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Sample records for gecko attachment system

  1. The adhesion model considering capillarity for gecko attachment system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Wan; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-03-01

    Geckos make use of approximately a million microscale hairs (setae) that branch off into hundreds of nanoscale spatulae to cling to different smooth and rough surfaces and detach at will. This hierarchical surface construction gives the gecko the adaptability to create a large real area of contact with surfaces. It is known that van der Waals force is the primary mechanism used to adhere to surfaces, and capillary force is a secondary effect that can further increase adhesive force. To investigate the effects of capillarity on gecko adhesion, we considered the capillary force as well as the solid-to-solid interaction. The capillary force expressed in terms of elliptical integral is calculated by numerical method to cope with surfaces with a wide range of contact angles. The adhesion forces exerted by a single gecko spatula in contact with planes with different contact angles for various relative humidities are calculated, and the contributions of capillary force to total adhesion force are evaluated. The simulation results are compared with experimental data. Finally, using the three-level hierarchical model recently developed to simulate a gecko seta contacting with random rough surface, the effect of the relative humidity and the hydrophobicity of surface on the gecko adhesion is investigated.

  2. Adhesion and friction in gecko toe attachment and detachment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Rosenberg, Kenny; Zhao, Boxin; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-12-19

    Geckos can run rapidly on walls and ceilings, requiring high friction forces (on walls) and adhesion forces (on ceilings), with typical step intervals of approximately 20 ms. The rapid switching between gecko foot attachment and detachment is analyzed theoretically based on a tape model that incorporates the adhesion and friction forces originating from the van der Waals forces between the submicron-sized spatulae and the substrate, which are controlled by the (macroscopic) actions of the gecko toes. The pulling force of a spatula along its shaft with an angle between theta 0 and 90 degrees to the substrate, has a "normal adhesion force" contribution, produced at the spatula-substrate bifurcation zone, and a "lateral friction force" contribution from the part of spatula still in contact with the substrate. High net friction and adhesion forces on the whole gecko are obtained by rolling down and gripping the toes inward to realize small pulling angles between the large number of spatulae in contact with the substrate. To detach, the high adhesion/friction is rapidly reduced to a very low value by rolling the toes upward and backward, which, mediated by the lever function of the setal shaft, peels the spatulae off perpendicularly from the substrates. By these mechanisms, both the adhesion and friction forces of geckos can be changed over three orders of magnitude, allowing for the swift attachment and detachment during gecko motion. The results have obvious implications for the fabrication of dry adhesives and robotic systems inspired by the gecko's locomotion mechanism.

  3. Microscopic modeling of the dynamics of frictional adhesion in the gecko attachment system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Gravish, Nick; Autumn, Kellar; Creton, Costantino

    2009-03-26

    We present a simple microscopic model describing the unique friction behavior of gecko setal arrays as they are dragged on smooth surfaces. Unlike other solids of high elastic modulus that do not stick under van der Waals forces alone, the gecko setal arrays do not require a compressive force to display a drag resistance but rather develop a tensile normal force when they are dragged (J. Experim. Biol. 2006, 209, 3569). We describe this unique behavior with a microscopic model involving curved beam structures at two length scales: at the spatula level, thousands of independent curved beams repeat detachment and reattachment, whereas at the seta level, the curved beam geometry of the seta induces a coupling between the frictional force and the adhesive force that depends on the angle of contact, therefore allowing easy release when the animal needs it. Our model accounts well for the dependence of the drag and adhesion forces on the drag velocity and can also explain macroscopic attachment/ detachment cycles of the setal array.

  4. Biomimetic wall-shaped hierarchical microstructure for gecko-like attachment.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Haytam; Tsipenyuk, Alexey; Varenberg, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Most biological hairy adhesive systems involved in locomotion rely on spatula-shaped terminal elements, whose operation has been actively studied during the last decade. However, though functional principles underlying their amazing performance are now well understood, due to technical difficulties in manufacturing the complex structure of hierarchical spatulate systems, a biomimetic surface structure featuring true shear-induced dynamic attachment still remains elusive. To try bridging this gap, a novel method of manufacturing gecko-like attachment surfaces is devised based on a laser-micromachining technology. This method overcomes the inherent disadvantages of photolithography techniques and opens wide perspectives for future production of gecko-like attachment systems. Advanced smart-performance surfaces featuring thin-film-based hierarchical shear-activated elements are fabricated and found capable of generating friction force of several tens of times the contact load, which makes a significant step forward towards a true gecko-like adhesive. PMID:25693519

  5. Biomimetic wall-shaped hierarchical microstructure for gecko-like attachment.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Haytam; Tsipenyuk, Alexey; Varenberg, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Most biological hairy adhesive systems involved in locomotion rely on spatula-shaped terminal elements, whose operation has been actively studied during the last decade. However, though functional principles underlying their amazing performance are now well understood, due to technical difficulties in manufacturing the complex structure of hierarchical spatulate systems, a biomimetic surface structure featuring true shear-induced dynamic attachment still remains elusive. To try bridging this gap, a novel method of manufacturing gecko-like attachment surfaces is devised based on a laser-micromachining technology. This method overcomes the inherent disadvantages of photolithography techniques and opens wide perspectives for future production of gecko-like attachment systems. Advanced smart-performance surfaces featuring thin-film-based hierarchical shear-activated elements are fabricated and found capable of generating friction force of several tens of times the contact load, which makes a significant step forward towards a true gecko-like adhesive.

  6. Frictional adhesion: A new angle on gecko attachment.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Dittmore, A; Santos, D; Spenko, M; Cutkosky, M

    2006-09-01

    Directional arrays of branched microscopic setae constitute a dry adhesive on the toes of pad-bearing geckos, nature's supreme climbers. Geckos are easily and rapidly able to detach their toes as they climb. There are two known mechanisms of detachment: (1) on the microscale, the seta detaches when the shaft reaches a critical angle with the substrate, and (2) on the macroscale, geckos hyperextend their toes, apparently peeling like tape. This raises the question of how geckos prevent detachment while inverted on the ceiling, where body weight should cause toes to peel and setal angles to increase. Geckos use opposing feet and toes while inverted, possibly to maintain shear forces that prevent detachment of setae or peeling of toes. If detachment occurs by macroscale peeling of toes, the peel angle should monotonically decrease with applied force. In contrast, if adhesive force is limited by microscale detachment of setae at a critical angle, the toe detachment angle should be independent of applied force. We tested the hypothesis that adhesion is increased by shear force in isolated setal arrays and live gecko toes. We also tested the corollary hypotheses that (1) adhesion in toes and arrays is limited as on the microscale by a critical angle, or (2) on the macroscale by adhesive strength as predicted for adhesive tapes. We found that adhesion depended directly on shear force, and was independent of detachment angle. Therefore we reject the hypothesis that gecko toes peel like tape. The linear relation between adhesion and shear force is consistent with a critical angle of release in live gecko toes and isolated setal arrays, and also with our prior observations of single setae. We introduced a new model, frictional adhesion, for gecko pad attachment and compared it to existing models of adhesive contacts. In an analysis of clinging stability of a gecko on an inclined plane each adhesive model predicted a different force control strategy. The frictional adhesion

  7. Role of tilted adhesion fibrils (setae) in the adhesion and locomotion of gecko-like systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boxin; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Wei, Zhensong; Chen, Yunfei; Autumn, Kellar; Turner, Kimberly; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-03-26

    Geckos are super climbers: they can readily and rapidly stick to almost any surface, whether hydrophilic or hydrophobic, rough or smooth, in dry or wet conditions, and detach with equal rapidity within tens of milliseconds. In this paper, we discuss the rapid switching between the strong adhesion/friction (attached) state and zero adhesion/friction (detached) state, and present a finite element analysis of gecko setae in terms of their adhesion and friction forces. The analysis shows why the asymmetric, naturally curved setae with a directional tilt play a crucial role in the gecko's articulation mechanism, consistent with recent experimental studies of gecko setal arrays. We derive guidelines for designing synthetic versions of gecko adhesive pads, and propose a design for a "gecko-inspired" adhesive surface consisting of arrays of curved, asymmetric, and directionally oriented microfibrils, attached to a semirigid backing, and suggest a method for its actuation.

  8. Frictional adhesion of patterned surfaces and implications for gecko and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Pesika, Noshir; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Boxin; Chen, Yunfei; Tirrell, Matthew; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2009-07-01

    Geckos and smaller animals such as flies, beetles, and spiders have extraordinary climbing abilities: They can firmly attach and rapidly detach from almost any kind of surface. In the case of geckos, this ability is attributed to the surface topography of their attachment pads, which are covered with fine columnar structures (setae). Inspired by this biological system, various kinds of regularly structured or "patterned" surfaces are being fabricated for use as responsive adhesives or in robotic systems. In this study, we theoretically analyze the correlated adhesion and friction (frictional adhesion) of patterned surfaces against smooth (unstructured) surfaces by applying well-established theories of van der Waals forces, together with the classic Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory of contact (or adhesion) mechanics, to recent theories of adhesion-controlled friction. Our results, when considered with recent experiments, suggest criteria for simultaneously optimizing the adhesion and friction of patterned surfaces. We show that both the van der Waals adhesion and the friction forces of flexible, tilted, and optimally spaced setal stalks or (synthetic) pillars are high enough to support not only a large gecko on rough surfaces of ceilings (adhesion) and walls (friction) but also a human being if the foot or toe pads-effectively the area of the hands-have a total area estimated at approximately 230 cm2.

  9. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm(-2)) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  10. Design of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong attachment and easy-removal properties: a numerical analysis of peel-zone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Wan, Jin; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu; Tian, Yu

    2012-10-01

    Despite successful fabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong adhesion forces, how to achieve an easy-removal property becomes a major concern that may restrict the wide applications of these bio-inspired surfaces. Research on how geckos detach rapidly has inspired the design of novel adhesive surfaces with strong and reversible adhesion capabilities, which relies on further fundamental understanding of the peeling mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the peel-zone plays an important role in the peeling off of adhesive tapes or fibrillar surfaces. In this study, a numerical method was developed to evaluate peel-zone deformation and the resulting mechanical behaviour due to the deformations of fibrillar surfaces detaching from a smooth rigid substrate. The effect of the geometrical parameters of pillars and the stiffness of backing layer on the peel-zone and peel strength, and the strong attachment and easy-removal properties have been analysed to establish a design map for bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces, which shows that the optimized strong attachment and easy-removal properties can vary by over three orders of magnitude. The adhesion and peeling design map established provides new insights into the design and development of novel gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces.

  11. Systemic mastocytosis in an African fat-tail gecko (Hemitheconyx caudicinctus).

    PubMed

    Irizarry Rovira, A R; Holzer, T R; Credille, K M

    2014-07-01

    A 3-year-old African fat-tail gecko (Hemitheconyx caudicinctus) suddenly became lethargic and died 2 days later. Necropsy examination revealed a submandibular mass and discolouration of the liver, kidneys and skeletal muscles of the tail. Microscopical evaluation revealed neoplastic mast cells in the skin, liver, kidneys, skeletal muscles, bones, spleen, uterus, ovaries and lungs. Exfoliative cytological, histopathological and ultrastructural features were consistent with systemic mastocytosis. Neoplastic proliferative disorders of mast cells are rare in reptiles and this is the first report of mast cell neoplasia in geckos.

  12. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm-2) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the

  13. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  14. Passively stuck: death does not affect gecko adhesion strength

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, William J.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many geckos use adhesive toe pads on the bottom of their digits to attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Although gecko adhesion has been studied for hundreds of years, gaps exist in our understanding at the whole-animal level. It remains unclear whether the strength and maintenance of adhesion are determined by the animal or are passively intrinsic to the system. Here we show, for the first time, that strong adhesion is produced passively at the whole-animal level. Experiments on both live and recently euthanized tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) revealed that death does not affect the dynamic adhesive force or motion of a gecko foot when pulled along a vertical surface. Using a novel device that applied repeatable and steady-increasing pulling forces to the foot in shear, we found that the adhesive force was similarly high and variable when the animal was alive (mean ± s.d. = 5.4 ± 1.7 N) and within 30 min after death (5.4 ± 2.1 N). However, kinematic analyses showed that live geckos are able to control the degree of toe pad engagement and can rapidly stop strong adhesion by hyperextending the toes. This study offers the first assessment of whole-animal adhesive force under extremely controlled conditions. Our findings reveal that dead geckos maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals, disproving that strong adhesion requires active control. PMID:25472940

  15. Passively stuck: death does not affect gecko adhesion strength.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Many geckos use adhesive toe pads on the bottom of their digits to attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Although gecko adhesion has been studied for hundreds of years, gaps exist in our understanding at the whole-animal level. It remains unclear whether the strength and maintenance of adhesion are determined by the animal or are passively intrinsic to the system. Here we show, for the first time, that strong adhesion is produced passively at the whole-animal level. Experiments on both live and recently euthanized tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) revealed that death does not affect the dynamic adhesive force or motion of a gecko foot when pulled along a vertical surface. Using a novel device that applied repeatable and steady-increasing pulling forces to the foot in shear, we found that the adhesive force was similarly high and variable when the animal was alive (mean ± s.d. = 5.4 ± 1.7 N) and within 30 min after death (5.4 ± 2.1 N). However, kinematic analyses showed that live geckos are able to control the degree of toe pad engagement and can rapidly stop strong adhesion by hyperextending the toes. This study offers the first assessment of whole-animal adhesive force under extremely controlled conditions. Our findings reveal that dead geckos maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals, disproving that strong adhesion requires active control.

  16. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  17. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.

    1994-12-13

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion. 3 figures.

  18. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion.

  19. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  20. Mechanical analyses on the digital behaviour of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) based on a multi-level directional adhesion model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuan; Wang, Xiaojie; Mei, Tao; Sun, Shaoming

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-level hierarchical model for the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) adhesive system and analyses the digital behaviour of the G. gecko under macro/meso-level scale. The model describes the structures of G. gecko's adhesive system from the nano-level spatulae to the sub-millimetre-level lamella. The G. gecko's seta is modelled using inextensible fibril based on Euler's elastica theorem. Considering the side contact of the spatular pads of the seta on the flat and rigid substrate, the directional adhesion behaviour of the seta has been investigated. The lamella-induced attachment and detachment have been modelled to simulate the active digital hyperextension (DH) and the digital gripping (DG) phenomena. The results suggest that a tiny angular displacement within 0.25° of the lamellar proximal end is necessary in which a fast transition from attachment to detachment or vice versa is induced. The active DH helps release the torque to induce setal non-sliding detachment, while the DG helps apply torque to make the setal adhesion stable. The lamella plays a key role in saving energy during detachment to adapt to its habitat and provides another adhesive function which differs from the friction-dependent setal adhesion system controlled by the dynamic of G. gecko's body. PMID:26345081

  1. Belt attachment and system

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  2. Geckos as Springs: Mechanics Explain Across-Species Scaling of Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Casey A; Imburgia, Michael J; Bartlett, Michael D; King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J; Irschick, Duncan J

    2015-01-01

    One of the central controversies regarding the evolution of adhesion concerns how adhesive force scales as animals change in size, either among or within species. A widely held view is that as animals become larger, the primary mechanism that enables them to climb is increasing pad area. However, prior studies show that much of the variation in maximum adhesive force remains unexplained, even when area is accounted for. We tested the hypothesis that maximum adhesive force among pad-bearing gecko species is not solely dictated by toepad area, but also depends on the ratio of toepad area to gecko adhesive system compliance in the loading direction, where compliance (C) is the change in extension (Δ) relative to a change in force (F) while loading a gecko's adhesive system (C = dΔ/dF). Geckos are well-known for their ability to climb on a range of vertical and overhanging surfaces, and range in mass from several grams to over 300 grams, yet little is understood of the factors that enable adhesion to scale with body size. We examined the maximum adhesive force of six gecko species that vary in body size (~2-100 g). We also examined changes between juveniles and adults within a single species (Phelsuma grandis). We found that maximum adhesive force and toepad area increased with increasing gecko size, and that as gecko species become larger, their adhesive systems become significantly less compliant. Additionally, our hypothesis was supported, as the best predictor of maximum adhesive force was not toepad area or compliance alone, but the ratio of toepad area to compliance. We verified this result using a synthetic "model gecko" system comprised of synthetic adhesive pads attached to a glass substrate and a synthetic tendon (mechanical spring) of finite stiffness. Our data indicate that increases in toepad area as geckos become larger cannot fully account for increased adhesive abilities, and decreased compliance must be included to explain the scaling of adhesion in

  3. A reversible wet/dry adhesive inspired by mussels and geckos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeshin; Lee, Bruce P; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2007-07-19

    The adhesive strategy of the gecko relies on foot pads composed of specialized keratinous foot-hairs called setae, which are subdivided into terminal spatulae of approximately 200 nm (ref. 1). Contact between the gecko foot and an opposing surface generates adhesive forces that are sufficient to allow the gecko to cling onto vertical and even inverted surfaces. Although strong, the adhesion is temporary, permitting rapid detachment and reattachment of the gecko foot during locomotion. Researchers have attempted to capture these properties of gecko adhesive in synthetic mimics with nanoscale surface features reminiscent of setae; however, maintenance of adhesive performance over many cycles has been elusive, and gecko adhesion is greatly diminished upon full immersion in water. Here we report a hybrid biologically inspired adhesive consisting of an array of nanofabricated polymer pillars coated with a thin layer of a synthetic polymer that mimics the wet adhesive proteins found in mussel holdfasts. Wet adhesion of the nanostructured polymer pillar arrays increased nearly 15-fold when coated with mussel-mimetic polymer. The system maintains its adhesive performance for over a thousand contact cycles in both dry and wet environments. This hybrid adhesive, which combines the salient design elements of both gecko and mussel adhesives, should be useful for reversible attachment to a variety of surfaces in any environment.

  4. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-10-24

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

  5. Turbine nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Norton, Paul F.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

  6. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  7. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

    1996-12-03

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

  8. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Jimenez, Oscar D.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed therebetween. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. And, a pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade.

  9. Effect of stiffness of multi-level hierarchical attachment system on adhesion enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Wan; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-10-01

    Geckos are known for their remarkable ability to cling on and detach from ceilings and walls using a unique attachment system. Their foot pads are covered by a large number of small hair (setae) that contain many branches per seta with a lower level of spatulae. This hierarchical structure gives the gecko adaptability to create a large real area of contact with rough surfaces. In this study, using the three-level hierarchical model recently developed to simulate a gecko seta contacting with random rough surface, the effects of spring stiffness and number of springs on the adhesion enhancement of multi-level hierarchical model are investigated. One- and three-level hierarchically structured spring models with different spring stiffnesses and number of springs on each level in contact with various rough surfaces are considered. The efficiency of attachment-the adhesion coefficient, the adhesion force, the number of contacts and the adhesion energy-for the three-level models with different stiffness is investigated in contact with different rough surfaces.

  10. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-11

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

  11. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  12. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  13. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-01-10

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

  14. The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Klittich, Mena R; Sitti, Metin; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system's performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both. PMID:27480603

  15. The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Klittich, Mena R; Sitti, Metin; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-08-02

    The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system's performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both.

  16. Evidence for capillarity contributions to gecko adhesion from single spatula nanomechanical measurements.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Mantz, Hubert; Spolenak, Ralph; Mecke, Klaus; Jacobs, Karin; Gorb, Stanislav N; Arzt, Eduard

    2005-11-01

    The hairy attachment system on a gecko's toes, consisting of one billion spatulae in the case of Gekko gecko [Ruibal, R. & Ernst, V. (1965) J. Morphol. 117, 271-294], allows it to adhere to nearly all surface topographies. The mechanistic basis for gecko adhesion has been intensely investigated, but the lowest hierarchical level, that of the spatula, has become experimentally accessible only recently. This report details measurements of the adhesion force exerted by a single gecko spatula for various atmospheric conditions and surface chemistries. Through judicious choice and modification of substrates, the short- and long-range adhesive forces are separated. In contrast to previous work [Autumn, K., Sitti, M., Liang, Y. C. A., Peattie, A. M., Hansen, W. R., Sponberg, S., Kenny, T. W., Fearing, R., Israelachvili, J. N. & Full, R. J. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 12252-12256], our measurements clearly show that humidity contributes significantly to gecko adhesion on a nanoscopic level. These findings are crucial for the development of artificial biomimetic attachment systems.

  17. The effect of temperature and humidity on adhesion of a gecko-inspired adhesive: implications for the natural system

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Klittich, Mena R.; Sitti, Metin; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive system of geckos has inspired hundreds of synthetic adhesives. While this system has been used relentlessly as a source of inspiration, less work has been done in reverse, where synthetics are used to test questions and hypotheses about the natural system. Here we take such an approach. We tested shear adhesion of a mushroom-tipped synthetic gecko adhesive under conditions that produced perplexing results in the natural adhesive system. Synthetic samples were tested at two temperatures (12 °C and 32 °C) and four different humidity levels (30%, 55%, 70%, and 80% RH). Surprisingly, adhesive performance of the synthetic samples matched that of living geckos, suggesting that uncontrolled parameters in the natural system, such as surface chemistry and material changes, may not be as influential in whole-animal performance as previously thought. There was one difference, however, when comparing natural and synthetic adhesive performance. At 12 °C and 80% RH, adhesion of the synthetic structures was lower than expected based on the natural system’s performance. Our approach highlights a unique opportunity for both biologists and material scientists, where new questions and hypotheses can be fueled by joint comparisons of the natural and synthetic systems, ultimately improving knowledge of both. PMID:27480603

  18. Resolving the nanoscale adhesion of individual gecko spatulae by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Gorb, Stanislav N; Spolenak, Ralph; Arzt, Eduard

    2005-03-22

    Animals that cling to walls and walk on ceilings owe this ability to micrometre and nanoscale attachment elements. The highest adhesion forces are encountered in geckoes, which have developed intricate hierarchical structures consisting of toes (millimetre dimensions), lamella (400-600microm size), setae (micrometre dimensions) and spatulae ( approximately 200nm size). Adhesion forces of setae on different substrates have previously been measured by a micro-electromechanical system technique. Here we report the first successful experiments in which the force-displacement curves were determined for individual spatulae by atomic force microscopy. The adhesion force for these smallest elements of the gecko's attachment system is reproducibly found to be about 10nN. This method sheds new light on the nanomechanisms of attachment and will help in the rational design of artificial attachment systems.

  19. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  20. Does the mechanism of sex determination constrain the potential for sex manipulation? A test in geckos with contrasting sex-determining systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Kubička, Lukáš; Landová, Eva

    2008-03-01

    The concentration of yolk steroids was suggested to influence offspring gender in oviparous animals subject to both temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and genotypic sex determination (GSD). However, the proposed mechanisms of steroid effects are thought to differ between TSD and GSD: a direct effect of oestrogens on gonad feminisation in TSD species vs a differential induction of male-producing or female-producing gametes in GSD species. Geckos offer an ideal opportunity for testing these suggested mechanisms. Closely related gecko species differ in their modes of sex determination. They lay clutches of two synchronously formed eggs; both eggs share equal steroid levels. If identical hormonal composition and environment during vitellogenesis, gravidity and incubation determine the sex of the progeny, siblings should share the same gender in both TSD and GSD geckos. We found strong support for this prediction in a TSD gecko species. Among clutches that were incubated at the temperature that produced both sexes, there were no clutches with siblings of the opposite sex. On the other hand, about half of the clutches yielded siblings of the opposite sex in four GSD species. These results suggest that sex-determining systems constrain the ability of the female to produce single-sex siblings and, hence, it seems that the GSD mechanism constrains the opportunities for sex ratio manipulation in geckos via yolk steroid manipulation.

  1. Dynamic self-cleaning in gecko setae via digital hyperextension.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihao; Lopez, Stephanie; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Xia, Zhenhai

    2012-11-01

    Gecko toe pads show strong adhesion on various surfaces yet remain remarkably clean around everyday contaminants. An understanding of how geckos clean their toe pads while being in motion is essential for the elucidation of animal behaviours as well as the design of biomimetic devices with optimal performance. Here, we test the self-cleaning of geckos during locomotion. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that geckos clean their feet through a unique dynamic self-cleaning mechanism via digital hyperextension. When walking naturally with hyperextension, geckos shed dirt from their toes twice as fast as they would if walking without hyperextension, returning their feet to nearly 80 per cent of their original stickiness in only four steps. Our dynamic model predicts that when setae suddenly release from the attached substrate, they generate enough inertial force to dislodge dirt particles from the attached spatulae. The predicted cleaning force on dirt particles significantly increases when the dynamic effect is included. The extraordinary design of gecko toe pads perfectly combines dynamic self-cleaning with repeated attachment/detachment, making gecko feet sticky yet clean. This work thus provides a new mechanism to be considered for biomimetic design of highly reuseable and reliable dry adhesives and devices.

  2. Adhesive force of a single gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autumn, Kellar; Liang, Yiching A.; Hsieh, S. Tonia; Zesch, Wolfgang; Chan, Wai Pang; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert J.

    2000-06-01

    Geckos are exceptional in their ability to climb rapidly up smooth vertical surfaces. Microscopy has shown that a gecko's foot has nearly five hundred thousand keratinous hairs or setae. Each 30-130µm long seta is only one-tenth the diameter of a human hair and contains hundreds of projections terminating in 0.2-0.5µm spatula-shaped structures. After nearly a century of anatomical description, here we report the first direct measurements of single setal force by using a two-dimensional micro-electro-mechanical systems force sensor and a wire as a force gauge. Measurements revealed that a seta is ten times more effective at adhesion than predicted from maximal estimates on whole animals. Adhesive force values support the hypothesis that individual seta operate by van der Waals forces. The gecko's peculiar behaviour of toe uncurling and peeling led us to discover two aspects of setal function which increase their effectiveness. A unique macroscopic orientation and preloading of the seta increased attachment force 600-fold above that of frictional measurements of the material. Suitably orientated setae reduced the forces necessary to peel the toe by simply detaching above a critical angle with the substratum.

  3. Adhesive force of a single gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Liang, Y A; Hsieh, S T; Zesch, W; Chan, W P; Kenny, T W; Fearing, R; Full, R J

    2000-06-01

    Geckos are exceptional in their ability to climb rapidly up smooth vertical surfaces. Microscopy has shown that a gecko's foot has nearly five hundred thousand keratinous hairs or setae. Each 30-130 microm long seta is only one-tenth the diameter of a human hair and contains hundreds of projections terminating in 0.2-0.5 microm spatula-shaped structures. After nearly a century of anatomical description, here we report the first direct measurements of single setal force by using a two-dimensional micro-electromechanical systems force sensor and a wire as a force gauge. Measurements revealed that a seta is ten times more effective at adhesion than predicted from maximal estimates on whole animals. Adhesive force values support the hypothesis that individual seta operate by van der Waals forces. The gecko's peculiar behaviour of toe uncurling and peeling led us to discover two aspects of setal function which increase their effectiveness. A unique macroscopic orientation and preloading of the seta increased attachment force 600-fold above that of frictional measurements of the material. Suitably orientated setae reduced the forces necessary to peel the toe by simply detaching above a critical angle with the substratum.

  4. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  5. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  6. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved. PMID:12776092

  7. How Do Geckos Stick?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Harold; Lundsgaard, Morten F. V.; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding how geckos--small lizards belonging to the family "Gekkonindae"--can "defy gravity" and walk across a ceiling provides a fascinating frame through which students can not only learn valuable content about electrostatic forces, but also engage in authentic scientific practice and explore new technologies based on gecko adhesion. In…

  8. Stick–slip friction of gecko-mimetic flaps on smooth and rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saurabh; Cadirov, Nicholas; Chary, Sathya; Kaufman, Yair; Hogan, Jack; Turner, Kimberly L.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and understanding of gecko ‘frictional-adhesion’ adhering and climbing mechanism has allowed researchers to mimic and create gecko-inspired adhesives. A few experimental and theoretical approaches have been taken to understand the effect of surface roughness on synthetic adhesive performance, and the implications of stick–slip friction during shearing. This work extends previous studies by using a modified surface forces apparatus to quantitatively measure and model frictional forces between arrays of polydimethylsiloxane gecko footpad-mimetic tilted microflaps against smooth and rough glass surfaces. Constant attachments and detachments occur between the surfaces during shearing, as described by an avalanche model. These detachments ultimately result in failure of the adhesion interface and have been characterized in this study. Stick–slip friction disappears with increasing velocity when the flaps are sheared against a smooth silica surface; however, stick–slip was always present at all velocities and loads tested when shearing the flaps against rough glass surfaces. These results demonstrate the significance of pre-load, shearing velocity, shearing distances, commensurability and shearing direction of gecko-mimetic adhesives and provide us a simple model for analysing and/or designing such systems. PMID:25589569

  9. Stick-slip friction of gecko-mimetic flaps on smooth and rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurabh; Cadirov, Nicholas; Chary, Sathya; Kaufman, Yair; Hogan, Jack; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-03-01

    The discovery and understanding of gecko 'frictional-adhesion' adhering and climbing mechanism has allowed researchers to mimic and create gecko-inspired adhesives. A few experimental and theoretical approaches have been taken to understand the effect of surface roughness on synthetic adhesive performance, and the implications of stick-slip friction during shearing. This work extends previous studies by using a modified surface forces apparatus to quantitatively measure and model frictional forces between arrays of polydimethylsiloxane gecko footpad-mimetic tilted microflaps against smooth and rough glass surfaces. Constant attachments and detachments occur between the surfaces during shearing, as described by an avalanche model. These detachments ultimately result in failure of the adhesion interface and have been characterized in this study. Stick-slip friction disappears with increasing velocity when the flaps are sheared against a smooth silica surface; however, stick-slip was always present at all velocities and loads tested when shearing the flaps against rough glass surfaces. These results demonstrate the significance of pre-load, shearing velocity, shearing distances, commensurability and shearing direction of gecko-mimetic adhesives and provide us a simple model for analysing and/or designing such systems.

  10. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand.

  11. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A−1/4. We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A−1/50. Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm2 of adhesive per hand. PMID:25411404

  12. Geckos as Springs: Mechanics Explain Across-Species Scaling of Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Casey A.; Imburgia, Michael J.; Bartlett, Michael D.; King, Daniel R.; Crosby, Alfred J.; Irschick, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    One of the central controversies regarding the evolution of adhesion concerns how adhesive force scales as animals change in size, either among or within species. A widely held view is that as animals become larger, the primary mechanism that enables them to climb is increasing pad area. However, prior studies show that much of the variation in maximum adhesive force remains unexplained, even when area is accounted for. We tested the hypothesis that maximum adhesive force among pad-bearing gecko species is not solely dictated by toepad area, but also depends on the ratio of toepad area to gecko adhesive system compliance in the loading direction, where compliance (C) is the change in extension (Δ) relative to a change in force (F) while loading a gecko’s adhesive system (C = dΔ/dF). Geckos are well-known for their ability to climb on a range of vertical and overhanging surfaces, and range in mass from several grams to over 300 grams, yet little is understood of the factors that enable adhesion to scale with body size. We examined the maximum adhesive force of six gecko species that vary in body size (~2–100 g). We also examined changes between juveniles and adults within a single species (Phelsuma grandis). We found that maximum adhesive force and toepad area increased with increasing gecko size, and that as gecko species become larger, their adhesive systems become significantly less compliant. Additionally, our hypothesis was supported, as the best predictor of maximum adhesive force was not toepad area or compliance alone, but the ratio of toepad area to compliance. We verified this result using a synthetic “model gecko” system comprised of synthetic adhesive pads attached to a glass substrate and a synthetic tendon (mechanical spring) of finite stiffness. Our data indicate that increases in toepad area as geckos become larger cannot fully account for increased adhesive abilities, and decreased compliance must be included to explain the scaling of

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  14. Staying sticky: contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mengüç, Yigit; Röhrig, Michael; Abusomwan, Uyiosa; Hölscher, Hendrik; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-01

    The exceptionally adhesive foot of the gecko remains clean in dirty environments by shedding contaminants with each step. Synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives have achieved similar attachment strengths to the gecko on smooth surfaces, but the process of contact self-cleaning has yet to be effectively demonstrated. Here, we present the first gecko-inspired adhesive that has matched both the attachment strength and the contact self-cleaning performance of the gecko's foot on a smooth surface. Contact self-cleaning experiments were performed with three different sizes of mushroom-shaped elastomer microfibres and five different sizes of spherical silica contaminants. Using a load-drag-unload dry contact cleaning process similar to the loads acting on the gecko foot during locomotion, our fully contaminated synthetic gecko adhesives could recover lost adhesion at a rate comparable to that of the gecko. We observed that the relative size of contaminants to the characteristic size of the microfibres in the synthetic adhesive strongly determined how and to what degree the adhesive recovered from contamination. Our approximate model and experimental results show that the dominant mechanism of contact self-cleaning is particle rolling during the drag process. Embedding of particles between adjacent fibres was observed for particles with diameter smaller than the fibre tips, and further studied as a temporary cleaning mechanism. By incorporating contact self-cleaning capabilities, real-world applications of synthetic gecko adhesives, such as reusable tapes, clothing closures and medical adhesives, would become feasible.

  15. The effect of surface water and wetting on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H

    2012-09-01

    Despite profound interest in the mechanics and performance of the gecko adhesive system, relatively few studies have focused on performance under conditions that are ecologically relevant to the natural habitats of geckos. Because geckos are likely to encounter surfaces that are wet, we used shear force adhesion measurements to examine the effect of surface water and toe pad wetting on the whole-animal performance of a tropical-dwelling gecko (Gekko gecko). To test the effect of surface wetting, we measured the shear adhesive force of geckos on three substrate conditions: dry glass, glass misted with water droplets and glass fully submerged in water. We also investigated the effect of wetting on the adhesive toe pad by soaking the toe pads prior to testing. Finally, we tested for repeatability of the adhesive system in each wetting condition by measuring shear adhesion after each step a gecko made under treatment conditions. Wetted toe pads had significantly lower shear adhesive force in all treatments (0.86 ± 0.09 N) than the control (17.96 ± 3.42 N), as did full immersion in water (0.44 ± 0.03 N). Treatments with droplets of water distributed across the surface were more variable and did not differ from treatments where the surface was dry (4.72 ± 1.59 N misted glass; 9.76 ± 2.81 N dry glass), except after the gecko took multiple steps. These findings suggest that surface water and the wetting of a gecko's adhesive toe pads may have significant consequences for the ecology and behavior of geckos living in tropical environments.

  16. Family systems theory, attachment theory, and culture.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, Fred; Rosen, Karen; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Family systems theory and attachment theory have important similarities and complementarities. Here we consider two areas in which the theories converge: (a) in family system theorists' description of an overly close, or "enmeshed," mother-child dyad, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of children's ambivalent attachment and mothers' preoccupied attachment; (b) in family system theorists' description of the "pursuer-distance cycle" of marital conflict, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of preoccupied and dismissive partners. We briefly review family systems theory evidence, and more extensively review attachment theory evidence, pertaining to these points of convergence. We also review cross-cultural research, which leads us to conclude that the dynamics described in both theories reflect, in part, Western ways of thinking and Western patterns of relatedness. Evidence from Japan suggests that extremely close ties between mother and child are perceived as adaptive, and are more common, and that children experience less adverse effects from such relationships than do children in the West. Moreover, in Japan there is less emphasis on the importance of the exclusive spousal relationship, and less need for the mother and father to find time alone to rekindle romantic, intimate feelings and to resolve conflicts by openly communicating their differences. Thus, the "maladaptive" pattern frequently cited by Western theorists of an extremely close mother-child relationship, an unromantic, conflictual marriage characterized by little verbal communication and a peripheral, distant father, may function very differently in other cultures. While we believe that both theories will be greatly enriched by their integration, we caution against the application of either theory outside the cultures in which they were developed.

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

  18. Biomechanics of gecko locomotion: the patterns of reaction forces on inverted, vertical and horizontal substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhouyi; Dai, Zhendong; Ji, Aihong; Ren, Lei; Xing, Qiang; Dai, Liming

    2015-02-04

    The excellent locomotion ability of geckos on various rough and/or inclined substrates has attracted scientists' attention for centuries. However, the moving ability of gecko-mimicking robots on various inclined surfaces still lags far behind that of geckos, mainly because our understanding of how geckos govern their locomotion is still very poor. To reveal the fundamental mechanism of gecko locomotion and also to facilitate the design of gecko-mimicking robots, we have measured the reaction forces (RFs) acting on each individual foot of moving geckos on inverted, vertical and horizontal substrates (i.e. ceiling, wall and floor), have associated the RFs with locomotion behaviors by using high-speed camera, and have presented the relationships of the force components with patterns of reaction forces (PRFs). Geckos generate different PRF on ceiling, wall and floor, that is, the PRF is determined by the angles between the direction of gravity and the substrate on which geckos move. On the ceiling, geckos produce reversed shear forces acting on the front and hind feet, which pull away from the body in both lateral and fore-aft directions. They use a very large supporting angle from 21° to 24° to reduce the forces acting on their legs and feet. On the floor, geckos lift their bodies using a supporting angle from 76° to 78°, which not only decreases the RFs but also improves their locomotion ability. On the wall, geckos generate a reliable self-locking attachment by using a supporting angle of 14.8°, which is only about half of the critical angle of detachment.

  19. Biomechanism of adhesion in gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ce; Sun, Jiurong; Ge, Yingbin; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Dapeng; Dai, Zhendong

    2012-02-01

    The study of the adhesion of millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been advanced in recent years with the emergence of new technology and measurement methods. The theory of the mechanism of adhesion by van der Waals forces is now accepted and broadly understood. However, this paper presents limitations of this theory and gives a new hypothesis of the biomechanism of gecko adhesion. The findings are obtained through measurements of the magnitude of the adhesion of setae under three different conditions, to show the close relationship between adhesion and status of the setae. They are reinforced by demonstrating two setal structures, follicle cells and hair, the former making the setae capable of producing bioelectrical charges, which play an important role in attachment and detachment processes. It is shown that the abundant muscular tissues at the base of the setae cells, which are controlled by peripheral nerves, are instrumental in producing the foot movement involved in attachment and detachment. Our study will further uncover the adhesion mechanism of geckos, and provide new ideas for designing and fabricating synthetic setae.

  20. Mechanisms Underlying the Emergent Properties of Gecko-like Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autumn, Kellar

    2010-03-01

    Imagine the difficulties a gecko would encounter if it employed a conventional pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) on its toes. PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere, and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective stiffness to that of PSAs. We have discovered nine benchmark properties of the gecko adhesive over the past decade: 1) anisotropy, 2) strong attachment with minimal preload, 3) easy and rapid detachment, 4) material independence, 5) self-cleaning 6) anti-self-adhesion, and 7) nonadhesive default state. Most recently, we discovered 8) dynamic adhesion and 9) wear resistance. Rate dependent, wear-free friction and adhesion in a dry hard solid may emerge from uncorrelated stick-slip of the spatulae. We confirmed these predictions in a gecko-like synthetic adhesive (GSA) made from a hard silicone polymer. The GSA slid smoothly while adhering, and its velocity-dependence and stick-slip frequency matched the predictions of the model. There has been rapid progress in understanding the principles underlying these remarkable properties, and in applying the principles of gecko adhesion in the fabrication of GSAs. Properties 1-9 have all been achieved in GSAs (although not yet in a single material).

  1. Correlates of Attachment at Age 3: Construct Validity of the Preschool Attachment Classification System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Ellen; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Cyr, Chantal; Mongeau, Chantal; St-Laurent, Diane

    2004-01-01

    This study examined correlates of attachment at age 3 to further validate preschool separation-reunion measures. Three-year-olds (N = 150) and their mothers participated in a separation-reunion protocol, the Preschool Attachment Classification System (PACS: J. Cassidy & R. S. Marvin with the MacArthur Working Group on Attachment, 1992), and a…

  2. Restriction Site-Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-seq) Reveals an Extraordinary Number of Transitions among Gecko Sex-Determining Systems.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Tony; Coryell, Jessi; Ezaz, Tariq; Lynch, Joshua; Scantlebury, Daniel P; Zarkower, David

    2015-05-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved many times in animals and studying these replicate evolutionary "experiments" can help broaden our understanding of the general forces driving the origin and evolution of sex chromosomes. However this plan of study has been hindered by the inability to identify the sex chromosome systems in the large number of species with cryptic, homomorphic sex chromosomes. Restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) is a critical enabling technology that can identify the sex chromosome systems in many species where traditional cytogenetic methods have failed. Using newly generated RAD-seq data from 12 gecko species, along with data from the literature, we reinterpret the evolution of sex-determining systems in lizards and snakes and test the hypothesis that sex chromosomes can routinely act as evolutionary traps. We uncovered between 17 and 25 transitions among gecko sex-determining systems. This is approximately one-half to two-thirds of the total number of transitions observed among all lizards and snakes. We find support for the hypothesis that sex chromosome systems can readily become trap-like and show that adding even a small number of species from understudied clades can greatly enhance hypothesis testing in a model-based phylogenetic framework. RAD-seq will undoubtedly prove useful in evaluating other species for male or female heterogamety, particularly the majority of fish, amphibian, and reptile species that lack visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and will significantly accelerate the pace of biological discovery.

  3. Shuttle-Attached Manipulator System requirements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodey, C. E.; Cepollina, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Shuttle mission requirements and cost objectives have led to the selection of a Shuttle-Attached Manipulator System (SAMS) as a general purpose mechanism for docking, payload handling, and the general launch and retrieval of free-flying satellites. SAMS design requirements are discussed, giving attention to end effectors, kinematics, timelines, dynamics, load ratings, TV cameras and lights. Requirements for low-cost payload satellites are considered, taking into account satellites with modular subsystems which are designed for replacement and for resupply in orbit by SAMS.

  4. A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Ferreira, Lino; Sundback, Cathryn; Nichol, Jason W; Chan, Edwin P; Carter, David J D; Bettinger, Chris J; Patanavanich, Siamrut; Chignozha, Loice; Ben-Joseph, Eli; Galakatos, Alex; Pryor, Howard; Pomerantseva, Irina; Masiakos, Peter T; Faquin, William; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Hong, Seungpyo; Borenstein, Jeffrey; Vacanti, Joseph; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2008-02-19

    There is a significant medical need for tough biodegradable polymer adhesives that can adapt to or recover from various mechanical deformations while remaining strongly attached to the underlying tissue. We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces. Translation of existing gecko-inspired adhesives for medical applications is complex, as multiple parameters must be optimized, including: biocompatibility, biodegradation, strong adhesive tissue bonding, as well as compliance and conformability to tissue surfaces. Ideally these adhesives would also have the ability to deliver drugs or growth factors to promote healing. As a first demonstration, we have created a gecko-inspired tissue adhesive from a biocompatible and biodegradable elastomer combined with a thin tissue-reactive biocompatible surface coating. Tissue adhesion was optimized by varying dimensions of the nanoscale pillars, including the ratio of tip diameter to pitch and the ratio of tip diameter to base diameter. Coating these nanomolded pillars of biodegradable elastomers with a thin layer of oxidized dextran significantly increased the interfacial adhesion strength on porcine intestine tissue in vitro and in the rat abdominal subfascial in vivo environment. This gecko-inspired medical adhesive may have potential applications for sealing wounds and for replacement or augmentation of sutures or staples.

  5. Frictional and elastic energy in gecko adhesive detachment.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar

    2008-03-01

    Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1 m s(-1). Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive since it requires both strong attachment and easy, rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). We discovered that the energy required to detach adhering tokay gecko setae (W(d)) is modulated by the angle (theta) of a linear path of detachment. Gecko setae resist detachment when dragged towards the animal during detachment (theta = 30 degrees ) requiring W(d) = 5.0+/-0.86(s.e.) J m(-2) to detach, largely due to frictional losses. This external frictional loss is analogous to viscous internal frictional losses during detachment of pressure-sensitive adhesives. We found that, remarkably, setae possess a built-in release mechanism. Setae acted as springs when loaded in tension during attachment and returned elastic energy when detached along the optimal path (theta=130 degrees ), resulting in W(d) = -0.8+/-0.12 J m(-2). The release of elastic energy from the setal shaft probably causes spontaneous release, suggesting that curved shafts may enable easy detachment in natural, and synthetic, gecko adhesives.

  6. Ultrahydrophobicity indicates a non-adhesive default state in gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Autumn, Kellar; Hansen, Wendy

    2006-11-01

    Geckos may represent the world's most demanding adhesives application. The adhesive setae on the toes of climbing geckos must adhere strongly yet avoid fouling or attachment at inappropriate times. We tested the hypothesis that gecko setae are non-adhesive in their unloaded default state by comparing the water droplet contact angle (theta) of isolated setal arrays to the smooth surface of eye spectacle scales of tokay geckos (Gekko gecko). At equilibrium, theta was 98.3 +/- 3.4 degrees in spectacle scales of live geckos and 93.3 +/- 3.5 degrees in isolated spectacles. Isolated setal arrays were ultrahydrophobic, with theta of 160.6 +/- 1.3 degrees (means +/- SD). The difference in theta of setal arrays and smooth spectacles indicates a very low contact fraction. Using Cassie's law of surface wettability, we infer that less than 6.6% of the surface of unloaded setae is solid and at least 93.4% is air space. We calculated that the contact fraction must increase from 6.6% in the unloaded state to 46% in the loaded state to account for previously measured values of adhesion. Thus gecko setae may be non-sticky by default because only a very small contact fraction is possible without mechanically deforming the setal array.

  7. Stress distribution and contact area measurements of a gecko toe using a high-resolution tactile sensor.

    PubMed

    Eason, Eric V; Hawkes, Elliot W; Windheim, Marc; Christensen, David L; Libby, Thomas; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-02-02

    The adhesive systems of geckos have been widely studied and have been a great source of bioinspiration. Load-sharing (i.e. preventing stress concentrations through equal distribution of loads) is necessary to maximize the performance of an adhesive system, but it is not known to what extent load-sharing occurs in gecko toes. In this paper, we present in vivo measurements of the stress distribution and contact area on the toes of a tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) using a custom tactile sensor with 100 μm spatial resolution. We found that the stress distributions were nonuniform, with large variations in stress between and within lamellae, suggesting that load-sharing in the tokay gecko is uneven. These results may be relevant to the understanding of gecko morphology and the design of improved synthetic adhesive systems.

  8. Efficient active actuation to imitate locomotion of gecko's toes using an ionic polymer-metal composite actuator enhanced by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; He, Qingsong; Yu, Dingshan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Ji, Aihong; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Ce; Dai, Zhendong

    2012-10-01

    Active actuation of the adhesive pads is important for a gecko-robot climbing on walls. We demonstrate the fabrication of an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuator enhanced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and its use for actively actuating an adhesive array to imitate the locomotion of gecko's toes. The as-fabricated IPMC actuator doped with CNTs exhibits a maximum blocking force of 3.59 gf driven at a low voltage of 3 V. It can be easily controlled by voltage signals to actuate an artificial gecko's toe to attach and detach from a surface. This will allow active, distributed actuation in a gecko robot.

  9. Nocturnal colour vision in geckos.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Lina S V; Kelber, Almut

    2004-01-01

    Nocturnal animals are said to sacrifice colour vision in favour of increased absolute sensitivity. This is true for most vertebrates that possess a dual retina with a single type of rod for colour-blind night vision and multiple types of cone for diurnal colour vision. However, among the nocturnal vertebrates, geckos are unusual because they have no rods but three cone types. Here, we show that geckos use their cones for colour vision in dim light. Two specimens of the nocturnal helmet gecko Tarentola (formerly Geckonia) chazaliae were able to discriminate blue from grey patterns by colour alone. Experiments were performed at 0.002 cd m(-2), a light intensity similar to dim moonlight. We conclude that nocturnal geckos can use cone-based colour vision at very dim light levels when humans rely on colour-blind rod vision. PMID:15801611

  10. Spatial model of the gecko foot hair: functional significance of highly specialized non-uniform geometry.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-02-01

    One of the important problems appearing in experimental realizations of artificial adhesives inspired by gecko foot hair is so-called clusterization. If an artificially produced structure is flexible enough to allow efficient contact with natural rough surfaces, after a few attachment-detachment cycles, the fibres of the structure tend to adhere one to another and form clusters. Normally, such clusters are much larger than original fibres and, because they are less flexible, form much worse adhesive contacts especially with the rough surfaces. Main problem here is that the forces responsible for the clusterization are the same intermolecular forces which attract fibres to fractal surface of the substrate. However, arrays of real gecko setae are much less susceptible to this problem. One of the possible reasons for this is that ends of the seta have more sophisticated non-uniformly distributed three-dimensional structure than that of existing artificial systems. In this paper, we simulated three-dimensional spatial geometry of non-uniformly distributed branches of nanofibres of the setal tip numerically, studied its attachment-detachment dynamics and discussed its advantages versus uniformly distributed geometry.

  11. Adhesion properties of gecko setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ginel; Peattie, Anne; Daniels, Roxanne; Full, Robert; Kenny, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Millions of keratin hairs on gecko feet, called setae, act as a spectacular dry adhesive. Each seta branches into hundreds of smaller fibers that terminate in spatula-shaped ends. Morphological differences between the setae from different gecko species are suspected to affect both single-seta and whole-animal adhesion properties. Single-seta adhesive force measurements made using a MEMS piezoresistive cantilever capable of two-axis measurements are presented.

  12. From the Cover: Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autumn, Kellar; Sitti, Metin; Liang, Yiching A.; Peattie, Anne M.; Hansen, Wendy R.; Sponberg, Simon; Kenny, Thomas W.; Fearing, Ronald; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Full, Robert J.

    2002-09-01

    Geckos have evolved one of the most versatile and effective adhesives known. The mechanism of dry adhesion in the millions of setae on the toes of geckos has been the focus of scientific study for over a century. We provide the first direct experimental evidence for dry adhesion of gecko setae by van der Waals forces, and reject the use of mechanisms relying on high surface polarity, including capillary adhesion. The toes of live Tokay geckos were highly hydrophobic, and adhered equally well to strongly hydrophobic and strongly hydrophilic, polarizable surfaces. Adhesion of a single isolated gecko seta was equally effective on the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of a microelectro-mechanical systems force sensor. A van der Waals mechanism implies that the remarkable adhesive properties of gecko setae are merely a result of the size and shape of the tips, and are not strongly affected by surface chemistry. Theory predicts greater adhesive forces simply from subdividing setae to increase surface density, and suggests a possible design principle underlying the repeated, convergent evolution of dry adhesive microstructures in gecko, anoles, skinks, and insects. Estimates using a standard adhesion model and our measured forces come remarkably close to predicting the tip size of Tokay gecko seta. We verified the dependence on size and not surface type by using physical models of setal tips nanofabricated from two different materials. Both artificial setal tips stuck as predicted and provide a path to manufacturing the first dry, adhesive microstructures.

  13. A micro/nano-fabricated gecko-inspired reversible adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northen, Michael Thomas

    The gecko adhesive has been of scientific interest for over two millennia, ever since Aristotle observed a gecko running up and down a tree. Since then, advances in optical and electron microscopy have provided increased information on the structure of the pad of the gecko's foot, for it is the structure that leads to the adhesion and not the chemistry. Each toe contains many ridges, or scansors, displaying arrays of ˜100 mum long, ˜5 mum wide setae, each branching into hundreds of smaller fibers called spatulae, ˜200 nm across and 5 nm thick. The combination of the setal flexibility and the nanoscale compliance of the spatulae creates a large amount of intimate surface contact, enhancing van der Waals interactions, and promoting adhesion. In this work, an adhesive---inspired by the gecko---was micro/nanofabricated. There were two main thrusts in this work. The first was to show the importance of the hierarchical structure on the performance of the gecko adhesive, and the future need to for multiple levels of compliance in synthetic dry adhesives. The second thrust was to create a surface with controllable adhesion. While the adhesion properties of the gecko are of great scientific interest, it is the ability to switch adhesion on and off that provides the technological driving force for mimicking the gecko system. The microscale setae of the gecko have been replicated by microfabricating flexible silicon dioxide freestanding structures ˜100 mum long and ˜10 mum wide. These structures were coated with aligned vertical polymeric nanorods ˜4 mum tall and ˜200 nm in diameter, analogous to the gecko spatulae. Testing of the synthetic structures shows that the multi-scale system provides a 5-fold increase in adhesion over nanorods alone, demonstrating the need for a hierarchical structure. To create a switchable adhesive, the silicon dioxide microstructures were replaced with nickel micro-paddles. When the nickel structures were placed in a magnetic field, a

  14. Reduction of water surface tension significantly impacts gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; McClung, Brandon; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The gecko adhesive system is dependent on weak van der Waals interactions that are multiplied across thousands of fine hair-like structures (setae) on geckos' toe pads. Due to the requirements of van der Waals forces, we expect that any interruption between the setae and substrate, such as a water layer, will compromise adhesion. Our recent results suggest, however, that the air layer (plastron) surrounding the superhydrophobic toe pads aid in expelling water at the contact interface and create strong shear adhesion in water when in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. To test the function of the air plastron, we reduced the surface tension of water using two surfactants, a charged anionic surfactant and a neutral nonionic surfactant. We tested geckos on three substrates: hydrophilic glass and two hydrophobic surfaces, glass with a octadecyl trichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer (OTS-SAM) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). We found that the anionic surfactant inhibited the formation of the air plastron layer and significantly reduced shear adhesion to all three substrates. Interestingly, the air plastron was more stable in the nonionic surfactant treatments than the anionic surfactant treatments and we found that geckos adhered better in the nonionic surfactant than in the anionic surfactant on OTS-SAM and PTFE but not on glass. Our results have implications for the evolution of a superhydrophobic toe pad and highlight some of the challenges faced in designing synthetic adhesives that mimic geckos' toes.

