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Sample records for geer downmodulate secretion

  1. Dendritic Cell-Secreted Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein-4 Regulates the T-cell Response by Downmodulating Bystander Surface B7.

    PubMed

    Halpert, Matthew M; Konduri, Vanaja; Liang, Dan; Chen, Yunyu; Wing, James B; Paust, Silke; Levitt, Jonathan M; Decker, William K

    2016-05-15

    The remarkable functional plasticity of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) allows the adaptive immune system to respond specifically to an incredibly diverse array of potential pathogenic insults; nonetheless, the specific molecular effectors and mechanisms that underpin this plasticity remain poorly characterized. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4), the target of the blockbuster cancer immunotherapeutic ipilimumab, is one of the most well-known and well-studied members of the B7 superfamily and negatively regulates T cell responses by a variety of known mechanisms. Although CTLA-4 is thought to be expressed almost exclusively among lymphoid lineage hematopoietic cells, a few reports have indicated that nonlymphoid APCs can also express the CTLA-4 mRNA transcript and that transcript levels can be regulated by external stimuli. In this study, we substantially build upon these critical observations, definitively demonstrating that mature myeloid lineage dendritic cells (DC) express significant levels of intracellular CTLA-4 that they constitutively secrete in microvesicular structures. CTLA-4(+) microvesicles can competitively bind B7 costimulatory molecules on bystander DC, resulting in downregulation of B7 surface expression with significant functional consequences for downstream CD8(+) T-cell responses. Hence, the data indicate a previously unknown role for DC-derived CTLA-4 in immune cell functional plasticity and have significant implication for the design and implementation of immunomodulatory strategies intended to treat cancer and infectious disease. PMID:26979751

  2. Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) Independent Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert S.; Smiles, Michael D.; George, Mark A.; Ton, Mimi C.; Le, Son K.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief of the Space Science Project Office at Glenn Research Center (GRC) requested support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to satisfy a request from the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Associate Administrator and the Planetary Science Division Chief to obtain an independent review of the Glenn Extreme Environments Rig (GEER) and the operational controls in place for mitigating any hazard associated with its operation. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  3. HLA-C Downmodulation by HIV-1 Vpu.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward; Evans, David T

    2016-05-11

    It is widely held that HIV-1 Nef downmodulates HLA-A and -B to protect infected cells from CD8(+) T cells but leaves HLA-C on the cell surface to inhibit NK cells. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Apps et al. (2016) revise this model by showing that the Vpu protein of primary HIV-1 isolates downmodulate HLA-C.

  4. Appearance of De Geer moraines in southern and western Finland - Implications for reconstructing glacier retreat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojala, Antti E. K.

    2016-02-01

    LiDAR digital elevation models (DEMs) from southern and western Finland were investigated to map and discriminate features of De Geer moraines, sparser and more scattered end moraines, and larger end moraine features (i.e., ice-marginal complexes). The results indicate that the occurrence and distribution of De Geer moraines and scattered end moraine ridges in Finland are more widespread than previously suggested. This is probably attributed to the ease of detecting and mapping these features with high-resolution DEMs, indicating the efficiency of LiDAR applications in geological and geomorphological studies. The variable appearance and distribution of moraine ridges in Finland support previous interpretations that no single model is likely to be appropriate for the genesis of De Geer moraines at all localities and for all types of end moraines. De Geer moraine appearances and interdistances probably result from a combination of the general rapidity of ice-margin recession during deglaciation, the proglacial water depth in which they were formed, and local glacier dynamics related to climate and terrain topography. The correlation between the varved clay-based rate of deglaciation and interdistances of distinct and regularly spaced De Geer moraine ridges indicates that the rate of deglaciation is probably involved in the De Geer ridge-forming process, but more thorough comparisons are needed to understand the extent to which De Geer interdistances represent an annual rate of ice-margin decay and the rapidity of regional deglaciation.

  5. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  6. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  7. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  8. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64+ monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients’ inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64+ cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64+ cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64+ cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  9. Surveillance definitions of infections in long-term care facilities: revisiting the McGeer criteria.

    PubMed

    Stone, Nimalie D; Ashraf, Muhammad S; Calder, Jennifer; Crnich, Christopher J; Crossley, Kent; Drinka, Paul J; Gould, Carolyn V; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Loeb, Mark; Maccannell, Taranisia; Malani, Preeti N; Mody, Lona; Mylotte, Joseph M; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Schweon, Steven J; Simor, Andrew E; Smith, Philip W; Stevenson, Kurt B; Bradley, Suzanne F

    2012-10-01

    (See the commentary by Moro, on pages 978-980 .) Infection surveillance definitions for long-term care facilities (ie, the McGeer Criteria) have not been updated since 1991. An expert consensus panel modified these definitions on the basis of a structured review of the literature. Significant changes were made to the criteria defining urinary tract and respiratory tract infections. New definitions were added for norovirus gastroenteritis and Clostridum difficile infections.

  10. Development of Mass Rearing Methods, and Novel Methods For Control of the Squash Bug, Anasa Tristis (De Geer) (Heteroptera: Coreidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Squash bug, Anasa tristis (De Geer), a major pest of squash, pumpkin, watermelon, cucumber and cantaloupe, uses piercing-sucking mouthparts to imbibe plant fluids. The severity of plant damage resulting from squash bug feeding causes extensive damage to stems resulting in wilting, fruit discolo...

  11. Kodamaea ohmeri (Ascomycota: Saccharomycotina) presence in commercial Bombus impatiens Cresson and feral Bombus pensylvanicus DeGeer (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, eight commercial and three feral bumble bee (Bombus impatiens Cresson and Bombus pensylvanicus DeGeer respectively, Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies were tested for the presence of Kodamaea ohmeri (Ascomycota: Saccharomycotina), a yeast known to attract small hive beetles (SHB) (Aethina ...

  12. Soluble factors released by Toxoplasma gondii-infected astrocytes down-modulate nitric oxide production by gamma interferon-activated microglia and prevent neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Claudia; Martinez, Rodrigo; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lima, Flávia R S; Pires, Ana Lúcia; Silva, Patrícia M; Bonomo, Adriana; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; De Souza, Wanderley; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2003-04-01

    The maintenance of a benign chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection is mainly dependent on the persistent presence of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in the central nervous system (CNS). However, IFN-gamma-activated microglia are paradoxically involved in parasitism control and in tissue damage during a broad range of CNS pathologies. In this way, nitric oxide (NO), the main toxic metabolite produced by IFN-gamma-activated microglia, may cause neuronal injury during T. gondii infection. Despite the potential NO toxicity, neurodegeneration is not a common finding during chronic T. gondii infection. In this work, we describe a significant down-modulation of NO production by IFN-gamma-activated microglia in the presence of conditioned medium of T. gondii-infected astrocytes (CMi). The inhibition of NO production was paralleled with recovery of neurite outgrowth when neurons were cocultured with IFN-gamma-activated microglia in the presence of CMi. Moreover, the modulation of NO secretion and the neuroprotective effect were shown to be dependent on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by T. gondii-infected astrocytes and autocrine secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) by microglia. These events were partially eliminated when infected astrocytes were treated with aspirin and cocultures were treated with anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibodies and RP-8-Br cyclic AMP (cAMP), a protein kinase A inhibitor. Further, the modulatory effects of CMi were mimicked by the presence of exogenous PGE(2) and by forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. Altogether, these data point to a T. gondii-triggered regulatory mechanism involving PGE(2) secretion by astrocytes and cAMP-dependent IL-10 secretion by microglia. This may reduce host tissue inflammation, thus avoiding neuron damage during an established Th1 protective immune response. PMID:12654825

  13. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D’Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A.; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur−/− mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR. PMID:26380915

  14. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-09-18

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur(-/-) mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR.

  15. Climate change impacts on groundwater resources: modelled deficits in a chalky aquifer, Geer basin, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouyère, Serge; Carabin, Guy; Dassargues, Alain

    An integrated hydrological model (MOHISE) was developed in order to study the impact of climate change on the hydrological cycle in representative water basins in Belgium. This model considers most hydrological processes in a physically consistent way, more particularly groundwater flows which are modelled using a spatially distributed, finite-element approach. Thanks to this accurate numerical tool, after detailed calibration and validation, quantitative interpretations can be drawn from the groundwater model results. Considering IPCC climate change scenarios, the integrated approach was applied to evaluate the impact of climate change on the water cycle in the Geer basin in Belgium. The groundwater model is described in detail, and results are discussed in terms of climate change impact on the evolution of groundwater levels and groundwater reserves. From the modelling application on the Geer basin, it appears that, on a pluri-annual basis, most tested scenarios predict a decrease in groundwater levels and reserves in relation to variations in climatic conditions. However, for this aquifer, the tested scenarios show no enhancement of the seasonal changes in groundwater levels. Un modèle hydrologique intégré (MOHISE) a été développé afin d'étudier l'impact du changement climatique sur le cycle hydrologique de bassins versants représentatifs de Belgique. Ce modèle prend en compte tous les processus hydrologiques d'une manière physiquement consistante, plus particulièrement les écoulements souterrains qui sont modélisés par une approche spatialement distribuée aux éléments finis. Grâce à cet outil numérique précis, après une calibration et une validation détaillées, des interprétations quantitatives peuvent être réalisées à partir des résultats du modèle de nappe. Considérant des scénarios de changements climatiques de l'IPCC, l'approche intégrée a été appliquée pour évaluer l'impact du changement climatique sur le cycle de l

  16. Karyosystematics of Triatoma rubrofasciata (De Geer, 1773) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Alevi, Kaio Cesar Chaboli; Borsatto, Kelly Cristine; Moreira, Felipe Ferraz Figueiredo; Jurberg, José; De Azeredo-Oliveir, Maria Tercília Vilela

    2015-08-03

    Triatoma rubrofasciata (De Geer) is the first species of triatomine described, and little is known on its vector biology. Studies are restricted to starvation resistance, interspecific morphometric variability, morphometry of testis follicles, coloration of the testicular peritoneal sheath, ultrastructure of the male accessory glands, phylogeny and cytogenetics. Thus, this study aims to address the karyosystematics of T. rubrofasciata and the possible events related to karyotype evolution of this species. Four adult males were analyzed cytogenetically. The analysis of meiotic metaphases of T. rubrofasciata allowed to confirm the karyotype of species, out more, 2n = 25 (22A + X1X2Y). This number is very important for taxonomic and evolutionary inferences on the species, because of the 88 triatomine species with described karyotype, only T. rubrofasciata exhibits 25 chromosomes. Based on the hypothesis of the karyotype 2n = 22 (20A + XY) as ancestral for triatomines, we propose three evolutionary hypotheses for the emergence of the karyotype of T rubrofasciata, all supported by agmatoploidy events (fission). Basically the hypotheses are 1) fission for a pair of autosomes, resulting in 22 autosomes and later fission of sex chromosome X; 2) fission of pair of autosomes and the sex chromosome X concomitantly; 3) fission of sex chromosome X and subsequently fission of pair of autosomes. Thus, this study highlights for the first time the importance of the number of chromosomes of T. rubrofasciata as characteristic diagnosis in Triatominae subfamily and describes three evolutionary hypotheses that possibly led the emergence of karyotype of this insect of global importance.

  17. Whole transcriptome analysis of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778).

    PubMed

    Schicht, Sabine; Qi, Weihong; Poveda, Lucy; Strube, Christina

    2014-03-01

    SUMMARY Although the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) is the major parasitic pest in poultry farming causing substantial economic losses every year, nucleotide data are rare in the public databases. Therefore, de novo sequencing covering the transcriptome of D. gallinae was carried out resulting in a dataset of 232 097 singletons and 42 130 contiguous sequences (contigs) which were subsequently clustered into 24 140 isogroups consisting of 35 788 isotigs. After removal of sequences possibly originating from bacteria or the chicken host, 267 464 sequences (231 657 singletons, 56 contigs and 35 751 isotigs) remained, of which 10·3% showed homology to proteins derived from other organisms. The most significant Blast top-hit species was the mite Metaseiulus occidentalis followed by the tick Ixodes scapularis. To gain functional knowledge of D. gallinae transcripts, sequences were mapped to Gene Ontology terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genomes (KEGG) pathways and parsed to InterProScan. The transcriptome dataset provides new insights in general mite genetics and lays a foundation for future studies on stage-specific transcriptomics as well as genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic explorations and might provide new perspectives to control this parasitic mite by identifying possible drug targets or vaccine candidates. It is also worth noting that in different tested species of the class Arachnida no 28S rRNA was detectable in the rRNA profile, indicating that 28S rRNA might consists of two separate, hydrogen-bonded fragments, whose (heat-induced) disruption may led to co-migration with 18S rRNA. PMID:24135293

  18. Whole transcriptome analysis of the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778).

    PubMed

    Schicht, Sabine; Qi, Weihong; Poveda, Lucy; Strube, Christina

    2014-03-01

    SUMMARY Although the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) is the major parasitic pest in poultry farming causing substantial economic losses every year, nucleotide data are rare in the public databases. Therefore, de novo sequencing covering the transcriptome of D. gallinae was carried out resulting in a dataset of 232 097 singletons and 42 130 contiguous sequences (contigs) which were subsequently clustered into 24 140 isogroups consisting of 35 788 isotigs. After removal of sequences possibly originating from bacteria or the chicken host, 267 464 sequences (231 657 singletons, 56 contigs and 35 751 isotigs) remained, of which 10·3% showed homology to proteins derived from other organisms. The most significant Blast top-hit species was the mite Metaseiulus occidentalis followed by the tick Ixodes scapularis. To gain functional knowledge of D. gallinae transcripts, sequences were mapped to Gene Ontology terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genomes (KEGG) pathways and parsed to InterProScan. The transcriptome dataset provides new insights in general mite genetics and lays a foundation for future studies on stage-specific transcriptomics as well as genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic explorations and might provide new perspectives to control this parasitic mite by identifying possible drug targets or vaccine candidates. It is also worth noting that in different tested species of the class Arachnida no 28S rRNA was detectable in the rRNA profile, indicating that 28S rRNA might consists of two separate, hydrogen-bonded fragments, whose (heat-induced) disruption may led to co-migration with 18S rRNA.

  19. AP-2 Is the Crucial Clathrin Adaptor Protein for CD4 Downmodulation by HIV-1 Nef in Infected Primary CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Marcos Vinicius; Wiltzer-Bach, Linda; Maurer, Brigitte; Banning, Carina; Arganaraz, Enrique; Schindler, Michael

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation involves various host factors. We investigated the importance of AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, V1H-ATPase, β-COP, and ACOT8 for CD4 downmodulation in HIV-1-infected short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing CD4(+) T cells and characterized direct interaction with Nef by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Binding of lentiviral Nefs to CD4 and AP-2 was conserved, and only AP-2 knockdown impaired Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation from primary T cells. Altogether, among the factors tested, AP-2 is the most important player for Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation.

  20. The 22 March 2014 Oso Landslide, Snohomish County, Washington: Findings of the GEER Reconnaissance Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartman, J.; Keaton, J. R.; Scott, A.; Benoit, J.; delaChapelle, J.; Gilbert, R.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We report the findings of the NSF-supported Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) investigation of the Oso Landslide. Our findings are principally based on data collected during a four-day team reconnaissance across the entire landslide area, but also draw upon other data sources including lidar surveys, high-resolution imagery, geologic mapping, precipitation data, and seismic records. The Oso Landslide claimed 43 lives, making it the deadliest landslide disaster in U.S. history. The landslide occurred within a thick sequence of glacial sediments that were deposited into the North Fork Stillaguamish River valley during the last glacial advance. Geomorphic evidence suggests that the valley in the vicinity of Oso Landslide has experienced multiple large landslides over at least the past 6,000 years. Intense three-week rainfall that immediately preceded the event very probably played an important role in triggering the landslide; however, many other factors likely contributed to destabilization of the landslide mass. These include: (i) alteration of the local groundwater recharge and hydrogeological regime due to previous landsliding and, possibly, land use practices, (ii) weakening and alteration of the landslide mass due to previous landsliding and other natural geologic processes, and (iii) changes in stress distribution resulting from removal and deposition of material from earlier landsliding. During our field reconnaissance we identified six distinctive landslide zones and several subzones that are characterized by different geomorphic expression resulting from deformation styles, geologic materials, vegetation, and sequence of deposition. Based on the reconnaissance observations and other available data, we hypothesize that the landslide occurred in two major stages. The first stage of movement is interpreted to be a remobilization of the 2006 slide mass and headward extension that included part or all of the forested slope of an ancient landslide

  1. Mobilization of NK cells by exercise: downmodulation of adhesion molecules on NK cells by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Suzui, M; Takeda, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    2000-10-01

    The change of plasma catecholamine concentration correlates with the change of natural killer (NK) activity and NK cell number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during and after moderate exercise. We studied the causal relation between exercise-induced catecholamine and expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells during and after exercise. The expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was significantly reduced during exercise (P < 0.01). When PBMC were stimulated with 10(-8)M norepinephrine in vitro, the expression of these adhesion molecules on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was downmodulated within 30 min. The binding capacity of NK cells to a CD44 ligand, hyaluronate, was reduced by the stimulation with norepinephrine (P < 0.01). The intravenous injection of norepinephrine in mice decreased the expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells (P < 0.01) and increased the number of CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells in PBMC (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise-induced catecholamines modulate the expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells, resulting in the mobilization of NK cells into the circulation. PMID:11003990

  2. Infections in Australian Aged-Care Facilities: Evaluating the Impact of Revised McGeer Criteria for Surveillance of Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Noleen J; Johnson, Sandra A; Richards, Michael J; Smith, Mary A; Worth, Leon J

    2016-05-01

    Our survey of 112 Australian aged-care facilities demonstrated the prevalence of healthcare-associated infections to be 2.9%. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) defined by McGeer criteria comprised 35% of all clinically defined UTIs. To estimate the infection burden in these facilities where microbiologic testing is not routine, modified surveillance criteria for UTIs are necessary.

  3. Lineament Domain of Regional Strike-Slip Corridor: Insight from the Neogene Transtensional De Geer Transform Fault in NW Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2015-05-01

    Lineaments on regional scale images represent controversial features in tectonic studies. Published models explain the presence of the lineament domains in most geodynamic environments as resulting from the enhanced erosion along strikes normal to the upper crustal regional extension. Despite their success in many tectonic frameworks, these models fail to explain the existing lineament domains in the regional strike-slip corridors that separate regional blocks, including the transform faults. The present paper investigates the lineament distribution in such environments, and specifically presents the results from a study along the shear corridor of the De Geer Transform Fault in the North Atlantic, responsible for the separation and drifting away between Northern Greenland and the Svalbard Archipelago since Oligocene times. The study spans from satellite image analysis and outcrop scale investigations to a more regional analysis on a digital bathymetric model of the North Atlantic-Arctic Ocean. Lineaments were automatically detected in the spectral band 8 (0.52-0.9 μm) of a Landsat 7 image (15 m/pixel resolution). A total of 320 image lineaments were extracted from both the regional and the local scale investigations and statistically analyzed. Results from the multi-scalar lineament analyses revealed the existence of a main N-S lineament domain regionally persistent from the De Geer corridor to the western margin of northern Spitsbergen where it relates to the youngest, post-Oligocene, tectonics observed onshore. This is confirmed by field observations showing that the N-S faults represent the youngest brittle deformation system and systematically cut the deformations associated with the building of the Tertiary West Spitsbergen fold and thrust belt. The N-S lineament domain is the result of the activity of a larger, regional scale tectonic feature, NW-SE oriented and responsible for the localized extension within its deformation corridor, the De Geer Transform

  4. Sedimentology and architecture of De Geer moraines in the western Scottish Highlands, and implications for grounding-line glacier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Phillips, Emrys

    2008-07-01

    Sedimentary exposures in moraines in a Scottish Highland valley (Glen Chaorach), reveal stacked sequences of bedded and laminated silt, sand and gravel, interspersed or capped with diamicton units. In four examples, faults and folds indicate deformation by glaciotectonism and syndepositional loading. We propose that these sediments were laid down in an ice-dammed lake, close to the last ice margin to occupy this glen. Individual units within cross-valley De Geer moraine ridges are interpreted by comparison with examples from similar environments elsewhere: stratified diamictons containing laminated or bedded lenses are interpreted as subaqueous ice-marginal debris-flow deposits; massive fine-grained deposits as hyperconcentrated flow deposits, and massive gravel units as high-density debris-flow deposits. Using an allostratigraphic approach we argue that glaciotectonically deformed coarsening-upward sand and gravel sequences that culminate in deposition of subglacial diamicton represent glacier advances into the ice-marginal lake, whereas undisturbed cross-bedded sand and gravel reflects channel or fan deposits laid down during glacier retreat. A flat terrace of bedded sand and gravel at the northern end of Glen Chaorach is interpreted as subaerial glaciofluvial outwash. On the basis of these inferences we propose the following three stage deglacial event chronology for Glen Chaorach. During glacier recession, ice separation and intra-lobe ponding first led to subaquaeous deposition of sorted and unsorted facies. Subsequent glacier stabilisation and ice-marginal oscillation produced glaciotectonic structures in the ice-marginal sediment pile and formed De Geer moraines. Finally, drainage of the ice-dammed lake allowed a subaerial ice-marginal drainage system to become established. Throughout deglaciation, deposition within the lake was characterized by abrupt changes in grain size and in the architecture of individual sediment bodies, reflecting changing delivery

  5. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  6. Tuning Side Arm Electronics in Unsymmetrical Cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Translocation Inhibitors to Improve their Human Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) Receptor Down-Modulating Potencies.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Reena; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Pflug, Nicholas C; Sama, Alekhya; Ali, Rameez; Schols, Dominique; Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W

    2016-03-24

    Cyclotriazadisulfonamide prevents HIV entry into cells by down-modulating surface CD4 receptor expression through binding to the CD4 signal peptide. According to a two-site binding model, 28 new unsymmetrical analogues bearing a benzyl tail group and nine bearing a cyclohexylmethyl tail have been designed and synthesized. The most potent new CD4 down-modulator (40 (CK147); IC50 63 nM) has a 4-dimethylaminobenzenesulfonyl side arm. One of the two side arms was varied with substituents in different positions. This gave a range of CD4 down-modulation potencies that correlated well with anti-HIV-1 activities. The side arms of 21 of the new benzyl-tailed analogues were modeled by means of quantum mechanical calculations. For CADA analogues with arenesulfonamide side arms, the pIC50 values for CD4 down-modulation correlated with the component of the electric dipole moment in the aromatic ring, suggesting that an attractive electronic interaction is a major factor determining the stability of the complex between the molecule and its target.

  7. Tuning Side Arm Electronics in Unsymmetrical Cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Translocation Inhibitors to Improve their Human Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) Receptor Down-Modulating Potencies.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Reena; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Pflug, Nicholas C; Sama, Alekhya; Ali, Rameez; Schols, Dominique; Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W

    2016-03-24

    Cyclotriazadisulfonamide prevents HIV entry into cells by down-modulating surface CD4 receptor expression through binding to the CD4 signal peptide. According to a two-site binding model, 28 new unsymmetrical analogues bearing a benzyl tail group and nine bearing a cyclohexylmethyl tail have been designed and synthesized. The most potent new CD4 down-modulator (40 (CK147); IC50 63 nM) has a 4-dimethylaminobenzenesulfonyl side arm. One of the two side arms was varied with substituents in different positions. This gave a range of CD4 down-modulation potencies that correlated well with anti-HIV-1 activities. The side arms of 21 of the new benzyl-tailed analogues were modeled by means of quantum mechanical calculations. For CADA analogues with arenesulfonamide side arms, the pIC50 values for CD4 down-modulation correlated with the component of the electric dipole moment in the aromatic ring, suggesting that an attractive electronic interaction is a major factor determining the stability of the complex between the molecule and its target. PMID:26974263

  8. Laboratory evaluation of a native strain of Beauveria bassiana for controlling Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (Acari: Dermanyssidae).

    PubMed

    Immediato, Davide; Camarda, Antonio; Iatta, Roberta; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Di Paola, Giancarlo; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2015-09-15

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (Acari: Dermanyssidae) is one of the most economically important ectoparasites of laying hens worldwide. Chemical control of this mite may result in environmental and food contamination, as well as the development of drug resistance. High virulence of Beauveria bassiana sensu lato strains isolated from naturally infected hosts or from their environment has been demonstrated toward many arthropod species, including ticks. However, a limited number of studies have assessed the use of B. bassiana for the control of D. gallinae s.l. and none of them have employed native strains. This study reports the pathogenicity of a native strain of B. bassiana (CD1123) against nymphs and adults of D. gallinae. Batches of nymph and adult mites (i.e., n=720 for each stage) for treated groups (TGs) were placed on paper soaked with a 0.1% tween 80 suspension of B. bassiana (CIS, 10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) conidia/ml), whilst 240 untreated control mites for each stage (CG) were exposed only to 0.1% tween 80. The mites in TG showed a higher mortality at all stages (p<0.01) when compared to CG, depending on the time of exposure and the conidial concentration. A 100% mortality rate was recorded using a CIS of 10(9) conidia/ml 12 days post infection (DPI) in adults and 14 DPI in nymphs. B. bassiana suspension containing 10(9) conidia/ml was highly virulent towards nymph and adult stages of D. gallinae, therefore representing a possible promising natural product to be used in alternative or in combination to other acaricidal compounds currently used for controlling the red mite.

  9. In vitro pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on Thai local plants against head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer).

    PubMed

    Rassami, Watcharawit; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-04-01

    Head lice infestation, a worldwide head infestation caused Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, is an important public health problem in Thailand. Several chemical pediculicides have lost in efficacy due to increasing resistance of lice against insecticide. Therefore, non-toxic alternative products, such as natural products from plants, e.g. plant extract pediculicides, are needed for head lice control. The aims of this study were to evaluate the potential of pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on three species of Thai local plants (Accacia concinna (Willd.) DC, Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. and Tamarindus indica Linn.) against head lice and to compare them with carbaryl shampoo (Hafif shampoo®; 0.6% w/v carbaryl) and non-treatment control in order to assess their in vitro. Doses of 0.12 and 0.25 ml/cm2 of each herbal shampoo were applied to filter paper, and ten head lice were place on the filter paper. The mortalities of head lice on the filter paper were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min by sterio-microscope. All herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 were more effective pediculicide than carbaryl shampoo with 100% mortality at 5 min. The median lethal time (LT50) of all herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 showed no significant differences over at 0.12 ml/cm2 (P<0.01). The most effective pediculicide was T. indica extract shampoo, followed by Av. bilimbi extract shampoo and Ac. concinna extract shampoo, with LT50 values<1.0 min. Our data showed that all herbal shampoos have high potential of pediculicide to head lice treatments for schoolchildren.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of a native strain of Beauveria bassiana for controlling Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (Acari: Dermanyssidae).

    PubMed

    Immediato, Davide; Camarda, Antonio; Iatta, Roberta; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Di Paola, Giancarlo; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2015-09-15

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (Acari: Dermanyssidae) is one of the most economically important ectoparasites of laying hens worldwide. Chemical control of this mite may result in environmental and food contamination, as well as the development of drug resistance. High virulence of Beauveria bassiana sensu lato strains isolated from naturally infected hosts or from their environment has been demonstrated toward many arthropod species, including ticks. However, a limited number of studies have assessed the use of B. bassiana for the control of D. gallinae s.l. and none of them have employed native strains. This study reports the pathogenicity of a native strain of B. bassiana (CD1123) against nymphs and adults of D. gallinae. Batches of nymph and adult mites (i.e., n=720 for each stage) for treated groups (TGs) were placed on paper soaked with a 0.1% tween 80 suspension of B. bassiana (CIS, 10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) conidia/ml), whilst 240 untreated control mites for each stage (CG) were exposed only to 0.1% tween 80. The mites in TG showed a higher mortality at all stages (p<0.01) when compared to CG, depending on the time of exposure and the conidial concentration. A 100% mortality rate was recorded using a CIS of 10(9) conidia/ml 12 days post infection (DPI) in adults and 14 DPI in nymphs. B. bassiana suspension containing 10(9) conidia/ml was highly virulent towards nymph and adult stages of D. gallinae, therefore representing a possible promising natural product to be used in alternative or in combination to other acaricidal compounds currently used for controlling the red mite. PMID:26206607

  11. In vitro pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on Thai local plants against head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer).

    PubMed

    Rassami, Watcharawit; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-04-01

    Head lice infestation, a worldwide head infestation caused Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, is an important public health problem in Thailand. Several chemical pediculicides have lost in efficacy due to increasing resistance of lice against insecticide. Therefore, non-toxic alternative products, such as natural products from plants, e.g. plant extract pediculicides, are needed for head lice control. The aims of this study were to evaluate the potential of pediculicidal activity of herbal shampoo base on three species of Thai local plants (Accacia concinna (Willd.) DC, Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. and Tamarindus indica Linn.) against head lice and to compare them with carbaryl shampoo (Hafif shampoo®; 0.6% w/v carbaryl) and non-treatment control in order to assess their in vitro. Doses of 0.12 and 0.25 ml/cm2 of each herbal shampoo were applied to filter paper, and ten head lice were place on the filter paper. The mortalities of head lice on the filter paper were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min by sterio-microscope. All herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 were more effective pediculicide than carbaryl shampoo with 100% mortality at 5 min. The median lethal time (LT50) of all herbal shampoos at 0.25 ml/cm2 showed no significant differences over at 0.12 ml/cm2 (P<0.01). The most effective pediculicide was T. indica extract shampoo, followed by Av. bilimbi extract shampoo and Ac. concinna extract shampoo, with LT50 values<1.0 min. Our data showed that all herbal shampoos have high potential of pediculicide to head lice treatments for schoolchildren. PMID:23334727

  12. CD4 and MHC class I down-modulation activities of nef alleles from brain- and lymphoid tissue-derived primary HIV-1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Gabuzda, Dana; Cowley, Daniel; Ellett, Anne; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 nef undergoes adaptive evolution in the CNS, reflecting altered requirements for HIV-1 replication in macrophages/microglia and brain-specific immune selection pressures. The role of Nef in HIV-1 neurotropism and the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is unclear. In this study, we characterized 82 nef alleles cloned from brain, CSF, spinal cord and blood/lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates from 7 subjects with HAD. CNS isolate-derived nef alleles were genetically compartmentalized and had reduced sequence diversity compared to those from lymphoid tissue isolates. Defective nef alleles predominated in a brain-derived isolate from one of the 7 subjects (MACS2-br). The ability of Nef to down-modulate CD4 and MHC class 1 (MHC-1) was generally conserved among nef alleles from both CNS and lymphoid tissues. However, the potency of CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation was variable, which was associated with sequence alterations known to influence these Nef functions. These results suggest that CD4 and MHC-1 down-modulation are highly conserved functions among nef alleles from CNS- and lymphoid tissue-derived HIV-1 isolates that may contribute to viral replication and escape from immune surveillance in the CNS. PMID:21165790

  13. Modeling the impact of the nitrate contamination on groundwater at the groundwater body scale : The Geer basin case study (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouyere, S.; Orban, P.; Hérivaux, C.

    2009-12-01

    In the next decades, groundwater managers will have to face regional degradation of the quantity and quality of groundwater under pressure of land-use and socio-economic changes. In this context, the objectives of the European Water Framework Directive require that groundwater be managed at the scale of the groundwater body, taking into account not only all components of the water cycle but also the socio-economic impact of these changes. One of the main challenges remains to develop robust and efficient numerical modeling applications at such a scale and to couple them with economic models, as a support for decision support in groundwater management. An integrated approach between hydrogeologists and economists has been developed by coupling the hydrogeological model SUFT3D and a cost-benefit economic analysis to study the impact of agricultural practices on groundwater quality and to design cost-effective mitigation measures to decrease nitrate pressure on groundwater so as to ensure the highest benefit to the society. A new modeling technique, the ‘Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell’ approach has been developed for large scale modeling purposes. The principle of this method is to fully couple different mathematical and numerical approaches to solve groundwater flow and solute transport problems. The mathematical and numerical approaches proposed allows an adaptation to the level of local hydrogeological knowledge and the amount of available data. In combination with long time series of nitrate concentrations and tritium data, the regional scale modelling approach has been used to develop a 3D spatially distributed groundwater flow and solute transport model for the Geer basin (Belgium) of about 480 km2. The model is able to reproduce the spatial patterns of nitrate concentrations together nitrate trends with time. The model has then been used to predict the future evolution of nitrate trends for two types of scenarios: (i) a “business as usual scenario

  14. Down-modulation of nucleoporin RanBP2/Nup358 impaired chromosomal alignment and induced mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, C; Kobayashi, A; Wong, R W

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal missegregation is a common feature of many human tumors. Recent studies have indicated a link between nucleoporin RanBP2/Nup358 and chromosomal segregation during mitosis; however, the molecular details have yet to be fully established. Observed through live cell imaging and flow cytometry, here we show that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RanBP2 induced G2/M phase arrest, metaphase catastrophe and mitotic cell death. Furthermore, RanBP2 down-modulation disrupted importin/karyopherin β1 as well as the expression and localization of the Ran GTPase activating protein 1. We found that N-terminal of RanBP2 interacted with the N-terminal of importin β1. Moreover, at least a portion of RanBP2 partially localizes at the centrosome during mitosis. Notably, we also found that GTPase Ran is also involved in the regulation of RanBP2–importin β1 interaction. Overall, our results suggest that mitotic arrest and the following cell death were caused by depletion of RanBP2. Our findings point to a crucial role for RanBP2 in proper mitotic progression and faithful chromosomal segregation. PMID:24113188

  15. Interference to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in the absence of downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Volsky, D J; Simm, M; Shahabuddin, M; Li, G; Chao, W; Potash, M J

    1996-01-01

    It is thought that interference during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is established by downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4. Here we present evidence to the contrary. At various times after primary infection, we superinfected T cells in vitro by exposure to a genetically distinct viral clone or to a virus carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Replication of each virus strain was determined by restriction enzyme analysis of total cellular DNA, by PCR amplification of viral DNA, or by assay of cell extracts for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. We found that efficient viral interference is established within 24 h of infection at a multiplicity of infection of 1. At that time, expression of viral structural proteins was low and infected cells displayed undiminished levels of surface CD4 and were fully susceptible to virus binding and fusion. Superinfection by either cell-free HIV-1 or cocultivation was blocked. Cells resistant to superinfection by HIV-1 remained susceptible to Moloney murine leukemia and vaccinia viruses. No interference was observed 4 h after primary infection or in cells infected with either UV-inactivated HIV-1 or a mutant virus defective in virus-cell fusion activity, indicating that binding of primary virus to CD4 is insufficient to prevent superinfection. The minimum viral requirements for this interference are that HIV-1 must be able to enter cells and synthesize viral DNA; Tat-mediated transcription is dispensable. Our results support the existence of a novel pathway to interference to HIV-1 infection, which we term postentry interference, which blocks superinfection during intracellular phases of the virus life cycle. PMID:8648718

  16. Glacial landforms on German Bank, Scotian Shelf: evidence for Late Wisconsinan ice-sheet dynamics and implications for the formation of De Geer moraines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Brian J.; Valentine, Page C.; Longva, Oddvar; Shaw, John

    2007-01-01

    The extent and behaviour of the southeast margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in Atlantic Canada is of significance in the study of Late Wisconsinan ice sheet-ocean interactions. Multibeam sonar imagery of subglacial, ice-marginal and glaciomarine landforms on German Bank, Scotian Shelf, provides evidence of the pattern of glacial-dynamic events in the eastern Gulf of Maine. Northwest-southeast trending drumlins and megaflutes dominate northern German Bank. On southern German Bank, megaflutes of thin glacial deposits create a distinct northwest-southeast grain. Lobate regional moraines (>10km long) are concave to the northwest, up-ice direction and strike southwest-northeast, normal to the direction of ice flow. Ubiquitous, overlying De Geer moraines (

  17. ErbB2 and EGFR are downmodulated during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Eleonora; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2003-10-15

    The expression of receptors belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor subfamily has been largely studied these last years in epithelial cells mainly as involved in cell proliferation and malignant progression. Although much work has focused on the role of these growth factor receptors in the differentiation of a variety of tissues, there is little information in regards to normal stromal cells. We investigated erbB2 expression in the murine fibroblast cell line Swiss 3T3L1, which naturally or hormonally induced undergoes adipocyte differentiation. We found that the Swiss 3T3-L1 fibroblasts express erbB2, in addition to EGFR, and in a quantity comparable to or even greater than the breast cancer cell line T47D. Proliferating cells increased erbB2 and EGFR levels when reaching confluence up to 4- and 10-fold, respectively. This expression showed a significant decrease when growth-arrested cells were stimulated to differentiate with dexamethasone and isobutyl-methylxanthine. Differentiated cells presented a decreased expression of both erbB2 and EGFR regardless of whether the cells were hormonally or spontaneously differentiated. EGF stimulation of serum-starved cells increased erbB2 tyrosine phosphorylation and retarded erbB2 migration in SDS-PAGE, suggesting receptor association and activation. Heregulin-alpha1 and -beta1, two EGF related factors, had no effect on erbB2 or EGFR phosphorylation. Although 3T3-L1 cells expressed heregulin, its specific receptors, erbB3 and erbB4, were not found. This is the first time in which erbB2 is reported to be expressed in an adipocytic cell line which does not depend on non EGF family growth factors (thyroid hormone, growth hormone, etc.) to accomplish adipose differentiation. Since erbB2 and EGFR expression were downmodulated as differentiation progressed it is conceivable that a mechanism of switching from a mitogenic to a differentiating signaling pathway may be involved, through regulation of the expression of these

  18. CD10 expressed by fibroblasts and melanoma cells degrades endothelin-1 secreted by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lining; Moroi, Yoichi; Takahara, Masakazu; Tsuji, Gaku; Oba, Junna; Hayashida, Sayaka; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Shan, Baoen; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent multifunctional peptide linked to wound healing, pigmentation, carcinogenesis, and fibrosclerotic processes in the skin. Whereas ET-1 was thought to be digested by receptor-mediated endocytosis, it is also reported to be biochemically degraded by the neutral endopeptidase CD10 using kidney homogenates. Although keratinocytes (KC) and fibroblasts (Fb) are sources of both ET-1 and CD10, respectively, there is no report investigating the direct association between CD10 expression and its function in relation to ET-1 degradation in the skin. CD10 expression in melanoma cells is associated with clinical prognosis, suggesting an important role in the invasive and metastatic potential of melanoma cells. Here, cultured KC produced much higher amounts of ET-1 than did cultured Fb or melanoma cells. In contrast, KC and A375 melanoma cells did not express CD10, while Fb, SK-MEL-28 and G361 melanoma cells constitutively expressed CD10. KC-derived ET-1 was down-modulated by both CD10-positive Fb and CD10-positive melanoma cells, and the inhibition was partially reversed under substitution conditions using CD10-knockdown Fb or CD10-knockdown melanoma cells. This indicates that CD10 on cultured Fb and melanoma cells is biochemically active in the degradation or down-modulation of ET-1 secreted from KC. These findings may lead to better understanding of skin homeostasis and of the malignant potential of melanoma.

