an electrodynamic shaker using band-limited white noise. The SDD results for the selected subsets of PCs show a clear improvement of the detectability of early damages compared to other DSF selections.

  3. Detection and quantification of pipe damage from change in time of flight and phase.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel K; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-09-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection in pipes is continuously increasing. Generally longitudinal (axial symmetric) modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers in transmission mode for this purpose. In most studies the change in the received signal strength with the extent of damage has been investigated while in this study the change in the phase and the time-of-flight (TOF) of the propagating wave modes with the damage size is investigated. The cross-correlation technique is used to record the small changes in the TOF as the damage size varies in steel pipes. Dispersion curves are calculated to carefully identify the propagating wave modes. Differential TOF is recorded and compared for different propagating wave modes. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that unlike the recorded signal strength the TOF and the phase are not affected by the bonding condition between the transducer and the pipe. Therefore, if the pipe is not damaged but the transducer-pipe bonding is deteriorated then although the received signal strength is altered the TOF and phase remain same avoiding the false positive alarms of damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensitivity analysis and regularization for damage detection of a bridge based on vibration induced by moving vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaka, Yudai; Yoshida, Ikumasa; Kim, Chul-Woo; Kawatani, Mitsuo

    Damage detection of a bridge based on vibration induced by moving vehicles is proposed. Accuracy of damage detection depends on observation and damage points. In this research, sensitivity of observation or damage points is estimated by using posterior covariance matrix of estimation error and information entropy. The estimation is not reliable where the sensitivity is low because it is strongly affected by prior information. New type of prior information is proposed and applied to a simple numerical problem for illustration of usefulness. The method is applied to the damage detection of experiment model with vehicle-induced vibration.

  5. Communication: Molecular gears.

    PubMed

    Burnell, E Elliott; de Lange, Cornelis A; Meerts, W Leo

    2016-09-07

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of hexamethylbenzene orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. The spectrum contains over 350 000 lines with many overlapping transitions, from which four independent direct dipolar couplings are obtained. The rotations of the six methyl groups appear to be correlated due to mutual steric hindrance. Adjacent methyl groups show counter-rotating or geared motion. Hexamethylbenzene thus behaves as a molecular hexagonal gear.

  6. Landing-gear impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flugge, W

    1952-01-01

    Report deals with the impact forces in landing gears. Both the landing impact and the taxiing impact have been considered, but drag forces have so far been excluded. The differential equations are developed and their numerical integration is shown, considering the nonlinear properties of the oleo shock strut. A way is shown for determining the dimensions of the metering pin from a given load-time diagram. A review of German literature on landing-gear impact is also presented.

  7. Compressive sensing for efficient health monitoring and effective damage detection of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardhana, Madhuka; Zhu, Xinqun; Liyanapathirana, Ranjith; Gunawardana, Upul

    2017-02-01

    Real world Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems consist of sensors in the scale of hundreds, each sensor generating extremely large amounts of data, often arousing the issue of the cost associated with data transfer and storage. Sensor energy is a major component included in this cost factor, especially in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). Data compression is one of the techniques that is being explored to mitigate the effects of these issues. In contrast to traditional data compression techniques, Compressive Sensing (CS) - a very recent development - introduces the means of accurately reproducing a signal by acquiring much less number of samples than that defined by Nyquist's theorem. CS achieves this task by exploiting the sparsity of the signal. By the reduced amount of data samples, CS may help reduce the energy consumption and storage costs associated with SHM systems. This paper investigates CS based data acquisition in SHM, in particular, the implications of CS on damage detection and localization. CS is implemented in a simulation environment to compress structural response data from a Reinforced Concrete (RC) structure. Promising results were obtained from the compressed data reconstruction process as well as the subsequent damage identification process using the reconstructed data. A reconstruction accuracy of 99% could be achieved at a Compression Ratio (CR) of 2.48 using the experimental data. Further analysis using the reconstructed signals provided accurate damage detection and localization results using two damage detection algorithms, showing that CS has not compromised the crucial information on structural damages during the compression process.