  15. Structure, attachment properties, and ecological importance of the attachment system of English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Björn; Seidel, Robin; Steinbrecher, Tina; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Root climbers such as English ivy (Hedera helix) rely on specialized adventitious roots for attachment, enabling the plants to climb on a wide range of natural and artificial substrates. Despite their importance for the climbing habit, the biomechanical properties of these specialized adventitious roots compared with standard roots and their performance in the attachment to different host species or inert substrates have not been studied. Here organs and tissues involved in the attachment are characterized and their significance in regard to a broader functional and ecological aspect is discussed. Depending on the substrate, the root clusters show different types of failure modes at various frequencies, demonstrating the close interaction between the climber and its substrates. With a Young’s Modulus of 109.2 MPa, the attachment roots are relatively stiff for non-woody roots. The central cylinders of the attachment roots show a high tensile strength of 38 MPa and a very high extensibility of 34%. In host trees naturally co-distributed with English ivy, a ‘balanced’ occurrence of failure of the attachment system of the climber and the bark of the host is found, suggesting a co-evolution of climber and host. Maximum loads of root clusters normalized by the number of roots match those of individually tested attachment roots. In comparison with most subterranean roots the properties and structure of the attachment roots of English ivy show distinct differences. There exist similarities to the properties found for roots of Galium aparine, suggesting a trend in not fully self-supporting plants towards a higher extensibility. PMID:21914660

  16. Structure, attachment properties, and ecological importance of the attachment system of English ivy (Hedera helix).

    PubMed

    Melzer, Björn; Seidel, Robin; Steinbrecher, Tina; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Root climbers such as English ivy (Hedera helix) rely on specialized adventitious roots for attachment, enabling the plants to climb on a wide range of natural and artificial substrates. Despite their importance for the climbing habit, the biomechanical properties of these specialized adventitious roots compared with standard roots and their performance in the attachment to different host species or inert substrates have not been studied. Here organs and tissues involved in the attachment are characterized and their significance in regard to a broader functional and ecological aspect is discussed. Depending on the substrate, the root clusters show different types of failure modes at various frequencies, demonstrating the close interaction between the climber and its substrates. With a Young's Modulus of 109.2 MPa, the attachment roots are relatively stiff for non-woody roots. The central cylinders of the attachment roots show a high tensile strength of 38 MPa and a very high extensibility of 34%. In host trees naturally co-distributed with English ivy, a 'balanced' occurrence of failure of the attachment system of the climber and the bark of the host is found, suggesting a co-evolution of climber and host. Maximum loads of root clusters normalized by the number of roots match those of individually tested attachment roots. In comparison with most subterranean roots the properties and structure of the attachment roots of English ivy show distinct differences. There exist similarities to the properties found for roots of Galium aparine, suggesting a trend in not fully self-supporting plants towards a higher extensibility.

  17. Gecko toe and lamellar shear adhesion on macroscopic, engineered rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Henry, Amy; Lin, Hauwen; Ren, Angela; Shiuan, Kevin; Fearing, Ronald S; Full, Robert J

    2014-01-15

    The role in adhesion of the toes and lamellae - intermediate-sized structures - found on the gecko foot remains unclear. Insight into the function of these structures can lead to a more general understanding of the hierarchical nature of the gecko adhesive system, but in particular how environmental topology may relate to gecko foot morphology. We sought to discern the mechanics of the toes and lamellae by examining gecko adhesion on controlled, macroscopically rough surfaces. We used live Tokay geckos, Gekko gecko, to observe the maximum shear force a gecko foot can attain on an engineered substrate constructed with sinusoidal patterns of varying amplitudes and wavelengths in sizes similar to the dimensions of the toes and lamellae structures (0.5 to 6 mm). We found shear adhesion was significantly decreased on surfaces that had amplitudes and wavelengths approaching the lamella length and inter-lamella spacing, losing 95% of shear adhesion over the range tested. We discovered that the toes are capable of adhering to surfaces with amplitudes much larger than their dimensions even without engaging claws, maintaining 60% of shear adhesion on surfaces with amplitudes of 3 mm. Gecko adhesion can be predicted by the ratio of the lamella dimensions to surface feature dimensions. In addition to setae, remarkable macroscopic-scale features of gecko toes and lamellae that include compliance and passive conformation are necessary to maintain contact, and consequently, generate shear adhesion on macroscopically rough surfaces. Findings on the larger scale structures in the hierarchy of gecko foot function could provide the biological inspiration to drive the design of more effective and versatile synthetic fibrillar adhesives.

  18. Thermally switchable adhesions of polystyrene-block-poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer pillar array mimicking climb attitude of geckos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Wang, Jing-Hong; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the gecko foot pad, we fabricated polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-b-PNIPAAm) copolymer pillar array to mimic climbing attitude of a gecko, alternately attach to and detach from a surface. The pillar array structure of the PS segment significantly enhances both of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic property of PNIPAAm segment tips at 25 and 50 °C, respectively, which could generate alternating adhesive forces of approximately 120 and 11 nN. The dramatic change in adhesive and friction force difference at 25 and 50 °C may guide the design of bio-inspired artificial analogues, which could approach gecko's climbing behavior.

  19. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  20. Cranial kinesis in geckoes: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; Aerts, P; De Vree, F

    2000-05-01

    Although it is generally assumed that cranial kinesis is a plesiomorphic characteristic in squamates, experimental data tend to contradict this hypothesis. In particular, coupled kinesis (i.e. streptostyly and mesokinesis) presumably arose independently in only a limited number of highly specialised groups. In this study, we investigated cranial kinesis in one of the most specialised of these groups: geckoes. On the basis of cineradiographic and electromyographic data, the fast opening and the slow closing/power stroke phases were modelled to elucidate possible functions of the observed kinesis. The results of these analyses show that the retraction of the muzzle unit during crushing is a self-reinforcing system that increases bite force and reduces the joint forces; the active protraction of the kinetic system during jaw opening, in contrast, enhances opening speed through the coupling of the intracranial units. It can be argued that cranial kinesis in geckoes is probably not an adaptive trait as such but, instead, a consequence of the 'Bauplan' of the cranial system in these animals. Presumably as a result of constructional constraints on the size of the jaw musculature and eyes, the supratemporal and postorbital bars were lost, which resulted in enormous mobility in the skull. To counteract the potential negative factors associated with this (decrease in bite force, skull damage), the kinetic system may have become coupled, and thus functional.

  1. Adhesional instabilities and gecko locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Geckos possess a remarkable ability to run rapidly on both walls and ceilings and in recent years the mechanisms that underlie this facility have come under close scrutiny. It is now generally agreed that one of the principal mechanisms of adhesion relies on the action of van der Waal forces acting between the final extremely fine structure of the gecko toe and the underlying substrate. High speed video analysis shows that adhesive contact is both made and broken in intervals of less than 20 ms and this suggests that the mechanism of detachment is one of adhesive instability rather than steady-state peeling. By considering the gecko seta/spatula as a Euler-Bernoulli cantilever it is possible to model this instability in non-dimensional terms and thus to test the analysis at a much larger scale with more conventional engineering materials. When applied to the scale and material combination appropriate to a gecko spatula, the predicted critical load, of around 10 nN, is close to values that have been observed using and AFM cantilever and a single detached spatula.

  2. Design and fabrication of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kejia; Tian, Yu; Erickson, Jeffrey S; Puthoff, Jonathan; Autumn, Kellar; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-04-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties; the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this study, we present an easy, scalable method, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques, to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provides anisotropic adhesion properties. We measured the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function. Consistent with the peel zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. The tribological properties of the synthetic arrays were highly anisotropic, reminiscent of the frictional adhesion behavior of gecko setal arrays. When a 60° tilt sample was actuated in the gripping direction, a static adhesion strength of ~1.4 N/cm(2) and a static friction strength of ~5.4 N/cm(2) were obtained. In contrast, when the dry adhesive was actuated in the releasing direction, we measured an initial repulsive normal force and negligible friction.

  3. A gecko-inspired double-sided adhesive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-12-21

    Geckos' outstanding abilities to adhere to various surfaces are widely credited to the large actual contact areas of the fibrillar and hierarchical structures on their feet. These special features regulate the essential structural compliance for every attachment and thus provide robust yet reversible adhesions. Inspired by gecko's feet and our commonly used double-faced tape, we have successfully fabricated a gecko-inspired double-sided dry adhesive by using porous anodic alumina template assisted nano-wetting on a stiff polymer. It was determined that the obtained 2-sided structure showed largely decreased effective stiffness compared with its 1-sided counterpart, which favored better compliance and interfacial integrity. We also demonstrated that the repeatable double-sided adhesive improved the macroscopic normal and shear adhesion capacities over the widely-studied 1-side structure by ~50% and ~85%, respectively. By using the synthetic double-sided adhesive, the usage of traditional pressure-sensitive/chemical adhesives could be well avoided. Besides, the double-sided nanostructures showed great potential in finding new interesting properties and practical applications for the synthetic dry adhesives.

  4. Fabrication and analysis of gecko-inspired hierarchical polymer nanosetae.

    PubMed

    Ho, Audrey Yoke Yee; Yeo, Lip Pin; Lam, Yee Cheong; Rodríguez, Isabel

    2011-03-22

    A gecko's superb ability to adhere to surfaces is widely credited to the large attachment area of the hierarchical and fibrillar structure on its feet. The combination of these two features provides the necessary compliance for the gecko toe-pad to effectively engage a high percentage of the spatulae at each step to any kind of surface topography. With the use of multi-tiered porous anodic alumina template and capillary force assisted nanoimprinting, we have successfully fabricated a gecko-inspired hierarchical topography of branched nanopillars on a stiff polymer. We also demonstrated that the hierarchical topography improved the shear adhesion force over a topography of linear structures by 150%. A systematic analysis to understand the phenomenon was performed. It was determined that the effective stiffness of the hierarchical branched structure was lower than that of the linear structure. The reduction in effective stiffness favored a more efficient bending of the branched topography and a better compliance to a test surface, hence resulting in a higher area of residual deformation. As the area of residual deformation increased, the shear adhesion force emulated. The branched pillar topography also showed a marked increase in hydrophobicity, which is an essential property in the practical applications of these structures for good self-cleaning in dry adhesion conditions.

  5. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  6. Dual-axis MEMS force sensors for gecko adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ginel Corina

    Dual-axis piezoresistive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) force sensors were used to investigate the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of gecko hairs, called setae. These hairs are part of a fantastic, robust dry adhesive. Their adhesion is highly angle-dependent, with both the "pitch" and "roll" orientation angles playing a role. This anisotropy in adhesion properties is critical for locomotion, as it enables detachment of the gecko's foot with limited pull-off force. Many synthetic mimics of the gecko adhesive are isotropic. This work on the anisotropy of natural setae will inform future work on synthetic dry adhesives. A dual-axis microscale force sensor was needed to study single seta adhesive forces, which are stronger parallel to a substrate than perpendicular. Piezoresistive silicon cantilevers that separately detect lateral and normal forces applied at the tip were used. The fabrication process and rigorous characterization of new devices are reported. A novel calibration method was developed that uses resonant frequency measurements in concert with finite element models to correct for the expected variability of critical dimensions. These corrected models were used to predict the stiffnesses of each cantilever, and thus improve the accuracy of force measurements made with these sensors. This calibration technique was also validated by direct measurement of the dual-axis cantilever stiffnesses using a reference cantilever. The adhesion force of a single gecko seta is dramatically enhanced by proper orientation. The dual-axis cantilevers were used to measure two components of force between a substrate and a Gekko gecko seta. Lateral adhesion was highest with the stalk oriented parallel to the surface at 0° pitch. Adhesion decreased smoothly as the pitch angle of the stalk was increased, until detachment or no adhesion occurred at approximately 30°. To display enhanced adhesion, the splayed tuft at the end of the seta needed to be only

  7. Investigating gecko setae adhesion using a dual-axis MEMS force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Ginel; Soto, Daniel; Peattie, Anne; Full, Robert; Kenny, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    A dual-axis piezoresistive MEMS force sensor was used to investigate the role of orientation angle on the adhesion of gecko hairs, called setae. Made of keratin with nanoscale features, gecko setae are a spectacular, robust dry adhesive with anisotropic adhesion properties. A wealth of recent research has been devoted to synthetic mimicry of the gecko seta. However, most synthetics do not yet display anisotropic adhesion, which is critical for controllable attachment and release. Previous research using a wire gauge tested the role of the pitch angle between the stalk of natural setae and the substrate and found a dramatic cutoff angle of 30^o, above which setae detach from the substrate [1]. The present work details the effect of the ``roll'' angle on natural setae adhesion. [1] K. Autumn, et al. Nature, 405: 681 (2000).

  8. Fabrication and properties of dual-level hierarchical structures mimicking gecko foot hairs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Shiyuan; Lv, Hao

    2013-02-01

    In nature, geckos have extraordinary adhesive capabilities. The multi-scale hierarchical structure of the gecko foot hairs, especially the high-aspect-ratio structure of its micro-scale seta and nano-scale spatulae is the critical factor of the gecko's ability to adopt and stick to any different surface with powerful adhesion force. In this paper, we present a simple and effective approach to fabricate dual-level hierarchical structures mimicking gecko foot hairs. Polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) hierarchical arrays were fabricated by demolding from a double stack mold that was composed of an SU-8 mold by thick film photolithography and a silicon mold by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. Top pillars of the fabricated structures have 3 micom diameter and 18 microm in height, while base pillars have 25 microm diameter and 40 microm in height. The water droplet contact angle tests indicate that the hierarchical structures increase the hydrophobic property significantly compared with the single-level arrays and the unstructured polymers, exhibiting superhydrophobicity (154.2 degrees) like the Tokay gecko's (160.9 degrees). The shear force tests show that the top pillars make attachment through side contact with a value of about 0.25 N/cm2, and moreover, the hierarchical structures are demonstrated to be more suitable for contacting with rough surfaces.

  9. Superhydrophobic gecko feet with high adhesive forces towards water and their bio-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kesong; Du, Jiexing; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2012-02-01

    Functional integration is an inherent characteristic for multiscale structures of biological materials. In this contribution, we first investigate the liquid-solid adhesive forces between water droplets and superhydrophobic gecko feet using a high-sensitivity micro-electromechanical balance system. It was found, in addition to the well-known solid-solid adhesion, the gecko foot, with a multiscale structure, possesses both superhydrophobic functionality and a high adhesive force towards water. The origin of the high adhesive forces of gecko feet to water could be attributed to the high density nanopillars that contact the water. Inspired by this, polyimide films with gecko-like multiscale structures were constructed by using anodic aluminum oxide templates, exhibiting superhydrophobicity and a strong adhesive force towards water. The static water contact angle is larger than 150° and the adhesive force to water is about 66 μN. The resultant gecko-inspired polyimide film can be used as a "mechanical hand" to snatch micro-liter liquids. We expect this work will provide the inspiration to reveal the mechanism of the high-adhesive superhydrophobic of geckos and extend the practical applications of polyimide materials.

  10. Robust self-cleaning and micromanipulation capabilities of gecko spatulae and their bio-mimics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Wan, Yiyang; Hu, Travis Shihao; Liu, Tony X; Tao, Dashuai; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Tian, Yu; Liu, Yue; Dai, Liming; Yang, Yanqing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Geckos have the extraordinary ability to prevent their sticky feet from fouling while running on dusty walls and ceilings. Understanding gecko adhesion and self-cleaning mechanisms is essential for elucidating animal behaviours and rationally designing gecko-inspired devices. Here we report a unique self-cleaning mechanism possessed by the nano-pads of gecko spatulae. The difference between the velocity-dependent particle-wall adhesion and the velocity-independent spatula-particle dynamic response leads to a robust self-cleaning capability, allowing geckos to efficiently dislodge dirt during their locomotion. Emulating this natural design, we fabricate artificial spatulae and micromanipulators that show similar effects, and that provide a new way to manipulate micro-objects. By simply tuning the pull-off velocity, our gecko-inspired micromanipulators, made of synthetic microfibers with graphene-decorated micro-pads, can easily pick up, transport, and drop-off microparticles for precise assembling. This work should open the door to the development of novel self-cleaning adhesives, smart surfaces, microelectromechanical systems, biomedical devices, and more. PMID:26584513

  11. Robust self-cleaning and micromanipulation capabilities of gecko spatulae and their bio-mimics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Quan; Wan, Yiyang; Hu, Travis Shihao; Liu, Tony X.; Tao, Dashuai; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Tian, Yu; Liu, Yue; Dai, Liming; Yang, Yanqing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Geckos have the extraordinary ability to prevent their sticky feet from fouling while running on dusty walls and ceilings. Understanding gecko adhesion and self-cleaning mechanisms is essential for elucidating animal behaviours and rationally designing gecko-inspired devices. Here we report a unique self-cleaning mechanism possessed by the nano-pads of gecko spatulae. The difference between the velocity-dependent particle-wall adhesion and the velocity-independent spatula-particle dynamic response leads to a robust self-cleaning capability, allowing geckos to efficiently dislodge dirt during their locomotion. Emulating this natural design, we fabricate artificial spatulae and micromanipulators that show similar effects, and that provide a new way to manipulate micro-objects. By simply tuning the pull-off velocity, our gecko-inspired micromanipulators, made of synthetic microfibers with graphene-decorated micro-pads, can easily pick up, transport, and drop-off microparticles for precise assembling. This work should open the door to the development of novel self-cleaning adhesives, smart surfaces, microelectromechanical systems, biomedical devices, and more. PMID:26584513

  12. Robust self-cleaning and micromanipulation capabilities of gecko spatulae and their bio-mimics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Wan, Yiyang; Hu, Travis Shihao; Liu, Tony X; Tao, Dashuai; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Tian, Yu; Liu, Yue; Dai, Liming; Yang, Yanqing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-11-20

    Geckos have the extraordinary ability to prevent their sticky feet from fouling while running on dusty walls and ceilings. Understanding gecko adhesion and self-cleaning mechanisms is essential for elucidating animal behaviours and rationally designing gecko-inspired devices. Here we report a unique self-cleaning mechanism possessed by the nano-pads of gecko spatulae. The difference between the velocity-dependent particle-wall adhesion and the velocity-independent spatula-particle dynamic response leads to a robust self-cleaning capability, allowing geckos to efficiently dislodge dirt during their locomotion. Emulating this natural design, we fabricate artificial spatulae and micromanipulators that show similar effects, and that provide a new way to manipulate micro-objects. By simply tuning the pull-off velocity, our gecko-inspired micromanipulators, made of synthetic microfibers with graphene-decorated micro-pads, can easily pick up, transport, and drop-off microparticles for precise assembling. This work should open the door to the development of novel self-cleaning adhesives, smart surfaces, microelectromechanical systems, biomedical devices, and more.

  13. Robust self-cleaning and micromanipulation capabilities of gecko spatulae and their bio-mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Quan; Wan, Yiyang; Hu, Travis Shihao; Liu, Tony X.; Tao, Dashuai; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Tian, Yu; Liu, Yue; Dai, Liming; Yang, Yanqing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-11-01

    Geckos have the extraordinary ability to prevent their sticky feet from fouling while running on dusty walls and ceilings. Understanding gecko adhesion and self-cleaning mechanisms is essential for elucidating animal behaviours and rationally designing gecko-inspired devices. Here we report a unique self-cleaning mechanism possessed by the nano-pads of gecko spatulae. The difference between the velocity-dependent particle-wall adhesion and the velocity-independent spatula-particle dynamic response leads to a robust self-cleaning capability, allowing geckos to efficiently dislodge dirt during their locomotion. Emulating this natural design, we fabricate artificial spatulae and micromanipulators that show similar effects, and that provide a new way to manipulate micro-objects. By simply tuning the pull-off velocity, our gecko-inspired micromanipulators, made of synthetic microfibers with graphene-decorated micro-pads, can easily pick up, transport, and drop-off microparticles for precise assembling. This work should open the door to the development of novel self-cleaning adhesives, smart surfaces, microelectromechanical systems, biomedical devices, and more.

  14. Superhydrophobic gecko feet with high adhesive forces towards water and their bio-inspired materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kesong; Du, Jiexing; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Functional integration is an inherent characteristic for multiscale structures of biological materials. In this contribution, we first investigate the liquid-solid adhesive forces between water droplets and superhydrophobic gecko feet using a high-sensitivity micro-electromechanical balance system. It was found, in addition to the well-known solid-solid adhesion, the gecko foot, with a multiscale structure, possesses both superhydrophobic functionality and a high adhesive force towards water. The origin of the high adhesive forces of gecko feet to water could be attributed to the high density nanopillars that contact the water. Inspired by this, polyimide films with gecko-like multiscale structures were constructed by using anodic aluminum oxide templates, exhibiting superhydrophobicity and a strong adhesive force towards water. The static water contact angle is larger than 150° and the adhesive force to water is about 66 μN. The resultant gecko-inspired polyimide film can be used as a ``mechanical hand'' to snatch micro-liter liquids. We expect this work will provide the inspiration to reveal the mechanism of the high-adhesive superhydrophobic of geckos and extend the practical applications of polyimide materials.

  15. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, Yigit

    This thesis work is primarily concerned with taking inspiration from the principles of gecko-adhesion in order to control the attachment of synthetic structured adhesives. We present gecko-inspired angled elastomer micropillars with flat or round tip endings as compliant pick-and-place micromanipulators. The pillars are 35 mum in diameter, 90 mum tall, and angled at an inclination of 20°. By gently pressing the tip of a pillar to a part, the pillar adheres to it through intermolecular forces. Next, by retracting quickly, the part is picked from a given donor substrate. During transferring, the adhesion between the pillar and the part is high enough to withstand disturbances due to external forces or the weight of the part. During release of the part onto a receiver substrate, the contact area of the pillar to the part is drastically reduced by controlled vertical or shear displacement, which results in reduced adhesive forces. The maximum repeatable ratio of pick-to-release adhesive forces was measured as 39 to 1. We find that a flat tip shape and shear displacement control provide a higher pick-to-release adhesion ratio than a round tip and vertical displacement control, respectively. We present a model of forces to serve as a framework for the operation of this micromanipulator. Finally, demonstrations of pick-and-place manipulation of mum-scale silicon microplatelets and a cm-scale glass cover slip serve as proofs of concept. The compliant polymer micropillars are safe for use with fragile parts, and, due to exploiting intermolecular forces, could be effective on most materials and in air, vacuum, and liquid environments. We present a study of the self-cleaning and contamination resistance phenomena of synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives made from elastomeric polyurethane. The phenomenon of self-cleaning makes the adhesive foot of the gecko robust against dirt, and makes it effectively sticky throughout the lifetime of the material (within the molting cycles

  16. Carbon nanotube-based synthetic gecko tapes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2007-06-26

    We have developed a synthetic gecko tape by transferring micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays onto flexible polymer tape based on the hierarchical structure found on the foot of a gecko lizard. The gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm(2)) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micrometer-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak van der Waals interactions into high shear forces. We have demonstrated for the first time a macroscopic flexible patch that can be used repeatedly with peeling and adhesive properties better than the natural gecko foot. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  17. Fiber feed for the CFHT Gecko spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrand, Jacques; Vitry, Rene

    2000-08-01

    Motivated by a strong concern to keep maintenance work as low as possible the direction of the CFHT had for some times contemplated the possibility to replace the original mirror train f/20 focus feeding their Gecko High Resolution Coude Spectrograph by a more convenient fiber link coupled to the f/8 Cassegrain focus. A decision supporting that idea was ultimately taken two years ago and our group at the OPM was contacted to build such a system according to precise specifications. This telescope facility, baptized CAFÉ for Cassegrain Fiber Environment, has now arrived to near completion and we are able to present here its main characteristics and the technical solutions that were adopted to meet the CFHT requirements and to provide the system with the best performances in terms of robustness and efficiency.

  18. Sliding-induced non-uniform pre-tension governs robust and reversible adhesion: a revisit of adhesion mechanisms of geckos

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Q. H.; Chen, B.; Gao, H. J.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2012-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed in the literature to explain the robust attachment and rapid, controllable detachment of geckos' feet on vertical walls or ceilings, yet, it is still debatable, which one is ultimately responsible for geckos' extraordinary capabilities for robust and reversible adhesion. In this paper, we re-examine some of the key movements of geckos' spatula pads and seta hairs during attachment and detachment, and propose a sequence of simple mechanical steps that would lead to the extraordinary properties of geckos observed in experiments. The central subject under study here is a linear distribution of pre-tension along the spatula pad induced by its sliding motion with respect to a surface. The resulting pre-tension, together with a control of setae's pulling force and angle, not only allows for robust and strong attachment, but also enables rapid and controllable detachment. We perform computational modelling and simulations to validate the following key steps of geckos' adhesion: (i) creation of a linear distribution of pre-tension in spatula through sliding, (ii) operation of an instability envelope controlled by setae's pulling force and angle, (iii) triggering of an adhesion instability leading to partial decohesion along the interface, and (iv) complete detachment of spatula through post-instability peeling. The present work not only reveals novel insights into the adhesion mechanism of geckos, but also develops a powerful numerical simulation approach as well as additional guidelines for bioinspired materials and devices. PMID:21775325

  19. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Palecek, Amanda M.; Argenbright, Clayton W.; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics. PMID:26696412

  20. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Palecek, Amanda M; Argenbright, Clayton W; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics. PMID:26696412

  1. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Palecek, Amanda M; Argenbright, Clayton W; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  2. Attachment of marine fasteners utilizing portable friction stud welding systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, I.C.; Steel, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    A fast, economical and structurally reliable method for attachment of fasteners in marine environments has long been sought by engineers and marine structure owners. A new portable friction stud welding system is one possible solution. The paper will present an explanation of friction welding, a description of portable friction stud welding equipment, as well as laboratory test results evidencing the integrity of this method of material joining. A method of providing improved electrical continuity is also presented.

  3. Removable, hermetically-sealing, filter attachment system for hostile environments

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Glenn L [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A removable and reusable filter attachment system. A filter medium is fixed o, and surrounded by, a filter frame having a coaxial, longitudinally extending, annular rim. The rim engages an annular groove which surrounds the opening of a filter housing. The annular groove contains a fusible material and a heating mechanism for melting the fusible material. Upon resolidifying, the fusible material forms a hermetic bond with the rim and groove. Remelting allows detachment and replacement of the filter frame.

  4. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ginel C; Soto, Daniel R; Peattie, Anne M; Full, Robert J; Kenny, T W

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts.

  5. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ginel C.; Soto, Daniel R.; Peattie, Anne M.; Full, Robert J.; Kenny, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts. PMID:21288955

  6. Modular microfluidic systems using reversibly attached PDMS fluid control modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Sip, Christopher G.; Folch, Albert; Dufva, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The use of soft lithography-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) valve systems is the dominating approach for high-density microscale fluidic control. Integrated systems enable complex flow control and large-scale integration, but lack modularity. In contrast, modular systems are attractive alternatives to integration because they can be tailored for different applications piecewise and without redesigning every element of the system. We present a method for reversibly coupling hard materials to soft lithography defined systems through self-aligning O-ring features thereby enabling easy interfacing of complex-valve-based systems with simpler detachable units. Using this scheme, we demonstrate the seamless interfacing of a PDMS-based fluid control module with hard polymer chips. In our system, 32 self-aligning O-ring features protruding from the PDMS fluid control module form chip-to-control module interconnections which are sealed by tightening four screws. The interconnection method is robust and supports complex fluidic operations in the reversibly attached passive chip. In addition, we developed a double-sided molding method for fabricating PDMS devices with integrated through-holes. The versatile system facilitates a wide range of applications due to the modular approach, where application specific passive chips can be readily attached to the flow control module.

  7. Geckos significantly alter foot orientation to facilitate adhesion during downhill locomotion.

    PubMed

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Geckos employ their adhesive system when moving up an incline, but the directionality of the system may limit function on downhill surfaces. Here, we use a generalist gecko to test whether limb modulation occurs on downhill slopes to allow geckos to take advantage of their adhesive system. We examined three-dimensional limb kinematics for geckos moving up and down a 45° slope. Remarkably, the hind limbs were rotated posteriorly on declines, resulting in digit III of the pes facing a more posterior direction (opposite to the direction of travel). No significant changes in limb orientation were found in any other condition. This pes rotation leads to a dramatic shift in foot function that facilitates the use of the adhesive system as a brake/stabilizer during downhill locomotion and, although this rotation is not unique to geckos, it is significant for the deployment of adhesion. Adhesion is not just advantageous for uphill locomotion but can be employed to help deal with the effects of gravity during downhill locomotion, highlighting the incredible multi-functionality of this key innovation.

  8. Self-drying: a gecko's innate ability to remove water from wet toe pads.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Wucinich, Nicholas A; Paoloni, Eva L; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-01-01

    When the adhesive toe pads of geckos become wet, they become ineffective in enabling geckos to stick to substrates. This result is puzzling given that many species of gecko are endemic to tropical environments where water covered surfaces are ubiquitous. We hypothesized that geckos can recover adhesive capabilities following exposure of their toe pads to water by walking on a dry surface, similar to the active self-cleaning of dirt particles. We measured the time it took to recover maximum shear adhesion after toe pads had become wet in two groups, those that were allowed to actively walk and those that were not. Keeping in mind the importance of substrate wettability to adhesion on wet surfaces, we also tested geckos on hydrophilic glass and an intermediately wetting substrate (polymethylmethacrylate; PMMA). We found that time to maximum shear adhesion recovery did not differ in the walking groups based on substrate wettability (22.7±5.1 min on glass and 15.4±0.3 min on PMMA) but did have a significant effect in the non-walking groups (54.3±3.9 min on glass and 27.8±2.5 min on PMMA). Overall, we found that by actively walking, geckos were able to self-dry their wet toe pads and regain maximum shear adhesion significantly faster than those that did not walk. Our results highlight a unexpected property of the gecko adhesive system, the ability to actively self-dry and recover adhesive performance after being rendered dysfunctional by water.

  9. Self-Drying: A Gecko's Innate Ability to Remove Water from Wet Toe Pads

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Wucinich, Nicholas A.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-01-01

    When the adhesive toe pads of geckos become wet, they become ineffective in enabling geckos to stick to substrates. This result is puzzling given that many species of gecko are endemic to tropical environments where water covered surfaces are ubiquitous. We hypothesized that geckos can recover adhesive capabilities following exposure of their toe pads to water by walking on a dry surface, similar to the active self-cleaning of dirt particles. We measured the time it took to recover maximum shear adhesion after toe pads had become wet in two groups, those that were allowed to actively walk and those that were not. Keeping in mind the importance of substrate wettability to adhesion on wet surfaces, we also tested geckos on hydrophilic glass and an intermediately wetting substrate (polymethylmethacrylate; PMMA). We found that time to maximum shear adhesion recovery did not differ in the walking groups based on substrate wettability (22.7±5.1 min on glass and 15.4±0.3 min on PMMA) but did have a significant effect in the non-walking groups (54.3±3.9 min on glass and 27.8±2.5 min on PMMA). Overall, we found that by actively walking, geckos were able to self-dry their wet toe pads and regain maximum shear adhesion significantly faster than those that did not walk. Our results highlight a unexpected property of the gecko adhesive system, the ability to actively self-dry and recover adhesive performance after being rendered dysfunctional by water. PMID:25054217

  10. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menguc, Yigit

    This thesis work is primarily concerned with taking inspiration from the principles of gecko-adhesion in order to control the attachment of synthetic structured adhesives. We present gecko-inspired angled elastomer micropillars with flat or round tip endings as compliant pick-and-place micromanipulators. The pillars are 35 mum in diameter, 90 mum tall, and angled at an inclination of 20°. By gently pressing the tip of a pillar to a part, the pillar adheres to it through intermolecular forces. Next, by retracting quickly, the part is picked from a given donor substrate. During transferring, the adhesion between the pillar and the part is high enough to withstand disturbances due to external forces or the weight of the part. During release of the part onto a receiver substrate, the contact area of the pillar to the part is drastically reduced by controlled vertical or shear displacement, which results in reduced adhesive forces. The maximum repeatable ratio of pick-to-release adhesive forces was measured as 39 to 1. We find that a flat tip shape and shear displacement control provide a higher pick-to-release adhesion ratio than a round tip and vertical displacement control, respectively. We present a model of forces to serve as a framework for the operation of this micromanipulator. Finally, demonstrations of pick-and-place manipulation of mum-scale silicon microplatelets and a cm-scale glass cover slip serve as proofs of concept. The compliant polymer micropillars are safe for use with fragile parts, and, due to exploiting intermolecular forces, could be effective on most materials and in air, vacuum, and liquid environments. We present a study of the self-cleaning and contamination resistance phenomena of synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives made from elastomeric polyurethane. The phenomenon of self-cleaning makes the adhesive foot of the gecko robust against dirt, and makes it effectively sticky throughout the lifetime of the material (within the molting cycles

  11. Does the attachment system towards owners change in aged dogs?

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Paolo; Pitteri, Elisa; Carnier, Paolo; Gabai, Gianfranco; Adamelli, Serena; Marinelli, Lieta

    2013-08-15

    Changes during senescence can significantly affect both the emotional and relational needs of old individuals and the characteristics of the attachment system. In order to determine whether the emotional response of dogs is affected by old age, we compared the behavioural parameters of adult (AD <7 years of age, n=25) and aged (AG ≥7 years of age, n=25) dogs in a distressing situation, which gives rise to attachment behaviour patterns (Strange Situation Test, SST). The physiological response of dogs was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol variations in samples collected both at the dogs' homes and at the study location, before and after the SST. Both groups of dogs expressed clear-cut patterns of attachment to their owners. During the initial part of the procedure, AG dogs sought more physical contact, but behaved more passively and showed less interest in an unknown person during separation from their owners. Compared with AD dogs, AG ones showed a significant increase in salivary cortisol concentrations after the SST. The combination of physiological and behavioural data of the present study supports the hypothesis that, later in life, dogs cope less efficiently with emotional distress caused by mild social challenge. PMID:23911691

  12. Towards gecko-feet-inspired bandages.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    A novel bandage inspired by gecko feet might one day be used during emergencies and internal surgeries. The bandage uses a combination of nanofabricated structures, biodegradable materials and adhesive surface chemistry that allows adhesion onto even wet, moving tissue.

  13. Defining the brain systems of lust, romantic attraction, and attachment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Helen E; Aron, Arthur; Mashek, Debra; Li, Haifang; Brown, Lucy L

    2002-10-01

    Mammals and birds have evolved three primary, discrete, interrelated emotion-motivation systems in the brain for mating, reproduction, and parenting: lust, attraction, and male-female attachment. Each emotion-motivation system is associated with a specific constellation of neural correlates and a distinct behavioral repertoire. Lust evolved to initiate the mating process with any appropriate partner; attraction evolved to enable individuals to choose among and prefer specific mating partners, thereby conserving their mating time and energy; male-female attachment evolved to enable individuals to cooperate with a reproductive mate until species-specific parental duties have been completed. The evolution of these three emotion-motivation systems contribute to contemporary patterns of marriage, adultery, divorce, remarriage, stalking, homicide and other crimes of passion, and clinical depression due to romantic rejection. This article defines these three emotion-motivation systems. Then it discusses an ongoing project using functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain to investigate the neural circuits associated with one of these emotion-motivation systems, romantic attraction. PMID:12238608

  14. Influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Gorb, Stanislav N; Hosoda, Naoe; Spolenak, Ralph; Arzt, Eduard

    2007-07-01

    In this study we show the influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion on both the nano- and macroscales. We present experimental data for the force necessary to pull off single spatulae from hard rough substrates and also detail observations on living geckos clinging to various surfaces. Both experiments consistently show that the effective adhesion shows a minimum for a root mean square roughness ranging from 100 to 300nm.

  15. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

    PubMed Central

    Jusufi, Ardian; Goldman, Daniel I.; Revzen, Shai; Full, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Geckos are nature's elite climbers. Their remarkable climbing feats have been attributed to specialized feet with hairy toes that uncurl and peel in milliseconds. Here, we report that the secret to the gecko's arboreal acrobatics includes an active tail. We examine the tail's role during rapid climbing, aerial descent, and gliding. We show that a gecko's tail functions as an emergency fifth leg to prevent falling during rapid climbing. A response initiated by slipping causes the tail tip to push against the vertical surface, thereby preventing pitch-back of the head and upper body. When pitch-back cannot be prevented, geckos avoid falling by placing their tail in a posture similar to a bicycle's kickstand. Should a gecko fall with its back to the ground, a swing of its tail induces the most rapid, zero-angular momentum air-righting response yet measured. Once righted to a sprawled gliding posture, circular tail movements control yaw and pitch as the gecko descends. Our results suggest that large, active tails can function as effective control appendages. These results have provided biological inspiration for the design of an active tail on a climbing robot, and we anticipate their use in small, unmanned gliding vehicles and multisegment spacecraft. PMID:18347344

  16. Electron attachment and ion mobility in hydrocarbons and related systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bakale, G.

    1988-01-01

    During the last two decades, a firm base for the emerging field of liquid state electronics (LSE) has developed through studies of the transport and reaction properties of excess electrons in a variety of liquid-phase systems. Pulse-conductivity techniques were used in many of these studies to measure the mobilities of electrons and ions in pure liquids as well as the rate constants of electron attachment to a wide variety of electron-accepting solutes. Results obtained through such studies have interdisciplinary implications that are described in the discussion that follows which includes examples of the contributions of LSE to physics, chemistry and biology. 42 refs.

  17. A microfabricated wedge-shaped adhesive array displaying gecko-like dynamic adhesion, directionality and long lifetime.

    PubMed

    Parness, Aaron; Soto, Daniel; Esparza, Noé; Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar; Cutkosky, Mark

    2009-12-01

    Gecko adhesion has become a paradigmatic example of bio-inspired engineering, yet among the many gecko-like synthetic adhesives (GSAs), truly gecko-like performance remains elusive. Many GSAs have previously demonstrated one or two features of the gecko adhesive. We present a new wedge-shaped GSA that exhibits several gecko-like properties simultaneously: directional features; zero force at detachment; high ratio of detachment force to preload force; non-adhesive default state; and the ability to maintain performance while sliding, even after thousands of cycles. Individual wedges independently detach and reattach during sliding, resulting in high levels of shear and normal adhesion during drag. This behaviour provides a non-catastrophic failure mechanism that is desirable for applications such as climbing robots where sudden contact failure would result in serious falls. The effects of scaling patch sizes up to tens of square centimetres are also presented and discussed. Patches of 1 cm(2) had an adhesive pressure of 5.1 kPa while simultaneously supporting 17.0 kPa of shear. After 30 000 attachment/detachment cycles, a patch retained 67 per cent of its initial adhesion and 76 per cent of its initial shear without cleaning. Square-based wedges of 20 mum and 50 mum are manufactured in a moulding process where moulds are fabricated using a dual-side, dual-angle lithography process on quartz wafers with SU-8 photoresist as the mould material and polydimethylsiloxane as the cast material.

  18. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false End-items, components, accessories, attachments...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is...) Accessories and attachments are associated equipment for any component, end-item or system, and which are...

  19. Vibration characteristics of a cantilever plate with attached spring-mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, M.; Sugimoto, T.

    2003-02-01

    Coupled free vibration analysis has been performed on a cantilever thin plate carrying a spring-mass system attached on an arbitrary point by using Rayleigh-Ritz method. Influence of an attached 'spring-mass' system, i.e., attached position, relative values of mass and spring constant, on the coupled vibration characteristics of the system has been clarified comparing with those of uncoupled ones. Optimal attached position to maximize coupled plate natural frequency is also investigated and shown in contour diagrams. The influence of an attached mass has also been investigated, as the limiting case whereby the spring stiffness of the 'spring-mass' system approaches infinity.

  20. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient.

    PubMed

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention.

  1. Use of the adult attachment projective picture system in psychodynamic psychotherapy with a severely traumatized patient

    PubMed Central

    George, Carol; Buchheim, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The following case study is presented to facilitate an understanding of how the attachment information evident from Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) assessment can be integrated into a psychodynamic perspective in making therapeutic recommendations that integrate an attachment perspective. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP) is a valid representational measure of internal representations of attachment based on the analysis of a set of free response picture stimuli designed to systematically activate the attachment system (George and West, 2012). The AAP provides a fruitful diagnostic tool for psychodynamic-oriented clinicians to identify attachment-based deficits and resources for an individual patient in therapy. This paper considers the use of the AAP with a traumatized patient in an inpatient setting and uses a case study to illustrate the components of the AAP that are particularly relevant to a psychodynamic conceptualization. The paper discusses also attachment-based recommendations for intervention. PMID:25140164

  2. Peramorphic traits in the tokay gecko skull.

    PubMed

    Daza, Juan D; Mapps, Aurelia A; Lewis, Patrick J; Thies, Monte L; Bauer, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Traditionally, geckos have been conceived to exhibit paedomorphic features relative to other lizards (e.g., large eyes, less extensively ossified skulls, and amphicoelous and notochordal vertebrae). In contrast, peramorphosis has not been considered an important process in shaping their morphology. Here, we studied different sized specimens of Gekko gecko to document ontogenetic changes in cranial anatomy, especially near maturity. Comparison of this species with available descriptions of other geckos resulted in the identification of 14 cranial characteristics that are expressed more strongly with size increase. These characteristics become move evident in later stages of post-hatching development, especially near maturation, and are, therefore, attributed to peramorphosis (hyperossification). ACCTRAN and DELTRAN character optimizations were applied to these characters using a tree of 11 genera derived from a gekkotan molecular phylogeny. This analysis revealed that G. gecko expresses the majority of these putative peramorphic features near maturity, and that some of these features are also expressed in species closely related to G. gecko. The characters studied have the potential to be applied in future phylogenetic and taxonomic studies of this group of lizards.

  3. A remote camera operation system using a marker attached cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hironori; Hama, Hiromitsu

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a convenient system to control a remote camera according to the eye-gazing direction of the operator, which is approximately obtained through calculating the face direction by means of image processing. The operator put a marker attached cap on his head, and the system takes an image of the operator from above with only one video camera. Three markers are set up on the cap, and 'three' is the minimum number to calculate the tilt angle of the head. The more markers are used, the robuster system may be made to occlusion, and the wider moving range of the head is tolerated. It is supposed that the markers must not exist on any three dimensional straight line. To compensate the marker's color change due to illumination conditions, the threshold for the marker extraction is adaptively decided using a k-means clustering method. The system was implemented with MATLAB on a personal computer, and the real-time operation was realized. Through the experimental results, robustness of the system was confirmed and tilt and pan angles of the head could be calculated with enough accuracy to use.

  4. Superhydrophobicity of the gecko toe pad: biological optimization versus laboratory maximization.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Subarajan, Shairani; Jain, Dharamdeep; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-08-01

    While many gecko-inspired hierarchically structured surfaces perform as well as or better than the natural adhesive system, these designs often fail to function across a variety of contexts. For example, the gecko can adhere to rough, wet and dirty surfaces; however, most synthetic mimics cannot maintain function when faced with a similar situation. The solution to this problem lies in a more thorough investigation of the natural system. Here, we review the adhesive system of the gecko toe pad, as well as the far less-well-studied anti-adhesive system that results from the chemistry and structure of the toe pad (superhydrophobicity). This paradoxical relationship serves as motivation to study functional optimization at the system level. As an example, we experimentally investigate the role of surface lipids in adhesion and anti-adhesion, and find a clear performance trade-off related to shear adhesion in air on a hydrophilic surface. This represents the first direct investigation of the role of surface lipids in gecko adhesion and anti-adhesion, and supports the argument that a system-level approach is necessary to elucidate optimization in biological systems. Without such an approach, bioinspired designs will be limited in functionality and context, especially compared to the natural systems they mimic.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354726

  5. Superhydrophobicity of the gecko toe pad: biological optimization versus laboratory maximization.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Subarajan, Shairani; Jain, Dharamdeep; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-08-01

    While many gecko-inspired hierarchically structured surfaces perform as well as or better than the natural adhesive system, these designs often fail to function across a variety of contexts. For example, the gecko can adhere to rough, wet and dirty surfaces; however, most synthetic mimics cannot maintain function when faced with a similar situation. The solution to this problem lies in a more thorough investigation of the natural system. Here, we review the adhesive system of the gecko toe pad, as well as the far less-well-studied anti-adhesive system that results from the chemistry and structure of the toe pad (superhydrophobicity). This paradoxical relationship serves as motivation to study functional optimization at the system level. As an example, we experimentally investigate the role of surface lipids in adhesion and anti-adhesion, and find a clear performance trade-off related to shear adhesion in air on a hydrophilic surface. This represents the first direct investigation of the role of surface lipids in gecko adhesion and anti-adhesion, and supports the argument that a system-level approach is necessary to elucidate optimization in biological systems. Without such an approach, bioinspired designs will be limited in functionality and context, especially compared to the natural systems they mimic.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  6. Type Three Secretion System in Attaching and Effacing Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gaytán, Meztlli O.; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Soto, Eduardo; González-Pedrajo, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli are diarrheagenic bacterial human pathogens that cause severe gastroenteritis. These enteric pathotypes, together with the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, belong to the family of attaching and effacing pathogens that form a distinctive histological lesion in the intestinal epithelium. The virulence of these bacteria depends on a type III secretion system (T3SS), which mediates the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytosol into the infected cells. The core architecture of the T3SS consists of a multi-ring basal body embedded in the bacterial membranes, a periplasmic inner rod, a transmembrane export apparatus in the inner membrane, and cytosolic components including an ATPase complex and the C-ring. In addition, two distinct hollow appendages are assembled on the extracellular face of the basal body creating a channel for protein secretion: an approximately 23 nm needle, and a filament that extends up to 600 nm. This filamentous structure allows these pathogens to get through the host cells mucus barrier. Upon contact with the target cell, a translocation pore is assembled in the host membrane through which the effector proteins are injected. Assembly of the T3SS is strictly regulated to ensure proper timing of substrate secretion. The different type III substrates coexist in the bacterial cytoplasm, and their hierarchical secretion is determined by specialized chaperones in coordination with two molecular switches and the so-called sorting platform. In this review, we present recent advances in the understanding of the T3SS in attaching and effacing pathogens.

  7. Investigation of Bioinspired Gecko Fibers to Improve Adhesion of HeartLander Surgical Robot

    PubMed Central

    Tortora, Giuseppe; Glass, Paul; Wood, Nathan; Aksak, Burak; Menciassi, Arianna; Sitti, Metin; Riviere, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a way for improving adhesion of a mobile robot (HeartLander) on biological tissue is presented, that integrates bioinspired gecko adhesive fibers on the robot surface. HeartLander is a medical robot proposed to perform clinical procedures on a beating heart, overcoming limitations of current cardiac procedures. Biologically inspired gecko fibers have been proposed for adhesion on surfaces. The aim of this work is to assess the advantages of integrating these structures for enhancing the grip between the artificial device and the myocardial tissue. Experimental in vitro tests have been carried out assessing the performance of the HeartLander attached to muscular tissue. The effect of the adhesive fibers on improving the adhesion behavior on a slippery surface has been investigated, obtaining a friction increase of 57.3 %. PMID:23366040

  8. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence and association of lipids and keratin in adhesive gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dharamdeep; Stark, Alyssa Y; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-04-22

    Lipid and protein aggregates are one of the fundamental materials of biological systems. Examples include cell membranes, insect cuticle, vertebrate epidermis, feathers, hair and adhesive structures known as 'setae' on gecko toes. Until recently gecko setae were assumed to be composed entirely of keratin, but analysis of footprints left behind by geckos walking on surfaces revealed that setae include various kinds of lipids. However, the arrangement and molecular-level behavior of lipids and keratin in the setae is still not known. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques to confirm the presence of lipids and investigate their association with keratin in 'pristine' sheds, or natural molts of the adhesive toe pad and non-adhesive regions of the skin. Analysis was also carried on the sheds after they were 'delipidized' to remove surface lipids. Our results show a distribution of similar lipids in both the skin and toe shed but with different dynamics at a molecular level. The present study can help us understand the gecko system both biologically and for design of synthetic adhesives, but the findings may be relevant to the characteristics of lipid-protein interactions in other biological systems.

  9. Effect of 16-Day Spaceflight on the Morphology of Thick-Toed Geckos (Pachydactylus Bibronii Smith, 1846)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulimova, V. I.; Nikitin, V. B.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Okshtein, I. L.; Almeida, E. A. C.; Ilyin, E. A.; Tairbekov, M. G.; Saveliev, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    There are grounds to believe that space flown experiments on thick-toed geckos may help solve the problem of floatation of vertebrates in microgravity. Geckos of this species carry on the lower surface of their toes numerous setae, which allow them to remain attached to any surfaces regardless of the gravitational effects. Experiments were performed on 5 animals in each of the following groups: flight, basal, synchronous and laboratory controls. 32 hours after a 16- day flight the animals were euthanazed and examined using traditional histology and X-ray microtomography. Body mass losses were 10% in the flight animals, 7.4% in the synchronous controls, and 12.3% in the laboratory controls. Since the flight and synchronous animals were kept at 15-19 C, whereas the laboratory controls - at 26-28 C, it can be inferred that environmental temperatures impacted animal metabolism no less than flight induced stress. Blood tests of the flown animals showed a 12% decrease of erythrocytes and a 40% decrease of dark-nuclear granulocytes, with the number of light-nuclear granulocytes remaining unchanged. In the small intestine the number of goblet cells increased allowing them to occupy a large portion of the cyptal surface. Enhanced secretion was accompanied by the appearance of dead intestinal cells in the lumen. Clusters of degraded hepatocytes were found at the liver edges of flight animals. Signs of liver involution were similar to the changes produced by alcohol consumption but did not spread to its central part. In the heart, insignificant hypertrophy and excessive blood supply that still remained within the physiological norm were detected. No significant changes were found in the pancreas, lungs, nervous systems or the snouts of the flown animals, but the volume of their gallbladders was greater than in controls. The epithelium of toe pads of the flight animals became thinner. Histological examination of the humerus did not demonstrate significant mineral losses

  10. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  11. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    PubMed

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  12. Retention force and fatigue strength of overdenture attachment systems.

    PubMed

    Botega, D M; Mesquita, M F; Henriques, G E P; Vaz, L G

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated retention force and fatigue resistance of two overdenture attachment systems. Twenty samples (O-ring and Bar-Clip) from two manufacturers (Conexão Sistemas de Prótese and Lifecore Biomedical) were prepared and divided into four groups: (i) Conexão/O-ring; (ii) Conexão/Bar-Clip; (iii) Lifecore/O-ring and (iv) Lifecore/Bar-Clip, with five samples in each group. They were submitted to mechanical fatigue test using a servohydraulic machine performing 5500 cycles of insertion and removal (f=0.8 Hz), immersed in artificial saliva. Retention force values were obtained three times (0, 3000 and after 5500 cycles) simulating the clinical service, using a tensile strength at 1 mm min(-1) and load cell of 1 kN. Data were analysed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test at 5% level. Results showed that Conexão/Bar-Clip specimens had significantly higher retention values than Lifecore/Bar-Clip (44.61 and 18.44 N, respectively), Conexão/O-ring specimens had significantly lower values than Lifecore/O-ring (13.91 and 19.75 N, respectively). Conexão/Bar-Clip values were always significantly higher than those of Conexão/O-ring group (44.61 and 13.91 N, respectively). Lifecore (O-ring and Bar-Clip) presented similar values (19.75 and 18.44 N, respectively). The systems evaluated showed satisfactory retention force values, before and after fatigue testing. Conexão/Bar-Clip specimens presented the highest values. A 5-year simulation of insertion and removal did not decrease retention values or fracture components.

  13. Attached manipulator system design and concept verification for zero-g simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, R.; Burkitt, W.; Corveleyn, P.; Cramer, P.; Duwaik, O.; Flatau, C.; Garber, P.; Grant, C.; Greeb, F.; Johnson, C.

    1973-01-01

    The attached manipulator system (AMS) is to simulate and demonstrate zero-g shuttle manipulator cargo handling operations. It is not the design or development of the shuttle attached manipulator system (SAMS); however, every effort is being made, to insure that the AMS will be functionally similar to the SAMS.

  14. Neural basis of attachment-caregiving systems interaction: insights from neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Delia; Trentini, Cristina; Tambelli, Renata; Pantano, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The attachment and the caregiving system are complementary systems which are active simultaneously in infant and mother interactions. This ensures the infant survival and optimal social, emotional, and cognitive development. In this brief review we first define the characteristics of these two behavioral systems and the theory that links them, according to what Bowlby called the “attachment-caregiving social bond” (Bowlby, 1969). We then follow with those neuroimaging studies that have focused on this particular issue, i.e., those which have studied the activation of the careging system in women (using infant stimuli) and have explored how the individual attachment model (through the Adult Attachment Interview) modulates its activity. Studies report altered activation in limbic and prefrontal areas and in basal ganglia and hypothalamus/pituitary regions. These altered activations are thought to be the neural substrate of the attachment-caregiving systems interaction. PMID:26379578

  15. Neural basis of attachment-caregiving systems interaction: insights from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Delia; Trentini, Cristina; Tambelli, Renata; Pantano, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The attachment and the caregiving system are complementary systems which are active simultaneously in infant and mother interactions. This ensures the infant survival and optimal social, emotional, and cognitive development. In this brief review we first define the characteristics of these two behavioral systems and the theory that links them, according to what Bowlby called the "attachment-caregiving social bond" (Bowlby, 1969). We then follow with those neuroimaging studies that have focused on this particular issue, i.e., those which have studied the activation of the careging system in women (using infant stimuli) and have explored how the individual attachment model (through the Adult Attachment Interview) modulates its activity. Studies report altered activation in limbic and prefrontal areas and in basal ganglia and hypothalamus/pituitary regions. These altered activations are thought to be the neural substrate of the attachment-caregiving systems interaction.

  16. Simulation of synthetic gecko arrays shearing on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    To better understand the role of surface roughness and tip geometry in the adhesion of gecko synthetic adhesives, a model is developed that attempts to uncover the relationship between surface feature size and the adhesive terminal feature shape. This model is the first to predict the adhesive behaviour of a plurality of hairs acting in shear on simulated rough surfaces using analytically derived contact models. The models showed that the nanoscale geometry of the tip shape alters the macroscale adhesion of the array of fibres by nearly an order of magnitude, and that on sinusoidal surfaces with amplitudes much larger than the nanoscale features, spatula-shaped features can increase adhesive forces by 2.5 times on smooth surfaces and 10 times on rough surfaces. Interestingly, the summation of the fibres acting in concert shows behaviour much more complex that what could be predicted with the pull-off model of a single fibre. Both the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Kendall peel models can explain the experimentally observed frictional adhesion effect previously described in the literature. Similar to experimental results recently reported on the macroscale features of the gecko adhesive system, adhesion drops dramatically when surface roughness exceeds the size and spacing of the adhesive fibrillar features.