  19. Downmodulation of Vaccine-Induced Immunity and Protection against the Intracellular Bacterium Francisella tularensis by the Inhibitory Receptor FcγRIIB

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Brian J.; Li, Ying; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Iglesias, Bibiana V.; Pham, Giang; Sunagar, Raju; Kumar, Sudeep; Gosselin, Edmund J.

    2015-01-01

    Fc gamma receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) is the only Fc gamma receptor (FcγR) which negatively regulates the immune response, when engaged by antigen- (Ag-) antibody (Ab) complexes. Thus, the generation of Ag-specific IgG in response to infection or immunization has the potential to downmodulate immune protection against infection. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of FcγRIIB on immune protection against Francisella tularensis (Ft), a Category A biothreat agent. We utilized inactivated Ft (iFt) as an immunogen. Naïve and iFt-immunized FcγRIIB knockout (KO) or wildtype (WT) mice were challenged with Ft-live vaccine strain (LVS). While no significant difference in survival between naïve FcγRIIB KO versus WT mice was observed, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice were significantly better protected than iFt-immunized WT mice. Ft-specific IgA in serum and bronchial alveolar lavage, as well as IFN-γ, IL-10, and TNF-α production by splenocytes harvested from iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO, were also significantly elevated. In addition, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice exhibited a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine levels in vivo at 5 days after challenge, which correlates with increased survival following Ft-LVS challenge in published studies. Thus, these studies demonstrate for the first time the ability of FcγRIIB to regulate vaccine-induced IgA production and downmodulate immunity and protection. The immune mechanisms behind the above observations and their potential impact on vaccine development are discussed. PMID:25961064

  20. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  1. Frequency as a releaser in the courtship song of two crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus (de Geer) and Teleogryllus oceanicus: a neuroethological analysis.

    PubMed

    Libersat, F; Murray, J A; Hoy, R R

    1994-04-01

    1. The courtship behavior of male field crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus (De Geer) and Teleogryllus oceanicus, is a complex, multimodal behavioral act that involves acoustic signals (a courtship song; Fig. 1A, B). The dominant frequency is 4.5 kHz for T. oceanicus song (Fig. 1A) and 13.5 kHz for G. bimaculatus (Fig. 1B). 2. When courting males are deprived of their courtship song by wing amputation, their courtship success declines markedly but is restored when courting is accompanied by tape-recordings of their courtship songs or a synthetic courtship song with only the dominant frequency of the natural song; other naturally occurring frequency components are ineffective for restoring mating success (Figs. 4, 5). 3. It has been suggested that an identified auditory interneuron, AN2, plays a critical role in courtship success. Chronic recordings of AN2 in an intact, tethered female show that AN2's response to the natural courtship song and synthesized songs at 4.5 and 13.5 kHz is similar in T. oceanicus. By contrast, in G. bimaculatus, AN2's response to the natural courtship song and synthesized song at 13.5 kHz, but not at 4.5 kHz, is similar (Fig. 2,3). 4. In behavioral experiments, playback of a 30 kHz synthetic courtship song in G. bimaculatus does not restore courtship success, yet this same stimulus elicits as strong a response from AN2 as does the normal courtship song (Fig. 6). Thus, contrary to earlier work by others, we conclude AN2 is not, by itself, a critical neural link in the courtship behavior of these two species of crickets.

  2. Suppression of Foxo1 Activity and Down-Modulation of CD62L (L-Selectin) in HIV-1 Infected Resting CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trinité, Benjamin; Chan, Chi N.; Lee, Caroline S.; Mahajan, Saurabh; Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A.; Folkvord, Joy M.; Pham, Michael; Connick, Elizabeth; Levy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin), a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1), CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo. PMID:25330112

  3. L Particles Transmit Viral Proteins from Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Infected Mature Dendritic Cells to Uninfected Bystander Cells, Inducing CD83 Downmodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Mirko; Mühl-Zürbes, Petra; Drassner, Christina; Daniel, Christoph; Klewer, Monika; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mature dendritic cells (mDCs) are known as the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) since they are also able to prime/induce naive T cells. Thus, mDCs play a pivotal role during the induction of antiviral immune responses. Remarkably, the cell surface molecule CD83, which was shown to have costimulatory properties, is targeted by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for viral immune escape. Infection of mDCs with HSV-1 results in downmodulation of CD83, resulting in reduced T cell stimulation. In this study, we report that not only infected mDCs but also uninfected bystander cells in an infected culture show a significant CD83 reduction. We demonstrate that this effect is independent of phagocytosis and transmissible from infected to uninfected mDCs. The presence of specific viral proteins found in these uninfected bystander cells led to the hypothesis that viral proteins are transferred from infected to uninfected cells via L particles. These L particles are generated during lytic replication in parallel with full virions, called H particles. L particles contain viral proteins but lack the viral capsid and DNA. Therefore, these particles are not infectious but are able to transfer several viral proteins. Incubation of mDCs with L particles indeed reduced CD83 expression on uninfected bystander DCs, providing for the first time evidence that functional viral proteins are transmitted via L particles from infected mDCs to uninfected bystander cells, thereby inducing CD83 downmodulation. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 has evolved a number of strategies to evade the host's immune system. Among others, HSV-1 infection of mDCs results in an inhibited T cell activation caused by degradation of CD83. Interestingly, CD83 is lost not only from HSV-1-infected mDCs but also from uninfected bystander cells. The release of so-called L particles, which contain several viral proteins but lack capsid and DNA, during infection is a common phenomenon observed among several viruses, such

  4. Inhibitory effects of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate on serum-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cells via nuclear factor-{kappa}B down-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dong-Wook; Lim, Hye Ryeon; Baek, Hyun Sook; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Seung Jin; Hyon, Suong-Hyu; Park, Jong-Chul . E-mail: parkjc@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    The abnormal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. Although (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) has antiproliferative effects on various cells, relatively a little is known about precise mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of EGCG on SMCs. In this study, the inhibitory effects of EGCG on attachment, proliferation, migration, and cell cycle of rat aortic SMCs (RASMCs) with serum stimulation were investigated. Also, the involvement of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) during these inhibitions by EGCG was examined. EGCG treatment resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition in attachment and proliferation of RASMCs induced by serum. While non-treated RASMCs migrated into denuded area in response to serum and showed essentially complete closure after 36 h, EGCG-treated cells covered only 31% of the area even after 48 h of incubation. Furthermore, EGCG treatment resulted in an appreciable cell cycle arrest at both G0/G1- and G2/M-phases. The immunoblot analysis revealed that the constitutive expression of NF-{kappa}B/p65 nuclear protein in RASMCs was lowered by EGCG in both the cytosol and the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the EGCG-caused inhibitory effects on RASMCs may be mediated through NF-{kappa}B down-modulation.

  5. Brucella abortus induces intracellular retention of MHC-I molecules in human macrophages down-modulating cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Delpino, M Victoria; Pozner, Roberto G; Velásquez, Lis N; Cassataro, Juliana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H

    2013-04-01

    Brucella abortus elicits a vigorous Th1 immune response which activates cytotoxic T lymphocytes. However, B. abortus persists in its hosts in the presence of CD8(+) T cells, establishing a chronic infection. Here, we report that B. abortus infection of human monocytes/macrophages inhibited the IFN-γ-induced MHC-I cell surface expression. This phenomenon was dependent on metabolically active viable bacteria. MHC-I down-modulation correlated with the development of diminished CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell response as evidenced by the reduced expression of the activation marker CD107a on CD8(+) T lymphocytes and a diminished percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells. Inhibition of MHC-I expression was not due to changes in protein synthesis. Rather, we observed that upon B. abortus infection MHC-I molecules were retained within the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these results describe a novel mechanism based on the intracellular sequestration of MHC-I molecules whereby B. abortus would avoid CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses, evading their immunological surveillance. PMID:23107169

  6. TET1 is controlled by pluripotency-associated factors in ESCs and downmodulated by PRC2 in differentiated cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Francesco; Incarnato, Danny; Krepelova, Anna; Dettori, Daniela; Rapelli, Stefania; Maldotti, Mara; Parlato, Caterina; Anselmi, Francesca; Galvagni, Federico; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) genes encode for a family of hydroxymethylase enzymes involved in regulating DNA methylation dynamics. Tet1 is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) where it plays a critical role the pluripotency maintenance. Tet1 is also involved in cell reprogramming events and in cancer progression. Although the functional role of Tet1 has been largely studied, its regulation is poorly understood. Here we show that Tet1 gene is regulated, both in mouse and human ESCs, by the stemness specific factors Oct3/4, Nanog and by Myc. Thus Tet1 is integrated in the pluripotency transcriptional network of ESCs. We found that Tet1 is switched off by cell proliferation in adult cells and tissues with a consequent genome-wide reduction of 5hmC, which is more evident in hypermethylated regions and promoters. Tet1 downmodulation is mediated by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) through H3K27me3 histone mark deposition. This study expands the knowledge about Tet1 involvement in stemness circuits in ESCs and provides evidence for a transcriptional relationship between Tet1 and PRC2 in adult proliferating cells improving our understanding of the crosstalk between the epigenetic events mediated by these factors. PMID:25925565

  7. Crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus Is Able to Down-Modulate the Acute Intestinal Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Caroline de Souza; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinicius; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Jacysyn, Jacqueline F.; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is the result of dysregulation of mucosal innate and adaptive immune responses. Factors such as genetic, microbial and environmental are involved in the development of these disorders. Accordingly, animal models that mimic human diseases are tools for the understanding the immunological processes of the IBD as well as to evaluate new therapeutic strategies. Crotoxin (CTX) is the main component of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom and has an immunomodulatory effect. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the modulatory effect of CTX in a murine model of colitis induced by 2,4,6- trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The CTX was administered intraperitoneally 18 hours after the TNBS intrarectal instillation in BALB/c mice. The CTX administration resulted in decreased weight loss, disease activity index (DAI), macroscopic tissue damage, histopathological score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity analyzed after 4 days of acute TNBS colitis. Furthermore, the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were lower in colon tissue homogenates of TNBS-mice that received the CTX when compared with untreated TNBS mice. The analysis of distinct cell populations obtained from the intestinal lamina propria showed that CTX reduced the number of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) and Th17 population; CTX decreased IL-17 secretion but did not alter the frequency of CD4+Tbet+ T cells induced by TNBS instillation in mice. In contrast, increased CD4+FoxP3+ cell population as well as secretion of TGF-β, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4) was observed in TNBS-colitis mice treated with CTX compared with untreated TNBS-colitis mice. In conclusion, the CTX is able to modulate the intestinal acute inflammatory response induced by TNBS, resulting in the improvement of clinical status of the mice. This effect of CTX is complex and involves the suppression of the pro-inflammatory environment elicited by intrarectal instillation of TNBS due to the induction of a

  8. The histone deacetylase inhibitors vorinostat and romidepsin downmodulate IL-10 expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiffon, CE; Adams, JE; van der Fits, L; Wen, S; Townsend, PA; Ganesan, A; Hodges, E; Vermeer, MH; Packham, G

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Vorinostat and romidepsin are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI), approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). However, the mechanism(s) by which these drugs exert their anti-cancer effects are not fully understood. Since CTCL is associated with immune dysregulation, we investigated whether these HDI modulated cytokine expression in CTCL cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH CTCL cell lines and primary CTCL cells were treated in vitro with vorinostat or romidepsin, or with STAT3 pathway inhibitors. Cell cycle parameters and apoptosis were analysed by propidium iodide and annexin V/propidium iodide staining respectively. Cytokine expression was analysed using QRT-PCR and elisa assays. STAT3 expression/phosphorylation and transcriptional activity were analysed using immunoblotting and transfection/reporter assays respectively. KEY RESULTS Vorinostat and romidepsin strongly down-regulated expression of the immunosuppressive cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, frequently overexpressed in CTCL, at both the RNA and protein level in CTCL cell lines and at the RNA level in primary CTCL cells. Vorinostat and romidepsin also increased expression of IFNG RNA and decreased expression of IL-2 and IL-4 RNA, although to a lesser extent compared to IL-10. Transient exposure to vorinostat was sufficient to suppress IL-10 secretion but was not sufficient to irreversibly commit cells to undergo cell death. STAT3 pathway inhibitors decreased production of IL-10 and vorinostat/romidepsin partially decreased STAT3-dependent transcription without effects on STAT3 expression or phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that HDI modulate cytokine expression in CTCL cells, potentially via effects on STAT3. Immunomodulation may contribute to the clinical activity of HDI in this disease. PMID:21198545

  9. The tetramethoxyflavone zapotin selectively activates protein kinase C epsilon, leading to its down-modulation accompanied by Bcl-2, c-Jun and c-Fos decrease.

    PubMed

    Toton, Ewa; Lisiak, Natalia; Rubis, Blazej; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Gruber, Peter; Hofmann, Johann; Rybczynska, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Zapotin, a tetramethoxyflavone, is a natural compound with a wide spectrum of activities in neoplastic cells. Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) has been shown to be oncogenic, with the ability to increase cell migration, invasion and survival of tumor cells. Here we report that zapotin inhibits cell proliferation. In wild-type HeLa cells with basal endogenous expression of PKCε, the IC(50) was found to be 17.9 ± 1.6 μM. In HeLa cells overexpressing doxycycline-inducible constitutively active PKCε (HeLaPKCεA/E), the IC(50) was 7.6 ± 1.3 μM, suggesting that PKCε enhances the anti-proliferative effect of zapotin. Moreover, we found that zapotin selectively activated PKCε in comparison with other PKC family members, but attenuated doxycycline-induced PKCε expression. As a result of zapotin treatment for 6, 12 and 24h, the doxycycline-induced levels of the two differently phosphorylated PKCε forms (87 kDa and 95 kDa) were decreased. Migration assays revealed that increasing concentrations of zapotin (from 3.5 to 15 μM) decreased migration of HeLaPKCεA/E cells. Furthermore, zapotin significantly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells in doxycycline-induced (HeLaPKCεA/E) cells after 24h and decreased the levels of Bcl-2, c-Jun, c-Fos. This was accompanied by a degradation of PARP-1. In summary, activation of PKCε and down-modulation of the induced PKCε level by zapotin were associated with decreased migration and increased apoptosis. These observations are consistent with the previously reported chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic action of zapotin.

  10. The tetramethoxyflavone zapotin selectively activates protein kinase C epsilon, leading to its down-modulation accompanied by Bcl-2, c-Jun and c-Fos decrease

    PubMed Central

    Toton, Ewa; Lisiak, Natalia; Rubis, Blazej; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Gruber, Peter; Hofmann, Johann; Rybczynska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Zapotin, a tetramethoxyflavone, is a natural compound with a wide spectrum of activities in neoplastic cells. Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) has been shown to be oncogenic, with the ability to increase cell migration, invasion and survival of tumor cells. Here we report that zapotin inhibits cell proliferation. In wild-type HeLa cells with basal endogenous expression of PKCε, the IC50 was found to be 17.9 ± 1.6 μM. In HeLa cells overexpressing doxycycline-inducible constitutively active PKCε (HeLaPKCεA/E), the IC50 was 7.6 ± 1.3 μM, suggesting that PKCε enhances the anti-proliferative effect of zapotin. Moreover, we found that zapotin selectively activated PKCε in comparison with other PKC family members, but attenuated doxycycline-induced PKCε expression. As a result of zapotin treatment for 6, 12 and 24 h, the doxycycline-induced levels of the two differently phosphorylated PKCε forms (87 kDa and 95 kDa) were decreased. Migration assays revealed that increasing concentrations of zapotin (from 3.5 to 15 μM) decreased migration of HeLaPKCεA/E cells. Furthermore, zapotin significantly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells in doxycycline-induced (HeLaPKCεA/E) cells after 24 h and decreased the levels of Bcl-2, c-Jun, c-Fos. This was accompanied by a degradation of PARP-1. In summary, activation of PKCε and down-modulation of the induced PKCε level by zapotin were associated with decreased migration and increased apoptosis. These observations are consistent with the previously reported chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic action of zapotin. PMID:22381066

  11. Authentication Without Secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  12. Secrets to success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-02-01

    A new national study reveals what it takes for physician practices to stay financially viable. Several Texas practices, among those rated as "better performers," share their secrets to success. One of those secrets, a physician says, is "hiring good people and getting out of their way." PMID:24500918

  13. Secrets in "The Day of Ahmed's Secret."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckett, Peter; Knox, Marjorie

    2001-01-01

    Examines images and the written text in the picture book, "The Day of Ahmed's Secret," by Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland. Examines the book in greater detail by looking for issues of authenticity as well as social issues within the book's pictures and written texts. (SG)

  14. Six secrets of champagne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2015-12-01

    Popping open a bottle of champagne is one of life's great delights, but how much do you really know about the science behind this greatest of wines? Gérard Liger-Belair reveals his six favourite champagne secrets.

  15. Secret quality of love.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Hall, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Many of us can recite three Donabedian dimensions of the quality of care of structure, process and outcome. Recently, I was introduced to another of Avedis Donabedian's quotes about the 'secret quality of love'. PMID:27581908

  16. Efficient quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-05-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the dealer generates some single particles and then uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode a determinate secret into these particles. The participants get their shadows by performing the single-particle measurements on their particles, and even the dealer cannot know their shadows. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more practical within the present technologies.

  17. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  18. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  19. Pathophysiology of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2004-02-01

    Defects in pancreatic islet beta-cell function play a major role in the development of diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a more or less rapid destruction of pancreatic beta cells, and the autoimmune process begins years before the beta-cell destruction becomes complete, thereby providing a window of opportunity for intervention. During the preclinical period and early after diagnosis, much of the insulin deficiency may be the result of functional inhibition of insulin secretion that may be at least partially and transiently reversible. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a progressive loss of beta-cell function throughout the course of the disease. The pattern of loss is an initial (probably of genetic origin) defect in acute or first-phase insulin secretion, followed by a decreasing maximal capacity of insulin secretion. Last, a defective steady-state and basal insulin secretion develops, leading to almost complete beta-cell failure requiring insulin treatment. Because of the reciprocal relation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, valid representation of beta-cell function requires interpretation of insulin responses in the context of the prevailing degree of insulin sensitivity. This appropriate approach highlights defects in insulin secretion at the various stages of the natural history of type 2 diabetes and already present in individuals at risk to develop the disease. To date none of the available therapies can stop the progressive beta-cell defect and the progression of the metabolic disorder. The better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease should lead to the development of new strategies to preserve beta-cell function in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Salivary Gland Secretion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, H. L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes materials and procedures for an experiment utilizing a live dog to demonstrate: (1) physiology of the salivary gland; (2) parasympathetic control of the salivary gland; (3) influence of varying salivary flow rates on sodium and potassium ions, osmolarity and pH; and (4) salivary secretion as an active process. (DS)

  1. Biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hişmioğullari, Adnan Adil; Bozdayi, A Mithat; Rahman, Khalid

    2007-06-01

    The liver has many biochemical functions, of which one of the most important is bile formation. Bile is both a secretory and an excretory fluid and two of its most important functions are the delivery to the intestinal tract of: (i) bile acids to assist in fat digestion and absorption; and (ii) liver-derived metabolites of potentially toxic materials prior to their elimination from the body in the feces. Bile contains numerous solutes, including bile acids, phospholipids and cholesterol. Biliary lipids mainly consist of cholesterol and phospholipids and their secretion into bile is affected by the secretion of bile acids. Phospholipids and cholesterol are synthesized in the hepatocytes and are thought to be transferred via vesicle- and non-vesicle-mediated mechanisms into the bile canaliculus. Hepatocytes acquire biliary lipid by three pathways, which are biosynthesis, lipoproteins and existing molecules drawn from intracellular membranes, with the newly synthesized biliary lipid accounting for less than 20% of the total lipids. The hepatic determinants of biliary cholesterol elimination are not limited to total cholesterol homeostasis, but also concern biliary disease conditions, since excess biliary cholesterol secretion is involved in cholesterol gallstone formation, as well as being a major risk factor for gallbladder cancer. The purpose of this review was to highlight some of the major mechanisms involved in biliary lipid secretion.

  2. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  4. Cell secretion: an update.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, A

    2008-08-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed 'porosome' and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article.

  5. Cell secretion: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jeremic, A

    2008-01-01

    This past decade has witnessed the publication of a flurry of scientific papers and reports on the subject of cell secretion, following discovery of a permanent plasma membrane structure termed ‘porosome’ and its determination as the universal secretory machinery in cells. This discovery has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the secretory process, demonstrating that membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the porosome base to release their contents to the cell exterior. The regulated release of intravesicular contents during cell secretion is governed by dilation of the porosome opening to the outside, and the extent of vesicle swelling. In agreement, a great number of articles have been written and studies performed, which are briefly discussed in this article. PMID:18363838

  6. Bile Formation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  7. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shail

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the “novel weapons hypothesis (NWH).” Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1–3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin. PMID:21057643

  8. Neuropeptides and nasal secretion.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, J N; Kaliner, M

    1991-10-01

    The nasal mucosa is innervated by the sensory, parasympathetic, and sympathetic nervous systems. Nociceptive sensory nerves are stimulated by mucosal injury, inhalation of irritants, or mast cell degranulation and release of the calcitonin gene-related peptide, the tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A, and other peptides by the axon response mechanism. Sensory nerve stimulation initiates systemic reflexes, such as the sneeze, and central parasympathetic reflexes which release acetylcholine, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and other peptides and lead to glandular secretion. In concert, these proinflammatory neural responses lead to vasodilation, vascular permeability, and glandular secretion. Sympathetic nerves release neuropeptide Y and norepinephrine, potent vasoconstrictors which act to decompress the nasal mucosa and produce nasal patency. The balance between the effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic neurotransmitters may regulate nasal homeostasis, whereas the nociceptive sensory system may be held in reserve as a defense mechanism. Dysfunction of these systems may lead to pathological nasal syndromes. In the future, specific neuropeptide agonists and antagonists may be useful for the treatment of human rhinitic diseases. PMID:1928355

  9. Modeling mechanisms of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Tabak, Joël; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2010-12-01

    Secretion is a fundamental cellular process involving the regulated release of intracellular products from cells. Physiological functions such as neurotransmission, or the release of hormones and digestive enzymes, are all governed by cell secretion. Anomalies in the processes involved in secretion contribute to the development and progression of diseases such as diabetes and other hormonal disorders. To unravel the mechanisms that govern such diseases, it is essential to understand how hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters are synthesized and processed, and how their signals are recognized, amplified and transmitted by intracellular signaling pathways in the target cells. Here, we discuss diverse aspects of the detailed mechanisms involved in secretion based on mathematical models. The models range from stochastic ones describing the trafficking of secretory vesicles to deterministic ones investigating the regulation of cellular processes that underlie hormonal secretion. In all cases, the models are closely related to experimental results and suggest theoretical predictions for the secretion mechanisms.

  10. Protecting Trade Secrets in Canada.

    PubMed

    Courage, Noel; Calzavara, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Patents in the life sciences industries are a key form of intellectual property (IP), particularly for products such as brand-name drugs and medical devices. However, trade secrets can also be a useful tool for many types of innovations. In appropriate cases, trade secrets can offer long-term protection of IP for a lower financial cost than patenting. This type of protection must be approached with caution as there is little room for error when protecting a trade secret. Strong agreements and scrupulous security can help to protect the secret. Once a trade secret is disclosed to the public, it cannot be restored as the owner's property; however, if the information is kept from the public domain, the owner can have a property right of unlimited duration in the information. In some situations patents and trade secrets may be used cooperatively to protect innovation, particularly for manufacturing processes. PMID:25986591

  11. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  12. Expansible quantum secret sharing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Xu, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-08-01

    In the practical applications, member expansion is a usual demand during the development of a secret sharing network. However, there are few consideration and discussion on network expansibility in the existing quantum secret sharing schemes. We propose an expansible quantum secret sharing scheme with relatively simple and economical quantum resources and show how to split and reconstruct the quantum secret among an expansible user group in our scheme. Its trait, no requirement of any agent's assistant during the process of member expansion, can help to prevent potential menaces of insider cheating. We also give a discussion on the security of this scheme from three aspects.

  13. Solubility and secretability.

    PubMed

    Schein, C H

    1993-08-01

    The solubility and secretability of proteins can often be affected by extremely small changes in their primary structure. Attempts to determine empirical rules for the alteration of protein structure to improve either of these characteristics have met with only partial success. Those (mostly serendipitous) improvements in solubility that have been obtained via mutagenesis cannot be considered to be 'protein engineering'. The most successful examples where directed mutagenesis has been used to alter protein solubility, hemoglobin and insulin, have relied on established crystal structures and a wealth of data about the relationship between sequence and structure of the targeted protein. Currently, optimizing culture growth conditions by trial and error remains the fastest way to improve expression.

  14. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  15. Bacterial Secretion Systems: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Green, Erin R; Mecsas, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection.

  16. Cilengitide downmodulates invasiveness and vasculogenic mimicry of neuropilin 1 expressing melanoma cells through the inhibition of αvβ5 integrin.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, Federica; Graziani, Grazia; Levati, Lauretta; Tentori, Lucio; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro M

    2015-03-15

    During melanoma progression, tumour cells show increased adhesiveness to the vascular wall, invade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and frequently form functional channels similar to vascular vessels (vasculogenic mimicry). These properties are mainly mediated by the interaction of integrins with ECM components. Since we had previously identified neuropilin 1 (NRP-1), a coreceptor of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), as an important determinant of melanoma aggressiveness, aims of this study were to identify the specific integrins involved in the highly invasive phenotype of NRP-1 expressing cells and to investigate their role as targets to counteract melanoma progression. Melanoma aggressiveness was evaluated in vitro as cell ability to migrate through an ECM layer and to form tubule-like structures using transfected cells. Integrins relevant to these processes were identified using specific blocking antibodies. The αvβ5 integrin was found to be responsible for about 80% of the capability of NRP-1 expressing cells to adhere on vitronectin. In these cells αvβ5 expression level was twice higher than in low-invasive control cells and contributed to the ability of melanoma cells to form tubule-like structures on matrigel. Cilengitide, a potent inhibitor of αν integrins activation, reduced ECM invasion, vasculogenic mimicry and secretion of VEGF-A and metalloproteinase 9 by melanoma cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that ανβ5 integrin is involved in the highly aggressive phenotype of melanoma cells expressing NRP-1. Moreover, we identified a novel mechanism that contributes to the antimelanoma activity of the αv integrin inhibitor cilengitide based on the inhibition of vasculogenic mimicry.

  17. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Destiny J; Kang, Byung-Ho; Heringer, Angelo S; Wilkop, Thomas E; Drakakaki, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) describes secretion pathways that bypass one or several of the canonical secretion pit-stops on the way to the plasma membrane, and/or involve the secretion of leaderless proteins. So far, alternatives to conventional secretion were primarily observed and studied in yeast and animal cells. The sessile lifestyle of plants brings with it unique restraints on how they adapt to adverse conditions and environmental challenges. Recently, attention towards unconventional secretion pathways in plant cells has substantially increased, with the large number of leaderless proteins identified through proteomic studies. While UPS pathways in plants are certainly not yet exhaustively researched, an emerging notion is that induction of UPS pathways is correlated with pathogenesis and stress responses. Given the multitude UPS events observed, comprehensively organizing the routes proteins take to the apoplast in defined UPS categories is challenging. With the establishment of a larger collection of studied plant proteins taking these UPS pathways, a clearer picture of endomembrane trafficking as a whole will emerge. There are several novel enabling technologies, such as vesicle proteomics and chemical genomics, with great potential for dissecting secretion pathways, providing information about the cargo that travels along them and the conditions that induce them. PMID:27665550

  18. Down-modulation of SEL1L, an unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation protein, sensitizes glioma stem cells to the cytotoxic effect of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Monica; Baronchelli, Simona; Schiffer, Davide; Mellai, Marta; Caldera, Valentina; Saccani, Gloria Jotti; Dalpra, Leda; Daga, Antonio; Orlandi, Rosaria; DeBlasio, Pasquale; Biunno, Ida

    2014-01-31

    Valproic acid (VPA), an histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatments of gliomas by virtue of its ability to reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes. VPA induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive pathway displaying a dichotomic yin yang characteristic; it initially contributes in safeguarding the malignant cell survival, whereas long-lasting activation favors a proapoptotic response. By triggering UPR, VPA might tip the balance between cellular adaptation and programmed cell death via the deregulation of protein homeostasis and induction of proteotoxicity. Here we aimed to investigate the impact of proteostasis on glioma stem cells (GSC) using VPA treatment combined with subversion of SEL1L, a crucial protein involved in homeostatic pathways, cancer aggressiveness, and stem cell state maintenance. We investigated the global expression of GSC lines untreated and treated with VPA, SEL1L interference, and GSC line response to VPA treatment by analyzing cell viability via MTT assay, neurosphere formation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR-responsive proteins. Moreover, SEL1L immunohistochemistry was performed on primary glial tumors. The results show that (i) VPA affects GSC lines viability and anchorage-dependent growth by inducing differentiative programs and cell cycle progression, (ii) SEL1L down-modulation synergy enhances VPA cytotoxic effects by influencing GSCs proliferation and self-renewal properties, and (iii) SEL1L expression is indicative of glioma proliferation rate, malignancy, and endoplasmic reticulum stress statuses. Targeting the proteostasis network in association to VPA treatment may provide an alternative approach to deplete GSC and improve glioma treatments.

  19. Indole-3-carbinol induces cMYC and IAP-family downmodulation and promotes apoptosis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive but not of EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chacon, Gema; de Los Rios, Cristobal; Zapata, Juan M

    2014-11-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a natural product found in broadly consumed plants of the Brassica genus, such as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower, which exhibits anti-tumor effects through poorly defined mechanisms. I3C can be orally administered and clinical trials have demonstrated that I3C and derivatives are safe in humans. In this study we show that I3C efficiently induces apoptosis in cell lines derived from EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphomas (virus latency I/II), while it does not have any cytotoxic activity against EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphomas and immortalized EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (virus latency III). The effect of I3C in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma is very specific, since only I3C and its C6-methylated derivative, but not other 3-substituted indoles, have an effect on cell viability. I3C treatment caused apoptosis characterized by loss of mitochondria membrane potential and caspase activation. I3C alters the expression of proteins involved in the control of apoptosis and transcription regulation in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Among those, cMYC, cIAP1/2 and XIAP downmodulation at mRNA and protein level precede apoptosis induction, thus suggesting a role in I3C cytotoxicity. We also showed that I3C and, more particularly, its condensation dimer 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) prolonged survival and reduced tumor burden of mice xenotransplanted with EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells. In summary these results, together with previous reports from clinical trials indicating the lack of toxicity in humans of I3C and derivatives, support the use of these compounds as a new therapeutic approach for treating patients with endemic (EBV-positive) Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:25180456

  20. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  1. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Smith IV, Amos M; Evans, Philip G; Lawrie, Benjamin J; Legre, Matthieu; Lougovski, Pavel; Ray, William R; Williams, Brian P; Qi, Bing; Grice, Warren P

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  2. Novel O-linked methylated glycan antigens decorate secreted immunodominant glycoproteins from the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Nguyen, D Linh; van Diepen, Angela; Smit, Cornelis H; Koeleman, Carolien A; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Maizels, Rick M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2016-03-01

    Glycan molecules from helminth parasites have been associated with diverse biological functions ranging from interactions with neighbouring host cell populations to down-modulation of specific host immunity. Glycoproteins secreted by the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are of particular interest as the excretory-secretory products (termed HES) of this parasite contain both heat-labile and heat-stable components with immunomodulatory effects. We used MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS/MS to analyse the repertoire of N- and O-linked glycans released from Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products by PNGase A and F, β-elimination and hydrazinolysis revealing a broad range of structures including novel methylhexose- and methylfucose-containing glycans. Monoclonal antibodies to two immunodominant glycans of H. polygyrus, previously designated Glycans A and B, were found to react by glycan array analysis to a methyl-hexose-rich fraction and to a sulphated LacDiNAc (LDN; GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc) structure, respectively. We also analysed the glycan repertoire of a major glycoprotein in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products, VAL-2, which contains many glycan structures present in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products including Glycan A. However, it was found that this set of glycans is not responsible for the heat-stable immunomodulatory properties of Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory-secretory products, as revealed by the inability of VAL-2 to inhibit allergic lung inflammation. Taken together, these studies reveal that H. polygyrus secretes a diverse range of antigenic glycoconjugates, and provides a framework to explore the biological and immunomodulatory roles they may play within the mammalian host. PMID:26688390

  3. Novel O-linked methylated glycan antigens decorate secreted immunodominant glycoproteins from the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Nguyen, D. Linh; van Diepen, Angela; Smit, Cornelis H.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Maizels, Rick M.; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2016-01-01

    Glycan molecules from helminth parasites have been associated with diverse biological functions ranging from interactions with neighbouring host cell populations to down-modulation of specific host immunity. Glycoproteins secreted by the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are of particular interest as the excretory–secretory products (termed HES) of this parasite contain both heat-labile and heat-stable components with immunomodulatory effects. We used MALDI-TOF-MS and LC–MS/MS to analyse the repertoire of N- and O-linked glycans released from Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products by PNGase A and F, β-elimination and hydrazinolysis revealing a broad range of structures including novel methylhexose- and methylfucose-containing glycans. Monoclonal antibodies to two immunodominant glycans of H. polygyrus, previously designated Glycans A and B, were found to react by glycan array analysis to a methyl-hexose-rich fraction and to a sulphated LacDiNAc (LDN; GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc) structure, respectively. We also analysed the glycan repertoire of a major glycoprotein in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products, VAL-2, which contains many glycan structures present in Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products including Glycan A. However, it was found that this set of glycans is not responsible for the heat-stable immunomodulatory properties of Heligmosomoides polygyrus excretory–secretory products, as revealed by the inability of VAL-2 to inhibit allergic lung inflammation. Taken together, these studies reveal that H. polygyrus secretes a diverse range of antigenic glycoconjugates, and provides a framework to explore the biological and immunomodulatory roles they may play within the mammalian host. PMID:26688390

  4. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  5. Plant secretome: unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Job, Dominique; Rakwal, Randeep

    2010-02-01

    Plant secretomics is a newly emerging area of the plant proteomics field. It basically describes the global study of secreted proteins into the extracellular space of plant cell or tissue at any given time and under certain conditions through various secretory mechanisms. A combination of biochemical, proteomics and bioinformatics approaches has been developed to isolate, identify and profile secreted proteins using complementary in vitro suspension-cultured cells and in planta systems. Developed inventories of secreted proteins under normal, biotic and abiotic conditions revealed several different types of novel secreted proteins, including the leaderless secretory proteins (LSPs). On average, LSPs can account for more than 50% of the total identified secretome, supporting, as in other eukaryotes, the existence of novel secretory mechanisms independent of the classical endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway, and suggesting that this non-classical mechanism of protein expression is, for as yet unknown reasons, more massively used than in other eukaryotic systems. Plants LSPs, which seem to be potentially involved in the defense/stress responses, might have dual (extracellular and/or intracellular) roles as most of them have established intracellular functions, yet presently unknown extracellular functions. Evidence is emerging on the role of glycosylation in the apical sorting and trafficking of secretory proteins. These initial secretome studies in plants have considerably advanced our understanding on secretion of different types of proteins and their underlying mechanisms, and opened a door for comparative analyses of plant secretomes with those of other organisms. In this first review on plant secretomics, we summarize and discuss the secretome definition, the applied approaches for unlocking secrets of the secreted proteins in the extracellular fluid, the possible functional significance and secretory mechanisms of LSPs, as well as glycosylation of

  6. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  7. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  8. Nonlinear Secret Image Sharing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2⁡m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  9. Cell secretion and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-07-01

    Secretion occurs in all cells of multicellular organisms and involves the delivery of secretory products packaged in membrane-bound vesicles to the cell exterior. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. Secretory vesicles are transported to specific sites at the plasma membrane, where they dock and fuse to release their contents. Similar to other cellular processes, cell secretion is found to be highly regulated and a precisely orchestrated event. It has been demonstrated that membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse at porosomes, which are specialized supramolecular structures at the cell plasma membrane. Swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of pressure, allowing expulsion of intravesicular contents. The extent of secretory vesicle swelling dictates the amount of intravesicular contents expelled during secretion. The discovery of the porosome, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle fusion at the base of porosomes, and vesicle swelling, has also been resolved. These findings reveal the molecular mechanism of cell secretion.