  8. Damage detection of engine bladed-disks using multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Tang, J.

    2006-03-01

    The timely detection of damage in aero-engine bladed-disks is an extremely important and challenging research topic. Bladed-disks have high modal density and, particularly, their vibration responses are subject to significant uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerance (blade-to-blade difference or mistuning), operating condition change and sensor noise. In this study, we present a new methodology for the on-line damage detection of engine bladed-disks using their vibratory responses during spin-up or spin-down operations which can be measured by blade-tip-timing sensing technique. We apply a principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach for data compression, feature extraction, and denoising. The non-model based damage detection is achieved by analyzing the change between response features of the healthy structure and of the damaged one. We facilitate such comparison by incorporating the Hotelling's statistic T2 analysis, which yields damage declaration with a given confidence level. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by case studies.

  9. Damage detection in composite materials using PZT actuators and sensors for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Michelle DuBose

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of bridges, buildings, aircrafts, and spacecraft using a network of sensors has gained popularity over recent years. In this thesis, the use of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is described for detecting damage in a composite panel. The composite panels are fabricated using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process. The panels are cut into small coupons (254 mm x 25.4 mm) to test various properties of the composite. A piezoelectric actuator is surface mounted on the composite coupon to generate Lamb waves while a surface mounted piezoelectric sensor measures the response. Data is collected from an undamaged composite coupon, and then the process is repeated for a damaged coupon. The existing damage is quantified by comparing the response of the damaged and undamaged composite coupons.

  10. Spatial resolution improvement for Lamb wave-based damage detection using frequency dependency compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Bao, Jingjing; Joseph, Roshan Prakash; Huang, Liping

    2017-04-01

    In Lamb wave inspection systems, the transfer functions of the transmitter and receiver, and the attenuation as Lamb wave propagates through the structure, result in frequency dependency in the amplitude of Lamb modes. This frequency dependency in amplitude also influences the testing resolution and complicates the damage evaluation. With the goal of spatial resolution improving, a frequency dependency compensation method is proposed. In this method, an accurate estimation of the frequency-dependent amplitude is firstly obtained, then a refined inverse filter is designed and applied to the raw Lamb mode signals to compensate the frequency dependency. An experimental example is introduced to illustrate the process of the proposed method. Besides, its sensitivity to the propagation distance and Taylor expansion order is thoroughly investigated. Finally, the proposed method is employed for damage detection. Its effectiveness in testing resolution improvement and damage identification could be obviously demonstrated by the imaging result of the damage.

  11. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dansheng; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-10-22

    In the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes.

  12. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dansheng; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    In the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes. PMID:27782088

  13. Application of higher order SVD to vibration-based system identification and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shu-Hsien; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Weng, Jian-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) is a powerful linear algebra tool. It is widely used in many different signal processing methods, such principal component analysis (PCA), singular spectrum analysis (SSA), frequency domain decomposition (FDD), subspace identification and stochastic subspace identification method ( SI and SSI ). In each case, the data is arranged appropriately in matrix form and SVD is used to extract the feature of the data set. In this study three different algorithms on signal processing and system identification are proposed: SSA, SSI-COV and SSI-DATA. Based on the extracted subspace and null-space from SVD of data matrix, damage detection algorithms can be developed. The proposed algorithm is used to process the shaking table test data of the 6-story steel frame. Features contained in the vibration data are extracted by the proposed method. Damage detection can then be investigated from the test data of the frame structure through subspace-based and nullspace-based damage indices.

  14. A Robust Poincare Maps Method for Damage Detection based on Single Type of Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zuo, Hao; Zhang, Xing-Wu; Xie, Yong; Chen, Xue-Feng

    2017-05-01

    The classical vibration-based structural health monitoring evaluates damage via the analysis of single type measurement. The relationships between different types of measurements, however, are usually neglected. To address this problem, vibration data is to be analyzed in state space in this paper based on the the Poincare map method. The Poincare map method is an effective approach in damage detection. This method, however, requires the dependent measurements for displacement, velocity and acceleration, respectively. Based on the Fourier transform properties, a robust Poincare map method for damage detection is proposed based on the single type of measurement. Numerical and experimental verifications are employed to verify the effectiveness of the developed method. Compared with the classical numerical differential method, the present method is more accurate and robust to noise.