  17. Shunt attachment and method for interfacing current collection systems

    DOEpatents

    Denney, Paul E.; Iyer, Natraj C.; Hannan, III, William F.

    1992-01-01

    A composite brush to shunt attachment wherein a volatile component of a composite but mostly metallic brush, used for current collection purposes, does not upon welding or brazing, adversely affect the formation of the interfacial bond with a conductive shunt which carries the current from the zone of the brush. The brush to shunt attachment for a brush material of copper-graphite composite and a shunt of copper, or substituting silver for copper as an alternative, is made through a hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The HIP process includes applying high pressure and temperature simultaneously at the brush to shunt interface, after it has been isolated or canned in a metal casing in which the air adjacent to the interface has been evacuated and the interfacial area has been sealed before the application of pressure and temperature.

  18. Shunt attachment and method for interfacing current collection systems

    DOEpatents

    Denney, P.E.; Iyer, N.C.; Hannan, W.F. III.

    1992-12-08

    A composite brush to shunt attachment wherein a volatile component of a composite but mostly metallic brush, used for current collection purposes, does not upon welding or brazing, adversely affect the formation of the interfacial bond with a conductive shunt which carries the current from the zone of the brush. The brush to shunt attachment for a brush material of copper-graphite composite and a shunt of copper, or substituting silver for copper as an alternative, is made through a hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The HIP process includes applying high pressure and temperature simultaneously at the brush to shunt interface, after it has been isolated or canned in a metal casing in which the air adjacent to the interface has been evacuated and the interfacial area has been sealed before the application of pressure and temperature. 6 figs.

  19. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-25

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

  20. Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints.

  1. Performance Modeling of Network-Attached Storage Device Based Hierarchical Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menasce, Daniel A.; Pentakalos, Odysseas I.

    1995-01-01

    Network attached storage devices improve I/O performance by separating control and data paths and eliminating host intervention during the data transfer phase. Devices are attached to both a high speed network for data transfer and to a slower network for control messages. Hierarchical mass storage systems use disks to cache the most recently used files and a combination of robotic and manually mounted tapes to store the bulk of the files in the file system. This paper shows how queuing network models can be used to assess the performance of hierarchical mass storage systems that use network attached storage devices as opposed to host attached storage devices. Simulation was used to validate the model. The analytic model presented here can be used, among other things, to evaluate the protocols involved in 1/0 over network attached devices.

  2. How habitat disturbance benefits geckos: Conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Ineich, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    I here provide some field observations and literature data showing that egg laying site availability could be the main limiting factor for most arboreal gecko population dynamics. Several natural (typhoons, volcanism, sea level variations) or human-mediated habitat modifications (garden openings in forested areas) provide enough habitat disturbances to significantly increase reproductive outputs in island gecko populations. Such observations, however, also apply to continental populations. Our observations suggest that artificial shelter and egg laying site creation could easily allow populations to increase and also supply easier access to arboreal species for ecological or biodiversity studies. Furthermore, our observations also point out that occurrence in man-made habitats and genetic uniformity of most widespread island lizards should not be considered as evidence of their recent introduction through human agency.

  3. Effects of contact shape on the scaling of biological attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolenak, Ralph; Gorb, Stanislav; Gao, Huajian; Arzt, Eduard

    2005-02-01

    Adhesion of biological systems has recently received much research attention: the survival of organisms ranging from single cells and mussels to insects, spiders and geckos relies crucially on their mechanical interaction with their environments. For spiders, lizards and possible other 'dry' adhesive systems, explanations for adhesion are based on van der Waals interaction, and the adhesion of single-contact elements has been described by the classical Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model derived for spherical contacts. However, real biological contacts display a variety of shapes and only rarely resemble a hemisphere. Here, we theoretically assess the influence of various contact shapes on the pull-off force for single contacts as well as their scaling potential in contact arrays. It is concluded that other shapes, such as a toroidal contact geometry, should lead to better attachment; such geometries are observed in our microscopic investigations of hair-tip shapes in beetles and flies.

  4. Viscoelastic features of adhesive setae of the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko L.).

    PubMed

    Ivlev, Yu F; Il'in, A I; Trofimov, O V

    2016-03-01

    Deformations of particular setae of adhesive toe pad of the tokay gecko were investigated by atomic-force microscopy. The effective elastic modulus of the investigated setae varying within 0.34-19 GPa, a pronounced hysteresis was observed during reversible bending of setae. The hysteresis-related energy losses may be as high as 98% of the total bending work. The pronounced viscous features of the setae contradict the hypothesis of dynamic self-cleaning of the gecko adhesive cover, according to which the setae are considered as absolutely elastic cantilever beams. PMID:27193882

  5. Viscoelastic features of adhesive setae of the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko L.).

    PubMed

    Ivlev, Yu F; Il'in, A I; Trofimov, O V

    2016-03-01

    Deformations of particular setae of adhesive toe pad of the tokay gecko were investigated by atomic-force microscopy. The effective elastic modulus of the investigated setae varying within 0.34-19 GPa, a pronounced hysteresis was observed during reversible bending of setae. The hysteresis-related energy losses may be as high as 98% of the total bending work. The pronounced viscous features of the setae contradict the hypothesis of dynamic self-cleaning of the gecko adhesive cover, according to which the setae are considered as absolutely elastic cantilever beams.

  6. Geckos as indicators of mining pollution.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Dean E; Hopkins, William A; Saldaña, Teresa; Baionno, Jennifer A; Arribas, Carmen; Standora, Michelle M; Fernández-Delgado, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    Catastrophic collapse of a mine tailings dam released several million cubic meters of toxic mud and acidic water into the Guadiamar River valley, southern Spain, in 1998. Remediation efforts removed most of the sludge from the floodplain, but contamination persists. Clean-up activities also produced clouds of aerosolized materials that further contaminated the surrounding landscape. Whole-body concentrations of 21 elements in the Moorish wall gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, a common inhabitant of both rural and urban areas, were compared among seven locations. Locations spanned an expected contamination gradient and included a rural and an urban non-mine-affected location, two mine-affected towns, and three locations on the contaminated floodplain. Multivariate analyses of whole-body concentrations identified pollutants that increased across the expected contamination gradient, a trend particularly evident for As, Pb, and Cd. Additionally, higher contaminant concentrations occurred in prey items eaten by geckos from mine-affected areas. Comparison of element concentrations in tails and whole bodies suggests that tail clips are a viable nondestructive index of contaminant accumulation. Our results indicate that areas polluted by the mine continue to experience contamination of the terrestrial food chain. Where abundant, geckos represent useful taxa to study the bioavailability of some hazardous pollutants.

  7. Prosthodontic maintenance requirements of implant-retained overdentures using the locator attachment system.

    PubMed

    Vere, Joe; Hall, Derek; Patel, Raj; Wragg, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prosthodontic maintenance requirements of patients rehabilitated with maxillary and mandibular implant-retained overdentures using the Locator Attachment System by retrospectively reviewing case records. Fifty patients made 112 unplanned return visits over a 3-year period. The most common reasons for returning were denture adjustments (n = 45), inadequate retention (n = 39), and loosening of the implant abutments (n = 14). Implant-retained overdentures using the Locator Attachment System have comparable prosthodontic maintenance requirements to other attachment systems. Problems associated with these prostheses are usually simple to resolve chairside.

  8. Gecko-Inspired Carbon Nanotube-Based Adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Goyal, Anubha; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Nature has developed hierarchical hairy structure on the wall-climbing gecko's foot, consisting of microscopic hairs called setae, which further split into hundreds of smaller structures called spatulas. In the last five years, numerous attempts to mimic gecko foot-hair using polymer soft molding and photolithography methods have been reported. However, most of these polymer-based synthetic gecko hairs fall short of the clinging ability of geckos. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown strong adhesion at nanometer scale. Here, we present our work on developing CNT-based macroscopic flexible tape mimicking the hierarchical structure found on gecko's foot. The synthetic gecko tape is made by transferring aligned CNT array onto flexible polymer tape. The unpatterned CNT-gecko tape can support a shear force stress similar to gecko foot (10 N/cm^2). The supported shear stress increase by a factor of four, when we use micro-patterned CNT patches (50 to 500 μm). We find that both setae (replicated by CNT bundles) and spatulas (individual CNT) are necessary to achieve large macroscopic shear adhesion. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  9. Surface wettability plays a significant role in gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Badge, Ila; Wucinich, Nicholas A; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2013-04-16

    Although we now have thousands of studies focused on the nano-, micro-, and whole-animal mechanics of gecko adhesion on clean, dry substrates, we know relatively little about the effects of water on gecko adhesion. For many gecko species, however, rainfall frequently wets the natural surfaces they navigate. In an effort to begin closing this gap, we tested the adhesion of geckos on submerged substrates that vary in their wettability. When tested on a wet hydrophilic surface, geckos produced a significantly lower shear adhesive force (5.4 ± 1.33 N) compared with a dry hydrophilic surface (17.1 ± 3.93 N). In tests on an intermediate wetting surface and a hydrophobic surface, we found no difference in shear adhesion between dry and wet contact. Finally, in tests on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), we found that geckos clung significantly better to wet PTFE (8.0 ± 1.09 N) than dry PTFE (1.6 ± 0.66 N). To help explain our results, we developed models based on thermodynamic theory of adhesion for contacting surfaces in different media and found that we can predict the ratio of shear adhesion in water to that in air. Our findings provide insight into how geckos may function in wet environments and also have significant implications for the development of a synthetic gecko mimic that retains adhesion in water. PMID:23576727

  10. The attachment system and physiology in adulthood: normative processes, individual differences, and implications for health.

    PubMed

    Robles, Theodore F; Kane, Heidi S

    2014-12-01

    Attachment theory provides a conceptual framework for understanding intersections between personality and close relationships in adulthood. Moreover, attachment has implications for stress-related physiology and physical health. We review work on normative processes and individual differences in the attachment behavioral system, as well as their associations with biological mechanisms related to health outcomes. We highlight the need for more basic research on normative processes and physiology and discuss our own research on individual differences in attachment and links with physiology. We then describe a novel perspective on attachment and physiology, wherein stress-related physiological changes may also be viewed as supporting the social-cognitive and emotion regulatory functions of the attachment system through providing additional energy to the brain, which has implications for eating behavior and health. We close by discussing our work on individual differences in attachment and restorative processes, including sleep and skin repair, and by stressing the importance of developing biologically plausible models for describing how attachment may impact chronic illness.

  11. Coming to America: Multiple Origins of New World Geckos

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Tony; Bauer, Aaron M; Colli, Guarino R; Greenbaum, Eli; Jackman, Todd R; Vitt, Laurie J; Simons, Andrew M

    2010-01-01

    Geckos in the Western Hemisphere provide an excellent model to study faunal assembly at a continental scale. We generated a time-calibrated phylogeny, including exemplars of all New World gecko genera, to produce a biogeographic scenario for the New World geckos. Patterns of New World gecko origins are consistent with almost every biogeographic scenario utilized by a terrestrial vertebrate with different New World lineages showing evidence of vicariance, dispersal via temporary land bridge, overseas dispersal, or anthropogenic introductions. We also recovered a strong relationship between clade age and species diversity, with older New World lineages having more species than more recently arrived lineages. Our data provide the first phylogenetic hypothesis for all New World geckos and highlight the intricate origins and ongoing organization of continental faunas. The phylogenetic and biogeographical hypotheses presented here provide an historical framework to further pursue research on the diversification and assembly of the New World herpetofauna. PMID:21126276

  12. Optical gecko toe: Optically controlled attractive near-field forces between plasmonic metamaterials and dielectric or metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; MacDonald, K. F.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2012-05-01

    On the mesoscopic scale, electromagnetic forces are of fundamental importance to an enormously diverse range of systems, from optical tweezers to the adhesion of gecko toes. Here we show that a strong light-driven force may be generated when a plasmonic metamaterial is illuminated in close proximity to a dielectric or metal surface. This near-field force can exceed radiation pressure and Casimir forces to provide an optically controlled adhesion mechanism mimicking the gecko toe: At illumination intensities of just a few tens of nW/μm2 it is sufficient to overcome the Earth's gravitational pull.

  13. Assessment of the GECKO-A Modeling Tool and Simplified 3D Model Parameterizations for SOA Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Hodzic, A.; La, S.; Camredon, M.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit chemical mechanisms aim to embody the current knowledge of the transformations occurring in the atmosphere during the oxidation of organic matter. These explicit mechanisms are therefore useful tools to explore the fate of organic matter during its tropospheric oxidation and examine how these chemical processes shape the composition and properties of the gaseous and the condensed phases. Furthermore, explicit mechanisms provide powerful benchmarks to design and assess simplified parameterizations to be included 3D model. Nevertheless, the explicit mechanism describing the oxidation of hydrocarbons with backbones larger than few carbon atoms involves millions of secondary organic compounds, far exceeding the size of chemical mechanisms that can be written manually. Data processing tools can however be designed to overcome these difficulties and automatically generate consistent and comprehensive chemical mechanisms on a systematic basis. The Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) has been developed for the automatic writing of explicit chemical schemes of organic species and their partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. GECKO-A can be viewed as an expert system that mimics the steps by which chemists might develop chemical schemes. GECKO-A generates chemical schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In its current version, GECKO-A can generate the full atmospheric oxidation scheme for most linear, branched and cyclic precursors, including alkanes and alkenes up to C25. Assessments of the GECKO-A modeling tool based on chamber SOA observations will be presented. GECKO-A was recently used to design a parameterization for SOA formation based on a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) approach. First results will be presented.

  14. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion.

  15. Testing the retention of attachments for implant overdentures - validation of an original force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, O; Lassauzay, C; Abi Nader, S; Feine, J; de Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate an original portable device to measure attachment retention of implant overdentures both in the lab and in clinical settings. The device was built with a digital force measurement gauge (Imada) secured to a vertical wheel stand associated with a customized support to hold and position the denture in adjustable angulations. Sixteen matrix and patrix cylindrical stud attachments (Locator) were randomly assigned as in vitro test specimens. Attachment abutments were secured in an implant analogue hung to the digital force gauge or to the load cell of a traction machine used as the gold standard (Instron Universal Testing Machine). Matrices were secured in a denture duplicate attached to the customized support, permitting reproducibility of their position on both pulling devices. Attachment retention in the axial direction was evaluated by measuring maximum dislodging force or peak load during five consecutive linear dislodgments of each attachment on both devices. After a wear simulation, retention was measured again at several time periods. The peak load measurements with the customized Imada device were similar to those obtained with the gold standard Instron machine. These findings suggest that the proposed portable device can provide accurate information on the retentive properties of attachment systems for removable dental prostheses.

  16. Biomaterial aspects: A key factor in the longevity of implant overdenture attachment systems

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: New attachment systems are released for mandibular two-implant overdentures often without evidence-based support. Biomaterial aspects are now the parameters considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Studies regarding their properties remain scarce. Purpose: The purpose of this review was to help the clinician in selrcting the most adapted stud attachments according evidence-based dentistry. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted using specific databases (PubMed, Medline, and Elsevier libraries). Peer-reviewed articles published in English up to July 2014 were identified. Emphasis was given on the biomaterial aspects and technical complications. No hand search was added. Results: The electronic search generated 115 full-text papers, of which 84 papers were included in the review. The majority were clinical and in vitro studies. Some review articles were also considered. Papers reported survival and failures of overdenture connection systems. Emphasis was laid on attachment deformation. Conclusion: Implant overdentures long-term follow-up studies may provide useful guidelines for the clinician in selecting the type of attachment system and overdenture design. Locator attachments are more and more used, with lesser complications reported. PMID:26312224

  17. Rational design and nanofabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai

    2012-08-20

    Gecko feet integrate many intriguing functions such as strong adhesion, easy detachment, and self-cleaning. Mimicking gecko toe pad structure leads to the development of new types of fibrillar adhesives useful for various applications. In this Concept article, in addition to the design of adhesive mimics by replicating gecko geometric features, we show a new trend of rational design by adding other physical, chemical, and biological principles on to the geometric merits, for enhancing robustness, responsive control, and durability. Current challenges and future directions are highlighted in the design and nanofabrication of biomimetic fibrillar adhesives.

  18. Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: attachment systems, and number and locations of implants--Part I.

    PubMed

    Warreth, Abdulhadi; Alkadhimi, Aslam Fadel; Sultan, Ahmed; Byrne, Caroline; Woods, Edel

    2015-01-01

    The use of dental implants in replacing missing teeth is an integral part of restorative dental treatment. Use of conventional complete dentures is associated with several problems such as lack of denture stability, support and retention. However, when mandibular complete dentures were used with two or more implants, an improvement in the patients' psychological and social well-being could be seen. There is general consensus that removable implant-supported overdentures (RISOs) with two implants should be considered as the first-choice standard of care for an edentulous mandible. This treatment option necessitates the use of attachment systems that connect the complete denture to the implant. Nevertheless, each attachment system has its inherent advantages and disadvantages, which should be considered when choosing a system. The first part of this article provides an overview on options available to restore the mandibular edentulous arch with dental implants. Different types of attachment systems, their features and drawbacks are also reviewed.

  19. Synthetic gecko foot-hairs from multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yurdumakan, Betul; Raravikar, Nachiket R; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2005-08-14

    We report a fabrication process for constructing polymer surfaces with multiwalled carbon nanotube hairs, with strong nanometer-level adhesion forces that are 200 times higher than those observed for gecko foot-hairs.

  20. Evaluation of statistical models for predicting Escherichia coli particle attachment in fluvial systems.

    PubMed

    Piorkowski, Gregory; Jamieson, Rob; Bezanson, Greg; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Yost, Chris

    2013-11-01

    Modeling surface water Escherichia coli fate and transport requires partitioning E. coli into particle-attached and unattached fractions. Attachment is often assumed to be a constant fraction or is estimated using simple linear models. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop statistical models for predicting E. coli attachment and virulence marker presence in fluvial systems, and (ii) relate E. coli attachment to a variety of environmental parameters. Stream water samples (n = 60) were collected at four locations in a rural, mixed-use watershed between June and October 2012, with four storm events (>20 mm rainfall) being captured. The percentage of E. coli attached to particles (>5 μm) and the occurrences of virulence markers were modeled using water quality, particle concentration, particle size distribution, hydrology and land use factors as explanatory variables. Three types of statistical models appropriate for highly collinear, multidimensional data were compared: least angle shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), classification and regression trees using the general, unbiased, interaction detection and estimation (GUIDE) algorithm, and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS). All models showed that E. coli particle attachment and the presence of E. coli virulence markers in the attached and unattached states were influenced by a combination of water quality, hydrology, land-use and particle properties. Model performance statistics indicate that MARS models outperform LASSO and GUIDE models for predicting E. coli particle attachment and virulence marker occurrence. Validating the MARS modeling approach in multiple watersheds may allow for the development of a parameterizing model to be included in watershed simulation models. PMID:24075474

  1. Equilibria and vibration of a buckled beam with attached masses or spring-mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, Raymond H.; Virgin, Lawrence N.

    2016-09-01

    A buckled beam with immovable pinned ends is considered. Attached to the beam are either one concentrated mass, two concentrated masses, a spring-mass system (that could model a human, robot, or passive vibration absorber), or a horizontal rigid bar with two vertical end springs (a "bounce-pitch" system that could model an animal or a vehicle). In the theoretical analysis, the beam is modeled as an inextensible elastica. Equilibrium configurations are determined first. Then small free vibrations about equilibrium are examined, and the lowest frequencies and corresponding modes are computed. The effects of various parameters are investigated, such as the ratio of the span to the total arc length of the beam, the locations and weights of the attached masses and systems, and the stiffnesses of the springs. For the case of a single attached mass, experiments are conducted and the results are compared to the theoretical ones.

  2. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  3. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  4. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software, and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software, and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software, and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  5. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  6. Structural properties of a scaled gecko foot-hair.

    PubMed

    Berengueres, Jose; Saito, Shigeki; Tadakuma, Kenjiro

    2007-03-01

    Experimental measurements on a cm-scale replica structure of a gecko foot-hair where magnets are used in place of (the usual) van der Waals force are reported. We conduct naked-eye experiments and investigate the mechanical properties of such hair structure and shapes that constitute it. Links between shapes and mechanical properties (functions) useful in geckos for clinging onto walls and adhering to rough surfaces are explained in terms of energy efficiency.

  7. Therapy for Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors using Attachment and Family Systems Theory Orientations

    PubMed Central

    Karakurt, Gunnur; Silver, Kristin E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand the effects of childhood sexual abuse on a survivor’s later life. For understanding and treating the emotional distress and interpersonal problems resulting from childhood sexual abuse, attachment theory provides a valuable framework. When this framework is combined with family systems theory, it can help therapists understand the family context where sexual abuse occurs and how this affects health and functioning throughout the lifespan. Case examples of female adult sexual abuse survivors are also explored, with insight from the intersection of systems and attachment theories. PMID:24443623

  8. Evidence for self-cleaning in gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, W. R.; Autumn, K.

    2005-01-01

    A tokay gecko can cling to virtually any surface and support its body mass with a single toe by using the millions of keratinous setae on its toe pads. Each seta branches into hundreds of 200-nm spatulae that make intimate contact with a variety of surface profiles. We showed previously that the combined surface area of billions of spatulae maximizes van der Waals interactions to generate large adhesive and shear forces. Geckos are not known to groom their feet yet retain their stickiness for months between molts. How geckos manage to keep their feet clean while walking about with sticky toes has remained a puzzle until now. Although self-cleaning by water droplets occurs in plant and animal surfaces, no adhesive has been shown to self-clean. In the present study, we demonstrate that gecko setae are a self-cleaning adhesive. Geckos with dirty feet recovered their ability to cling to vertical surfaces after only a few steps. Self-cleaning occurred in arrays of setae isolated from the gecko. Contact mechanical models suggest that self-cleaning occurs by an energetic disequilibrium between the adhesive forces attracting a dirt particle to the substrate and those attracting the same particle to one or more spatulae. We propose that the property of self-cleaning is intrinsic to the setal nanostructure and therefore should be replicable in synthetic adhesive materials in the future. PMID:15630086

  9. Evidence for self-cleaning in gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Hansen, W R; Autumn, K

    2005-01-11

    A tokay gecko can cling to virtually any surface and support its body mass with a single toe by using the millions of keratinous setae on its toe pads. Each seta branches into hundreds of 200-nm spatulae that make intimate contact with a variety of surface profiles. We showed previously that the combined surface area of billions of spatulae maximizes van der Waals interactions to generate large adhesive and shear forces. Geckos are not known to groom their feet yet retain their stickiness for months between molts. How geckos manage to keep their feet clean while walking about with sticky toes has remained a puzzle until now. Although self-cleaning by water droplets occurs in plant and animal surfaces, no adhesive has been shown to self-clean. In the present study, we demonstrate that gecko setae are a self-cleaning adhesive. Geckos with dirty feet recovered their ability to cling to vertical surfaces after only a few steps. Self-cleaning occurred in arrays of setae isolated from the gecko. Contact mechanical models suggest that self-cleaning occurs by an energetic disequilibrium between the adhesive forces attracting a dirt particle to the substrate and those attracting the same particle to one or more spatulae. We propose that the property of self-cleaning is intrinsic to the setal nanostructure and therefore should be replicable in synthetic adhesive materials in the future.

  10. Evidence for self-cleaning in gecko setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, W. R.; Autumn, K.

    2005-01-01

    A tokay gecko can cling to virtually any surface and support its body mass with a single toe by using the millions of keratinous setae on its toe pads. Each seta branches into hundreds of 200-nm spatulae that make intimate contact with a variety of surface profiles. We showed previously that the combined surface area of billions of spatulae maximizes van der Waals interactions to generate large adhesive and shear forces. Geckos are not known to groom their feet yet retain their stickiness for months between molts. How geckos manage to keep their feet clean while walking about with sticky toes has remained a puzzle until now. Although self-cleaning by water droplets occurs in plant and animal surfaces, no adhesive has been shown to self-clean. In the present study, we demonstrate that gecko setae are a self-cleaning adhesive. Geckos with dirty feet recovered their ability to cling to vertical surfaces after only a few steps. Self-cleaning occurred in arrays of setae isolated from the gecko. Contact mechanical models suggest that self-cleaning occurs by an energetic disequilibrium between the adhesive forces attracting a dirt particle to the substrate and those attracting the same particle to one or more spatulae. We propose that the property of self-cleaning is intrinsic to the setal nanostructure and therefore should be replicable in synthetic adhesive materials in the future. adhesion | contact mechanics | locomotion | reptilia | nanotechnology

  11. Ancestrally high elastic modulus of gecko setal beta-keratin.

    PubMed

    Peattie, Anne M; Majidi, Carmel; Corder, Andrew; Full, Robert J

    2007-12-22

    Typical bulk adhesives are characterized by soft, tacky materials with elastic moduli well below 1MPa. Geckos possess subdigital adhesives composed mostly of beta-keratin, a relatively stiff material. Biological adhesives like those of geckos have inspired empirical and modelling research which predicts that even stiff materials can be effective adhesives if they take on a fibrillar form. The molecular structure of beta-keratin is highly conserved across birds and reptiles, suggesting that material properties of gecko setae should be similar to that of beta-keratin previously measured in birds, but this has yet to be established. We used a resonance technique to measure elastic bending modulus in two species of gecko from disparate habitats. We found no significant difference in elastic modulus between Gekko gecko (1.6 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae) and Ptyodactylus hasselquistii (1.4 GPa +/- 0.15s.e.; n=24 setae). If the elastic modulus of setal keratin is conserved across species, it would suggest a design constraint that must be compensated for structurally, and possibly explain the remarkable variation in gecko adhesive morphology.

  12. Comparison of attached and suspended growth methanogenesis in a two phase system

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Gough, R.H.; Jones, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Performance of an attached growth methane phase was compared to that of a completely mixed methane phase in a two-phase anaerobic process. An anaerobic rotating biological contactor (AnRBC) and a completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were used to study the attached growth and suspended growth phase systems, respectively. In the methane phase, the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was varied from 10 to 72 hours and the pH was maintained either at 6.0 or at 7.5. The attached growth methane system was observed to be more efficient than the suspended growth methane process in methane production per gram of total organic carbon (TOC) removed.

  13. Gecko-inspired carbon nanotube-based self-cleaning adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P M; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    The design of reversible adhesives requires both stickiness and the ability to remain clean from dust and other contaminants. Inspired by gecko feet, we demonstrate the self-cleaning ability of carbon nanotube-based flexible gecko tapes.

  14. Neural Response during the Activation of the Attachment System in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder: An fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are characterized by emotional instability, impaired emotion regulation and unresolved attachment patterns associated with abusive childhood experiences. We investigated the neural response during the activation of the attachment system in BPD patients compared to healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven female patients with BPD without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 17 healthy female controls matched for age and education were telling stories in the scanner in response to the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), an eight-picture set assessment of adult attachment. The picture set includes theoretically-derived attachment scenes, such as separation, death, threat and potential abuse. The picture presentation order is designed to gradually increase the activation of the attachment system. Each picture stimulus was presented for 2 min. Analyses examine group differences in attachment classifications and neural activation patterns over the course of the task. Unresolved attachment was associated with increasing amygdala activation over the course of the attachment task in patients as well as controls. Unresolved controls, but not patients, showed activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ). We interpret this as a neural signature of BPD patients' inability to exert top-down control under conditions of attachment distress. These findings point to possible neural mechanisms for underlying affective dysregulation in BPD in the context of attachment trauma and fear.

  15. Neural Response during the Activation of the Attachment System in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are characterized by emotional instability, impaired emotion regulation and unresolved attachment patterns associated with abusive childhood experiences. We investigated the neural response during the activation of the attachment system in BPD patients compared to healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven female patients with BPD without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 17 healthy female controls matched for age and education were telling stories in the scanner in response to the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), an eight-picture set assessment of adult attachment. The picture set includes theoretically-derived attachment scenes, such as separation, death, threat and potential abuse. The picture presentation order is designed to gradually increase the activation of the attachment system. Each picture stimulus was presented for 2 min. Analyses examine group differences in attachment classifications and neural activation patterns over the course of the task. Unresolved attachment was associated with increasing amygdala activation over the course of the attachment task in patients as well as controls. Unresolved controls, but not patients, showed activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ). We interpret this as a neural signature of BPD patients’ inability to exert top-down control under conditions of attachment distress. These findings point to possible neural mechanisms for underlying affective dysregulation in BPD in the context of attachment trauma and fear. PMID:27531977

  16. A unique method of retaining orbital prosthesis with attachment systems - a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Satyabodh S; Akash, N R; Prithviraj, D R; Lekha, K

    2014-06-01

    Diminution of the orbital contents post-surgical removal of a malignant tumor can have a severe psychological impact on the patient in terms of function and esthetics. Therefore, esthetic remedy should be planned subsequently, since tumor obliteration precedes cosmetic concern. A convenient option for successful rehabilitation in such patients is a simple, user-friendly, removable orbital prosthesis. Retention of the prosthesis is one of the key factors for the successful rehabilitation. Spectacle frame, conformers, adhesives, osseointegrated implants, magnets or buttons have been used to impart retention to the prosthesis. The use of semi precision attachments in maxillofacial prostheses is limited to the osseointegrated prostheses. This case report describes a conventional spectacle frame technique, to retain the silicone orbital prosthesis using two different types of stud attachments viz., dalla bona and O-ring attachment systems. PMID:24332358

  17. Introduction to the adhesive bonding session. [foam system for attaching thermal insulation on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle unique requirements call for the development of a specific adhesive system to reliable attach reusable surface insulation. A low density foam system has been developed that provides strain isolation from the support structure and remains structurally stable in space shuttle thermal environment. Surface preparation and its stabilization by an adhesive primer system are the most important factors in preventing corrosion from reducing the reliability and durability of the adhesive bonding component.

  18. Stress analysis of mandibular implant-retained overdenture with independent attachment system: effect of restoration space and attachment height.

    PubMed

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Talebi, Saeid; Khodaeian, Niloufar; Farzin, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study, 2 implants were embedded in the interforaminal region of an acrylic model. Two kinds of retention mechanisms were used to construct complete overdentures: ball type and direct abutment (Locator). The ball-type retention mechanism models included 3 different collar heights (1, 2, and 3 mm) with 15 mm occlusal plane height, and 3 different occlusal plane heights (9, 12, and 15 mm) with 1 mm collar height. The direct abutment models included 3 different occlusal plane heights (9, 12, and 15 mm) with 1 mm cuff height. Vertical unilateral and bilateral loads of 150 N were applied to the central fossa of the first molar. The stress of the bone around the implant was analyzed by finite element analysis. The results showed that by increasing vertical restorative space, the maximum stress values around implants were decreased in both unilateral and bilateral loading models. The results also showed that the increase in maximum stress values around implants correlated with the ball attachment collar height. The Locator attachment with a 1 mm cuff height and 9 mm occlusal plane height demonstrated 6.147 and 3.914 MPa in unilateral and bilateral loading conditions, respectively. While a reduction in the collar height of a ball-type retention mechanism and an increase in the vertical restorative space in direct abutment retention mechanisms are both biomechanically favorable, and may result in reduced stress in peri-implant bone, a ball attachment seems to be more favorable in the stress distribution around an implant than a Locator attachment.

  19. Sticky gecko feet: the role of temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Lopez, Stephanie; Ge, Liehui; Hagan, Emily; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Gecko adhesion is expected to be temperature insensitive over the range of temperatures typically experienced by geckos. Previous work is limited and equivocal on whether this expectation holds. We tested the temperature dependence of adhesion in Tokay and Day geckos and found that clinging ability at 12 degrees C was nearly double the clinging ability at 32 degrees C. However, rather than confirming a simple temperature effect, our data reveal a complex interaction between temperature and humidity that can drive differences in adhesion by as much as two-fold. Our findings have important implications for inferences about the mechanisms underlying the exceptional clinging capabilities of geckos, including whether performance of free-ranging animals is based solely on a dry adhesive model. An understanding of the relative contributions of van der Waals interactions and how humidity and temperature variation affects clinging capacities will be required to test hypotheses about the evolution of gecko toepads and is relevant to the design and manufacture of synthetic mimics.

  20. Effects of surface wettability on gecko adhesion underwater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Z L; Wang, C; Chen, S H

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments have shown that gecko adhesion underwater depends significantly on surface wettability. Theoretical models of a gecko seta adhering on different substrates are firstly established in order to disclose such an adhesion mechanism. The results show that the capillary force induced by nano-bubbles between gecko seta and the substrate is the mainly influencing factor. The capillary force exhibits an attractive feature between gecko setae and hydrophobic surfaces underwater. However, it is extremely weak or even repulsive on hydrophilic surfaces underwater. A self-similarly splitting model is further considered to simulate multiple gecko setae on substrates underwater. It is interesting to find that the total capillary force depends significantly on the number of nano-bubble bridges and wettability of substrates. The total force is attractive and increases monotonically with the increase of the splitting number on hydrophobic substrates underwater. However, it decreases drastically or even becomes repulsive on hydrophilic substrates underwater. The present result can not only give a reasonable explanation on the existing experimental observations but also be helpful for the design of novel biomimetic adhesives.

  1. Ecological effects of the invasive giant madagascar day gecko on endemic mauritian geckos: applications of binomial-mixture and species distribution models.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Gallagher, Laura E; Henshaw, Sion M; Besnard, Aurélien; Tucker, Rachel M; Bachraz, Vishnu; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma.

  2. Ecological Effects of the Invasive Giant Madagascar Day Gecko on Endemic Mauritian Geckos: Applications of Binomial-Mixture and Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C.; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Gallagher, Laura E.; Henshaw, Sion M.; Besnard, Aurélien; Tucker, Rachel M.; Bachraz, Vishnu; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma. PMID:24785293

  3. Design and Verification of Space Station EVA-Operated Truss Attachment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katell, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design and verification of a system used to attach two segments of the International Space Station (ISS). This system was first used in space to mate the P6 and Z1 trusses together in December 2000, through a combination of robotic and extravehicular tasks. Features that provided capture, coarse alignment, and fine alignment during the berthing process are described. Attachment of this high value hardware was critical to the ISS's sequential assembly, necessitating the inclusion of backup design and operational features. Astronauts checked for the proper performance of the alignment and bolting features during on-orbit operations. During berthing, the system accommodates truss-to-truss relative displacements that are caused by manufacturing tolerances and on-orbit thermal gradients. After bolt installation, the truss interface becomes statically determinate with respect to in-plane shear loads and isolates attach bolts from bending moments. The approach used to estimate relative displacements and the means of accommodating them is explained. Confidence in system performance was achieved through a cost-effective collection of tests and analyses, including thermal, structural, vibration, misalignment, contact dynamics, underwater simulation, and full-scale functional testing. Design considerations that have potential application to other mechanisms include accommodating variations of friction coefficients in the on-orbit joints, wrench torque tolerances, joint preload, moving element clearances at temperature extremes, and bolt-nut torque reaction.

  4. Exact free vibration of multi-step Timoshenko beam system with several attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, S. H.; El-Sayed, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of the natural frequencies, mode shapes of an axially loaded multi-step Timoshenko beam combined system carrying several attachments. The influence of system design and the proposed sub-system non-dimensional parameters on the combined system characteristics are the major part of this investigation. The effect of material properties, rotary inertia and shear deformation of the beam system for each span are included. The end masses are elastically supported against rotation and translation at an offset point from the point of attachment. A sub-system having two degrees of freedom is located at the beam ends and at any of the intermediate stations and acts as a support and/or a suspension. The boundary conditions of the ordinary differential equation governing the lateral deflections and slope due to bending of the beam system including the shear force term, due to the sub-system, have been formulated. Exact global coefficient matrices for the combined modal frequencies, the modal shape and for the discrete sub-system have been derived. Based on these formulae, detailed parametric studies of the combined system are carried out. The applied mathematical model is valid for wide range of applications especially in mechanical, naval and structural engineering fields.

  5. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dellarupe, A; Unzaga, J M; Moré, G; Kienast, M; Larsen, A; Stiebel, C; Rambeaud, M; Venturini, M C

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum). This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina. PMID:27419102

  6. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Dellarupe, A.; Unzaga, J.M.; Moré, G.; Kienast, M.; Larsen, A.; Stiebel, C.; Rambeaud, M.; Venturini, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum). This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina. PMID:27419102

  7. System and method for changing a glove attached to a glove box

    DOEpatents

    Aluisi, Alan

    2001-01-01

    A system for changing the gloves of a glove box. The system requires the use of a new glove and a glove change ring to form a temporary secondary barrier to the exchange of atmospheres between the inner glove box and the room in which the glove box is operated. The system describes specific means for disengaging a used glove from the glove box port. The means for disengaging the used glove include use of a glove change hook and use of a glove with an attached tab for use in removal. A method for changing the gloves of a glove box is also described.

  8. Powered orthosis and attachable power-assist device with Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kengo; Saito, Yukio; Oshima, Toru; Higashihara, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the developments and control strategies of exoskeleton-type robot systems for the application of an upper limb powered orthosis and an attachable power-assist device for care-givers. Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System, which consist of a computer controlled motor, parallel connected hydraulic actuators, position sensors, and pressure sensors, are installed in the system to derive the joint motion of the exoskeleton arm. The types of hydraulic component structure and the control strategy are discussed in relation to the design philosophy and target joints motions. PMID:24110321

  9. Hitchhiker-G: A new carrier system for attached shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, T. C.

    1987-01-01

    A new carrier system has been developed for economical and quick response flight of small attached payloads on the space shuttle. Hitchhiker-G can accommodate up to 750 lb. of customer payloads in canisters or mounted to an exposed plate. The carrier connects to the orbiter's electrical systems and provides up to six customers with standard electrical services including power, real time telemetry, and commands. A transparent data and command system concept is employed to allow the customer to easily use his own ground support equipment and personnel to control his payload during integration and flight operations. The first Hitchhiker-G was successfully flown in January 1986 on STS 61C.

  10. Adhesive behaviour of gecko-inspired nanofibrillar arrays: combination of experiments and finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-zhi; Xu, Yun; Gu, Ping

    2012-04-01

    A polypropylene nanofibrillar array was successfully fabricated by template-assisted nanofabrication strategy. Adhesion properties of this gecko-inspired structure were studied through two parallel and independent approaches: experiments and finite element simulations. Experimental results show relatively good normal adhesion, but accompanied by high preloads. The interfacial adhesion was modelled by effective spring elements with piecewise-linear constitution. The effective elasticity of the fibre-array system was originally calculated from our measured elasticity of single nanowire. Comparisons of the experimental and simulative results reveal quantitative agreement except for some explainable deviations, which suggests the potential applicability of the present models and applied theories.

  11. The carriage of antibiotic resistance by enteric bacteria from imported tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) destined for the pet trade.

    PubMed

    Casey, Christine L; Hernandez, Sonia M; Yabsley, Michael J; Smith, Katherine F; Sanchez, Susan

    2015-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a growing public health concern and has serious implications for both human and veterinary medicine. The nature of the global economy encourages the movement of humans, livestock, produce, and wildlife, as well as their potentially antibiotic-resistant bacteria, across international borders. Humans and livestock can be reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria; however, little is known about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria harbored by wildlife and, to our knowledge, limited data has been reported for wild-caught reptiles that were specifically collected for the pet trade. In the current study, we examined the antibiotic resistance of lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates from wild-caught Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) imported from Indonesia for use in the pet trade. In addition, we proposed that the conditions under which wild animals are captured, transported, and handled might affect the shedding or fecal prevalence of antibiotic resistance. In particular we were interested in the effects of density; to address this, we experimentally modified densities of geckos after import and documented changes in antibiotic resistance patterns. The commensal enteric bacteria from Tokay geckos (G. gecko) imported for the pet trade displayed resistance against some antibiotics including: ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin and tetracycline. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after experimentally mimicking potentially stressful transportation conditions reptiles experience prior to purchase. There were, however, some interesting trends observed when comparing Tokay geckos housed individually and those housed in groups. Understanding the prevalence of antibiotic resistant commensal enteric flora from common pet reptiles is paramount because of the potential for humans exposed to these animals to acquire antibiotic

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Gecko-inspired Fibrillar Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongkwan

    Over the last decade, geckos' remarkable ability to stick to and climb surfaces found in nature has motivated a wide range of scientific interest in engineering gecko-mimetic surface for various adhesive and high friction applications. The high adhesion and friction of its pads have been attributed to a complex array of hairy structures, which maximize surface area for van der Waals interaction between the toes and the counter-surface. While advances in micro- and nanolithography technique have allowed fabrication of increasingly sophisticated gecko mimetic surfaces, it remains a challenge to produce an adhesive as robust as that of the natural gecko pads. In order to rationally design gecko adhesives, understanding the contact behavior of fibrillar interface is critical. The first chapter of the dissertation introduces gecko adhesion and its potential applications, followed by a brief survey of gecko-inspired adhesives. Challenges that limit the performance of the current adhesives are presented. In particular, it is pointed out that almost all testing of gecko adhesives have been on clean, smooth glass, which is ideal for adhesion due to high surface energy and low roughness. Surfaces in application are more difficult to stick to, so the understanding of failure modes in low energy and rough surfaces is important. The second chapter presents a fabrication method for thermoplastic gecko adhesive to be used for a detailed study of fibrillar interfaces. Low-density polyethylene nanofibers are replicated from a silicon nanowire array fabricated by colloidal lithography and metal-catalyzed chemical etching. This process yields a highly ordered array of nanofibers over a large area with control over fiber diameter, length, and number density. The high yield and consistency of the process make it ideal for a systematic study on factors that affect adhesion and friction of gecko adhesives. The following three chapters examine parameters that affect macroscale friction of

  13. Arboreal Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis) Differentially Modulate Fore- and Hind Limb Kinematics in Response to Changes in Habitat Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Mingna V.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    By using adhesion, geckos can move through incredibly challenging habitats. However, continually changing terrain may necessitate modulation of the adhesive apparatus in order to maximize its effectiveness over a range of challenges. Behaviorally modulating how the adhesive system is applied can occur by altering the alignment of the foot relative to the long axis of the body and/or the angles between the digits (interdigital angle). Given the directionality of the adhesive system, geckos likely vary the application of the system via these mechanisms as they run. We quantified 3D movements (using high-speed video) of the day gecko, Phelsuma madagascariensis, running on a range of ecologically relevant inclines (0°, 45°, 90°) and perch diameters (1.5 cm, 10 cm and broad). We measured the instantaneous sum of interdigital angles and foot alignment relative to the body, as well as other kinematic variables, throughout each stride and across treatments. Modulation of foot alignment at 45° and 90° was similar between the forelimb and hind limb, but differed at 0°, suggesting that P. madagascariensis is able to exert an adhesive force using multiple strategies. Both the sum of interdigital angles and alignment in the fore- and hind foot were modulated. Differences in modulation between the limbs are likely related to the underlying morphology. The modulation of interdigital angle and foot alignment suggests that aspects other than the mechanism of adhesion, such as joint morphology, are important for arboreal movement in geckos. Our study of foot usage in arboreal locomotion reveals patterns that may be widespread across pad-bearing lizards. In addition to understanding the constraints exerted by the adhesive apparatus, we highlight how biomechanical traits may respond to the evolution of novel adaptations and morphologies. PMID:27145027

  14. Arboreal Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis) Differentially Modulate Fore- and Hind Limb Kinematics in Response to Changes in Habitat Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Mingna V; Higham, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    By using adhesion, geckos can move through incredibly challenging habitats. However, continually changing terrain may necessitate modulation of the adhesive apparatus in order to maximize its effectiveness over a range of challenges. Behaviorally modulating how the adhesive system is applied can occur by altering the alignment of the foot relative to the long axis of the body and/or the angles between the digits (interdigital angle). Given the directionality of the adhesive system, geckos likely vary the application of the system via these mechanisms as they run. We quantified 3D movements (using high-speed video) of the day gecko, Phelsuma madagascariensis, running on a range of ecologically relevant inclines (0°, 45°, 90°) and perch diameters (1.5 cm, 10 cm and broad). We measured the instantaneous sum of interdigital angles and foot alignment relative to the body, as well as other kinematic variables, throughout each stride and across treatments. Modulation of foot alignment at 45° and 90° was similar between the forelimb and hind limb, but differed at 0°, suggesting that P. madagascariensis is able to exert an adhesive force using multiple strategies. Both the sum of interdigital angles and alignment in the fore- and hind foot were modulated. Differences in modulation between the limbs are likely related to the underlying morphology. The modulation of interdigital angle and foot alignment suggests that aspects other than the mechanism of adhesion, such as joint morphology, are important for arboreal movement in geckos. Our study of foot usage in arboreal locomotion reveals patterns that may be widespread across pad-bearing lizards. In addition to understanding the constraints exerted by the adhesive apparatus, we highlight how biomechanical traits may respond to the evolution of novel adaptations and morphologies.

  15. Arboreal Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis) Differentially Modulate Fore- and Hind Limb Kinematics in Response to Changes in Habitat Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Mingna V; Higham, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    By using adhesion, geckos can move through incredibly challenging habitats. However, continually changing terrain may necessitate modulation of the adhesive apparatus in order to maximize its effectiveness over a range of challenges. Behaviorally modulating how the adhesive system is applied can occur by altering the alignment of the foot relative to the long axis of the body and/or the angles between the digits (interdigital angle). Given the directionality of the adhesive system, geckos likely vary the application of the system via these mechanisms as they run. We quantified 3D movements (using high-speed video) of the day gecko, Phelsuma madagascariensis, running on a range of ecologically relevant inclines (0°, 45°, 90°) and perch diameters (1.5 cm, 10 cm and broad). We measured the instantaneous sum of interdigital angles and foot alignment relative to the body, as well as other kinematic variables, throughout each stride and across treatments. Modulation of foot alignment at 45° and 90° was similar between the forelimb and hind limb, but differed at 0°, suggesting that P. madagascariensis is able to exert an adhesive force using multiple strategies. Both the sum of interdigital angles and alignment in the fore- and hind foot were modulated. Differences in modulation between the limbs are likely related to the underlying morphology. The modulation of interdigital angle and foot alignment suggests that aspects other than the mechanism of adhesion, such as joint morphology, are important for arboreal movement in geckos. Our study of foot usage in arboreal locomotion reveals patterns that may be widespread across pad-bearing lizards. In addition to understanding the constraints exerted by the adhesive apparatus, we highlight how biomechanical traits may respond to the evolution of novel adaptations and morphologies. PMID:27145027

  16. Impact of Child Maltreatment on Attachment and Social Rank Systems: Introducing an Integrated Theory.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Leon; Taylor, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Child maltreatment is a prevalent societal problem that has been linked to a wide range of social, psychological, and emotional difficulties. Maltreatment impacts on two putative evolved psychobiological systems in particular, the attachment system and the social rank system. The maltreatment may disrupt the child's ability to form trusting and reassuring relationships and also creates a power imbalance where the child may feel powerless and ashamed. The aim of the current article is to outline an evolutionary theory for understanding the impact of child maltreatment, focusing on the interaction between the attachment and the social rank system. We provide a narrative review of the relevant literature relating to child maltreatment and these two theories. This research highlights how, in instances of maltreatment, these ordinarily adaptive systems may become maladaptive and contribute to psychopathology. We identify a number of novel hypotheses that can be drawn from this theory, providing a guide for future research. We finally explore how this theory provides a guide for the treatment of victims of child maltreatment. In conclusion, the integrated theory provides a framework for understanding and predicting the consequences of maltreatment, but further research is required to test several hypotheses made by this theory.

  17. Synthetic Gecko Foot-hairs from Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism that allows a gecko lizard to climb any vertical surface and hang from a ceiling with one toe has attracted considerable interest and awe for over two millennia. Recent studies have discovered that the gecko's ability to defy gravity comes from its remarkable feet and toes. Each five-toed foot is covered with microscopic elastic hairs called setae. The ends of these hairs split into spatulas which come in contact with the surface and induce enough intermolecular [van der Waals, (VdW)] forces to hold them in place. Similarly, the same VdW forces act between our two hands when they are held together, but in this case, they do not stick to each other. The reason is that the roughness of our hands prevents them from coming close to each other at separations relevant for VdW forces. On the other hand, based on the gecko's foot anatomy, if our hands were made up of tiny elastic structures that were able to deform or bend at different length scales in accordance with the contact surface and correct for the roughness, then perhaps our hands could also adhere to the surfaces we touch. In my talk, I will present the recent advances we have made in fabricating polymer surfaces with multiwalled carbon nanotube hairs with strong nanometer-level adhesion forces that are 200 times higher than those observed for Gecko foot-hairs. This fabrication process allows the flexibility to create structures that are found in nature on the Gecko's foot and offer excellent potential for applications as dry adhesives for space, microelectronics and MEMS devices. This work was done in collaboration with Betul Yurdumakan, Nachiket Raravikar and Pulickel Ajayan.

  18. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Dryden, Daniel M.; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; French, Roger H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor–Winterton approximation and the Young–Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air. PMID:26109635

  19. Adaptive simplification and the evolution of gecko locomotion: Morphological and biomechanical consequences of losing adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V.; Collins, Clint E.; Hulsey, C. Darrin; Russell, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations permit the diversification of lineages, but they may also impose functional constraints on behaviors such as locomotion. Thus, it is not surprising that secondary simplification of novel locomotory traits has occurred several times among vertebrates and could potentially lead to exceptional divergence when constraints are relaxed. For example, the gecko adhesive system is a remarkable innovation that permits locomotion on surfaces unavailable to other animals, but has been lost or simplified in species that have reverted to a terrestrial lifestyle. We examined the functional and morphological consequences of this adaptive simplification in the Pachydactylus radiation of geckos, which exhibits multiple unambiguous losses or bouts of simplification of the adhesive system. We found that the rates of morphological and 3D locomotor kinematic evolution are elevated in those species that have simplified or lost adhesive capabilities. This finding suggests that the constraints associated with adhesion have been circumvented, permitting these species to either run faster or burrow. The association between a terrestrial lifestyle and the loss/reduction of adhesion suggests a direct link between morphology, biomechanics, and ecology. PMID:25548182

  20. Spatial model of the gecko foot hair: functional significance of highly specialized non-uniform geometry

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    One of the important problems appearing in experimental realizations of artificial adhesives inspired by gecko foot hair is so-called clusterization. If an artificially produced structure is flexible enough to allow efficient contact with natural rough surfaces, after a few attachment–detachment cycles, the fibres of the structure tend to adhere one to another and form clusters. Normally, such clusters are much larger than original fibres and, because they are less flexible, form much worse adhesive contacts especially with the rough surfaces. Main problem here is that the forces responsible for the clusterization are the same intermolecular forces which attract fibres to fractal surface of the substrate. However, arrays of real gecko setae are much less susceptible to this problem. One of the possible reasons for this is that ends of the seta have more sophisticated non-uniformly distributed three-dimensional structure than that of existing artificial systems. In this paper, we simulated three-dimensional spatial geometry of non-uniformly distributed branches of nanofibres of the setal tip numerically, studied its attachment–detachment dynamics and discussed its advantages versus uniformly distributed geometry. PMID:25657843

  1. Effective elastic modulus of isolated gecko setal arrays.

    PubMed

    Autumn, K; Majidi, C; Groff, R E; Dittmore, A; Fearing, R

    2006-09-01

    Conventional pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are fabricated from soft viscoelastic materials that satisfy Dahlquist's criterion for tack with a Young's modulus (E) of 100 kPa or less at room temperature and 1 Hz. In contrast, the adhesive on the toes of geckos is made of beta-keratin, a stiff material with E at least four orders of magnitude greater than the upper limit of Dahlquist's criterion. Therefore, one would not expect a beta-keratin structure to function as a PSA by deforming readily to make intimate molecular contact with a variety of surface profiles. However, since the gecko adhesive is a microstructure in the form of an array of millions of high aspect ratio shafts (setae), the effective elastic modulus (E(eff)) is much lower than E of bulk beta-keratin. In the first test of the E(eff) of a gecko setal adhesive, we measured the forces resulting from deformation of isolated arrays of tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) setae during vertical compression, and during tangential compression at angles of +45 degrees and -45 degrees . We tested the hypothesis that E(eff) of gecko setae falls within Dahlquist's criterion for tack, and evaluated the validity of a model of setae as cantilever beams. Highly linear forces of deformation under all compression conditions support the cantilever model. E(eff) of setal arrays during vertical and +45 degrees compression (along the natural path of drag of the setae) were 83+/-4.0 kPa and 86+/-4.4 kPa (means +/- s.e.m.), respectively. Consistent with the predictions of the cantilever model, setae became significantly stiffer when compressed against the natural path of drag: E(eff) during -45 degrees compression was 110+/-4.7 kPa. Unlike synthetic PSAs, setal arrays act as Hookean elastic solids; setal arrays function as a bed of springs with a directional stiffness, assisting alignment of the adhesive spatular tips with the contact surface during shear loading.

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

  3. Mandibular two-implant overdentures: three-year prosthodontic maintenance using the locator attachment system.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Andrew; Lyons, Karl; Thomson, W Murray; Payne, Alan G T

    2011-01-01

    Limited clinical research identifies prosthodontic maintenance requirements of mandibular overdentures using the Locator attachment system. Sixty-five edentulous participants received complete maxillary dentures opposing mandibular two-implant overdentures with either Locator nylon (n = 21), Southern plastic (n = 24), or Straumann gold (n = 20) matrices. Prosthodontic maintenance was recorded prospectively for 3 years using defined categories. Over the 3-year period, a mean 3.52 ± 4.8, 2.08 ± 1.9, and 5.5 ± 4.2 maintenance events occurred for Locator, Southern, and Straumann participants, respectively. Prosthodontic success rates of 90% in the Locator nylon group, 88% in the Southern plastic group, and 75% in the Straumann gold group were achieved. Int J Prosthodont 2011;24:328-331.