  10. Second messengers in renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C

    1985-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a central role in electrolyte homeostasis and in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. The level of activity of this system is determined primarily by the rate at which the kidneys secrete renin into the blood. Although many factors affect renin secretion in vivo, it is certain that all extracellular first messengers affect the activity of the renin-secreting cell by altering its intracellular concentrations of only a few second messengers. The thesis of this review is that free ionic calcium (Ca2+) and cAMP are inhibitory and stimulatory second messengers in renin secretion and that Ca2+ is preeminent. In general, intracellular Ca2+ is controlled by two mechanisms of Ca2+ efflux (Na-Ca exchange; primary active Ca2+ transport) and two mechanisms of Ca2+ influx and/or mobilization (voltage-sensitive Ca channels; receptor-operated channels). There is evidence to suggest that first messengers affect intracellular Ca2+, and therefore renin secretion, by affecting these efflux, influx, and mobilization pathways.

  11. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  12. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  13. On family secrets and -K.

    PubMed

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making.

  14. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  15. The Year of Secret Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Jaclyn

    2004-01-01

    The path to "novelist" was a convoluted one for Moriarty, who began writing fiction as doctoral student at Cambridge University. Her interest in young adults stems from an appreciation for the "troubles, strengths, and surprises of that age group." Now, in a uniquely formatted book titled "The Year of Secret Assignments," we peek inside the mind…

  16. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Gonzalo P.; Lüchtenborg, Anne-Marie; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i) reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii) lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455472

  17. Secretion of Protective Antigens by Tissue-Stage Nematode Larvae Revealed by Proteomic Analysis and Vaccination-Induced Sterile Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Ivens, Al C.; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J.; McSorley, Henry J.; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  18. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  19. Secretion of protective antigens by tissue-stage nematode larvae revealed by proteomic analysis and vaccination-induced sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Ivens, Al C; Harcus, Yvonne; Filbey, Kara J; McSorley, Henry J; Murray, Janice; Bridgett, Stephen; Ashford, David; Dowle, Adam A; Maizels, Rick M

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites infect over 1 billion humans, with little evidence for generation of sterilising immunity. These helminths are highly adapted to their mammalian host, following a developmental program through successive niches, while effectively down-modulating host immune responsiveness. Larvae of Heligmosomoides polygyrus, for example, encyst in the intestinal submucosa, before emerging as adult worms into the duodenal lumen. Adults release immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products, but mice immunised with adult H. polygyrus ES become fully immune to challenge infection. ES products of the intestinal wall 4th stage (L4) larvae are similarly important in host-parasite interactions, as they readily generate sterile immunity against infection, while released material from the egg stage is ineffective. Proteomic analyses of L4 ES identifies protective antigen targets as well as potential tissue-phase immunomodulatory molecules, using as comparators the adult ES proteome and a profile of H. polygyrus egg-released material. While 135 proteins are shared between L4 and adult ES, 72 are L4 ES-specific; L4-specific proteins correspond to those whose transcription is restricted to larval stages, while shared proteins are generally transcribed by all life cycle forms. Two protein families are more heavily represented in the L4 secretome, the Sushi domain, associated with complement regulation, and the ShK/SXC domain related to a toxin interfering with T cell signalling. Both adult and L4 ES contain extensive but distinct arrays of Venom allergen/Ancylostoma secreted protein-Like (VAL) members, with acetylcholinesterases (ACEs) and apyrase APY-3 particularly abundant in L4 ES. Serum antibodies from mice vaccinated with L4 and adult ES react strongly to the VAL-1 protein and to ACE-1, indicating that these two antigens represent major vaccine targets for this intestinal nematode. We have thus defined an extensive and novel repertoire of H

  20. Tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheated secret keys and shared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Chong-An

    2013-01-01

    A (t,n) secret image-sharing scheme shares a secret image to n participants, and the t users recover the image. During the recovery procedure of a conventional secret image-sharing scheme, cheaters may use counterfeit secret keys or modified shared images to cheat other users' secret keys and shared images. A cheated secret key or shared image leads to an incorrect secret image. Unfortunately, the cheater cannot be identified. We present an exponent and modulus-based scheme to provide a tamper-proof secret image-sharing scheme for identifying cheaters on secret keys or shared images. The proposed scheme allows users to securely select their secret key. This assignment can be performed over networks. Modulus results of each shared image is calculated to recognize cheaters of a shared image. Experimental results indicate that the proposed scheme is excellent at identifying cheated secret keys and shared images.

  1. Mucins in cat airway secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J R; Gallagher, J T; Richardson, P S; Sheehan, J K; Carlstedt, I

    1991-01-01

    Mucous secretions were obtained from cat tracheas that had received [3H]glucose and [35S]sulphate to radiolabel mucus glycoproteins biosynthetically. Samples were collected under resting ('basal') conditions as well as after pilocarpine stimulation and were separated into gel and sol phases by centrifugation. Macromolecules were partially purified by using gel chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B, and the species that were eluted with the void volume were then separated into two major populations with isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation in CsCl. The major component from the gel phase of pilocarpine-induced secretions had a buoyant density typical of mucins and was observed as linear and apparently flexible chains by electron microscopy. Reduction of disulphide bonds gave subunits that could be further cleaved by trypsin digestion into components of approximately the same size as the high-Mr glycopeptides obtained from other mucins after this treatment. In contrast, the dominant species in the gel phase of the 'basal' secretion had a significantly higher buoyant density than expected for mucins and was largely unaffected by reduction, as studied by gel chromatography. The macromolecules were fragmented by trypsin, suggesting that they contain a polypeptide backbone. This more dense component also predominated in the sol phase both from the 'basal' secretions and from the pilocarpine-released secretions. Digestion with DNAase, chondroitin ABC lyase or heparan sulphate lyase had no effect, which shows that this component is not DNA, a dermatan sulphate/chondroitin sulphate or a heparan sulphate proteoglycan. In contrast, endo-beta-galactosidase and keratanase caused some fragmentation, suggesting that the molecules contain some linkages of the poly-(N-acetyl-lactosamine) type, although the degradation was not as extensive as expected for keratan sulphate. Treatment with alkaline borohydride resulted in extensive fragmentation of the high-Mr glycopeptides from both

  2. Sec-mediated secretion by Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates within a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of macrophages. PV formation requires delivery of effector proteins directly into the host cell cytoplasm by a type IVB secretion system. However, additional secretion systems are likely responsible for modification of the PV lumen microenvironment that promote pathogen replication. Results To assess the potential of C. burnetii to secrete proteins into the PV, we analyzed the protein content of modified acidified citrate cysteine medium for the presence of C. burnetii proteins following axenic (host cell-free) growth. Mass spectrometry generated a list of 105 C. burnetii proteins that could be secreted. Based on bioinformatic analysis, 55 proteins were selected for further study by expressing them in C. burnetii with a C-terminal 3xFLAG-tag. Secretion of 27 proteins by C. burnetii transformants was confirmed by immunoblotting culture supernatants. Tagged proteins expressed by C. burnetii transformants were also found in the soluble fraction of infected Vero cells, indicating secretion occurs ex vivo. All secreted proteins contained a signal sequence, and deletion of this sequence from selected proteins abolished secretion. These data indicate protein secretion initially requires translocation across the inner-membrane into the periplasm via the activity of the Sec translocase. Conclusions C. burnetii secretes multiple proteins, in vitro and ex vivo, in a Sec-dependent manner. Possible roles for secreted proteins and secretion mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24093460

  3. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  4. Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Mary C.; Schriock, Eldon D.; Jaffe, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma is a common cause of gynecologic problems that include oligomenorrhea, infertility, amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Diagnosis requires a combination of endocrine testing and radiologic evaluation. The diagnosis of macroadenomas is usually straightforward and these large tumors may be associated with mass effects such as severe headache, nerve palsies or visual changes. Microadenomas may be more subtle in presentation, and the diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia without radiologic evidence of a tumor frequently is problematic. The management of prolactin-secreting adenoma remains controversial, with no clear consensus or indication for surgical versus medical treatment. Surgical intervention is a realistic option for those patients who have access to an experienced neurosurgeon and who have tumor characteristics that offer a reasonable hope for cure. Many questions remain to be answered, including the cause, natural history of development and the optimum treatment for individual cases. Images PMID:6659490

  5. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  6. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion.

  7. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  8. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  9. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  10. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance. PMID:23613592

  11. Comparative analysis of the secretion capability of early and late flagellar type III secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A remarkable feature of the flagellar-specific type III secretion system (T3SS) is the selective recognition of a few substrate proteins among the many thousand cytoplasmic proteins. Secretion substrates are divided into two specificity classes: early substrates secreted for hook-basal body (HBB) construction and late substrates secreted after HBB completion. Secretion was reported to require a disordered N-terminal secretion signal, mRNA secretion signals within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) and for late substrates, piloting proteins known as the T3S chaperones. Here, we utilized translational β-lactamase fusions to probe the secretion efficacy of the N-terminal secretion signal of fourteen secreted flagellar substrates in Salmonella enterica. We observed a surprising variety in secretion capability between flagellar proteins of the same secretory class. The peptide secretion signals of the early-type substrates FlgD, FlgF, FlgE and the late-type substrate FlgL were analysed in detail. Analysing the role of the 5′-UTR in secretion of flgB and flgE revealed that the native 5′-UTR substantially enhanced protein translation and secretion. Based on our data, we propose a multicomponent signal that drives secretion via the flagellar T3SS. Both mRNA and peptide signals are recognized by the export apparatus and together with substrate-specific chaperones allowing for targeted secretion of flagellar substrates. PMID:24946091

  12. An assessment of the antibacterial activity in larval excretion/secretion of four species of insects recorded in association with corpses, using Lucilia sericata Meigen as the marker species.

    PubMed

    Barnes, K M; Gennard, D E; Dixon, R A

    2010-12-01

    The relative antibacterial activities of excretion/secretion (ES) from two carrion-feeding insects, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, and a detritivore, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, were compared to that of Lucilia sericata Meigen, a species with ES of known antibacterial capacity, in order to explore the antimicrobial potential of other carrion and detritivore species. Viable counts were used to assess time-kill of ES against five bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. Antibacterial activity was recorded in all four insect species although T. molitor and D. maculatus were the most effective in controlling growth of P. mirabilis. The blowflies were more effective in controlling a wider range of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The larval ES from all species was shown to reduce bacterial growth rate although differences in antibacterial spectrum were noted and the degree of potency varied between the four species. These differences may be explained ecologically by the different colonisation times of each insect species on the corpse. Overall, this study demonstrates that research into other carrion-feeding insect species has potential to provide an increased source of antimicrobial chemicals to broaden the range of bacterial species beyond that currently controlled using L. sericata. PMID:20307342

  13. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  14. A universal nanoparticle cell secretion capture assay.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Secreted proteins play an important role in intercellular interactions, especially between cells of the immune system. Currently, there is no universal assay that allows a simple noninvasive identification and isolation of cells based on their secretion of various products. We have developed such a method. Our method is based on the targeting, to the cell surface, of heterofunctional nanoparticles coupled to a cell surface-specific antibody and to a secreted protein-specific antibody, which captures the secreted protein on the surface of the producing cell. Importantly, this method does not compromise cellviability and is compatible with further culture and expansion of the secreting cells.

  15. Studies into secretions of Tetrahymena: enzymes secreted into inorganic medium.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Karsa, J; Csaba, G

    1992-01-01

    The peptides secreted by Tetrahymena cells into inorganic medium were chromatographed. Six fractions showing a marked enzyme-like activity were examined for influence on certain physiological parameters of Tetrahymena. The enzymatically active fractions increased the phagocytic activity of Tetrahymena and decreased its binding capacity for lectins and hormone (insulin), but enhanced insulin imprinting at primary interaction. It remains to be clarified whether these effects were due to the enzymatic or other components of the fractions investigated, or to lack of the compensatory influence of the fractions not studied.

  16. Semiquantum secret sharing using entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Chan, W. H.; Long Dongyang

    2010-08-15

    Secret sharing is a procedure for sharing a secret among a number of participants such that only the qualified subsets of participants have the ability to reconstruct the secret. Even in the presence of eavesdropping, secret sharing can be achieved when all the members are quantum. So what happens if not all the members are quantum? In this paper, we propose two semiquantum secret sharing protocols by using maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type states in which quantum Alice shares a secret with two classical parties, Bob and Charlie, in a way that both parties are sufficient to obtain the secret, but one of them cannot. The presented protocols are also shown to be secure against eavesdropping.

  17. Calcium calmodulin and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Brown, B L; Walker, S W; Tomlinson, S

    1985-08-01

    As long ago as 1970, it was proposed that Ca2+ can act as a 'second messenger' like cAMP (Rasmussen & Nagata, 1979). The recognition that calmodulin is a major Ca2+ binding protein in non-muscle cells has prompted the suggestion that calmodulin may serve an analogous role for Ca2+ to that served by protein kinase for cAMP (Wang & Waisman, 1979), or at least to the regulatory subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases. It is becoming clear that calmodulin probably does play a role in stimulus secretion coupling in endocrine cells. Nevertheless, some of the experimental approaches which have led to this rather tentative conclusion do induce some doubts, as we have attempted to indicate. Many of the pharmacological agents used in the studies cited in this review are not specific in their interaction with calmodulin. For example, the phenothiazines also inhibit phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase. The introduction of more specific drugs, such as the naphthalene sulphonamides, may lead to a clearer picture of the role of calmodulin in hormone secretion. Relationships probably exist between cyclic nucleotides, calcium, calmodulin, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover and phospholipids in the overall control of the secretory process (see Fig. 1). There is considerable evidence that calcium is the primary internal signal initiating exocytosis of hormone from many glands. However, it appears that cyclic nucleotides can modulate the calcium signal either positively or negatively and it is possible that cAMP and calcium can separately activate secretion. The presence of both calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in the same tissue would appear to suggest either spatial or temporal control mechanisms or that (diagram; see text) the calcium requirement for calmodulin activation differs between the two enzymes. The true explanation is probably far more complex and involves perhaps as yet unknown factors that can differentially

  18. Controlling secretion to limit chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Georgilis, Athena; Gil, Jesús

    2016-08-15

    The tumor microenvironment influences cancer progression and therapy outcome by mechanisms not yet fully understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, Bent and colleagues (pp. 1811-1821) show how chemotherapy causes endothelial senescence. Interestingly, senescent endothelial cells do not mount a typical senescence-associated secretory phenotype but instead acutely secrete IL-6, promoting chemoresistance. This study unveils a physiological switch involving PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling that restrains the senescence secretory responses to limit the detrimental consequences of persistent inflammation. PMID:27601527

  19. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  20. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D

    2007-10-01

    Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient includes routine methods for maintaining mucociliary function, as well as techniques for secretion removal. Humidification, mobilization of the patient, and airway suctioning are all routine procedures for managing secretions in the ventilated patient. Early ambulation of the post-surgical patient and routine turning of the ventilated patient are common secretion-management techniques that have little supporting evidence of efficacy. Humidification is a standard of care and a requisite for secretion management. Both active and passive humidification can be used. The humidifier selected and the level of humidification required depend on the patient's condition and the expected duration of intubation. In patients with thick, copious secretions, heated humidification is superior to a heat and moisture exchanger. Airway suctioning is the most important secretion removal technique. Open-circuit and closed-circuit suctioning have similar efficacy. Instilling saline prior to suctioning, to thin the secretions or stimulate a cough, is not supported by the literature. Adequate humidification and as-needed suctioning are the foundation of secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient. Intermittent therapy for secretion removal includes techniques either to simulate a cough, to mechanically loosen secretions, or both. Patient positioning for secretion drainage is also widely used. Percussion and postural drainage have been widely employed for mechanically ventilated patients but have not been shown to reduce ventilator-associated pneumonia or atelectasis. Manual hyperinflation and insufflation-exsufflation, which attempt to improve secretion removal by simulating a cough, have been described in mechanically ventilated patients, but neither has been studied sufficiently to support routine use. Continuous lateral rotation with a specialized bed reduces atelectasis in some patients, but has not been shown

  1. Matroids and quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep; Raussendorf, Robert

    2010-05-15

    A secret-sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol to distribute a secret state in an encoded form among a group of players such that only authorized subsets of the players can reconstruct the secret. Classically, efficient secret-sharing schemes have been shown to be induced by matroids. Furthermore, access structures of such schemes can be characterized by an excluded minor relation. No such relations are known for quantum secret-sharing schemes. In this paper we take the first steps toward a matroidal characterization of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. In addition to providing a new perspective on quantum-secret-sharing schemes, this characterization has important benefits. While previous work has shown how to construct quantum-secret-sharing schemes for general access structures, these schemes are not claimed to be efficient. In this context the present results prove to be useful; they enable us to construct efficient quantum-secret-sharing schemes for many general access structures. More precisely, we show that an identically self-dual matroid that is representable over a finite field induces a pure-state quantum-secret-sharing scheme with information rate 1.

  2. Mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Maechler, Pierre

    2013-10-15

    In the endocrine fraction of the pancreas, the β-cell rapidly reacts to fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations by adjusting the rate of insulin secretion. Glucose-sensing coupled to insulin exocytosis depends on transduction of metabolic signals into intracellular messengers recognized by the secretory machinery. Mitochondria play a central role in this process by connecting glucose metabolism to insulin release. Mitochondrial activity is primarily regulated by metabolic fluxes, but also by dynamic morphology changes and free Ca(2+) concentrations. Recent advances of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis are discussed; in particular the roles of the newly-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU and its regulatory partner MICU1, as well as the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger. This review describes how mitochondria function both as sensors and generators of metabolic signals; such as NADPH, long chain acyl-CoA, glutamate. The coupling factors are additive to the Ca(2+) signal and participate to the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

  3. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    PubMed

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussis toxin from B. pertussis may be more generally valid than previously anticipated. Secretion and modification of toxins from H. pylori and L. pneumophila profoundly affect host cell metabolism, thus entering the discipline of cellular microbiology. Finally, results from genome sequencing projects revealed the presence of up to three TFSS in a single organism, and the analysis of their interplay and adaptation to different functions will be a future challenge. TFSS-carrying plasmids were discovered in different ecosystems, suggesting that genetic exchange may speed up their evolution and adaptation to different cell-cell interactions. PMID:11918819

  4. Calcium signaling and secretion in cholangiocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Mateus T; Nathanson, Michael H

    2015-07-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis affects up to one-third of individuals who abuse alcohol and can be associated with high mortality. Although this disorder is characterized by hepatocellular damage, steatosis and neutrophil infiltration, recent evidence suggests that cholestasis or impaired bile secretion may be a frequent occurrence as well. Bile secretion results from the concerted activity of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. Hepatocytes secrete bile acids and conjugated products into the bile canaliculi, which then are modified by cholangiocytes through secretion of bicarbonate and water to give rise to the final secreted bile. Here the molecular mechanisms regulating bile secretion in cholangiocytes are reviewed. Moreover, we discuss how the expression of intracellular Ca(2+) channels might be regulated in cholangiocytes, plus evidence that components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery are altered in a range of cholestatic diseases of the bile ducts. PMID:26100660

  5. Motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Chayon; Tanaka, Toru; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Motilin and ghrelin are gastrointestinal hormones that stimulate the migrating motor complex (MMC) of gastrointestinal motility during the fasting state. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on pepsinogen secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. By using a gastric lumen-perfusion system, we found that the intravenous administration of carbachol and motilin stimulated pepsinogen secretion, the latter in a dose-dependent manner, whereas ghrelin had no effect. We then investigated the pathways of motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion using acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Treatment with atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, completely inhibited both carbachol and motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion. Motilin-induced pepsinogen secretion was observed in the vagotomized suncus. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates pepsinogen secretion, and suggest that this effect occurs through a cholinergic pathway in suncus. PMID:25957475

  6. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  7. Type V Secretion Systems in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fan, Enguo; Chauhan, Nandini; Udatha, D B R K Gupta; Leo, Jack C; Linke, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Type V secretion denotes a variety of secretion systems that cross the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria but that depend on the Sec machinery for transport through the inner membrane. They are possibly the simplest bacterial secretion systems, because they consist only of a single polypeptide chain (or two chains in the case of two-partner secretion). Their seemingly autonomous transport through the outer membrane has led to the term "autotransporters" for various subclasses of type V secretion. In this chapter, we review the structure and function of these transporters and review recent findings on additional factors involved in the secretion process, which have put the term "autotransporter" to debate. PMID:26999388

  8. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epithelial anion and fluid secretion, their regulation, and how these processes are altered in CF disease to account for organ-specific secretory phenotypes. PMID:22675668

  9. Stimulation of leptin secretion by insulin

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Minglun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Inui, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Leptin has a crucial role in regulating food intake and maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Although little is known about the process of leptin secretion, insulin, which has an important role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids, is believed to regulate leptin secretion through a posttranscriptional mechanism in the short term, and via glucose metabolism in the long term. The gastric mucosa secretes leptin, but this mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Understanding the mechanism of insulin-regulated leptin secretion could lead to the development of new treatment methods for obesity and its comorbidities, which are serious public health concerns. PMID:23565488

  10. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  11. Gonadotropin secretion in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M; Laessle, R G; Fichter, M M

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-two normal weight women with bulimia nervosa (BN) were studied (mean age, 25 +/- 5 yr; body mass index, 20.2 +/- 2.6 kg/m2). Sixteen of them reported menstrual cycles in the range of 21-42 days, and 6 had experienced absence of menstruation for at least 3 months. Twenty-one healthy women with regular menstrual cycles (mean age, 23 +/- 2 yr; body mass index, 20.7 +/- 1.4) served as the control subjects. Frequent morning blood samples for estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) determinations were obtained for the duration of 1 menstrual cycle or for 6 weeks in the case of amenorrhea. LH, FSH, cortisol, and insulin secretion were studied on day 3, 4, or 5 after the onset of a menstrual cycle or on a random day in the 6 BN women with amenorrhea. Blood samples were collected at 15-min intervals from 1800-0600 h for LH and FSH and at 30-min intervals from 2400-0600 h for cortisol and insulin. Nineteen of the 21 controls, but only 10 of the 22 BN women, fulfilled the following standard criteria: maximum E2 above 440 pmol/L, maximum P4 above 19 nmol/L, and luteal phase length of 9 days or more. The 10 BN women with normal menstrual cycles had lower mean insulin concentrations than the controls (70 +/- 20 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.01), but gonadotropin secretion, cortisol, and T3 concentrations were similar. The 8 BN women with amenorrhea or ovulatory dysfunction (maximum E2, less than 440 pmol/L; maximum P4, less than 6 nmol/L) displayed decreased mean LH pulse frequency (2.6 +/- 2.4 vs. 5.7 +/- 2.0 pulses/12 h; P less than 0.01), increased mean cortisol (120 +/- 40 vs. 80 +/- 20 nmol/L; P less than 0.01), decreased mean insulin (90 +/- 40 vs. 120 +/- 30 pmol/L; P less than 0.05), and decreased mean T3 concentrations (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2 nmol/L; P less than 0.01). The data suggest that BN in normal weight women is associated with an increased rate of ovarian dysfunction; decreased pulsatile LH secretion seems to be an important mechanism. Increased

  12. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    PubMed

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  13. The type III secretion injectisome.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guy R

    2006-11-01

    The type III secretion injectisome is a complex nanomachine that allows bacteria to deliver protein effectors across eukaryotic cellular membranes. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of its structure, assembly and mode of operation. The principal structural components of the injectisome, from the base located in the bacterial cytosol to the tip of the needle protruding from the cell surface, have been investigated in detail. The structures of several constituent proteins were solved at the atomic level and important insights into the assembly process have been gained. However, despite the ongoing concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, the role of many of the constituent components of this nanomachine remain unknown. PMID:17041629

  14. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas for stimulating…

  15. Family Secrets: The Bioethics of Genetic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Dina G.; DuPre, Michael J.; Holt, Susan; Chen, Shaw-Ree; Wischnowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses "Family Secrets," a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum module that focuses on the bioethical implications of genetic testing. In high school biology classrooms throughout New York State, students are using "Family Secrets" to learn about DNA testing; Huntington's disease (HD); and the ethical, legal, and social…

  16. [Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe secreted proteins].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ling; Liu, Yun-Fan; Xie, Jian-Ping

    2007-02-01

    Secreted proteins play a vital physiological role. Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for cell cycle study and a potential useful drug screen model. Secreted proteins also initiate the mating. However, few global studies concerning the secreted proteins of S. pombe was reported. To address this issue, bioinformatics were used to reveal the global secreted proteins of S. pombe. The 4997 proteins deduced from the S. pombe genome were analyzed by combined several programs. One hundred and sixty proteins were identified carrying an NH2-terminal secretory signal peptide by signalP3.0. Among them, 117 proteins are integral membrane proteins (TMpred), 13 proteins are lipoproteins (PrositeS-can), and 66 proteins are secreted proteins. The location of the secreted proteins was also predicted by Target P. Some of the secreted proteins are involved in the nutrition, reproduction, as well as the communication between cells and environment. The global information of the secreted proteins of S. pombe will benefit further studies in drug screening model and host searching for heterologous gene expression.

  17. Bacterial Secretion Systems – An overview

    PubMed Central

    Green, Erin R.; Mecsas, Joan

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens utilize a multitude of methods to invade mammalian hosts, damage tissue sites, and thwart the immune system from responding. One essential component of these strategies for many bacterial pathogens is the secretion of proteins across phospholipid membranes. Secreted proteins can play many roles in promoting bacterial virulence, from enhancing attachment to eukaryotic cells, to scavenging resources in an environmental niche, to directly intoxicating target cells and disrupting their functions. Many pathogens use dedicated protein secretion systems to secrete virulence factors from the cytosol of the bacteria into host cells or the host environment. In general, bacterial protein secretion apparatuses can be divided into different classes, based on their structures, functions, and specificity. Some systems are conserved in all classes of bacteria and secrete a broad array of substrates, while others are only found in a small number of bacterial species and/or are specific to only one or a few proteins. In this chapter, we review the canonical features of several common bacterial protein secretion systems, as well as their roles in promoting the virulence of bacterial pathogens. Additionally, we address recent findings that indicate that the innate immune system of the host can detect and respond to the presence of protein secretion systems during mammalian infection. PMID:26999395

  18. Type VI secretion system: secretion by a contractile nanomachine

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are present in about a quarter of all Gram-negative bacteria. Several key components of T6SS are evolutionarily related to components of contractile nanomachines such as phages and R-type pyocins. The T6SS assembly is initiated by formation of a membrane complex that binds a phage-like baseplate with a sharp spike, and this is followed by polymerization of a long rigid inner tube and an outer contractile sheath. Effectors are preloaded onto the spike or into the tube during the assembly by various mechanisms. Contraction of the sheath releases an unprecedented amount of energy, which is used to thrust the spike and tube with the associated effectors out of the effector cell and across membranes of both bacterial and eukaryotic target cells. Subunits of the contracted sheath are recycled by T6SS-specific unfoldase to allow for a new round of assembly. Live-cell imaging has shown that the assembly is highly dynamic and its subcellular localization is in certain bacteria regulated with a remarkable precision. Through the action of effectors, T6SS has mainly been shown to contribute to pathogenicity and competition between bacteria. This review summarizes the knowledge that has contributed to our current understanding of T6SS mode of action. PMID:26370934

  19. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  20. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    PubMed Central

    Krehenbrink, Martin; Downie, J Allan

    2008-01-01

    Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP), a twin-arginine translocase (TAT) secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP) were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I) and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V) is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I) system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to the genes encoding the

  1. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  2. Extracellular Enzyme Secretion by Pseudomonas lemoignei

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M. W.; Merrick, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of succinate to repress the secretion of Pseudomonas lemoignei poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase was a function of pH. Repression only occurred when the pH of the medium was 7.0 or less. At a higher pH, lack of sensitivity to succinate concentration may have been due to a limited ability to transport succinate. Actively secreting cultures (at pH 7.4) continued to secrete enzyme for approximately 30 min after the pH was rapidly decreased to pH 6.8, even though sufficient succinate was present to repress enzyme synthesis. Similarly, after the addition of rifampin to secreting cultures, there was a 30-min delay before secretion was inhibited. Evidence is presented which suggests that continued secretion may be the result of depolymerase messenger ribonucleic acid accumulation within the cells. Studies with chloramphenicol indicated that de novo protein synthesis is necessary for the secretion of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase and that exoenzyme is not released from a preformed pool. Studies with various inhibitors of protein synthesis indicated that synthesis of exoenzyme is 5 to 10 times more susceptible to inhibition than is the synthesis of cell-associated proteins. PMID:4152045

  3. Glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford; Salehi, Albert; Vergari, Elisa; Zhang, Quan; Rorsman, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes involves a ménage à trois of impaired glucose regulation of pancreatic hormone release: in addition to impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion, the release of the hyperglycaemic hormone glucagon becomes dysregulated; these last-mentioned defects exacerbate the metabolic consequences of hypoinsulinaemia and are compounded further by hypersecretion of somatostatin (which inhibits both insulin and glucagon secretion). Glucagon secretion has been proposed to be regulated by either intrinsic or paracrine mechanisms, but their relative significance and the conditions under which they operate are debated. Importantly, the paracrine and intrinsic modes of regulation are not mutually exclusive; they could operate in parallel to control glucagon secretion. Here we have applied mathematical modelling of α-cell electrical activity as a novel means of dissecting the processes that underlie metabolic regulation of glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that basal hypersecretion of somatostatin and/or increased activity of somatostatin receptors may explain the loss of adequate counter-regulation under hypoglycaemic conditions, as well as the physiologically inappropriate stimulation of glucagon secretion during hyperglycaemia seen in diabetic patients. We therefore advocate studying the interaction of the paracrine and intrinsic mechanisms; unifying these processes may give a more complete picture of the regulation of glucagon secretion from α-cells than studying the individual parts. PMID:27044683

  4. Insulin signaling pathways in lepidopteran ecdysone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wendy A.; Lamattina, Anthony; Collins, McKensie

    2014-01-01

    Molting and metamorphosis are stimulated by the secretion of ecdysteroid hormones from the prothoracic glands. Insulin-like hormones have been found to enhance prothoracic gland activity, providing a mechanism to link molting to nutritional state. In silk moths (Bombyx mori), the prothoracic glands are directly stimulated by insulin and the insulin-like hormone bombyxin. Further, in Bombyx, the neuropeptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) appears to act at least in part through the insulin-signaling pathway. In the prothoracic glands of Manduca sexta, while insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, neither insulin nor bombyxin II stimulate ecdysone secretion. Involvement of the insulin-signaling pathway in Manduca prothoracic glands was explored using two inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002 and wortmannin. PI3K inhibitors block the phosphorylation of Akt and 4EBP but have no effect on ecdysone secretion, or on the phosphorylation of the MAPkinase, ERK. Inhibitors that block phosphorylation of ERK, including the MEK inhibitor U0126, and high doses of the RSK inhibitor SL0101, effectively inhibit ecdysone secretion. The results highlight differences between the two lepidopteran insects most commonly used to directly study ecdysteroid secretion. In Bombyx, the PTTH and insulin-signaling pathways intersect; both insulin and PTTH enhance the phosphorylation of Akt and stimulate ecdysteroid secretion, and inhibition of PI3K reduces ecdysteroid secretion. By contrast, in Manduca, the action of PTTH is distinct from insulin. The results highlight species differences in the roles of translational regulators such as 4EBP, and members of the MAPkinase pathway such as ERK and RSK, in the regulation of insect ecdysone secretion, and in the impact of nutritionally-sensitive hormones such as insulin in the control of ecdysone secretion and molting. PMID:24550835

  5. Digestive Secretion of Dionaea muscipula (Venus's Flytrap).

    PubMed

    Scala, J; Iott, K; Schwab, D W; Semersky, F E

    1969-03-01

    The digestive fluid of Dionaea muscipula has been studied with respect to its protein content as a function of time after entrapment of protein material and some enzymes of the secretion. Maximum secretion of enzyme occurs within the first 3 days of the digestive cycle and protein reaches its maximum at 4 days. Phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase have been observed in the secretion. The enzymes have acid pH optima and the proteinase has a molecular weight of about 40,000.

  6. Islet Insulin Secretion Measurements in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hugill, Alison; Shimomura, Kenju; Cox, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes detailed protocols for in vitro measurements of insulin function and secretion in isolated mouse islets for the analysis of glucose homeostasis. We specify a method of enzyme digestion and hand picking to isolate and release the greatest number of high quality islets from the pancreas of the mouse. We describe an effective method for generating dynamic measurements of insulin secretion using a perifusion assay including a detailed protocol for constructing a peristaltic pump and tubing assembly. In addition we describe an alternative and simple technique for measuring insulin secretion using static incubation of isolated islets. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584553

  7. Parathyroid hormone - Secretion and metabolism in vivo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habener, J. F.; Powell, D.; Murray, T. M.; Mayer, G. P.; Potts, J. T., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Gel filtration and radioimmunoassay were used to determine the molecular size and immunochemical reactivity of parathyroid hormone present in gland extracts, in the general peripheral circulation, and in parathyroid effluent blood from patients with hyperparathyroidism, as well as from calves and from cattle. It was found that parathyroid hormone secreted from the parathyroids in man and cattle is at least as large as the molecule extracted from normal bovine glands. However, once secreted into the circulation the hormone is cleaved, and one or more fragments, immunologically, dissimilar to the originally secreted hormone, constitute the dominant form of circulating immunoreactive hormone.

  8. Graph states for quantum secret sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Damian; Sanders, Barry C.

    2008-10-01

    We consider three broad classes of quantum secret sharing with and without eavesdropping and show how a graph state formalism unifies otherwise disparate quantum secret sharing models. In addition to the elegant unification provided by graph states, our approach provides a generalization of threshold classical secret sharing via insecure quantum channels beyond the current requirement of 100% collaboration by players to just a simple majority in the case of five players. Another innovation here is the introduction of embedded protocols within a larger graph state that serves as a one-way quantum-information processing system.

  9. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  10. Cell secretion: current structural and biochemical insights.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Saurabh; Lee, Elizabeth C; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2010-10-12

    Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent) secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12 nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  11. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready. PMID:24110653

  12. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready.

  13. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  14. How to Share a Quantum Secret

    SciTech Connect

    Cleve, R.; Gottesman, D.; Lo, H.

    1999-07-01

    We investigate the concept of quantum secret sharing. In a (k,thinspn) threshold scheme, a secret quantum state is divided into n shares such that any k of those shares can be used to reconstruct the secret, but any set of k{minus}1 or fewer shares contains absolutely no information about the secret. We show that the only constraint on the existence of threshold schemes comes from the quantum {open_quotes}no-cloning theorem,{close_quotes} which requires that n{lt}2k , and we give efficient constructions of all threshold schemes. We also show that, for k{le}n{lt}2k{minus}1 , then any (k,thinspn) threshold scheme {ital must} distribute information that is globally in a mixed state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  15. Secreting Glandular Trichomes: More than Just Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Secreting glandular plant trichome types which accumulate large quantities of metabolic products in the space between their gland cell walls and cuticle permit the plant to amass secretions in a compartment that is virtually outside the plant body. These structures not only accumulate and store what are often phytotoxic oils but they position these compounds as an apparent first line of defense at the surface of the plant. Recent advances in methods for isolation and study of trichome glands have allowed more precise analysis of gland cell metabolism and enzymology. Isolation of mutants with altered trichome phenotypes provides new systems for probing the genetic basis of trichome development. These advances and their continuation can pave the way for future attempts at modification of trichome secretion. The biochemical capability of glandular secreting trichomes and the potential for its future manipulation to exploit this external storage compartment is the focus of this review. PMID:16668241

  16. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  17. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  18. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Leverrier, Anthony; Garcia-Patron, Raul

    2011-09-15

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

  19. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  20. Molecular machinery and mechanism of cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-05-01

    Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures, called porosomes, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release use a highly regulated secretory process. Similar to other fundamental cellular processes, cell secretion is precisely regulated. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nanometer resolution and in real time, and its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and the fusion of opposing bilayers, that is, the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, have also been resolved. These findings reveal, for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells.