  15. Early detection of renal damage and disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Gregory F

    2005-05-01

    Renal damage and disease can be caused by acute or chronic insults to the kidney. Acute renal damage often results from ischemic or toxic insults and usually affects the tubular portion of the nephron. In contrast, chronic renal disease can be caused by diseases and/or disorders that affect any portion of the nephron, including its blood supply and supporting interstitium. Early detection of acute renal disease facilitates appropriate intervention that can arrest or at least attenuate tubular cell damage and the development of established acute renal failure. Similarly,early detection of chronic renal disease, before the onset of renal azotemia and chronic renal failure, should facilitate appropriate intervention that stabilizes renal function or at least slows its progressive decline.

  16. Damage detection in reusable launch vehicle components using guided ultrasonic waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoncel, David; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Schell, Jochen; Peres, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles are often used in space applications to guarantee space exploration with reduced costs. These structures often use components from newly developed materials. It is inevitable that reliable inspection methods will be required for quality control and maintenance of such structures to avoid potential damage. This paper describes some initial results from evaluation tests based on Lamb waves for damage detection of Reusable Launch Vehicle composite components. Low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducers were used for Lamb wave generation. Non-contact measurements of Lamb wave responses were taken by a laser vibrometer. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the great potential of the method for quality inspection and structural damage detection of space composite structures.

  17. A novel sensitivity-based method for damage detection of structures under unknown periodic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseralavi, S. S.; Salajegheh, E.; Fadaee, M. J.; Salajegheh, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a technique for damage detection in structures under unknown periodic excitations using the transient displacement response. The method is capable of identifying the damage parameters without finding the input excitations. We first define the concept of displacement space as a linear space in which each point represents displacements of structure under an excitation and initial condition. Roughly speaking, the method is based on the fact that structural displacements under free and forced vibrations are associated with two parallel subspaces in the displacement space. Considering this novel geometrical viewpoint, an equation called kernel parallelization equation (KPE) is derived for damage detection under unknown periodic excitations and a sensitivity-based algorithm for solving KPE is proposed accordingly. The method is evaluated via three case studies under periodic excitations, which confirm the efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Online damage detection using recursive principal component analysis and recursive condition indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, M.; Bhowmik, B.; Tiwari, A. K.; Hazra, B.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel baseline free approach for continuous online damage detection of multi degree of freedom vibrating structures using recursive principal component analysis (RPCA) in conjunction with online damage indicators is proposed. In this method, the acceleration data is used to obtain recursive proper orthogonal modes in online using the rank-one perturbation method, and subsequently utilized to detect the change in the dynamic behavior of the vibrating system from its pristine state to contiguous linear/nonlinear-states that indicate damage. The RPCA algorithm iterates the eigenvector and eigenvalue estimates for sample covariance matrices and new data point at each successive time instants, using the rank-one perturbation method. An online condition indicator (CI) based on the L2 norm of the error between actual response and the response projected using recursive eigenvector matrix updates over successive iterations is proposed. This eliminates the need for offline post processing and facilitates online damage detection especially when applied to streaming data. The proposed CI, named recursive residual error, is also adopted for simultaneous spatio-temporal damage detection. Numerical simulations performed on five-degree of freedom nonlinear system under white noise and El Centro excitations, with different levels of nonlinearity simulating the damage scenarios, demonstrate the robustness of the proposed algorithm. Successful results obtained from practical case studies involving experiments performed on a cantilever beam subjected to earthquake excitation, for full sensors and underdetermined cases; and data from recorded responses of the UCLA Factor building (full data and its subset) demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology as an ideal candidate for real-time, reference free structural health monitoring.

  19. Use of near-infrared video recording system for the detection of freeze damaged citrus leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobar, D. E.; Bowen, R. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cooper, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A video recording system with a visible light blocking filter to give sensitivity in the 0.78 m to 1.1 m waveband detected freeze-damaged citrus leaves rapidly. With this technique, the time to analyze images can be decreased from about one day for conventional photography to less than one hour for video recording.

  20. Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP Structures using Electric Pulse Wave Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT For laminated CFRP structures, it is quite difficult to detect internal damage such as delamination, matrix cracks, and...unclassified Abstract. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are applied to many aerospace structures. For these laminated CFRP ...Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) has been increasingly applied to the aerospace primary structures because of its high specific strength and