  4. Peer attachment formation by systemic redox regulation with social training after a sensitive period

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Mamiko; Karino, Genta; Senoo, Aya; Mimura, Koki; Shirakawa, Yuka; Fukushima, Yuta; Obara, Saya; Sekihara, Hitomi; Ozawa, Shimpei; Ikegami, Kentaro; Ueda, Toyotoshi; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Nakamura, Shun

    2013-01-01

    Attachment formation is the most pivotal factor for humans and animals in the growth and development of social relationships. However, the developmental processes of attachment formation mediated by sensory-motor, emotional, and cognitive integration remain obscure. Here we developed an animal model to understand the types of social interactions that lead to peer-social attachment formation. We found that the social interaction in a sensitive period was essential to stabilise or overwrite the initially imprinted peer affiliation state and that synchronised behaviour with others based on common motivations could be a driver of peer social attachment formation. Furthermore, feeding experience with supplementation of ubiquinol conferred peer social attachment formation even after the sensitive period. Surprisingly, the experience of feeding beyond the cage window was also effective to reduce the required amount ubiquinol, suggesting that peri-personal space modulation may affect socio-emotional cognition and there by lead to attachment formation. PMID:23974241

  5. The nature of the gecko lizard adhesive force.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanxin; Neuzil, Pavel; Kustandi, Tanu Suryadi; Oh, Sharon; Samper, Victor D

    2005-08-01

    The extraordinary climbing skills of gecko lizards have been under investigation for a long time. Here we report results of direct measurement of single spatula forces in air with varying relative humidities and in water, by the force-distance method using an atomic force microscope. We have found that the presence of water strongly affects the adhesion force and from analysis of our results, we have demonstrated that the dominant force involved is the capillary force.

  6. Effects of humidity on the mechanical properties of gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Michael S; Wilkinson, Matt; Puthoff, Jonathan B; Mayer, George; Autumn, Kellar

    2011-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in relative humidity (RH) causes changes in the mechanical properties of the keratin of adhesive gecko foot hairs (setae). We measured the effect of RH on the tensile deformation properties, fracture, and dynamic mechanical response of single isolated tokay gecko setae and strips of the smooth lamellar epidermal layer. The mechanical properties of gecko setae were strongly affected by RH. The complex elastic modulus (measured at 5 Hz) of a single seta at 80% RH was 1.2 GPa, only 39% of the value when dry. An increase in RH reduced the stiffness and increased the strain to failure. The loss tangent increased significantly with humidity, suggesting that water absorption produces a transition to a more viscous type of deformation. The influence of RH on the properties of the smooth epidermal layer was comparable with that of isolated seta, with the exception of stress at rupture. These values were two to four times greater for the setae than for the smooth layer. The changes in mechanical properties of setal keratin were consistent with previously reported increases in contact forces, supporting the hypothesis that an increase in RH softens setal keratin, which increases adhesion and friction.

  7. Comparative studies on the structure and adhesion of setae in G. gecko and G. swinhonis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ce; Wang, WenBo; Yu, Min; Dai, ZhenDong; Sun, JiuRong

    2007-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histological techniques were used to observe and study the setae structures of two gecko species (G. gecko and G. swinhonis) and the relationships between these structures and the adhesive forces. The SEM results showed that the setae of these two species were densely distributed in an orderly fashion, and branched with curved tips. The setae of G. gecko had cluster structures, each cluster containing 4-6 setae whose terminal branches curved towards the center of the toes at approximately 10 degrees , the tips of the branches like spatulae and densely arrayed at an interval of less than 0.2-0.3 microm. On the contrary, the branch tips in the setae of G. swinhonis were curled, and the terminal parts of setae curved towards the center of the toes at various angles. Usually the setae of these gecko species branch twice at the top at intervals greater than that of G. gecko. The histological observation found that inside the setae of these two species there were plenty of unevenly distributed contents, such as epithelia, fat cells, pigmental cells and muscle tissue, but no gland cells existed. The results of functional experiments suggested that modifying the structure of gecko's setae could reduce its adhesive ability dramatically, demonstrating the positive correlation between the structure of the gecko's setae and its adhesive ability. The above results provide important information in designing bio-mimic setae and bio-gecko robots.

  8. Bond strengths of three resin systems used with brackets and embedded wire attachments.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R P; Mayhew, R B; Oesterle, L J; Pierson, W P

    1985-01-01

    Orthodontic wire bonded directly to teeth with a resin adhesive system has been used to establish anchor units for procedures in orthodontics as well as for splinting teeth in other disciplines. This procedure can save the cost and time of placing a bracket. In addition, several different resin systems have been used for this procedure as well as for placing brackets. The purpose of this study was to determine the strength of three adhesive systems used to bond orthodontic wires directly to teeth and to compare these values with those found for directly bonded orthodontic brackets. Equal sample sizes of brackets or wires were attached to 240 human teeth with either Concise, Miradept, or Endur in a standardized area of etched enamel. Shear and tensile strengths were measured at 30 minutes and at 48 hours. At 30 minutes brackets were significantly stronger than embedded wires, and Concise was significantly stronger than either of the other resins. However, all significant differences between any of the three resin systems using either bonded brackets or wires disappeared at 48 hours. Whether or not this initial strength difference is clinically significant remains speculative.

  9. Bond strengths of three resin systems used with brackets and embedded wire attachments.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R P; Mayhew, R B; Oesterle, L J; Pierson, W P

    1985-01-01

    Orthodontic wire bonded directly to teeth with a resin adhesive system has been used to establish anchor units for procedures in orthodontics as well as for splinting teeth in other disciplines. This procedure can save the cost and time of placing a bracket. In addition, several different resin systems have been used for this procedure as well as for placing brackets. The purpose of this study was to determine the strength of three adhesive systems used to bond orthodontic wires directly to teeth and to compare these values with those found for directly bonded orthodontic brackets. Equal sample sizes of brackets or wires were attached to 240 human teeth with either Concise, Miradept, or Endur in a standardized area of etched enamel. Shear and tensile strengths were measured at 30 minutes and at 48 hours. At 30 minutes brackets were significantly stronger than embedded wires, and Concise was significantly stronger than either of the other resins. However, all significant differences between any of the three resin systems using either bonded brackets or wires disappeared at 48 hours. Whether or not this initial strength difference is clinically significant remains speculative. PMID:3155593

  10. 24 CFR 350.11 - Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in Book-entry System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Securities in Book-entry System. 350.11 Section 350.11 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURES § 350.11 Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by a creditor...

  11. 24 CFR 350.11 - Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in Book-entry System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Securities in Book-entry System. 350.11 Section 350.11 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURES § 350.11 Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in Book-entry System. The interest of a debtor in a Security Entitlement may be reached by a creditor...

  12. Self-Cleaning Synthetic Adhesive Surfaces Mimicking Tokay Geckos.

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema; Burckel, David Bruce; Fan, Hongyou; Houston, Jack E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Johnson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    A gecko's extraordinary ability to suspend itself from walls and ceilings of varied surface roughness has interested humans for hundreds of years. Many theories and possible explanations describing this phenomenon have been proposed including sticky secretions, microsuckers, and electrostatic forces; however, today it is widely accepted that van der Waals forces play the most important role in this type of dry adhesion. Inarguably, the vital feature that allows a gecko's suspension is the presence of billions 3 of tiny hairs on the pad of its foot called spatula. These features are small enough to reach within van der Waals distances of any surface (spatula radius %7E100 nm); thus, the combined effect of billions of van der Waals interactions is more than sufficient to hold a gecko's weight to surfaces such as smooth ceilings or wet glass. Two lithographic approaches were used to make hierarchal structures with dimensions similar to the gecko foot dimensions noted above. One approach combined photo-lithography with soft lithography (micro-molding). In this fabrication scheme the fiber feature size, defined by the alumina micromold was 0.2 um in diameter and 60 um in height. The second approach followed more conventional photolithography-based patterning. Patterned features with dimensions %7E0.3 mm in diameter by 0.5 mm tall were produced. We used interfacial force microscopy employing a parabolic diamond tip with a diameter of 200 nm to measure the surface adhesion of these structures. The measured adhesive forces ranged from 0.3 uN - 0.6 uN, yielding an average bonding stress between 50 N/cm2 to 100 N/cm2. By comparison the reported literature value for the average stress of a Tokay gecko foot is 10 N/cm2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Sandia National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research & Development program (LDRD). All coating processes were conducted in the cleanroom facility located at the University of New Mexico's Center for High Technology

  13. On the Origins of Disorganized Attachment and Internal Working Models: Paper I. A Dyadic Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Beatrice; Lachmann, Frank; Markese, Sara; Bahrick, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Despite important recent progress in understanding disorganized attachment, we still lack a full understanding of the mechanisms of disorganized attachment formation and transmission prior to 12 months. In this paper we lay out our recommendations for the study of the 4-month origins of disorganized attachment. In our subsequent Paper II we report on the results of a large empirical study that was conducted along the lines we recommend in Paper I. Both Papers I and II are based on Beebe, Jaffe, Markese, Buck, Chen, Cohen, Bahrick, Andrews, Feldstein (2010). In Paper I we describe our proposal that a detailed microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication would further inform our understanding of the process of disorganized attachment formation between mother and infant. Such a microanalysis would allow us to characterize the nature of the 4-month infant’s procedural representations, or emerging “internal working models” of attachment. PMID:25392604

  14. Shape-memory alloy overload protection device for osseointegrated transfemoral implant prosthetic limb attachment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Fei; Hughes, Steven

    2002-11-01

    The osseointegrated trans-femoral implant system provides a direct anchoring technique to attach prosthetic limb. This technique was first introduced PI Brenmark in Sweden. The UK had the first clinical trial in 1997 and currently has 6 active limb wearers. The success of this procedure has the potential for improved gait function and mobility, increased employability and significant long-term improvements in the quality of life for above knee amputees. However, the significant load involved in the trans-femoral implant system has caused permanent deformation and/or fractures of the implant abutment in several occasions. To protect the implant system, the implant abutment in particularly, an overloading protection device was introduced. The device uses mechanical mechanism to release torsion overload on the abutment. However, the bending overload protection remains unsolved. To solve the problem, a new overload protection device was developed. This device uses SMA component for bending overload protection. In this paper, the results of non-linear finite element modelling of the SMA and steel (AISI 1040) components were presented. Experiments were also carried out using steel components to assess the design which is based on the non-linear property of the materials.

  15. Attachment Without Fear

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.

    2012-01-01

    John Bowlby hypothesized an attachment system that interacts with caregiving, exploration, and fear systems in the brain, with a particular emphasis on fear. Neurobiological research confirms many of his hypotheses and also raises some new questions. A psychological model based on this neurobiological research is presented here. The model extends conventional attachment theory by describing additional attachment processes independent of fear. In this model, the attachment elements of trust, openness, and dependence interact with the caregiving elements of caring, empathy, and responsibility. PMID:22879835

  16. [Low-cost simple anchorage systems in the removable hybrid prosthesis. Locator Root Attachment and Würzburg post].

    PubMed

    Teubner, Eckart; Galindo, Martha L; Arnold, Dario; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    For a simple and provisional retention of a removable prosthesis, less expensive direct retainers are an option compared to indirect cast gold copings with attachment. The Dalbo-Rotex-retainer and the Ticap-system are clinically established. The Locator Root attachment and the Würzburger Stift were recently introduced. The Locator Root attachment uses a massive profiled cylindrical post as a radicular anchorage. The Würzburger Stift has a small endodontic part which is retained by four spreadable lamellae in a convergent cavity. They further differ in the design of the male and female part. Depending on the clinical situation these characteristics can offer benefits and disadvantages. Both systems are documented and their indication, advantages and restrictions are discussed with clinical relevance.

  17. Biohydrogen production in the suspended and attached microbial growth systems from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Li, Feifei; Tang, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    Waste pastry was hydrolyzed by glucoamylase and protease which were obtained from solid state fermentation of Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae to produce waste pastry hydrolysate. Then, the effects of hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (4-12h) on hydrogen production rate (HPR) in the suspended microbial growth system (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and attached microbial growth system (continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor, CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate were investigated. The maximum HPRs of CSTR (201.8mL/(h·L)) and CMISR (255.3mL/(h·L)) were obtained at HRT of 6h and 4h, respectively. The first-order reaction could be used to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of waste pastry. The carbon content of the waste pastry remained 22.8% in the undigested waste pastry and consumed 77.2% for carbon dioxide and soluble microbial products. To our knowledge, this is the first study which reports biohydrogen production from waste pastry. PMID:27416509

  18. Queued History based Mediator Identification for an Incentive Attached peer to peer Electronic Coupon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojima, Taiki; Ikkai, Yoshitomo; Komoda, Norihisa

    An incentive attached peer to peer (P2P) electronic coupon system is proposed in which users forward e-coupons to potential users by providing incentives to those mediators. A service provider needs to acquire distribution history for incentive payment by recording UserIDs (UIDs) in the e-coupons, since this system is intended for pure P2P environment. This causes problems of dishonestly altering distribution history. In order to solve such problems, distribution history is realized in a couple of queues structure. They are the UID queue, and the public key queue. Each element of the UID queue at the initial state consists of index, a secret key, and a digital signature. In recording one's UID, the encrypted UID is enqueued to the UID queue with a new digital signature created by a secret key of the dequeued element, so that each UID cannot be altered. The public key queue provides the functionality of validating digital signatures on mobile devices. This method makes it possible both each UID and sequence of them to be certificated. The availability of the method is evaluated by quantifying risk reduction using Fault Tree Analysis (FTA). And it's recognized that the method is better than common encryption methods.

  19. Biohydrogen production in the suspended and attached microbial growth systems from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Li, Feifei; Tang, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    Waste pastry was hydrolyzed by glucoamylase and protease which were obtained from solid state fermentation of Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae to produce waste pastry hydrolysate. Then, the effects of hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (4-12h) on hydrogen production rate (HPR) in the suspended microbial growth system (continuous stirred tank reactor, CSTR) and attached microbial growth system (continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor, CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate were investigated. The maximum HPRs of CSTR (201.8mL/(h·L)) and CMISR (255.3mL/(h·L)) were obtained at HRT of 6h and 4h, respectively. The first-order reaction could be used to describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of waste pastry. The carbon content of the waste pastry remained 22.8% in the undigested waste pastry and consumed 77.2% for carbon dioxide and soluble microbial products. To our knowledge, this is the first study which reports biohydrogen production from waste pastry.

  20. Development of a rotating algal biofilm growth system for attached microalgae growth with in situ biomass harvest.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Henry, Wesley; Michael, Clayton; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-12-01

    This work aimed to develop a rotating algal biofilm (RAB) cultivation system that can be widely adopted by microalgae producers for easy biomass harvest. Algal cells were grown on the surface of a material rotating between nutrient-rich liquid and CO2-rich gaseous phase. Scrapping biomass from the attached surface avoided the expensive harvest operations such as centrifugation. Among various attachment materials, cotton sheet resulted in best algal growth, durability, and cost effectiveness. A lab-scale RAB system was further optimized with harvest frequency, rotation speed, and CO2 levels. The algal biomass from the RAB system had a similar water content as that in centrifuged biomass. An open pond raceway retrofitted with a pilot-scale RAB system resulted in a much higher biomass productivity when compared to a control open pond. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB system is an efficient algal culture system for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity.

  1. Comparative study of the fluid viscosity in tarsal hairy attachment systems of flies and beetles.

    PubMed

    Peisker, Henrik; Heepe, Lars; Kovalev, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-10-01

    Wet adhesive systems of insects strongly rely for their function on the formation of capillary bridges with the substrate. Studies on the chemical composition and evaporation dynamics of tarsal secretions strongly suggest a difference in chemistry of secretion in beetles and flies, both possessing hairy attachment devices. This difference is assumed to influence the viscosity of the secretion. Here, we applied a microrheological technique, based on the immersion of nanometric beads in the collected tarsal footprints, to estimate secretion viscosity in a beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) and a fly (Calliphora vicina). Both species studied possess distinct differences in viscosity, the median of which was calculated as 21.8 and 10.9 mPa s, respectively. We further present an approximate theoretical model to calculate the contact formation time of spatula-like terminal contact elements using the viscosity data of the covering fluid. The estimated contact formation time is proportional to the tarsal secretion viscosity and to the square of the contact radius of the contact element.

  2. Fifteen years of experience with Integral-Leg-Prosthesis: Cohort study of artificial limb attachment system.

    PubMed

    Juhnke, Dora-Lisa; Beck, James P; Jeyapalina, Sujee; Aschoff, Horst H

    2015-01-01

    Integral-Leg-Prosthesis (ILP) is a comparatively new attachment system that allows direct skeletal docking of artificial limbs. Between January 1999 and December 2013, 69 patients with transfemoral amputation were fitted with ILPs by a single German surgeon. Device design iterations and surgical techniques evolved during these years. For the purposes of comparison, patients receiving the first two designs and procedure iterations were placed in group 1 and the patients fitted with the final design were placed in group 2. Infection rate and planned and unplanned surgical interventions were statistically compared using Fisher exact test. Data demonstrated that the high rate of stoma-associated infections seen in group 1 was dramatically reduced in group 2. Of the 39 patients with 42 implants in group 2, none had operative interventions secondary to infection. All group 2 patients remained infection-free without the use of antibiotics by following a simple but defined wound-hygiene protocol. We concluded that the final iteration of the osseointegrated intramedullary device with a low energy surface at the soft tissue and prosthesis interface allowed a biologically stable skin stoma that remained infection-free without chronic use of antibiotics. The reduction in the infection rate was attributed to the clinically based, empirically driven changes in design and surgical techniques.

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

  4. Fifteen years of experience with Integral-Leg-Prosthesis: Cohort study of artificial limb attachment system.

    PubMed

    Juhnke, Dora-Lisa; Beck, James P; Jeyapalina, Sujee; Aschoff, Horst H

    2015-01-01

    Integral-Leg-Prosthesis (ILP) is a comparatively new attachment system that allows direct skeletal docking of artificial limbs. Between January 1999 and December 2013, 69 patients with transfemoral amputation were fitted with ILPs by a single German surgeon. Device design iterations and surgical techniques evolved during these years. For the purposes of comparison, patients receiving the first two designs and procedure iterations were placed in group 1 and the patients fitted with the final design were placed in group 2. Infection rate and planned and unplanned surgical interventions were statistically compared using Fisher exact test. Data demonstrated that the high rate of stoma-associated infections seen in group 1 was dramatically reduced in group 2. Of the 39 patients with 42 implants in group 2, none had operative interventions secondary to infection. All group 2 patients remained infection-free without the use of antibiotics by following a simple but defined wound-hygiene protocol. We concluded that the final iteration of the osseointegrated intramedullary device with a low energy surface at the soft tissue and prosthesis interface allowed a biologically stable skin stoma that remained infection-free without chronic use of antibiotics. The reduction in the infection rate was attributed to the clinically based, empirically driven changes in design and surgical techniques. PMID:26348827

  5. Adhesion and friction force coupling of gecko setal arrays: implications for structured adhesive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boxin; Pesika, Noshir; Rosenberg, Kenny; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    The extraordinary climbing ability of geckos is partially attributed to the fine structure of their toe pads, which contain arrays consisting of thousands of micrometer-sized stalks (setae) that are in turn terminated by millions of fingerlike pads (spatulae) having nanoscale dimensions. Using a surface forces apparatus (SFA), we have investigated the dynamic sliding characteristics of setal arrays subjected to various loading, unloading, and shearing conditions at different angles. Setal arrays were glued onto silica substrates and, once installed into the SFA, brought toward a polymeric substrate surface and then sheared. Lateral shearing of the arrays was initiated along both the "gripping" and "releasing" directions of the setae on the foot pads. We find that the anisotropic microstructure of the setal arrays gives rise to quite different adhesive and tribological properties when sliding along these two directions, depending also on the angle that the setae subtend with respect to the surface. Thus, dragging the setal arrays along the gripping direction leads to strong adhesion and friction forces (as required during contact and attachment), whereas when shearing along the releasing direction, both forces fall to almost zero (as desired during rapid detachment). The results and analysis provide new insights into the biomechanics of adhesion and friction forces in animals, the coupling between these two forces, and the specialized structures that allow them to optimize these forces along different directions during movement. Our results also have practical implications and criteria for designing reversible and responsive adhesives and articulated robotic mechanisms.

  6. Attachment Disorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Judith, Ed.; George, Carol, Ed.

    Disorganized attachment relationships were first formally identified on the basis of the anomalous behavior of some infants during laboratory separations and reunions with the parent. This book presents new research and theory on the topic of attachment disorganization, an area of investigation that is of increasing importance in the study of…

  7. Genetic variability of the tokay gecko based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaochao; Gong, Shu; Jiang, Lichun; Peng, Rui; Shan, Xiang; Zou, Dandan; Yang, Chengzhong; Zou, Fangdong

    2013-10-01

    With largely allopatric distribution, the black tokay and the red tokay are two distinct morphs of the subspecies Gekko gecko gecko. In consideration of their different morphological characteristics, the taxonomic status of G. g. gecko is disputed. Through detailed morphological comparison, it has been proposed that the black tokay should be elevated to species ranking, but without strong genetic evidence. In order to further investigate the taxonomic status of the tokay gecko (G. gecko), we used one mitochondrial marker (ND2) and three nuclear markers (RAG1, c-mos, and ITS2) to explore the phylogenetic and taxonomic relationship of the tokay gecko. Our results revealed a deep phylogeographical divergence in tokay gecko and at the same time provided us with the evidence of possible introgressive hybridization or/and incomplete lineage sorting between the black tokay and the red tokay. The elevation of the black tokay to species level is also supported by our results. However, due to limited sampling and genetic data, this elevation should be further corroborated by more genetic evidence.

  8. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  9. Sex determination in Madagascar geckos of the genus Paroedura (Squamata: Gekkonidae): are differentiated sex chromosomes indeed so evolutionary stable?

    PubMed

    Koubová, Martina; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Rovatsos, Michail; Farkačová, Klára; Altmanová, Marie; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-12-01

    Among amniote vertebrates, geckos represent a clade with exceptional variability in sex determination; however, only a minority of species of this highly diverse group has been studied in this respect. Here, we describe for the first time a female heterogamety in the genus Paroedura, the group radiated in Madagascar and adjacent islands. We identified homomorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a highly heterochromatic W chromosome in Paroedura masobe, Paroedura oviceps, Paroedura karstophila, Paroedura stumpffi, and Paroedura lohatsara. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that female-specific sequences are greatly amplified in the W chromosome of P. lohatsara and that P. gracilis seems to possess a derived system of multiple sex chromosomes. Contrastingly, neither CGH nor heterochromatin visualization revealed differentiated sex chromosomes in the members of the Paroedura picta-Paroedura bastardi-Paroedura ibityensis clade, which is phylogenetically nested within lineages with a heterochromatic W chromosome. As a sex ratio consistent with genotypic sex determination has been reported in P. picta, it appears that the members of the P. picta-P. bastardi-P. ibityensis clade possess homomorphic, poorly differentiated sex chromosomes and may represent a rare example of evolutionary loss of highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a telomeric probe revealed a telomere-typical pattern in all species and an accumulation of telomeric sequences in the centromeric region of autosomes in P. stumpffi and P. bastardi. Our study adds important information for the greater understanding of the variability and evolution of sex determination in geckos and demonstrates how the geckos of the genus Paroedura provide an interesting model for studying the evolution of the sex chromosomes.

  10. Imaging diagnosis-pulmonary-tracheobronchial prolapse in a new Caledonian giant gecko (Rhacodactylus leachianus).

    PubMed

    Hoey, Seamus; Keller, Dominique; Chamberlin, Tamara; Pinkerton, Marie; Waller, Kenneth; Drees, Randi

    2013-01-01

    A 3-year-old male New Caledonian giant gecko, or Leach's gecko (Rhacodactylus leachianus) presented with acute lethargy and coelomic distention. Findings from survey radiographs and an upper gastrointestinal tract contrast study were consistent with severe aerophagia, a collapsed left lung, and hyperinflation of the right lung due to suspected bronchial obstruction. The gecko was treated with conservative medical management, but was found dead 5 days after presentation. Necropsy findings showed intussusception of the proximal left lung into the left mainstem bronchus and trachea.

  11. Redesign of solid rocket booster/external tank attachment ring for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An improved design concept is presented for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB)/external tank (ET) attachment ring structural component. This component picks up three struts which attach the aft end of each SRB to the ET. The concept is a partial ring with carefully tapered ends to distribute fastener loads safely into the SRB. Extensive design studies and analyses were performed to arrive at the concept. Experiments on structural elements were performed to determine material strength and stiffness characteristics. Materials and fabrication studies were conducted to determine acceptable tolerances for the design concept. An overview is provided of the work along with conclusions and major recommendations.

  12. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  13. A new species of gecko (Squamata: Diplodactylidae: Strophurus) from north Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Vanderduys, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A new species of diplodactylid gecko in the genus Strophurus Fitzinger, from north Queensland, Australia, is described herein as Strophurus congoo sp. nov. It is a small, pale grey to tan, unpatterned or faintly striped gecko, resembling the phasmid geckos in appearance, habitat and behaviour. However, within Strophurus it is not closely related to the phasmid geckos. It is distinguished from all other Strophurus by a combination of even scalation, dull colouration, small size and short tail length. It is only known to occur in a restricted area of the northern Great Dividing Range, within the Einasleigh Uplands bioregion, in a relatively infertile area of rolling, largely granitic hills, and is only known from spinifex (Triodia) hummock grasslands in open woodland. PMID:27395178

  14. A new species of gecko (Squamata: Diplodactylidae: Strophurus) from north Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Vanderduys, Eric

    2016-06-01

    A new species of diplodactylid gecko in the genus Strophurus Fitzinger, from north Queensland, Australia, is described herein as Strophurus congoo sp. nov. It is a small, pale grey to tan, unpatterned or faintly striped gecko, resembling the phasmid geckos in appearance, habitat and behaviour. However, within Strophurus it is not closely related to the phasmid geckos. It is distinguished from all other Strophurus by a combination of even scalation, dull colouration, small size and short tail length. It is only known to occur in a restricted area of the northern Great Dividing Range, within the Einasleigh Uplands bioregion, in a relatively infertile area of rolling, largely granitic hills, and is only known from spinifex (Triodia) hummock grasslands in open woodland.

  15. Caiman periodontium as an intermediate between basal vertebrate ankylosis-type attachment and mammalian "true" periodontium.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, James E; Anderton, Xochitl; Flores-De-Jacoby, Lavinia; Carlson, David S; Shuler, Charles F; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2002-12-01

    The teeth of many fish, amphibia, and reptiles are attached to the alveolar bone via ankylosis. In contrast, mammalian periodontia are characterized by a gomphosis, an attachment of the tooth root in the alveolar bone socket via periodontal ligament fibers. Among the reptiles, the crocodilians are the only group featuring a gomphosis-type connection between tooth root and alveolar bone, while in other reptiles tooth-root and jawbone are connected via ankylosis. The purpose of the present study was to compare several key features of the crocodilian periodontium with those of the mammalian and noncrocodilian reptile periodontium. As experimental models for our study we chose the periodontium of newborn geckos (Hemidacylus turcicus), juvenile caimans (Caiman crocodilus crocodilus), and 10-day-postnatal Swiss-Webster mice (Mus musculus) as representative models for noncrocodilian reptiles, crocodilian reptiles, and mammals. The caiman periodontium emerged as an intermediary between the mineral-free mouse ligament and the mineralized gecko ankylosis-type attachment. Caiman ligament fibers were less organized than mouse ligament fibers but featured distinct fasciae surrounding ligament fiber bundles. Caiman Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) was similarly perforated as mouse HERS and distinctly different from the continuous gecko HERS. Both caiman and mouse HERS covered the entire tooth root length, while in the gecko HERS was limited to the coronal portion of the root, allowing for cementoid-mediated ankylosis at the apical tip of the root. We interpret our data to indicate distinct differences in mineral distribution, periodontal ligament fiber organization, and HERS distribution between noncrocodilian reptiles, crocodilian reptiles, and mammals. Mineral deposits in the caiman ligament may reflect an evolutionary position of the caiman periodontium between ankylosis and gomphosis.

  16. Reverse adhesion of a gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive switched by an ion-exchange polymer-metal composite actuator.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Jie; Liu, Rui; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Li-Ming; Fang, Shao-Ming; Elliott, Winston Howard; Tan, Wei

    2015-03-11

    Inspired by how geckos abduct, rotate, and adduct their setal foot toes to adhere to different surfaces, we have developed an artificial muscle material called ion-exchange polymer-metal composite (IPMC), which, as a synthetic adhesive, is capable of changing its adhesion properties. The synthetic adhesive was cast from a Si template through a sticky colloid precursor of poly(methylvinylsiloxane) (PMVS). The PMVS array of setal micropillars had a high density of pillars (3.8 × 10(3) pillars/mm(2)) with a mean diameter of 3 μm and a pore thickness of 10 μm. A graphene oxide monolayer containing Ag globular nanoparticles (GO/Ag NPs) with diameters of 5-30 nm was fabricated and doped in an ion-exchanging Nafion membrane to improve its carrier transfer, water-saving, and ion-exchange capabilities, which thus enhanced the electromechanical response of IPMC. After being attached to PMVS micropillars, IPMC was actuated by square wave inputs at 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V to bend back and forth, driving the micropillars to actively grip or release the surface. To determine the adhesion of the micropillars, the normal adsorption and desorption forces were measured as the IPMC drives the setal micropillars to grip and release, respectively. Adhesion results demonstrated that the normal adsorption forces were 5.54-, 14.20-, and 23.13-fold higher than the normal desorption forces under 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V, respectively. In addition, shear adhesion or friction increased by 98, 219, and 245%, respectively. Our new technique provides advanced design strategies for reversible gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives, which might be used for spiderman-like wall-climbing devices with unprecedented performance.

  17. [The processing of Gekko gecko and the pharmacological action of its different parts].

    PubMed

    Gong, Q; Yu, R; Wang, W; Zhang, D; Den, S; Dai J

    1998-04-01

    Both pharmacologic and toxic experiments are made on different parts of Gekko gecko Linnaeus. The results show that Gekko gecko Linnaeus' heads and its feet have obvious pharmacological action without any toxic or side effects, which provides a sound basis for the increase in its clinical utilization and the expansion of its medicinal parts as well as guarantee of safety and effectiveness after taking the medicine.

  18. Changes in materials properties explain the effects of humidity on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Puthoff, Jonathan B; Prowse, Michael S; Wilkinson, Matt; Autumn, Kellar

    2010-11-01

    Geckos owe their remarkable stickiness to millions of dry setae on their toes, and the mechanism of adhesion in gecko setae has been the topic of scientific scrutiny for over two centuries. Previously, we demonstrated that van der Waals forces are sufficient for strong adhesion and friction in gecko setae, and that water-based capillary adhesion is not required. However, recent studies demonstrated that adhesion increases with relative humidity (RH) and proposed that surface hydration and capillary water bridge formation is important or even necessary. In this study, we confirmed a significant effect of RH on gecko adhesion, but rejected the capillary adhesion hypothesis. While contact forces of isolated tokay gecko setal arrays increased with humidity, the increase was similar on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, inconsistent with a capillary mechanism. Contact forces increased with RH even at high shear rates, where capillary bridge formation is too slow to affect adhesion. How then can a humidity-related increase in adhesion and friction be explained? The effect of RH on the mechanical properties of setal β-keratin has escaped consideration until now. We discovered that an increase in RH softens setae and increases viscoelastic damping, which increases adhesion. Changes in setal materials properties, not capillary forces, fully explain humidity-enhanced adhesion, and van der Waals forces remain the only empirically supported mechanism of adhesion in geckos. PMID:20952618

  19. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-01-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536] PMID:26246284

  20. Gecko proteins induce the apoptosis of bladder cancer 5637 cells by inhibiting Akt and activating the intrinsic caspase cascade.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun-Young; Park, Soon Yong; Jo, Ara; Kim, Mira; Leem, Sun-Hee; Jun, Woo-Jin; Shim, Sang In; Lee, Sang Chul; Chung, Jin Woong

    2015-09-01

    Gecko proteins have long been used as anti-tumor agents in oriental medicine, without any scientific background. Although anti-tumor effects of Gecko proteins on several cancers were recently reported, their effect on bladder cancer has not been investigated. Thus, we explored the anti-tumor effect of Gecko proteins and its cellular mechanisms in human bladder cancer 5637 cells. Gecko proteins significantly reduced the viability of 5637 cells without any cytotoxic effect on normal cells. These proteins increased the Annexin-V staining and the amount of condensed chromatin, demonstrating that the Gecko proteinsinduced cell death was caused by apoptosis. Gecko proteins suppressed Akt activation, and the overexpression of constitutively active form of myristoylated Akt prevented Gecko proteins-induced death of 5637 cells. Furthermore, Gecko proteins activated caspase 9 and caspase 3/7. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Gecko proteins suppressed the Akt pathway and activated the intrinsic caspase pathway, leading to the apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 531-536].

  1. Direct evidence of phospholipids in gecko footprints and spatula-substrate contact interface detected using surface-sensitive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ping Yuan; Ge, Liehui; Li, Xiaopeng; Stark, Alyssa Y; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-04-01

    Observers ranging from Aristotle to young children have long marvelled at the ability of geckos to cling to walls and ceilings. Detailed studies have revealed that geckos are 'sticky' without the use of glue or suction devices. Instead, a gecko's stickiness derives from van der Waals interactions between proteinaceous hairs called setae and substrate. Here, we present surprising evidence that although geckos do not use glue, a residue is transferred on surfaces as they walk-geckos leave footprints. Using matrix-free nano-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry, we identified the residue as phospholipids with phosphocholine head groups. Moreover, interface-sensitive sum-frequency generation spectroscopy revealed predominantly hydrophobic methyl and methylene groups and the complete absence of water at the contact interface between a gecko toe pad and the substrate. The presence of lipids has never been considered in current models of gecko adhesion. Our analysis of gecko footprints and the toe pad-substrate interface has significant consequences for models of gecko adhesion and by extension, the design of synthetic mimics.

  2. The neurobiology of attachment.

    PubMed

    Insel, T R; Young, L J

    2001-02-01

    It is difficult to think of any behavioural process that is more intrinsically important to us than attachment. Feeding, sleeping and locomotion are all necessary for survival, but humans are, as Baruch Spinoza famously noted, "a social animal" and it is our social attachments that we live for. Over the past decade, studies in a range of vertebrates, including humans, have begun to address the neural basis of attachment at a molecular, cellular and systems level. This review describes some of the important insights from this work.

  3. Bacterial Production and Growth Rate Estimation from [3H]Thymidine Incorporation for Attached and Free-Living Bacteria in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Iriberri, Juan; Unanue, Marian; Ayo, Begoña; Barcina, Isabel; Egea, Luis

    1990-01-01

    Production and specific growth rates of attached and free-living bacteria were estimated in an oligotrophic marine system, La Salvaje Beach, Vizcaya, Spain, and in a freshwater system having a higher nutrient concentration, Butron River, Vizcaya, Spain. Production was calculated from [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation by estimating specific conversion factors (cells or micrograms of C produced per mole of thymidine incorporated) for attached and free-living bacteria, respectively, in each system. Conversion factors were not statistically different between attached and free-living bacteria: 6.812 × 1011 and 8.678 × 1011 μg of C mol−1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the freshwater system, and 1.276 × 1011 and 1.354 × 1011 μg of C mol−1 for free-living and attached bacteria in the marine system. Therefore, use of a unique conversion factor for the mixed bacterial population is well founded. However, conversion factors were higher in the freshwater system than in the marine system. This could be due to the different trophic conditions of the two systems. Free-living bacteria contributed the most to production in the two systems (85% in the marine system and 67% in the freshwater system) because of their greater contribution to total biomass. Specific growth rates calculated from production data and biomass data were similar for attached and free-living bacteria. PMID:16348123

  4. Bacterial production and growth rate estimation from ( sup 3 H)thymidine incorporation for attached and free-living bacteria in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Ayo, B.; Barcina, I., Egea, L. )

    1990-02-01

    Production and specific growth rates of attached and free-living bacteria were estimated in an oligotrophic marine system, La Salvaje Beach, Vizcaya, Spain, and in a freshwater system having a higher nutrient concentration, Butron River, Vizcaya, Spain. Production was calculated from (methyl-{sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation by estimating specific conversion factors (cells or micrograms of C produced per mole of thymidine incorporated) for attached and free-living bacteria, respectively, in each system. Conversion factors were not statistically different between attached and free-living bacteria: 6.812 {times} 10{sup 11} and 8.678 {times} 10{sup 11} {mu}g of C mol{sup {minus}1} for free-living and attached bacteria in the freshwater system, and 1.276 {times} 10{sup 11} and 1.354 {times} 10{sup 11} {mu}g of C mol{sup {minus}1} for free-living and attached bacteria in the marine system. Therefore, use of a unique conversion factor for the mixed bacterial population is well founded. However, conversion factors were higher in the freshwater system than in the marine system. This could be due to the different tropic conditions of the two systems. Free-living bacteria contributed the most to production in the two systems (85% in the marine system and 67% in the freshwater system) because of their greater contribution to total biomass. Specific growth rates calculated from production data and biomass data were similar for attached and free-living bacteria.

  5. Strong, reversible underwater adhesion via gecko-inspired hydrophobic fibers.

    PubMed

    Soltannia, Babak; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-12-24

    Strong, reversible underwater adhesion using gecko-inspired surfaces is achievable through the use of a hydrophobic structural material and does not require surface modification or suction cup effects for this adhesion to be effective. Increased surface energy can aid in dry adhesion in an air environment but strongly degrades wet adhesion via reduction of interfacial energy underwater. A direct comparison of structurally identical but chemically different mushroom shaped fibers shows that strong, reversible adhesion, even in a fully wetted, stable state, is feasible underwater if the structural material of the fibers is hydrophobic and the mating surface is not strongly hydrophilic. The exact adhesion strength will be a function of the underwater interfacial energy between surfaces and the specific failure modes of individual fibers. This underwater adhesion has been calculated to be potentially greater than the dry adhesion for specific combinations of hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Gecko inspired carbon nanotube based thermal gap pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Sunny; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Thermal management has become a critical factor in designing the next generation of microprocessors. The bottleneck in design of material for efficient heat transfer from electronic units to heat sinks is to enhance heat flow across interface between two dissimilar, rough surfaces. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been shown to be promising candidates for thermal transport. However, the heat transport across the interface continues to be a challenging hurdle. In the current work we designed free standing thermal pads based on gecko-inspired carbon nanotube adhesives. The pads were made of metallic carbon nanotubes and the structure was designed such that it would allow large area of intimate contact. We showed that these adhesive pads can be used as electrical and thermal interconnects.

  7. Evaluation of Underwater Adhesives and Friction Coatings for In Situ Attachment of Fiber Optic Sensor System for Subsea Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Le, Suy Q.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Smith, Frederick D.; Tapia, Alma S.; Brower, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrity and performance monitoring of subsea pipelines and structures provides critical information for managing offshore oil and gas production operation and preventing environmentally damaging and costly catastrophic failure. Currently pipeline monitoring devices require ground assembly and installation prior to the underwater deployment of the pipeline. A monitoring device that could be installed in situ on the operating underwater structures could enhance the productivity and improve the safety of current offshore operation. Through a Space Act Agreement (SAA) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Astro Technology, Inc. (ATI), JSC provides technical expertise and testing facilities to support the development of fiber optic sensor technologies by ATI. This paper details the first collaboration effort between NASA JSC and ATI in evaluating underwater applicable adhesives and friction coatings for attaching fiber optic sensor system to subsea pipeline. A market survey was conducted to examine different commercial ]off ]the ]shelf (COTS) underwater adhesive systems and to select adhesive candidates for testing and evaluation. Four COTS epoxy based underwater adhesives were selected and evaluated. The adhesives were applied and cured in simulated seawater conditions and then evaluated for application characteristics and adhesive strength. The adhesive that demonstrated the best underwater application characteristics and highest adhesive strength were identified for further evaluation in developing an attachment system that could be deployed in the harsh subsea environment. Various friction coatings were also tested in this study to measure their shear strengths for a mechanical clamping design concept for attaching fiber optic sensor system. A COTS carbide alloy coating was found to increase the shear strength of metal to metal clamping interface by up to 46 percent. This study provides valuable data for

  8. Attachment-related psychodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Phillip R; Mikulincer, Mario

    2002-09-01

    Because there has been relatively little communication and cross-fertilization between the two major lines of research on adult attachment, one based on coded narrative assessments of defensive processes, the other on simple self-reports of 'attachment style' in close relationships, we here explain and review recent work based on a combination of self-report and other kinds of method, including behavioral observations and unconscious priming techniques. The review indicates that considerable progress has been made in testing central hypotheses derived from attachment theory and in exploring unconscious, psychodynamic processes related to affect-regulation and attachment-system activation. The combination of self-report assessment of attachment style and experimental manipulation of other theoretically pertinent variables allows researchers to test causal hypotheses. We present a model of normative and individual-difference processes related to attachment and identify areas in which further research is needed and likely to be successful. One long-range goal is to create a more complete theory of personality built on attachment theory and other object relations theories.

  9. Physical and metallurgical considerations of failures of soldered bars in bar attachment systems for implant overdentures: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Waddell, J Neil; Payne, Alan G T; Swain, Michael V

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify the etiological factors of failure of soldered bars in bar attachment systems for removable implant overdentures. A search of MEDLINE using the key words "bar attachment systems" was performed of English language peer-reviewed journals published between 1975 and 2005. Clinical studies of implant overdentures with prosthodontic maintenance complications of bar attachment systems were identified to establish the perceived etiology of failure. A further search of MEDLINE using the key words "solder joint" was also performed of the fixed prosthodontic literature to identify specific factors affecting the strength, fatigue resistance, and quality of gold solder joints used for bar attachment systems. The first search on bar attachment systems produced evidence of low failure rates of interabutment bars, but higher failure rates of bars where distal cantilever extensions were used. There were no explanations or descriptions of the nature of those failures in the clinical studies reviewed. The second search on fixed prosthodontic literature identified multiple factors that could potentially relate to the failed solder joints with bar attachments. Two potential sites of failure in bar attachments with distal cantilevers were identified, and a simple estimate of the tensile stresses at the solder joints was performed. The values found are comparable to the fatigue failure stresses reported in the searched literature.

  10. A Jungian contribution to a dynamic systems understanding of disorganized attachment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Linda

    2011-06-01

    This panel emerged from shared clinical concerns when working with adult patients whose presentation style was reminiscent of a disorganized (Type D) infant attachment pattern. Psychotherapeutic work with such patients poses complicated transference and countertransference dilemmas which are addressed by all four panellists via theory and clinical vignettes. In common is an interest in contemporary attachment, neuroscience and trauma theories and their relationship to analytical psychology. Intergenerational trauma seems to be a salient factor in the evolution of fragmented and fragmenting interactions that lead to failures in self-coherence and healthy interpersonal relationships. Such early relational trauma is compounded by further episodes of abuse and neglect leading to failure in a core sense of self. These clinicians share how they have integrated theory and practice in order to help dissociated and disorganized patients to transform their dark and extraordinary suffering through implicit and explicit experiences with the analyst into new, life giving patterns of relationship with self and others. The alchemy of transformation, both positive and negative, is evident in the case material presented. PMID:21675978

  11. Physiological Status Drives Metabolic Rate in Mediterranean Geckos Infected with Pentastomes

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Isabel C.; Sakla, Andrew J.; Detwiler, Jillian T.; Le Gall, Marion; Behmer, Spencer T.; Criscione, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Negative effects of parasites on their hosts are well documented, but the proximate mechanisms by which parasites reduce their host’s fitness are poorly understood. For example, it has been suggested that parasites might be energetically demanding. However, a recent meta-analysis suggests that they have statistically insignificant effects on host resting metabolic rate (RMR). It is possible, though, that energetic costs associated with parasites are only manifested during and/or following periods of activity. Here, we measured CO2 production (a surrogate for metabolism) in Mediterranean geckos (Hemidactylus turcicus) infected with a lung parasite, the pentastome Raillietiella indica, under two physiological conditions: rested and recently active. In rested geckos, there was a negative, but non-significant association between the number of pentastomes (i.e., infection intensity) and CO2 production. In recently active geckos (chased for 3 minutes), we recorded CO2 production from its maximum value until it declined to a stationary phase. We analyzed this decline as a 3 phase function (initial decline, secondary decline, stationary). Geckos that were recently active showed, in the secondary phase, a significant decrease in CO2 production as pentastome intensity increased. Moreover, duration of the secondary phase showed a significant positive association with the number of pentastomes. These results suggest that the intensity of pentastome load exerts a weak effect on the metabolism of resting geckos, but a strong physiological effect on geckos that have recently been active; we speculate this occurs via mechanical constraints on breathing. Our results provide a potential mechanism by which pentastomes can reduce gecko fitness. PMID:26657838

  12. Physiological Status Drives Metabolic Rate in Mediterranean Geckos Infected with Pentastomes.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Isabel C; Sakla, Andrew J; Detwiler, Jillian T; Le Gall, Marion; Behmer, Spencer T; Criscione, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Negative effects of parasites on their hosts are well documented, but the proximate mechanisms by which parasites reduce their host's fitness are poorly understood. For example, it has been suggested that parasites might be energetically demanding. However, a recent meta-analysis suggests that they have statistically insignificant effects on host resting metabolic rate (RMR). It is possible, though, that energetic costs associated with parasites are only manifested during and/or following periods of activity. Here, we measured CO2 production (a surrogate for metabolism) in Mediterranean geckos (Hemidactylus turcicus) infected with a lung parasite, the pentastome Raillietiella indica, under two physiological conditions: rested and recently active. In rested geckos, there was a negative, but non-significant association between the number of pentastomes (i.e., infection intensity) and CO2 production. In recently active geckos (chased for 3 minutes), we recorded CO2 production from its maximum value until it declined to a stationary phase. We analyzed this decline as a 3 phase function (initial decline, secondary decline, stationary). Geckos that were recently active showed, in the secondary phase, a significant decrease in CO2 production as pentastome intensity increased. Moreover, duration of the secondary phase showed a significant positive association with the number of pentastomes. These results suggest that the intensity of pentastome load exerts a weak effect on the metabolism of resting geckos, but a strong physiological effect on geckos that have recently been active; we speculate this occurs via mechanical constraints on breathing. Our results provide a potential mechanism by which pentastomes can reduce gecko fitness. PMID:26657838

  13. Extension of the CAPRAM mechanism with the improved mechanism generator GECKO-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, Peter; Mouchel-Vallon, Camille; Tilgner, Andreas; Wolke, Ralf; Aumont, Bernard; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Organic compounds are an ubiquitous constituent of the tropospheric multiphase system. With either biogenic or anthropogenic sources, they have a major influence on the atmospheric multiphase system and thus have become a main research topic within the last decades. Modelling can provide a useful tool to explore the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. While in the gas phase several comprehensive near-explicit mechanisms exist, in the aqueous phase those mechanisms are very limited. The current study aims to advance the currently most comprehensive aqueous phase mechanism CAPRAM 3.0 by means of automated mechanism construction. Therefore, the mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere; see Aumont et al., 2005) has been advanced to the aqueous phase. A protocol has been designed for automated mechanism construction based on reviewed experimental data and evaluated prediction methods. The generator is able to describe the oxidation of aliphatic organic compounds by OH and NO3. For the mechanism construction, mainly structure-activity relationships are used, which are completed by Evans-Polanyi-type correlations and further suitable estimates. GECKO-A has been used to create new CAPRAM versions, where branching ratios are introduced and new chemical subsystems with species with up to 4 carbon atoms are added. The currently most comprehensive version, CAPRAM 3.7, includes about 2000 aqueous phase species and more than 3300 reactions in the aqueous phase. Box model studies have been performed using a meteorological scenario with non-permanent clouds. Besides the investigation of the concentration-time profiles, detailed time-resolved flux analyses have been performed. Several aqueous phase subsystems have been investigated, such as the formation of oxidised mono- and diacids in the aqueous phase, as well as interactions to inorganic cycles and the influence on the gas phase chemistry and composition. Results

  14. Extension of the CAPRAM mechanism with the improved mechanism generator GECKO-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H.; Bräuer, P.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Tilgner, A.; Wolke, R.; Aumont, B.

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of organic compounds in natural and anthropogenically influenced eco-systems has put these compounds into the focus of environmental research. To investigate the chemistry of organic compounds in the tropospheric multiphase system, modelling can provide a useful tool. While in the gas phase several comprehensive near-explicit mechanisms exist, in the aqueous phase those mechanisms are very limited. The present study aims to advance the currently most comprehensive aqueous phase mechanism CAPRAM 3.0n (Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010; Bräuer et al., 2013) by means of automated mechanism self-construction. Therefore, the mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere; see Aumont et al., 2005) has been advanced to the aqueous phase. A protocol has been designed for automated mechanism construction based on reviewed experimental data and evaluated prediction methods. The generator is able to describe the oxidation of aliphatic organic compounds by OH and NO3. For the mechanism construction, mainly structure-activity relationships are used. They are completed by Evans-Polanyi-type correlations, which have been further improved for the purpose of automated mechanism self-construction. GECKO-A has been used to create new CAPRAM versions, where branching ratios are introduced and new chemical subsystems with species with up to 4 carbon atoms are added. The currently most comprehensive version, CAPRAM 3.5alpha, includes about 2000 aqueous phase species and more than 3300 reactions in the aqueous phase. Process studies with the box model SPACCIM (SPectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model; Wolke et al., 2005) have been performed using a meteorological scenario with non-permanent clouds. Besides the investigation of the concentration-time profiles, detailed time-resolved flux analyses have been performed. Several aqueous phase subsystems have been investigated, such as the formation of

  15. The oxytocin system promotes resilience to the effects of neonatal isolation on adult social attachment in female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Barrett, C E; Arambula, S E; Young, L J

    2015-07-21

    Genes and social experiences interact to create variation in social behavior and vulnerability to develop disorders of the social domain. Socially monogamous prairie voles display remarkable diversity in neuropeptide receptor systems and social behavior. Here, we examine the interaction of early-life adversity and brain oxytocin receptor (OTR) density on adult social attachment in female prairie voles. First, pups were isolated for 3 h per day, or unmanipulated, from postnatal day 1-14. Adult subjects were tested on the partner preference (PP) test to assess social attachment and OTR density in the brain was quantified. Neonatal social isolation impaired female PP formation, without affecting OTR density. Accumbal OTR density was, however, positively correlated with the percent of time spent huddling with the partner in neonatally isolated females. Females with high accumbal OTR binding were resilient to neonatal isolation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that parental nurturing shapes neural systems underlying social relationships by enhancing striatal OTR signaling. Thus, we next determined whether early touch, mimicking parental licking and grooming, stimulates hypothalamic OT neuron activity. Tactile stimulation induced immediate-early gene activity in OT neurons in neonates. Finally, we investigated whether pharmacologically potentiating OT release using a melanocortin 3/4 agonist, melanotan-II (10 mg kg(-1) subcutaneously), would mitigate the social isolation-induced impairments in attachment behavior. Neonatal melanotan-II administration buffered against the effects of early isolation on partner preference formation. Thus, variation in accumbal OTR density and early OT release induced by parental nurturing may moderate susceptibility to early adverse experiences, including neglect.

  16. The oxytocin system promotes resilience to the effects of neonatal isolation on adult social attachment in female prairie voles

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, C E; Arambula, S E; Young, L J

    2015-01-01

    Genes and social experiences interact to create variation in social behavior and vulnerability to develop disorders of the social domain. Socially monogamous prairie voles display remarkable diversity in neuropeptide receptor systems and social behavior. Here, we examine the interaction of early-life adversity and brain oxytocin receptor (OTR) density on adult social attachment in female prairie voles. First, pups were isolated for 3 h per day, or unmanipulated, from postnatal day 1–14. Adult subjects were tested on the partner preference (PP) test to assess social attachment and OTR density in the brain was quantified. Neonatal social isolation impaired female PP formation, without affecting OTR density. Accumbal OTR density was, however, positively correlated with the percent of time spent huddling with the partner in neonatally isolated females. Females with high accumbal OTR binding were resilient to neonatal isolation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that parental nurturing shapes neural systems underlying social relationships by enhancing striatal OTR signaling. Thus, we next determined whether early touch, mimicking parental licking and grooming, stimulates hypothalamic OT neuron activity. Tactile stimulation induced immediate-early gene activity in OT neurons in neonates. Finally, we investigated whether pharmacologically potentiating OT release using a melanocortin 3/4 agonist, melanotan-II (10 mg kg−1 subcutaneously), would mitigate the social isolation-induced impairments in attachment behavior. Neonatal melanotan-II administration buffered against the effects of early isolation on partner preference formation. Thus, variation in accumbal OTR density and early OT release induced by parental nurturing may moderate susceptibility to early adverse experiences, including neglect. PMID:26196439

  17. The oxytocin system promotes resilience to the effects of neonatal isolation on adult social attachment in female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Barrett, C E; Arambula, S E; Young, L J

    2015-01-01

    Genes and social experiences interact to create variation in social behavior and vulnerability to develop disorders of the social domain. Socially monogamous prairie voles display remarkable diversity in neuropeptide receptor systems and social behavior. Here, we examine the interaction of early-life adversity and brain oxytocin receptor (OTR) density on adult social attachment in female prairie voles. First, pups were isolated for 3 h per day, or unmanipulated, from postnatal day 1-14. Adult subjects were tested on the partner preference (PP) test to assess social attachment and OTR density in the brain was quantified. Neonatal social isolation impaired female PP formation, without affecting OTR density. Accumbal OTR density was, however, positively correlated with the percent of time spent huddling with the partner in neonatally isolated females. Females with high accumbal OTR binding were resilient to neonatal isolation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that parental nurturing shapes neural systems underlying social relationships by enhancing striatal OTR signaling. Thus, we next determined whether early touch, mimicking parental licking and grooming, stimulates hypothalamic OT neuron activity. Tactile stimulation induced immediate-early gene activity in OT neurons in neonates. Finally, we investigated whether pharmacologically potentiating OT release using a melanocortin 3/4 agonist, melanotan-II (10 mg kg(-1) subcutaneously), would mitigate the social isolation-induced impairments in attachment behavior. Neonatal melanotan-II administration buffered against the effects of early isolation on partner preference formation. Thus, variation in accumbal OTR density and early OT release induced by parental nurturing may moderate susceptibility to early adverse experiences, including neglect. PMID:26196439

  18. Detection rates of geckos in visual surveys: Turning confounding variables into useful knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lardner, Bjorn; Rodda, Gordon H.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Savidge, Julie A.; Reed, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Transect surveys without some means of estimating detection probabilities generate population size indices prone to bias because survey conditions differ in time and space. Knowing what causes such bias can help guide the collection of relevant survey covariates, correct the survey data, anticipate situations where bias might be unacceptably large, and elucidate the ecology of target species. We used negative binomial regression to evaluate confounding variables for gecko (primarily Hemidactylus frenatus and Lepidodactylus lugubris) counts on 220-m-long transects surveyed at night, primarily for snakes, on 9,475 occasions. Searchers differed in gecko detection rates by up to a factor of six. The worst and best headlamps differed by a factor of at least two. Strong winds had a negative effect potentially as large as those of searchers or headlamps. More geckos were seen during wet weather conditions, but the effect size was small. Compared with a detection nadir during waxing gibbous (nearly full) moons above the horizon, we saw 28% more geckos during waning crescent moons below the horizon. A sine function suggested that we saw 24% more geckos at the end of the wet season than at the end of the dry season. Fluctuations on a longer timescale also were verified. Disturbingly, corrected data exhibited strong short-term fluctuations that covariates apparently failed to capture. Although some biases can be addressed with measured covariates, others will be difficult to eliminate as a significant source of error in longterm monitoring programs.