  1. Structure of a type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Low, Harry H; Gubellini, Francesca; Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Braun, Nathalie; Connery, Sarah; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lu, Fang; Redzej, Adam; Fronzes, Rémi; Orlova, Elena V; Waksman, Gabriel

    2014-04-24

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems translocate virulence factors into eukaryotic cells, distribute genetic material between bacteria and have shown potential as a tool for the genetic modification of human cells. Given the complex choreography of the substrate through the secretion apparatus, the molecular mechanism of the type IV secretion system has proved difficult to dissect in the absence of structural data for the entire machinery. Here we use electron microscopy to reconstruct the type IV secretion system encoded by the Escherichia coli R388 conjugative plasmid. We show that eight proteins assemble in an intricate stoichiometric relationship to form an approximately 3 megadalton nanomachine that spans the entire cell envelope. The structure comprises an outer membrane-associated core complex connected by a central stalk to a substantial inner membrane complex that is dominated by a battery of 12 VirB4 ATPase subunits organized as side-by-side hexameric barrels. Our results show a secretion system with markedly different architecture, and consequently mechanism, to other known bacterial secretion systems. PMID:24670658

  2. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  3. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  4. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret... Top Secret material. The ATSCOs will be responsible for the accountability and custodianship of...

  6. Quantum Ramp Secret Sharing Scheme and Quantum Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heling; Wang, Huifeng; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of quantum secret sharing, quantum ramp secret sharing schemes were proposed (Ogawa et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032318 [2005]), which had a trade-off between security and coding efficiency. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an intermediate set, which cannot fully reconstruct the secret. This paper revisits the size of a share in the quantum ramp secret scheme based on a relation between the quantum operations and the coherent information. We also propose an optimal quantum ramp secret sharing scheme.

  7. Effects of endothelin family on ANP secretion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kuichang; Park, Byung Mun; Choi, Young Tae; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2016-08-01

    The endothelins (ET) peptide family consists of ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and sarafotoxin (s6C, a snake venom) and their actions appears to be different among isoforms. The aim of this study was to compare the secretagogue effect of ET-1 on atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion with ET-3 and evaluate its physiological meaning. Isolated nonbeating atria from male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to evaluate stretch-activated ANP secretion in response to ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and s6C. Changes in mean blood pressure (MAP) were measured during acute injection of ET-1 and ET-3 with and without natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist (A71915) in anesthetized rats. Changes in atrial volume induced by increased atrial pressure from o to 1, 2, 4, or 6cm H2O caused proportional increases in mechanically-stimulated extracellular fluid (ECF) translocation and stretch-activated ANP secretion. ET-1 (10nM) augmented basal and stretch-activated ANP secretion in terms of ECF translocation, which was blocked by the pretreatment with ETA receptor antagonist (BQ123, 1μM) but not by ETB receptor antagonist (BQ788, 1μM). ETA receptor antagonist itself suppressed stretch-activated ANP secretion. As compared to ET-1- induced ANP secretion (3.2-fold by 10nM), the secretagogue effects of ANP secretion by ET-2 was similar (2.8-fold by 10nM) and ET-3 and s6C were less potent (1.7-fold and 1.5-fold by 100nM, respectively). Acute injection of ET-1 or ET-3 increased mean blood pressure (MAP), which was augmented in the presence of natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist. Therefore, we suggest that the order of secretagogue effect of ET family on ANP secretion was ET-1≥ET-2>ET-3>s6C and ET-1-induced ANP secretion negatively regulates the pressor effect of ET-1. PMID:27208702

  8. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  9. Dynamics of protein secretion during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Muroya, Susumu; Nishimura, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    The major functions of adipocytes include both lipid storage and the production of secretory factors. However, the type of proteins released from mouse 3T3-L1 cells during adipocyte differentiation remains poorly understood. We examined the dynamics of secreted proteins during adipocyte differentiation using mass spectrometry (MS) combined with an iTRAQ (®) labeling method that enables the simultaneous analysis of relative protein expression levels. A total of 215 proteins were identified and quantified from approximately 10 000 MS/MS spectra. Of these, approximately 38% were categorized as secreted proteins based on gene ontology classification. Adipokine secretion levels were increased with the progression of differentiation. By contrast, levels of fibril collagen components, such as subunits of type I and III collagens, were decreased during differentiation. Basement membrane components attained their peak levels at day 4 when small lipid droplets accumulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Simultaneously, peak levels of collagen microfibril components that comprise type V and VI collagen subunits were also observed. Our data demonstrated that extracellular matrix components were predominantly released during the early and middle stages of adipocyte differentiation, with a subsequent increase in the secretion of adipokines. This suggests that 3T3-L1 cells secrete adipokines after their ECM is constructed during adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27516960

  10. Calcium secretion in canine tracheal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bazzaz, F.J.; Jayaram, T.

    1985-10-01

    Calcium (Ca) affects many cellular functions of the respiratory tract mucosa and might alter the viscoelastic properties of mucus. To evaluate Ca homeostasis in a respiratory epithelium we investigated transport of Ca by the canine tracheal mucosa. Mucosal tissues were mounted in Ussing-type chambers and bathed with Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C. Unidirectional fluxes of 45Ca were determined in tissues that were matched by conductance and short-circuit current (SCC). Under short-circuit conditions there was a significant net Ca secretion of 1.82 +/- 0.36 neq . cm-2 . h-1 (mean +/- SE). Under open-circuit conditions, where the spontaneous transepithelial potential difference could attract Ca toward the lumen, net Ca secretion increased significantly to 4.40 +/- 1.14 compared with 1.54 +/- 1.17 neq . cm-2 . h-1 when the preparation was short-circuited. Addition of a metabolic inhibitor, 2,4-dinitrophenol (2 mM in the mucosal bath), decreased tissue conductance and SCC and slightly decreased the unidirectional movement of Ca from submucosa to lumen. Submucosal epinephrine (10 microM) significantly enhanced Ca secretion by 2.0 +/- 0.63 neq . cm-2 . h-1. Submucosal ouabain (0.1 mM) failed to inhibit Ca secretion. The data suggest that canine tracheal mucosa secretes Ca; this secretory process is augmented by epinephrine or by the presence of a transepithelial potential difference as found under in vivo conditions.

  11. Cell secretion machinery: studies using the AFM.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    A new field in biology, 'nano-cell biology', has emerged from the successful use of force microscopy in understanding the structure and dynamics of cells and biomolecules, at nm resolution and in real time. Atomic force microscopy, in combination with conventional tools and approaches (electron microscopy, electrophysiology, X-ray diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology), has revealed for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells. Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them, dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures called Porosome, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling, and the fusion of opposing bilayers, i.e., the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, has also been resolved.

  12. Fast-weighted secret image sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sian-Jheng; Chen, Lee Shu-Teng; Lin, Ja-Chen

    2009-07-01

    Thien and Lin [Comput. and Graphics 26(5), 765-770 (2002)] proposed a threshold scheme to share a secret image among n shadows: any t of the n shadows can recover the secret, whereas t-1 or fewer shadows cannot. However, in real life, certain managers probably play key roles to run a company and thus need special authority to recover the secret in managers' meeting. (Each manager's shadow should be more powerful than an ordinary employee's shadow.) In Thien and Lin's scheme, if a company has less than t managers, then manager's meeting cannot recover the secret, unless some managers were given multiple shadows in advance. But this compromise causes managers inconvenience because too many shadows were to be kept daily and carried to the meeting. To solve this dilemma, a weighted sharing method is proposed: each of the shadows has a weight. The secret is recovered if and only if the total weights (rather than the number) of received shadows is at least t. The properties of GF(2r) are utilized to accelerate sharing speed. Besides, the method is also a more general approach to polynomial-based sharing. Moreover, for convenience, each person keeps only one shadow and only one shadow index.

  13. Biochemical Methods to Analyze Wnt Protein Secretion.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Kathrin; Boutros, Michael; Gross, Julia Christina

    2016-01-01

    Wnt proteins act as potent morphogens in various aspects of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. However, in addition to its physiological importance, aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to the onset and progression of different types of cancer. On the cellular level, the secretion of Wnt proteins involves trafficking of lipid-modified Wnts from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi and further compartments via the Wnt cargo receptor evenness interrupted. Others and we have recently shown that Wnt proteins are secreted on extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as microvesicles and exosomes. Although more details about specific regulation of Wnt secretion steps are emerging, it remains largely unknown how Wnt proteins are channeled into different release pathways such as lipoprotein particles, EVs and cytonemes. Here, we describe protocols to purify and quantify Wnts from the supernatant of cells by either assessing total Wnt proteins in the supernatant or monitoring Wnt proteins on EVs. Purified Wnts from the supernatant as well as total cellular protein content can be investigated by immunoblotting. Additionally, the relative activity of canonical Wnts in the supernatant can be assessed by a dual-luciferase Wnt reporter assay. Quantifying the amount of secreted Wnt proteins and their activity in the supernatant of cells allows the investigation of intracellular trafficking events that regulate Wnt secretion and the role of extracellular modulators of Wnt spreading. PMID:27590148

  14. Targeted Secretion Inhibitors—Innovative Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Keith; Chaddock, John

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are highly effective therapeutic products. Their therapeutic success results from highly specific and potent inhibition of neurotransmitter release with a duration of action measured in months. These same properties, however, make the botulinum neurotoxins the most potent acute lethal toxins known. Their toxicity and restricted target cell activity severely limits their clinical utility. Understanding the structure-function relationship of the neurotoxins has enabled the development of recombinant proteins selectively incorporating specific aspects of their pharmacology. The resulting proteins are not neurotoxins, but a new class of biopharmaceuticals, Targeted Secretion Inhibitors (TSI), suitable for the treatment of a wide range of diseases where secretion plays a major role. TSI proteins inhibit secretion for a prolonged period following a single application, making them particularly suited to the treatment of chronic diseases. A TSI for the treatment of chronic pain is in clinical development. PMID:22069575

  15. Essential secret image sharing with increasable shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shang-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Li et al. and Yang et al. proposed (t,s,k,n)-essential secret image sharing methods to share a secret image into essential shadows and nonessential shadows. However, if the shadows have been distributed to the holders and extra shadows are required, the processes of regenerating and retransmitting shadows are necessary. In the proposed method, when receiving t essential shadows and k-t nonessential shadows, the total size of the adopted shadow is the same as the size of the secret image. Most importantly, the proposed method achieves less size of total required shadows (when using the minimal essential shadows) than what was proposed by Li et al. and achieves less size of essential shadow than the method contended by Yang et al. Moreover, we can have the additional shadows relate to other existing shadows without regenerating.

  16. A light-triggered protein secretion system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daniel; Gibson, Emily S; Kennedy, Matthew J

    2013-05-13

    Optical control of protein interactions has emerged as a powerful experimental paradigm for manipulating and studying various cellular processes. Tools are now available for controlling a number of cellular functions, but some fundamental processes, such as protein secretion, have been difficult to engineer using current optical tools. Here we use UVR8, a plant photoreceptor protein that forms photolabile homodimers, to engineer the first light-triggered protein secretion system. UVR8 fusion proteins were conditionally sequestered in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a brief pulse of light triggered robust forward trafficking through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane. UVR8 was not responsive to excitation light used to image cyan, green, or red fluorescent protein variants, allowing multicolor visualization of cellular markers and secreted protein cargo as it traverses the cellular secretory pathway. We implemented this novel tool in neurons to demonstrate restricted, local trafficking of secretory cargo near dendritic branch points.

  17. Type III secretion systems and pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, C; Hart, C A

    2001-02-01

    Some bacterial pathogens have evolved by acquiring pathogenicity islands (PIs), which are clusters of genes encoding virulence traits. PIs encoding the secretion of effector molecules via type III secretion (TTS) systems have been discovered in several gram-negative pathogens. TTS systems are involved in contact-dependent secretion of virulence factors and can facilitate delivery of toxins directly into target cells. The expanding list of bacteria found to contain clusters of TTS genes includes members of the genera Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Bordetella, Burkholderia, Chlamydia and a number of plant pathogens or symbionts. This review discusses the current knowledge of the role of TTS PIs in pathogenicity, the genetic organisation and evolution of such systems,and the potential for using TTS systems as targets for novel treatments.

  18. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    PubMed

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored. PMID:21500624

  19. Milk lipid secretion: recent biomolecular aspects

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Neonates of most species depend on milk lipids for calories, fat-soluble vitamins, and bioactive lipid components for growth and development during the postnatal period. To meet neonatal nutrition and development needs, the mammary gland has evolved efficient mechanisms for synthesizing and secreting large quantities of lipid during lactation. Although the biochemical steps involved in milk lipid synthesis are understood, the identities of the genes mediating these steps and the molecular physiology of milk lipid production and secretion have only recently begun to be understood in detail through advances in mouse genetics, gene expression analysis, protein structural properties, and the cell biology of lipid metabolism. This review discusses emerging data about the molecular, cellular, and structural determinants of milk lipid synthesis and secretion within the context of physiological functions. PMID:24605173

  20. Control of prolactin secretion in mammals.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J A; Shaar, C J

    1980-06-01

    Evidence describing the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin secretion in mammals is reviewed, with focus on catecholamines, serotonin, and polypeptides. Dopamine may be a physiological prolactin inhibiting factor (PIF), while norepinephrine and possibly epinephrine regulate prolactin release at the level of the hypothalamus. Serotonin may participate in the regulation of prolactin secretion by stimulating the release of prolactin releasing factor (PRF). The identity of PRF is not known, but two polypeptides--thyrotropin releasing hormone and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide--can act directly on the adenohypophysis to stimulate prolactin release.

  1. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  2. THE VERSATILE BACTERIAL TYPE IV SECRETION SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Cascales, Eric; Christie, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use type IV secretion systems for two fundamental objectives related to pathogenesis — genetic exchange and the delivery of effector molecules to eukaryotic target cells. Whereas gene acquisition is an important adaptive mechanism that enables pathogens to cope with a changing environment during invasion of the host, interactions between effector and host molecules can suppress defence mechanisms, facilitate intracellular growth and even induce the synthesis of nutrients that are beneficial to bacterial colonization. Rapid progress has been made towards defining the structures and functions of type IV secretion machines, identifying the effector molecules, and elucidating the mechanisms by which the translocated effectors subvert eukaryotic cellular processes during infection. PMID:15035043

  3. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  4. The Best Kept Secret in Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvino, James

    2004-01-01

    It is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in educating gifted high school youth, and yet for 45 years, Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) has been going strong, "Motivating Tomorrow's Leaders Today." After spending nine inspirational days in 1958 with Albert Schweitzer (Nobel Prize physician and philosopher) at his clinic in the African jungle,…

  5. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with (3H)choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day.

  6. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  7. The Best-Kept Secret in Town

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he has toured many impressive schools over the years and has heard one familiar statement that amazes him: "We are the best-kept secret in town." How can a school exist for any significant period of time and be virtually unknown to the community it serves? The truth is that if one considers his school to…

  8. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    PubMed

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  9. Pharmacological regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, E F

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the key endocrine factor regulating systemic Ca(2+) homeostasis. Elevated levels of circulating PTH increase bone turnover and, depending on the duration of elevation, will result in net anabolic or catabolic effects on the skeleton. Secretion of PTH from the parathyroid glands is regulated by small changes in circulating levels of Ca(2+) which are detected by a Ca(2+) receptor on the surface of parathyroid cells. This G protein-coupled receptor is the primary molecular entity used by parathyroid cells to regulate secretion of PTH. As such, the Ca(2+) receptor is a unique molecular target for new drugs capable of increasing or decreasing circulating levels of PTH. Compounds which activate the Ca(2+) receptor are termed calcimimetics and they inhibit the secretion of PTH; a calcimimetic compound is in late stage clinical trials for the treatment of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Conversely, calcilytic compounds, which are Ca(2+) receptor antagonists, stimulate secretion of PTH; a calcilytic compound is in early clinical development for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:12171519

  10. Secrets of Mlearning Failures: Confronting Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Having implemented and evaluated over 35 mlearning projects in a variety of contexts in higher education over the past 6 years the researcher is ready to share the untold secret: not all mlearning projects succeed! This article critiques three of the researcher's mlearning projects that can be classed as "failures" and compares them to successful…

  11. 29 CFR 1903.9 - Trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concerns or relates to the trade secrets, processes, operations, style of work, or apparatus, or to the... thereof or any book containing any abstract or particulars thereof to be seen or examined by any person..., the Compliance Safety and Health Officer shall consult with a reasonable number of employees who...

  12. Eccrine sweat gland development and sweat secretion.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Yi; Schlessinger, David

    2015-09-01

    Eccrine sweat glands help to maintain homoeostasis, primarily by stabilizing body temperature. Derived from embryonic ectoderm, millions of eccrine glands are distributed across human skin and secrete litres of sweat per day. Their easy accessibility has facilitated the start of analyses of their development and function. Mouse genetic models find sweat gland development regulated sequentially by Wnt, Eda and Shh pathways, although precise subpathways and additional regulators require further elucidation. Mature glands have two secretory cell types, clear and dark cells, whose comparative development and functional interactions remain largely unknown. Clear cells have long been known as the major secretory cells, but recent studies suggest that dark cells are also indispensable for sweat secretion. Dark cell-specific Foxa1 expression was shown to regulate a Ca(2+) -dependent Best2 anion channel that is the candidate driver for the required ion currents. Overall, it was shown that cholinergic impulses trigger sweat secretion in mature glands through second messengers - for example InsP3 and Ca(2+) - and downstream ion channels/transporters in the framework of a Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter model. Notably, the microenvironment surrounding secretory cells, including acid-base balance, was implicated to be important for proper sweat secretion, which requires further clarification. Furthermore, multiple ion channels have been shown to be expressed in clear and dark cells, but the degree to which various ion channels function redundantly or indispensably also remains to be determined.

  13. Kinins as mediators of intestinal secretion.

    PubMed

    Gaginella, T S; Kachur, J F

    1989-01-01

    Kinins are small peptides that have diverse biological actions. Concentrations of kinins in the nanomolar or subnanomolar range induce intestinal smooth muscle contraction and evoke mucosal electrolyte secretion. Hyperkininemia is associated with effects on gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Bradykinin and kallidin are the predominant kinins with effects on the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Bradykinin stimulates chloride ion secretion by the guinea pig and rabbit ileum, rabbit colon, rat colon and monolayers of human HCA-7 cells. Kinins directly or indirectly stimulate phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. Cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (e.g., fibroblasts, mast cells, leukocytes), by liberating cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the kinin response; direct effects on epithelial cells cannot be ruled out, however. Antagonists now exist for kinin receptors. Based on studies with these antagonists in smooth muscle preparations, two subgroups of kinin receptor have been identified. The B2-type receptor appears to be responsible for both the contraction of ileal muscle and ileal secretion. Kinins are probably more important as pathophysiological rather than as physiological mediators. They may amplify the effect of inflammatory products that induce intestinal secretion. The precise involvement of kinins in clinical mucosal secretory states and diarrhea will require quantitative assessment of their levels during each phase of mucosal inflammation. Additional studies on the mechanism of action of kinins will be essential in designing therapy to mitigate the symptoms associated with mucosal inflammation.

  14. Proprotein Convertases Process Pmel17 during Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that traffics to melanosomes where it forms a fibrillar matrix on which melanin gets deposited. Before being cleaved into smaller fibrillogenic fragments the protein undergoes processing by proprotein convertases, a class of serine proteases that typically recognize the canonical motif RX(R/K)R↓. The current model of Pmel17 maturation states that this processing step occurs in melanosomes, but in light of recent reports this issue has become controversial. We therefore addressed this question by thoroughly assessing the processing kinetics of either wild-type Pmel17 or a secreted soluble Pmel17 derivative. Our results demonstrate clearly that processing of Pmel17 occurs during secretion and that it does not require entry of the protein into the endocytic system. Strikingly, processing proceeds even in the presence of the secretion inhibitor monensin, suggesting that Pmel17 is an exceptionally good substrate. In line with this, we find that newly synthesized surface Pmel17 is already quantitatively cleaved. Moreover, we demonstrate that Pmel17 function is independent of the sequence identity of its unconventional proprotein convertase-cleavage motif that lacks arginine in P4 position. The data alter the current view of Pmel17 maturation and suggest that the multistep processing of Pmel17 begins with an early cleavage during secretion that primes the protein for later functional processing. PMID:21247888

  15. Identification of Glycosaminoglycans in Human Airway Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Maria E.; Casalino-Matsuda, Susana M.; Forteza, Rosanna M.

    2006-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), known to be present in airway mucus, are macromolecules with a variety of structural and biological functions. In the present work, we used fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) to identify and relatively quantify GAGs in human tracheal aspirates (HTA) obtained from healthy volunteers. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and submucosal gland (SMG) cells were used to assess their differential contribution to GAGs in mucus. Distribution was further assessed by immunofluorescence in human trachea tissue sections and in cell cultures. HTA samples contained keratan sulfate (KS), chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS), and hyaluronan (HA), whereas heparan sulfate (HS) was not detected. SMG cultures secreted CS/DS and HA, CS/DS being the most abundant GAGs in these cultures. NHBE cells synthesized KS, HA, and CS/DS. Confocal microscopy showed that KS was exclusively found at the apical border of NHBE cells and on the apical surface of ciliated epithelial cells in tracheal tissues. CS/DS and HA were present in both NHBE and SMG cells. HS was only found in the extracellular matrix in trachea tissue sections. In summary, HTA samples contain KS, CS/DS, and HA, mirroring a mixture of secretions originated in surface epithelial cells and SMGs. We conclude that surface epithelium is responsible for most HA and all KS present in secretions, whereas glands secrete most of CS/DS. These data suggest that, in diseases where the contribution to secretions of glands versus epithelial cells is altered, the relative concentration of individual GAGs, and therefore their biological activities, will also be affected. PMID:16195536

  16. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  17. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2.

    PubMed

    Ho, Melissa E; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-03-29

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  19. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  20. SecReT4: a web-based bacterial type IV secretion system resource

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Dexi; Liu, Linmeng; Tai, Cui; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    SecReT4 (http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/SecReT4/) is an integrated database providing comprehensive information of type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) in bacteria. T4SSs are versatile assemblages that promote genetic exchange and/or effector translocation with consequent impacts on pathogenesis and genome plasticity. T4SSs have been implicated in conjugation, DNA uptake and release and effector translocation. The effectors injected into eukaryotic target cells can lead to alteration of host cellular processes during infection. SecReT4 offers a unique, highly organized, readily exploreable archive of known and putative T4SSs and cognate effectors in bacteria. It currently contains details of 10 752 core components mapping to 808 T4SSs and 1884 T4SS effectors found in representatives of 289 bacterial species, as well as a collection of more than 900 directly related references. A broad range of similarity search, sequence alignment, phylogenetic, primer design and other functional analysis tools are readily accessible via SecReT4. We propose that SecReT4 will facilitate efficient investigation of large numbers of these systems, recognition of diverse patterns of sequence-, gene- and/or functional conservation and an improved understanding of the biological roles and significance of these versatile molecular machines. SecReT4 will be regularly updated to ensure its ongoing maximum utility to the research community. PMID:23193298

  1. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  2. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  3. Thermal requirements of Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778) (Acari: Dermanyssidae).

    PubMed

    Tucci, Edna Clara; do Prado, Angelo P; de Araújo, Raquel Pires

    2008-01-01

    The thermal requirements for development of Dermanyssus gallinae were studied under laboratory conditions at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 degrees C, a 12h photoperiod and 60-85% RH. The thermal requirements for D. gallinae were as follows. Preoviposition: base temperature 3.4 degrees C, thermal constant (k) 562.85 degree-hours, determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.59, regression equation: Y= -0.006035 + 0.001777x. Egg: base temperature 10.60 degrees C, thermal constant (k) 689.65 degree-hours, determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.94, regression equation: Y= -0.015367 + 0.001450x. Larva: base temperature 9.82 degrees C, thermal constant (k) 464.91 degree-hours, determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.87, regression equation: Y= -0.021123 + 0.002151x. Protonymph: base temperature 10.17 degrees C, thermal constant (k) 504.49 degree-hours, determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.90, regression equation: Y= -0.020152 + 0.001982x. Deutonymph: base temperature 11.80 degrees C, thermal constant (k) 501.11 degree-hours, determination coefficient (R(2)) 0.99, regression equation: Y= -0.023555 + 0.001996x. The results obtained showed that 15 to 42 generations of Dermanyssus gallinae may occur during the year in the State of São Paulo, as estimated based on isotherm charts. Dermanyssus gallinae may develop continually in the State of São Paulo, with a population decrease in the winter. There were differences between the developmental stages of D. gallinae in relation to thermal requirements.

  4. Sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that hormone secretion from endocrine glands is regulated by hierarchical feedback mechanisms. However, although Cannon revealed in the 1920s that sympathoadrenal medullary function increased during emergency situations, no studies on the autonomic nervous regulation of hormone secretion have been undertaken for many years. In the past 40 years, the autonomic nervous regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreas, gastrin secretion from the stomach, glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex, etc., has been demonstrated. Estradiol secretion from the ovary is strongly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and its possible regulation by autonomic nerves has been largely unnoticed. Some histological studies have revealed rich adrenergic sympathetic innervation in the ovary. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the activation of the sympathetic nerves to the ovary directly reduces estradiol secretion from the ovary. This article reviews physiological and morphological studies, primarily in rats, on the sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  6. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Sang-Jik; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Yeam, Inhwa; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. • A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. • The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. • Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  7. Extracellular RNAs: A Secret Arm of Immune System Regulation.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect multicellular organisms from the attack of a variety of pathogens. To exert this function efficiently, the system has developed the capacity to coordinate the function of different cell types and the ability to down-modulate the response when the foreign attack is over. For decades, immunologists believed that these two characteristics were primarily related to cytokine/chemokine-based communication and cell-to-cell direct contact. More recently, it has been shown that immune cells also communicate by transferring regulatory RNAs, microRNAs in particular, from one cell to the other. Several studies have suggested a functional role of extracellular regulatory RNAs in cell-to-cell communication in different cellular contexts. This minireview focuses on the potential role of extracellular RNA transfer in the regulation of adaptive immune response, also contextualizing it in a broader field of what is known of cell-free RNAs in communication among different organisms in the evolutionary scale.

  8. Trade secrets in life science and pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M; Cai, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through "improper means" is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today's interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees' careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft. PMID:25414378

  9. Hoopoes color their eggs with antimicrobial uropygial secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Juan J.; Martín-Vivaldi, M.; Peralta-Sánchez, J. M.; Arco, L.; Juárez-García-Pelayo, N.

    2014-09-01

    Uropygial gland secretions are used as cosmetics by some species of birds to color and enhance properties of feathers and teguments, which may signal individual quality. Uropygial secretions also reach eggshells during incubation and, therefore, may influence the coloration of birds' eggs, a trait that has attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists for more than one century. The color of hoopoe eggs typically changes along incubation, from bluish-gray to greenish-brown. Here, we test experimentally the hypothesis that dark uropygial secretion of females is responsible for such drastic color change. Moreover, since uropygial secretion of hoopoes has antimicrobial properties, we also explore the association between color and antimicrobial activity of the uropygial secretion of females. We found that eggs stayed bluish-gray in nests where female access to the uropygial secretion was experimentally blocked. Furthermore, experimental eggs that were maintained in incubators and manually smeared with uropygial secretion experienced similar color changes that naturally incubated eggs did, while control eggs that were not in contact with the secretions did not experience such color changes. All these results strongly support the hypothesis that female hoopoes use their uropygial gland secretion to color the eggs. Moreover, saturation of the uropygial secretion was associated with antimicrobial activity against Bacillus licheniformis. Given the known antimicrobial potential of uropygial secretions of birds, this finding opens the possibility that in scenarios of sexual selection, hoopoes in particular and birds in general signal antimicrobial properties of their uropygial secretion by mean of changes in egg coloration along incubation.

  10. Information Theoretic Secret Key Generation: Structured Codes and Tree Packing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitinawarat, Sirin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation deals with a multiterminal source model for secret key generation by multiple network terminals with prior and privileged access to a set of correlated signals complemented by public discussion among themselves. Emphasis is placed on a characterization of secret key capacity, i.e., the largest rate of an achievable secret key,…

  11. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  12. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  13. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  14. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  15. 10 CFR 1016.34 - Accountability for Secret Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. 1016.34 Section... Information § 1016.34 Accountability for Secret Restricted Data. Each permittee possessing documents containing Secret Restricted Data shall establish a document accountability procedure and shall...

  16. Trade secrets in life science and pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Nealey, Tara; Daignault, Ronald M; Cai, Yu

    2014-11-20

    Trade secret protection arises under state common law and state statutes. In general, a trade secret is information that is not generally known to the public and is maintained as a secret, and it provides a competitive advantage or economic benefit to the trade secret holder. Trade secrets can be worth tens or hundreds of millions of dollars, and damage awards in trade secret litigation have been high; often, there is a lot at stake. Obtaining a trade secret through "improper means" is misappropriation. If the alleged trade secret, however, was developed independently, known publicly, or not maintained as a secret, then those defenses may successfully overcome a claim for trade secret misappropriation. With today's interconnectedness in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields, more collaborations, joint ventures, and outsourcing arrangements among firms, and increased mobility of employees' careers, life science companies need to not only understand how to protect their trade secrets, but also know how to defend against a claim for trade secret theft.

  17. Hedgehog Secretion and Signal Transduction in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kaitlyn E.; Chiang, Chin

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins is essential for proper embryonic patterning and development. Dysregulation of Hh signaling is associated with a variety of human diseases ranging from developmental disorders such as holoprosencephaly to certain forms of cancer, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. Genetic studies in flies and mice have shaped our understanding of Hh signaling and revealed that nearly all core components of the pathway are highly conserved. Although many aspects of the Drosophila Hh pathway are conserved in vertebrates, mechanistic differences between the two species have begun to emerge. Perhaps the most striking divergence in vertebrate Hh signaling is its dependence on the primary cilium, a vestigial organelle that is largely absent in flies. This minireview will provide an overview of Hh signaling and present recent insights into vertebrate Hh secretion, receptor binding, and signal transduction. PMID:22474285

  18. Active Wnt proteins are secreted on exosomes.

    PubMed

    Gross, Julia Christina; Chaudhary, Varun; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Wnt signalling has important roles during development and in many diseases. As morphogens, hydrophobic Wnt proteins exert their function over a distance to induce patterning and cell differentiation decisions. Recent studies have identified several factors that are required for the secretion of Wnt proteins; however, how Wnts travel in the extracellular space remains a largely unresolved question. Here we show that Wnts are secreted on exosomes both during Drosophila development and in human cells. We demonstrate that exosomes carry Wnts on their surface to induce Wnt signalling activity in target cells. Together with the cargo receptor Evi/WIs, Wnts are transported through endosomal compartments onto exosomes, a process that requires the R-SNARE Ykt6. Our study demonstrates an evolutionarily conserved functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of Wnt proteins.

  19. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators - stored in granules - as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Schistosoma mansoni Egg Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Califf, Lindsay L.; Xu, Tao; Hernandez, Hector J.; Stadecker, Miguel J.; Yates, John R.; Williams, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a largely neglected, global health problem. The morbid pathology of the disease stems from the host's inflammatory response to parasite eggs trapped in host tissues. Long term host/parasite survival is dependent upon the successful modulation of the acute pathological response, which is induced by egg antigens. In this study, using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology, we identified the Schistosoma mansoni egg secretome consisting of 188 proteins. Notably we identified proteins involved in redox balance, molecular chaperoning and protein folding, development and signaling, scavenging and metabolic pathways, immune response modulation, and 32 novel, previously uncharacterized schistosome proteins. We localized a subset of previously-characterized schistosome proteins identified in egg secretions in this study, to the surface of live S. mansoni eggs using the circumoval precipitin reaction. The identification of proteins actively secreted by live schistosome eggs provides important new information for understanding immune modulation and the pathology of schistosomiasis. PMID:17644200

  1. Regulation of renal potassium secretion: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Welling, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    A new understanding of renal potassium balance has emerged as the molecular underpinnings of potassium secretion have become illuminated, highlighting the key roles of apical potassium channels, renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) and Big Potassium (BK), in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron and collecting duct. These channels act as the final-regulated components of the renal potassium secretory machinery. Their activity, number, and driving forces are precisely modulated to ensure potassium excretion matches dietary potassium intake. Recent identification of the underlying regulatory mechanisms at the molecular level provides a new appreciation of the physiology and reveals a molecular insight to explain the paradoxic actions of aldosterone on potassium secretion. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field.

  2. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with {sup 3}H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers.

  3. [The symbolic power of bodily secretions].

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2002-01-10

    Are ethical and political questions discussed more in aesthetic than in social terms? Political debates in contemporary art are often expressed through the use of symbolic power structures that are related to bodily secretions and products. By visualizing the less delicate parts of the organic body, contemporary artists focus on the vulnerability of the human body and its illness and pain. If human suffering is aestheticized: is this a question of form or a question of creating a cultural cover-up? Bodily secretions are associated with a range of complex social and cultural meanings and symbols. Metaphors related to body products may function as markers of ethnic, religious, social and sexual differences. In postmodern cultural criticism, the symbolic power of body metaphors is of great importance.

  4. The SNARE Machinery in Mast Cell Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Axel; Baumann, Anja; Vitte, Joana; Blank, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNARE) proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, secretory carrier membrane proteins, complexins, or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion. PMID:22679448

  5. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  6. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  7. Floral and vegetative cues in oil-secreting and non-oil-secreting Lysimachia species

    PubMed Central

    Schäffler, I.; Balao, F.; Dötterl, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Unrelated plants pollinated by the same group or guild of animals typically evolve similar floral cues due to pollinator-mediated selection. Related plant species, however, may possess similar cues either as a result of pollinator-mediated selection or as a result of sharing a common ancestor that possessed the same cues or traits. In this study, visual and olfactory floral cues in Lysimachia species exhibiting different pollination strategies were analysed and compared, and the importance of pollinators and phylogeny on the evolution of these floral cues was determined. For comparison, cues of vegetative material were examined where pollinator selection would not be expected. Methods Floral and vegetative scents and colours in floral oil- and non-floral oil-secreting Lysimachia species were studied by chemical and spectrophotometric analyses, respectively, compared between oil- and non-oil-secreting species, and analysed by phylogenetically controlled methods. Key Results Vegetative and floral scent was species specific, and variability in floral but not vegetative scent was lower in oil compared with non-oil species. Overall, oil species did not differ in their floral or vegetative scent from non-oil species. However, a correlation was found between oil secretion and six floral scent constituents specific to oil species, whereas the presence of four other floral compounds can be explained by phylogeny. Four of the five analysed oil species had bee-green flowers and the pattern of occurrence of this colour correlated with oil secretion. Non-oil species had different floral colours. The colour of leaves was similar among all species studied. Conclusions Evidence was found for correlated evolution between secretion of floral oils and floral but not vegetative visual and olfactory cues. The cues correlating with oil secretion were probably selected by Macropis bees, the specialized pollinators of oil-secreting Lysimachia species, and may have

  8. Type II secretion and Legionella virulence.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Type II secretion (T2S) is one of six systems that can occur in Gram-negative bacteria for the purpose of secreting proteins into the extracellular milieu and/or into host cells. This chapter will describe the T2S system of Legionella pneumophila. Topics to be covered include the genetic basis of T2S in L. pneumophila, the numbers (>25), types, and novelties of Legionella proteins that are secreted via T2S, and the many ways in which T2S and its substrates promote L. pneumophila physiology, ecology, and virulence. Within the aquatic environment, T2S plays a major role in L. pneumophila intracellular infection of multiple types of (Acanthamoeba, Hartmannella, and Naegleria) amoebae. Within the mammalian host, T2S promotes bacterial persistence in lungs, intracellular infection of both macrophages and epithelial cells, and a dampening of the host innate immune response. In this context, T2S may represent a potential target for both industrial and biomedical application. PMID:23900831

  9. Preconditioning stimuli that augment chromaffin cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Laura; García-Eguiagaray, Josefina; García, Antonio G; Gandía, Luis

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated here whether a preconditioned stimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors augmented the catecholamine release responses elicited by supramaximal 3-s pulses of 100 muM acetylcholine (100ACh) or 100 mM K(+) (100K(+)) applied to fast-perifused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Threshold concentrations of nicotine (1-3 muM) that caused only a tiny secretion did, however, augment the responses elicited by 100ACh or 100K(+) by 2- to 3.5-fold. This effect was suppressed by mecamylamine and by Ca(2+) deprivation, was developed with a half-time (t(1/2)) of 1 min, and was reversible. The nicotine effect was mimicked by threshold concentrations of ACh, choline, epibatidine, and oxotremorine-M but not by methacholine. Threshold concentrations of K(+) caused lesser potentiation of secretion compared with that of threshold nicotine. The data are compatible with an hypothesis implying 1) that continuous low-frequency sympathetic discharge places chromaffin cells at the adrenal gland in a permanent "hypersensitive" state; and 2) this allows an explosive secretion of catecholamines by high-frequency sympathetic discharge during stress.

  10. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-15

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors. PMID:27472103

  11. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors.