  19. Dynamics of gecko locomotion: a force-measuring array to measure 3D reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the interaction between each foot of an animal and the substrate is one of the most effective ways to understand the dynamics of legged locomotion. Here, a new facility - the force-measuring array (FMA) - was developed and applied to measure 3D reaction forces of geckos on different slope surfaces. The FMA consists of 16 3D sensors with resolution to the mN level. At the same time the locomotion behaviour of geckos freely moving on the FMA was recorded by high speed camera. The reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet measured by the FMA and correlated with locomotion behaviour provided enough information to reveal the mechanical and dynamic secrets of gecko locomotion. Moreover, dynamic forces were also measured by a force platform and correlated with locomotion behaviour. The difference between the forces measured by the two methods is discussed. From the results we conclude that FMA is the best way to obtain true reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet.

  20. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko.

  1. Sticking to the story: outstanding challenges in gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Stark, Alyssa Y; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The natural clinging ability of geckos has inspired hundreds of studies seeking design principles that could be applied to creating synthetic adhesives with the same performance capabilities as the gecko: adhesives that use no glue, are self-cleaning and reusable, and are insensitive to a wide range of surface chemistries and roughness. Important progress has been made, and the basic mechanics of how 'hairy' adhesives work have been faithfully reproduced, advancing theory in surface science and portending diverse practical applications. However, after 15 years, no synthetic mimic can yet perform as well as a gecko and simultaneously meet of all the criteria listed above. Moreover, processes for the production of inexpensive and scalable products are still not clearly in view. Here, we discuss our perspective on some of the gaps in understanding that still remain; these gaps in our knowledge should stimulate us to turn to deeper study of the way in which free-ranging geckos stick to the variety of surfaces found in their natural environments and to a more complete analysis of the materials composing the gecko toe pads. PMID:27030772

  2. Sticking to the story: outstanding challenges in gecko-inspired adhesives.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, Peter H; Stark, Alyssa Y; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The natural clinging ability of geckos has inspired hundreds of studies seeking design principles that could be applied to creating synthetic adhesives with the same performance capabilities as the gecko: adhesives that use no glue, are self-cleaning and reusable, and are insensitive to a wide range of surface chemistries and roughness. Important progress has been made, and the basic mechanics of how 'hairy' adhesives work have been faithfully reproduced, advancing theory in surface science and portending diverse practical applications. However, after 15 years, no synthetic mimic can yet perform as well as a gecko and simultaneously meet of all the criteria listed above. Moreover, processes for the production of inexpensive and scalable products are still not clearly in view. Here, we discuss our perspective on some of the gaps in understanding that still remain; these gaps in our knowledge should stimulate us to turn to deeper study of the way in which free-ranging geckos stick to the variety of surfaces found in their natural environments and to a more complete analysis of the materials composing the gecko toe pads.

  3. Folklore and traditional ecological knowledge of geckos in Southern Portugal: implications for conservation and science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and folklore are repositories of large amounts of information about the natural world. Ideas, perceptions and empirical data held by human communities regarding local species are important sources which enable new scientific discoveries to be made, as well as offering the potential to solve a number of conservation problems. We documented the gecko-related folklore and TEK of the people of southern Portugal, with the particular aim of understanding the main ideas relating to gecko biology and ecology. Our results suggest that local knowledge of gecko ecology and biology is both accurate and relevant. As a result of information provided by local inhabitants, knowledge of the current geographic distribution of Hemidactylus turcicus was expanded, with its presence reported in nine new locations. It was also discovered that locals still have some misconceptions of geckos as poisonous and carriers of dermatological diseases. The presence of these ideas has led the population to a fear of and aversion to geckos, resulting in direct persecution being one of the major conservation problems facing these animals. It is essential, from both a scientific and conservationist perspective, to understand the knowledge and perceptions that people have towards the animals, since, only then, may hitherto unrecognized pertinent information and conservation problems be detected and resolved. PMID:21892925

  4. Folklore and traditional ecological knowledge of geckos in Southern Portugal: implications for conservation and science.

    PubMed

    Ceríaco, Luis M P; Marques, Mariana P; Madeira, Natália C; Vila-Viçosa, Carlos M; Mendes, Paula

    2011-09-05

    Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and folklore are repositories of large amounts of information about the natural world. Ideas, perceptions and empirical data held by human communities regarding local species are important sources which enable new scientific discoveries to be made, as well as offering the potential to solve a number of conservation problems. We documented the gecko-related folklore and TEK of the people of southern Portugal, with the particular aim of understanding the main ideas relating to gecko biology and ecology. Our results suggest that local knowledge of gecko ecology and biology is both accurate and relevant. As a result of information provided by local inhabitants, knowledge of the current geographic distribution of Hemidactylus turcicus was expanded, with its presence reported in nine new locations. It was also discovered that locals still have some misconceptions of geckos as poisonous and carriers of dermatological diseases. The presence of these ideas has led the population to a fear of and aversion to geckos, resulting in direct persecution being one of the major conservation problems facing these animals. It is essential, from both a scientific and conservationist perspective, to understand the knowledge and perceptions that people have towards the animals, since, only then, may hitherto unrecognized pertinent information and conservation problems be detected and resolved.

  5. 24 CFR 350.11 - Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in Book-entry System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT BOOK-ENTRY PROCEDURES § 350.11 Notice of Attachment for Ginnie Mae Securities in... notice of attachment in any particular case or class of cases....

  6. Testing the island effect on phenotypic diversification: insights from the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Šmíd, Jiří; Sol, Daniel; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Island colonization is often assumed to trigger extreme levels of phenotypic diversification. Yet, empirical evidence suggests that it does not always so. In this study we test this hypothesis using a completely sampled mainland-island system, the arid clade of Hemidactylus, a group of geckos mainly distributed across Africa, Arabia and the Socotra Archipelago. To such purpose, we generated a new molecular phylogeny of the group on which we mapped body size and head proportions. We then explored whether island and continental taxa shared the same morphospace and differed in their disparities and tempos of evolution. Insular species produced the most extreme sizes of the radiation, involving accelerated rates of evolution and higher disparities compared with most (but not all) of the continental groups. In contrast, head proportions exhibited constant evolutionary rates across the radiation and similar disparities in islands compared with the continent. These results, although generally consistent with the notion that islands promote high morphological disparity, reveal at the same time a complex scenario in which different traits may experience different evolutionary patterns in the same mainland-island system and continental groups do not always present low levels of morphological diversification compared to insular groups.

  7. Testing the island effect on phenotypic diversification: insights from the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Šmíd, Jiří; Sol, Daniel; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Island colonization is often assumed to trigger extreme levels of phenotypic diversification. Yet, empirical evidence suggests that it does not always so. In this study we test this hypothesis using a completely sampled mainland-island system, the arid clade of Hemidactylus, a group of geckos mainly distributed across Africa, Arabia and the Socotra Archipelago. To such purpose, we generated a new molecular phylogeny of the group on which we mapped body size and head proportions. We then explored whether island and continental taxa shared the same morphospace and differed in their disparities and tempos of evolution. Insular species produced the most extreme sizes of the radiation, involving accelerated rates of evolution and higher disparities compared with most (but not all) of the continental groups. In contrast, head proportions exhibited constant evolutionary rates across the radiation and similar disparities in islands compared with the continent. These results, although generally consistent with the notion that islands promote high morphological disparity, reveal at the same time a complex scenario in which different traits may experience different evolutionary patterns in the same mainland-island system and continental groups do not always present low levels of morphological diversification compared to insular groups. PMID:27071837

  8. Attachment Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Edward F.

    1998-08-18

    The present invention includes an attachment apparatus comprising a rotation limiting member adapted to be threaded onto a threaded member; and a preload nut adapted to be threaded onto the threaded member. The rotation limiting member comprises a plurality of pins; and the preload nut comprises plurality of slots, preferably wherein the plurality of pins and the plurality of slots are the same in number, which is preferably three. The plurality of pins of the rotation limiting member are filled into a corresponding plurality of slots of the preload nut to form a rotatable unit adapted to be threaded onto the threaded member. In use, the rotatable unit is threaded onto the threaded member. The present invention thus provides a unitized removable device for holes, including holes other than circular in shape, which have an established depth before an end of, or before an enlargement of the hole. The configuration of some exposed part of the device, or the head, is shaped and formed for its intended purpose, such as clamping, anchor points, eye bolts, stud anchor, and the like. The device allows for the installation, preloading and removal of all components of the device, as a unit, without damage to the member for which attachment is required by simple rotations of some exposed part of the device.

  9. Borderline disorder and attachment pathology.

    PubMed

    West, M; Keller, A; Links, P; Patrick, J

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the theoretical and empirical association between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline personality disorder. Attachment theory focuses on the maintenance of a sense of safety and security through a close personal relationship with a particular person. Based on a biological behavioural system, functional attachment relationships in adulthood rely on experiences and expectations of security within the relationship. These issues are also important to the definition and dynamics of borderline personality disorder. The dimensions and patterns of reciprocal attachment were compared with other scales measuring components of psychopathology and interpersonal relationships. In a sample of 85 female outpatients, only four of the attachment scales--feared loss, secure base, compulsive care-seeking and angry withdrawal--identified patients with high scores on a measure of borderline disorder. Of these four scales, feared loss had the predominant effect. These empirical results support the hypothesized relationship between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline disorder.

  10. Highly durable and unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs for gecko-like dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyeon Seong; Kwon, Ki Yoon; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Kwang Su; Yi, Hoon; Yoo, Pil J.; Pang, Changhyun; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kim, Tae-il

    2015-10-01

    Gecko-like dry adhesive using high aspect ratio polymeric nanohairs has insuperable limitations, although it has huge potential in many applications. Repeated harsh contacts on a target substrate lead to physical collapse of nanohairs and significant degradation of the adhesion property, because the polymeric nanohairs are quite fragile due to poor mechanical robustness. Herein, we demonstrate a highly robust gecko-like dry adhesive with unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs (diameter 100 nm) with a high aspect ratio (∼9) using an ultrathin metal coating. 100 cycles of repeated adhesion tests with 1 N preloading force did not significantly degrade adhesion or cause collapse of nanohairs. We believe that this approach allows gecko-like dry adhesive to be utilized in many related applications and diverse industry interests.

  11. Role of seta angle and flexibility in the gecko adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Congcong; Alex Greaney, P.

    2014-08-01

    A model is developed to describe the reversible nature of gecko dry adhesion. The central aspect of this model is that the seta can be easily peeled away from the contacting surface by a small moment at the contact tip. It is shown that this contact condition is very sensitive, but can result in robust adhesion if individual setae are canted and highly flexible. In analogy to the "cone of friction," we consider the "adhesion region"—the domain of normal and tangential forces that maintain adhesion. Results demonstrate that this adhesion region is highly asymmetric enabling the gecko to adhere under a variety of loading conditions associated with scuttling horizontally, vertically, and inverted. Moreover, under each of these conditions, there is a low energy path to de-adhesion. In this model, obliquely canted seta (as possessed by geckos) rather than vertically aligned fibers (common in synthetic dry adhesive) provides the most robust adhesion.

  12. Highly durable and unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs for gecko-like dry adhesive.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyeon Seong; Kwon, Ki Yoon; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Kwang Su; Yi, Hoon; Yoo, Pil J; Pang, Changhyun; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kim, Tae-il

    2015-10-16

    Gecko-like dry adhesive using high aspect ratio polymeric nanohairs has insuperable limitations, although it has huge potential in many applications. Repeated harsh contacts on a target substrate lead to physical collapse of nanohairs and significant degradation of the adhesion property, because the polymeric nanohairs are quite fragile due to poor mechanical robustness. Herein, we demonstrate a highly robust gecko-like dry adhesive with unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs (diameter 100 nm) with a high aspect ratio (∼9) using an ultrathin metal coating. 100 cycles of repeated adhesion tests with 1 N preloading force did not significantly degrade adhesion or cause collapse of nanohairs. We believe that this approach allows gecko-like dry adhesive to be utilized in many related applications and diverse industry interests.

  13. Highly durable and unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs for gecko-like dry adhesive.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyeon Seong; Kwon, Ki Yoon; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Kwang Su; Yi, Hoon; Yoo, Pil J; Pang, Changhyun; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kim, Tae-il

    2015-10-16

    Gecko-like dry adhesive using high aspect ratio polymeric nanohairs has insuperable limitations, although it has huge potential in many applications. Repeated harsh contacts on a target substrate lead to physical collapse of nanohairs and significant degradation of the adhesion property, because the polymeric nanohairs are quite fragile due to poor mechanical robustness. Herein, we demonstrate a highly robust gecko-like dry adhesive with unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs (diameter 100 nm) with a high aspect ratio (∼9) using an ultrathin metal coating. 100 cycles of repeated adhesion tests with 1 N preloading force did not significantly degrade adhesion or cause collapse of nanohairs. We believe that this approach allows gecko-like dry adhesive to be utilized in many related applications and diverse industry interests. PMID:26391964

  14. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-02-23

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies.

  15. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  16. An Attachable Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Driven Wireless Sensing System Demonstrating Milling-Processes and Cutter-Wear/Breakage-Condition Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tien-Kan; Yeh, Po-Chen; Lee, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Tseng, Chia-Yung; Lo, Wen-Tuan; Wang, Chieh-Min; Wang, Wen-Chin; Tu, Chi-Jen; Tasi, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    An attachable electromagnetic-energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system for monitoring milling-processes and cutter-wear/breakage-conditions is demonstrated. The system includes an electromagnetic energy harvester, three single-axis Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers, a wireless chip module, and corresponding circuits. The harvester consisting of magnets with a coil uses electromagnetic induction to harness mechanical energy produced by the rotating spindle in milling processes and consequently convert the harnessed energy to electrical output. The electrical output is rectified by the rectification circuit to power the accelerometers and wireless chip module. The harvester, circuits, accelerometer, and wireless chip are integrated as an energy-harvester driven wireless vibration-sensing system. Therefore, this completes a self-powered wireless vibration sensing system. For system testing, a numerical-controlled machining tool with various milling processes is used. According to the test results, the system is fully self-powered and able to successfully sense vibration in the milling processes. Furthermore, by analyzing the vibration signals (i.e., through analyzing the electrical outputs of the accelerometers), criteria are successfully established for the system for real-time accurate simulations of the milling-processes and cutter-conditions (such as cutter-wear conditions and cutter-breaking occurrence). Due to these results, our approach can be applied to most milling and other machining machines in factories to realize more smart machining technologies. PMID:26907297

  17. The effect of contaminants on the adhesion of the spatulae of a gecko.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Mao, Chien-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Many researchers have reported that the robust adhesion that enables geckos to move quickly and securely across a range of vertical and horizontal surfaces is provided by the hierarchical structure of their feet (i.e. lamellae, setae, spatulae, etc.). Maintaining this robust adhesion requires an intimate contact between the terminal tips of the spatulae and the surface. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on the adhesive properties of the spatulae when a particle becomes trapped at the contact surface. Using the Johnson, Kendall and Roberts (JKR) theory, a model was constructed to assist in the analysis of the interactions between the spatula tip, the particle and the surface. The results showed that the keratin (the natural material of the spatula) provides a robust system for adhesion even when there is a particle in the contact area, and the effective contact area of spatulae will be 80%. When the particle is significantly harder than the surface, the adhesion properties of the contact surface influenced by the particle will be more obvious. The results also reveal that the generated adhesion is considerably higher when the spatula is in contact with a softer surface, such as wood or concrete, rather than a hard surface, such as glass or SiO2.

  18. Comparative evaluation of three attached growth systems and a constructed wetland for in situ treatment of raw municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Loupasaki, E; Diamadopoulos, E

    2013-01-01

    The necessity to treat municipal wastewaters in situ, with a low cost, yet effective system, led to the research of alternative methods for wastewater treatment. Attached growth systems can be an alternative option. Three attached growth systems with different media substrate, a rockwool cubes unit, a Kaldnes rings unit and a plastic bottle caps unit were studied in comparison with a constructed wetland in order to evaluate their ability to treat raw municipal wastewater. The selection of the three different media was based on their high porosity and surface area, as well as their availability and price. Three different operating periods were carried out with variations in the organic loading rate and the feeding frequency. The units were fed intermittently with short resting periods, less than 32 h, and relative high mean organic loading rates of 70, 50 and 30 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m2d), respectively for each operating period. The constructed wetland and the rockwool cubes unit were the most effective, with mean COD reduction as mass rate (mg/d) 88% and 88%, biological oxygen demand 78% and 76%, dissolved organic carbon 73% and 67%, and total suspended solids 91% and 92%, respectively. Total nitrogen reduction was significantly higher at the constructed wetland with mean reduction as mass rate 51%, 60% and 83% for each period, compared to 41%, 43% and 60%, respectively, of the rockwool cubes unit. This study showed that it is possible to design, build and operate in situ small and decentralized treatment systems by using readily available packing materials and with minimum wastewater pretreatment.

  19. Rate-dependent frictional adhesion in natural and synthetic gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Wilkinson, Matt; Sponberg, Simon; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noe; Soto, Daniel; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Broide, Michael; Cutkosky, Mark; Creton, Costantino; Autumn, Kellar

    2010-02-01

    Geckos owe their remarkable stickiness to millions of dry, hard setae on their toes. In this study, we discovered that gecko setae stick more strongly the faster they slide, and do not wear out after 30,000 cycles. This is surprising because friction between dry, hard, macroscopic materials typically decreases at the onset of sliding, and as velocity increases, friction continues to decrease because of a reduction in the number of interfacial contacts, due in part to wear. Gecko setae did not exhibit the decrease in adhesion or friction characteristic of a transition from static to kinetic contact mechanics. Instead, friction and adhesion forces increased at the onset of sliding and continued to increase with shear speed from 500 nm s(-1) to 158 mm s(-1). To explain how apparently fluid-like, wear-free dynamic friction and adhesion occur macroscopically in a dry, hard solid, we proposed a model based on a population of nanoscopic stick-slip events. In the model, contact elements are either in static contact or in the process of slipping to a new static contact. If stick-slip events are uncorrelated, the model further predicted that contact forces should increase to a critical velocity (V*) and then decrease at velocities greater than V*. We hypothesized that, like natural gecko setae, but unlike any conventional adhesive, gecko-like synthetic adhesives (GSAs) could adhere while sliding. To test the generality of our results and the validity of our model, we fabricated a GSA using a hard silicone polymer. While sliding, the GSA exhibited steady-state adhesion and velocity dependence similar to that of gecko setae. Observations at the interface indicated that macroscopically smooth sliding of the GSA emerged from randomly occurring stick-slip events in the population of flexible fibrils, confirming our model predictions.

  20. Why have not the hairs on the feet of gecko been smaller?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; He, Shijie; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Ji, Baohua

    2012-10-01

    The nanometer size of the tiny hair is the key to the secret of strong stickiness of gecko's feet, by which the hair can achieve the maximum adhesion strength that is insensitive to the interfacial flaws with substrate surface. But the question why the hairs have not been smaller is not answered yet. In this study, we derived a geometric parameter of the surface structures considering lateral interaction among hairs, which gives a critical size below which these hairs will bunch together and cause failure of the adhesion, suggesting a lower limit of the dimension of hairs on gecko's feet.

  1. Gecko-inspired bidirectional double-sided adhesives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-05-14

    A new concept of gecko-inspired double-sided adhesives (DSAs) is presented. The DSAs, constructed by dual-angled (i.e. angled base and angled tip) micro-pillars on both sides of the backplane substrate, are fabricated by combinations of angled etching, mould replication, tip modification, and curing bonding. Two types of DSA, symmetric and antisymmetric (i.e. pillars are patterned symmetrically or antisymmetrically relative to the backplane), are fabricated and studied in comparison with the single-sided adhesive (SSA) counterparts through both non-conformal and conformal tests. Results indicate that the DSAs show controllable and bidirectional adhesion. Combination of the two pillar-layers can either amplify (for the antisymmetric DSA, providing a remarkable and durable adhesion capacity of 25.8 ± 2.8 N cm⁻² and a high anisotropy ratio of ∼8) or counteract (for the symmetric DSA, generating almost isotropic adhesion) the adhesion capacity and anisotropic level of one SSA (capacity of 16.2 ± 1.7 N cm⁻² and anisotropy ratio of ∼6). We demonstrate that these two DSAs can be utilized as a facile fastener for two individual objects and a small-scale delivery setup, respectively, complementing the functionality of the commonly studied SSA. As such, the double-sided patterning is believed to be a new branch in the further development of biomimetic dry adhesives.

  2. Vertical anisotropic microfibers for a gecko-inspired adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2012-06-12

    Geckos are able to adhere strongly and release easily from surfaces because the structurally anisotropic fibers on their toes naturally exhibit force anisotropy based on the direction of articulation. Here, semicircular fibers, with varying amounts of contact area on the two faces, are investigated to ascertain whether fiber shape can be used to gain anisotropy in shear and shear adhesion forces. Testing of 10-μm-diameter polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibers against a 4-mm-diameter flat glass puck show that shear and shear adhesion forces were two to five times greater when in-plane movement caused the flat face, rather than the curved face, of the fiber to come in contact with the glass puck. The directional adhesion and shear force anisotropy results are close to theoretical approximations using the Kendall peel model and clearly demonstrate how fiber shape may be used to influence the properties of the adhesive. This result has broad applicability, and by combining the results shown here with other current vertical and angled designs, synthetic adhesives can be further improved to behave more like their natural counterparts.

  3. Proximal testicular ducts of the Mediterranean gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus).

    PubMed

    Rheubert, Justin L; Sever, David M; Geheber, Aaron D; Siegel, Dustin S

    2010-12-01

    The efferent ducts of the Mediterranean Gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus (Gekkonidae) were investigated using light and electron microscopy. The seminiferous tubules unite into a single rete testis tubule. The rete testis divides into 3-4 ductuli efferentes which all drain into the cranial portion of the ductus epididymis. All efferent ducts are most active during the months of December to August. The rete testis is composed of a simple squamous epithelium with bifurcated nuclei and a labyrinthine network of intercellular canaliculi. Ciliated and nonciliated cells are present, and more than one cilium extends from the scattered ciliated cells. The presence of small clear vesicles and widened intercellular canaliculi suggest that cells of the rete testis are responsible for intake of luminal fluids. The ductuli efferentes are composed of a simple cuboidal epithelium consisting of ciliated and nonciliated cells, and ciliated cells are the dominant cell type. During the inactive season the number of lysosomes increases and the cells become spermiophagic. The ductus epididymis is composed of a tall pseudostratified columnar epithelium with relatively scarce basal cells. No evidence for regionalization was observed. The ductus epididymis is highly secretory during the active season with numerous electron-dense secretory granules, whose glycoprotein products are released by merocrine secretion. Basally, the active epididymis has swollen intercellular canaliculi and enlarged cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum. During the inactive season the secretory activity decreases and membranous structures and fibrous material are observed within widened intercellular canaliculi apical to the basal cells.

  4. Bayesian species delimitation in West African forest geckos (Hemidactylus fasciatus)

    PubMed Central

    Leaché, Adam D.; Fujita, Matthew K.

    2010-01-01

    Genealogical data are an important source of evidence for delimiting species, yet few statistical methods are available for calculating the probabilities associated with different species delimitations. Bayesian species delimitation uses reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (rjMCMC) in conjunction with a user-specified guide tree to estimate the posterior distribution for species delimitation models containing different numbers of species. We apply Bayesian species delimitation to investigate the speciation history of forest geckos (Hemidactylus fasciatus) from tropical West Africa using five nuclear loci (and mtDNA) for 51 specimens representing 10 populations. We find that species diversity in H. fasciatus is currently underestimated, and describe three new species to reflect the most conservative estimate for the number of species in this complex. We examine the impact of the guide tree, and the prior distributions on ancestral population sizes (θ) and root age (τ0), on the posterior probabilities for species delimitation. Mis-specification of the guide tree or the prior distribution for θ can result in strong support for models containing more species. We describe a new statistic for summarizing the posterior distribution of species delimitation models, called speciation probabilities, which summarize the posterior support for each speciation event on the starting guide tree. PMID:20519219

  5. Removal Time and Efficacy of Riddell Quick Release Face Guard Attachment System Side Clips During 1 Football Season

    PubMed Central

    Gruppen, Tonia; Smith, Molly; Ganss, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Context In the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement, “Acute Management of the Cervical Spine-Injured Athlete,” the technique recommended for face-mask (FM) removal is one that “creates the least head and neck motion, is performed most quickly, is the least difficult, and carries the least chance of failure.” Industrial and technological advances in football helmet design and FM attachment systems might influence the efficacy of emergency FM removal. Objective To examine the removal times and success rates of the Quick Release (QR) Face Guard Attachment System (Riddell Sports, Inc, Elyria, OH) throughout and at the conclusion of 1 season of play by a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III football team competing in the Midwest. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting College laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 69 randomly selected Revolution IQ (Riddell Sports, Inc) football helmets fitted with the QR system were used. Intervention(s) Each helmet was secured to a spine board, and investigators attempted to remove both of the QR side clips from the helmet with the Riddell insertion tool. Main Outcome Measure(s) Dependent variables included total time for removal of both QR side clips from the FM and success rate for removal of both side clips. Results The overall success rate for removal of both clips was 94.8% (164/173), whereas the mean times for removal of both clips ranged from 9.92 ± 12.06 seconds to 16.65 ± 20.97 seconds over 4 trial sessions. We found no differences among mean times for trial sessions throughout the season of play among the same helmets or among different helmets (P > .05). Conclusions Removal time and success rate of the Riddell QR were satisfactory during and after 1 season of play despite use in various temperatures and precipitation. PMID:22889658

  6. The first cytogenetic description of Euleptes europaea (Gené, 1839) from Northern Sardinia reveals the highest diploid chromosome number among sphaerodactylid geckos (Sphaerodactylidae, Squamata).

    PubMed

    Gornung, Ekaterina; Mosconi, Fabio; Annesi, Flavia; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    The karyotype of a sphaerodactylid gecko Euleptes europaea (Gené, 1839) was assembled for the first time in this species. It is made of 2n = 42 gradually decreasing in size chromosomes, the highest chromosome number so far acknowledged in the family Sphaerodactylidae. The second chromosome pair of the karyotype appears slightly heteromorphic in the male individual. Accordingly, FISH with a telomeric probe revealed an uneven distribution of telomeric repeats on the two homologues of this pair, which may be indicative of an XY sex-determination system in the species, to be further investigated.

  7. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  8. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  9. Integrating Recovery and the Narrative Attachment Systems Perspective to Working through Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardon, Stephanie; Pernice-Duca, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) presents a number of symptoms and adjustment issues for individuals, but it is also associated with a myriad of risks for the larger family system. A systemic perspective is crucial to comprehending the development of BPD. Promoting healthy relationships with one or more supportive adult enables the child to…

  10. Nonlinear phenomena from a PIC-attached gold tip using a plasmonic-whispering gallery mode hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Takashima, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshito; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2013-09-01

    We proposed a plasmonic-WGM hybrid system composed of a tapered-fiber-coupled microsphere resonator and a PICattached gold tip to focus the incident light into a nanoscale domain (~728.8 nm2) with high coupling efficiency of ~80.3 % and the Q factor of ~1.9×106. In order to experimentally verify the strong interaction between light and matter owing to efficient excitation of localized surface plasmon at the gold-coated tip, we demonstrated to observe two-photon excited fluorescence from PIC dye molecules attached on the gold-coated tip even under a weak CW excitation condition via a tapered-fiber-coupled microsphere resonator.

  11. Comparison of the efficiencies of attached- versus suspended-growth SBR systems in the treatment of recycled paper mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Mohd Hafizuddin; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah; Abu Hasan, Hassimi; Abd Rahim, Reehan Adnee

    2015-11-01

    The complexity of residual toxic organics from biologically treated effluents of pulp and paper mills is a serious concern. To date, it has been difficult to choose the best treatment technique because each of the available options has advantages and drawbacks. In this study, two different treatment techniques using laboratory-scale aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were tested with the same real recycled paper mill effluent to evaluate their treatment efficiencies. Two attached-growth SBRs using granular activated carbon (GAC) with and without additional biomass and a suspended-growth SBR were used in the treatment of real recycled paper mill effluent at a chemical oxygen demand (COD) level in the range of 800-1300 mg/L, a fixed hydraulic retention time of 24 h and a COD:N:P ratio of approximately 100:5:1. The efficiency of this biological treatment process was studied over a 300-day period. The six most important wastewater quality parameters, namely, chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, ammonia (expressed as NH3-N), phosphorus (expressed as PO4(3)-P), colour, and suspended solids (SS), were measured to compare the different treatment techniques. It was determined that these processes were able to almost completely and simultaneously eliminate COD (99%) and turbidity (99%); the removals of NH3-N (90-100%), PO4(3)-P (66-78%), colour (63-91%), and SS (97-99%) were also sufficient. The overall performance results confirmed that an attached-growth SBR system using additional biomass on GAC is a promising configuration for wastewater treatment in terms of performance efficiency and process stability under fluctuations of organic load. Hence, this hybrid system is recommended for the treatment of pulp and paper mill effluents.

  12. Increasing the Power of a University Computing System with Attached Array Processors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimison, Alec

    1982-01-01

    Array processors are emerging as one cost-effective way of increasing the computing power of existing university computer systems. Two array processor installations at Cornell University and implications for other colleges and universities are discussed. (Author/JN)

  13. Emergency Face-Mask Removal Effectiveness: A Comparison of Traditional and Nontraditional Football Helmet Face-Mask Attachment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E.; Belmore, Keith; Decoster, Laura C.; Armstrong, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Football helmet face-mask attachment design changes might affect the effectiveness of face-mask removal. Objective: To compare the efficiency of face-mask removal between newly designed and traditional football helmets. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Applied biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Twenty-five certified athletic trainers. Intervention(s): The independent variable was face-mask attachment system on 5 levels: (1) Revolution IQ with Quick Release (QR), (2) Revolution IQ with Quick Release hardware altered (QRAlt), (3) traditional (Trad), (4) traditional with hardware altered (TradAlt), and (5) ION 4D (ION). Participants removed face masks using a cordless screwdriver with a back-up cutting tool or only the cutting tool for the ION. Investigators altered face-mask hardware to unexpectedly challenge participants during removal for traditional and Revolution IQ helmets. Participants completed each condition twice in random order and were blinded to hardware alteration. Main Outcome Measure(s): Removal success, removal time, helmet motion, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Time and 3-dimensional helmet motion were recorded. If the face mask remained attached at 3 minutes, the trial was categorized as unsuccessful. Participants rated each trial for level of difficulty (RPE). We used repeated-measures analyses of variance (α  =  .05) with follow-up comparisons to test for differences. Results: Removal success was 100% (48 of 48) for QR, Trad, and ION; 97.9% (47 of 48) for TradAlt; and 72.9% (35 of 48) for QRAlt. Differences in time for face-mask removal were detected (F4,20  =  48.87, P  =  .001), with times ranging from 33.96 ± 14.14 seconds for QR to 99.22 ± 20.53 seconds for QRAlt. Differences were found in range of motion during face-mask removal (F4,20  =  16.25, P  =  .001), with range of motion from 10.10° ± 3.07° for QR to 16.91° ± 5.36° for TradAlt. Differences also were detected

  14. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2013-01-21

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer 'smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  15. Friction and adhesion of gecko-inspired PDMS flaps on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Chary, Sathya; Das, Saurabh; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-08-01

    Geckos have developed a unique hierarchical structure to maintain climbing ability on surfaces with different roughness, one of the extremely important parameters that affect the friction and adhesion forces between two surfaces. Although much attention has been paid on fabricating various structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of a gecko foot, yet no systematic effort, in experiment or theory, has been made to quantify the effect of surface roughness on the performance of the fabricated structures that mimic the hierarchical structure of geckos. Using a modified surface forces apparatus (SFA), we measured the adhesion and friction forces between microfabricated tilted PDMS flaps and optically smooth SiO(2) and rough SiO(2) surfaces created by plasma etching. Anisotropic adhesion and friction forces were measured when sliding the top glass surface along (+y) and against (-y) the tilted direction of the flaps. Increasing the surface roughness first increased the adhesion and friction forces measured between the flaps and the rough surface due to topological matching of the two surfaces but then led to a rapid decrease in both of these forces. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness significantly affects the performance of gecko mimetic adhesives and that different surface textures can either increase or decrease the adhesion and friction forces of the fabricated adhesives.

  16. A detailed 3D finite element analysis of the peeling behaviour of a gecko spatula.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Roger A; Holl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed finite element analysis of the adhesion of a gecko spatula. The gecko spatulae form the tips of the gecko foot hairs that transfer the adhesional and frictional forces between substrate and foot. The analysis is based on a parameterised description of the 3D geometry of the spatula that only requires 12 parameters. The adhesion is described by a nonlinear computational contact formulation that accounts for the van der Waals interaction between spatula and substrate. The spatula adhesion model is implemented using an enriched contact finite element formulation recently developed by the first author. The finite element model is then used to simulate the peeling behaviour of the gecko spatula under applied vertical and rotational loading for various model parameters. Variations of the material stiffness, adhesional strength and range, stiction, spatula size and spatula inclination are considered to account for the natural variation of spatula properties. The study demonstrates that the spatula can function over a wide range of conditions. The computed pull-off forces are in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The study also examines the energy required for the spatula pull-off. The proposed model is ideal to study the influence of substrate roughness on the spatula adhesion, as is finally demonstrated.

  17. Patterns of diversification in islands: A comparative study across three gecko genera in the Socotra Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Morales, Hernán E; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Sindaco, Roberto; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    In this study we used the complete fauna of geckos of the Socotra Archipelago to test whether the three gecko genera co-occurring in the islands (Pristurus, Hemidactylus and Haemodracon) produced similar outcomes of morphological and climatic diversification. To test this, we produced a time-calibrated tree of 346 geckos including all 16 endemic species of the archipelago and 26 potential close-relatives in the continent. Our dating estimates revealed that most of the diversity of geckos in the archipelago was the consequence of in situ diversification. However not all genera shared similar patterns of diversification. While in Hemidactylus and Haemodracon this involved great differences in body size and low levels of climatic diversification (mostly involving sympatric distributions), an opposite pattern appeared in Pristurus in which most of the diversification involved shifts in climatic envelopes (mostly involving allopatric and parapatric distributions) but almost no size differentiation. Consistently with this, Pristurus was the only genus in which rates of size diversification in islands were substantially lower than in the continent. This illustrates how different groups can greatly differ in their patterns of intra-island diversification and highlights the importance of taxon-dependent factors at determining different patterns of diversification in the same insular context. PMID:26911521

  18. Footprints in the sand: independent reduction of subdigital lamellae in the Namib–Kalahari burrowing geckos

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Trip; Bauer, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Many desert organisms exhibit convergence, and certain physical factors such as windblown sands have generated remarkably similar ecomorphs across divergent lineages. The burrowing geckos Colopus, Chondrodactylus and Palmatogecko occupy dune ecosystems in the Namib and Kalahari deserts of southwest Africa. Considered closely related, they share several putative synapomorphies, including reduced subdigital pads (toe pads) and spinose digital scales. Though recognized as part of Africa's ecologically diverse Pachydactylus Group, the burrowing geckos' precise phylogenetic affinities remain elusive. Convergent pedal modification provides a tenable alternative explaining the geckos' derived terrestriality and adaptation to Namib and Kalahari sands. We generated a molecular phylogeny for the Pachydactylus Group to examine evolutionary relationships among the burrowing geckos and infer historical patterns of pedal character change. Bayesian and parsimony analyses revealed all three burrowing genera to be deeply nested within Pachydactylus, each genus belonging to a separate clade. Strong support for these distinct clades indicates ecomorphological adaptations for burrowing have evolved independently three times in the southern Pachydactylus Group. We argue that the physical properties of Namib and Kalahari sands played a principal role in selecting for pedal similarity. PMID:16618680

  19. Patterns of diversification in islands: A comparative study across three gecko genera in the Socotra Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Morales, Hernán E; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Sindaco, Roberto; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    In this study we used the complete fauna of geckos of the Socotra Archipelago to test whether the three gecko genera co-occurring in the islands (Pristurus, Hemidactylus and Haemodracon) produced similar outcomes of morphological and climatic diversification. To test this, we produced a time-calibrated tree of 346 geckos including all 16 endemic species of the archipelago and 26 potential close-relatives in the continent. Our dating estimates revealed that most of the diversity of geckos in the archipelago was the consequence of in situ diversification. However not all genera shared similar patterns of diversification. While in Hemidactylus and Haemodracon this involved great differences in body size and low levels of climatic diversification (mostly involving sympatric distributions), an opposite pattern appeared in Pristurus in which most of the diversification involved shifts in climatic envelopes (mostly involving allopatric and parapatric distributions) but almost no size differentiation. Consistently with this, Pristurus was the only genus in which rates of size diversification in islands were substantially lower than in the continent. This illustrates how different groups can greatly differ in their patterns of intra-island diversification and highlights the importance of taxon-dependent factors at determining different patterns of diversification in the same insular context.

  20. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2012-12-01

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer `smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  1. How do the substrate reaction forces acting on a gecko's limbs respond to inclines?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhouyi; Dai, Zhendong; Li, Wei; Ji, Aihong; Wang, Wenbao

    2015-02-01

    Locomotion is an essential character of animals, and excellent moving ability results from the delicate sensing of the substrate reaction forces (SRF) acting on body and modulating the behavior to adapt the motion requirement. The inclined substrates present in habitats pose a number of functional challenges to locomotion. In order to effectively overcome these challenges, climbing geckos execute complex and accurate movements that involve both the front and hind limbs. Few studies have examined gecko's SRF on steeper inclines of greater than 90°. To reveal how the SRFs acting on the front and hind limbs respond to angle incline changes, we obtained detailed measurements of the three-dimensional SRFs acting on the individual limbs of the tokay gecko while it climbed on an inclined angle of 0-180°. The fore-aft forces acting on the front and hind limbs show opposite trends on inverted inclines of greater than 120°, indicating propulsion mechanism changes in response to inclines. When the incline angles change, the forces exerted in the normal and fore-aft directions by gecko's front and hind limbs are reassigned to take full advantage of limbs' different roles in overcoming resistance and in propelling locomotion. This also ensures that weight acts in the angle range between the forces generated by the front and hind limbs. The change in the distribution of SRF with a change in the incline angle is directly linked to the favorable trade-off between locomotive maneuverability and stability.

  2. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system.

  3. Thermoelectric generating system attached to a carburizing furnace at Komatsu Ltd., Awazu Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaibe, H.; Makino, K.; Kajihara, T.; Fujimoto, S.; Hachiuma, H.

    2012-06-01

    At the end of October 2009, KELK Ltd. started a field test of the thermoelectric generation system at a carburizing furnace of Komatsu Ltd., Awazu Plant. Residual carburizing gas based on CO, H2 and N2 is burned resulting that 20-30 kW range of flame constantly heats up the hot side of TEG. A single unit of TEG consists of 16 of the Bi-Te thermo-modules, each of which has a size of 50 × 50 × 4.2 mm3 and can generate 24W under the circumstance of 280 °C and 30 °C of hot side and cold side temperature, respectively [1]. 16 modules are separated into 4 groups and they are connected electrically depending on design concept, namely in case of focusing on reliability, parallel connection are used and in case of on simplicity and high-voltage transmission, series connection is preferably employed. The module is being life-time tested at various conditions. For instance, 10,000 of heat cycling under the hot side temperature between 250 and 50 °C with a constant cold side temperature at 30 °C gives within a few percent degrade. Both buck-and booster-type DC/DC converters controlled by one chip computer were set up and Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) was well facilitated to search for the maximum output power depending on the hot and cold temperature. The electric output power from the 16 modules is summed up to charge 4 lead storage batteries (12V-65Ah) and then through DC/AC inverters electricity goes to LED light tubes inside the factory. 214 W can be generated and 180 W is delivered to the batteries.

  4. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  5. Attachment: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how attachment theory can be useful strategy for producing therapeutic change and more productive client functioning. Addresses basic attachment theory concepts and parallels between counseling and attachment. Provides case example to focus, integrate, and elaborate elements presented. (Author)

  6. Design of attachment type of drug delivery system by complex formation of avidin with biotinyl drug model and biotinyl saccharide.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Tatsuro; Yamabe, Etsuro; Hara, Kei; Hirai, Mikiko; Ohya, Yuichi

    2004-02-10

    Recent studies have focused on the active targeting of drug delivery by combining a homing device and antitumor drug. For this purpose, synthesis of a well-designed vehicle (such as polymer/drug conjugates or nanoparticles) carrying a drug and a homing device requires many steps. We propose a new type of drug delivery system (DDS) by formation of a complex containing avidin (Av) plus biotinyl drug with a biotinyl homing device, which easily accommodates the combination of various drugs and homing devices. The targetable drug complex can be prepared by selecting an appropriate biotinyl drug derivative and a biotinyl homing device and mixing them with avidin. Fluorescent dye with 5-(and-6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) was used as a drug model, and galactose (Gal) recognized by liver parenchymal cells was used as a homing device. TAMRA and galactose were attached to biotin (Bio) through a triethyleneglycol (TEG) spacer group to give Bio-TEG-TAMRA conjugate and Bio-TEG-Gal conjugate, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopic studies suggest that the complexes prepared by mixing Bio-TEG-Gal conjugate and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Av (feed molar ratio 4:1), and mixing Bio-TEG-Gal conjugate, Bio-TEG-TAMRA conjugate and FITC-labeled Av are internalized into the hepatoma cells through a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium pathogenicity island 1-encoded type III secretion system translocases mediate intimate attachment to nonphagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2009-07-01

    Delivery of bacterial proteins into mammalian cells by type III secretion systems (TTSS) is thought to require the intimate association of bacteria with target cells. The molecular bases of this intimate association appear to be different in different bacteria involving TTSS components, as well as surface determinants not associated with TTSS. We show here that the protein translocases SipB, SipC, and SipD of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded TTSS are required for the intimate association of these bacteria with mammalian cells. S. Typhimurium mutant strains lacking any of the translocases were defective for intimate attachment. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that SipD is present on the bacterial surface prior to bacterial contact with host cells. In contrast, SipB and SipC were detected on the bacterial surface only subsequent to bacterial contact with the target cell. We conclude that the coordinated deployment and interaction between the protein translocases mediate the SPI-1 TTSS-dependent intimate association of S. Typhimurium with host cells.

  8. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1995-01-01

    A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk.

  9. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.

    1995-04-11

    A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk. 6 figures.

  10. 48 CFR 204.7105 - Contract exhibits and attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... attachments. 204.7105 Section 204.7105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... 204.7105 Contract exhibits and attachments. Follow the procedures at PGI 204.7105 for use and numbering of contract exhibits and attachments....

  11. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  12. Effect of abutment angulation in the retention and durability of three overdenture attachment systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ustrell, Raul; Mendes, Jose Manuel; Braga, Ana Cristina; Berastegui, Esther

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study investigated and compared the durability and retention of three types of attachments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three commercially available attachments were investigated: Clix®, Dalbo-Plus® and Locator®. In total, 72 samples of these attachments were placed in the acrylic resin forms and subjected to mechanical testing (5400 cycles of insertion and removal) over the respective ball or Locator abutments immersed in artificial saliva at pH 7 and 37℃. The abutments were placed at angulations of 0°, 10° and 20°. The retention force was recorded at the beginning and after 540, 1080, 2160, 3240, 4320 and 5400 insertion-removal cycles. RESULTS The results revealed that there were significant differences in the average values of the insertion/removal force due to angulation (F (2.48) = 343619, P<.05) and the type of attachment (F (7.48) = 23.220, P<.05). CONCLUSION Greater angulation of the abutments was found to influence the retention capacity of the attachments, and the fatigue test simulating 5 years of denture insertion and removal did not produce wear in the metal abutments. PMID:26949484

  13. Outcompeted by an invader? Interference and exploitative competition between tropical house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) and Barbados leaf-toed gecko (Phyllodactylus pulcher) for diurnal refuges in anthropogenic coastal habitats.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert; Pernetta, Angelo P; Horrocks, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    House geckos in the genus Hemidactylus are highly successful colonizers of regions beyond their native range, with colonization often resulting in displacement of native gecko species through competitive interactions for daytime refuge (crevices) and prey resources. We report on data collected from nighttime surveys undertaken in April-May 2014 on Barbados, West Indies, that focused on the distribution and abundance of the endemic Barbados leaf-toed gecko (Phyllodactylus pulcher) and the introduced tropical house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) along unlit coastal walls and among boulders in the grounds of a hotel resort. In contrast to patterns of displacement of native species by H. mabouia seen elsewhere, P. pulcher was more abundant than H. mabouia on coastal walls, whereas the latter was found in greater numbers using boulders at this site. Walls and boulders differed with regard to availability of diurnal refugia suitable for geckos, with the walls having high frequency of small crevices with openings <20 mm, and boulders offering very little cover other than the underside of the boulder itself. To investigate whether this niche separation was a result of differences in diurnal refuge use between the species, we conducted experimental trials in which geckos were allowed to select between refugia with different characteristics. Both species selected for narrower and warmer refugia, and refugia that had been previously occupied by the other species. These shared preferences for refugia type suggest that other factors underlie the niche separation observed in the field. In supporting high densities of P. pulcher, coastal walls could offer important secondary habitat by augmenting the natural cliff side habitat of this endemic gecko, a finding that could be exploited for the conservation of this candidate species for Critically Endangered classification. PMID:26923791

  14. Outcompeted by an invader? Interference and exploitative competition between tropical house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) and Barbados leaf-toed gecko (Phyllodactylus pulcher) for diurnal refuges in anthropogenic coastal habitats.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert; Pernetta, Angelo P; Horrocks, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    House geckos in the genus Hemidactylus are highly successful colonizers of regions beyond their native range, with colonization often resulting in displacement of native gecko species through competitive interactions for daytime refuge (crevices) and prey resources. We report on data collected from nighttime surveys undertaken in April-May 2014 on Barbados, West Indies, that focused on the distribution and abundance of the endemic Barbados leaf-toed gecko (Phyllodactylus pulcher) and the introduced tropical house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) along unlit coastal walls and among boulders in the grounds of a hotel resort. In contrast to patterns of displacement of native species by H. mabouia seen elsewhere, P. pulcher was more abundant than H. mabouia on coastal walls, whereas the latter was found in greater numbers using boulders at this site. Walls and boulders differed with regard to availability of diurnal refugia suitable for geckos, with the walls having high frequency of small crevices with openings <20 mm, and boulders offering very little cover other than the underside of the boulder itself. To investigate whether this niche separation was a result of differences in diurnal refuge use between the species, we conducted experimental trials in which geckos were allowed to select between refugia with different characteristics. Both species selected for narrower and warmer refugia, and refugia that had been previously occupied by the other species. These shared preferences for refugia type suggest that other factors underlie the niche separation observed in the field. In supporting high densities of P. pulcher, coastal walls could offer important secondary habitat by augmenting the natural cliff side habitat of this endemic gecko, a finding that could be exploited for the conservation of this candidate species for Critically Endangered classification.

  15. Development of a strain/temperature gauge and attachment system for use on carbon composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanius, S. J.; Brasfield, R. G.; Wnuk, S. P.

    1987-03-01

    The difficulties encountered when instrumenting solid rocket motors for acquiring strain data are reviewed, emphasizing the strong temperature dependence due to apparent strain effects. The development of a strain/temperature gage to overcome some of these problems is discussed. This gage is designed to produce low apparent strain when attached to a carbon-carbon substrate. Characterization and performance data for gages attached with ceramic cement to carbon-carbon tensile coupons are presented, and the effect of a flame-sprayed installation process is discussed.

  16. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  17. Investigation of bioinspired gecko fibers to improve adhesion of HeartLander surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Giuseppe; Glass, Paul; Wood, Nathan; Aksak, Burak; Menciassi, Arianna; Sitti, Metin; Riviere, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    HeartLander is a medical robot proposed for minimally invasive epicardial intervention on the beating heart. To date, all prototypes have used suction to gain traction on the epicardium. Gecko-foot-inspired micro-fibers have been proposed for repeatable adhesion to surfaces. In this paper, a method for improving the traction of HeartLander on biological tissue is presented. The method involves integration of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives on the inner surfaces of the suction chambers of HeartLander. Experiments have been carried out on muscle tissue ex vivo assessing the traction performance of the modified HeartLander with bio-inspired adhesive. The adhesive fibers are found to improve traction on muscle tissue by 57.3 %.

  18. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  19. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor); Harwell, William D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets of rare earth material are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates of the stator magnet, each of which includes an adhering surface. In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet is closely adjacent to a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate, or the like, affixed to the payload. When the rotor magnet is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet is disposed closely adjacent to a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces, which permits the release of a payload. An actuator for selectively rotating the rotor magnet between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For affecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guide means cooperable with guide means on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces of the polar plates to the ferrous plate.

  20. High Diversity of Hepatozoon spp. in Geckos of the Genus Tarentola.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Beatriz; Rato, Catarina; Harris, D James; Perera, Ana

    2016-08-01

    :   Hemogregarines are the most-commonly reported hemoparasites in reptiles. In this work we analyzed samples from 572 individuals of 6 species of the wall gecko genus Tarentola from European and African countries adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea as well as from the Macaronesian islands. Screening was done using hemogregarine-specific primers for the 18S rRNA gene. Positive amplifications were sequenced so that the diversity of the hemogregarines from these hosts could be assessed within a phylogenetic framework. The results from the phylogenetic analysis showed that within Tarentola, the detected parasites are comprised of at least 4 distinct main lineages of Hepatozoon spp. In clades A and B, the new sequences clustered closely together with the ones previously known from individuals of the genus Tarentola and other species of geckos but also with those from other vertebrate host groups including skinks, snakes, iguanids, and rodents. Clade C included a sample from Tarentola angustimentalis of the Canary Islands. This sequence is the first molecular characterization of these hemogregarines in this archipelago. Until now, this lineage had only been found in lacertids, skinks, and snakes, so this infection extends the host range for this clade. Lastly, in the newly detected clade D, the retrieved parasite sequences form a group currently identified as exclusive of geckos. Our results show that geckos of Tarentola spp. harbor a great diversity of hemogregarines but also that further sampling and other tools, including a multi-locus approach using faster-evolving genetic markers, and identification of definitive hosts are needed to better understand the biology, diversity, and distribution of these parasites. PMID:26835601

  1. The mitochondrial genome of the gold-dust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda (Sauria, Gekkota, Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Tian, Chao; Bauer, Aaron M; Zhou, Kaiya

    2016-01-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the gold-dust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda, which is native to northern Madagascar. The mitogenome is 15,416 bp in size, consisting of 37 genes coding for 13 proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. Due to the unsuccessful sequencing of the control region, the length is relatively shorter than that of other gekkonids. The gene organization conforms to the vertebrate consesus gene arrangement.

  2. Electrocardiogram, heart movement and heart rate in the awake gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia).

    PubMed

    Germer, Carina M; Tomaz, Juliana M; Carvalho, Ana F; Bassani, Rosana A; Bassani, José W M

    2015-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the simplest and most effective non-invasive method to assess the electrical activity of the heart and to obtain information on the heart rate (HR) and rhythm. Because information on the HR of very small reptiles (body mass <10 g) is still scarce in the literature, in the present work we describe a procedure for recording the ECG in non-anesthetized geckos (Hemidactylus mabouia, Moreau de Jonnès, 1818) under different conditions, namely manual restraint (MR), spontaneous tonic immobility (TI), and in the non-restrained condition (NR). In the gecko ECG, the P, QRS and T waves were clearly distinguishable. The HR was 2.83 ± 0.02 Hz under MR, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the HR under the TI (1.65 ± 0.09 Hz) and NR (1.60 ± 0.10 Hz) conditions. Spontaneously beating isolated gecko hearts contracted at 0.84 ± 0.03 Hz. The in vitro beating rate was affected in a concentration-dependent fashion by adrenoceptor stimulation with noradrenaline, as well as by the muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol, which produced significant positive and negative chronotropic effects, respectively (p < 0.001). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the ECG morphology and HR values in geckos, particularly under TI. The methodology and instrumentation developed here are useful for non-invasive in vivo physiological and pharmacological studies in small reptiles without the need of physical restraint or anesthesia.

  3. Effects of spatial subsidies and habitat structure on the foraging ecology and size of geckos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Amy A.; Young, Hillary S.; McCauley, Douglas J.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Fisher, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    While it is well established that ecosystem subsidies—the addition of energy, nutrients, or materials across ecosystem boundaries—can affect consumer abundance, there is less information available on how subsidy levels may affect consumer diet, body condition, trophic position, and resource partitioning among consumer species. There is also little information on whether changes in vegetation structure commonly associated with spatial variation in subsidies may play an important role in driving consumer responses to subsidies. To address these knowledge gaps, we studied changes in abundance, diet, trophic position, size, and body condition of two congeneric gecko species (Lepidodactylus spp.) that coexist in palm dominated and native (hereafter dicot dominated) forests across the Central Pacific. These forests differ trongly both in the amount of marine subsidies that they receive from seabird guano and carcasses, and in the physical structure of the habitat. Contrary to other studies, we found that subsidy level had no impact on the abundance of either gecko species; it also did not have any apparent effects on resource partitioning between species. However, it did affect body size, dietary composition, and trophic position of both species. Geckos in subsidized, dicot forests were larger, had higher body condition and more diverse diets, and occupied a much higher trophic position than geckos found in palm dominated, low subsidy level forests. Both direct variation in subsidy levels and associated changes in habitat structure appear to play a role in driving these responses. These results suggest that variation in subsidy levels may drive important behavioral responses in predators, even when their numerical response is limited. Strong changes in trophic position of consumers also suggest that subsidies may drive increasingly complex food webs, with longer overall food chain length.

  4. Attached and unattached fractions of short-lived radon decay products in outdoor environments: effect on the human respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Amrane, M; Oufni, L; Misdaq, M A

    2014-12-01

    The authors developed a model for determining the alpha- and beta-activities per unit volume of air due to radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their decay products attached and unattached to the aerosol in the outdoor air at the workplace in natural conditions at different locations in Morocco by using both CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, the percentage of (218)Po, (214)Pb and (214)Po radionuclides attached to the aerosols and the unattached fraction f(j) for different values of the attachment rate were evaluated. Radon and thoron concentrations in outdoor air of the studied different locations were found to vary from 9.20±0.8 to 16.30±1.50 Bq m(-3) and 0.22±0.02 to 1.80±0.20 Bq m(-3), respectively. The committed equivalent doses due to the radon short-lived progeny (218)Po and (214)Po attached and unattached to the aerosol air were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of outdoor air.

  5. The role of surface chemistry in adhesion and wetting of gecko toe pads.

    PubMed

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y; Paoloni, Eva L; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-17

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  6. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    PubMed Central

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70–90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties. PMID:25323067

  7. Harnessing tunable scanning probe techniques to measure shear enhanced adhesion of gecko-inspired fibrillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Zhou, James H-W; Zhang, Cheng; Menon, Carlo; Gates, Byron D

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical arrays of mesoscale to nanoscale fibrillar structures on a gecko's foot enable the animal to climb surfaces of varying roughness. Adhesion force between the fibrillar structures and various surfaces is maximized after the gecko drags its foot in one direction, which has also been demonstrated to improve the adhesion forces of artificial fibrillar arrays. Essential conditions that influence the magnitude of these interactions include the lateral distance traveled and velocity between the contacting surfaces, as well as the velocity at which the two surfaces are subsequently separated. These parameters have, however, not been systematically investigated to assess the adhesion properties of artificial adhesives. We introduce a systematic study that investigates these conditions using a scanning probe microscope to measure the adhesion forces of artificial adhesives through a process that mimics the mechanism by which a gecko climbs. The measured adhesion response was different for arrays of shorter and longer fibrils. These results from 9000 independent measurements also provide further insight into the dynamics of the interactions between fibrillar arrays and contacting surfaces. These studies establish scanning probe microscopy techniques as a versatile approach for measuring a variety of adhesion properties of artificial fibrillar adhesives.

  8. Preparation and properties of polyurethane/silicone materials for biomimetic gecko setae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Dai, Zhendong; Yang, Shengrong

    2014-03-01

    In the biomimetic design of gecko setae, it is necessary to select materials with appropriate adhesive properties and to understand the effects of materials on normal and tangential adhesive forces. To meet the adhesion performance requirements of the biomimetic gecko robot foot, in this study, performance-improved polyurethane/silicone polymer materials were designed and synthesized, and the normal adhesion and tangential adhesion were measured using an adhesive friction comprehensive tester. The results show that normal adhesion increased with an increase in load when the normal load is small; when the normal load exceeds a critical value, the increase in normal adhesion slows and adhesion saturates. Under the condition of an adhesive state, the tangential adhesive force was larger for a smaller negative normal force, and a relatively large tangential adhesive force could be generated with a very small negative normal force. The elastic modulus of the synthetic polyurethane/silicone material varied with varying ratios of components, and it increased with increasing urethane content. Polyurethane/silicone material with about 30% polyurethane provided greater adhesion than other materials with different contents of polyurethane. The results provide a basis for the choice of biomimetic materials of the biomimetic gecko robot foot.

  9. Temperature, field activity and post-feeding metabolic response in the Asian house gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus.

    PubMed

    Lei, Juan; Booth, David T

    2014-10-01

    Temperature has significant effects on physiological activities and geographical distribution of ectotherms. The Asian house gecko Hemidactylus frenatus has become one of the most widely distributed reptiles in the world and is an invasive species in Australia. Since being introduced into northern Australia, Asian house geckos have spread rapidly and expanded into south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales. Despite their rapid spread, there have been few studies that address thermal adaptability of this species. In order to understand how temperature might limit the distribution and feeding behavior of H. frenatus we observed gecko foraging activities in the wild over the winter period, measured the temperature at which voluntary feeding ceases, and assessed the effect of temperature (30, 25, 20, and 18 °C) on post-feeding metabolic rate. Resting metabolic rate and post-feeding peak in metabolic rate decreased with low temperature, while the duration of elevated metabolic rate after feeding increased at lower temperature. The SDA coefficient (a ratio of the energy expended due to the post-feeding rise in metabolic rate to the energy contained within the meal) did not change systematically with ambient temperature. Field observations and voluntary feeding experiments showed that H. frenatus stop feeding when ambient temperature drops below 17 °C, so that persistent night time temperatures below 17 °C may be limiting the distribution of this species.

  10. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  11. A new blood parasite within the relict endemic New Zealand gecko Hoplodactylus duvaucelii.

    PubMed

    Barry, Manuela; Peirce, Michael A; Heath, Allen C G; Brunton, Dianne H; Barraclough, Rosemary K

    2011-06-30

    Duvaucel geckos (Hoplodactylus duvaucelii) are large endemic lizards that have been extirpated from the New Zealand mainland due to introduced mammalian predators. This species has subsequently become the subject of species translocation conservation management in an endeavour to increase the number of populations and as a part of island ecological restoration. Blood sampling of a captive adult male after tail autotomy led to the discovery of a Rickettsia-like organism within this gecko's erythrocytes. We conclude that this infection was acquired at the gecko's source location, a remote island closed to the general public and lacking potential invasive parasite reservoir reptiles. The likely vector is the native mite Geckobia naultina. This finding represents valuable new baseline information about the health parameters of this threatened species. Particularly in the light of the paucity of reported blood parasitism in New Zealand reptiles, the conservation management of this species through relocation and captive-breeding, and the on-going concerns regarding the introduction of novel parasites to New Zealand.

  12. Social attachments and traumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which we engage with our social world has been central to our survival as a species and, accordingly, is relevant to how we cope with trauma and adversity. This review summarises current knowledge about the importance of social connections from an evolutionary perspective, as well as integrating this with a discussion of prevailing attachment theories. Experimental research supporting the potential benefit of attachments for managing adversity are presented, along with a review of how these benefits are moderated by individual differences in attachment style. The potential impact of trauma on attachment systems, and the manner in which this can compound trauma stress is discussed. Finally, a broader overview of social network analysis is introduced and it is proposed that a more sociocentric framework of trauma response would promote a fuller understanding of how social processes moderate trauma response. PMID:26996531

  13. Aquatic versus terrestrial attachment: Water makes a difference

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal attachment to a substrate is very different in terrestrial and aquatic environments. We discuss variations in both the forces acting to detach animals and forces of attachment. While in a terrestrial environment gravity is commonly understood as the most important detachment force, under submerged conditions gravity is nearly balanced out by buoyancy and therefore matters little. In contrast, flow forces such as drag and lift are of higher importance in an aquatic environment. Depending on the flow conditions, flow forces can reach much higher values than gravity and vary in magnitude and direction. For many of the attachment mechanisms (adhesion including glue, friction, suction and mechanical principles such as hook, lock, clamp and spacer) significant differences have to be considered under water. For example, the main principles of dry adhesion, van der Waals forces and chemical bonding, which make a gecko stick to the ceiling, are weak under submerged conditions. Capillary forces are very important for wet adhesion, e.g., in terrestrial beetles or flies, but usually do not occur under water. Viscous forces are likely an important contributor to adhesion under water in some mobile animals such as torrent frogs and mayflies, but there are still many open questions to be answered. Glue is the dominant attachment mechanism of sessile aquatic animals and the aquatic realm presents many challenges to this mode of attachment. Viscous forces and the lack of surface tension under submerged conditions also affect frictional interactions in the aquatic environment. Moreover, the limitation of suction to the pressure difference at vacuum conditions can be ameliorated under water, due to the increasing pressure with water depth. PMID:25671138

  14. Aquatic versus terrestrial attachment: Water makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Ditsche, Petra; Summers, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Animal attachment to a substrate is very different in terrestrial and aquatic environments. We discuss variations in both the forces acting to detach animals and forces of attachment. While in a terrestrial environment gravity is commonly understood as the most important detachment force, under submerged conditions gravity is nearly balanced out by buoyancy and therefore matters little. In contrast, flow forces such as drag and lift are of higher importance in an aquatic environment. Depending on the flow conditions, flow forces can reach much higher values than gravity and vary in magnitude and direction. For many of the attachment mechanisms (adhesion including glue, friction, suction and mechanical principles such as hook, lock, clamp and spacer) significant differences have to be considered under water. For example, the main principles of dry adhesion, van der Waals forces and chemical bonding, which make a gecko stick to the ceiling, are weak under submerged conditions. Capillary forces are very important for wet adhesion, e.g., in terrestrial beetles or flies, but usually do not occur under water. Viscous forces are likely an important contributor to adhesion under water in some mobile animals such as torrent frogs and mayflies, but there are still many open questions to be answered. Glue is the dominant attachment mechanism of sessile aquatic animals and the aquatic realm presents many challenges to this mode of attachment. Viscous forces and the lack of surface tension under submerged conditions also affect frictional interactions in the aquatic environment. Moreover, the limitation of suction to the pressure difference at vacuum conditions can be ameliorated under water, due to the increasing pressure with water depth. PMID:25671138

  15. Adolescent Attachment and Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    1996-01-01

    In relationships among attachment classification, psychopathology, and personality, traits were examined in a group of 60 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Attachment was examined in 27 adolescent-mother pairs. Both adolescent and maternal attachment status were overwhelmingly insecure and were highly concordant. Results support a model of…

  16. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, William D. (Inventor); Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm (11) of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets (31,32) of rare earth material which are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet (32), is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates (35,36) of the stator magnet (31), each of which includes an adhering surface (35a,36a). In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (32) is closely adjacent a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate 20, or the like, affixed to the payload (20 or 50). When the rotor magnet (32) is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (31) is disposed closely adjacent a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) which permits the release of a payload. An actuator (51 or 70) for selectively rotating the rotor magnet (32) between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For effecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guides (91,92) cooperable with guides (96,16,17) on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces (35a,36a) of the polar plates to the ferrous plate (20).

  17. Effect of seeding using an avidin-biotin binding system on the attachment of periodontal ligament fibroblasts to nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds: three-dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong-Ju; Jung, Im-Hee; Park, Jung-Chul; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Chong-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose For periodontal tissue engineering, it is a primary requisite and a challenge to select the optimum types of cells, properties of scaffold, and growth factor combination to reconstruct a specific tissue in its natural form and with the appropriate function. Owing to fundamental disadvantages associated with using a two-dimensional substrate, several methods of seeding cells into three-dimensional scaffolds have been reported and the authors have asserted its usefulness and effectiveness. In this study, we explore the cell attachment of periodontal ligament fibroblasts on nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA) scaffold using avidin biotin binding system (ABBS). Methods Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were isolated from the health tooth extracted for the purpose of orthodontic procedure. HA nanoparticles were prepared and Ca(NO3)2-4H2O and (OC2H5)3P were selected as precursors of HA sol. The final scaffold was 8 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height disk with porosity value of 81.55%. 1×105 periodontal ligament fibroblasts were applied to each scaffold. The cells were seeded into scaffolds by static, agitating and ABBS seeding method. Results The number of periodontal ligament fibroblasts attached was greater for ABBS seeding method than for static or agitating method (P<0.05). No meaningful difference has been observed among seeding methods with scanning electron microscopy images. However, increased strength of cell attachment of ABBS could be deduced from the high affinity between avidin and biotin (Kd=10-15 M). Conclusions The high-affinity ABBS enhances the ability of periodontal ligament fibroblasts to attach to three-dimensionally constructed n-HA scaffolds. PMID:21556257

  18. The cell-bound fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius: the carboxyl terminus specifies attachment in a Streptococcus gordonii model system.

    PubMed Central

    Rathsam, C; Giffard, P M; Jacques, N A

    1993-01-01

    The ftf gene, coding for the cell-bound beta-D-fructosyltransferase (FTF) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, has been analyzed, and its deduced amino acid sequence has been compared with that of the secreted FTF of Streptococcus mutans and the levansucrases (SacBs) of Bacillus species. A unique proline-rich region detected at the C terminus of the FTF of S. salivarius preceded a hydrophobic terminal domain. This proline-rich region was shown to possess strong homology to the product of the prgC gene from pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis, which encodes a pheromone-responsive protein of unknown function, as well as homology to the human proline-rich salivary protein PRP-4. A series of 3'-OH deletions of the S. salivarius ftf gene expressed in Streptococcus gordonii Challis LGR2 showed that the C terminus was required for cell surface attachment in this heterologous organism, as only the complete gene product was cell bound. This cell-bound activity was released in the presence of sucrose, suggesting that the mode of attachment and release of the S. salivarius FTF in S. gordonii was similar to that in its native host. PMID:8331080

  19. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Neerja; Thakkur, Rahul K

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40° of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction. PMID:24403798

  20. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Neerja; Thakkur, Rahul K

    2013-10-01

    Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40° of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction.

  1. Contaminant adhesion (aerial/ground biofouling) on the skin of a gecko.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Cribb, Bronwen W; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Watson, Jolanta A

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we have investigated the micro- and nano-structuring and contaminant adhesional forces of the outer skin layer of the ground dwelling gecko--Lucasium steindachneri. The lizard's skin displayed a high density of hairs with lengths up to 4 μm which were spherically capped with a radius of curvature typically less than 30 nm. The adhesion of artificial hydrophilic (silica) and hydrophobic (C18) spherical particles and natural pollen grains were measured by atomic force microscopy and demonstrated extremely low values comparable to those recorded on superhydrophobic insects. The lizard scales which exhibited a three-tier hierarchical architecture demonstrated higher adhesion than the trough regions between scales. The two-tier roughness of the troughs comprising folding of the skin (wrinkling) limits the number of contacting hairs with particles of the dimensions used in our study. The gecko skin architecture on both the dorsal and trough regions demonstrates an optimized topography for minimizing solid-solid and solid-liquid particle contact area, as well as facilitating a variety of particulate removal mechanisms including water-assisted processes. These contrasting skin topographies may also be optimized for other functions such as increased structural integrity, levels of wear protection and flexibility of skin for movement and growth. While single hair adhesion is low, contributions of many thousands of individual hairs (especially on the abdominal scale surface and if deformation occurs) may potentially aid in providing additional adhesional capabilities (sticking ability) for some gecko species when interacting with environmental substrates such as rocks, foliage and even man-made structuring. PMID:26063826

  2. Adherence to Bergmann's rule by lizards may depend on thermoregulatory mode: support from a nocturnal gecko.

    PubMed

    Penniket, Sophie; Cree, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts an increase in body size with decreasing environmental temperature; however, the converse pattern has been found in the majority of lizards studied to date. For these ectotherms, small body size may provide thermal benefits (rapid heat uptake when basking), which would be highly advantageous in cold environments. Yet such an advantage may not exist in nocturnal lizards (which do not avidly bask), in which Bergmann's rule has not been closely studied. We have examined whether the body size of a primarily nocturnal gecko, Woodworthia "Otago/Southland" changed with elevation and operative temperature (determined using physical copper models). In a laboratory study, we investigated whether thermoregulatory mode (heliothermy or thigmothermy) alters the effect of body size on heating and cooling rates. This gecko followed Bergmann's rule, thereby showing the opposite of the dominant pattern in diurnal lizards. Size at maturity, maximum size of adults and size at birth were larger at higher elevations and at lower operative temperatures. Using physical models, we found that large body size can confer thermal benefits for nocturnal lizards that remain within diurnal retreats. Bergmann's rule should not be dismissed for all lizards. Our results clearly support Bergmann's rule for at least one thigmothermic species, for which large body size may provide thermal benefits. Future studies on Bergmann's rule in lizards should consider thermoregulatory mode. We advocate that this ecogeographic rule be examined in relation to operative temperature measured at field sites. Finally, we predict that climate warming may weaken the relationship between body size and elevation in this gecko.

  3. Contaminant adhesion (aerial/ground biofouling) on the skin of a gecko.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Cribb, Bronwen W; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Watson, Jolanta A

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we have investigated the micro- and nano-structuring and contaminant adhesional forces of the outer skin layer of the ground dwelling gecko--Lucasium steindachneri. The lizard's skin displayed a high density of hairs with lengths up to 4 μm which were spherically capped with a radius of curvature typically less than 30 nm. The adhesion of artificial hydrophilic (silica) and hydrophobic (C18) spherical particles and natural pollen grains were measured by atomic force microscopy and demonstrated extremely low values comparable to those recorded on superhydrophobic insects. The lizard scales which exhibited a three-tier hierarchical architecture demonstrated higher adhesion than the trough regions between scales. The two-tier roughness of the troughs comprising folding of the skin (wrinkling) limits the number of contacting hairs with particles of the dimensions used in our study. The gecko skin architecture on both the dorsal and trough regions demonstrates an optimized topography for minimizing solid-solid and solid-liquid particle contact area, as well as facilitating a variety of particulate removal mechanisms including water-assisted processes. These contrasting skin topographies may also be optimized for other functions such as increased structural integrity, levels of wear protection and flexibility of skin for movement and growth. While single hair adhesion is low, contributions of many thousands of individual hairs (especially on the abdominal scale surface and if deformation occurs) may potentially aid in providing additional adhesional capabilities (sticking ability) for some gecko species when interacting with environmental substrates such as rocks, foliage and even man-made structuring.

  4. A new Bent-toed gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the Mekongga Mountains, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riyanto, Awal; Kurniati, Hellen; Engilis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We describe Cyrtodactylus hitchi sp. nov., a new species of Bent-toed Gecko from montane forests in the Mekongga Mountains, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia. Although we cannot speculate about relationships, morphologically it shares several traits with C. batik, a large species known only from Mount Tompotika near the tip of Sulawesi's Eastern Peninsula. The following unique combination of characters distinguishes it from all other congeners: absence of precloacal groove, absence of precloacal and femoral pores, absence of enlarged femoral scales, no abrupt contact between large and small postfemoral scales, 18-20 lamellae under the fourth toes, and transversely enlarged, median subcaudal scales arranged in a single row. PMID:27394851

  5. A new species of gecko from arid inland regions of eastern Australia (Diplodactylus; Diplodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Couper, Patrick J; Oliver, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of small terrestrial gecko in the genus Diplodactylus from inland regions of western Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. Diplodactylus ameyi sp. nov. can be distinguished from its congeners in the Diplodactylus conspicillatus species-group by its relatively large size, bulbous tail which lacks an acute attenuated extension at tip, small first labial scale and comparatively robust head morphology (which includes a broadly rounded snout and no well-defined canthus rostralis). Related populations from eastern and central Queensland currently referred to D. platyurus include further deeply divergent lineages but additional material is required to resolve systematic boundaries in this region. PMID:27394511

  6. A new species of gecko from arid inland regions of eastern Australia (Diplodactylus; Diplodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Couper, Patrick J; Oliver, Paul M

    2016-03-24

    We describe a new species of small terrestrial gecko in the genus Diplodactylus from inland regions of western Queensland and New South Wales, Australia. Diplodactylus ameyi sp. nov. can be distinguished from its congeners in the Diplodactylus conspicillatus species-group by its relatively large size, bulbous tail which lacks an acute attenuated extension at tip, small first labial scale and comparatively robust head morphology (which includes a broadly rounded snout and no well-defined canthus rostralis). Related populations from eastern and central Queensland currently referred to D. platyurus include further deeply divergent lineages but additional material is required to resolve systematic boundaries in this region.

  7. Geckoprinting: assembly of microelectronic devices on unconventional surfaces by transfer printing with isolated gecko setal arrays.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaeyoung; Kim, Juho; Song, Kwangsun; Autumn, Kellar; Lee, Jongho

    2014-10-01

    Developing electronics in unconventional forms provides opportunities to expand the use of electronics in diverse applications including bio-integrated or implanted electronics. One of the key challenges lies in integrating semiconductor microdevices onto unconventional substrates without glue, high pressure or temperature that may cause damage to microdevices, substrates or interfaces. This paper describes a solution based on natural gecko setal arrays that switch adhesion mechanically on and off, enabling pick and place manipulation of thin microscale semiconductor materials onto diverse surfaces including plants and insects whose surfaces are usually rough and irregular. A demonstration of functional 'geckoprinted' microelectronic devices provides a proof of concept of our results in practical applications.

  8. A new Bent-toed gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the Mekongga Mountains, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riyanto, Awal; Kurniati, Hellen; Engilis, Andrew

    2016-05-05

    We describe Cyrtodactylus hitchi sp. nov., a new species of Bent-toed Gecko from montane forests in the Mekongga Mountains, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia. Although we cannot speculate about relationships, morphologically it shares several traits with C. batik, a large species known only from Mount Tompotika near the tip of Sulawesi's Eastern Peninsula. The following unique combination of characters distinguishes it from all other congeners: absence of precloacal groove, absence of precloacal and femoral pores, absence of enlarged femoral scales, no abrupt contact between large and small postfemoral scales, 18-20 lamellae under the fourth toes, and transversely enlarged, median subcaudal scales arranged in a single row.

  9. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio; Sato, Chiaki

    2015-12-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified.

  10. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and attachment: vehicles for the development of resilience in young people leaving the care system.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Elizabeth; Williams, Jessica; Waters, Cerith

    2014-10-01

    It is well recognised that Looked After Children (LAC) and Young People Leaving Care (YPLC) have complex mental health needs and often engage in self-destructive behaviours such as self-harm, drug and alcohol use and suicide attempts. They can experience a high level of instability in relationships and frequently live transient lifestyles. Traditional mental health services for children, young people and adults have been unable to meet the attachment needs of this particular group such that they rarely benefit from therapeutic interventions and remain in a constant state of emotional dysregulation. This article describes the way in which two distinct therapeutic models - Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy - have been interwoven in order to engage and captivate young people leaving care in a therapeutic relationship. This relationship can then be used to help build skills to increase their resilience as they enter adulthood. PMID:24249838

  11. Separation of the osmotically driven fusion event from vesicle-planar membrane attachment in a model system for exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We demonstrate that there are two experimentally distinguishable steps in the fusion of phospholipid vesicles with planar bilayer membranes. In the first step, the vesicles form a stable, tightly bound pre-fusion state with the planar membrane; divalent cations (Ca++) are required for the formation of this state if the vesicular and/or planar membrane contain negatively charged lipids. In the second step, the actual fusion of vesicular and planar membranes occurs. The driving force for this step is the osmotic swelling of vesicles attached (in the pre- fusion state) to the planar membrane. We suggest that osmotic swelling of vesicles may also be crucial for biological fusion and exocytosis. PMID:6699082

  12. Blade attachment assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  13. Corticosterone treatment has subtle effects on thermoregulatory behavior and raises metabolic rate in the New Zealand common gecko, Hoplodactylus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Preest, Marion R; Cree, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Baseline concentrations of adrenal glucocorticoids often vary substantially in wild vertebrates in the field. In at least one ectotherm, females of the New Zealand common gecko, Hoplodactylus maculatus, this variation in baseline (not stress-induced) corticosterone appears to be correlated with variation in body temperature (T(b)). We tested the hypothesis that elevated corticosterone affects thermoregulatory behavior so as to raise T(b) and that, independently of an increase in T(b), corticosterone increases metabolic rate. Compared with geckos receiving placebo implants, those that received implants containing corticosterone displayed heat-seeking behaviors, had a higher mean T(b) in their home cages, and, at one time of day, selected a higher mean T(b) in a thermal gradient. At a constant T(b), corticosterone-treated geckos consumed oxygen at a rate approximately 50% higher than placebo geckos. This work has far-reaching implications for a variety of physiological and ecological processes in ectotherms and suggests that corticosterone should be considered as a variable influencing T(b) and metabolism in future studies.

  14. Developmental stages of the climbing gecko Tarentola annularis with special reference to the claws, pad lamellae, and subdigital setae.

    PubMed

    Khannoon, Eraqi R

    2015-07-01

    Studying the in ovo mode of development of squamates has the advantage of allowing easy access to embryos without surgically compromising gravid females. Despite the non-ophidian squamates being a very diverse lineage of reptiles, embryonic tables for individuals of this group are very few. Here, I present the first in ovo embryonic table for a basal multi-scansored, pad-bearing gecko, Tarentola annularis. In this gecko, only the III and IV digits bear claws. Eleven embryonic stages are described based on chronological development of morphological characteristics. In contrast to other previously studied geckos, this species exhibits a longer incubation period. Comparison with other squamates, embryonic development of T. annularis is an indicative of a conserved developmental strategy. Interestingly, the clawless digits of this gecko do exhibit claws during the first half of embryonic development. Thus, regression of claws in these digits could be an advantage of studying this particular taxon, as it raises the question, to be answered in future study, of which mechanisms could be responsible for such claw regression. Before hatching, the outer periderm layer sloughs revealing the functional setae. The present study provides not only a model for pentadactyl limbs and digit development, but also an example of a unique developmental phenomenon, as represented by claw regression.

  15. Comparative Studies of the Thick-Toed Geckos after the 16 and 12 Days Spaceflight in <> Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, V. B.; Proshchina, A. E.; Kharlamova, A. S.; Barabanov, V. M.; Krivova, J. S.; Godovalova, O. S.; Savelieva, E. S.; Makarov, A. N.; Gulimova, V. I.; Okshtein, I. L.; Naidenko, S. V.; Souza, K. A.; Almeida, E. A. C.; Ilyin, E. A.; Saveliev, S. V.

    2008-06-01

    In our study we compare the data from analysis of thick-toed geckoes Pachydactylus turneri from 16 and 12 days spaceflights onboard «Foton-M2» (M2) and «Foton-M3» (M3) satellites respectively. These studies were realized in the frames of Russian-American joint experiments. In M2 they were performed on 4 females and 1 male in each of the following groups: flight (F), basal (BC) and delayed synchronous (SC) controls. In M3 there were 5 females in each group. The animals were euthanized and examined using traditional histology, immunohistochemistry and X-ray microtomography. Mallory, Nissl and hematoxylin-eosin staining were used to compare the condition of brain, heart, liver, pancreas, spleen and small intestine. Brain and pancreas were also studied immunohistochemically. Behavior was registered by video camera in F and SC (M3). Thus we confirm the previous assumption that geckoes can preserve in weightlessness their ability to fi x themselves to the surfaces by their toe pads. We did not reveal in liver, pancreas, spleen and small intestine of F-M3 geckoes such evident changes like in F-M2 group. Glial destruction was detected immunohistochemically in the brains of F-M3 geckoes, especially in the cortical structures and epithalamus. Gluckocorticoids level for geckoes' feces in F-M2 was 4 times higher than in SC-M2 whereas the results for M3 were almost the same. Microtomografi c analysis of the femur bones showed some redistribution of the trabeculae in F-M3 group which occured in the direction from the outer compact bone to the bone center. Thus we conclude that in most structures of F-M3 animals the changes were less then in F-M2 ones. It can be explaned by shorter duration of M3 flight, higer temperature and the presence of water source. More prolonged experiments with larger groups of geckoes are necessary to verify the obtained data. Probably geckoes are well preadapted to conditions of spaceflight due to their specific biology.

  16. Structural-acoustic model of a rectangular plate-cavity system with an attached distributed mass and internal sound source: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnat, Miha; Čepon, Gregor; Boltežar, Miha

    2014-03-01

    In this paper three approaches are combined to develop a structural-acoustic model of a rectangular plate-cavity system with an attached distributed mass and internal sound source. The first approach results from a recently presented analysis based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method and is used to circumvent the difficulties in obtaining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a plate with an attached, distributed mass. Furthermore, different plate boundary conditions can be accommodated. The resulting mode shapes are defined as continuous functions; this is advantageous as they can be directly used in the second approach, i.e., the classic modal-interaction approach in order to obtain the coupled equations of the system. Finally, in the third approach a group of point sources emitting a pressure pulse in the time domain is used to model an internal sound source. For the validation of the developed model an experiment was conducted in two configurations using a simply supported aluminium plate and a clamped plate coupled with a plexiglas box containing a loudspeaker. Good agreement was found between the analytical and experimental data.

  17. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure Arises during Range Expansion of an Invasive Gecko

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kristen Harfmann; Petren, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Processes of range expansion are increasingly important in light of current concerns about invasive species and range shifts due to climate change. Theoretical studies suggest that genetic structuring may occur during range expansion. Ephemeral genetic structure can have important evolutionary implications, such as propagating genetic changes along the wave front of expansion, yet few studies have shown evidence of such structure. We tested the hypothesis that genetic structure arises during range expansion in Hemidactylus mabouia, a nocturnal African gecko recently introduced to Florida, USA. Twelve highly variable microsatellite loci were used to screen 418 individuals collected from 43 locations from four sampling sites across Florida, representing a gradient from earlier (∼1990s) to very recent colonization. We found earlier colonized locations had little detectable genetic structure and higher allelic richness than more recently colonized locations. Genetic structuring was pronounced among locations at spatial scales of tens to hundreds of meters near the leading edge of range expansion. Despite the rapid pace of range expansion in this introduced gecko, dispersal is limited among many suitable habitat patches. Fine-scale genetic structure is likely the result of founder effects during colonization of suitable habitat patches. It may be obscured over time and by scale-dependent modes of dispersal. Further studies are needed to determine if such genetic structure affects adaptation and trait evolution in range expansions and range shifts. PMID:22053186

  18. Removal mechanisms of dew via self-propulsion off the gecko skin

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory S.; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Myhra, Sverre; Gellender, Marty; Watson, Jolanta A.

    2015-01-01

    Condensation resulting in the formation of water films or droplets is an unavoidable process on the cuticle or skin of many organisms. This process generally occurs under humid conditions when the temperature drops below the dew point. In this study, we have investigated dew conditions on the skin of the gecko Lucasium steindachneri. When condensation occurs, we show that small dew drops, as opposed to a thin film, form on the lizard's scales. As the droplets grow in size and merge, they can undergo self-propulsion off the skin and in the process can be carried away a sufficient distance to freely engage with external forces. We show that factors such as gravity, wind and fog provide mechanisms to remove these small droplets off the gecko skin surface. The formation of small droplets and subsequent removal from the skin may aid in reducing microbial contact (e.g. bacteria, fungi) and limit conducive growth conditions under humid environments. As well as providing an inhospitable microclimate for microorganisms, the formation and removal of small droplets may also potentially aid in other areas such as reduction and cleaning of some surface contaminants consisting of single or multiple aggregates of particles. PMID:25762647

  19. Modeling of the Gecko's skin microfibrillar structures using the Immersed Boundary method via DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Isnardo; Carrasquillo, Kenneth; Leonardi, Stefano; Araya, Guillermo; Hussain, Fazle; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    There is a current interest in surfaces that mimic the skin of some species (i.e., sharks, dolphins and geckos) in order to achieve drag reduction. The surface considered is based on the microfribrillar structures of a gecko's skin (Aksak et al. 2008). The structures are modeled by means of the immersed boundary method proposed by Fadlun et al. (2000). Direct simulations are performed to predict flow dynamics with a Reynolds number of 7000 based on the height of the channel and centerline velocity. The ratio of the height of the structure with respect to the height of the channel is approximately 0.05. The main motivation is to study how the microfribillar structures affect the momentum transfer from the viscous layer to the outer layer. The surface shows a reduction of the area affected by the shear stress due to the cavities formed by the pattern. As expected, the cavities create a low velocity zone thus decreasing the Reynolds shear stresses. Lambda-2 and Q-criterion were implemented to identify the elongated streamwise vortices. The results show that when compared to a flat channel the microfribillar structures tend to preserve these streamwise vortices instead of bursting into the outer layer which is a source of drag increase.

  20. Removal mechanisms of dew via self-propulsion off the gecko skin.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Cribb, Bronwen W; Myhra, Sverre; Gellender, Marty; Watson, Jolanta A

    2015-04-01

    Condensation resulting in the formation of water films or droplets is an unavoidable process on the cuticle or skin of many organisms. This process generally occurs under humid conditions when the temperature drops below the dew point. In this study, we have investigated dew conditions on the skin of the gecko Lucasium steindachneri. When condensation occurs, we show that small dew drops, as opposed to a thin film, form on the lizard's scales. As the droplets grow in size and merge, they can undergo self-propulsion off the skin and in the process can be carried away a sufficient distance to freely engage with external forces. We show that factors such as gravity, wind and fog provide mechanisms to remove these small droplets off the gecko skin surface. The formation of small droplets and subsequent removal from the skin may aid in reducing microbial contact (e.g. bacteria, fungi) and limit conducive growth conditions under humid environments. As well as providing an inhospitable microclimate for microorganisms, the formation and removal of small droplets may also potentially aid in other areas such as reduction and cleaning of some surface contaminants consisting of single or multiple aggregates of particles.

  1. Assessment of the GECKO-A modeling tool using chamber observations for C12 alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; La, S.; Ouzebidour, F.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Yee, L. D.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zhang, X.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production and ageing is the result of atmospheric oxidation processes leading to the progressive formation of organic species with higher oxidation state and lower volatility. Explicit chemical mechanisms reflect our understanding of these multigenerational oxidation steps. Major uncertainties remain concerning the processes leading to SOA formation and the development, assessment and improvement of such explicit schemes is therefore a key issue. The development of explicit mechanism to describe the oxidation of long chain hydrocarbons is however a challenge. Indeed, explicit oxidation schemes involve a large number of reactions and secondary organic species, far exceeding the size of chemical schemes that can be written manually. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is a computer program designed to overcome this difficulty. GECKO-A generates gas phase oxidation schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In this study, we examine the ability of the generated schemes to explain SOA formation observed in the Caltech Environmental Chambers from various C12 alkane isomers and under high NOx and low NOx conditions. First results show that the model overestimates both the SOA yields and the O/C ratios. Various sensitivity tests are performed to explore processes that might be responsible for these disagreements.

  2. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences of eyelid geckos (Squamata: Eublepharidae).

    PubMed

    Jonniaux, Pierre; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2008-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of approximately 2.3 kbp including the complete NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene and its flanking genes, as well as parts of 12S and 16S rRNA genes were determined from major species of the eyelid gecko family Eublepharidae sensu [Kluge, A.G. 1987. Cladistic relationships in the Gekkonoidea (Squamata, Sauria). Misc. Publ. Mus. Zool. Univ. Michigan 173, 1-54.]. In contrast to previous morphological studies, phylogenetic analyses based on these sequences supported that Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae form a sister group with Pygopodidae, raising the possibility of homoplasious character change in some key features of geckos, such as reduction of movable eyelids and innovation of climbing toe pads. The phylogenetic analyses also provided a well-resolved tree for relationships between the eublepharid species. The Bayesian estimation of divergence times without assuming the molecular clock suggested the Jurassic divergence of Eublepharidae from Gekkonidae and radiations of most eublepharid genera around the Cretaceous. These dating results appeared to be robust against some conditional changes for time estimation, such as gene regions used, taxon representation, and data partitioning. Taken together with geological evidence, these results support the vicariant divergence of Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae by the breakup of Pangea into Laurasia and Gondwanaland, and recent dispersal of two African eublepharid genera from Eurasia to Africa after these landmasses were connected in the Early Miocene.

  3. A new genus of miniaturized and pug-nosed gecko from South America (Sphaerodactylidae: Gekkota)

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Tony; Daza, Juan D; Colli, Guarino R; Vitt, Laurie J; Bauer, Aaron M

    2011-01-01

    Sphaerodactyl geckos comprise five genera distributed across Central and South America and the Caribbean. We estimated phylogenetic relationships among sphaerodactyl genera using both separate and combined analyses of seven nuclear genes. Relationships among genera were incongruent at different loci and phylogenies were characterized by short, in some cases zero length, internal branches and poor phylogenetic support at most nodes. We recovered a polyphyletic Coleodactylus, with Coleodactylus amazonicus being deeply divergent from the remaining Coleodactylus species sampled. The C. amazonicus lineage possessed unique codon deletions in the genes PTPN12 and RBMX while the remaining Coleodactylus species had unique codon deletions in RAG1. Topology tests could not reject a monophyletic Coleodactylus, but we show that short internal branch lengths decreased the accuracy of topology tests because there were not enough data along short branches to support one phylogenetic hypothesis over another. Morphological data corroborated results of the molecular phylogeny, with Coleodactylus exhibiting substantial morphological heterogeneity. We identified a suite of unique craniofacial features that differentiate C. amazonicus not only from other Coleodactylus species, but also from all other geckos. We describe this novel sphaerodactyl lineage as a new genus, Chatogekko gen. nov. We present a detailed osteology of Chatogekko, characterizing osteological correlates of miniaturization that provide a framework for future studies in sphaerodactyl systematics and biology. PMID:22125341

  4. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences of eyelid geckos (Squamata: Eublepharidae).

    PubMed

    Jonniaux, Pierre; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2008-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences of approximately 2.3 kbp including the complete NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene and its flanking genes, as well as parts of 12S and 16S rRNA genes were determined from major species of the eyelid gecko family Eublepharidae sensu [Kluge, A.G. 1987. Cladistic relationships in the Gekkonoidea (Squamata, Sauria). Misc. Publ. Mus. Zool. Univ. Michigan 173, 1-54.]. In contrast to previous morphological studies, phylogenetic analyses based on these sequences supported that Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae form a sister group with Pygopodidae, raising the possibility of homoplasious character change in some key features of geckos, such as reduction of movable eyelids and innovation of climbing toe pads. The phylogenetic analyses also provided a well-resolved tree for relationships between the eublepharid species. The Bayesian estimation of divergence times without assuming the molecular clock suggested the Jurassic divergence of Eublepharidae from Gekkonidae and radiations of most eublepharid genera around the Cretaceous. These dating results appeared to be robust against some conditional changes for time estimation, such as gene regions used, taxon representation, and data partitioning. Taken together with geological evidence, these results support the vicariant divergence of Eublepharidae and Gekkonidae by the breakup of Pangea into Laurasia and Gondwanaland, and recent dispersal of two African eublepharid genera from Eurasia to Africa after these landmasses were connected in the Early Miocene. PMID:18029117

  5. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing.

  6. Ontogeny of Metabolic Rate and Red Blood Cell Size in Eyelid Geckos: Species Follow Different Paths

    PubMed Central

    Starostová, Zuzana; Konarzewski, Marek; Kozłowski, Jan; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2013-01-01

    While metabolism is a fundamental feature of all organisms, the causes of its scaling with body mass are not yet fully explained. Nevertheless, observations of negative correlations between red blood cell (RBC) size and the rate of metabolism suggest that size variation of these cells responsible for oxygen supply may play a crucial role in determining metabolic rate scaling in vertebrates. Based on a prediction derived from the Cell Metabolism Hypothesis, metabolic rate should increase linearly with body mass in species with RBC size invariance, and slower than linearly when RBC size increases with body mass. We found support for that prediction in five species of eyelid geckos (family Eublepharidae) with different patterns of RBC size variation during ontogenetic growth. During ontogeny, metabolic rate increases nearly linearly with body mass in those species of eyelid geckos where there is no correlation between RBC size and body mass, whereas non-linearity of metabolic rate scaling is evident in those species with ontogenetic increase of RBC size. Our findings provide evidence that ontogenetic variability in RBC size, possibly correlating with sizes of other cell types, could have important physiological consequences and can contribute to qualitatively different shape of the intraspecific relationship between metabolic rate and body mass. PMID:23705003

  7. Infant Feeding and Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Mary D. Salter; Tracy, Russel L.

    This paper has two major purposes: first, to consider how infant feeding behavior may fit into attachment theory; and second, to cite some evidence to show how an infant's early interaction with his mother in the feeding situation is related to subsequent development. It was found that sucking and rooting are precursor attachment behaviors that…

  8. Temperament and Attachment Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2004-01-01

    Reviewed in this article is research on children with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) who exhibit specific patterns of socially aberrant behavior resulting from being maltreated or having limited opportunities to form selective attachments. There are no data explaining why 2 different patterns of the disorder, an emotionally withdrawn-inhibited…

  9. Attachment Line Blockage Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Photographs shows the attachment-line experiment model with fairing and fence for supersonic attachment-line experiments. The fairing is intended to eliminate the wing/fuselage juncture shock and align the flow for the streamlined fence. The streamlined fence traps the turbulent fuselage boundary layer to prevent turbulent contamination of the leading edge flow.

  10. Separation and Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Developing secure attachments with babies gives them a very special gift--the foundation for good infant mental health! In this article, the author discusses how to develop secure attachments with babies. Babies who are in the care of others during the day often suffer from separations from their special adults. Thirteen "tips" to ensure that…

  11. Attachment and Cognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Riuter, Corine, Ed.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The five chapters and epilogue of this special issue present theoretical and empirical contributions on the relevance of attachment theory to cognitive development and education. A literature review is followed by explorations of attachment theory and emotions, cognitive development, literacy, and the communication effectiveness of the mother.…

  12. A gecko skin micro/nano structure - A low adhesion, superhydrophobic, anti-wetting, self-cleaning, biocompatible, antibacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Green, David W; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Li, Xin; Cribb, Bronwen W; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2015-07-01

    Geckos, and specifically their feet, have attracted significant attention in recent times with the focus centred around their remarkable adhesional properties. Little attention however has been dedicated to the other remaining regions of the lizard body. In this paper we present preliminary investigations into a number of notable interfacial properties of the gecko skin focusing on solid and aqueous interactions. We show that the skin of the box-patterned gecko (Lucasium sp.) consists of dome shaped scales arranged in a hexagonal patterning. The scales comprise of spinules (hairs), from several hundred nanometres to several microns in length, with a sub-micron spacing and a small radius of curvature typically from 10 to 20 nm. This micro and nano structure of the skin exhibited ultralow adhesion with contaminating particles. The topography also provides a superhydrophobic, anti-wetting barrier which can self clean by the action of low velocity rolling or impacting droplets of various size ranges from microns to several millimetres. Water droplets which are sufficiently small (10-100 μm) can easily access valleys between the scales for efficient self-cleaning and due to their dimensions can self-propel off the surface enhancing their mobility and cleaning effect. In addition, we demonstrate that the gecko skin has an antibacterial action where Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis) are killed when exposed to the surface however eukaryotic cell compatibility (with human stem cells) is demonstrated. The multifunctional features of the gecko skin provide a potential natural template for man-made applications where specific control of liquid, solid and biological contacts is required.

  13. Adolescent attachment and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, D S; Horowitz, H A

    1996-04-01

    The relationships among attachment classification, psychopathology, and personality traits were examined in a group of 60 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. The concordance of attachment classification was examined in 27 adolescent-mother pairs. Both adolescent and maternal attachment status were overwhelmingly insecure and were highly concordant. Adolescents showing a dismissing attachment organization were more likely to have a conduct or substance abuse disorder, narcissistic or antisocial personality disorder, and self-reported narcissistic, antisocial, and paranoid personality traits. Adolescents showing a preoccupied attachment organization were more likely to have an affective disorder, obsessive-compulsive, histrionic, borderline or schizotypal personality disorder, and self-reported avoidant, anxious, and dysthymic personality traits. The results support a model of development of psychopathology based partially on relational experiences with parents.

  14. Electromagnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic attachment mechanism is disclosed for use as an end effector of a remote manipulator system. A pair of electromagnets, each with a U-shaped magnetic core with a pull-in coil and two holding coils, are mounted by a spring suspension system on a base plate of the mechanism housing with end pole pieces adapted to move through openings in the base plate when the attractive force of the electromagnets is exerted on a strike plate of a grapple fixture affixed to a target object. The pole pieces are spaced by an air gap from the strike plate when the mechanism first contacts the grapple fixture. An individual control circuit and power source is provided for the pull-in coil and one holding coil of each electromagnet. A back-up control circuit connected to the two power sources and a third power source is provided for the remaining holding coils. When energized, the pull-in coils overcome the suspension system and air gap and are automatically de-energized when the pole pieces move to grapple and impose a preload force across the grapple interface. A battery backup is a redundant power source for each electromagnet in each individual control circuit and is automatically connected upon failure of the primary source. A centerline mounted camera and video monitor are used in cooperation with a target pattern on the reflective surface of the strike plate to effect targeting and alignment.

  15. Loss and Disorganization from an Attachment Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula

    2010-01-01

    In this article, it is hypothesized that disorganizing, disorienting, and unresolved states of mind about loss experiences, as classified by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) coding system, may offer insight into the bereaved mind and may guide clinical treatment approaches. This article discusses pre-loss attachment organizations and the…

  16. Durability Evaluation of a Thin Film Sensor System With Enhanced Lead Wire Attachments on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Kiser, J. Douglas; Singh, Mrityunjay; Cuy, Mike; Blaha, Charles A.; Androjna, Drago

    2000-01-01

    An advanced thin film sensor system instrumented on silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix ceramic matrix composites (SiC/SiC CMCs), was evaluated in a Mach 0.3 burner rig in order to determine its durability to monitor material/component surface temperature in harsh environments. The sensor system included thermocouples in a thin film form (5 microns thick), fine lead wires (75 microns diameter), and the bonds between these wires and the thin films. Other critical components of the overall system were the heavy, swaged lead wire cable (500 microns diameter) that contained the fine lead wires and was connected to the temperature readout, and ceramic attachments which were bonded onto the CMCs for the purpose of securing the lead wire cables, The newly developed ceramic attachment features a combination of hoops made of monolithic SiC or SiC/SiC CMC (which are joined to the test article) and high temperature ceramic cement. Two instrumented CMC panels were tested in a burner rig for a total of 40 cycles to 1150 C (2100 F). A cycle consisted of rapid heating to 1150 C (2100 F), a 5 minute hold at 1150 C (2100 F), and then cooling down to room temperature in 2 minutes. The thin film sensor systems provided repeatable temperature measurements for a maximum of 25 thermal cycles. Two of the monolithic SiC hoops debonded during the sensor fabrication process and two of the SiC/SiC CMC hoops failed during testing. The hoops filled with ceramic cement, however, showed no sign of detachment after 40 thermal cycle test. The primary failure mechanism of this sensor system was the loss of the fine lead wire-to-thin film connection, which either due to detachment of the fine lead wires from the thin film thermocouples or breakage of the fine wire.

  17. Modelling of biological Cr(VI) removal in draw-fill reactors using microorganisms in suspended and attached growth systems.

    PubMed

    Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Tsiflikiotou, Maria; Akritidou, Lydia; Viennas, Anastasios; Tsiamis, George; Pavlou, Stavros; Bourtzis, Kostas; Vayenas, Dimitris V

    2013-02-01

    The kinetics of hexavalent chromium bio-reduction in draw-fill suspended and attached growth reactors was examined using sugar as substrate and indigenous microorganisms from the industrial sludge of the Hellenic Aerospace Industry. Initially, experiments in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr (VI) concentrations of 1.4-110 mg/l were carried out, to extensively study the behaviour of a mixed culture. The maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate of 2 mg/l h was achieved for initial concentration 12.85 mg/l with biomass production rate 4.1 mg biomass/l h. Analysis of the microbial structure in the batch reactor culture indicated that the dominant bacterial communities were constituted by bacterial members of Raoultella sp., Citrobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Salmonella sp., Achromobacter sp. and Kerstersia sp. while the dominant fungal strain was that of Pichia jadinii. Experiments using the same mixed culture were also carried out in packed-bed reactors with plastic support media. High removal rates were achieved (2.0 mg/l h) even in high initial concentrations (109 mg/l). A combination of the model of Tsao and Hanson for growth enhancement and that of Aiba and Shoda for growth inhibition was used in order to describe and predict the process of Cr(VI) bio-reduction in suspended growth and packed-bed reactors. Kinetic constants of the equation obtained from both batch (or draw-fill) culture experiments. In the draw-fill experiments at the packed-bed reactor, hexavalent chromium inhibitory effects were minimized increasing the inhibitory constant value K(i)' at 148.5 mg/l, compared to suspended growth experiments which was K(i) = 8.219 mg/l. The model adequately predicts hexavalent chromium reduction in both batch reactors for all initial concentrations tested.

  18. The star identification, pointing and tracking system of UVSTAR, an attached payload instrument system for the Shuttle Hitchhiker-M platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, Francesco; Stalio, Roberto; Trampus, Paolo; Broadfoot, A. Lyle; Sandel, Bill R.; Sicuranza, Giovanni

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for star identification and pointing/tracking of a spaceborne electro-optical system and simulation analyses to test the algorithm. The algorithm will be implemented in the guiding system of UVSTAR, a spectrographic telescope for observations of astronomical and planetary sources operating in the 500-1250 A waveband at approximately 1 A resolution. The experiment is an attached payload and will fly as a Hitchhiker-M payload on the Shuttle. UVSTAR includes capabilities for independent target acquisition and tracking. The spectrograph package has internal gimbals that allow angular movement of plus or minus 3 deg from the central position. Rotation about the azimuth axis (parallel to the Shuttle z axis) and elevation axis (parallel to the Shuttle x axis) will actively position the field of view to center the target of interest in the fields of the spectrographs. The algorithm is based on an on-board catalog of stars. To identify star fields, the algorithm compares the positions of stars recorded by the guiding imager to positions computed from the on-board catalog. When the field has been identified, its position within the guiding imager field of view can be used to compute the pointing corrections necessary to point to a target of interest. In tracking mode, the software uses the past history to predict the quasi-periodic attitude control motions of the shuttle and sends pointing commands to cancel the motion and stabilize UVSTAR on the target. The guiding imager (guider) will have an 80-mm focal length and f/1.4 optics giving a field of view of 6 deg x 4.5 deg using a 385 x 288 pixel intensified CCD. It will be capable of providing high accuracy (better than 2 arc-sec) attitude determination from coarse (6 deg x 4.5 deg) initial knowledge of the pointing direction; and of pointing toward the target. It will also be capable of tracking at the same high accuracy with a processing time of less than a few hundredths of a second.

  19. SPENT FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER ATTACHMENT DESIGN DEFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J

    2007-10-16

    A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the attachment system. Assumptions in the original SARP concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. Similar weaknesses in the attachment system designs of other casks were also noted. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  20. In Vivo Measurement of Mesokinesis in Gekko gecko: The Role of Cranial Kinesis during Gape Display, Feeding and Biting.

    PubMed

    Montuelle, Stéphane J; Williams, Susan H

    2015-01-01

    Cranial kinesis refers to movements of skeletal sub-units relative to one another at mobile sutures within the skull. The presence and functional significance of cranial kinesis has been investigated in various vertebrates, with much of our understanding coming from comparative studies and manipulation of ligamentous specimens. Drawing on these studies, cranial kinesis in lizards has been modeled as a four-bar linkage system involving streptostyly (rotation of the quadrate), hypokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the palato-maxillary sub-unit), mesokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the snout at the fronto-parietal suture) and metakinesis (sliding movements between parietal and supraocciptal bones). In vivo studies, although limited, suggest that cranial kinesis serves an important role during routine behaviors such as feeding. Here, we use X-ray Reconstruction Of Moving Morphology to further quantify mesokinesis in vivo in Gekko gecko during three routine behaviors: gape display, biting and post-ingestion feeding. During gape display, the snout rotates dorsally above rest position, with mesokinesis accounting for a 10% increase in maximum gape over that achieved solely by the depression of the lower jaw. During defensive biting, the snout rotates ventrally below rest position to participate in gape closure. Finally, ventroflexion of the snout also occurs during post-ingestion feeding, accounting for 42% of gape closure during intra-oral transport, 86% during puncture-crushing, and 61% during pharyngeal packing. Mesokinesis thus appears to facilitate prey puncturing by allowing the snout to rotate ventrally so that the upper teeth pierce the prey item, thus limiting the need for large movements of the lower jaw. This is suggested to maintain a firm grip on the prey and reduce the possibility of prey escape. More generally, this study demonstrates that mesokinesis is a key component of defensive biting and gape display behaviors, as well as

  1. In Vivo Measurement of Mesokinesis in Gekko gecko: The Role of Cranial Kinesis during Gape Display, Feeding and Biting

    PubMed Central

    Montuelle, Stéphane J.; Williams, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial kinesis refers to movements of skeletal sub-units relative to one another at mobile sutures within the skull. The presence and functional significance of cranial kinesis has been investigated in various vertebrates, with much of our understanding coming from comparative studies and manipulation of ligamentous specimens. Drawing on these studies, cranial kinesis in lizards has been modeled as a four-bar linkage system involving streptostyly (rotation of the quadrate), hypokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the palato-maxillary sub-unit), mesokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the snout at the fronto-parietal suture) and metakinesis (sliding movements between parietal and supraocciptal bones). In vivo studies, although limited, suggest that cranial kinesis serves an important role during routine behaviors such as feeding. Here, we use X-ray Reconstruction Of Moving Morphology to further quantify mesokinesis in vivo in Gekko gecko during three routine behaviors: gape display, biting and post-ingestion feeding. During gape display, the snout rotates dorsally above rest position, with mesokinesis accounting for a 10% increase in maximum gape over that achieved solely by the depression of the lower jaw. During defensive biting, the snout rotates ventrally below rest position to participate in gape closure. Finally, ventroflexion of the snout also occurs during post-ingestion feeding, accounting for 42% of gape closure during intra-oral transport, 86% during puncture-crushing, and 61% during pharyngeal packing. Mesokinesis thus appears to facilitate prey puncturing by allowing the snout to rotate ventrally so that the upper teeth pierce the prey item, thus limiting the need for large movements of the lower jaw. This is suggested to maintain a firm grip on the prey and reduce the possibility of prey escape. More generally, this study demonstrates that mesokinesis is a key component of defensive biting and gape display behaviors, as well as

  2. Mirror Attachment For Borescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gearhart, John F.; Peloquin, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Attachment for articulated borescope provides views into small, normally inaccessible spaces. Simple small round mirror on extension arm welded to borescope head. Tilted at angle to axis of borescope head, mirror provides views sideways to borescope head. Disassembly of turbopump blades not necessary to enable fluorescent-penetrant-dye inspection. Attachment used to inspect difficult-to-reach internal parts of other assemblies. Also used for inspection with ordinary white light.