  12. A Trade Secret Model for Genomic Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Conley, John M.; Kenan, William Rand; Mitchell, Robert; Cadigan, R. Jean; Davis, Arlene M.; Dobson, Allison W.; Gladden, Ryan Q.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic biobanks present ethical challenges that are qualitatively unique and quantitatively unprecedented. Many critics have questioned whether the current system of informed consent can be meaningfully applied to genomic biobanking. Proposals for reform have come from many directions, but have tended to involve incremental change in current informed consent practice. This paper reports on our efforts to seek new ideas and approaches from those whom informed consent is designed to protect: research subjects. Our model emerged from semi-structured interviews with healthy volunteers who had been recruited to join either of two biobanks (some joined, some did not), and whom we encouraged to explain their concerns and how they understood the relationship between specimen contributors and biobanks. These subjects spoke about their DNA and the information it contains in ways that were strikingly evocative of the legal concept of the trade secret. They then described the terms and conditions under which they might let others study their DNA, and there was a compelling analogy to the commonplace practice of trade secret licensing. We propose a novel biobanking model based on this trade secret concept, and argue that it would be a practical, legal, and ethical improvement on the status quo. PMID:23061589

  13. Secret Sharing of a Quantum State.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Luo-Kan; Li, Zheng-Da; Liu, Chang; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-07-15

    Secret sharing of a quantum state, or quantum secret sharing, in which a dealer wants to share a certain amount of quantum information with a few players, has wide applications in quantum information. The critical criterion in a threshold secret sharing scheme is confidentiality: with less than the designated number of players, no information can be recovered. Furthermore, in a quantum scenario, one additional critical criterion exists: the capability of sharing entangled and unknown quantum information. Here, by employing a six-photon entangled state, we demonstrate a quantum threshold scheme, where the shared quantum secrecy can be efficiently reconstructed with a state fidelity as high as 93%. By observing that any one or two parties cannot recover the secrecy, we show that our scheme meets the confidentiality criterion. Meanwhile, we also demonstrate that entangled quantum information can be shared and recovered via our setting, which shows that our implemented scheme is fully quantum. Moreover, our experimental setup can be treated as a decoding circuit of the five-qubit quantum error-correcting code with two erasure errors.

  14. Activated microglia enhance neurogenesis via trypsinogen secretion.

    PubMed

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Dutta, Ranjan; Chen, Zhihong; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2013-05-21

    White matter neurons in multiple sclerosis brains are destroyed during demyelination and then replaced in some chronic multiple sclerosis lesions that exhibit a morphologically distinct population of activated microglia [Chang A, et al. (2008) Brain 131(Pt 9):2366-2375]. Here we investigated whether activated microglia secrete factors that promote the generation of neurons from white matter cells. Adult rat brain microglia (resting or activated with lipopolysaccharide) were isolated by flow cytometry and cocultured with neonatal rat optic nerve cells in separate but media-connected chambers. Optic nerve cells cocultured with activated microglia showed a significant increase in the number of cells of neuronal phenotype, identified by neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin (TUJ-1) labeling, compared with cultures with resting microglia. To investigate the possible source of the TUJ-1-positive cells, A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and A2B5-negative cells were isolated and cocultured with resting and activated microglia. Significantly more TUJ-1-positive cells were generated from A2B5-negative cells (∼70%) than from A2B5-positive cells (~30%). Mass spectrometry analysis of microglia culture media identified protease serine 2 (PRSS2) as a factor secreted by activated, but not resting, microglia. When added to optic nerve cultures, PRSS2 significantly increased neurogenesis, whereas the serine protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, decreased activated microglia-induced neurogenesis. Collectively our data provide evidence that activated microglia increase neurogenesis through secretion of PRSS2.

  15. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells. PMID:27665549

  16. Catechin secretion and phytotoxicity: Fact not fiction.

    PubMed

    Bais, Harsh P; Kaushik, Shail

    2010-09-01

    Research indicates that the invasiveness of Centaurea stoebe is attributed to the stronger allelopathic effects on the native North American species than on the related European species, which is one of the unquestionable aspects of the "novel weapons hypothesis (NWH)." Studies originating from controlled to field conditions have shown that C. stoebe utilizes its biochemical potential to exert its invasiveness. The roots of C. stoebe secrete a potent phytotoxin, catechin, which has a detrimental effect on the surrounding plant species. Although, studies on catechin secretion and phytotoxicity represent one of the most well studied systems describing negative plant-plant interactions, it has also sparked controversies lately due to its phytotoxicity dosages and secretion effluxes. Previous reports negate the phytotoxic and pro-oxidant nature of catechin.1-3 In our recent study we have shown that catechin is highly phytotoxic against Arabidopsis thaliana and Festuca idahoensis. We also show that (±) catechin applied to roots of A. thaliana induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) confirming the pro-oxidant nature of catechin. In addition, activation of signature cell death genes such as acd2 and cad1 post catechin treatment in A. thaliana ascertains the phytotoxic nature of catechin.

  17. Adopting Frank Warren's PostSecret Art Project to Illustrate the Role of Secrets in Interpersonal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxman, Christina G.

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of secrets summons the adage that ''what someone doesn't know won't hurt them.'' While this phrase implies that keeping secrets can be advantageous, it also foreshadows another consideration: secrets have the propensity to hurt others (Caughlin, Scott, Miller, & Hefner, 2009). Despite this, the act…

  18. Verifiable Quantum ( k, n)-threshold Secret Key Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Teng, Yi-Wei; Chai, Hai-Ping; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2011-03-01

    Based on Lagrange interpolation formula and the post-verification mechanism, we show how to construct a verifiable quantum ( k, n) threshold secret key sharing scheme. Compared with the previous secret sharing protocols, ours has the merits: (i) it can resist the fraud of the dealer who generates and distributes fake shares among the participants during the secret distribution phase; Most importantly, (ii) It can check the cheating of the dishonest participant who provides a false share during the secret reconstruction phase such that the authorized group cannot recover the correct secret.

  19. In vivo quantification of the secretion rates of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Michael H H; Beer, Tobias; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria secrete a broad range of substrates into the extracellular space. Common to all substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence and nonapeptide repeats in the C-terminal part that bind Ca(2+) in the extracellular space, to trigger protein folding. Like all T1SS, the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli consists of an ABC transporter, a membrane fusion protein and an outer membrane protein allowing the one step translocation of the substrate across both membranes. Here, we analyzed the secretion rate of the HlyA T1SS. Our results demonstrate that the rate is independent of substrate-size and operates at a speed of approximately 16 amino acids per transporter per second. We also demonstrate that the rate is independent of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration raising the question of the driving force of substrate secretion by T1SS in general. PMID:27616645

  20. In vivo quantification of the secretion rates of the hemolysin A Type I secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, Michael H. H.; Beer, Tobias; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) of Gram-negative bacteria secrete a broad range of substrates into the extracellular space. Common to all substrates is a C-terminal secretion sequence and nonapeptide repeats in the C-terminal part that bind Ca2+ in the extracellular space, to trigger protein folding. Like all T1SS, the hemolysin A (HlyA) T1SS of Escherichia coli consists of an ABC transporter, a membrane fusion protein and an outer membrane protein allowing the one step translocation of the substrate across both membranes. Here, we analyzed the secretion rate of the HlyA T1SS. Our results demonstrate that the rate is independent of substrate-size and operates at a speed of approximately 16 amino acids per transporter per second. We also demonstrate that the rate is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration raising the question of the driving force of substrate secretion by T1SS in general. PMID:27616645

  1. The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion.

    PubMed

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Boland, Wilhelm; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Plants produce nectar in their flowers as a reward for their pollinators and most of our crops depend on insect pollination, but little is known on the physiological control of nectar secretion. Jasmonates are well-known for their effects on senescence, the development and opening of flowers and on plant defences such as extrafloral nectar. Their role in floral nectar secretion has, however, not been explored so far. We investigated whether jasmonates have an influence on floral nectar secretion in oil-seed rape, Brassica napus. The floral tissues of this plant produced jasmonic acid (JA) endogenously, and JA concentrations peaked shortly before nectar secretion was highest. Exogenous application of JA to flowers induced nectar secretion, which was suppressed by treatment with phenidone, an inhibitor of JA synthesis. This effect could be reversed by additional application of JA. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine and its structural mimic coronalon also increased nectar secretion. Herbivory or addition of JA to the leaves did not have an effect on floral nectar secretion, demonstrating a functional separation of systemic defence signalling from reproductive nectar secretion. Jasmonates, which have been intensively studied in the context of herbivore defences and flower development, have a profound effect on floral nectar secretion and, thus, pollination efficiency in B. napus. Our results link floral nectar secretion to jasmonate signalling and thereby integrate the floral nectar secretion into the complex network of oxylipid-mediated developmental processes of plants. PMID:20174464

  2. Mechanisms of bicarbonate secretion: lessons from the airways.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Early studies showed that airway cells secrete HCO(3)(-) in response to cAMP-mediated agonists and HCO(3)(-) secretion was impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF). Studies with Calu-3 cells, an airway serous model with high expression of CFTR, also show the secretion of HCO(3)(-) when cells are stimulated with cAMP-mediated agonists. Activation of basolateral membrane hIK-1 K(+) channels inhibits HCO(3)(-) secretion and stimulates Cl(-) secretion. CFTR mediates the exit of both HCO(3)(-) and Cl(-) across the apical membrane. Entry of HCO(3)(-) on a basolateral membrane NBC or Cl(-) on the NKCC determines which anion is secreted. Switching between these two secreted anions is determined by the activity of hIK-1 K(+) channels.

  3. Developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamazaki, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones play important roles in plant-microbe interactions in rhizospheres. Soybean roots secrete daidzein and genistein to attract rhizobia. Despite the importance of isoflavones in plant-microbe interactions, little is known about the developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots. In this study, soybeans were grown in hydroponic culture, and isoflavone contents in tissues, isoflavone secretion from the roots, and the expression of isoflavone conjugates hydrolyzing beta-glucosidase (ICHG) were investigated. Isoflavone contents did not show strong growth-dependent changes, while secretion of daidzein from the roots dramatically changed, with higher secretion during vegetative stages. Coordinately, the expression of ICHG also peaked at vegetative stages. Nitrogen deficiency resulted in 8- and 15-fold increases in secretion of daidzein and genistein, respectively, with no induction of ICHG. Taken together, these results suggest that large amounts of isoflavones were secreted during vegetative stages via the hydrolysis of (malonyl)glucosides with ICHG. PMID:26168358

  4. Studies on the Contribution of Human Cytomegalovirus UL21a and UL97 to Viral Growth and Inactivation of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Reveal a Unique Cellular Mechanism for Downmodulation of the APC/C Subunits APC1, APC4, and APC5

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) deregulates the cell cycle by several means, including inactivation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Viral proteins UL97 and UL21a, respectively, affect the APC/C by phosphorylation of APC/C coactivator Cdh1 and by inducing the degradation of subunits APC4 and APC5, which along with APC1 form the APC/C platform subcomplex. The aim of this study was to further characterize the mechanism of APC/C inactivation and define the relative contributions of UL21a and UL97 to APC/C substrate accumulation and to viral growth. We show that in uninfected cells, UL21a but not UL97 can disrupt APC/C function, leading to the accumulation of substrates. We find that UL21a is necessary and sufficient to induce the degradation of APC1, in addition to the previously reported APC4 and APC5. We also demonstrate that there is a previously unreported cellular mechanism for a specific decrease in the levels of all three platform subunits, APC1, APC4, and APC5, upon the depletion of any one of these subunits or of subunit APC8. Finally, we show that at a low multiplicity of infection, either UL97 or UL21a can partially complement a growth-defective mutant virus lacking both UL21a and UL97, with significantly greater benefit afforded by the expression of both proteins. This double mutant also can be partially rescued by inactivation of the APC/C using small interfering RNAs against specific subunits. These results further our understanding of HCMV's interaction with the cell cycle machinery and reveal a new cellular pattern of APC/C subunit downmodulation. IMPORTANCE HCMV lytic infection subverts the host cell cycle machinery in multiple ways. A major effect is inactivation of the APC/C, which plays a central role in the control of cell cycle progression. This study provides further insight into the mechanism of inactivation. We discovered that the APC1 subunit, which along with APC4 and APC5 form the platform

  5. Two-Party secret key distribution via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    DOE PAGES

    Grice, Warren P.; Evans, Philip G.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, William R.; Williams, Brian P.; Qi, B.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a method of distributing secret information based on N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) in a modied plug-and-play two-party Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system with N 2 intermediate nodes and compare it to both standard QSS and QKD. Our setup is based on the Clavis2 QKD system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of N parties can build a secret key based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N 2 parties. This method signicantly reduces the number of resources (singlemore » photon detectors, lasers and dark ber connections) needed to implement QKD on the grid.« less

  6. Two-Party secret key distribution via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P.; Evans, Philip G.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, William R.; Williams, Brian P.; Qi, B.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a method of distributing secret information based on N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) in a modied plug-and-play two-party Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system with N 2 intermediate nodes and compare it to both standard QSS and QKD. Our setup is based on the Clavis2 QKD system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of N parties can build a secret key based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N 2 parties. This method signicantly reduces the number of resources (single photon detectors, lasers and dark ber connections) needed to implement QKD on the grid.

  7. Functional Production of a Soluble and Secreted Single-Chain Antibody by a Bacterial Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chiu-Min; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Zhuang, Ya-Han; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Kao, Chien-Han; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Cheng, Ta-Chun; Chuang, Chih-Hung; Hsieh, Yuan-Chin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Cheng, Tian-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) serve as an alternative to full-length monoclonal antibodies used in research and therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, when recombinant scFvs are overexpressed in bacteria, they often form inclusion bodies and exhibit loss of function. To overcome this problem, we developed an scFv secretion system in which scFv was fused with osmotically inducible protein Y (osmY), a bacterial secretory carrier protein, for efficient protein secretion. Anti-EGFR scFv (αEGFR) was fused with osmY (N- and C-termini) and periplasmic leader sequence (pelB) to generate αEGFR-osmY, osmY-αEGFR, and pelB-αEGFR (control), respectively. In comparison with the control, both the osmY-fused αEGFR scFvs were soluble and secreted into the LB medium. Furthermore, the yield of soluble αEGFR-osmY was 20-fold higher, and the amount of secreted protein was 250-fold higher than that of osmY-αEGFR. In addition, the antigen-binding activity of both the osmY-fused αEGFRs was 2-fold higher than that of the refolded pelB-αEGFR from inclusion bodies. Similar results were observed with αTAG72-osmY and αHer2-osmY. These results suggest that the N-terminus of osmY fused with scFv produces a high yield of soluble, functional, and secreted scFv, and the osmY-based bacterial secretion system may be used for the large-scale industrial production of low-cost αEGFR protein. PMID:24824752

  8. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. Materials and Methods: From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Results: Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Conclusion: Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma. PMID:27306775

  9. [Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion].

    PubMed

    Mendonça, B B; Madureira, G; Bloise, W; Albergaria, A; Halpern, A; Liberman, B; Villares, S M; Batista, M C; Avancini, V F; Nitterdorfi, C T

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied 8 patients (4 males and 4 females) with Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion. Chronological age ranged from 15 to 45 years and duration of the disease ranged from 3 to 48 months. All patients presented typical signs of Cushing's syndrome, blood hypertension, and four of them had hyperpigmentation of the skin. Five patients had fasting hyperglycemia and all patients but one had serum hypokalemia (serum K = 2.2 to 3.9mEq/l). The circadian rhythm of cortisol was absent in all patients and basal cortisol levels were elevated in all patients but one. Basal ACTH levels evaluated in 7 patients were elevated in 6 (29 to 1050 pg/ml-MRC). One patient presented normal depression of urinary 17-OH after two days of dexamethasone and normal increase of urinary 17-OH and serum 11-dexycortisol after methyrapone. Four patients had carcinoid tumor (3 thymic and 1 bronchial), two had pancreatic islets cell tumors, one had bilateral pheochromocytoma and medular carcinoma of the thyroid, and one had oat cell carcinoma of the lung and medular carcinoma of the thyroid. Thoracic X-rays identified the ectopic ACTH secretion tumor in four cases, all confirmed by CT scan. Abdominal CT showed a difuse enlargement of the adrenals in seven cases and bilateral nodules in one case (pheochromocytomas). Six patients died within 3 years of the diagnosis. The authors concluded that clinical and hormonal findings could mislead the findings of ACTH ectopic secretion and Cushing's disease, and suggest that thoracic X-rays and CT scans of the skull, thorax, and abdome should be done in all cases of Cushing's syndrome. PMID:2559451

  10. Regulation of aldosterone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone synthesized in and secreted from the outer layer of the adrenal cortex, the zona glomerulosa. Aldosterone is responsible for regulating sodium homeostasis, thereby helping to control blood volume and blood pressure. Insufficient aldosterone secretion can lead to hypotension and circulatory shock, particularly in infancy. On the other hand, excessive aldosterone levels, or those too high for sodium status, can cause hypertension and exacerbate the effects of high blood pressure on multiple organs, contributing to renal disease, stroke, visual loss, and congestive heart failure. Aldosterone is also thought to directly induce end-organ damage, including in the kidneys and heart. Because of the significance of aldosterone to the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, it is important to understand the regulation of its biosynthesis and secretion from the adrenal cortex. Herein, the mechanisms regulating aldosterone production in zona glomerulosa cells are discussed, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the secretory response to the main controllers of aldosterone production, the renin-angiotensin II system, serum potassium levels and adrenocorticotrophic hormone. The signaling pathways involved include phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, cytosolic calcium levels, calcium influx pathways, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, diacylglycerol, protein kinases C and D, 12-hydroxyeicostetraenoic acid, phospholipase D, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, tyrosine kinases, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A complete understanding of the signaling events regulating aldosterone biosynthesis may allow the identification of novel targets for therapeutic interventions in hypertension, primary aldosteronism, congestive heart failure, renal disease, and other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:24944029

  11. Secret Objective Standoff: International Safeguards Educational Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Okowita, Samantha L

    2014-01-01

    The International Safeguards Regime, being so multi-faceted, can be overwhelming to those first introduced to its many components. The organizers and lecturers of workshops and courses on nonproliferation often provide a series of independent lectures and must somehow demonstrate the cohesive and effective nature of the system. An exercise titled The Secret Objective Standoff was developed to complement lectures with hands-on learning to assist participants in bringing all the many components (IAEA agreements, export controls, treaty obligations, international diplomacy, etc.) of the International Safeguards Regime together. This exercise divides participants into teams that are assigned the role of either a country or the IAEA and asks that they fully immerse themselves in their roles. The teams are then randomly assigned three unique and secret objectives that are intended to represent realistic and current geopolitical scenarios. Through construction, trading, or hoarding of four resources (experts, technology, money, and uranium), the teams have a finite number of turns to accomplish their objectives. Each turn has three phases random dispersal of resources, a timed discussion where teams can coordinate and strategize with others, and an action phase. During the action phase, teams inform the moderator individually and secretly what they will be doing that turn. The exercise has been tested twice with Oak Ridge National Laboratory personnel, and has been conducted with outside participants twice, in each case the experience was well received by both participants and instructors. This exercise provides instructors the ability to modify the exercise before or during game play to best fit their educational goals. By offering a range of experiences, from an in-depth look at specific components to a generalized overview, this exercise is an effective tool in helping participants achieve a full understanding the International Safeguards Regime.

  12. Secret neutrino interactions: a pseudoscalar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth Hansen, Rasmus; Tram, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments point towards the existence of additional mostly sterile neutrino mass eigenstates in the eV mass range. At the same time, such sterile neutrinos are disfavoured by cosmology (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure), unless they can be prevented from being thermalised in the early Universe. To this aim, we introduce a model of sterile neutrino secret interactions mediated by a new light pseudoscalar: The new interactions can accomodate sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, providing a good fit to all the up to date cosmological data.

  13. Veritas Asteroid Family Still Holds Secrets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakovic, B.

    2012-12-01

    Veritas asteroid family has been studied for about two decades. These studies have revealed many secrets, and a respectable knowledge about this family had been collected. Here I will present many of these results and review the current knowledge about the family. However, despite being extensively studied, Veritas family is still a mystery. This will be illustrated through the presentation of the most interesting open problems. Was there a secondary collision within this family? Does asteroid (490) Veritas belong to the family named after it? How large was the parent body of the family? Finally, some possible directions for future studies that aims to address these questions are discussed as well.

  14. Involvement of hypothalamic dopamine in the regulation of prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reymond, M J; Porter, J C

    1985-01-01

    The neuroendocrine control of prolactin (PRL) secretion is known to be a multifactorial process, but dopamine (DA) secreted by the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurons of the hypothalamus is believed to exert a predominant inhibitory control on the secretion of PRL. The secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, including the rate of biosynthesis of DA and the rate of release of the neurohormone into hypophysial portal blood, can be readily evaluated in the rat. In most conditions in which an altered secretion of PRL has been documented, an altered secretory activity of the TIDA neurons has been found. When an acute reduction in the secretion of DA is observed, an increased secretion of PRL is associated, with an inverse relationship between DA and PRL concentrations in hypophysial portal and systemic blood, respectively. However, the secretion of PRL can be regulated by PRL itself through stimulation of the secretory activity of the TIDA neurons, and consequently hyperprolactinemia can be observed concomitantly with a sustained high secretion of DA, as seen after treatment with estrogen. The short loop feedback of PRL secretion seems to be impaired in the aging rat, since a sustained reduced hypothalamic secretion of DA is observed in spite of long-term hyperprolactinemia.

  15. Trade Secret Law and Information Systems: Can Your Students Keep a Secret?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Lorrie; Ford, Janet C.; White, Barbara Jo; Clapper, Danial L.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of intellectual property (IP) law on information systems (IS) professionals in business cannot be overstated. The IS 2010 model curriculum guidelines for undergraduate IS programs stress the importance of information security and knowledge about IP. While copyright and patents are the most well-known types of IP, another, trade secrets,…

  16. The Versatile Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacterial Type VI Secretion Systems (T6SS) function as contractile nanomachines to puncture target cells and deliver lethal effectors. In the ten years since the discovery of the T6SS, much has been learned about the structure and function of this versatile protein secretion apparatus. Most of the conserved protein components that comprise the T6SS apparatus itself have been identified and ascribed specific functions. In addition, numerous effector proteins that are translocated by the T6SS have been identified and characterized. These protein effectors usually represent toxic cargoes that are delivered by the attacker cell to a target cell. The field is beginning to better understand the lifestyle or physiology that dictates when bacteria normally express their T6SS. In this Chapter, we consider what is known about the structure and regulation of the T6SS, the numerous classes of antibacterial effector T6SS substrates, and how the action of the T6SS relates to a given lifestyle or behavior in certain bacteria. PMID:27227310

  17. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  18. Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion.

    PubMed

    Cieszyński, Łukasz; Berendt-Obołończyk, Monika; Szulc, Michał; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is defined as a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms occurring due to hypercortisolism. Cortisol excess may be endogenous or exogenous. The most common cause of CS is glucocorticoid therapy with supraphysiological (higher than in the case of substitution) doses used in various diseases (e.g. autoimmune). One possible CS cause is ectopic (extra-pituitary) ACTH secretion (EAS) by benign or malignant tumours. Since its first description in 1963, EAS aetiology has changed, i.e. as well as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), higher incidence in other malignancies has been reported. Ectopic ACTH secretion symptoms are usually similar to hypercortisolism symptoms due to other causes. A clinical suspicion of CS requires laboratory investigations. There is no single and specific laboratory test for making a CS diagnosis, and therefore multiple dynamic tests should be ordered. A combination of multiple laboratory noninvasive and invasive tests gives 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for EAS diagnosis. If the EAS is caused by localised malignancy, surgery is the optimal treatment choice. Radical tumour excision may be performed in 40% of patients, and 80% of them are cured of the disease. The authors present an interesting clinical case of EAS, which is always a huge diagnostic challenge for clinicians. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 458-464). PMID:27387249

  19. Neisseria gonorrhoeae secretes chromosomal DNA via a novel type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Holly L; Domínguez, Nadia M; Schwartz, Kevin J; Hackett, Kathleen T; Dillard, Joseph P

    2005-03-01

    The process of DNA donation for natural transformation of bacteria is poorly understood and has been assumed to involve bacterial cell death. Recently in Neisseria gonorrhoeae we found that mutations in three genes in the gonococcal genetic island (GGI) reduced the ability of a strain to act as a donor in transformation and to release DNA into the culture. To better characterize the GGI and the process of DNA donation, the 57 kb genetic island was cloned, sequenced and subjected to insertional mutagenesis. DNA sequencing revealed that the GGI has characteristics of a horizontally acquired genomic island and encodes homologues of type IV secretion system proteins. The GGI was found to be incorporated near the chromosomal replication terminus at the dif site, a sequence targeted by the site-specific recombinase XerCD. Using a plasmid carrying a small region of the GGI and the associated dif site, we demonstrated that this model island could be integrated at the dif site in strains not carrying the GGI and was spontaneously excised from that site. Also, we were able to delete the entire 57 kb region by transformation with DNA from a strain lacking the GGI. Thus the GGI was likely acquired and integrated into the gonococcal chromosome by site-specific recombination and may be lost by site-specific recombination or natural transformation. We made mutations in six putative type IV secretion system genes and assayed these strains for the ability to secrete DNA. Five of the mutations greatly reduced or completely eliminated DNA secretion. Our data indicate that N. gonorrhoeae secretes DNA via a specific process. Donated DNA may be used in natural transformation, contributing to antigenic variation and the spread of antibiotic resistance, and it may modulate the host immune response.

  20. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  1. [Research progress on musk secretion mechanism of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Feng, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Gui-Jun; Zeng, De-Jun; Zhang, Cheng-Lu; Chen, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    Forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii), a rare wild medicinal animal, is listed under the category of the state key protected wildlife list of China. Musk, secreted by the musk glands, is with high economic and medicinal value and used as precious traditional medicine in China. In order to meet the needs of musk in Chinese traditional medicine, forest musk deer farming was conducted in 1950s, but the research progress on musk secretion mechanism was slow. Therefore, by reviewing the histological and anatomical structure of forest musk deer musk gland, the relationship between sex hormones and the musk secretion process, and the molecular mechanism of the musk secretion, the existing problems in investigating the musk secretion mechanism were analyzed and the development trends in this field were also discussed, in order to provide a reference for further studies on the musk secretion mechanism and improve musk production of forest musk deer.

  2. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  3. A secret image sharing scheme for light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuang-Shyr

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a new ( r, n)-threshold secret image sharing scheme with low information overhead for images is provided, which has a low distortion rate, and is more applicable for light images. A secret image is encoded into n noise-like shadow images to satisfy the condition that any r of the n shares can be used to reveal the secret image, and no information on the secret can be revealed from any r - 1 or fewer shares. The size of the shadow images is relatively small. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  4. Hyperphosphorylation and Cleavage at D421 Enhance Tau Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rivest-McGraw, Jessica; Bertrand, Johanne; Lauzon, Michel; Leclerc, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that tau pathology propagates in a predictable manner in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Moreover, tau accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD’s patients. The mechanisms underlying the propagation of tau pathology and its accumulation in the CSF remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have reported that human tau was secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells when it was overexpressed indicating that tau secretion could contribute to the spreading of tau pathology in the brain and could lead to its accumulation in the CSF. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of human tau resulted in its secretion by Hela cells. The main form of tau secreted by these cells was cleaved at the C-terminal. Surprisingly, secreted tau was dephosphorylated at several sites in comparison to intracellular tau which presented a strong immunoreactivity to all phospho-dependent antibodies tested. Our data also revealed that phosphorylation and cleavage of tau favored its secretion by Hela cells. Indeed, the mimicking of phosphorylation at 12 sites known to be phosphorylated in AD enhanced tau secretion. A mutant form of tau truncated at D421, the preferential cleavage site of caspase-3, was also significantly more secreted than wild-type tau. Taken together, our results indicate that hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of tau by favoring its secretion could contribute to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain and its accumulation in the CSF. PMID:22615831

  5. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D.; Soares, Vitor Y. R.; Deschler, Daniel G.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects’ degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs. PMID:26690506

  6. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D; Soares, Vitor Y R; Deschler, Daniel G; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2015-12-22

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects' degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs.

  7. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage.

    PubMed

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D; Soares, Vitor Y R; Deschler, Daniel G; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects' degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs. PMID:26690506

  8. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  9. Skin manifestations of hormone-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Serge A

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine and metabolic diseases, besides affecting other organs, can result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology and can lead to a complex symptomatology. Dermatologists may see some of these skin lesions first, either before the endocrinologist, or even after the internist or specialist has missed the right diagnosis. Because some skin lesions might reflect a life-threatening endocrine or metabolic disorder, identifying the underlying disorder is very important, so that patients can receive corrective rather than symptomatic treatment. In this issue, we will review various hormone-secreting tumors, including pituitary disorders (Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly), hyperthyroidism, glucagonoma, carcinoid syndrome, mastocytosis, and hyperandrogenism. We will focus on clinical manifestations, mainly cutaneous, followed by a brief discussion on how to make the diagnosis of each condition in addition to treatment options. PMID:21054708

  10. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  11. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  12. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  13. Coxiella Type IV Secretion and Cellular Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Daniel E.; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Coxiella burnetii is a wide spread zoonotic bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever. In vivo, Coxiella displays a tropism for mononuclear phagocytes where it participates in biogenesis of a lysosome-like replication compartment to conduct its obligate intracellular lifestyle. Coxiella actively regulates multiple events during infection, presumably via proteins with effector functions that are delivered to the host cytosol by a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Because the organism is currently refractory to genetic manipulation, Coxiella Dot/Icm substrates have been identified using bioinformatics and Legionella pneumophila as a surrogate type IV delivery system. Functional characterization of the biological activity of these effector proteins will dramatically aid our ability to model Coxiella-host cell interactions. PMID:19144560

  14. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    PubMed

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A K W; Douma, Rutger D; Seifar, Reza M; van Gulik, Walter M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  15. Renal tubular secretion of glutathione (GSH)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.D.; Curthoys, N.P.

    1986-05-01

    The rapid turnover of renal GSH may require its secretion into the tubular lumen. Renal clearance of plasma GSH was measured in rats anesthetized with Inactin and infused with (/sup 3/H)inulin. Renal ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (..gamma..GT) was then inactivated (> 97%) by infusion of acivicin and samples were collected for 6-7 h. By 4.5 h arterial and urinary GSH increased from 5..mu..M and 1.3 n mol/h to 23 ..mu..M and 2400-7000 nmol/h, respectively. The ratio of urinary GSH to filtered load increased from < 0.01 to 0.7-2.6. When renal GSH was decreased to 30% of normal by pretreating rats with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), the subsequent inactivation of ..gamma..GT caused only a slight increase in arterial GSH and urinary GSH increased to only 400-600 nmol/h (60-70% of filtered load). The amount of GSH filtered by the kidney was reduced by initially treating a rat with acivicin and 3 h later infusing purified ..gamma..GT (0.2 mg/h) to degrade plasma GSH. Just before infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH was 23 ..mu..M and urinary GSH was equal to 90% of the filtered load. At 1 h after infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH decreased to 0.3 ..mu..M, whereas urinary GSH remained elevated (1200-1800 nmol/h) and now equalled 10-20 times the filtered load. When similar experiments were carried out in BSO treated rats, maximal urinary GSH was reduced to 200 nmol/h, a value that was still 10 times the filtered load. Therefore, secreted GSH constitutes a significant portion of the GSH that is normally catabolized within the tubular lumen.

  16. An Engineered Yeast Efficiently Secreting Penicillin

    PubMed Central

    Gidijala, Loknath; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Douma, Rutger D.; Seifar, Reza M.; van Gulik, Walter M.; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN). As yet, the industrial production of this β-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT) and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL) resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L). PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel) β-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents), whose production involves NRPS's. PMID:20016817

  17. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis proteins secreted by the Por secretion system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Narita, Yuka; Shoji, Mikio; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses a number of potential virulence factors for periodontopathogenicity. In particular, cysteine proteinases named gingipains are of interest given their abilities to degrade host proteins and process other virulence factors such as fimbriae. Gingipains are translocated on the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu by the Por secretion system (PorSS), which consists of a number of membrane or periplasmic proteins including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorO, PorP, PorQ, PorT, PorU, PorV (PG27, LptO), PorW and Sov. To identify proteins other than gingipains secreted by the PorSS, we compared the proteomes of P. gingivalis strains kgp rgpA rgpB (PorSS-proficient strain) and kgp rgpA rgpB porK (PorSS-deficient strain) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide-mass fingerprinting. Sixteen spots representing 10 different proteins were present in the particle-free culture supernatant of the PorSS-proficient strain but were absent or faint in that of the PorSS-deficient strain. These identified proteins possessed the C-terminal domains (CTDs), which had been suggested to form the CTD protein family. These results indicate that the PorSS is used for secretion of a number of proteins other than gingipains and that the CTDs of the proteins are associated with the PorSS-dependent secretion. PMID:23075153

  18. Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis proteins secreted by the Por secretion system.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Narita, Yuka; Shoji, Mikio; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis possesses a number of potential virulence factors for periodontopathogenicity. In particular, cysteine proteinases named gingipains are of interest given their abilities to degrade host proteins and process other virulence factors such as fimbriae. Gingipains are translocated on the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu by the Por secretion system (PorSS), which consists of a number of membrane or periplasmic proteins including PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorO, PorP, PorQ, PorT, PorU, PorV (PG27, LptO), PorW and Sov. To identify proteins other than gingipains secreted by the PorSS, we compared the proteomes of P. gingivalis strains kgp rgpA rgpB (PorSS-proficient strain) and kgp rgpA rgpB porK (PorSS-deficient strain) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide-mass fingerprinting. Sixteen spots representing 10 different proteins were present in the particle-free culture supernatant of the PorSS-proficient strain but were absent or faint in that of the PorSS-deficient strain. These identified proteins possessed the C-terminal domains (CTDs), which had been suggested to form the CTD protein family. These results indicate that the PorSS is used for secretion of a number of proteins other than gingipains and that the CTDs of the proteins are associated with the PorSS-dependent secretion.

  19. Type II secretion in Yersinia—a secretion system for pathogenicity and environmental fitness

    PubMed Central

    von Tils, Dominik; Blädel, Inga; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Heusipp, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    In Yersinia species, type III secretion (T3S) is the most prominent and best studied secretion system and a hallmark for the infection process of pathogenic Yersinia species. Type II secretion (T2S), on the other hand, is less well-characterized, although all Yersinia species, pathogenic as well as non-pathogenic, possess one or even two T2S systems. The only Yersinia strain in which T2S has so far been studied is the human pathogenic strain Y. enterocolitica 1b. Mouse infection experiments showed that at least one of the two T2S systems of Y. enterocolitica 1b, termed Yts1, is involved in dissemination and colonization of deeper tissues like liver and spleen. Interestingly, in vitro studies revealed a complex regulation of the Yts1 system, which is mainly active at low temperatures and high Mg2+-levels. Furthermore, the functional characterization of the proteins secreted in vitro indicates a role of the Yts1 machinery in survival of the bacteria in an environmental habitat. In silico analyses identified Yts1 homologous systems in bacteria that are known as plant symbionts or plant pathogens. Thus, the recent studies point to a dual function of the Yts1 T2S systems, playing a role in virulence of humans and animals, as well as in the survival of the bacteria outside of the mammalian host. In contrast, the role of the second T2S system, Yts2, remains ill defined. Whereas the T3S system and its virulence-mediating role has been intensively studied, it might now be time to also focus on the T2S system and its role in the Yersinia lifestyle, especially considering that most of the Yersinia isolates are not found in infected humans but have been gathered from various environmental samples. PMID:23248779

  20. Nightshade Wound Secretion: The World's Simplest Extrafloral Nectar?

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Wounded nightshade leaves secrete a sugary liquid that, like extrafloral nectar (EFN), attracts ants as defence against herbivores. The secretion of these droplets requires no detectable nectary tissue, showing how little it takes to produce a functioning nectary. Easy de novo formation of extrafloral nectaries explains their 'scattered' phylogenetic distribution. PMID:27375224

  1. Secrets and Misperceptions: The Creation of Self-Fulfilling Illusions

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines who hears what secrets, comparing two similar secrets-one that is highly stigmatized and one that is less so. Using a unique survey representative of American adults and intake forms from a medical clinic, I document marked differences in who hears these secrets. People who are sympathetic to the stigmatizing secret are more likely to hear of it than those who may react negatively. This is a consequence of people not just selectively disclosing their own secrets but selectively sharing others’ as well. As a result, people in the same social network will be exposed to and influenced by different information about those they know and hence experience that network differently. When people effectively exist in networks tailored by others not to offend, then the information they hear tends to be that of which they already approve. Were they to hear secrets they disapproved of, then their attitudes might change, but they are less likely to hear those secrets. As such, the patterns of secret hearing contribute to a stasis in public opinion. PMID:26082932

  2. Extrafloral nectar secretion from wounds of Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Lortzing, Tobias; Calf, Onno W; Böhlke, Marlene; Schwachtje, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Geuß, Daniel; Kosanke, Susanne; van Dam, Nicole M; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Plants usually close wounds rapidly to prevent infections and the loss of valuable resources such as assimilates(1). However, herbivore-inflicted wounds on the bittersweet nightshade Solanum dulcamara appear not to close completely and produce sugary wound secretions visible as droplets. Many plants across the plant kingdom secrete sugary nectar from extrafloral nectaries(2) to attract natural enemies of herbivores for indirect defence(3,4). As ants forage on wound edges of S. dulcamara in the field, we hypothesized that wound secretions are a form of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We show that, unlike EFN from known nectaries, wound secretions are neither associated with any specific structure nor restricted to certain locations. However, similar to EFN, they are jasmonate-inducible and the plant controls their chemical composition. Wound secretions are attractive for ants, and application of wound secretion mimics increases ant attraction and reduces herbivory on S. dulcamara plants in a natural population. In greenhouse experiments, we reveal that ants can defend S. dulcamara from two of its native herbivores, slugs and flea beetle larvae. Since nectar is defined by its ecological function as a sugary secretion involved in interactions with animals(5), such 'plant bleeding' could be a primitive mode of nectar secretion exemplifying an evolutionary origin of structured extrafloral nectaries. PMID:27243650

  3. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  4. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.27 Top secret control. The EOP Security Officer serves as the Top Secret Control Officer (TSCO) for OMB. He will be assisted by the Alternate TSCOs in each division/office...

  6. Type VI Secretion: not just for pathogenesis anymore

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Andrea J.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Type VI Secretion Systems (T6SS) have been studied primarily in the context of pathogenic bacterial-host interactions. Recent data suggest, however, that these versatile secretion systems may also function to promote commensal or mutualistic relationships between bacteria and eukaryotes, or to mediate cooperative or competitive interactions between bacteria. PMID:20638635

  7. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the MSDS, provided that the operator— (1) Can support the claim that the chemical's identity is a... secret, (3) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the MSDS information on the properties and effects of the hazardous chemical. (b) The...

  8. Nightshade Wound Secretion: The World's Simplest Extrafloral Nectar?

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Wounded nightshade leaves secrete a sugary liquid that, like extrafloral nectar (EFN), attracts ants as defence against herbivores. The secretion of these droplets requires no detectable nectary tissue, showing how little it takes to produce a functioning nectary. Easy de novo formation of extrafloral nectaries explains their 'scattered' phylogenetic distribution.

  9. Redox proteins are constitutively secreted by skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Takagi, Mayumi; Nakamura-Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-11-01

    Myokines are skeletal muscle-derived hormones. In this study, using a C2C12 myotube contraction system, we sought to determine whether the skeletal muscle secreted thioredoxin (TRX) and related redox proteins. Redox proteins such as TRXs, peroxiredoxins, and glutaredoxins were detected in the C2C12 myotube culture medium in the absence of any stimulation. The amounts of TRXs, peroxiredoxins, and glutaredoxins secreted by the C2C12 myotubes were not affected by the contraction, unless the myotubes were injured. Because TRX-1 was known to be a secreted protein that lacks a signal peptide, we examined whether this protein was secreted via exosome vesicles. The results indicated that TRX-1 was not secreted via exosome vesicles. We concluded that TRX-1 and related redox proteins are myokines that are constitutively secreted by the skeletal muscle cells. Although the mechanism of TRX-1 secretion remains unclear, our findings suggest that the skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ and the redox proteins that are constitutively secreted from the skeletal muscle may exert antioxidant and systemic health-promoting effects.

  10. Quantum secret sharing schemes and reversibility of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Iwamoto, Mitsugu; Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    2005-09-15

    Quantum secret sharing schemes encrypting a quantum state into a multipartite entangled state are treated. The lower bound on the dimension of each share given by Gottesman [Phys. Rev. A 61, 042311 (2000)] is revisited based on a relation between the reversibility of quantum operations and the Holevo information. We also propose a threshold ramp quantum secret sharing scheme and evaluate its coding efficiency.

  11. Secret key distillation from shielded two-qubit states

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Joonwoo

    2010-05-15

    The quantum states corresponding to a secret key are characterized using the so-called private states, where the key part consisting of a secret key is shielded by the additional systems. Based on the construction, it was shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states. In this work, I consider the shielded two-qubit states in a key-distillation scenario and derive the conditions under which a secret key can be distilled using the recurrence protocol or the two-way classical distillation, advantage distillation together with one-way postprocessing. From the security conditions, it is shown that a secret key can be distilled from bound entangled states in a much wider range. In addition, I consider the case that in which white noise is added to quantum states and show that the classical distillation protocol still works despite a certain amount of noise although the recurrence protocol does not.

  12. Cropping and noise resilient steganography algorithm using secret image sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez-Sandoval, Oswaldo; Fierro-Radilla, Atoany; Espejel-Trujillo, Angelina; Nakano-Miyatake, Mariko; Perez-Meana, Hector

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an image steganography scheme, in which a secret image is hidden into a cover image using a secret image sharing (SIS) scheme. Taking advantage of the fault tolerant property of the (k,n)-threshold SIS, where using any k of n shares (k≤n), the secret data can be recovered without any ambiguity, the proposed steganography algorithm becomes resilient to cropping and impulsive noise contamination. Among many SIS schemes proposed until now, Lin and Chan's scheme is selected as SIS, due to its lossless recovery capability of a large amount of secret data. The proposed scheme is evaluated from several points of view, such as imperceptibility of the stegoimage respect to its original cover image, robustness of hidden data to cropping operation and impulsive noise contamination. The evaluation results show a high quality of the extracted secret image from the stegoimage when it suffered more than 20% cropping or high density noise contamination.

  13. Annexin 1 is secreted by the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Haigler, H T; Christmas, P

    1990-12-01

    The human prostate expresses very high concentrations of annexins 1, 4, and 5 and secretes high concentrations of annexins 1 and 5. Although the biological roles of these proteins in prostate secretions are not known, these studies emphasize the need to consider extracellular sites for physiological functions of annexins. The clear demonstration of secretion of proteins that have blocked N-termini and lack hydrophobic signal sequences raises the possibility that novel cellular secretory pathways exist. Preliminary immunohistochemical experiments in collaboration with Dr. James Fallon indicate that both annexins 1 and 4 are expressed in prostate ductal secretory epithelium. Since annexin 1, but not annexin 4, is secreted, a comparison of the cellular fate of these two related proteins in the prostate may provide a useful model system for determining the structural elements that direct the secretion of proteins which lack conventional signal sequences.

  14. Mechanism and Synergism in Epithelial Fluid and Electrolyte Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong Hee; Park, Seonghee; Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Muallem, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    A central function of epithelia is the control of the volume and electrolyte composition of bodily fluids through vectorial transport of electrolytes and the obligatory H2O. In exocrine glands fluid and electrolyte secretion is carried out by both acinar and duct cells, with the portion of fluid secreted by each cell type vary among glands. All acinar cells secrete isotonic, plasma-like fluid, while the duct determines the final electrolyte composition of the fluid by absorbing most of the Cl− and secreting HCO3−. The key transporters mediating acinar fluid and electrolyte secretion are the basolateral Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter, the luminal Ca2+-activated Cl− channel ANO1 and basolateral and luminal Ca2+-activated K+ channels. Ductal fluid and HCO3− secretion are mediated by the basolateral membrane Na+-HCO3− cotransporter NBCe1-B and the luminal membrane Cl−/HCO3− exchanger slc26a6 and the Cl− channel CFTR. The function of the transporters is regulated by multiple inputs, which in the duct include major regulation by the WNK/SPAK pathway that inhibit secretion and the IRBIT/PP1 pathway that antagonize the effects of the WNK/SPAK pathway to both stimulate and coordinate the secretion. The function of these regulatory pathways in secretory glands acinar cells is yet to be examined. An important concept in biology is synergism among signaling pathways to generate the final physiological response that ensures regulation with high fidelity and guards against cell toxicity. While synergism is observed in all epithelial functions, the molecular mechanism mediating the synergism is not known. Recent work reveals a central role for IRBIT as a third messenger that integrates and synergizes the function of the Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways in activation of epithelial fluid and electrolyte secretion. These concepts are discussed in this review using secretion by the pancreatic and salivary gland ducts as model systems. PMID:24240699

  15. Regulation of mucous acinar exocrine secretion with age.

    PubMed

    Culp, D J; Richardson, L A

    1996-01-01

    Denny and co-workers (Navazesh et al., 1992) recently reported decreased concentrations of MG1 and MG2 mucins in resting and stimulated whole human saliva with age. The current study was therefore conducted to examine whether there is a corresponding attenuation with age in stimulus secretion coupling regulating mucous cell exocrine secretion. We utilized an in vitro model system, isolated rat sublingual acini, to evaluate the regulation of mucous cell exocrine secretion. Rat sublingual glands are similar to human sublingual and minor mucous glands, both histologically and in terms of their pattern of innervation, which is predominantly parasympathetic. Mucin secretion is thus activated primarily by muscarinic cholinergic agonist and to a lesser extent by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which is co-localized with acetylcholine in parasympathetic nerve terminals. We isolated sublingual mucous acini from five-month-old and 24-month-old rats and compared the concentration responses for mucin secretion induced by VIP and the muscarinic agonist, arecaidine propargyl ester (APE). Concentration-response curves for VIP were nearly identical for mucous acini from the five-month-old and 24-month-old animals. Values for basal secretion, maximal secretion, and EC50 (approximately equal to 200 nmol/L VIP) were statistically equivalent between both age groups. Concentration-response curves for APE were also very similar between age groups, with no statistically significant difference in basal secretion or EC50 values (approximately equal to 50 nmol/L APE). Maximal secretion was slightly less but statistically different for 24-month-old vs. five-month-old animals, 158% vs. 169% above basal secretion, respectively. Collectively, we found no substantial age-related changes in the secretory responsiveness of salivary mucous cells.

  16. Biliary lipid secretion in health and in cholesterol gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Carey, M C; Mazer, N A

    1984-01-01

    The secretory compartment for biliary lecithin and cholesterol secretion probably resides in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocyte. The secretory compartment for bile salts lies predominantly in the enterohepatic circulation which fluxes bile salts continuously through the smooth endoplasmic reticulum compartment and extracts lipids for secretion into bile. Most of bile lecithin is newly synthesized by the liver; most of bile cholesterol is derived from extrahepatic sources. Both cholesterol and lecithin secretion are coupled to bile salt secretion and describe output curves which can be fitted by rectangular hyperbolae: since bile salt secretion is a linear function of input, the relative proportions of cholesterol to bile salts plus lecithin in bile increase at low bile salt outputs. In health, an adequate bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion coupled with normal cholesterol secretion maintains the relative composition of bile in a stable state: fasting compositions usually lie within the micellar zone or metastable supersaturated zone of a triangular coordinate-phase diagram plot. In cholesterol gallstone disease, mean bile salt (+ lecithin) secretion rates are subnormal and/or mean cholesterol secretion rates are supranormal, especially in the fasting state. If individuals are obese there is also enhanced hypersecretion of biliary cholesterol. Either or both secretory defects lead to an elevation and persistence of cholesterol supersaturation of bile. The physical state of the secreted lipids in bile is complex and fluctuant, and probably involves vesicle structures and mixed micelles at high water and cholesterol concentrations and predominantly micellar structures at low water and cholesterol concentrations. In lithogenic bile, the physical state, proportions and nucleation potential of the lipid aggregates are probably different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST).

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Sang-Jik; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Yeam, Inhwa; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-04-18

    Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  18. Insulin secretion at high altitude in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Singh, T.; Rai, R. M.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of hypoxia on circulatory levels of insulin, its response to oral glucose administration (100 g) and changes in circadian rhythms of glucose as well as insulin were evaluated in euglycemic males at sea level (SL, 220 m) during their stay at high altitude (3500 m, SJ) and in high altitude natives (HAN). Basal glucose levels were not altered at high altitude but the rise in glucose (δ glucose) after glucose load was significantly higher in SJ and HAN (p<0.01) as compared to SL values. An increase (p<0.01) both in basal as well as glucose induced rise in insulin secretion (δ insulin) was observed at HA. The rise in insulin in SJ was significantly higher (p<0.01) than in HAN. This elevation in glucose and insulin levels was also evident at different times of the day. The circadian rhythmicity of glucose as well as insulin was altered by the altitude stress. The findings of the study show a rise in insulin level at HA but the hyperglycemia in the face of hyper-insulinism require the presumption of a simultaneous and dispropotionate rise of insulin antagonistic hormones upsetting the effect of insulin on glucose metabolism.

  19. Physiopathology of prolactin secretion in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, P G

    2000-06-01

    In many species prolactin is of biological importance and has a major role in determining the deposition and mobilization of fat. In human physiology, outside pregnancy, prolactin secretion is altered by increasing body weight in both children and adults. Prolactin in this circumstance appears to be marker of hypothalamic-pituitary function: the prolactin response to insulin-hypoglycaemia, thyrotrophin releasing hormone stimulation and other stimulatory factors may be diminished. In addition, obesity alters the 24h spontaneous release of prolactin with a generalised dampening of release. A number of explanations have been given as possible causes for these alterations, but it seems likely that they reflect obesity per se and are associated with hyperinsulinaemia. Weight reduction, with accompanying decrease in plasma insulin levels, leads to a normalization of prolactin responses in most, but not all, circumstances. To date, no molecular basis has been identified which links prolactin with increasing body fatness, weight and appetite: new data suggests a possible link in obese men between fasting plasma prolactin and leptin concentrations. PMID:10997622

  20. Exploring the Secrets of the Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George

    Short, professional autobiographies of the founders of space physics have been solicited by AGU's History Committee and published in special sections of Space Physics issues of the Journal of Geophysical Research. Here we have a book-length professional autobiography by the discoverer of magnetospheric substorms, which is arguably the most intensely researched topic in the field.Probably the book's most valuable contribution to the history of space physics is precisely the narration of the discovery of substorms. Exploring the Secrets of the Aurora has an epic quality. It starts with Akasofu's insight that the auroral zone—a circumpolar zone that auroras inhabit, with geographic borders established in the previous century—is a fiction. There followed a struggle to replace it with the concept of an expandable auroral oval, which has quite a different shape. The road to final success entailed Akasofu's installing a chain of aurora-imaging, “all-sky” cameras stretching the north-south length of Alaska. These proved the point and set a precedent for north-south aligned magnetometer chains.

  1. Neonaticides following "secret" pregnancies: seven case reports.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, E

    1989-01-01

    Seven neonaticides were reported during a 14-month period in the State of Iowa. This is an alarming number considering that only one such case was reported in the previous year. The majority of cases involved the birth of a live infant to an adolescent who had reportedly kept her pregnancy secret from family and friends. The death of the infants resulted from exposure or drowning. Efforts were made by the mother to hide or dispose of her infant's body. Basic information about each of the reported cases is presented, as well as the sentences given the adult mothers charged with the crime of child endangerment. The dynamics of these cases are reviewed in the context of earlier studies dealing with the phenomenon of neonaticide. Infanticide has deep roots in several cultures. It was practiced in some primitive societies and was decreed a capital offense as early as 1643. Its occurrence recently prompts suggestions for activities by professionals to prevent these tragedies. More research and further attention to this problem is warranted. PMID:2502808

  2. Choice of measurement as the secret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Feng; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-04-01

    Recently, Kalev et al. [A. Kalev, A. Mann, and M. Revzen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 260502 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.260502] proposed a quantum (public) communication protocol with an interesting encoding style, where the signal is encoded in the choice of the measurement basis of one of the communicating parties (Bob) and Bob's measurement results are irrelevant for the communication. As we know, one of the main advantages of quantum technique in communication over the classical one is the higher security. Therefore, as Kalev et al. have mentioned in their paper, an interesting open question is whether one could and how to utilize this new encoding style to design a secure communication protocol, i.e., translate the choice of measurement into the secret. Here we propose a quantum key distribution protocol, which is a secure communication protocol, with this encoding style, where Bob's measurement results are still irrelevant. Furthermore, the security of the proposed protocol in the zero-error case has been proved.

  3. Novel Threshold Changeable Secret Sharing Schemes Based on Polynomial Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingchu; Guo, Cheng; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Ren, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    After any distribution of secret sharing shadows in a threshold changeable secret sharing scheme, the threshold may need to be adjusted to deal with changes in the security policy and adversary structure. For example, when employees leave the organization, it is not realistic to expect departing employees to ensure the security of their secret shadows. Therefore, in 2012, Zhang et al. proposed (t → t′, n) and ({t1, t2,⋯, tN}, n) threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. However, their schemes suffer from a number of limitations such as strict limit on the threshold values, large storage space requirement for secret shadows, and significant computation for constructing and recovering polynomials. To address these limitations, we propose two improved dealer-free threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. In our schemes, we construct polynomials to update secret shadows, and use two-variable one-way function to resist collusion attacks and secure the information stored by the combiner. We then demonstrate our schemes can adjust the threshold safely. PMID:27792784

  4. Type V Protein Secretion Pathway: the Autotransporter Story

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Desvaux, Mickaël; Fernandez, Rachel C.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer

    2004-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane layer which constrains uptake and secretion of solutes and polypeptides. To overcome this barrier, bacteria have developed several systems for protein secretion. The type V secretion pathway encompasses the autotransporter proteins, the two-partner secretion system, and the recently described type Vc or AT-2 family of proteins. Since its discovery in the late 1980s, this family of secreted proteins has expanded continuously, due largely to the advent of the genomic age, to become the largest group of secreted proteins in gram-negative bacteria. Several of these proteins play essential roles in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections and have been characterized in detail, demonstrating a diverse array of function including the ability to condense host cell actin and to modulate apoptosis. However, most of the autotransporter proteins remain to be characterized. In light of new discoveries and controversies in this research field, this review considers the autotransporter secretion process in the context of the more general field of bacterial protein translocation and exoprotein function. PMID:15590781

  5. Por Secretion System-Dependent Secretion and Glycosylation of Porphyromonas gingivalis Hemin-Binding Protein 35

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Mikio; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Kondo, Yoshio; Narita, Yuka; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Naito, Mariko; Nakayama, Koji

    2011-01-01

    The anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in severe forms of periodontal disease and refractory periapical perodontitis. We have recently found that P. gingivalis has a novel secretion system named the Por secretion system (PorSS), which is responsible for secretion of major extracellular proteinases, Arg-gingipains (Rgps) and Lys-gingipain. These proteinases contain conserved C-terminal domains (CTDs) in their C-termini. Hemin-binding protein 35 (HBP35), which is one of the outer membrane proteins of P. gingivalis and contributes to its haem utilization, also contains a CTD, suggesting that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS. In this study, immunoblot analysis of P. gingivalis mutants deficient in the PorSS or in the biosynthesis of anionic polysaccharide-lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) revealed that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS and is glycosylated with A-LPS. From deletion analysis with a GFP-CTD[HBP35] green fluorescent protein fusion, the C-terminal 22 amino acid residues of CTD[HBP35] were found to be required for cell surface translocation and glycosylation. The GFP-CTD fusion study also revealed that the CTDs of CPG70, peptidylarginine deiminase, P27 and RgpB play roles in PorSS-dependent translocation and glycosylation. However, CTD-region peptides were not found in samples of glycosylated HBP35 protein by peptide map fingerprinting analysis, and antibodies against CTD-regions peptides did not react with glycosylated HBP35 protein. These results suggest both that the CTD region functions as a recognition signal for the PorSS and that glycosylation of CTD proteins occurs after removal of the CTD region. Rabbits were used for making antisera against bacterial proteins in this study. PMID:21731719

  6. Role of the neuropeptide, bombesin, in bile secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times, bile secretion has been considered vital for maintaining health. One of the main functions of bile secretion is gastric acid neutralization with biliary bicarbonate during a meal or Pavlovian response. Although the liver has many extrinsic and intrinsic nerve innervations, the functional role of these nerves in biliary physiology is poorly understood. To understand the role of neural regulation in bile secretion, our recent studies on the effect of bombesin, a neuropeptide, on bile secretion and its underlying mechanisms will be reviewed. Using isolated perfused rat livers (IPRL) from both normal and 2 week bile duct ligated rats, as well as hepatocyte couplets and isolated bile duct units (IBDU) from normal rat livers, bombesin was shown to stimulate biliary bicarbonate and fluid secretion from bile ducts. Detailed pH studies indicated that bombesin stimulated the activity of Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, which was counterbalanced by a secondary activation of electrogenic Na+/HCO3- symport. Quantitative videomicroscopic studies showed that bombesin-stimulated fluid secretion in IBDU was dependent on Cl- and HCO3- in the media, anion exchanger(s), Cl- and K+ channels, and carbonic anhydrase, but not on the microtubular system. Furthermore, this bombesin response is inhibited by somatostatin but not substance P. Finally, studies of secondary messengers in isolated cholangiocytes and IBDU indicated that bombesin had no effect on intracellular cAMP, cGMP, or Ca++ levels in cholangiocytes. These results provide evidence that neuropeptides such as bombesin can directly stimulate fluid and bicarbonate secretion from cholangiocytes by activating luminal Cl-/HCO3- exchange, but by different mechanisms from those established for secretin. These findings, in turn, suggest that neuropeptides may play an important regulatory role in biliary transport and secretion. Thus, this neuropeptidergic regulation of bile secretion may provide a plausible mechanism for the

  7. Identification of new secreted effectors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Kaoru; Worley, Micah; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred

    2005-10-01

    A common theme in bacterial pathogenesis is the secretion of bacterial products that modify cellular functions to overcome host defenses. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to inject effector proteins into host cells. The genes encoding the structural components of the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among bacterial species and can be identified by sequence homology. In contrast, the sequences of secreted effector proteins are less conserved and are therefore difficult to identify. A strategy was developed to identify virulence factors secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cell cytoplasm. We constructed a transposon, which we refer to as mini-Tn5-cycler, to generate translational fusions between Salmonella chromosomal genes and a fragment of the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase gene derived from Bordetella pertussis (cyaA'). In-frame fusions to bacterial proteins that are secreted into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm were identified by high levels of cyclic AMP in infected cells. The assay was sufficiently sensitive that a single secreted fusion could be identified among several hundred that were not secreted. This approach identified three new effectors as well as seven that have been previously characterized. A deletion of one of the new effectors, steA (Salmonella translocated effector A), attenuated virulence. In addition, SteA localizes to the trans-Golgi network in both transfected and infected cells. This approach has identified new secreted effector proteins in Salmonella and will likely be useful for other organisms, even those in which genetic manipulation is more difficult.

  8. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  9. Acid secretion and proton conductance in human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Illek, Beate

    2002-04-01

    Acid secretion and proton conductive pathways across primary human airway surface epithelial cultures were investigated with the pH stat method in Ussing chambers and by single cell patch clamping. Cultures showed a basal proton secretion of 0.17 +/- 0.04 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), and mucosal pH equilibrated at 6.85 +/- 0.26. Addition of histamine or ATP to the mucosal medium increased proton secretion by 0.27 +/- 0.09 and 0.24 +/- 0.09 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), respectively. Addition of mast cells to the mucosal medium of airway cultures similarly activated proton secretion. Stimulated proton secretion was similar in cultures bathed mucosally with either NaCl Ringer or ion-free mannitol solutions. Proton secretion was potently blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and was unaffected by mucosal bafilomycin A(1), Sch-28080, or ouabain. Mucosal amiloride blocked proton secretion in tissues that showed large amiloride-sensitive potentials. Proton secretion was sensitive to the application of transepithelial current and showed outward rectification. In whole cell patch-clamp recordings a strongly outward-rectifying, zinc-sensitive, depolarization-activated proton conductance was identified with an average chord conductance of 9.2 +/- 3.8 pS/pF (at 0 mV and a pH 5.3-to-pH 7.3 gradient). We suggest that inflammatory processes activate proton secretion by the airway epithelium and acidify the airway surface liquid.

  10. Catecholamine-Secreting Paragangliomas at the Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Kuhweide, Rudolf; Lanser, Michael J.; Fisch, Ugo

    1996-01-01

    Paragangliomas (glomus tumors) comprise 15% of all neoplasms at the skull base. Despite extensive growth, these tumors usually do not secrete active biogenic substances into the circulation in sufficient quantities to produce symptoms. When they do secrete large amounts of catecholamines, they will cause symptoms that mimic a pheochromocytoma. The still confusing nomenclature of paragangliomas is reviewed, and the clinical work-up, surgical treatment, and follow-up of five patients with catecholamine-secreting paragangliomas of temporal bone (3), infratemporal fossa (1), and nasopharynx (1) are presented and discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170951

  11. ER to Golgi-Dependent Protein Secretion: The Conventional Pathway.

    PubMed

    Viotti, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Secretion is the cellular process present in every organism that delivers soluble proteins and cargoes to the extracellular space. In eukaryotes, conventional protein secretion (CPS) is the trafficking route that secretory proteins undertake when are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus (GA), and subsequently to the plasma membrane (PM) via secretory vesicles or secretory granules. This book chapter recalls the fundamental steps in cell biology research contributing to the elucidation of CPS; it describes the most prominent examples of conventionally secreted proteins in eukaryotic cells and the molecular mechanisms necessary to regulate each step of this process. PMID:27665548

  12. A Method for Staining Nematode Secretions and Structures

    PubMed Central

    Premachandran, D.; Von Mende, N.; Hussey, R. S.; McClure, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Secretions from amphids, phasmids, and excretory system were stained by incubating nematodes in 0.1% coomassie brilliant blue G-250 in 40% aqueous methanol containing 10% acetic acid on slides with coverslips sealed with nail polish or Zut. Nematodes incubated in this staining solution usually produced copious amounts of secretions from their amphids and excretory pore. Phasmids also stained dark blue, enabling them to be easily observed. Other biological dyes stained these secretions or were useful for differentiating specific morphological features of nematodes. PMID:19290186

  13. Effect of environmental contaminants on nasal lysozyme secretions.

    PubMed

    Noble, Rudolf E

    2002-02-01

    Human nasal secretions are comprised of lysozyme and albumin as their main protein components. Lysozyme, an anti-microbial substance, is produced by nasal serous cells while albumin is obtained, primarily, from increased nasal vasculature permeability. We measured lysozyme levels in nasal secretions following challenge by a variety of non-infectious environmental contaminants. The methodology given presents a simple and rapid method of collecting nasal secretions and determining their lysozyme content, a technique which can be used for a host of environmental irritants.

  14. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M; Ferry, Vivian E; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A Paul; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-07-01

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  15. Multiparty semiquantum secret sharing based on rearranging orders of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gan; Wang, Yue; Wang, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Based on the assumption of a perfect qubit, Boyer et al. proposed a novel semiquantum key distribution protocol [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 140501], in which quantum Alice shares a secret key with classical Bob. In this paper, we use Bell states to propose a multiparty semiquantum secret sharing (MSQSS) protocol, in which only the boss is quantum and all agents are classical. Classical agents are restricted to performing measurements in a computational basis and rearranging orders of qubits. Unless all classical agents collaborate, no subset of them can obtain the secret of the quantum boss. Also, we show that this proposed protocol is secure against eavesdropping.

  16. Competitively coupled maps for hiding secret visual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidelys, M.; Ziaukas, P.; Ragulskis, M.

    2016-02-01

    A novel digital image hiding scheme based on competitively coupled maps is presented in this paper. Self-organizing patterns produced by an array of non-diffusively coupled nonlinear maps are exploited to conceal the secret. The secret image is represented in the form of a dot-skeleton representation and is embedded into a spatially homogeneous initial state far below the noise level. Self-organizing patterns leak the secret image at a predefined set of system parameters. Computational experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness and the security of the proposed image hiding scheme.

  17. Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Secreted Single Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Somin Eunice; Chen, Qian; Bhat, Ramray; Petkiewicz, Shayne; Smith, Jessica M.; Ferry, Vivian E.; Correia, Ana Luisa; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-06-03

    Plasmon rulers, consisting of pairs of gold nanoparticles, allow single-molecule analysis without photobleaching or blinking; however, current plasmon rulers are irreversible, restricting detection to only single events. Here, we present a reversible plasmon ruler, comprised of coupled gold nanoparticles linked by a single aptamer, capable of binding individual secreted molecules with high specificity. We show that the binding of target secreted molecules to the reversible plasmon ruler is characterized by single-molecule sensitivity, high specificity, and reversibility. Lastly, such reversible plasmon rulers should enable dynamic and adaptive live-cell measurement of secreted single molecules in their local microenvironment.

  18. Characterization of the Unconventional Secretion of the Ebola Matrix Protein VP40.

    PubMed

    Reynard, Olivier; Mateo, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    While most secreted proteins use the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi secretion pathway to reach the extracellular medium, a few proteins are secreted through unconventional secretary pathways. Viral proteins can be secreted through unconventional secretion pathways. Here, we describe how we have recently demonstrated that the Ebola virus (EBOV) matrix protein VP40 is released from transfected and infected cells in a soluble form through an unconventional secretion pathway. PMID:27665561

  19. TRAPP Complexes in Secretion and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Lipatova, Zhanna; Segev, Nava

    2016-01-01

    TRAPP is a highly conserved modular multi-subunit protein complex. Originally identified as a “transport protein particle” with a role in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport, its multiple subunits and their conservation from yeast to humans were characterized in the late 1990s. TRAPP attracted attention when it was shown to act as a Ypt/Rab GTPase nucleotide exchanger, GEF, in the 2000s. Currently, three TRAPP complexes are known in yeast, I, II, and III, and they regulate two different intracellular trafficking pathways: secretion and autophagy. Core TRAPP contains four small subunits that self assemble to a stable complex, which has a GEF activity on Ypt1. Another small subunit, Trs20/Sedlin, is an adaptor required for the association of core TRAPP with larger subunits to form TRAPP II and TRAPP III. Whereas the molecular structure of the core TRAPP complex is resolved, the architecture of the larger TRAPP complexes, including their existence as dimers and multimers, is less clear. In addition to its Ypt/Rab GEF activity, and thereby an indirect role in vesicle tethering through Ypt/Rabs, a direct role for TRAPP as a vesicle tether has been suggested. This idea is based on TRAPP interactions with vesicle coat components. While much of the basic information about TRAPP complexes comes from yeast, mutations in TRAPP subunits were connected to human disease. In this review we will summarize new information about TRAPP complexes, highlight new insights about their function and discuss current controversies and future perspectives. PMID:27066478

  20. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  1. Structure of EspB, a secreted substrate of the ESX-1 secretion system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Korotkova, Natalia; Piton, Jérémie; Wagner, Jonathan M.; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Japaridze, Aleksandre; Evans, Timothy J.; Cole, Stewart T.; Pojer, Florence; Korotkov, Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis secretes multiple virulence factors during infection via the general Sec and Tat pathways, and via specialized ESX secretion systems, also referred to as type VII secretion systems. The ESX-1 secretion system is an important virulence determinant because deletion of ESX-1 leads to attenuation of M. tuberculosis. ESX-1 secreted protein B (EspB) contains putative PE (Pro-Glu) and PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) domains, and a C-terminal domain, which is processed by MycP1 protease during secretion. We determined the crystal structure of PE–PPE domains of EspB, which represents an all-helical, elongated molecule closely resembling the structure of the PE25–PPE41 heterodimer despite limited sequence similarity. Also, we determined the structure of full-length EspB, which does not have interpretable electron density for the C-terminal domain confirming that it is largely disordered. Comparative analysis of EspB in cell lysate and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis revealed that mature secreted EspB forms oligomers. Electron microscopy analysis showed that the N-terminal fragment of EspB forms donut-shaped particles. These data provide a rationale for the future investigation of EspB's role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:26051906

  2. Beyond the wall: Candida albicans secret(e)s to survive.

    PubMed

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans occupies various niches of the human body such as the skin and the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It can also enter the blood stream and cause deadly, systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, but also in immunocompetent individuals through inserted medical devices. To survive in these diverse host environments, C. albicans has developed specialized virulence attributes and rapidly adapts itself to local growth conditions and defense mechanisms. Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins that are involved in biofilm formation, tissue invasion, immune evasion, and wall maintenance, as well as acquisition of nutrients including metal ions. The secretome of C. albicans is predicted to comprise 225 proteins. On a proteomic level, however, analysis of the secretome of C. albicans is incomplete as many secreted proteins are only produced under certain conditions. Interestingly, glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins and known cytoplasmic proteins are also consistently detected in the growth medium. Importantly, a core set of seven wall polysaccharide-processing enzymes seems to be consistently present, including the diagnostic marker Mp65. Overall, we discuss the importance of the secretome for virulence and suggest potential targets for better and faster diagnostic methods.

  3. Beyond the wall: Candida albicans secret(e)s to survive.

    PubMed

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans occupies various niches of the human body such as the skin and the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. It can also enter the blood stream and cause deadly, systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, but also in immunocompetent individuals through inserted medical devices. To survive in these diverse host environments, C. albicans has developed specialized virulence attributes and rapidly adapts itself to local growth conditions and defense mechanisms. Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins that are involved in biofilm formation, tissue invasion, immune evasion, and wall maintenance, as well as acquisition of nutrients including metal ions. The secretome of C. albicans is predicted to comprise 225 proteins. On a proteomic level, however, analysis of the secretome of C. albicans is incomplete as many secreted proteins are only produced under certain conditions. Interestingly, glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins and known cytoplasmic proteins are also consistently detected in the growth medium. Importantly, a core set of seven wall polysaccharide-processing enzymes seems to be consistently present, including the diagnostic marker Mp65. Overall, we discuss the importance of the secretome for virulence and suggest potential targets for better and faster diagnostic methods. PMID:23170918

  4. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  5. Expression and secretion of heterologous proteases by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed Central

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Wang, L; Kortt, A; Stewart, D; Radford, A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the basic protease of Dichelobacter nodosus (bprV) and the subtilisin of Bacillus subtilis (aprE) were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In each case, enzymatically active protein was detected in the supernatants of liquid cultures. While the secretion of subtilisin was directed by its own signal peptide, the natural signal peptide of the bprV basic protease did not facilitate secretion. A hybrid aprE-bprV gene in which the promoter and signal peptide coding sequences of subtilisin replaced those of bprV could be expressed, and basic protease was secreted by C. glutamicum. Expression of these proteases in C. glutamicum provides an opportunity to compare protein secretion from this gram-positive host with that from other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7747974

  6. Autocrine regulation of milk secretion by a protein in milk.

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, C J; Addey, C V; Boddy, L M; Peaker, M

    1995-01-01

    Frequency or completeness of milk removal from the lactating mammary gland regulates the rate of milk secretion by a mechanism which is local, chemical and inhibitory in nature. Screening of goat's milk proteins in rabbit mammary explant cultures identified a single whey protein of M(r) 7600 able to inhibit synthesis of milk constituents. The active whey protein, which we term FIL (Feedback inhibitor of Lactation), also decreased milk secretion temporarily when introduced into a mammary gland of lactating goats. FIL was synthesized by primary cultures of goat mammary epithelial cells, and was secreted vectorially together with other milk proteins. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that it is a hitherto unknown protein. The evidence indicates that local regulation of milk secretion by milk removal is through autocrine feedback inhibition by this milk protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7826353

  7. Effect of nervous excitation on acid secretion in horses.

    PubMed

    Sandin, A; Andrews, F M; Nadeau, J A; Nilsson, G

    2000-03-01

    Nervous excitation was induced by various means in horses provided with a gastric cannula. Insulin hypoglycaemia profoundly inhibited the basal acid output and volume secreted from the stomach. No clear effect on acid secretion was noted after administration of bethanechol, as the acid output was covered by the copious secretion of saliva. Atropine almost abolished the basal acid output. Sensoric stimulation by teasing caused a slight but not significant increase in the total acid output. These data suggest that cholinergic excitation might play a role in the stimulation of both volume and acid secretion in the horse. The inhibitory effect seen on these two parameters after insulin hypoglycaemia may hypothetically be ascribed to inhibitory impulses carried in peptide neurones of the vagal nerves or to inhibitory impulses in adrenergic nerves acting directly or indirectly on the parietal cells.

  8. Eyes, ears, lips, fingertips, secrets: Dora, psychoanalysis, and the body.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    The topic of secrets will be expanded here to apply to complex secrets of the body, sex, and gender kept by both patients and analysts. Their detection is made harder by our field's current lack of interest in them compared to Freud's curiosity. We tend to ignore body narratives these days, with both men and women, keeping secret from ourselves daily challenges to theory that do indeed exist. Dora's case will be used to examine her own, her father's, and Freud's expectations of what constitutes a sexed and gendered portrait of grown-up males and females, and how they behave together. Contemporary embodied questions will emerge in discussion of Dora and her mother(s), the men in the story, and some male case vignettes. Ordinary secrets, hidden in broad daylight in both 1905 and in 2014, will be "revealed." PMID:25688679

  9. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  10. Directional cell movement through tissues is controlled by exosome secretion.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Ketova, Tatiana; Hoshino, Daisuke; Zijlstra, Andries; Weaver, Alissa M

    2015-05-13

    Directional cell movement through tissues is critical for multiple biological processes and requires maintenance of polarity in the face of complex environmental cues. Here we use intravital imaging to demonstrate that secretion of exosomes from late endosomes is required for directionally persistent and efficient in vivo movement of cancer cells. Inhibiting exosome secretion or biogenesis leads to defective tumour cell migration associated with increased formation of unstable protrusions and excessive directional switching. In vitro rescue experiments with purified exosomes and matrix coating identify adhesion assembly as a critical exosome function that promotes efficient cell motility. Live-cell imaging reveals that exosome secretion directly precedes and promotes adhesion assembly. Fibronectin is found to be a critical motility-promoting cargo whose sorting into exosomes depends on binding to integrins. We propose that autocrine secretion of exosomes powerfully promotes directionally persistent and effective cell motility by reinforcing otherwise transient polarization states and promoting adhesion assembly.