  3. Micromechanical die attachment surcharge

    DOEpatents

    Filter, William F.; Hohimer, John P.

    2002-01-01

    An attachment structure is disclosed for attaching a die to a supporting substrate without the use of adhesives or solder. The attachment structure, which can be formed by micromachining, functions purely mechanically in utilizing a plurality of shaped pillars (e.g. round, square or polygonal and solid, hollow or slotted) that are formed on one of the die or supporting substrate and which can be urged into contact with various types of mating structures including other pillars, a deformable layer or a plurality of receptacles that are formed on the other of the die or supporting substrate, thereby forming a friction bond that holds the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure can further include an alignment structure for precise positioning of the die and supporting substrate to facilitate mounting the die to the supporting substrate. The attachment structure has applications for mounting semiconductor die containing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device, a microsensor or an integrated circuit (IC), and can be used to form a multichip module. The attachment structure is particularly useful for mounting die containing released MEM devices since these devices are fragile and can otherwise be damaged or degraded by adhesive or solder mounting.

  4. To optimal elasticity of adhesives mimicking gecko foot-hairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. E.; Popov, V.

    2006-10-01

    Artificial structure of a plate with elastic fibers interacting with rough fractal surface by Van der Waals forces is simulated numerically to find an optimal relation between the system parameters. The force balance equations are solved numerically for different values of elastic constant and variable surface roughness. An optimal elasticity is found to provide maximum cohesion force between the plate and surface. It is shown that high flexibility of the fibers is not always good to efficiency of the system, artificial adhesives must be made from stiff enough polymers. If the ellasticity is close to an optimum, the force is almost constant at a wide interval of the surface roughness. It is desirable to make system adaptive to wide spectrum of applications.

  5. Longitudinal and lateral-directional static aerodynamic characteristics of an unpowered escape system extraction rocket model with attached launch tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.; Satterthwaite, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    An escape system extraction rocket proposed for use on the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft was tested at Mach numbers of 0.1 and 0.3 through an angle of attack range from -2 deg to 102 deg and an angle of sideslip range from 0 deg to 15 deg in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel. The data are presented without analysis.

  6. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives.

  7. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s‑1 and 20 µm s‑1.

  8. Effect of 12-Day Spaceflight on Brain of Thick-Toed Geckos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proshchina, A. E.; Karlamova, A. S.; Barabanovet, V. M.; Godovalova, O. S.; Guilimova, V. I.; Krivova, Y. S.; Makarov, A. N.; Nikitin, V. B.; Savelieva, E. S.; Saveliev, S. V.

    2008-06-01

    In the frames of Russian-American joint space experiment onboard Foton-M3 satellite there was undertaken a study of spaceflight influence on brain of the thick-toed gecko (Pachydactylus turneri Gray, 1864). Serial brain sections were stained according to Nissl and also the immunohistochemical method with antibodies to NGF-receptor (p75NGFR), CD95 (also known as Fas and APO-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and transferrin-receptor (CD71). Detailed examination of the sections of rhombencephalon revealed cytological changes in the neuron bodies of vestibular nuclei inside the flight group. Immunohistochemicaly we found the increase density of CD95 and p75NGFR and decrease of GFAP expression in medial cortex and epithalamus in flight group compared both control.

  9. Adhesion switch on a gecko-foot inspired smart nanocupule surface.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlong

    2014-11-21

    A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 ± 5.5° and 150.6 ± 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation.

  10. The fourth Bent-toed Gecko of the genus Cyrtodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riyanto, Awal; Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L

    2015-01-01

    Cyrtodactylus petani sp. nov. is a new species of Bent-toed Gecko from Java, Indonesia that had been masquerading under the name C. fumosus (Müller, 1895). The new species is differentiated from C. fumosus and all its Sundaland congeners by having the following combination of morphological characters: a maximum SVL of 57.2 mm; nine or ten supralabials; seven or eight infralabials; strongly tuberculate body and limbs; 20-25 paravertebral tubercles; 30-35 ventral scales; enlarged precloacal scales; enlarged femoral scales; 17-18 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; 31-35 continuous precloacal and femoral pores in males, pores absent in females; no precloacal groove; no enlarged median subcaudals; tubercles on anterior portion of tail; no reticulated pattern on top of head; a blotched dorsal pattern; and no paired, dark, semi-lunar shaped blotches on the nape. PMID:26701567

  11. A new Bent-toed Gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae: Cyrtodactylus) from Phetchaburi Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Olivier S G; Sumontha, Montri; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    A new Bent-toed Gecko, Cyrtodactylus phetchaburiensis sp. nov. is described from the Tha Yang District of Phetchaburi Province, western Thailand. It is a medium-sized Cyrtodactylus (SVL to at least 63.2 mm), with small, mostly keeled tubercles in 20 regular longitudinal rows on dorsum; 33 scales across mid-venter between lowest rows of flank tubercles; enlarged row of femoral scales present; five precloacal pores in male, femoral pores and precloacal groove absent; 5-6 broad basal lamellae and 11 narrow distal lamellae beneath digit IV of pes; and a single median row of transversely enlarged subcaudal scales present. It has a dorsal colour pattern of large, dark, diffusely-edged markings on a fawn background and a pair of dark scapular patches. The species is a member of the Central Indochinese (Thai-Myanmar) clade of Cyrtodactylus and is most closely related to C. oldhami (Theobald), from which it differs in colour pattern. PMID:27394348

  12. Geckoprinting: assembly of microelectronic devices on unconventional surfaces by transfer printing with isolated gecko setal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaeyoung; Kim, Juho; Song, Kwangsun; Autumn, Kellar; Lee, Jongho

    2014-01-01

    Developing electronics in unconventional forms provides opportunities to expand the use of electronics in diverse applications including bio-integrated or implanted electronics. One of the key challenges lies in integrating semiconductor microdevices onto unconventional substrates without glue, high pressure or temperature that may cause damage to microdevices, substrates or interfaces. This paper describes a solution based on natural gecko setal arrays that switch adhesion mechanically on and off, enabling pick and place manipulation of thin microscale semiconductor materials onto diverse surfaces including plants and insects whose surfaces are usually rough and irregular. A demonstration of functional ‘geckoprinted’ microelectronic devices provides a proof of concept of our results in practical applications. PMID:25056216

  13. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s-1 and 20 µm s-1.

  14. A new insular species of Rock Gecko (Cnemaspis Boulenger) from Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Grismer, L Lee; Wood, P L Jr; Quah, Evan S H; Anuar, Shahrul; Ngadi, Ehwan; Ahmad, Norhayati

    2015-07-10

    A new, diminutive species of Rock Gecko Cnemaspis mahsuriae sp. nov. of the affinis group, is described from Gunung Raya on Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Peninsular Malaysia and is differentiated from all other species in the affinis group by having a unique combination of characters including a maximum SVL of 36.6 mm; keeled subtibials and ventrals; 21-24 paravertebral tubercles; no tubercles in the lateral caudal furrows; caudal tubercles not encircling tail; no precloacal pores; 23-26 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; no white ocelli in the shoulder region; no yellow postscapular band; and faint yellow bars on the flanks. Cnemaspis mahsuriae sp. nov. is a forest-dwelling species living in close sympatry or paraptry with the insular endemic C. roticanai Grismer & Chan. The Langkawi Archipelago harbors a unique mix of Malaysian and Indochinese taxa and the frequency of new discoveries from this group of islands is increasing.

  15. Investigating SOA from alpha-pinene ozonolysis with the GECKO modeling tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Lawler, M. J.; Smith, J. N.; Camredon, M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric oxidation of terpenes leads to a rich variety of functionalized organic molecules of vapor pressures low enough to permit their condensation on particles. GECKO-A is an explicit chemical model useful for investigating fine details of tropospheric oxidation chemistry. The TDCIMS measurement technique allows the identification of specific molecular formulae in aerosol particles. We have incorporated recent advances in alpha-pinene chemistry into the model and apply it to study alpha-pinene ozonolysis and its subsequent condensable products. We assess the degree to which particle size affects modeled aerosol chemical composition and structure from alpha-pinene ozonolysis and compare the statistical composition of the modeled aerosol to that observed by TDCIMS in chamber studies.

  16. A new Bent-toed Gecko (Squamata: Gekkonidae: Cyrtodactylus) from Phetchaburi Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Olivier S G; Sumontha, Montri; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-03-09

    A new Bent-toed Gecko, Cyrtodactylus phetchaburiensis sp. nov. is described from the Tha Yang District of Phetchaburi Province, western Thailand. It is a medium-sized Cyrtodactylus (SVL to at least 63.2 mm), with small, mostly keeled tubercles in 20 regular longitudinal rows on dorsum; 33 scales across mid-venter between lowest rows of flank tubercles; enlarged row of femoral scales present; five precloacal pores in male, femoral pores and precloacal groove absent; 5-6 broad basal lamellae and 11 narrow distal lamellae beneath digit IV of pes; and a single median row of transversely enlarged subcaudal scales present. It has a dorsal colour pattern of large, dark, diffusely-edged markings on a fawn background and a pair of dark scapular patches. The species is a member of the Central Indochinese (Thai-Myanmar) clade of Cyrtodactylus and is most closely related to C. oldhami (Theobald), from which it differs in colour pattern.

  17. Gecko gaskets for self-sealing and high-strength reversible bonding of microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wasay, A; Sameoto, D

    2015-07-01

    We report in this work a novel reversible bonding technique for elastomeric microfluidic devices by integrating gecko-inspired dry adhesives with microfluidic channels which greatly enhances the bonding strength of reversibly sealed channels. The concept is applicable to nearly any elastomer and can be used to bond against any smooth surface which allows for van der Waals interactions. It does not require any solvents or glues or sources for plasma activation or thermal-compressive loading to aid the bonding process and is achievable at zero extra cost. We also demonstrate a quick fabrication technique involving soft master thermo-compressive molding of these microfluidic devices with thermoplastic elastomers. The resultant devices can be used for both pressure driven and non-pressure driven flows. We report the maximum contained pressure of these devices manufactured from two grades of styrene ethylene butylene styrene (SEBS) by conducting a burst pressure test with various substrates.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube/IPMC actuator for imitating locomotion of gecko's toes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingsong; Yu, Min; Ding, Yan; Dai, Zhendong

    2012-04-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT)/Nafion nanocomposite was fabricated by dispersion of treated MCNTs in a Nafion solution. The multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) filler was prepared with the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide. Starting from cast Nafion membranes, IPMCs were manufactured by electroless plating. The current and the blocking force were measured with an IPMC actuation testing apparatus. Compared with a bare Nafion-based IPMC, the blocking force of the new IPMC improved 1-1.4 times, and the current increased by 33%-67%. The clearly enhanced performance of the new MCNT filler-based IPMC is attributed to the well-distributed MCNTs that improved the electrical properties of the IPMC. Finally, the new IPMC was successfully employed to directly actuate gecko-inspired adhesive arrays that we fabricated by ourselves.

  19. The fourth Bent-toed Gecko of the genus Cyrtodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riyanto, Awal; Grismer, L Lee; Wood, Perry L

    2015-12-22

    Cyrtodactylus petani sp. nov. is a new species of Bent-toed Gecko from Java, Indonesia that had been masquerading under the name C. fumosus (Müller, 1895). The new species is differentiated from C. fumosus and all its Sundaland congeners by having the following combination of morphological characters: a maximum SVL of 57.2 mm; nine or ten supralabials; seven or eight infralabials; strongly tuberculate body and limbs; 20-25 paravertebral tubercles; 30-35 ventral scales; enlarged precloacal scales; enlarged femoral scales; 17-18 subdigital lamellae on the fourth toe; 31-35 continuous precloacal and femoral pores in males, pores absent in females; no precloacal groove; no enlarged median subcaudals; tubercles on anterior portion of tail; no reticulated pattern on top of head; a blotched dorsal pattern; and no paired, dark, semi-lunar shaped blotches on the nape.

  20. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment VIII. The wood-fueled gasification system, Evergreen Energy Corporation's final engineering report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    Evergreen Energy Corporation provided projected cost and operating data on the Evergreen/Texaco entrained-bed wood gasification system currently under development as an alternative to the state-of-the-art fixed-bed wood gasification system proposed by Davy McKee. Overall capital costs for the total plant remain about the same at approx. $250 million. The Evergreen/Texaco system will provide significant capital cost savings in the gasifiers, gas cleanup, and waste water treatment sections, and eliminate the need for a large off-site wood-fired power boiler. These reductions are offset by higher investments in the feedstock preparation, drying, and feeding section plus the need for a larger air separation plant and compressor to supply oxygen at high pressure to the gasifier.

  1. Importance of loading and unloading procedures for gecko-inspired controllable adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2013-08-27

    The importance of loading and unloading procedures has been shown in a variety of different methods for biological dry adhesives, such as the fibers on the feet of the Tokay gecko, but biomimetic dry adhesives have yet to be explored in a similar manner. To date, little work has systematically varied multiple parameters to discern the influence of the testing procedure, and the effect of the approach angle remains uncertain. In this study, a synthetic adhesive is moved in 13 individual approach and retraction angles relative to a flat substrate as well as 9 different shear lengths to discern how loading and unloading procedures influence the preload, adhesion, and shear/friction forces supported. The synthetic adhesive, composed of vertical 10 μm diameter semicircular poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, is tested against a 4 mm diameter flat glass puck on a home-built microtribometer using both vertical approach and retraction tests and angled approach and retraction tests. The results show that near maximum adhesion and friction can be obtained for most approach and retraction angles, provided that a sufficient shear length is performed. The results also show that the reaction forces during adhesive placement can be significantly reduced by using specific approach angles, resulting for the vertical fibers in a 38-fold increase in the ratio of adhesion force to preload force, μ', when compared to that when using a vertical approach. These results can be of use to those currently researching gecko-inspired adhesives when designing their testing procedures and control algorithms for climbing and perching robots.

  2. The phylogenetic distribution, anatomy and histology of the post-cloacal bones and adnexa of geckos.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P; Vickaryous, Matthew K; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-02-01

    Post-cloacal bones of gekkotans may be present as a single (medial) pair, two pairs (medial and lateral), or may be lacking. We, herein, demonstrate that the presence of a single medial pair is the ancestral condition for the Gekkota, that the lateral pair is of sporadic occurrence within and between families, except for the Eublepharidae where it is universal, and that absence is also of sporadic occurrence except for the Sphaerodactylidae where it is the ancestral condition. Adult male Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) possess only the medial pair of bones, and these exhibit a regionally-specific expression of woven, fibrolamellar, and lamellar bone, and an enclosed medullary cavity. Females and small juvenile males lack bony elements but exhibit a conspicuous band of dense connective tissue located about the anterior and lateral margins of the cloacal sacs. As males grow and attain sexual maturity, the medial post-cloacal bones condense in this band of dense connective tissue, and are thus shown to be dermal ossifications, similar to osteoderms but with muscular associations (although this is also known for crocodylians). Based upon ontogenetic data we set forth a scenario to explain the loss of the medial post-cloacal bones in various lineages. Differential staining of the cloacal sacs failed to reveal any specialized glandular structures. Investigation of the post-cloacal spurs shows them to be associated with cellular connective tissue of a type similar to that found in the vicinity of the medial post-cloacal bones. This suggests that the lateral post-cloacal bones may also be dermal bones, but histological evidence is needed to corroborate this.

  3. The phylogenetic distribution, anatomy and histology of the post-cloacal bones and adnexa of geckos.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P; Vickaryous, Matthew K; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-02-01

    Post-cloacal bones of gekkotans may be present as a single (medial) pair, two pairs (medial and lateral), or may be lacking. We, herein, demonstrate that the presence of a single medial pair is the ancestral condition for the Gekkota, that the lateral pair is of sporadic occurrence within and between families, except for the Eublepharidae where it is universal, and that absence is also of sporadic occurrence except for the Sphaerodactylidae where it is the ancestral condition. Adult male Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) possess only the medial pair of bones, and these exhibit a regionally-specific expression of woven, fibrolamellar, and lamellar bone, and an enclosed medullary cavity. Females and small juvenile males lack bony elements but exhibit a conspicuous band of dense connective tissue located about the anterior and lateral margins of the cloacal sacs. As males grow and attain sexual maturity, the medial post-cloacal bones condense in this band of dense connective tissue, and are thus shown to be dermal ossifications, similar to osteoderms but with muscular associations (although this is also known for crocodylians). Based upon ontogenetic data we set forth a scenario to explain the loss of the medial post-cloacal bones in various lineages. Differential staining of the cloacal sacs failed to reveal any specialized glandular structures. Investigation of the post-cloacal spurs shows them to be associated with cellular connective tissue of a type similar to that found in the vicinity of the medial post-cloacal bones. This suggests that the lateral post-cloacal bones may also be dermal bones, but histological evidence is needed to corroborate this. PMID:26606399

  4. Bioadhesion of mussels and geckos: Molecular mechanics, surface chemistry, and nanoadhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin

    The adhesive strategies of living creatures are diverse, ranging from temporary to permanent adhesions with various functions such as locomotion, self-defense, communication, colony formation, and so on. The classic example of temporary adhesion is the gecko, which is known for its ability to walk along vertical and even inverted surfaces; this remarkable adhesion arises from the interfacial weak interactions of van der Waals and capillary forces. In contrast, a celerbrated example of permanent adhesion is found in marine mussels which secrete protein adhesives that function in aqueous environments without mechanical failure against turbulent conditions on the seashore. In addition, mussel adhesives stick to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces. However, most commonly used man-made adhesives lack such unique adhesion properties compared to their natural counterparts. For example, many commercial adhesives quickly lose their adhesive strength when exposed to solvents, particularly water. The first part of this thesis focused on adhesion mechanics of mussels at a single-molecule level, in which the adhesive molecule showed surprisingly strong yet reversible adhesion on inorganic surfaces but exhibited irreversible covalent bond formation on organic surfaces. Strong and reversible adhesion on mucin surfaces was found, indicating potential application for drug delivery via mucus layers. Next, inspired by the mussel's versatile adhesion on a wide variety of material surfaces, a material-independent surface modification chemistry called 'polydopamine coating' is described. This concept was subsequently adapted to develop a surface-independent polymeric primer for layer-by-layer assembly of multifunctional coatings. Finally, a new bio-hybrid adhesive 'geckel' was developed by the functional combination of adhesion strategies of geckos and mussels. The new bio-inspired adhesive and material-independent surface chemistry can revolutionize the research areas such as

  5. Origin and in situ diversification in Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Sindaco, Roberto; Pupin, Fabio; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2012-08-01

    The Socotra Archipelago is an ancient continental fragment of Gondwanan origin and one of the most isolated landforms on Earth and a biodiversity hot spot. Yet, the biogeography and evolutionary history of its endemic fauna still remain largely overlooked. We investigate the origin, tempo and mode of diversification in the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago. Concatenated and multilocus species coalescent analyses of Hemidactylus from Arabia and North Africa indicate that the Hemidactylus from Socotra do not form a monophyletic group and branch as three independent and well-supported clades instead. Both the chronogram inferred using the gene tree approach of BEAST and the age-calibrated multilocus species tree obtained using *BEAST suggest that the origin of Hemidactylus from Socotra may have involved a first vicariance event that occurred in the Early Miocene, followed by two independent transoceanic dispersal events that occurred more recently, during the Pliocene. Within Socotra, we analysed patterns of genetic diversity, the phylogeography and the demographic history in all seven nonintroduced species of Hemidactylus. Results based on two mitochondrial and two nuclear loci from 144 individuals revealed complex patterns of within-island diversification and high levels of intra-species genetic divergence. The interplay of both historical and ecological factors seems to have a role in the speciation process of this group of geckos. Interestingly, the case of H. forbesii and H. oxyrhinus, which inhabit the island of Abd al Kuri with an area of 133 km(2), may represent one of the most extreme cases of intra-island speciation in reptiles ever reported. PMID:22738330

  6. Adhesion switch on a gecko-foot inspired smart nanocupule surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenlong

    2014-10-01

    A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 +/- 5.5° and 150.6 +/- 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation.A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 +/- 5.5° and 150.6 +/- 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04090b

  7. Interactions between Hair Cells Shape Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions in a Model of the Tokay Gecko's Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Michael; Piro, Oreste; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The hearing of tetrapods including humans is enhanced by an active process that amplifies the mechanical inputs associated with sound, sharpens frequency selectivity, and compresses the range of responsiveness. The most striking manifestation of the active process is spontaneous otoacoustic emission, the unprovoked emergence of sound from an ear. Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the inner ear, are known to provide the energy for such emissions; it is unclear, though, how ensembles of such cells collude to power observable emissions. Methodology and Principal Findings We have measured and modeled spontaneous otoacoustic emissions from the ear of the tokay gecko, a convenient experimental subject that produces robust emissions. Using a van der Pol formulation to represent each cluster of hair cells within a tonotopic array, we have examined the factors that influence the cooperative interaction between oscillators. Conclusions and Significance A model that includes viscous interactions between adjacent hair cells fails to produce emissions similar to those observed experimentally. In contrast, elastic coupling yields realistic results, especially if the oscillators near the ends of the array are weakened so as to minimize boundary effects. Introducing stochastic irregularity in the strength of oscillators stabilizes peaks in the spectrum of modeled emissions, further increasing the similarity to the responses of actual ears. Finally, and again in agreement with experimental findings, the inclusion of a pure-tone external stimulus repels the spectral peaks of spontaneous emissions. Our results suggest that elastic coupling between oscillators of slightly differing strength explains several properties of the spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the gecko. PMID:20559557

  8. Contaminant adhesion (aerial/ground biofouling) on the skin of a gecko

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory S.; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Watson, Jolanta A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the micro- and nano-structuring and contaminant adhesional forces of the outer skin layer of the ground dwelling gecko—Lucasium steindachneri. The lizard's skin displayed a high density of hairs with lengths up to 4 μm which were spherically capped with a radius of curvature typically less than 30 nm. The adhesion of artificial hydrophilic (silica) and hydrophobic (C18) spherical particles and natural pollen grains were measured by atomic force microscopy and demonstrated extremely low values comparable to those recorded on superhydrophobic insects. The lizard scales which exhibited a three-tier hierarchical architecture demonstrated higher adhesion than the trough regions between scales. The two-tier roughness of the troughs comprising folding of the skin (wrinkling) limits the number of contacting hairs with particles of the dimensions used in our study. The gecko skin architecture on both the dorsal and trough regions demonstrates an optimized topography for minimizing solid–solid and solid–liquid particle contact area, as well as facilitating a variety of particulate removal mechanisms including water-assisted processes. These contrasting skin topographies may also be optimized for other functions such as increased structural integrity, levels of wear protection and flexibility of skin for movement and growth. While single hair adhesion is low, contributions of many thousands of individual hairs (especially on the abdominal scale surface and if deformation occurs) may potentially aid in providing additional adhesional capabilities (sticking ability) for some gecko species when interacting with environmental substrates such as rocks, foliage and even man-made structuring. PMID:26063826

  9. Attachment and coercive sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Smallbone, S W; Dadds, M R

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between childhood attachment and coercive sexual behavior. One hundred sixty-two male undergraduate students completed self-report measures of childhood maternal attachment, childhood paternal attachment, adult attachment, antisociality, aggression, and coercive sexual behavior. As predicted, insecure childhood attachment, especially insecure paternal attachment, was associated with antisociality, aggression, and coercive sexual behavior. Moreover, childhood attachment independently predicted coercive sexual behavior after antisociality and aggression were statistically controlled. The hypothesis that paternal avoidant attachment would predict coercive sexual behavior independently of its relationship with aggression and antisociality was also supported. Posthoc analysis indicated that maternal anxious attachment was associated with antisociality and that paternal avoidant attachment was associated with both antisociality and coercive sexual behavior. These results are consistent with criminological and psychological research linking adverse early family experiences with offending and lend support to an attachment-theoretical framework for understanding offending behavior in general and sexual offending behavior in particular.

  10. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment IV. Health and safety aspects of the eucalypt biomass to methanol energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    The basic eucalyptus-to-methanol energy process is described and possible health and safety risks are identified at all steps of the process. The toxicology and treatment for exposure to these substances are described and mitigating measures are proposed. The health and safety impacts and risks of the wood gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to those of the coal liquefaction and conversion system. The scope of this report includes the health and safety risks of workers (1) in the laboratory and greenhouse, where eucalyptus seedlings are developed, (2) at the biomass plantation, where these seedlings are planted and mature trees harvested, (3) transporting these logs and chips to the refinery, (4) in the hammermill, where the logs and chips will be reduced to small particles, (5) in the methanol synthesis plant, where the wood particles will be converted to methanol, and (6) transporting and dispensing the methanol. Finally, the health and safety risks of consumers using methanol is discussed.

  11. Autism and Attachment: The Attachment Q-Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, Anna H.; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Swinkels, Sophie H. N.

    2007-01-01

    Children with autism are able to show secure attachment behaviours to their parents/caregivers. Most studies on attachment in children with autism used a (modified) Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to examine attachment security. An advantage of the Attachment Q-Sort (AQS) over the SSP is that it can be attuned to the secure-base behaviour of…

  12. Adult attachment interviews of women from low-risk, poverty, and maltreatment risk samples: comparisons between the hostile/helpless and traditional AAI coding systems.

    PubMed

    Frigerio, Alessandra; Costantino, Elisabetta; Ceppi, Elisa; Barone, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the correlates of a Hostile-Helpless (HH) state of mind among 67 women belonging to a community sample and two different at-risk samples matched on socio-economic indicators, including 20 women from low-SES population (poverty sample) and 15 women at risk for maltreatment being monitored by the social services for the protection of juveniles (maltreatment risk sample). The Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) protocols were reliably coded blind to the samples' group status. The rates of HH classification increased in relation to the risk status of the three samples, ranging from 9% for the low-risk sample to 60% for the maltreatment risk sample to 75% for mothers in the maltreatment risk sample who actually maltreated their infants. In terms of the traditional AAI classification system, 88% of the interviews from the maltreating mothers were classified Unresolved/Cannot Classify (38%) or Preoccupied (50%). Partial overlapping between the 2 AAI coding systems was found, and discussion concerns the relevant contributions of each AAI coding system to understanding of the intergenerational transmission of maltreatment. PMID:23724955

  13. Predictive Implications of Secure Mother-Infant Attachments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Judith Lynn

    The general proposition of attachment theory is that attachment is grounded in an independent, biologically based system. The quality of primary attachment relationships strongly influences a child's early personality organization, particularly the concept of self and others. The theory emphasizes the primary status and biological function of…

  14. Attachment Theory in Supervision: A Critical Incident Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Fitch, Jenelle C.

    2008-01-01

    Critical incident experiences are a powerful source of counselor development (T. M. Skovholt & P. R. McCarthy, 1988a, 1988b) and are relevant to attachment issues. An attachment theory perspective of supervision is presented and applied to a critical incident case scenario. By focusing on the behavioral systems (i.e., attachment, caregiving, and…

  15. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  16. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bast, Richard M.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Henning, Carl D.; Lennon, Joseph P.; Pastrnak, John W.; Smith, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  17. Ladder attachment platform

    DOEpatents

    Swygert,; Richard, W [Springfield, SC

    2012-08-28

    A ladder attachment platform is provided that includes a base for attachment to a ladder that has first and second side rails and a plurality of rungs that extend between in a lateral direction. Also included is a user platform for having a user stand thereon that is carried by the base. The user platform may be positioned with respect to the ladder so that it is not located between a first plane that extends through the first side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction and a second plane that extends through the second side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction.

  18. Three-dimensional distribution of polymorphs and magnesium in a calcified underwater attachment system by diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Leemreize, Hanna; Almer, Jonathan D; Stock, Stuart R; Birkedal, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    Biological materials display complicated three-dimensional hierarchical structures. Determining these structures is essential in understanding the link between material design and properties. Herein, we show how diffraction tomography can be used to determine the relative placement of the calcium carbonate polymorphs calcite and aragonite in the highly mineralized holdfast system of the bivalve Anomia simplex. In addition to high fidelity and non-destructive mapping of polymorphs, we use detailed analysis of X-ray diffraction peak positions in reconstructed powder diffraction data to determine the local degree of Mg substitution in the calcite phase. These data show how diffraction tomography can provide detailed multi-length scale information on complex materials in general and of biomineralized tissues in particular.

  19. Cone-like rectification properties of cGMP-gated channels in transmutated retinal photoreceptors of nocturnal geckoes.

    PubMed

    Vellani, Vittorio; Giacomoni, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors of nocturnal geckoes are scotopic, with rod-shaped outer segments, and sensitivities to light similar to the one of retinal rods from other species of lower vertebrates. However, these cells are not rods, but they originated from cones of ancestral diurnal geckoes with pure-cone retinas, after being forced to adapt to a nocturnal behavior. Several interesting adaptations of these rod-like cones have been studied to date; molecular biology and functional studies confirmed that several proteins of the phototransductive cascade display structural and functional properties that indicate their origin from cones rather than from rods. In this paper, we investigate, with whole cell voltage clamp in the photoreceptor detached outer segment preparation, the voltage rectification properties of cGMP-gated channels in three species, Gekko gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, and Hemidactylus frenatus. We show that the current-voltage properties in the physiological voltage range are reminiscent of the ones of cGMP-gated channels from cones rather than from rods of other cold-blooded vertebrates. The origin and the relevance of the mechanisms investigated are discussed. PMID:25506076

  20. Cone-Like Rectification Properties of cGMP-Gated Channels in Transmutated Retinal Photoreceptors of Nocturnal Geckoes

    PubMed Central

    Giacomoni, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors of nocturnal geckoes are scotopic, with rod-shaped outer segments, and sensitivities to light similar to the one of retinal rods from other species of lower vertebrates. However, these cells are not rods, but they originated from cones of ancestral diurnal geckoes with pure-cone retinas, after being forced to adapt to a nocturnal behavior. Several interesting adaptations of these rod-like cones have been studied to date; molecular biology and functional studies confirmed that several proteins of the phototransductive cascade display structural and functional properties that indicate their origin from cones rather than from rods. In this paper, we investigate, with whole cell voltage clamp in the photoreceptor detached outer segment preparation, the voltage rectification properties of cGMP-gated channels in three species, Gekko gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, and Hemidactylus frenatus. We show that the current-voltage properties in the physiological voltage range are reminiscent of the ones of cGMP-gated channels from cones rather than from rods of other cold-blooded vertebrates. The origin and the relevance of the mechanisms investigated are discussed. PMID:25506076

  1. Measuring preferential attachment in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H.; Néda, Z.; Barabási, A. L.

    2003-02-01

    A key ingredient of many current models proposed to capture the topological evolution of complex networks is the hypothesis that highly connected nodes increase their connectivity faster than their less connected peers, a phenomenon called preferential attachment. Measurements on four networks, namely the science citation network, Internet, actor collaboration and science coauthorship network indicate that the rate at which nodes acquire links depends on the node's degree, offering direct quantitative support for the presence of preferential attachment. We find that for the first two systems the attachment rate depends linearly on the node degree, while for the last two the dependence follows a sublinear power law.

  2. The interaction of fetuin with phosphatidylcholine monolayers. Characterization of a lipoprotein membrane system suitable for the attachment of myxoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tiffany, J. M.; Blough, H. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. An artificial membrane system was formed by spreading at air/water and oil/water interfaces, by using phosphatidylcholine and the glycoprotein fetuin (mol.wt. 48400). 2. The plot of increase of interfacial pressure against amount of protein added beneath a monomolecular film of phosphatidylcholine showed two discontinuities, corresponding to the completion of two distinct layers of protein: (a) largely denatured and closely associated with the polar head groups of phosphatidylcholine, possibly with penetration of non-polar protein groups between the phosphatidylcholine molecules and (b) an additional adsorbed layer of substantially native fetuin in either a close-packed or open-lattice array. A more compactly organized membrane was apparently formed at pH7.4 with 1mm-Mg2+ in the aqueous phase than without Mg2+; at 15mm-Mg2+, more random adsorption of protein appeared to take place. Qualitatively similar results were obtained at pH5.1 with 1mm-Mg2+. Closer initial packing of the phosphatidylcholine layer decreased both the magnitude of the interfacial pressure change and the amounts of protein bound in the two layers. 3. The amount of N-acetylneuraminic acid released by neuraminidase (EC 3.2.1.18) in the subphase was measured at pH5.1; a mean distribution of 9.7×1013 residues/cm2 was calculated for the completed second protein layer. PMID:5420053

  3. Neurobiology of social attachments.

    PubMed

    Coria-Avila, Genaro A; Manzo, Jorge; Garcia, Luis I; Carrillo, Porfirio; Miquel, Marta; Pfaus, James G

    2014-06-01

    Many types of social attachments can be observed in nature. We discuss the neurobiology of two types (1) intraspecific (with a partner) and (2) parental (with the offspring). Stimuli related to copulation facilitate the first, whereas pregnancy, parturition and lactation facilitate the second. Both types develop as consequence of cohabitation. These events seem to stimulate similar neural pathways that increase (1) social recognition, (2) motivation, reward; and (3) decrease fear/anxiety. Subregions of the amygdala and cortex facilitate social recognition and also disinhibition to decrease rejection responses. The interrelationship between MeA, BNST, LS may mediate the activation of NAcc via the mPOA to increase motivation and reward. Cortical areas such as the ACC discriminate between stimuli. The interaction between OT and D2-type receptors in NAcc shell facilitates intraspecific attachment, but D1-type appears to facilitate parental attachment. This difference may be important for maternal females to direct their attention, motivation and expression of attachment toward the appropriate target. PMID:24769402

  4. Quick-attach clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vano, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Clamp of the slideable jaw type can be applied to moving lines such as cables or ropes. The clamp has a trigger-operated jaw that can be attached to a redrop parachute on a moving tow cable. The trigger mechanism maintains the jaws retracted in the housing until they are released for clamping.

  5. Attachment and Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Preeti; Sharan, Pratap

    2007-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) arise from core psychopathology of interpersonal relationships and understanding of self and others. The distorted representations of self and others, as well as unhealthy relationships that characterize persons with various PDs, indicate the possibility that persons with PDs have insecure attachment. Insecure…

  6. High Prevalence of Insecure Attachment in Patients with Primary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balint, Elisabeth M; Gander, Manuela; Pokorny, Dan; Funk, Alexandra; Waller, Christiane; Buchheim, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor and is predicted by heightened CV reactivity to stress in healthy individuals. Patients with hypertension also show an altered stress response, while insecure attachment is linked to a heightened stress reactivity as well. This is the first study aiming to assess attachment representations in patients with primary hypertension and to investigate their CV responses when their attachment system is activated. We studied 50 patients (38 men, 12 women) with primary hypertension. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), a widely used and validated interview, was performed to measure the patients' attachment representations, and to activate their attachment system. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured after 10 min at rest prior to and directly after the AAP interview. Mood and state anxiety were assessed using the Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire (MDBF) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S) before and after the experiment. The prevalence of insecure attachment (dismissing, preoccupied, unresolved) in hypertensive patients was predominant (88%), while in non-clinical populations, only about 50% of individuals had insecure attachment patterns. Blood pressure (p < 0.001), heart rate (p = 0.016), and rate pressure product (p < 0.001) significantly increased in response to the attachment interview. Secure attached patients showed the highest rise in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.020) and the lowest heart rate compared to the other attachment groups (p = 0.043). However, attachment representation showed no significant group or interaction effects on diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and rate pressure product. Insecure attachment was highly over-represented in our sample of patients with primary hypertension. Additionally, a robust CV response to the attachment-activating stimulus was observed. Our data suggest that insecure attachment is significantly linked to primary hypertension

  7. High Prevalence of Insecure Attachment in Patients with Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Elisabeth M.; Gander, Manuela; Pokorny, Dan; Funk, Alexandra; Waller, Christiane; Buchheim, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor and is predicted by heightened CV reactivity to stress in healthy individuals. Patients with hypertension also show an altered stress response, while insecure attachment is linked to a heightened stress reactivity as well. This is the first study aiming to assess attachment representations in patients with primary hypertension and to investigate their CV responses when their attachment system is activated. We studied 50 patients (38 men, 12 women) with primary hypertension. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), a widely used and validated interview, was performed to measure the patients' attachment representations, and to activate their attachment system. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured after 10 min at rest prior to and directly after the AAP interview. Mood and state anxiety were assessed using the Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire (MDBF) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S) before and after the experiment. The prevalence of insecure attachment (dismissing, preoccupied, unresolved) in hypertensive patients was predominant (88%), while in non-clinical populations, only about 50% of individuals had insecure attachment patterns. Blood pressure (p < 0.001), heart rate (p = 0.016), and rate pressure product (p < 0.001) significantly increased in response to the attachment interview. Secure attached patients showed the highest rise in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.020) and the lowest heart rate compared to the other attachment groups (p = 0.043). However, attachment representation showed no significant group or interaction effects on diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and rate pressure product. Insecure attachment was highly over-represented in our sample of patients with primary hypertension. Additionally, a robust CV response to the attachment-activating stimulus was observed. Our data suggest that insecure attachment is significantly linked to primary hypertension

  8. High Prevalence of Insecure Attachment in Patients with Primary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balint, Elisabeth M; Gander, Manuela; Pokorny, Dan; Funk, Alexandra; Waller, Christiane; Buchheim, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor and is predicted by heightened CV reactivity to stress in healthy individuals. Patients with hypertension also show an altered stress response, while insecure attachment is linked to a heightened stress reactivity as well. This is the first study aiming to assess attachment representations in patients with primary hypertension and to investigate their CV responses when their attachment system is activated. We studied 50 patients (38 men, 12 women) with primary hypertension. The Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), a widely used and validated interview, was performed to measure the patients' attachment representations, and to activate their attachment system. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured after 10 min at rest prior to and directly after the AAP interview. Mood and state anxiety were assessed using the Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire (MDBF) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S) before and after the experiment. The prevalence of insecure attachment (dismissing, preoccupied, unresolved) in hypertensive patients was predominant (88%), while in non-clinical populations, only about 50% of individuals had insecure attachment patterns. Blood pressure (p < 0.001), heart rate (p = 0.016), and rate pressure product (p < 0.001) significantly increased in response to the attachment interview. Secure attached patients showed the highest rise in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.020) and the lowest heart rate compared to the other attachment groups (p = 0.043). However, attachment representation showed no significant group or interaction effects on diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and rate pressure product. Insecure attachment was highly over-represented in our sample of patients with primary hypertension. Additionally, a robust CV response to the attachment-activating stimulus was observed. Our data suggest that insecure attachment is significantly linked to primary hypertension

  9. Development of an attached growth reactor for NH₄-N removal at a drinking water supply system in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khanitchaidecha, Wilawan; Shakya, Maneesha; Nakano, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Kazama, Futaba

    2012-01-01

    Higher concentrations of ammonium (NH(4)-N) and iron (Fe) than a standard for drinking are typical characteristics of groundwater in the study area. To remove NH(4)-N and Fe, the drinking water supply system in this study consists of a series of treatment units (i.e., aeration and sedimentation, filtration, and chlorination); however, NH(4)-N in treated water is higher than a standard for drinking (i.e., <1.5 mg NH(4)-N/L). The objective of this study, therefore, is to develop an attached growth system containing a fiber carrier for reducing NH(4)-N concentration within a safe level in the treated water. To avoid the need of air supply for nitrification, groundwater was continuously dripped through the reactor. It made the system simple operation and energy efficient. Effects of reactor design (reactor length and carrier area) were studied to achieve a high NH(4)-N removal efficiency. In accordance with raw groundwater characteristics in the area, effects of low inorganic carbon (IC) and phosphate (PO(4)-P) and high Fe on the removal efficiency were also investigated. The results showed a significant increase in NH(4)-N removal efficiency with reactor length and carrier area. A low IC and PO(4)-P had no effect on NH(4)-N removal, whereas a high Fe decreased the efficiency significantly. The first 550 days operation of a pilot-scale reactor installed in the drinking water supply system showed a gradual increase in the efficiency, reaching to 95-100%, and stability in the performance even with increased flow rate from 210 to 860 L/day. The high efficiency of the present work was indicated because only less than 1 mg of NH(4)-N/L was left over in the treated water.

  10. God attachment, mother attachment, and father attachment in early and middle adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sim, Tick Ngee; Yow, Amanda Shixian

    2011-06-01

    The present study examined the interplay of attachment to God, attachment to mother, and attachment to father with respect to adjustment (hope, self-esteem, depression) for 130 early and 106 middle adolescents in Singapore. Results showed that the parental attachments were generally linked (in expected directions) to adjustment. God attachment, however, had unique results. At the bivariate level, God attachment was only linked to early adolescents' self-esteem. When considered together with parental attachments (including interactions), God attachment did not emerge as the key moderator in attachment interactions and yielded some unexpected results (e.g., being positively linked to depression). These results are discussed viz-a-viz the secure base and safe haven functions that God and parental attachments may play during adolescence.

  11. Systematics, biogeography, and evolution of Hemidactylus geckos (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) elucidated using mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N

    2006-02-01

    With more than 80 species inhabiting all warm continental land masses and hundreds of intervening continental and oceanic islands, Hemidactylus geckos are one of the most species-rich and widely distributed of all reptile genera. They consequently represent an excellent model for biogeographic, ecological, and evolutionary studies. A molecular phylogeny for Hemidactylus is presented here, based on 702 bp of mtDNA (303 bp cytochrome b and 399 bp 12S rRNA) from 166 individuals of 30 species of Hemidactylus plus Briba brasiliana, Cosymbotus platyurus, and several outgroups. The phylogeny indicates that Hemidactylus may have initially undergone rapid radiation, and long-distance dispersal is more extensive than in any other reptilian genus. In the last 15 My, African lineages have naturally crossed the Atlantic Ocean at least twice. They also colonized the Gulf of Guinea, Cape Verde and Socotra islands, again sometimes on more than one occasion. Many extensive range extensions have occurred much more recently, sometimes with devastating consequences for other geckos. These colonizations are likely to be largely anthropogenic, involving the 'weedy' commensal species, H. brookii s. lat, H. mabouia, H. turcicus, H. garnotii, and H. frenatus. These species collectively have colonized the Mediterranean region, tropical Africa, much of the Americas and hundreds of islands in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic oceans. Five well-supported clades are discernable in Hemidactylus, with the African H. fasciatus unallocated. 1. Tropical Asian clade: (Cosymbotus platyurus (H. bowringii, H. karenorum, H. garnotii)) (H. flaviviridis (Asian H. brookii, H. frenatus)). 2. African H. angulatus and Caribbean H. haitianus. 3. Arid clade, of NE Africa, SW Asia, etc.: (H. modestus (H. citernii, H. foudai)) (H. pumilio (H. granti, H. dracaenacolus) (H. persicus, H. macropholis, H. robustus, H. turcicus (H. oxyrhinus (H. homoeolepis, H. forbesii))). 4. H. mabouia clade (H. yerburii, H. mabouia

  12. Leadership and attachment theory.

    PubMed

    Bresnahan, Christopher G; Mitroff, Ian I

    2007-09-01

    Comments on the six articles contained in the special issue of the American Psychologist (January 2007) devoted to leadership, written by W. Bennis; S. J. Zaccaro; V. H. Vroom and A. G. Yago; B. J. Avolio; R. J. Sternberg; and R. J. Hackman and R. Wageman. The current authors opine that the inclusion of attachment theory in the study of leadership could strengthen leadership theories as a whole.

  13. The Relation of Insecure Attachment States of Mind and Romantic Attachment Styles to Adolescent Aggression in Romantic Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Erin M.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.; Manning, Nell

    2010-01-01

    The relation of attachment states of mind and self reported attachment relationship styles to romantic partner aggression was examined in a community sample of 93 adolescents. Higher levels of insecure-preoccupied and insecure-dismissing states of mind, as assessed by the Adolescent Attachment Interview at age 14, were predictive, respectively, of perpetration and victimization of psychological aggression in romantic relationships four years later. Partners’ romantic attachment anxiety was linked to both psychological and physical aggression perpetration in romantic relationships. Results are interpreted as suggesting the value of assessing aggression in adolescent romantic relationships in the context of broader patterns of regulation of affect and behavior via the attachment system. PMID:20730640

  14. Mechanism of apoptosis induction in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells following treatment with a gecko peptides mixture

    PubMed Central

    JIN, YING; DUAN, LENG-XIN; XU, XIN-LI; GE, WEN-JING; LI, RUI-FANG; QIU, XIANG-JUN; SONG, YING; CAO, SHAN-SHAN; WANG, JIAN-GANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the apoptotic effect and molecular mechanisms of gecko peptides mixture (GPM) on the human liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line in vitro. The methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to identify the dose- (0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25 and 0.30 mg/ml) and time-dependent (24, 48 and 72 h) inhibitory effect of GPM on HepG2 cells and their proliferation. Hoechst 33258 staining was carried out to detect the nuclear change coupled with apoptosis induced by GPM. Western blotting was used to evaluate apoptosis-related protein expression changes induced by GPM, including caspase, cytochrome c (Cyt c) and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). MTT results showed that GPM significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hoechst 33258 staining demonstrated that GPM induced typical apoptotic morphological changes, while western blotting analysis revealed that GPM increased caspase-3, caspase-9, Cyt c and AIF protein expression levels in HepG2 cells treated with 0.06 or 0.08 mg/ml for 24 h. In conclusion, GPM could induce apoptosis by activating the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. PMID:27330750

  15. The Duplex Nature of the Retina of the Nocturnal Gecko as Reflected in the Electroretinogram

    PubMed Central

    Dodt, Eberhard; Jessen, Karl Heinz

    1961-01-01

    The effect of light and dark adaptation on the electrical activity in two species of nocturnal gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus and Tarentola mauritanica was studied. The electroretinogram of both species changes from the scotopic type in the dark-adapted state to the photopic type after strong light adaptation. For the scotopic response fusion frequencies up to 18 flashes per sec. are obtained in both species. For the photopic response fusion frequencies up to 50 flashes per sec. are seen in Tarentola, and up to 25 flashes per sec. in Hemidactylus. Proceeding from dark to light adaptation the increment threshold (dI) is measured at different levels of adaptive illumination (I). At low levels of illumination the dI/I ratio is found to be small and at high levels of illumination to be large. No difference in the dI/I ratio is obtained for test lights of 462 and 605 mµ. During dark adaptation the change of threshold after exposure to moderate and weak lights (up to 103 times dark threshold) is rather fast. After light adaptation to strong light (106 times dark threshold) duplex dark adaptation curves are seen with a break separating a fast and a slow phase of dark adaptation. The significance of these results from a retina which possesses sense cells of only one type is discussed. PMID:13723366

  16. Insights into Himalayan biogeography from geckos: a molecular phylogeny of Cyrtodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ishan; Bauer, Aaron M; Jackman, Todd R; Karanth, K Praveen

    2014-11-01

    The India-Asia collision profoundly influenced the climate, topography and biodiversity of Asia, causing the formation of the biodiverse Himalayas. The species-rich gekkonid genus Cyrtodactylus is an ideal clade for exploring the biological impacts of the India-Asia collision, as previous phylogenetic hypotheses suggest basal divergences occurred within the Himalayas and Indo-Burma during the Eocene. To this end, we sampled for Cyrtodactylus across Indian areas of the Himalayas and Indo-Burma Hotspots and used three genes to reconstruct relationships and estimate divergence times. Basal divergences in Cyrtodactylus, Hemidactylus and the Palaearctic naked-toed geckos were simultaneous with or just preceded the start of the India-Asia collision. Diversification within Cyrtodactylus tracks the India-Asia collision and subsequent geological events. A number of geographically concordant clades are resolved within Indo-Burmese Cyrtodactylus. Our study reveals 17 divergent lineages that may represent undescribed species, underscoring the previously undocumented diversity of the region. The importance of rocky habitats for Cyrtodactylus indicates the Indo-Gangetic flood plains and the Garo-Rajmahal Gap are likely to have been important historical barriers for this group.

  17. NOTE: Fabrication of a gecko-like hierarchical fibril array using a bonded porous alumina template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryadi Kustandi, Tanu; Samper, Victor Donald; Ng, Wan Sing; Chong, Ai Shing; Gao, Han

    2007-10-01

    We report a new method to fabricate a hierarchical microfibril array by using bonded porous alumina templates. The fabrication approach extends a powerful and well-established technique of creating porous alumina to create a polymer multilevel structure, mimicking the hierarchical structure of gecko adhesive foot hairs. The nanoporous alumina (pore diameter ≈60 nm; interpore distance ≈100 nm) was generated by the anodization of an aluminum film in an oxalic acid solution. The microporous alumina was produced by exploiting the parallel wafer-scale processing of conventional lithography and anisotropic chemical etching of the thick film of anodic alumina pores. The micro- and nanoporous alumina membranes were subsequently brought into intimate contact and their bonding was accomplished by means of capillary forces and then van der Waals bonding. Hierarchical polymeric microfibrils (fibril diameter ≈10 µm fibril length ≈70 µm) with nanofibril arrays at their tips were obtained after depositing a desired material into the pores and selective etching of the template membranes. The nanofibril has a lateral dimension of approximately 60 nm with length-to-diameter aspect ratios as high as 100:1.

  18. Mitochondrial introgression via ancient hybridization, and systematics of the Australian endemic pygopodid gecko genus Delma.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Ian G; Bauer, Aaron M; Jackman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 1500 species of geckos found across six continents, few remain as unfamiliar as the pygopodids - Family Pygopodidae (Gray, 1845). These gekkotans are limited to Australia (44 species) and New Guinea (2 species), but have diverged extensively into the most ecologically diverse limbless radiation save Serpentes. Current phylogenetic understanding of the family has relied almost exclusively on two works, which have produced and synthesized an immense amount of morphological, geographical, and molecular data. However, current interspecific relationships within the largest genus Delma Gray 1831 are based chiefly upon data from two mitochondrial loci (16s, ND2). Here, we reevaluate the interspecific relationships within the genus Delma using two mitochondrial and four nuclear loci (RAG1, MXRA5, MOS, DYNLL1), and identify points of strong conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial genomic data. We address mito-nuclear discordance, and remedy this conflict by recognizing several points of mitochondrial introgression as the result of ancient hybridization events. Owing to the legacy value and intraspecific informativeness, we suggest the continued use of ND2 as a phylogenetic marker. Results identify strong support for species groups, but relationships among these clades, and the placement of several enigmatic taxa remain uncertain. We suggest a more careful review of Delma australis and the 'northwest Australia' clade. Accurately assessing and addressing species richness and relationships within this endemic Australian Gekkotan genus is relevant for understanding patterns of squamate speciation across the region. PMID:26505536

  19. A new species of dwarf gecko in the genus Lygodactylus (squamata: Gekkonidae) from central Kenya.

    PubMed

    Malonza, Patrick K; Granthon, Carolina; Williams, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Lygodactylus gecko (L. wojnowskii sp. nov.) is described from the vicinity of Chogoria Town on the eastern lower slopes of Mt. Kenya in central Kenya. A phylogeny based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA shows that the proposed new taxon is distinct within the Lygodactylus picturatus group and is the sister lineage to L. mombasicus and L. kimhowelli. It is morphologically very similar to both L. mombasicus and L. keniensis but its dorsal coloration and pattern is different. Its dorsum is grey with dark stripes while its head has black and white stripes that form a Y-shaped mark. While the male throat pattern is similar to that of L. mombasicus, that of the female is like that of females and some males of Lygodactylus keniensis. Lygodactylus wojnowskii sp. nov. has a higher number of post-postmental scales (6) than do its close relatives (5). The new species is distributed on the lower slopes of mid-altitude areas on eastern Mt. Kenya, but it may occur in other areas at similar elevations in central Kenya. It is associated with short, scattered trees within agricultural areas. It has not yet been recorded within the protected Chogoria forest block of Mt. Kenya forest. It is likely present in Mwea National Reserve as it occurs in nearby areas. PMID:27395510

  20. Multilocus phylogeography reveals nested endemism in a gecko across the monsoonal tropics of Australia.

    PubMed

    Moritz, C; Fujita, M K; Rosauer, D; Agudo, R; Bourke, G; Doughty, P; Palmer, R; Pepper, M; Potter, S; Pratt, R; Scott, M; Tonione, M; Donnellan, S

    2016-03-01

    Multilocus phylogeography can uncover taxonomically unrecognized lineage diversity across complex biomes. The Australian monsoonal tropics include vast, ecologically intact savanna-woodland plains interspersed with ancient sandstone uplands. Although recognized in general for its high species richness and endemism, the biodiversity of the region remains underexplored due to its remoteness. This is despite a high rate of ongoing species discovery, especially in wetter regions and for rock-restricted taxa. To provide a baseline for ongoing comparative analyses, we tested for phylogeographic structure in an ecologically generalized and widespread taxon, the gecko Heteronotia binoei. We apply coalescent analyses to multilocus sequence data (mitochondrial DNA and eight nuclear DNA introns) from individuals sampled extensively and at fine scale across the region. The results demonstrate surprisingly deep and geographically nested lineage diversity. Several intra-specific clades previously shown to be endemic to the region were themselves found to contain multiple, short-range lineages. To infer landscapes with concentrations of unique phylogeographic diversity, we probabilistically estimate the ranges of lineages from point data and then, combining these estimates with the nDNA species tree, estimate phyloendemism across the region. Highest levels of phyloendemism occur in northern Top End, especially on islands, across the topographically complex Arnhem escarpment, and across the sandstone ranges of the western Gulf region. These results drive home that deep phylogeographic structure is prevalent in tropical low-dispersal taxa, even ones that are ubiquitous across geography and habitats. PMID:26671627

  1. Multimodal dispersal during the range expansion of the tropical house gecko Hemidactylus mabouia.

    PubMed

    Short, Kristen H; Petren, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Dispersal influences both the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of range expansion. While some studies have demonstrated a role for human-mediated dispersal during invasion, the genetic effects of such dispersal remain to be understood, particularly in terrestrial range expansions. In this study, we investigated multimodal dispersal during the range expansion of the invasive gecko Hemidactylus mabouia in Florida using 12 microsatellite loci. We investigated dispersal patterns at the regional scale (metropolitan areas), statewide scale (state of Florida), and global scale (including samples from the native range). Dispersal was limited at the smallest, regional scale, within metropolitan areas, as reflected by the presence of genetic structure at this scale, which is in agreement with a previous study in this same invasion at even smaller spatial scales. Surprisingly, there was no detectable genetic structure at the intermediate statewide scale, which suggests dispersal is not limited across the state of Florida. There was evidence of genetic differentiation between Florida and other areas where H. mabouia occurs, so we concluded that at the largest scale, dispersal was limited. Humans likely contributed to patterns of dispersal at all three scales but in different ways. Infrequent low-volume dispersal has occurred within regions, frequent high-volume dispersal has occurred across the state, and infrequent long-distance dispersal has occurred among continents at the global scale. This study highlights the importance of considering different modes of dispersal at multiple spatial scales to understand the dynamics of invasion and range expansion.