  11. Mink-mouse hybridomas that secrete mink immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Galakhar, N L; Djatchenko, S N; Fomicheva, I I; Mechetina, L V; Taranin, A V; Belousov, E S; Nayakshin, A M; Baranov, O K

    1988-11-25

    Optimum conditions were established to obtain mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas secreting mink IgG in fusions of mouse myelomas with mink immune spleen cells. Minks were immunized with allogeneic IgG, and the spleen cells were fused with three mouse myeloma lines P3-X63-Ag8.653, NSO and Sp2/0-Ag14. Of these, P3-X63-Ag8.653 and NSO were found to be the best fusion partners giving the highest yield of hybrid clones and number of IgG secreting clones. Cloning of mink-mouse hybridomas was efficient when BALB/c nu/nu peritoneal and spleen cells were used as feeders. The ten clonal lines produced secreted intact mink IgG molecules as shown by SDS-PAGE and subsequent immunoblotting. The secretion level of IgG ranged from 5 to 200 ng/ml in the clonal lines.

  12. Microfluidic Devices for the Measurement of Cellular Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrell, Adrian M.; Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Roper, Michael G.

    2016-06-01

    The release of chemical information from cells and tissues holds the key to understanding cellular behavior and dysfunction. The development of methodologies that can measure cellular secretion in a time-dependent fashion is therefore essential. Often these measurements are made difficult by the high-salt conditions of the cellular environment, the presence of numerous other secreted factors, and the small mass samples that are produced when frequent sampling is used to resolve secretory dynamics. In this review, the methods that we have developed for measuring hormone release from islets of Langerhans are dissected to illustrate the practical difficulties of studying cellular secretions. Other methods from the literature are presented that provide alternative approaches to particularly challenging areas of monitoring cellular secretion. The examples presented in this review serve as case studies and should be adaptable to other cell types and systems for unique applications.

  13. Melatonin in Epilepsy: A New Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Justyna; Kijonka, Marek; Pęcka, Marcin; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The main objective of the study was to create a mathematical model that describes the melatonin circadian secretion and, then the functionality of the model was tested by a comparison of the melatonin secretions in children with and without epilepsy. Material and Methods. The patients were divided into the epilepsy group (EG, n = 52) and the comparison group (CG, n = 30). The melatonin level was assessed by a radioimmunoassay method. The diurnal melatonin secretion was described using a nonlinear least squares method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was chosen to estimate the dependence of the acquired data. The model reproduces blood concentration profiles and its parameters were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and logistic regression. Results. The correlation analysis performed for the EG and CG groups showed moderate correlations between age and the melatonin secretion model parameters. Patients with epilepsy are characterized by an increased phase shift of melatonin release. PMID:27478439

  14. A Generalized Information Theoretical Model for Quantum Secret Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    An information theoretical model for quantum secret sharing was introduced by H. Imai et al. (Quantum Inf. Comput. 5(1), 69-80 2005), which was analyzed by quantum information theory. In this paper, we analyze this information theoretical model using the properties of the quantum access structure. By the analysis we propose a generalized model definition for the quantum secret sharing schemes. In our model, there are more quantum access structures which can be realized by our generalized quantum secret sharing schemes than those of the previous one. In addition, we also analyse two kinds of important quantum access structures to illustrate the existence and rationality for the generalized quantum secret sharing schemes and consider the security of the scheme by simple examples.

  15. Secretion of cellulase - a key role in production

    SciTech Connect

    Montenecourt, B.S.; Sheir-Neiss, G.I.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, B.K.; Frein, E.M.; Eveleigh, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A mutant strain, Rut-C30, was compared to wild-type Trichoderma reesei to investigate differences that might explain the observed difference in cellulase secretion between the two. 21 references, 1 figure, 1 table. (ACR)

  16. PFIESTERIA SHUMWAYAE KILLS FISH BY MICROPREDATION NOT ECOTOXIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Massive fish kills in mid-Atlantic USA estuaries involving several million Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus,have been attributed to dinoflagellates of the toxic Pfiesteria complex (TPC). Potent ichthyotoxins secreted during Pfiesteria blooms are thought to be responsible fo...

  17. Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Acne Yields Up Secret That Points to New Treatments Bacteria on skin sometimes release fatty acids ... News) -- In a finding that could lead to new treatments for acne, scientists say they've discovered ...

  18. Type III Secretion: Building and Operating a Remarkable Nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Portaliou, Athina G; Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Loos, Maria S; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-02-01

    The Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein export pathway that is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and delivers effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells. At its core lie the injectisome (a sophisticated transmembrane secretion apparatus) and a complex network of specialized chaperones that target secretory proteins to the antechamber of the injectisome. The assembly of the system, and the subsequent secretion of proteins through it, undergo fine-tuned, hierarchical regulation. Here, we present the current understanding of the injectisome assembly process, secretion hierarchy, and the role of chaperones. We discuss these events in light of available structural and biochemical dissection and propose future directions essential to revealing mechanistic insight into this fascinating nanomachine. PMID:26520801

  19. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) in {sup 3}H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium.

  20. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  1. Do pancreatic β cells "taste" nutrients to secrete insulin?

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-08-28

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is controlled by nutrients, hormones, and neurotransmitters. Unlike the latter, which work through classic receptors, glucose and most other nutrients do not interact with membrane receptors but must be metabolized by β cells to induce insulin secretion. Studies have revealed the presence of umami and sweet taste receptors and their downstream effectors in β cells. That the receptors are functional was established by the effects of fructose and artificial sweeteners, which induced signals similar to those produced in taste buds of the tongue. These signals mediated an increase in insulin secretion in the presence of glucose. However, the physiological implications of these pathways in insulin secretion are unclear because of the large differences between plasma concentrations of fructose or sweeteners and their effective concentrations in vitro.

  2. Platelet secretion: From haemostasis to wound healing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-05-01

    Upon activation, platelets secrete more than 300 active substances from their intracellular granules. Platelet dense granule components, such as ADP and polyphosphates, contribute to haemostasis and coagulation, but also play a role in cancer metastasis. α-Granules contain multiple cytokines, mitogens, pro- and anti-inflammatory factors and other bioactive molecules that are essential regulators in the complex microenvironment of the growing thrombus but also contribute to a number of disease processes. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretion and the genetic regulation of granule biogenesis still remains incomplete. In this review we summarise our current understanding of the roles of platelet secretion in health and disease, and discuss some of the hypotheses that may explain how platelets may control the release of its many secreted components in a context-specific manner, to allow platelets to play multiple roles in health and disease.

  3. Granular gland transcriptomes in stimulated amphibian skin secretions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianbao; Farragher, Susan; Bjourson, Anthony J; Orr, David F; Rao, Pingfan; Shaw, Chris

    2003-04-01

    Amphibian defensive skin secretions are complex, species-specific cocktails of biologically active molecules, including many uncharacterized peptides. The study of such secretions for novel peptide discovery is time-limited, as amphibians are in rapid global decline. While secretion proteome analysis is non-lethal, transcriptome analysis has until now required killing of specimens prior to skin dissection for cDNA library construction. Here we present the discovery that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding dermal granular gland peptides are present in defensive skin secretions, stabilized by endogenous nucleic acid-binding amphipathic peptides. Thus parallel secretory proteome and transcriptome analyses can be performed without killing the specimen in this model amphibian system--a finding that has important implications in conservation of biodiversity within this threatened vertebrate taxon and whose mechanistics may have broader implications in biomolecular science.

  4. Expression and Targeting of Secreted Proteins from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bauler, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a vacuole termed the inclusion. Many of the interactions of chlamydiae with the host cell are dependent upon bacterial protein synthesis and presumably exposure of these proteins to the cytosol. Because of the dearth of genetic tools for chlamydiae, previous studies examining secreted proteins required the use of heterologous bacterial systems. Recent advances in genetic manipulation of chlamydia now allow for transformation of the bacteria with plasmids. We describe here a shuttle vector system, pBOMB4, that permits expression of recombinant proteins under constitutive or conditional promoter control. We show that the inclusion membrane protein IncD is secreted in a type III-dependent manner from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and also secreted from C. trachomatis in infected cells where it localizes appropriately to the inclusion membrane. IncD truncated of the first 30 amino acids containing the secretion signal is no longer secreted and is retained by the bacteria. Cytosolic exposure of secreted proteins can be confirmed by using CyaA, GSK, or microinjection assays. A protein predicted to be retained within the bacteria, NrdB is indeed localized to the chlamydia. In addition, we have shown that the chlamydial effector protein, CPAF, which is secreted into the host cell cytosol by a Sec-dependent pathway, also accesses the cytosol when expressed from this system. These assays should prove useful to assess the secretion of other chlamydial proteins that are potentially exposed to the cytosol of the host cell. PMID:24443531

  5. Role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Min Goo

    2014-06-01

    Transepithelial bicarbonate secretion plays a key role in the maintenance of fluid and protein secretion from epithelial cells and the protection of the epithelial cell surface from various pathogens. Epithelial bicarbonate secretion is mainly under the control of cAMP and calcium signaling. While the physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced bicarbonate secretion are relatively well defined, those induced by calcium signaling remain poorly understood in most epithelia. The present review summarizes the current status of knowledge on the role of calcium signaling in epithelial bicarbonate secretion. Specifically, this review introduces how cytosolic calcium signaling can increase bicarbonate secretion by regulating membrane transport proteins and how it synergizes with cAMP-induced mechanisms in epithelial cells. In addition, tissue-specific variations in the pancreas, salivary glands, intestines, bile ducts, and airways are discussed. We hope that the present report will stimulate further research into this important topic. These studies will provide the basis for future medicines for a wide spectrum of epithelial disorders including cystic fibrosis, Sjögren's syndrome, and chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Variable effects of soman on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.K.; Zwierzynski, D.J.; Stone, K.K.; Culp, D.J.; Marin, M.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the anticholinesterase agent, soman, on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea, in vitro. We mounted pieces of ferret trachea in Ussing-type chambers. Secreted sulfated macromolecules were radiolabeled by adding 500 microCi of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} to the submucosal medium and incubating for 17 hr. Soman added to the submucosal side produced a concentration-dependent increase in radiolabeled macromolecular release with a maximal secretory response (mean +/- SD) of 202 +/- 125% (n = 8) relative to the basal secretion rate at a concentration of 10{sup {minus} 7} M. The addition of either 10{sup {minus}6} M pralidoxime (acetylcholinesterase reactivator) or 10{sup {minus}6} M atropine blocked the response to 10{sup {minus}7} M soman. At soman concentrations greater than 10{sup {minus}7} M, secretion rate decreased and was not significantly different from basal secretion. Additional experiments utilizing acetylcholine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, suggest that inhibition of secretion by high concentrations of soman may be due to a secondary antagonistic effect of soman on muscarinic receptors.

  7. A model study of the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Ypey, D L; de Goede, J; Verveen, A A; Hekkens, W

    1989-07-01

    A computer simulation model is presented of the gastric phase regulation of gastric acid secretion in humans. The model is based on experimental data from the literature and includes terms representing gastric pH and gastric volume-dependent gastrin secretion, gastrin-dependent acid secretion, food storage in the stomach, and gastric emptying. We have explored the predictive value of the model in assessing the relative importance of gastric pH-dependent and gastric volume-dependent acid secretion mechanisms under various conditions. Similarly we have studied the role of gastric acid deregulation in achlorhydria, the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and duodenal ulcer, and the influence of the antacid drugs cimetidine and ranitidine under duodenal ulcer conditions. Model analysis of normal gastric acid regulation suggests that gastric volume-controlled acid secretion is of major importance during eating and predicts that pH-dependent gastrin secretion is of major importance in preventing excessively low pH levels between meals and during the night.

  8. Human Insulinomas Show Distinct Patterns of Insulin Secretion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude; Nenquin, Myriam; Guiot, Yves; Rahier, Jacques; Sempoux, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Insulinomas are β-cell tumors that cause hypoglycemia through inappropriate secretion of insulin. Characterization of the in vitro dynamics of insulin secretion by perifused fragments of 10 human insulinomas permitted their subdivision into three functional groups with similar insulin content. Group A (four patients with fasting and/or postprandial hypoglycemic episodes) showed qualitatively normal responses to glucose, leucine, diazoxide, tolbutamide, and extracellular CaCl2 omission or excess. The effect of glucose was concentration dependent, but, compared with normal islets, insulin secretion was excessive in both low- and high-glucose conditions. Group B (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) was mainly characterized by large insulin responses to 1 mmol/L glucose, resulting in very high basal secretion rates that were inhibited by diazoxide and restored by tolbutamide but were not further augmented by other agents except for high levels of CaCl2. Group C (three patients with fasting hypoglycemic episodes) displayed very low rates of insulin secretion and virtually no response to stimuli (including high CaCl2 concentration) and inhibitors (CaCl2 omission being paradoxically stimulatory). In group B, the presence of low-Km hexokinase-I in insulinoma β-cells (not in adjacent islets) was revealed by immunohistochemistry. Human insulinomas thus show distinct, though not completely heterogeneous, defects in insulin secretion that are attributed to the undue expression of hexokinase-I in 3 of 10 patients. PMID:26116696

  9. Pathophysiology of rhinitis. Lactoferrin and lysozyme in nasal secretions.

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, G D; Jeney, E V; Baraniuk, J N; Kim, I; Meredith, S D; Kaliner, M A

    1989-01-01

    The antimicrobial proteins lactoferrin (Lf) and lysozyme (Ly) are invariably found in nasal secretions. To investigate the cellular sources and the secretory control of these nasal proteins in vivo, 34 adult subjects underwent nasal provocation tests with methacholine (MC), histamine (H), and gustatory stimuli. Nasal lavages were collected and analyzed for total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), Lf, and Ly. MC (25 mg), H (1 mg), and gustatory stimuli (spicy foods) all increased the concentrations of TP, Alb, Lf, and Ly. However, when each protein was assessed as a percentage of TP (i.e., Alb% = Alb/TP; Lf% = Lf/TP; Ly% = Ly/TP), MC and gustatory stimuli, which both induce glandular secretion, selectively augmented Lf% and Ly% without changing Alb%, while H, which primarily increases vascular permeability, increased Alb% without significantly affecting Lf% or Ly%. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis of nasal secretions demonstrated both Lf and Ly in cholinergically induced secretions. Furthermore, histochemical analyses of nasal turbinate tissue revealed Lf and Ly colocalization within the serous cells of submucosal glands, providing evidence that both proteins are strictly glandular products within the nasal mucosa. Therefore, both Lf and Ly are produced and secreted from the glands, and their secretion may be pharmacologically regulated in attempts to improve host defenses. Images PMID:2681268

  10. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Kirkbride, Kellye C; Grega-Larson, Nathan E; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J; Weaver, Alissa M

    2016-07-18

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  11. Hydrolase secretion is a consequence of membrane recycling

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Acanthamoeba releases lysosomal hydrolases continuously into the culture medium. This release is specific for lysosomal hydrolases, but not other cellular proteins, and is energy dependent. The secreted hydrolases can be separated into two groups on the basis of their secretion kinetics: one is secreted at approximately 15% of the cellular activity per hour and the other at approximately 5%. Intracellularly the lysosomal hydrolases are restricted almost exclusively to secondary lysosomes where the hydrolases demonstrate a differential pH-dependent binding to membrane. Hydrolase secretion is not the result of secondary lysosomes' fusing with the plasma membrane since soluble and particulate lysosomal contents are not released at the same rate. Together the data suggest that the secreted hydrolases are trapped in shuttle vesicles that cycle membrane from secondary lysosomes to the cell surface. The inner membrane and content of these vesicles undergo a marked pH shift when, following fragmentation from lysosomes, these vesicles fuse with plasma membrane. This rapid pH shift and the differential pH-dependent membrane binding of hydrolases appear to account for the heterogeneous hydrolase secretion kinetics. PMID:6707089

  12. Proteolytic events in the processing of secreted proteins in fungi.

    PubMed

    Calmels, T P; Martin, F; Durand, H; Tiraby, G

    1991-01-01

    Secreted heterologous proteins have been found to be produced much less efficiently by fungi than secreted homologous ones. This could be due, at least in part, to proteolytic cleavage by site-specific endoproteases of the secretory pathway, similar to the yeast KEX2 protease and the mammalian dibasic endoproteinases found in secretory pathways. Mature secreted fungal proteins may be protected from such cleavage due to the absence of cleavable sites in exposed regions. A comparison of the dipeptide distributions of 33 secreted and 34 cytoplasmic proteins from fungal producers of extracellular enzymes indicated a significant bias for some doublets, including the basic dipeptides Lys-Arg, Arg-Arg and Arg-Lys which have also been demonstrated to be KEX2 substrates. Other combinations were also found to be rare in secreted proteins, which could indicate either a broader specificity of the considered endopeptidase, or the presence either in the secretory organelles or among the secreted proteins of additional proteases with different specificities. Experimental evidence that the Lys-Arg site is processed in Tolypocladium geodes was provided by cloning a synthetic prosequence upstream of a phleomycin resistance (Sh ble) gene and analyzing the N-terminus of the corresponding protein purified from the culture supernatant. This system also provides a tool for further studies of specific proteases of fungi.

  13. A molecular mechanism that stabilizes cooperative secretions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook

    2010-01-01

    Summary Bacterial populations frequently act as a collective by secreting a wide range of compounds necessary for cell-cell communication, host colonization and virulence. However, how such behaviors avoid exploitation by spontaneous ‘cheater’ mutants that use but do not contribute to secretions remains unclear. We investigate this question using Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming, a collective surface motility requiring massive secretions of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. We first show that swarming is immune to the evolution of rhlA− ‘cheaters’. We then demonstrate that P. aeruginosa resists cheating through metabolic prudence: wild-type cells secrete biosurfactants only when the cost of their production and impact on individual fitness is low, therefore preventing non-secreting strains from gaining an evolutionary advantage. Metabolic prudence works because the carbon-rich biosurfactants are only produced when growth is limited by another growth limiting nutrient, the nitrogen source. By genetically manipulating a strain to produce the biosurfactants constitutively we show that swarming becomes cheatable: a non-producing strain rapidly outcompetes and replaces this obligate cooperator. We argue that metabolic prudence, which may first evolve as a direct response to cheating or simply to optimize growth, can explain the maintenance of massive secretions in many bacteria. More generally, prudent regulation is a mechanism to stabilize cooperation. PMID:21166901

  14. An unexpected knock on Corrigan’s secret door

    PubMed Central

    Woywodt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Corrigan’s secret door describes a metaphorical escape route for busy physicians. The term was derived from the successful and exceptionally busy professional life of Irish physician Dominic John Corrigan (1802–80). It is claimed that Corrigan’s outpatient clinic was so busy that he required a secret door in his consulting rooms to escape from the ever-growing queue of eager patients. The origins of this charming story are unknown, and the door may have never existed. However, at present, Corrigan’s secret door is often quoted when busy physicians have their own little ways in surviving a stressful professional life. Generations of British-trained doctors have grown up with Corrigan’s secret door, as it was featured in the introduction of the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. Accordingly, trainees as well as more senior doctors are often reminded that having a ‘secret door’ is vital in surviving in the medical profession. My own escape is through classical music and the violoncello, in particular. As the name implies, my own secret door is normally invisible to colleagues and patients. This little article is about a patient who found me out, and a reflection on the role of classical music and the cello in my professional life. PMID:25984078

  15. Inhibition of cyclic gonadotropin secretion by endogenous human prolactin.

    PubMed

    Tyson, J E; Khojandi, M; Huth, J; Smith, B; Thomas, P

    1975-02-01

    The resumption of cyclic uterine bleeding reportedly accompanies the use of human prolactin (HPRL)-suppressing agents in postpill galactorrhea-amenorrhea. In this laboratory, HPRL suppression with L-dopa was variable and short lived. Basal plasma HPRL levels were elevated before and after as much as five months of therapy. Galactorrhea persisted and mean gonadotropin concentrations were subnormal. An immediate and sustained attenuation of HPRL secretion ( less than 200 per cent) followed the use of 2-Br-alpha-ergocryptine (CB-154). Cyclic gonadotropin secretion resumed and was accompanied by ovulation and, in one instance, pregnancy. The cessation of galactorrhea was positively correlated with the rise in the daily concentration of 17 beta-estradiol. Cyclic postovulatory menstruation continued after the cessation of CB-154 treatment. HPRL levels remained normal. The daily patterns of human follicle-stimulating hormone (HFSH) and human tuteinizing hormone (HLH) secretion created by the suppression of HPRL displayed an inherent rhythmicity identical to that observed at the time of menarche. The inhibitory effects of HPRL appeared directed at cyclic rather than tonic gonadotropin secretion. At the same time, diminished ovarian estrogen production seemed to increase mammary gland sensitivity to HPRL, leading to lactation. One may postulate, therefore, that the ingestion of sex steroids is associated with an over-all suppression of endogenous cyclic and, to a lesser extent, tonic gonadotropin secretion secondary to which ovarian function is attenuated. Without physiologic concentration of circulating estrogen, HPRL induces mammary alveolar function with the production of a milklike secretion.

  16. Constraints on secret neutrino interactions after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forastieri, Francesco; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Natoli, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Neutrino interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics may affect the cosmological evolution and can be constrained through observations. We consider the possibility that neutrinos possess secret scalar or pseudoscalar interactions mediated by the Nambu-Goldstone boson of a still unknown spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry, as in, e.g., Majoron models. In such scenarios, neutrinos still decouple at Tsimeq 1 MeV, but become tightly coupled again (``recouple'') at later stages of the cosmological evolution. We use available observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, including Planck 2013 and the joint BICEP2/Planck 2015 data, to derive constraints on the quantity γνν4, parameterizing the neutrino collision rate due to scalar or pseudoscalar interactions. We consider both a minimal extension of the standard ΛCDM model, and more complicated scenarios with extra relativistic degrees of freedom or non-vanishing tensor amplitude. For a wide range of dataset and model combinations, we find a typical constraint γνν4 lesssim 0.9× 10-27 (95% C.L.), implying an upper limit on the redshift zνrec of neutrino recoupling 0lesssim 850, leaving open the possibility that the latter occured well before hydrogen recombination. In the framework of Majoron models, the upper limit on γνν roughly translates on a constraint g lesssim 8.2× 10-7 on the Majoron-neutrino coupling constant g. In general, the data show a weak (~ 1σ) but intriguing preference for non-zero values of γνν4, with best fits in the range γνν4 = (0.15-0.35)× 10-27, depending on the particular dataset. This is more evident when either high-resolution CMB observations from the ACT and SPT experiments are included, or the possibility of non-vanishing tensor modes is considered. In particular, for the minimal model ΛCDM+γνν and including the Planck 2013, ACT and SPT data, we report γνν4=(0.44+0.17-0.36)×10-27 (0300 lesssim zνrec lesssim 550) at 68

  17. Protease secretion by Erwinia chrysanthemi: the specific secretion functions are analogous to those of Escherichia coli alpha-haemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Létoffé, S; Delepelaire, P; Wandersman, C

    1990-01-01

    A 5.5 kb DNA fragment carrying the functions necessary for the specific secretion of the extracellular metalloproteases B and C produced by the Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi has been sequenced. The fragment contains four transcribed and translated genes: inh, which codes for a protease inhibitor and is not required for protease secretion, and prtD, prtE and prtF, which share significant homology with the hlyB, hlyD and tolC genes required for alpha-haemolysin secretion in Escherichia coli. Mutations in any of the three prt genes abolish protease secretion. The prtD and prtE products (60 and 50 kd) contain at least one hydrophobic segment and the prtF gene product contains a signal sequence. Images Fig.4. Fig. 5. PMID:2184029

  18. Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria Secretes Proteases and Xylanases via the Xps Type II Secretion System and Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Magali; Scheibner, Felix; Hoffmeister, Anne-Katrin; Hartmann, Nadine; Hause, Gerd; Rother, Annekatrin; Jordan, Michael; Lautier, Martine; Arlat, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant-pathogenic bacteria utilize type II secretion (T2S) systems to secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S substrates presumably mediate the degradation of plant cell wall components during the host-pathogen interaction and thus promote bacterial virulence. Previously, the Xps-T2S system from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria was shown to contribute to extracellular protease activity and the secretion of a virulence-associated xylanase. The identities and functions of additional T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, however, are still unknown. In the present study, the analysis of 25 candidate proteins from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria led to the identification of two type II secreted predicted xylanases, a putative protease and a lipase which was previously identified as a virulence factor of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. Studies with mutant strains revealed that the identified xylanases and the protease contribute to virulence and in planta growth of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. When analyzed in the related pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris, several T2S substrates from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria were secreted independently of the T2S systems, presumably because of differences in the T2S substrate specificities of the two pathogens. Furthermore, in X. campestris pv. vesicatoria T2S mutants, secretion of T2S substrates was not completely absent, suggesting the contribution of additional transport systems to protein secretion. In line with this hypothesis, T2S substrates were detected in outer membrane vesicles, which were frequently observed for X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. We, therefore, propose that extracellular virulence-associated enzymes from X. campestris pv. vesicatoria are targeted to the Xps-T2S system and to outer membrane vesicles. IMPORTANCE The virulence of plant-pathogenic bacteria often depends on TS2 systems, which secrete degradative enzymes into the extracellular milieu. T2S

  19. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65.

    PubMed

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F

    2007-11-01

    We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  20. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  1. Btc22 chaperone is required for secretion and stability of the type III secreted protein Bsp22 in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi; Abe, Akio

    2012-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a sophisticated protein secretion machinery that delivers bacterial virulence proteins into host cells. A needle-tip protein, Bsp22 , is one of the secreted substrates of the T3SS and plays an essential role in the full function of the T3SS in Bordetella bronchiseptica. In this study, we found that BB1618 functions as a chaperone for Bsp22 . The deletion of BB1618 resulted in a dramatic impairment of Bsp22 secretion into the culture supernatants and Bsp22 stability in the bacterial cytosol. In contrast, the secretion of other type III secreted proteins was not affected by the BB1618 mutation. Furthermore, the BB1618 mutant strain could not induce cytotoxicity and displayed the same phenotypes as the Bsp22 mutant strain. An immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that BB1618 interacts with Bsp22 , but not with BopB and BopD . Thus, we identified BB1618 as a specific type III chaperone for Bsp22 . Therefore, we propose that BB1618 be renamed Btc22 for the Bordetella type III chaperone for Bsp22 .

  2. Secretion of lysosomal hydrolases by stimulated and nonstimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages were obtained from untreated mice and from mice treated with thioglycollate medium (TA), proteose peptone medium (PP), or a suspension of streptococcus A cell wall material (SA). The biochemical and secretory properties of these cells in long term cultures (up to 2 wk) were compared. TA-elicited macrophages contained more protein, lactate dehydrogenase, lysosomal hydrolases, and in particular, more plasminogen activator than the other cells studied. All types of macrophages studied were found to release considerable amounts of lysosomal hydrolases (beta-glucuronidase, N-acetyl-beta- glucosaminidase, alpha-mannosidase, and acid phosphatase) into the medium. Release was independent of phagocytosis and must, therefore, be regarded as true secretion. In both elicited and nonelicited macrophages, the rates of lysosomal enzyme secretion were virtually identical in the presence and in the absence of serum, and they were not enhanced by increasing serum concentrations. Lysosomal enzyme secretion in macrophages appears to depend on protein synthesis, since it was blocked by low concentrations of cycloheximide which neither affected cell viability nor lowered the intracellular enzyme levels. The amounts of lysosomal hydrolases secreted were highest in TA- elicited macrophages. The rates of secretion of PP- or SA-elicited and of nonelicited macrophages were about one-fourth of that of the TA- elicited cells. This difference, although significant, is much smaller than that observed for the secretion of plasminogen activator which was 20-50 times higher in TA-elicited cells. Acid glycosidases were also found in the peritoneal lavage media used for cell harvesting from both treated and nontreated mice. This indicates that active secretion of lysosomal hydrolases may be an in vivo property of the macrophage. PMID:29935

  3. Integrin adhesion in regulation of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sofia V; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Gierow, J Peter

    2006-09-01

    The extracellular microenvironment regulates lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion. Culturing isolated rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells on different extracellular matrix proteins revealed that laminin enhances carbachol-stimulated secretion to a greater extent than other extracellular matrix proteins investigated. Furthermore, immunofluorescence indicated that integrin subunits, potentially functioning as laminin receptors are present in acinar cells. Among these, the integrin alpha6 and beta1 subunit mRNA expression was also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. Secretion assays, which measured beta-hexosaminidase activity released in the culture media, demonstrated that function-blocking integrin alpha6 and beta1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) induce a rapid, transient and dose-dependent secretory response in cultured cells. To determine the intracellular pathways by which integrin alpha6 and beta1 mAbs could induce secretion, selected second messenger molecules were inhibited. Although inhibitors of protein kinase C and IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization attenuated carbachol-stimulated secretion, no effect on integrin mAb-induced release was observed. In addition, protein tyrosine kinases do not appear to have a role in transducing signals arising from mAb interactions. Our data clearly demonstrate, though, that cell adhesion through integrins regulates secretion from lacrimal gland acinar cells. The fact that the integrin mAbs affect the cholinergic response differently and that the integrin beta1 mAb secretion, but not the alpha6, was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, suggests that each subunit utilizes separate intracellular signaling pathways to induce exocytosis. The results also indicate that the secretory response triggered by the beta1 integrin mAb is generated through dephosphorylation events.

  4. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Swelling of the vesicle is prerequisite for PTH secretion.

    PubMed

    Lim, S K; Kwon, Y H; Song, Y D; Lee, H C; Ryu, K J; Huh, K B; Park, C S

    1996-02-01

    Unlike most secretory cells, high extra cellular calcium inhibits rather than stimulates hormonal secretion in several cells such as parathyroid cells, Juxtaglomerular cells and osteoclast. To gain further insight into the common but unique stimulus-secretion coupling mechanism in these cells, bovine parathyroid slices were incubated in various conditions of Krebs-Ringer (KR) solution containing essential amino acids. Parathyroid cells showed the inverse dependency of secretion on extra cellular calcium concentration as we expected. Ammonium acetate overcame the inhibitory effect of 2.5 mM of calcium and the maximum effect was as much as the five times of the basal value, while there was a little additive effect under 0 mM CaCl2. PTH secretion was biphasic according to the change of extra cellular osmolarity and the lowest response was observed at 300 mOsm/l. In Na-rich KR solution, high concentration of nigericin (> 10(-4)M) completely overcame the inhibitory effect of 2.5 mM CaCl2 and the maximum stimulatory effect was 8 times greater whereas it was only 2 times greater without CaCl2. In K-rich KR solution that abolished the K-gradient between the extra cellular solution and the cytoplasm, the rate of PTH secretion increased, and furthermore the addition of nigericin increased the rate of secretion significantly. The results above suggested that the osmotic swelling of the secretory vesicle in parathyroid cells might promote exocytosis as in Juxtaglomerular cells. We propose that the swelling of the vesicle is also prerequisite for secretion in several cells inhibited paradoxically by Ca++, whatever the signal transduction pathway for swelling of the secretory granules induced by the lowering of Ca++ in cytoplasm are.

  6. Nutrients and cyclical interdigestive pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Holtmann, G; Kelly, D G; DiMagno, E P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It is hypothesised that nutrients increase pancreatic enzyme secretion by converting cyclical interdigestive secretion to a non-cyclical pattern. This study tested the hypotheses that nutrients do not interrupt cycles and determined the relation of nutrients, calories, and osmotic load to the rate of pancreatic secretion. METHODS: Twenty six healthy persons were intubated with oroduodenal and orogastric tubes. Each had one of four different solutions containing 12 to 36% of calories as protein, 24 to 48% as fat, and 40 to 64% as carbohydrate infused into the duodenum at 40, 90, or 160 kcal/h for 300 minutes. Nine g/l sodium chloride (290 mOsm) was added to 16 infusates; osmolality of the other 10 infusates was 24 to 98 mOsm. Pancreatic enzyme outputs were measured every 15 minutes and peaks of enzyme secretion were identified. RESULTS: The number of enzyme peaks was similar for the different infusates and the proportion of nutrients in the infusates did not affect secretion of individual enzymes. The nadir, but not the peak of the cycles of enzyme outputs correlated with increasing the caloric load (r = 0.55, p < 0.003 for nadir:peak ratio). Increasing osmolality did not affect cycling but reduced (p < 0.001) enzyme output. CONCLUSION: Nutrients entering the duodenum do not abolish cycles of enzyme secretion; instead they modulate cycles by increasing the nadir. Forty and 90 kcal infusions submaximally stimulate pancreatic secretion and might be used in patients with pancreatitis without producing pain; adding sodium chloride to solutions should increase this effect. PMID:8984034

  7. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chitinase, a gradually secreted protein.

    PubMed

    Folders, J; Algra, J; Roelofs, M S; van Loon, L C; Tommassen, J; Bitter, W

    2001-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino acid residues, without a typical N-terminal signal sequence. Nevertheless, an N-terminal segment of 11 residues was found to be cleaved off in the secreted protein. The protein shows sequence similarity to the secreted chitinases ChiC of Serratia marcescens, ChiA of Vibrio harveyi, and ChiD of Bacillus circulans and consists of an activity domain and a chitin-binding domain, which are separated by a fibronectin type III domain. ChiC was able to bind and degrade colloidal chitin and was active on the artificial substrates carboxymethyl-chitin-Remazol Brilliant Violet and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose, but not on p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-N-acetylglucosamine, indicating that it is an endochitinase. Expression of the chiC gene appears to be regulated by the quorum-sensing system of P. aeruginosa, since this gene was not expressed in a lasIR vsmI mutant. After overnight growth, the majority of the ChiC produced was found intracellularly, whereas only small amounts were detected in the culture medium. However, after several days, the cellular pool of ChiC was largely depleted, and the protein was found in the culture medium. This release could not be ascribed to cell lysis. Since ChiC did not appear to be secreted via any of the known secretion systems, a novel secretion pathway seems to be involved.

  8. Model for Glucagon Secretion by Pancreatic α-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Vélez, Virginia; Dupont, Geneviève; Gil, Amparo; González, Alejandro; Quesada, Iván

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon hormone is synthesized and released by pancreatic α-cells, one of the islet-cell types. This hormone, along with insulin, maintains blood glucose levels within the physiological range. Glucose stimulates glucagon release at low concentrations (hypoglycemia). However, the mechanisms involved in this secretion are still not completely clear. Here, using experimental calcium time series obtained in mouse pancreatic islets at low and high glucose conditions, we propose a glucagon secretion model for α-cells. Our model takes into account that the resupply of releasable granules is not only controlled by cytoplasmic , as in other neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, but also by the level of extracellular glucose. We found that, although calcium oscillations are highly variable, the average secretion rates predicted by the model fall into the range of values reported in the literature, for both stimulated and non-stimulated conditions. For low glucose levels, the model predicts that there would be a well-controlled number of releasable granules refilled slowly from a large reserve pool, probably to ensure a secretion rate that could last for several minutes. Studying the α-cell response to the addition of insulin at low glucose, we observe that the presence of insulin reduces glucagon release by decreasing the islet level. This observation is in line with previous work reporting that dynamics, mainly frequency, is altered by insulin [1]. Thus, the present results emphasize the main role played by and glucose in the control of glucagon secretion by α-cells. Our modeling approach also shows that calcium oscillations potentiate glucagon secretion as compared to constant levels of this cellular messenger. Altogether, the model sheds new light on the subcellular mechanisms involved in α-cell exocytosis, and provides a quantitative predictive tool for studying glucagon secretion modulators in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22412861

  9. 45 CFR 5.65 - Exemption four: Trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be expected if the information is disclosed? (c) Designation of certain confidential information. A... Exemption four: Trade secrets and confidential commercial or financial information. We will withhold trade... confidential. (a) Trade secrets. A trade secret is a secret, commercially valuable plan, formula, process,...

  10. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  11. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  12. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  13. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Appellate determinations under 31 CFR 1.5(i) with respect to records of the United States Secret Service... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States Secret Service D...—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service....

  14. Total protein output during rapid reduction of bile salt secretion rates in man.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P R; Toth, J L; Upadhya, G A; Ilson, R G; Strasberg, S M

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the effect of bile salt secretion on total biliary protein secretion in man. Bile was collected in eight patients from a tube in the bile duct. Collection was started after a meal and continued for six hours, in order to obtain bile salt secretion rates over the entire physiological range. Total protein secretion rates did not vary with change in bile salt secretion or bile flow. The protein pattern assessed by SDS-PAGE did not vary with bile salt secretion. The results indicate that bile salt secretion has little influence on biliary protein secretion under these conditions in man. Changes in bile salt secretion were associated with linear change in bile flow, but there was no relationship between bile flow and protein secretion rates. This argues against convective sieving of plasma proteins into bile. Images Fig. 4 PMID:2920916

  15. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  16. The dynamics of secretion during sea urchin embryonic skeleton formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, Fred H.