  2. Ultrastructural description of spermiogenesis within the Mediterranean Gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus (Squamata: Gekkonidae).

    PubMed

    Rheubert, Justin L; Siegel, Dustin S; Venable, Katherine J; Sever, David M; Gribbins, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    We studied spermiogenesis in the Mediterranean Gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus, at the electron microscope level and compared to what is known within other Lepidosaurs. In H. turcicus germ cells are connected via cytoplasmic bridges where organelle and cytoplasm sharing is observed. The acrosome develops from merging transport vesicles that arise from the Golgi and subsequently partition into an acrosomal cap containing an acrosomal cortex, acrosomal medulla, perforatorium, and subacrosomal cone. Condensation of DNA occurs in a spiral fashion and elongation is aided by microtubules of the manchette. A nuclear rostrum extends into the subacrosomal cone and is capped by an epinuclear lucent zone. Mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum migrate to the posterior portion of the developing germ cell during the cytoplasmic shift and the flagellum elongates. Mitochondria surround the midpiece as the anlage of the annulus forms. The fibrous sheath begins at mitochondrial tier 3 and continues into the principal piece. Peripheral fibers associated with microtubule doublets 3 and 8 are grossly enlarged. During the final stages of germ cell development spermatids are wrapped with a series of Sertoli cell processes, which exhibit ectoplasmic specializations and differing cytoplasmic consistencies. The results observed here corroborate previous studies, which show the conservative nature of sperm morphology. However, ultrastructural character combinations specific to sperm and spermiogenesis seem to differ among taxa. Further studies into sperm morphology are needed in order to judge the relevance of the ontogenic changes recorded here and to determine their role in future studies on amniote evolution.

  3. Phylogeny and cryptic diversity in geckos (Phyllopezus; Phyllodactylidae; Gekkota) from South America's open biomes.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Tony; Colli, Guarino R; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Werneck, Fernanda P; Simons, Andrew M

    2012-03-01

    The gecko genus Phyllopezus occurs across South America's open biomes: Cerrado, Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests (SDTF, including Caatinga), and Chaco. We generated a multi-gene dataset and estimated phylogenetic relationships among described Phyllopezus taxa and related species. We included exemplars from both described Phyllopezus pollicaris subspecies, P. p. pollicaris and P. p.przewalskii. Phylogenies from the concatenated data as well as species trees constructed from individual gene trees were largely congruent. All phylogeny reconstruction methods showed Bogertia lutzae as the sister species of Phyllopezus maranjonensis, rendering Phyllopezus paraphyletic. We synonymized the monotypic genus Bogertia with Phyllopezus to maintain a taxonomy that is isomorphic with phylogenetic history. We recovered multiple, deeply divergent, cryptic lineages within P. pollicaris. These cryptic lineages possessed mtDNA distances equivalent to distances among other gekkotan sister taxa. Described P. pollicaris subspecies are not reciprocally monophyletic and current subspecific taxonomy does not accurately reflect evolutionary relationships among cryptic lineages. We highlight the conservation significance of these results in light of the ongoing habitat loss in South America's open biomes.

  4. Macroscale adhesion of gecko setae reflects nanoscale differences in subsurface composition.

    PubMed

    Loskill, Peter; Puthoff, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Matt; Mecke, Klaus; Jacobs, Karin; Autumn, Kellar

    2013-01-01

    Surface energies are commonly used to determine the adhesion forces between materials. However, the component of surface energy derived from long-range forces, such as van der Waals forces, depends on the material's structure below the outermost atomic layers. Previous theoretical results and indirect experimental evidence suggest that the van der Waals energies of subsurface layers will influence interfacial adhesion forces. We discovered that nanometre-scale differences in the oxide layer thickness of silicon wafers result in significant macroscale differences in the adhesion of isolated gecko setal arrays. Si/SiO(2) bilayer materials exhibited stronger adhesion when the SiO(2) layer is thin (approx. 2 nm). To further explore how layered materials influence adhesion, we functionalized similar substrates with an octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayer and again identified a significant influence of the SiO(2) layer thickness on adhesion. Our theoretical calculations describe how variation in the SiO(2) layer thickness produces differences in the van der Waals interaction potential, and these differences are reflected in the adhesion mechanics. Setal arrays used as tribological probes provide the first empirical evidence that the 'subsurface energy' of inhomogeneous materials influences the macroscopic surface forces.

  5. Mitochondrial introgression via ancient hybridization, and systematics of the Australian endemic pygopodid gecko genus Delma.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Ian G; Bauer, Aaron M; Jackman, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 1500 species of geckos found across six continents, few remain as unfamiliar as the pygopodids - Family Pygopodidae (Gray, 1845). These gekkotans are limited to Australia (44 species) and New Guinea (2 species), but have diverged extensively into the most ecologically diverse limbless radiation save Serpentes. Current phylogenetic understanding of the family has relied almost exclusively on two works, which have produced and synthesized an immense amount of morphological, geographical, and molecular data. However, current interspecific relationships within the largest genus Delma Gray 1831 are based chiefly upon data from two mitochondrial loci (16s, ND2). Here, we reevaluate the interspecific relationships within the genus Delma using two mitochondrial and four nuclear loci (RAG1, MXRA5, MOS, DYNLL1), and identify points of strong conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial genomic data. We address mito-nuclear discordance, and remedy this conflict by recognizing several points of mitochondrial introgression as the result of ancient hybridization events. Owing to the legacy value and intraspecific informativeness, we suggest the continued use of ND2 as a phylogenetic marker. Results identify strong support for species groups, but relationships among these clades, and the placement of several enigmatic taxa remain uncertain. We suggest a more careful review of Delma australis and the 'northwest Australia' clade. Accurately assessing and addressing species richness and relationships within this endemic Australian Gekkotan genus is relevant for understanding patterns of squamate speciation across the region.

  6. Multilocus phylogeography reveals nested endemism in a gecko across the monsoonal tropics of Australia.

    PubMed

    Moritz, C; Fujita, M K; Rosauer, D; Agudo, R; Bourke, G; Doughty, P; Palmer, R; Pepper, M; Potter, S; Pratt, R; Scott, M; Tonione, M; Donnellan, S

    2016-03-01

    Multilocus phylogeography can uncover taxonomically unrecognized lineage diversity across complex biomes. The Australian monsoonal tropics include vast, ecologically intact savanna-woodland plains interspersed with ancient sandstone uplands. Although recognized in general for its high species richness and endemism, the biodiversity of the region remains underexplored due to its remoteness. This is despite a high rate of ongoing species discovery, especially in wetter regions and for rock-restricted taxa. To provide a baseline for ongoing comparative analyses, we tested for phylogeographic structure in an ecologically generalized and widespread taxon, the gecko Heteronotia binoei. We apply coalescent analyses to multilocus sequence data (mitochondrial DNA and eight nuclear DNA introns) from individuals sampled extensively and at fine scale across the region. The results demonstrate surprisingly deep and geographically nested lineage diversity. Several intra-specific clades previously shown to be endemic to the region were themselves found to contain multiple, short-range lineages. To infer landscapes with concentrations of unique phylogeographic diversity, we probabilistically estimate the ranges of lineages from point data and then, combining these estimates with the nDNA species tree, estimate phyloendemism across the region. Highest levels of phyloendemism occur in northern Top End, especially on islands, across the topographically complex Arnhem escarpment, and across the sandstone ranges of the western Gulf region. These results drive home that deep phylogeographic structure is prevalent in tropical low-dispersal taxa, even ones that are ubiquitous across geography and habitats.

  7. Bio-inspired Gecko Micro-surface for Drag Reduction in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Isnardo; Carrasquillo, Kenneth; Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Leonardi, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations of a turbulent channel flow with a porous wall inspired from the Gecko lizard were performed at Reynolds number of Reτ = 450 . Two superposed fluids were considered. As initial condition, one fluid fills the microfibrillar surface, the interface with the overlying fluid being flat and corresponding to the crests plane. The code is based on a finite difference scheme with a Runge Kutta and fractional step. The porous wall is modeled with the immersed boundary method, while the dynamic of the interface between the two fluids is solved with a level set method. A parametric study has been performed varying the viscosity ratio between the two fluids. Two cases have been considered, with and without surface tension. Without surface tension the microfibrillar wall acts as a rough wall increasing the drag. However, when the surface tension is large enough to maintain the interface stable, the external fluid cannot enter into the porous wall and an effective slip is produced. When the fluid in the porous wall has a viscosity 100 times smaller than that of the overlying fluid, a drag reduction of about 60 % can be observed. In this case, the near wall coherent structures become significantly weaker. The numerical simulations were performed on XSEDE TACC under Grant No. CTS070066. S.L., I.A. and K.C. were supported by ONR MURI grant.

  8. A new species of dwarf gecko in the genus Lygodactylus (squamata: Gekkonidae) from central Kenya.

    PubMed

    Malonza, Patrick K; Granthon, Carolina; Williams, Dean A

    2016-01-08

    A new species of Lygodactylus gecko (L. wojnowskii sp. nov.) is described from the vicinity of Chogoria Town on the eastern lower slopes of Mt. Kenya in central Kenya. A phylogeny based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA shows that the proposed new taxon is distinct within the Lygodactylus picturatus group and is the sister lineage to L. mombasicus and L. kimhowelli. It is morphologically very similar to both L. mombasicus and L. keniensis but its dorsal coloration and pattern is different. Its dorsum is grey with dark stripes while its head has black and white stripes that form a Y-shaped mark. While the male throat pattern is similar to that of L. mombasicus, that of the female is like that of females and some males of Lygodactylus keniensis. Lygodactylus wojnowskii sp. nov. has a higher number of post-postmental scales (6) than do its close relatives (5). The new species is distributed on the lower slopes of mid-altitude areas on eastern Mt. Kenya, but it may occur in other areas at similar elevations in central Kenya. It is associated with short, scattered trees within agricultural areas. It has not yet been recorded within the protected Chogoria forest block of Mt. Kenya forest. It is likely present in Mwea National Reserve as it occurs in nearby areas.

  9. Tooth development in a model reptile: functional and null generation teeth in the gecko Paroedura picta.

    PubMed

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Horacek, Ivan; Tucker, Abigail S

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes tooth development in a basal squamate, Paroedura picta. Due to its reproductive strategy, mode of development and position within the reptiles, this gecko represents an excellent model organism for the study of reptile development. Here we document the dental pattern and development of non-functional (null generation) and functional generations of teeth during embryonic development. Tooth development is followed from initiation to cytodifferentiation and ankylosis, as the tooth germs develop from bud, through cap to bell stages. The fate of the single generation of non-functional (null generation) teeth is shown to be variable, with some teeth being expelled from the oral cavity, while others are incorporated into the functional bone and teeth, or are absorbed. Fate appears to depend on the initiation site within the oral cavity, with the first null generation teeth forming before formation of the dental lamina. We show evidence for a stratum intermedium layer in the enamel epithelium of functional teeth and show that the bicuspid shape of the teeth is created by asymmetrical deposition of enamel, and not by folding of the inner dental epithelium as observed in mammals.

  10. Adopting Children with Attachment Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Notes that attachment behavior in infants is a facet of normal child development, and that children with attachment problems require special attention during and after the adoption process. Presents actions needed to increase the probability that such children can be successfully adopted, detailed attachment patterns, and parenting strategies and…

  11. Understanding Attachment: Beliefs about Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Arricale, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Examines attachment prototype, attachment-related feelings about conflict, style of expressing conflict, and conflict tactics using self-report questionnaires from 188 volunteer college students. Analysis indicated that persons who endorsed secure attachment reported feeling less threat from arguing; persons endorsing dismissing attachment…

  12. Attachment and Relationships: Beyond Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Using a question-answer format, this paper examines the concept of attachment and its importance for parents and caregivers of young children. Twenty topics are addressed through an examination of relevant theory, research findings, and clinical evidence: (1) a "who's who" list of researchers on attachment; (2) definition of attachment; (3)…

  13. Attachment: Theoretical Development and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Zeanah argues that ethological attachment theory, as outlined by John Bowlby, has provided one of the most important frameworks for understanding crucial risk and protective factors in social and emotional development. However, although attachment theory and the notion of attachment disorders have influenced such initiatives, many psychologists,…

  14. Attachment Theory: Retrospect and Prospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherton, Inge

    1985-01-01

    Provides overview of attachment theory as parented by John Bowlby in "Attachment and Loss". Uses two major concepts from this work to interpret refinements and elaborations of attachment theory attibuted to Mary Ainsworth. Considers how recent insights into development of socioemotional understanding and development of event representation can be…

  15. Membrane and Core Periplasmic Agrobacterium tumefaciens Virulence Type IV Secretion System Components Localize to Multiple Sites around the Bacterial Perimeter during Lateral Attachment to Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Julieta; Cameron, Todd A.; Zupan, John; Zambryski, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) transfer DNA and/or proteins into recipient cells. Here we performed immunofluorescence deconvolution microscopy to localize the assembled T4SS by detection of its native components VirB1, VirB2, VirB4, VirB5, VirB7, VirB8, VirB9, VirB10, and VirB11 in the C58 nopaline strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, following induction of virulence (vir) gene expression. These different proteins represent T4SS components spanning the inner membrane, periplasm, or outer membrane. Native VirB2, VirB5, VirB7, and VirB8 were also localized in the A. tumefaciens octopine strain A348. Quantitative analyses of the localization of all the above Vir proteins in nopaline and octopine strains revealed multiple foci in single optical sections in over 80% and 70% of the bacterial cells, respectively. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VirB8 expression following vir induction was used to monitor bacterial binding to live host plant cells; bacteria bind predominantly along their lengths, with few bacteria binding via their poles or subpoles. vir-induced attachment-defective bacteria or bacteria without the Ti plasmid do not bind to plant cells. These data support a model where multiple vir-T4SS around the perimeter of the bacterium maximize effective contact with the host to facilitate efficient transfer of DNA and protein substrates. PMID:22027007

  16. Space Station attached payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Lenwood G.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom is being designed and developed with user requirements being used to shape the configuration. Plans include accommodation provisions for a wide variety of attached payloads including the Earth sciences research activities which are the focus of this conference. The station program is even beginning some preliminary payload manifesting which involves planning for accommodation of payload during the station's assembly flights. Potential payload organizations should be aware of the station's plans for payload accommodations so as to guide their own payload activities for future space station use.

  17. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  18. Anxious attachment and psychological distress in cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    West, M; Sarah Rose, M; Brewis, C S

    1995-06-01

    This study investigated the relevance of anxious attachment to the differentiation of psychologically distressed and non-psychologically distressed cardiac patients. Attachment is a biologically based behavioral system in which proximity to a special other is sought or maintained to achieve a sense of safety and security. Anxious attachment, as the name denotes, fails to achieve the function of attachment in the sense of individuals having little or no confidence in the availability of their attachment figures. Empirically, three scales (feared loss of the attachment figure, proximity seeking and separation protest) capture the features of anxious attachment as elaborated by Bowlby. These scales were administered to 178 cardiac rehabilitation patients drawn from the cardiac rehabilitation program of the Calgary General Hospital. The results indicate that feared loss and proximity seeking differentiated psychologically distressed from non-psychologically distressed patients. The implications of this finding for the understanding of psychologically distressed cardiac patients are discussed.

  19. Anti-angiogenic activity of gecko aqueous extracts and its macromolecular components in CAM and HUVE-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhen; Huang, Shu-Qiong; Liu, Jian-Ting; Jiang, Gui-Xiang; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Gecko is a kind of traditional Chinese medicine with remarkable antineoplastic activity. However, undefined mechanisms and ambiguity regarding active ingredients limit new drug development from gecko. This study was conducted to assess anti-angiogenic properties of the aqueous extracts of fresh gecko (AG) or macromolecular components separated from AG (M-AG). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach was applied to detect the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of the tumor cells treated with AG or M-AG. The effect of AG or M-AG on vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migratory ability was analyzed by tetrazolium dye colorimetric method, transwell and wound-healing assays. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were used to ensure the anti-angiogenic activity of M-AG in vivo. The results showed that AG or M-AG inhibited the VEGF secretion of tumor cells, the relative inhibition rates of AG and M-AG being 27.2% and 53.2% respectively at a concentration of 20 μL/mL. AG and M-AG inhibited the vascular endothelial (VE) cell proliferation with IC50 values of 11.5 ± 0.5 μL/mL and 12.9 ± 0.4 μL/mL respectively. The VE cell migration potential was inhibited significantly (p<0.01) by the AG (≥ 24 μL/mL) or M-AG (≥ 12 μL/ mL) treatment. In vivo, neovascularization of CAM treated with M-AG was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) at a concentration of 0.4 μL/mL. This study provided evidence that anti-angiogenesis is one of the anti-tumor mechanisms of AG and M-AG, with the latter as a promising active component.

  20. Perceived hunger mediates the relationship between attachment anxiety and emotional eating.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Katherine E; Siegel, Harold I

    2013-08-01

    Eating is an inherently emotional activity and the attachment system is an emotion regulation system. Individuals with attachment insecurity have less interoceptive awareness and difficulty regulating emotion. Insecurely attached individuals may eat emotionally because they misinterpret internal hunger cues, (i.e. think they are hungry when they are experiencing some other internal, attachment-related state). The current study found a positive association between attachment anxiety and emotional eating. This relationship was mediated by perceived hunger.

  1. 48 CFR 1436.270-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., exhibits and other attachments. 1436.270-4 Section 1436.270-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... attachments. For Section J, List of documents, exhibits, and other attachments, include wage determinations (See FAR 22.404), SF-24—Bid Bond (See FAR 28.101), and other attachments by listing the title, date...

  2. Sexuality examined through the lens of attachment theory: attachment, caregiving, and sexual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Péloquin, Katherine; Brassard, Audrey; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Shaver, Phillip R

    2014-01-01

    Attachment researchers have proposed that the attachment, caregiving, and sexual behavioral systems are interrelated in adult love relationships (Mikulincer & Shaver, 2007 ). This study examined whether aspects of partners' caregiving (proximity, sensitivity, control, compulsive caregiving) mediated the association between their attachment insecurities (anxiety and avoidance) and each other's sexual satisfaction in two samples of committed couples (Study 1: 126 cohabiting or married couples from the general community; Study 2: 55 clinically distressed couples). Partners completed the Experiences in Close Relationships measure (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 ), the Caregiving Questionnaire (Kunce & Shaver, 1994 ), and the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction (Lawrance & Byers, 1998 ). Path analyses based on the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) revealed that caregiving proximity mediated the association between low attachment avoidance and partners' sexual satisfaction in distressed and nondistressed couples. Sensitivity mediated this association in nondistressed couples only. Control mediated the association between men's insecurities (attachment-related avoidance and anxiety) and their partners' low sexual satisfaction in nondistressed couples. Attachment anxiety predicted compulsive caregiving, but this caregiving dimension was not a significant mediator. These results are discussed in light of attachment theory and their implications for treating distressed couples. PMID:23659357

  3. Sexuality examined through the lens of attachment theory: attachment, caregiving, and sexual satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Péloquin, Katherine; Brassard, Audrey; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Shaver, Phillip R

    2014-01-01

    Attachment researchers have proposed that the attachment, caregiving, and sexual behavioral systems are interrelated in adult love relationships (Mikulincer & Shaver, 2007 ). This study examined whether aspects of partners' caregiving (proximity, sensitivity, control, compulsive caregiving) mediated the association between their attachment insecurities (anxiety and avoidance) and each other's sexual satisfaction in two samples of committed couples (Study 1: 126 cohabiting or married couples from the general community; Study 2: 55 clinically distressed couples). Partners completed the Experiences in Close Relationships measure (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 ), the Caregiving Questionnaire (Kunce & Shaver, 1994 ), and the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction (Lawrance & Byers, 1998 ). Path analyses based on the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM) revealed that caregiving proximity mediated the association between low attachment avoidance and partners' sexual satisfaction in distressed and nondistressed couples. Sensitivity mediated this association in nondistressed couples only. Control mediated the association between men's insecurities (attachment-related avoidance and anxiety) and their partners' low sexual satisfaction in nondistressed couples. Attachment anxiety predicted compulsive caregiving, but this caregiving dimension was not a significant mediator. These results are discussed in light of attachment theory and their implications for treating distressed couples.

  4. Scaling and biomechanics of surface attachment in climbing animals

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Attachment devices are essential adaptations for climbing animals and valuable models for synthetic adhesives. A major unresolved question for both natural and bioinspired attachment systems is how attachment performance depends on size. Here, we discuss how contact geometry and mode of detachment influence the scaling of attachment forces for claws and adhesive pads, and how allometric data on biological systems can yield insights into their mechanism of attachment. Larger animals are expected to attach less well to surfaces, due to their smaller surface-to-volume ratio, and because it becomes increasingly difficult to distribute load uniformly across large contact areas. In order to compensate for this decrease of weight-specific adhesion, large animals could evolve overproportionally large pads, or adaptations that increase attachment efficiency (adhesion or friction per unit contact area). Available data suggest that attachment pad area scales close to isometry within clades, but pad efficiency in some animals increases with size so that attachment performance is approximately size-independent. The mechanisms underlying this biologically important variation in pad efficiency are still unclear. We suggest that switching between stress concentration (easy detachment) and uniform load distribution (strong attachment) via shear forces is one of the key mechanisms enabling the dynamic control of adhesion during locomotion. PMID:25533088

  5. Adult attachment styles: some thoughts on closeness-distance struggles.

    PubMed

    Pistole, M C

    1994-06-01

    Difficulty with distance regulation is a central source of controversy in couples' relationships. This article describes how attachment theory can contribute to the understanding and treatment of closeness-distance struggles. Discussion focuses on (a) closeness-seeking as a feature of the attachment system, (b) individual differences in adult attachment styles, and (c) the working model that governs how salient interpersonal information is processed and is responded to both emotionally and behaviorally. These elements of the attachment system not only contribute to understanding closeness-distance disturbance but also provide access points for therapeutic intervention.

  6. High risks of losing genetic diversity in an endemic Mauritian gecko: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Groombridge, Jim J; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A; Gallagher, Laura E; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations.

  7. Landscape Genetics of Leaf-Toed Geckos in the Tropical Dry Forest of Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Christopher; Jiménez Arcos, Victor H.; Mendez de la Cruz, Fausto R.; Murphy, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation due to both natural and anthropogenic forces continues to threaten the evolution and maintenance of biological diversity. This is of particular concern in tropical regions that are experiencing elevated rates of habitat loss. Although less well-studied than tropical rain forests, tropical dry forests (TDF) contain an enormous diversity of species and continue to be threatened by anthropogenic activities including grazing and agriculture. However, little is known about the processes that shape genetic connectivity in species inhabiting TDF ecosystems. We adopt a landscape genetic approach to understanding functional connectivity for leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus tuberculosus) at multiple sites near the northernmost limit of this ecosystem at Alamos, Sonora, Mexico. Traditional analyses of population genetics are combined with multivariate GIS-based landscape analyses to test hypotheses on the potential drivers of spatial genetic variation. Moderate levels of within-population diversity and substantial levels of population differentiation are revealed by FST and Dest. Analyses using structure suggest the occurrence of from 2 to 9 genetic clusters depending on the model used. Landscape genetic analysis suggests that forest cover, stream connectivity, undisturbed habitat, slope, and minimum temperature of the coldest period explain more genetic variation than do simple Euclidean distances. Additional landscape genetic studies throughout TDF habitat are required to understand species-specific responses to landscape and climate change and to identify common drivers. We urge researchers interested in using multivariate distance methods to test for, and report, significant correlations among predictor matrices that can impact results, particularly when adopting least-cost path approaches. Further investigation into the use of information theoretic approaches for model selection is also warranted. PMID:23451230

  8. Ecophysiology Tracks Phylogeny and Meets Ecological Models in an Iberian Gecko.

    PubMed

    Rato, C; Carretero, M A

    2015-01-01

    Because fitness of ectotherms, including reptiles, is highly dependent on temperature and water availability, the study of ecophysiological traits, such as preferred temperature (T p) and water loss rates (WLRs), may provide mechanistic evidence on the restricting factors to the species ranges. The Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, is a species complex with a circum-Mediterranean distribution. In the Iberian Peninsula, two sister parapatric forms of the complex, known as the Iberian and the European clades, are found. Ecological models previously performed using presence records and bioclimatic variables suggest niche divergence between both lineages correlated with precipitation rather than with temperature. In this study, we test this correlative hypothesis using ecophysiological evidence. In the laboratory, we analyzed the T p and WLRs for 84 adult males from seven distinct populations ascribed to one of the two lineages present in Iberia. Specifically, we evaluated the existence of trait conservatism versus adaptation among populations, lineages, or both. In addition, we tested for a trade-off between water and thermal traits and assessed whether climate regime of sampling localities had any influence on the ecophysiological patterns found. We found that T p is quite conserved at both the population and lineage levels and independent from body size. In contrast, water loss experiments revealed some variation among populations, but the regression analysis failed to detect correlation between T p and WLR at any level. Overall, the European lineage displayed a trend for higher water loss and was more diverse among populations when compared with the Iberian lineage. The lack of correspondence between ecophysiological traits and local climatic conditions favors phylogenetic signal versus adaptation. This suggests divergent evolutionary responses to the environment, mainly acting on water ecology, in both lineages, which may account for the differences in their

  9. Scar-free wound healing and regeneration following tail loss in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Stephanie Lynn; Lungu, Ilinca Mihaela; Vickaryous, Matthew Kenneth

    2012-10-01

    Many lizards are able to undergo scar-free wound healing and regeneration following loss of the tail. In most instances, lizard tail loss is facilitated by autotomy, an evolved mechanism that permits the tail to be self-detached at pre-existing fracture planes. However, it has also been reported that the tail can regenerate following surgical amputation outside the fracture plane. In this study, we used the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, to investigate and compare wound healing and regeneration following autotomy at a fracture plane and amputation outside the fracture plane. Both forms of tail loss undergo a nearly identical sequence of events leading to scar-free wound healing and regeneration. Early wound healing is characterized by transient myofibroblasts and the formation of a highly proliferative wound epithelium immunoreactive for the wound keratin marker WE6. The new tail forms from what is commonly referred to as a blastema, a mass of proliferating mesenchymal-like cells. Blastema cells express the protease matrix metalloproteinase-9. Apoptosis (demonstrated by activated caspase 3 immunostaining) is largely restricted to isolated cells of the original and regenerating tail tissues, although cell death also occurs within dermal structures at the original-regenerated tissue interface and among clusters of newly formed myocytes. Furthermore, the autotomized tail is unique in demonstrating apoptosis among cells adjacent to the fracture planes. Unlike mammals, transforming growth factor-β3 is not involved in wound healing. We demonstrate that scar-free wound healing and regeneration are intrinsic properties of the tail, unrelated to the location or mode of tail detachment.

  10. High risks of losing genetic diversity in an endemic Mauritian gecko: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Groombridge, Jim J; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A; Gallagher, Laura E; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations. PMID

  11. Tuning micropillar tapering for optimal friction performance of thermoplastic gecko-inspired adhesive.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkwan; Chung, Yunsie; Tsao, Angela; Maboudian, Roya

    2014-05-14

    We present a fabrication method and friction testing of a gecko-inspired thermoplastic micropillar array with control over the tapering angle of the pillar sidewall. A combination of deep reactive ion etching of vertical silicon pillars and subsequent maskless chemical etching produces templates with various widths and degrees of taper, which are then replicated with low-density polyethylene. As the silicon pillars on the template are chemically etched in a bath consisting of hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid, and acetic acid (HNA), the pillars are progressively thinned, then shortened. The replicated polyethylene pillar arrays exhibit a corresponding increase in friction as the stiffness is reduced with thinning and then a decrease in friction as the stiffness is again increased. The dilution of the HNA bath in water influences the tapering angle of the silicon pillars. The friction of the replicated pillars is maximized for the taper angle that maximizes the contact area at the tip which in turn is influenced by the stiffness of the tapered pillars. To provide insights on how changes in microscale geometry and contact behavior may affect friction of the pillar array, the pillars are imaged by scanning electron microscopy after friction testing, and the observed deformation behavior from shearing is related to the magnitude of the macroscale friction values. It is shown that the tapering angle critically changes the pillar compliance and the available contact area. Simple finite element modeling calculations are performed to support that the observed deformation is consistent with what is expected from a mechanical analysis. We conclude that friction can be maximized via proper pillar tapering with low stiffness that still maintains enough contact area to ensure high adhesion.

  12. Ecophysiology Tracks Phylogeny and Meets Ecological Models in an Iberian Gecko.

    PubMed

    Rato, C; Carretero, M A

    2015-01-01

    Because fitness of ectotherms, including reptiles, is highly dependent on temperature and water availability, the study of ecophysiological traits, such as preferred temperature (T p) and water loss rates (WLRs), may provide mechanistic evidence on the restricting factors to the species ranges. The Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica, is a species complex with a circum-Mediterranean distribution. In the Iberian Peninsula, two sister parapatric forms of the complex, known as the Iberian and the European clades, are found. Ecological models previously performed using presence records and bioclimatic variables suggest niche divergence between both lineages correlated with precipitation rather than with temperature. In this study, we test this correlative hypothesis using ecophysiological evidence. In the laboratory, we analyzed the T p and WLRs for 84 adult males from seven distinct populations ascribed to one of the two lineages present in Iberia. Specifically, we evaluated the existence of trait conservatism versus adaptation among populations, lineages, or both. In addition, we tested for a trade-off between water and thermal traits and assessed whether climate regime of sampling localities had any influence on the ecophysiological patterns found. We found that T p is quite conserved at both the population and lineage levels and independent from body size. In contrast, water loss experiments revealed some variation among populations, but the regression analysis failed to detect correlation between T p and WLR at any level. Overall, the European lineage displayed a trend for higher water loss and was more diverse among populations when compared with the Iberian lineage. The lack of correspondence between ecophysiological traits and local climatic conditions favors phylogenetic signal versus adaptation. This suggests divergent evolutionary responses to the environment, mainly acting on water ecology, in both lineages, which may account for the differences in their

  13. An attachment perspective on psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    MIKULINCER, MARIO; SHAVER, PHILIP R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, attachment theory, which was originally formulated to describe and explain infant-parent emotional bonding, has been applied to the study of adolescent and adult romantic relationships and then to the study of psychological processes, such as interpersonal functioning, emotion regulation, coping with stress, and mental health. In this paper, we offer a brief overview of the attachment perspective on psychopathology. Following a brief account of attachment theory, we go on to explain how the study of individual differences in adult attachment intersects with the study of psychopathology. Specifically, we review research findings showing that attachment insecurity is a major contributor to mental disorders, and that the enhancement of attachment security can facilitate amelioration of psychopathology. PMID:22294997

  14. Present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylidae: Phyllodactylus) stems from three independent colonization events.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Rodríguez-Guerra, Andrea; Chaves, Jaime A

    2016-10-01

    We re-examined the biogeography of the leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus) endemic to the Galápagos Islands by analyzing for the first time samples of P. gilberti, a species endemic to Wolf island, in a phylogenetic framework. Our aim was to test the three-colonizations scenario previously proposed for these lizards and estimate the age of each colonization event. To achieve this we estimated simultaneously a species tree and divergence times with Bayesian methods. Our results supported the three-colonizations scenario. Similar to a previous hypothesis, the species tree obtained here showed that most species of Phyllodactylus are nested in a single clade with an age between 5.49 and 13.8Ma, whereas a second independent colonization corresponding to P. darwini from San Cristóbal island occurred 3.03Ma ago. The species from Wolf island, P. gilberti, stems from a more recent colonization event (0.69Ma). Thus, present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos stems from three independent, asynchronous colonization events. As with other Galápagos organisms, the Pacific coast of South America seems to be the source for the founders of P. gilberti. PMID:27400628

  15. Present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylidae: Phyllodactylus) stems from three independent colonization events.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Rodríguez-Guerra, Andrea; Chaves, Jaime A

    2016-10-01

    We re-examined the biogeography of the leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus) endemic to the Galápagos Islands by analyzing for the first time samples of P. gilberti, a species endemic to Wolf island, in a phylogenetic framework. Our aim was to test the three-colonizations scenario previously proposed for these lizards and estimate the age of each colonization event. To achieve this we estimated simultaneously a species tree and divergence times with Bayesian methods. Our results supported the three-colonizations scenario. Similar to a previous hypothesis, the species tree obtained here showed that most species of Phyllodactylus are nested in a single clade with an age between 5.49 and 13.8Ma, whereas a second independent colonization corresponding to P. darwini from San Cristóbal island occurred 3.03Ma ago. The species from Wolf island, P. gilberti, stems from a more recent colonization event (0.69Ma). Thus, present diversity of Galápagos leaf-toed geckos stems from three independent, asynchronous colonization events. As with other Galápagos organisms, the Pacific coast of South America seems to be the source for the founders of P. gilberti.

  16. Redescription of the rare Philippine false gecko Pseudogekko brevipes (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) and description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Watters, Jessa L; Köhler, Gunther; Whitsett, Collin; Huron, Nicholas A; Brown, Rafe M; Diesmos, Arvin C; Siler, Cameron D

    2015-01-01

    Recent investigations into the species diversity of false geckos (genus Pseudogekko Taylor) have revealed several cryptic species, highlighting the need for a more thorough understanding of diversity within this enigmatic genus of endemic Philippine geckos. Newly available genetic data reveal that two of the four currently recognized species are complexes of multiple deeply divergent evolutionary lineages. In this paper we evaluate species diversity in one of these complexes, P. brevipes Boettger, and describe one additional new species. For nearly a century, P. brevipes has been recognized as a single, "widespread" species with a geographic range spanning two major faunal regions and several island groups. Poor understanding of this species has persisted due to both limited sampling and its apparent rarity. We evaluate both morphological and genetic data to define species limits in P. brevipes, and find character-based evidence to justify the recognition of two unique evolutionary lineages, one of which we describe as a new species (P. atiorum sp. nov.). The species included in this study have allopatric distributions and differ from congeners by numerous diagnostic characters of external morphology, and therefore should be recognized as full species in accordance with lineage-based species concepts. This newly described species increases the total number of species of Pseudogekko to seven. PMID:26624104

  17. Molecular phylogenetics and species delimitation of leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylidae: Phyllodactylus) throughout the Mexican tropical dry forest.

    PubMed

    Blair, Christopher; Méndez de la Cruz, Fausto R; Law, Christopher; Murphy, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Methods and approaches for accurate species delimitation continue to be a highly controversial subject in the systematics community. Inaccurate assessment of species' limits precludes accurate inference of historical evolutionary processes. Recent evidence suggests that multilocus coalescent methods show promise in delimiting species in cryptic clades. We combine multilocus sequence data with coalescence-based phylogenetics in a hypothesis-testing framework to assess species limits and elucidate the timing of diversification in leaf-toed geckos (Phyllodactylus) of Mexico's dry forests. Tropical deciduous forests (TDF) of the Neotropics are among the planet's most diverse ecosystems. However, in comparison to moist tropical forests, little is known about the mode and tempo of biotic evolution throughout this threatened biome. We find increased speciation and substantial, cryptic molecular diversity originating following the formation of Mexican TDF 30-20million years ago due to orogenesis of the Sierra Madre Occidental and Mexican Volcanic Belt. Phylogenetic results suggest that the Mexican Volcanic Belt, the Rio Fuerte, and Isthmus of Tehuantepec may be important biogeographic barriers. Single- and multilocus coalescent analyses suggest that nearly every sampling locality may be a distinct species. These results suggest unprecedented levels of diversity, a complex evolutionary history, and that the formation and expansion of TDF vegetation in the Miocene may have influenced subsequent cladogenesis of leaf-toed geckos throughout western Mexico.

  18. Overview for Attached Payload Accommodations and Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Craig; Cook, Gene; Nabizadeh, Rodney; Phillion, James

    2007-01-01

    External payload accommodations are provided at attach sites on the U.S provided ELC, U.S. Truss, the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM EF) and the Columbus EPF (External Payload Facilities). The Integrated Truss Segment (ITS) provides the backbone structure for the ISS. It attaches the solar and thermal control arrays to the rest of the complex, and houses cable distribution trays Extravehicular Activity (EVA) support equipment such as handholds and lighting; and providing for Extravehicular Robotic (EVR) accommodations using the Mobile Servicing System (MSS). It also provides logistics and maintenance, and payload attachment sites. The attachment sites accommodate logistics and maintenance and payloads carriers, zenith and nadir. The JEM-EF, a back porch-like attachment to the JEM Pressurized Module, accommodates up to eight payloads, which can be serviced by the crew via the JEM PM's airlock and dedicated robotic arm. The Columbus-EPF is another porch-like platform that can accommodate two zenith and two nadir looking payloads.

  19. Expression of beta-keratin mRNAs and proline uptake in epidermal cells of growing scales and pad lamellae of gecko lizards.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Toni, Mattia; Dalla Valle, Luisa

    2007-07-01

    Beta-keratins form a large part of the proteins contained in the hard beta layer of reptilian scales. The expression of genes encoding glycine-proline-rich beta-keratins in normal and regenerating epidermis of two species of gecko lizards has been studied by in situ hybridization. The probes localize mRNAs in differentiating oberhautchen and beta cells of growing scales and in modified scales, termed pad lamellae, on the digits of gecko lizards. In situ localization at the ultrastructural level shows clusters of gold particles in the cytoplasm among beta-keratin filaments of oberhautchen and beta cells. They are also present in the differentiating elongation or setae of oberhautchen cells present in pad lamellae. Setae allow geckos to adhere and climb vertical surfaces. Oberhautchen and beta cells also incorporate tritiated proline. The fine localization of the beta-keratin mRNAs and the uptake of proline confirms the biomolecular data that identified glycine-proline-rich beta-keratin in differentiating beta cells of gecko epidermis. The present study also shows the presence of differentiating and metabolically active cells in both inner and outer oberhautchen/beta cells at the base of the outer setae localized at the tip of pad lamellae. The addition of new beta and alpha cells to the corneous layer near the tip of the outer setae explains the anterior movement of the setae along the apical free-margin of pad lamellae. The rapid replacement of setae ensures the continuous usage of the gecko's adhesive devices, the pad lamellae, during most of their active life.

  20. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  1. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  2. Labor, delivery, and early parenthood: an attachment theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carol L; Rholes, W Steven; Simpson, Jeffry A; Tran, Sisi

    2007-04-01

    Having a baby is a powerful experience that, according to attachment theory, should activate the attachment system and elicit attachment needs and motives. The current study investigated first-time parents' perceptions of and responses to events surrounding labor and delivery and early parenthood. Couples expecting their first child completed measures of attachment orientations and questionnaires assessing key aspects of the experience of labor, delivery, and early parenthood. Attachment anxiety and avoidance significantly predicted individuals' perceptions of themselves and their partners, reactions to their partners' behavior, and emotional responses to their infants. Jealousy of the infant, perceptions of support given to or received from partners, and feelings of closeness to the infant were all associated with attachment orientations in theoretically meaningful ways.

  3. Attachment and adolescent psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Allen, J P; Moore, C; Kuperminc, G; Bell, K

    1998-10-01

    To explore the meaning and function of attachment organization during adolescence, its relation to multiple domains of psychosocial functioning was examined in a sample of 131 moderately at-risk adolescents. Attachment organization was assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview; multiple measures of functioning were obtained from parents, adolescents, and their peers. Security displayed in adolescents' organization of discourse about attachment experiences was related to competence with peers (as reported by peers), lower levels of internalizing behaviors (as reported by adolescents), and lower levels of deviant behavior (as reported by peers and by mothers). Preoccupation with attachment experiences, seen in angry or diffuse and unfocused discussion of attachment experiences, was linked to higher levels of both internalizing and deviant behaviors. These relations generally remained even when other attachment-related constructs that had been previously related to adolescent functioning were covaried in analysis. Results are interpreted as suggesting an important role for attachment organization in a wide array of aspects of adolescent psychosocial development. PMID:9839424

  4. The Legacy of Early Attachments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ross A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates what has been learned regarding the impact of early close relationships on psychological development, by examining the origins of continuity and change in attachment security and its prediction of later behavior. Evaluates research on impact of changing family circumstances and quality of care on attachment security. Offers new…

  5. The legacy of early attachments.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R A

    2000-01-01

    The impact of early close relationships on psychological development is one of the enduring questions of developmental psychology that is addressed by attachment theory and research. This essay evaluates what has been learned, and offers ideas for future research, by examining the origins of continuity and change in the security of attachment early in life, and its prediction of later behavior. The discussion evaluates research on the impact of changing family circumstances and quality of care on changes in attachment security, and offers new hypotheses for future study. Considering the representations (or internal working models) associated with attachment security as developing representations, the discussion proposes that (1) attachment security may be developmentally most influential when the working models with which it is associated have sufficiently matured to influence other emerging features of psychosocial functioning; (2) changes in attachment security are more likely during periods of representational advance; and (3) parent-child discourse and other relational influences shape these developing representations after infancy. Finally, other features of early parent-child relationships that develop concurrently with attachment security, including negotiating conflict and establishing cooperation, also must be considered in understanding the legacy of early attachments.

  6. Attachment behaviors in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Sigman, M; Ungerer, J A

    1984-09-01

    The social behaviors of 14 autistic children and 14 normal children of equivalent mental age were observed during a free-play situation as well as during separation from and reunion with their mothers and a stranger. As a group, the autistic children showed evidence of attachment to their mothers, directing more social behaviors and more physical contact to their caregivers than to the stranger during the reunion episodes. Within the autistic group, the children who showed an increase in attachment behaviors in response to separation and reunion demonstrated more advanced symbolic play skills than those autistic children who showed no change in attachment behaviors. One possible explanation may be that autistic children require more advanced levels of symbolic ability to form attachments to others than is necessary for the development of attachments in normal children.

  7. Parenting and preschooler attachment among low-income urban African American families.

    PubMed

    Barnett, D; Kidwell, S L; Leung, K H

    1998-12-01

    This study examined the parental correlates of child attachment in a preschool-aged, economically disadvantaged, urban, African American sample. Sixty-nine 4- to 5-year-olds and their primary caregivers participated in the Strange Situation assessment procedure. Based on Cassidy and Marvin's classification system for preschoolers, 61% of the children were classified as securely attached, with girls being significantly more likely to be securely attached than boys (74% versus 45%). The majority of the insecure attachments were of the avoidant variety. Consistent with attachment theory, parents of securely attached children were rated as significantly more warm and accepting and less controlling with their children than were parents of insecurely attached preschoolers. Relative to parents of securely attached preschoolers, parents of children judged to be insecurely attached reported being more likely to use corporal punishment and less likely to use verbal reminders when their children misbehaved. Parenting was associated with attachment over and above the effects of child sex.

  8. Autonomous berthing/unberthing of a Work Attachment Mechanism/Work Attachment Fixture (WAM/WAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami S.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the autonomous berthing of a Work Attachment Mechanism/Work Attachment Fixture (WAM/WAF) developed by NASA for berthing and docking applications in space. The WAM/WAF system enables fast and reliable berthing (unberthing) of space hardware. A successful operation of the WAM/WAF requires that the WAM motor velocity be precisely controlled. The operating principle and the design of the WAM/WAF is described as well as the development of a control system used to regulate the WAM motor velocity. The results of an experiment in which the WAM/WAF is used to handle an orbital replacement unit are given.

  9. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation. PMID:24945717

  10. Attachment anxiety is related to Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Christopher P; Jaremka, Lisa M; Glaser, Ronald; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Farrar, William B; Malarkey, William B; Chen, Min; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-10-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding individual differences in chronic interpersonal stress. Attachment anxiety, a type of relationship insecurity characterized by worry about rejection and abandonment, is a chronic interpersonal stressor. Stress impacts cellular immunity, including herpesvirus reactivation. We investigated whether attachment anxiety was related to the expression of a latent herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), when individuals were being tested for breast or colon cancer and approximately 1 year later. Participants (N=183) completed a standard attachment questionnaire and provided blood to assess EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgG antibody titers. Individuals with more attachment anxiety had higher EBV VCA IgG antibody titers than those with less attachment anxiety. The strength of the association between attachment anxiety and antibody titers was the same at both assessments. This study is the first to show an association between latent herpesvirus reactivation and attachment anxiety. Because elevated herpesvirus antibody titers reflect poorer cellular immune system control over the latent virus, these data suggest that high attachment anxiety is associated with cellular immune dysregulation.

  11. Two new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus spp. (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Madagascar, including a new host of Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Scott Seville, R; Hartdegen, Ruston

    2016-10-01

    During May and June 2015, four common leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus fimbriatus (Schneider), five satanic leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus phantasticus (Boulenger), and four mossy leaf-tailed geckos, Uroplatus sikorae Boettger originally collected from Madagascar and housed at the Dallas Zoo, USA, had their faeces examined for coccidian parasites. Eight (62%) geckos were found to be passing oöcysts, including a new eimerian, a new isosporan and a previously described eimerian. Three of four (75%) U. fimbratus (type-host) and one of five (20%) U. phantasticus were infected with Eimeria schneideri n. sp.; oöcysts were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured (mean length × width, L × W) 15.1 × 13.5 µm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but one to many polar granules were present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 6.9 × 5.3 µm, L/W = 1.3. Stieda, sub-Stieda and para-Stieda bodies were absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present as dispersed granules. Four of five (80%) U. phantasticus harboured Isospora boulengeri n. sp.; oöcysts were subpheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bi-layered wall and measured 17.3 × 16.0 µm, L/W = 1.1. A micropyle and oöcyst residuum were absent but a polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.5 × 6.9 µm, L/W = 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present but a para-Stieda body was absent. A globular sporocyst residuum was present with dispersed granules. In addition, one of four (25%) U. sikorae was infected with an eimerian indistinguishable from Eimeria brygooi Upton & Barnard, 1987, previously reported from Madagascar day gecko, Phelsuma grandis Gray and golddust day gecko, Phelsuma laticauda (Boettger) from Madagascar. These are the first coccidians described from Uroplatus spp. PMID:27638735

  12. Attachment Theory: Contributions to Group Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1997-01-01

    Describes attachment theory, explores its application to group counseling, and elaborates points of interest to group workers. Focuses on attachment styles, attachment and caregiving, the group leader's goals, the group as an attachment experience, interventions based on attachment theory, its use in psychoeducational groups, and complexities in…

  13. Everything You Want To Know about Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    This paper discusses infant attachment, which it defines as a long-lasting emotional bond revealed when a child under stress seeks out and tries to stay close to a specific figure. The paper addresses: (1) What is attachment? Who are the pioneers in attachment theory?; (2) How do we notice attachment in action?; (3) Is attachment the only…

  14. The effect of some drugs on the mitral cell odor-evoked responses in the gecko olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K; Shibuya, T

    1985-01-01

    The activity of odor-evoked olfactory mitral cell response of the gecko was recorded extracellularly by glass microelectrodes. The activities of the mitral cell observed during the presentation of the odor (n-amyl acetate) could be described as excitation, suppression or zero. The present experiments were undertaken to study the neural activities of the mitral cell in the olfactory bulb by perfusion application of some drugs (cobalt chloride, carnosine, norepinephrine, GABA and D-L-homocysteate) on the olfactory bulb surface or iontophoretic application of some drugs (carnosine, norepinephrine, GABA and D-L-homocysteate) to the glomerulus and the external plexiform layer to change the physiological environment. The effect of the drugs suggested that the synaptic neurons on the mitral cell have different chemical characteristics.

  15. A new phasmid gecko (Squamata: Diplodactylidae: Strophurus) from the Arnhem Plateau: more new diversity in rare vertebrates from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Paul M; Parkin, Tom

    2014-10-22

    The Arnhem Plateau is a rugged expanse of sandstone escarpment in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics with a highly endemic biota. Here we describe a new species of small spinifex dwelling Strophurus (phasmid gecko) that also appears to be endemic to this region. Strophurus horneri sp. nov. can be diagnosed from all congeners by aspects of size, coloration and scalation. Even with the description of this new species, however, levels of morphological and genetic diversity within Strophurus from the stone country of the Northern Territory suggest additional divergent lineages are present. A number of recent studies have now provided preliminary evidence of evolutionary diversity within the Arnhem Plateau, but data remains scant and almost nothing is known about how topography and historical processes have shaped the endemic biota of this region. 

  16. Regulation of the elastic modulus of polyurethane microarrays and its influence on gecko-inspired dry adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhao, Aiwu; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Dapeng; Li, Da; Guo, Hongyan; Tao, Wenyu; Gan, Zibao; Zhang, Maofeng

    2011-02-01

    We studied the influence of the elastic modulus on the gecko-inspired dry adhesion by regulating the elastic modulus of bulk polyurethane combined with changing the size of microarrays. Segmented polyurethane (PU) was utilized to fabricate micro arrays by the porous polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) membrane molding method. The properties of the micro arrays, such as the elastic modulus and adhesion, were investigated by Triboindenter. The study demonstrates that bulk surfaces show the highest elastic modulus, with similar values at around 175 MPa and decreasing the arrays radius causes a significant decrease in E, down to 0.62 MPa. The corresponding adhesion experiments show that decrease of the elastic modulus can enhance the adhesion which is consistent with the recent theoretical models.

  17. Attachment: A Concept That Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giblin, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Explores the concept of "attachment" from the perspectives of love and work; marriage, parenting, and child development; triangles and the family emotional field; and evaluation instruments. (Author/JBJ)

  18. Attachment at work and performance.

    PubMed

    Neustadt, Elizabeth A; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2011-09-01

    This paper examines the relations between self-reported attachment orientation at work and personality, self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence (aka emotional self-efficacy), and independently assessed career potential and job performance. Self-report data were collected from 211 managers in an international business in the hospitality industry; independent assessments of these managers' job performance and career potential were separately obtained from the organization. A self-report measure of romantic attachment was adapted for application in the work context; a two-factor solution was found for this measure. Secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work was positively related to self-esteem, trait emotional intelligence, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and also to job performance. Not only was secure/autonomous attachment orientation at work statistically predictive of job performance, but the new measure also made a distinct contribution, beyond conscientiousness, to this prediction. PMID:21838647

  19. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ): scale development.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Marc A; Thomas, Stuart W

    2011-01-01

    In line with dynamic systems and dialectical theories of development, it was theorized that a psychopathology such as an addiction could have several causes (equifinality) and that more specific diagnoses and treatments of the most salient clinical issues for individuals coming from different developmental paths could increase the success rates of most therapies. Further, the issues from a developmental dynamic systems perspective should include not only individual clinical issues, but also relational, familial, peer, and organizational functioning. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ) was developed as a research and clinical instrument relevant to these concerns. The 29 scales were based on naturalistic observations of patients in treatment and 12-step groups, attachment theory, and the clinical literature dealing with the addictions. The attachment scales were taken from classic attachment theory but, in line with more recent formulations, included relations to mother, father, and partner. Study 1 found the ACIQ to have good coefficient alphas (.79), and factor analyses revealed that the eight factors loaded on different attachment figures and sets of clinical issues rather than attachment styles per se. Study 2 found test-retest reliability to be, on average, .79. The results were in line with the developmental hypothesis that partner and father attachments are different than attachments to mother, and that family and peer relations as well as clinical issues need to be considered separately.

  20. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ): scale development.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Marc A; Thomas, Stuart W

    2011-01-01

    In line with dynamic systems and dialectical theories of development, it was theorized that a psychopathology such as an addiction could have several causes (equifinality) and that more specific diagnoses and treatments of the most salient clinical issues for individuals coming from different developmental paths could increase the success rates of most therapies. Further, the issues from a developmental dynamic systems perspective should include not only individual clinical issues, but also relational, familial, peer, and organizational functioning. The Attachment and Clinical Issues Questionnaire (ACIQ) was developed as a research and clinical instrument relevant to these concerns. The 29 scales were based on naturalistic observations of patients in treatment and 12-step groups, attachment theory, and the clinical literature dealing with the addictions. The attachment scales were taken from classic attachment theory but, in line with more recent formulations, included relations to mother, father, and partner. Study 1 found the ACIQ to have good coefficient alphas (.79), and factor analyses revealed that the eight factors loaded on different attachment figures and sets of clinical issues rather than attachment styles per se. Study 2 found test-retest reliability to be, on average, .79. The results were in line with the developmental hypothesis that partner and father attachments are different than attachments to mother, and that family and peer relations as well as clinical issues need to be considered separately. PMID:22256681