    2008-05-01

    Skeleton formation involves secretion of massive amounts of mineral precursor, usually a calcium salt, and matrix proteins, many of which are deposited on, or even occluded within, the mineral. The cell biological underpinnings of this secretion and subsequent assembly of the biomineralized skeletal element is not well understood. We ask here what is the relationship of the trafficking and secretion of the mineral and matrix within the primary mesenchyme cells of the sea urchin embryo, cells that deposit the endoskeletal spicule. Fluorescent labeling of intracellular calcium deposits show mineral precursors are present in granules visible by light microscopy, from whence they are deposited in the endoskeletal spicule, especially at its tip. In contrast, two different matrix proteins tagged with GFP are present in smaller post-Golgi vesicles only seen by electron microscopy, and the secreted protein are only incorporated into the spicule in the vicinity of the cell of origin. The matrix protein, SpSM30B, is post-translationally modified during secretion, and this processing continues after its incorporation into the spicule. Our findings also indicate that the mineral precursor and two well characterized matrix proteins are trafficked by different cellular routes.

  17. Cultured human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Yohn, J J; Morelli, J G; Walchak, S J; Rundell, K B; Norris, D A; Zamora, M R

    1993-01-01

    The human epidermal-melanin unit exists as a complex interplay of cell-cell interactions. Melanocytes synthesize melanin and transfer it to the surrounding keratinocytes, which, in turn, produce factors that affect melanocyte homeostasis, growth, and melanization. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor peptide produced by endothelial cells, has recently been shown to stimulate human melanocyte proliferation and tyrosinase activity. To investigate the possibility that keratinocytes synthesize and secrete ET-1, we grew human keratinocytes in a defined serum-free medium and measured ET-1 levels in the keratinocytes and the keratinocyte-conditioned medium. Northern analysis of keratinocyte total RNA also was performed. We found that human keratinocytes express preproET-1 mRNA and translate the message to ET-1 protein, which is secreted into the keratinocyte medium. Human keratinocytes produced ET-1 in a time-dependent manner with total production of 20.1 +/- 1.1 pg ET-1/10(6) cells at 24 h (n = 7). Although total ET-1 production (secreted plus cell-associated ET-1) was similar, the proportion of secreted versus cell-associated ET-1 varied widely among the different donors. We have found that human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete ET-1 in vitro. From these data we believe that the keratinocyte could be an in vivo epidermal source of this melanocyte growth and pigmentation factor.

  18. Elucidation of cell secretion: pancreas led the way.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Constantin

    2004-01-01

    Secretion is a basic process in all cells and is required for several important functions such as neurotransmission, the secretion of digestive juices from the exocrine pancreas and the release of hormones from endocrine and neuroendocrine cells. Due to these important functions, the mechanism of cell secretion has been intensely investigated for over half a century. However, it is only in the last decade, with the discovery of a new cellular structure, the 'porosome' or 'fusion pore', and the elucidation of SNARE-induced membrane fusion, that has finally provided us with an understanding of cell secretion at the molecular level. The 'porosome', a supramolecular structure at the cell plasma membrane, was first discovered in the exocrine pancreas, and subsequently in endocrine/neuroendocrine cells and in neurons. The structure and dynamics of the 'porosome' in live cells at nanometer resolution and in real-time, its composition and functional reconstitution in lipid membrane, have all been determined. These findings have fundamentally changed our understanding of cell secretion and provide a clear understanding of this highly regulated process in cells.

  19. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  20. Genetic Analysis of the Colicin V Secretion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L. H.; Fath, M. J.; Mahanty, H. K.; Tai, P. C.; Kolter, R.

    1995-01-01

    Colicin V (ColV) is peptide antibiotic secreted by Escherichia coli through a dedicated exporter composed of three proteins, CvaA, CvaB, and TolC. ColV secretion is independent of the E. coli general secretory pathway (Sec) but requires an N-terminal export signal specific for the CvaAB/TolC exporter. ColV secretion was characterized using genetic and biochemical methods. When the ColV N-terminal extension is replaced with the OmpA signal sequence, the Sec system can localize ColV to the periplasm. Periplasmic ColV is lethal to cells lacking the ColV immunity protein, Cvi. Based on this result, a genetic assay was designed to monitor for the presence of periplasmic ColV during normal CvaAB/TolC mediated secretion. Results indicate that low levels of ColV may be present in the periplasm during secretion. Precursor and mature ColV were also characterized from the wild-type system and in various exporter mutant backgrounds using immunoprecipitation. ColV processing is rapid in wild-type cells, and CvaA and CvaB are critical for processing to occur. In contrast, processing occurs normally, albeit more slowly, in a TolC mutant. PMID:8536973

  1. Androecia in two Clusia species: development, structure and resin secretion.

    PubMed

    Sá-Haiad, B; Silva, C P; Paula, R C V; Rocha, J F; Machado, S R

    2015-07-01

    Clusia fluminensis and C. lanceolata are dioecious shrubs having resiniferous flowers with strongly distinct androecia. The aim of this study was to investigate the development and anatomy of their androecia and the ultrastructure, histochemistry and secretory process of their androecium resin glands, examining whether the cellular aspects of resin secretion differed between these two morphologically distinct androecia. Stamens differ, being free in C. fluminensis and clustered in a synandrium in C. lanceolata. Staminode sterility is due to the undifferentiated nature of the anthers in C. lanceolata and degeneration of meiocytes and anther indehiscence in C. fluminensis. Resin is produced in subepidermal cavities and canals with wide lumens. In the secretory stage, epithelial cells present sinuous walls, voluminous nuclei, polymorphic plastids associated with periplastidial reticulum, mitochondria, oil bodies, multivesicular bodies, endoplasmic reticulum and dictyosomes. The resin is released through rupture points on the distal surface of stamens and staminodes, associated with disrupted cavities and canals. Our results show morphological diversity associated with functional similarity. Also, a secretion pattern shared by the two species includes initiation of the secretory process in young floral buds, compartmentalisation of the secretion in pre-anthesis buds and release of secretions at anthesis. Cellular aspects of resin secretion in these species are quite similar, as are the chemical identities of the main components of the floral resins of the genus.

  2. Constitutive secretion of tau protein by an unconventional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiyun; Dage, Jeffrey L; Citron, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and several related disorders. In the disease tau aggregates into paired helical and straight filaments, which can form higher order neurofibrillary tangles in neurons and this pathology is associated with progressive neuronal loss and cognitive decline. Tau is a cytoplasmic protein and is thought to be released only from degenerating cells. In contrast, here we provide evidence that tau is constitutively secreted at a low level. We directly show tau release in cell culture model systems. In inducible transfected cell lines we observe that a small proportion of full-length tau is released from intact cells in a time dependent manner. We show that this tau is released by an unconventional secretion process, as the release is temperature dependent but not blocked by inhibitors of the conventional secretory pathway. We characterize the released tau as full length, not vesicle associated and containing Phospho-Tau (181P) proportional to its intracellular concentration. We demonstrate that tau secretion and its suppression by low temperature also occurs in human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells. The constitutive tau secretion that we propose provides the most parsimonious explanation for the observed presence of tau in the CSF of healthy animals and human beings. If previously postulated pathogenic extracellular tau intermediates are released by this route, low level constitutive tau secretion could play a role in the spread of tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other human tauopathies. PMID:22668776

  3. Type VI Secretion System Toxins Horizontally Shared between Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Klimko, John A.; Trudgian, David C.; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread protein secretion apparatus used by Gram-negative bacteria to deliver toxic effector proteins into adjacent bacterial or host cells. Here, we uncovered a role in interbacterial competition for the two T6SSs encoded by the marine pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. Using comparative proteomics and genetics, we identified their effector repertoires. In addition to the previously described effector V12G01_02265, we identified three new effectors secreted by T6SS1, indicating that the T6SS1 secretes at least four antibacterial effectors, of which three are members of the MIX-effector class. We also showed that the T6SS2 secretes at least three antibacterial effectors. Our findings revealed that many MIX-effectors belonging to clan V are “orphan” effectors that neighbor mobile elements and are shared between marine bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. We demonstrated that a MIX V-effector from V. alginolyticus is a functional T6SS effector when ectopically expressed in another Vibrio species. We propose that mobile MIX V-effectors serve as an environmental reservoir of T6SS effectors that are shared and used to diversify antibacterial toxin repertoires in marine bacteria, resulting in enhanced competitive fitness. PMID:26305100

  4. Contrasted evolutionary constraints on secreted and non-secreted proteomes of selected Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinobacteria have adapted to contrasted ecological niches such as the soil, and among others to plants or animals as pathogens or symbionts. Mycobacterium genus contains mostly pathogens that cause a variety of mammalian diseases, among which the well-known leprosy and tuberculosis, it also has saprophytic relatives. Streptomyces genus is mostly a soil microbe known for its secondary metabolites, it contains also plant pathogens, animal pathogens and symbionts. Frankia, a nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium establishes a root symbiosis with dicotyledonous pionneer plants. Pathogens and symbionts live inside eukaryotic cells and tissues and interact with their cellular environment through secreted proteins and effectors transported through transmembrane systems; nevertheless they also need to avoid triggering host defense reactions. A comparative genome analysis of the secretomes of symbionts and pathogens allows a thorough investigation of selective pressures shaping their evolution. In the present study, the rates of silent mutations to non-silent mutations in secretory proteins were assessed in different strains of Frankia, Streptomyces and Mycobacterium, of which several genomes have recently become publicly available. Results It was found that secreted proteins as a whole have a stronger purifying evolutionary rate (non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions or Ka/Ks ratio) than the non-secretory proteins in most of the studied genomes. This difference becomes statistically significant in cases involving obligate symbionts and pathogens. Amongst the Frankia, secretomes of symbiotic strains were found to have undergone evolutionary trends different from those of the mainly saprophytic strains. Even within the secretory proteins, the signal peptide part has a higher Ka/Ks ratio than the mature part. Two contrasting trends were noticed amongst the Frankia genomes regarding the relation between selection strength (i.e. Ka/Ks ratio) and the codon adaptation

  5. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease. PMID:1399544

  6. Protein secretion in Pichia pastoris and advances in protein production.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Leonardo M; Huang, Chung-Jr; Batt, Carl A

    2012-01-01

    Yeast expression systems have been successfully used for over 20 years for the production of recombinant proteins. With the growing interest in recombinant protein expression for various uses, yeast expression systems, such as the popular Pichia pastoris, are becoming increasingly important. Although P. pastoris has been successfully used in the production of many secreted and intracellular recombinant proteins, there is still room for improvement of this expression system. In particular, secretion of recombinant proteins is still one of the main reasons for using P. pastoris. Therefore, endoplasmic reticulum protein folding, correct glycosylation, vesicular transport to the plasma membrane, gene dosage, secretion signal sequences, and secretome studies are important considerations for improved recombinant protein production. PMID:22057543

  7. Biliary lipid secretion and its control. Effect of taurodehydrocholate.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, K; Coleman, R

    1987-01-01

    Multiple short pulses of taurocholate (TC) brought about, in isolated perfused rat livers, the secretion of phospholipid and cholesterol into bile; the lipids showed an appreciable lag period behind the bile-salt secretion, and there was considerable variability in response, both between low and high dose pulses of TC and, at the higher dose, even between individual livers. When a background continuous infusion of taurodehydrocholate (a hydrophilic non-micelle-forming bile-salt analogue) was superimposed upon the short TC pulses, the lipid secretion showed much better control, and the lipid peaks were of more uniform size, following more closely, or more coincident with, the bile-salt output peaks. Taurodehydrocholate may provide a signal for the control of the supply and delivery of lipid vesicles to the bile-canalicular membrane, from where the lipid vesicles are then removed by the action of the pulses of TC. PMID:3663176

  8. Assembly and mechanisms of bacterial type IV secretion machines

    PubMed Central

    Zechner, Ellen L.; Lang, Silvia; Schildbach, Joel F.

    2012-01-01

    Type IV secretion occurs across a wide range of prokaryotic cell envelopes: Gram-negative, Gram-positive, cell wall-less bacteria and some archaea. This diversity is reflected in the heterogeneity of components that constitute the secretion machines. Macromolecules are secreted in an ATP-dependent process using an envelope-spanning multi-protein channel. Similar to the type III systems, this apparatus extends beyond the cell surface as a pilus structure important for direct contact and penetration of the recipient cell surface. Type IV systems are remarkably versatile in that they mobilize a broad range of substrates, including single proteins, protein complexes, DNA and nucleoprotein complexes, across the cell envelope. These machines have broad clinical significance not only for delivering bacterial toxins or effector proteins directly into targeted host cells, but also for direct involvement in phenomena such as biofilm formation and the rapid horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. PMID:22411979

  9. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins in Eimeria tenella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlee, Intan Azlinda; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2015-09-01

    Eimeria tenella is a protozoan parasite that causes coccidiosis, an economically important disease in the poultry industry. The characterization of proteins that are secreted by parasites have been shown to play important roles in parasite invasion and are considered to be potential control agents. In this study, 775 proteins potentially secreted by E. tenella were identified. These proteins were further filtered to remove mitochondrial proteins. Out of 763 putative secreted proteins, 259 proteins possess transmembrane domains while another 150 proteins have GPI (Glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchors. Homology search revealed that 315 and 448 proteins have matches with known and hypothetical proteins in the database, respectively. Within this data set, previously characterized secretory proteins such as micronemes, rhoptry kinases and dense granules were detected.

  10. Porosome: the universal molecular machinery for cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2008-12-31

    Porosomes are supramolecular, lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. The mouth of the porosome opening to the outside, range in size from 150 nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas, to 12 nm in neurons, which dilates during cell secretion, returning to its resting size following completion of the process. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. In this mini review, the discovery of the porosome, its structure, function, isolation, chemistry, and reconstitution into lipid membrane, the molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling and fusion at the base of porosomes, and how this new information provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of cell secretion, is discussed.

  11. Temporally resolved, independent stages of individual exocytotic secretion events.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, T J; Borges, R; Finnegan, J M; Pihel, K; Amatore, C; Wightman, R M

    1996-01-01

    The stages of the complex events involved in exocytotic secretion after vesicle-cell membrane fusion have been examined at the level of individual vesicles. Catecholamine flux from single bovine adrenal medullary cells was measured with carbon-fiber microelectrodes firmly touching the cell surface. The data reveal that secretion during exocytotic events has three distinct stages: a small increase in catecholamine flux, a rapid, but not instantaneous, rise to a maximum, followed by an exponential decrease in the flux. These stages are interpreted in the following ways. The initial stage corresponds to catecholamine secretion through a fusion pore. The rate of pore expansion appears to control the rise time of the flux to its maximum value. The final exponential stage is consistent with chemical dissociation of the intravesicular matrix or gel. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8789125

  12. Comparative study of the labial gland secretion in termites (Isoptera).

    PubMed

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Krasulová, Jana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Pytelková, Jana; Cvačka, Josef; Kutalová, Kateřina; Bourguignon, Thomas; Miura, Toru; Šobotník, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Labial glands are present in all castes and developmental stages of all termite species. In workers, their secretion contains a food-marking pheromone and digestive enzymes, while soldier secretion plays a defensive role. However, these functions were studied only in a limited set of species, and do not allow drawing general conclusions. Hence, we have investigated the chemical composition of the labial gland extracts from soldiers and workers in 15 termite species belonging to 6 families using an integrative approach based on proteomic and small-molecule profiling. We confirmed the presence of hydroquinone and cellulase in the labial glands of workers, and we identified new toxic compounds in soldiers and workers of several species. Our results highlight the dual role of labial gland secretion, i.e. the defensive role in soldiers and workers of several termite species, and the digestive function in workers.

  13. Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, L.E. Jr.; Fertig, J.; Pomerleau, O.; Hunt, D.; Parker, K.

    1984-01-02

    The relationships among changes in plasma nicotine, ACTH, and cortisol secretion after smoking were investigated. Ten male subjects smoked cigarettes containing 2.87 mg nicotine and 0.48 mg nicotine. No rises in cortisol or ACTH were detected after smoking 0.48 mg nicotine cigarettes. Cortisol rises were significant in 11 of 15 instances after smoking 2.87 mg nicotine cigarattes, but ACTH rose significantly in only 5 of the 11 instances where cortisol increased. Each ACTH rise occurred in a subject who reported nausea and was observed to be pale, sweaty, and tachycardic. Peak plasma nicotine concentrations were not significantly different in sessions when cortisol rose with or without ACTH increases, but cortisol increases were significantly greater in nauseated than in non-nauseated smokers. This data suggest that smoking-induced nausea stimulates cortisol release by stimulating ACTH secretion and that cortisol secretion in non-nauseated smokers may occur through a non-ACTH mechanism.

  14. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  15. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Omura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-07-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 microg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 microg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. alpha,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with alpha,beta,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  16. Comparative Study of the Labial Gland Secretion in Termites (Isoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Krasulová, Jana; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Pytelková, Jana; Cvačka, Josef; Kutalová, Kateřina; Bourguignon, Thomas; Miura, Toru; Šobotník, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Labial glands are present in all castes and developmental stages of all termite species. In workers, their secretion contains a food-marking pheromone and digestive enzymes, while soldier secretion plays a defensive role. However, these functions were studied only in a limited set of species, and do not allow drawing general conclusions. Hence, we have investigated the chemical composition of the labial gland extracts from soldiers and workers in 15 termite species belonging to 6 families using an integrative approach based on proteomic and small-molecule profiling. We confirmed the presence of hydroquinone and cellulase in the labial glands of workers, and we identified new toxic compounds in soldiers and workers of several species. Our results highlight the dual role of labial gland secretion, i.e. the defensive role in soldiers and workers of several termite species, and the digestive function in workers. PMID:23071569

  17. Induction of interleukin 1 secretion by adjuvant-active peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, F; Guenounou, M; Nauciel, C

    1983-01-01

    The ability of differently structured, purified peptidoglycans (PG) to induce interleukin 1 (IL1) secretion was compared. PG from Bacillus megaterium and Staphylococcus aureus stimulated the production of IL1 by mouse peritoneal macrophages and human adherent mononuclear cells, whereas PG from Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Corynebacterium poinsettiae were inactive. There was a correlation between the ability of PG to induce IL1 secretion and previously demonstrated immunoenhancing activities (adjuvant effect, increase of resistance to tumor growth) of PG. PG solubilization by lysozyme decreased but did not abolish the PG effect on IL1 secretion. Active PG induced IL1 production in nude mice and in the C3H/HeJ strain (which is unresponsive to lipopolysaccharides). PMID:6605929

  18. Cardiopulmonary exercise: a recently discovered secret of tai chi.

    PubMed

    Ng, R K

    1992-08-01

    Every piece of literature or book about tai chi claims it to be the supreme martial art (soft style) and a therapeutic exercise. Nevertheless, none of the authors can describe scientifically how and why it works. Many people did not gain any health benefit in practicing tai chi and only very few people were able to apply its legendary secret power. During the last 10 years, the author thought he had discovered the secret in Hong Kong and brought it to Los Angeles. The secret lies in the fundamental movements of the body, called tai chi basic exercise routines. The entry level of the exercise has many similarities with medical treatments for respiratory illness and with walking exercise--the most recommended aerobic exercise for coronary artery disease.

  19. Measurement of gastric secretion as a student teaching exercise.

    PubMed

    Nicol, S C; MacPherson, R D; McLeod, L J

    1991-12-01

    Teaching gastrointestinal physiology to preclinical medical students presents problems in finding suitable practical exercises to demonstrate the physiology of gastric acid secretion. In our course, students measure their own gastric secretory activity by the use of nasogastric tubes. Gastric secretion can be stimulated by insulin-induced hypoglycemia or by pentagastrin, a synthetic gastrin analogue. The time course of the secretory responses, i.e., volume, acid output, and pH, are followed by collecting control and poststimulatory secretions into 15-min samples. The effect of antiulcer drugs, such as cimetidine, can be easily studied in such experiments. The results of these experiments are very reproducible, allowing year-to-year comparisons of treatments. Examples of results of various experimental protocols are shown. We believe this to be a useful class exercise not only because of the excellent results it yields but because of the experience and insights it produces.

  20. Regulation of human growth hormone secretion and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuzuru; Murakami, Yoshio; Sohmiya, Motoi; Nishiki, Masateru

    2002-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion from anterior pituitary is regulated by the hypothalamus and the mediators of GH actions. Major regulatory factors include GH releasing hormone (GHRH), somatostatin (SRIF), GH releasing peptide (ghrerin) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I). The principal physiological regulation mechanisms of GH secretion are neural endogenous rhythm, sleep, stress, exercise, and nutritional and metabolic signals. GH deficiency results from various hereditary or acquired causes, which may be isolated or combined with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. GH deficiency can be treated with recombinant human GH, which results in accelerating growth in children and normalization of intermediary metabolism in adults. GH hypersecretion mostly results from a pituitary tumor and causes acromegaly or gigantism. Hypersecretion of GH can be treated by transshenoidal surgery. Medical treatment with octreotide and analogs is also effective to reduce GH secretion in combination with or without the surgery. PMID:11838603

  1. Wnt trafficking: new insights into Wnt maturation, secretion and spreading.

    PubMed

    Port, Fillip; Basler, Konrad

    2010-10-01

    Proteins of the Wnt family are secreted signaling molecules that regulate multiple processes in animal development and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Wnts spread over considerable distances to regulate gene expression in cells located at distant sites. Paradoxically, Wnts are poorly mobile because of their posttranslational modification with lipids. Recent evidence suggests that several pathways exist that are capable of transforming hydrophobic, insoluble Wnts into long-range signaling molecules. Furthermore, the discovery of Wntless as a protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt suggests that Wnt trafficking through the secretory pathway is already under special scrutiny. Here, we review recent data on the molecular machinery that controls Wnt secretion and discuss how Wnts can be mobilized for long-range signaling. PMID:20477987

  2. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Ômura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-05-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 µg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 µg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. α,β,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with α,β,β,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  3. A Yersinia secreted effector protein promotes virulence by preventing inflammasome recognition of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Igor E.; Palm, Noah W.; Sadanand, Saheli; Ryndak, Michelle B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Bliska, James B.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect conserved microbial structures generally absent from eukaryotes. Bacterial pathogens commonly utilize pore-forming toxins or specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence factors that promote bacterial replication by modulating host cell physiology. Detection of these secretion systems or toxins by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain leucine-rich-repeat proteins (NLRs) triggers the assembly of multiprotein complexes, termed inflammasomes, necessary for caspase-1 activation. Here we demonstrate that caspase-1 activation in response to the Yersinia type III secretion system (T3SS) requires the adapter ASC, and involves both NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. We further identify a Yersinia type III secreted effector protein, YopK, which prevents inflammasome activation by preventing cellular recognition of the T3SS. Inflammasome-mediated sensing of the T3SS promotes bacterial clearance from infected tissues in vivo. These data demonstrate that a class of bacterial proteins interferes with cellular recognition of bacterial secretion systems, which contributes to bacterial survival within host tissues. PMID:20478539

  4. Hexameric structures of the archaeal secretion ATPase GspE and implications for a universal secretion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Atsushi; Tainer, John A

    2007-02-01

    The secretion superfamily ATPases are conserved motors in key microbial membrane transport and filament assembly machineries, including bacterial type II and IV secretion, type IV pilus assembly, natural competence, and archaeal flagellae assembly. We report here crystal structures and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) solution analyses of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus secretion superfamily ATPase, afGspE. AfGspE structures in complex with ATP analogue AMP-PNP and Mg(2+) reveal for the first time, alternating open and closed subunit conformations within a hexameric ring. The closed-form active site with bound Mg(2+) evidently reveals the catalytically active conformation. Furthermore, nucleotide binding results and SAXS analyses of ADP, ATPgammaS, ADP-Vi, and AMP-PNP-bound states in solution showed that asymmetric assembly involves ADP binding, but clamped closed conformations depend on both ATP gamma-phosphate and Mg(2+) plus the conserved motifs, arginine fingers, and subdomains of the secretion ATPase superfamily. Moreover, protruding N-terminal domain shifts caused by the closed conformation suggest a unified piston-like, push-pull mechanism for ATP hydrolysis-dependent conformational changes, suitable to drive diverse microbial secretion and assembly processes by a universal mechanism. PMID:17255937

  5. Hexameric Structures of the Archaeal Secretion Atpase GspE And Implications for a Universal Secretion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, A.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-06-04

    The secretion superfamily ATPases are conserved motors in key microbial membrane transport and filament assembly machineries, including bacterial type II and IV secretion, type IV pilus assembly, natural competence, and archaeal flagellae assembly. We report here crystal structures and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) solution analyses of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus secretion superfamily ATPase, afGspE. AfGspE structures in complex with ATP analogue AMP-PNP and Mg(2+) reveal for the first time, alternating open and closed subunit conformations within a hexameric ring. The closed-form active site with bound Mg(2+) evidently reveals the catalytically active conformation. Furthermore, nucleotide binding results and SAXS analyses of ADP, ATPgammaS, ADP-Vi, and AMP-PNP-bound states in solution showed that asymmetric assembly involves ADP binding, but clamped closed conformations depend on both ATP gamma-phosphate and Mg(2+) plus the conserved motifs, arginine fingers, and subdomains of the secretion ATPase superfamily. Moreover, protruding N-terminal domain shifts caused by the closed conformation suggest a unified piston-like, push-pull mechanism for ATP hydrolysis-dependent conformational changes, suitable to drive diverse microbial secretion and assembly processes by a universal mechanism.

  6. Effects of trifluoperazine on renin secretion of rat kidney slices.

    PubMed

    Churchill, P C; Churchill, M C

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested recently that calmodulin acts as an intracellular "Ca-receptor," and that many Ca-dependent cellular activities are mediated in some manner by Ca-calmodulin. The renin-secretory activity of juxtaglomerular cells appears to be inversely related to intracellular Ca concentration (Ca); if Ca-calmodulin is the mediator in the secretory process, it follows that secretory rate should be inversely related to Ca-calmodulin activity. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the effects of trifluoperazine, an inactivator of Ca-calmodulin, on renin secretion of rat kidney slices. Over the range 10(-6) to 10(-4) M, trifluoperazine produced a concentration-dependent increase in renin release. As assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release, the trifluoperazine-induced increase in renin release cannot be attributed to increased cell membrane permeability to proteins. Thus, trifluoperazine stimulated renin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. This is consistent with an inverse relation between Ca-calmodulin activity and renin secretion. However, in the presence of trifluoperazine, isoproterenol still stimulated and antidiuretic hormone, angiotensin II, high extracellular K concentration, ouabain and vanadate still inhibited renin secretion. Provided these stimulatory and inhibitory effects are associated with decreased and increased Ca, respectively, these observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the effects of Ca, on renin secretion are mediated by changes in Ca-calmodulin activity, since increases in Ca promote rather than attenuate the binding of trifluoperazine to calmodulin. It is concluded that trifluoperazine-stimulated renin secretion is mediated by a decrease in Cai produced by inhibition of Ca influx and/or stimulation of Ca efflux and/or sequestration.

  7. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  8. Stimulation of corticosterone secretion in vitro by brief ACTH exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, L.D.; Tam, B.; Greer, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between ACTH concentration and exposure duration on stimulation of corticosterone (B) secretion in vitro using perifused enzymatically dispersed rat adrenocortical cells. A modular perifusion apparatus was used that permitted evaluation of 20-24 cell chambers per experimental session. In expt 1,20-1000 pg/ml concentrations of synthetic ACTH-(1-24) were presented to cells for 1 min. In expt 2, 100 pg ACTH-(1-24) was presented to adrenal cells in five dose-duration regimens ranging from 5 pg/min for 20 min to 100 pg/min for 1 min. Perifusal rate was 1 ml/min in all sessions. B was determined by radioimmunoassay. In expt 1 (constant-duration paradigm), 1-min presentation of ACTH-(1-24) produced log-linear dose-response effects across these concentrations. In expt 2 (constant-mass paradigm), identical masses administered in different dose-duration regimens had different steroidogenic efficacies: low-dose long-duration regimens provoked greater total release than high-dose short-duration regimens. Overall, every dose-duration regimen was associated with stimulation of B secretion. These results indicate that 1) very brief exposure to physiological concentrations of ACTH-(1-24) is a significant stimulus for corticosteroid secretion; 2) variations in the dose-duration regimen over the physiological range modifies both the maximum rate of secretion and the duration of secretion, but not the response latency; and 3) ACTH-(1-24) presentation mass is not the sole determinant of B secretion.

  9. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  10. Calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1979-10-01

    The quantitative relation of calcium and protein secretion was studied on the isolated perfused canine pancreas at different secretory states of hydrokinetic and ecbolic stimulation and various extracellular Ca++-concentrations. 1. Calcium and protein secretion are correlated at both ecbolic and hydrokinetic stimulation as well as by biological or synthetic secretion. 2. Enzyme-associated calcium was estimated at 35 nmol/mg protein and did not vary under differing stimulatory and secretory conditions. 3. During variable concentrations of synthetic secretin basal protein and calcium concentrations in the pancreatic juice show a hyperbolic relationship to the respective rates of fluid secretion. At flow rates beyond 3 ml/5 min the calcium concentrations asymptotically tend to 0.46 mEq/l while protein concentrations nearly decrease to zero. Moreover, the y-intercept of the regressionline correlating the calcium and protein concentrations gives with 0.48 mEq/l Ca++ additional evidence of the existence and magnitude of an enzyme-independent calcium fraction, which seems to remain constant over the whole range of secretory rates. 4. The omission of perfusate calcium does not abolish the calcium-protein correlation either at hydrokinetic or at ecbolic stimulation, but diminishes the enzyme-independent calcium fraction. 5. Enhancing perfusate Ca++-concentrations augments calcium output byt fails in stimulating enzyme secretion. It is concluded that at exclusively hydrokinetic stimulation basal secreted protein with a definite amount of chelated calcium is diluted by variable rates of pancreatic juice containing enzyme independent Ca++ at a constant concentration. During different secretory states of hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulation the respective proportions of enzyme associated and independent calcium vary, and thus determine changes in the calcium-protein ratios. Extracellular calcium can only influence the non-protein-bound calcium fraction of the pancreatic juice

  11. Secreted proteins as a fundamental source for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Miroslava; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteins secreted by various cells (the secretomes) are a potential rich source of biomarkers since they reflect various states of the cells at real time and at given conditions. To have accessible, sufficient and reliable protein markers is desirable since they mark various stages of disease development and their presence/absence can be used for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification and therapeutic monitoring. As direct analysis of blood/plasma, a common and noninvasive patient screening method, can be difficult for candidate protein biomarker identification, the alternative/complementary approaches are required, one of them is the analysis of secretomes in cell conditioned media in vitro. Since the proteins secreted by cells as a response to various stimuli are most likely secreted into blood/plasma, the identification and preselection of candidate protein biomarkers from cell secretomes with subsequent validation of their presence at higher levels in serum/plasma is a promising approach. In this review, we discuss the proteins secreted by three progenitor cell types (smooth muscle, endothelial and cardiac progenitor cells) and two adult cell types (neonatal rat ventrical myocytes and smooth muscle cells) which can be relevant to cardiovascular research and which have been recently published in the literature. We found, at least for secretome studies included in this review, that secretomes of progenitor and adult cells overlap by 48% but the secretomes are very distinct among progenitor cell themselves as well as between adult cells. In addition, we compared secreted proteins to protein identifications listed in the Human Plasma PeptideAtlas and in two reports with cardiovascular-related proteins and we performed the extensive literature search to find if any of these secreted proteins were identified in a biomarker study. As expected, many proteins have been identified as biomarkers in cancer but 18 proteins (out of 62) have been tested as biomarkers in

  12. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  13. Differentially expressed protein markers in human submandibular and sublingual secretions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Denny, Patricia; Denny, Paul; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Li, Yang; McBride, Jim; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Navazesh, Mavash; Wong, David T

    2004-11-01

    Proteome analysis of secretions from individual salivary glands is important for understanding the health of the oral cavity and pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, cross-contamination of submandibular (SM) and sublingual (SL) glandular secretions can occur. The close anatomic relationship of the SM and SL ductal orifices can lead to such contamination. Additionally, these glands may share common ducts. To insure the purity of SM/SL secretions for proteomic analysis, it is important to develop unique biomarkers which could be used to verify the integrity of the individual glandular saliva. In this study, a proteomics approach based on mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis techniques was utilized to identify and verify a set of proteins (cystatin C, calgranulin B and MUC5B mucin), which are differentially expressed in SM/SL secretions. SM/SL fluids were obtained from nine healthy subjects. Cystatin C was found to be an SM-selective protein as it was found in all SM fluids but not detected in two SL fluids. MUC5B mucin and calgranulin B, on the other hand, were found to be SL-selective proteins. All SL samples contained MUC5B mucin, whereas MUC5B mucin was not detected in four SM samples. Eight of the SL samples contained calgranulin B; however, calgranulin B was absent in eight SM samples. This set of protein markers, especially calgranulin B, can be used to determine the purity of SM/SL samples, and therefore identify potential individuals who do not exhibit cross-contaminated SM/SL secretions, an important requirement for subsequent proteome analysis of pure SM and SL secretions.

  14. Oncological emergencies: syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).

    PubMed

    Matwiejczuk, Sylwester; Püsküllüoğlu, Miroslawa; Zygulska, Aneta L

    2014-01-01

    Excessive secretion of vasopressin in the course of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion is a common cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Clinical symptoms depend on the cause, rate of change of sodium level and their absolute values. Treatment options include fluid restrictions, intravenous administration of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, loop diuretics and vaptans. The sodium level should not be adjusted too fast, because it may lead to irreversible brain damage. The article presents pathophysiology, diagnostics and recommendations of management of this oncological emergency.

  15. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or “ramp”), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect. PMID:26586412

  16. The outs and ins of bacterial type IV secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhiyong; Atmakuri, Krishnamohan; Christie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use type IV secretion systems (T4SS) to translocate macromolecular substrates destined for bacterial, plant or human target cells. The T4SS are medically important, contributing to virulence-gene spread, genome plasticity and the alteration of host cellular processes during infection. The T4SS are ancestrally related to bacterial conjugation machines, but present-day functions include (i) conjugal transfer of DNA by cell-to-cell contact, (ii) translocation of effector molecules to eukaryotic target cells, and (iii) DNA uptake from or release to the extracellular milieu. Rapid progress has been made toward identification of type IV secretion substrates and the requirements for substrate recognition. PMID:14607070

  17. Gibberellic acid stimulates acid invertase secretion in pea ovary protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Beltrán, J P

    1991-02-25

    Protoplasts purified from mesocarp of nonpollinated pea (Pisum sativum L.) ovaries released acid invertase to the incubation medium. The association of the acid invertase with microsomal fractions, and the sensitivity to energy-metabolism inhibitors and to tunicamycin, indicated the secretory nature of the release process. In the presence of GA3 (10 microM), the protoplasts increased their invertase secretion at about 60 min, this effect being counteracted by tunicamycin but not by cycloheximide. Subcellular fractionation of GA3-treated protoplasts showed that higher invertase secretion was the result of a promotion of invertase transfer from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus. PMID:2001743

  18. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or "ramp"), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect.

  19. Secretion of platelet-activating factor by periovulatory ovine follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, B.M.; Van Kirk, E.A.; Murdoch, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Secretion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in vitro by ovine follicles and ovarian interstitium obtained at various times before, during and after the endogenous preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulation was quantified by radioimmunoassay. Release of PAF by the preovulatory follicle increased within 2 h after initiation of the surge of LH. Capacity for secretion of PAF was greatest at the time of ovulation, then declined thereafter. Production of PAF by ovarian interstitium throughout the periovulatory period was relatively low and did not change with time. It appears that PAF could act as an intrafollicular mediator in the mechanisms of ovulation and(or) luteinization.

  20. Odorant-Binding Protein: Localization to Nasal Glands and Secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevsner, Jonathan; Sklar, Pamela B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1986-07-01

    An odorant-binding protein (OBP) was isolated from bovine olfactory and respiratory mucosa. We have produced polyclonal antisera to this protein and report its immunohistochemical localization to mucus-secreting glands of the olfactory and respiratory mucosa. Although OBP was originally isolated as a pyrazine binding protein, both rat and bovine OBP also bind the odorants [3H]methyldihydrojasmonate and 3,7-dimethyl-octan-1-ol as well as 2-isobutyl-3-[3H]methoxypyrazine. We detect substantial odorant-binding activity attributable to OBP in secreted rat nasal mucus and tears but not in saliva, suggesting a role for OBP in transporting or concentrating odorants.

  1. Residual insulin secretion in adolescent diabetics after remission.

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, M D; Rayner, P W; Nattrass, M

    1987-01-01

    Twenty four hour blood glucose profiles were compared in two groups of insulin dependent adolescent diabetic patients who were beyond their initial partial remission phase. In the group with persistent endogenous insulin secretion, blood glucose profiles were significantly lower but the difference was small and not reflected in average 24 hour concentrations of glucose nor glycosylated haemoglobin. Endogenous insulin secretion must be considered in studies of metabolic control after the remission period but the effect on overall glucose control is probably clinically unimportant. PMID:3318713

  2. ["Secret causes": causality and determinism in the classical age].

    PubMed

    Cléro, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The notion of the "secret cause", which appears in many classical texts is tied to a particular practice of science and a conception of its methods where the "law" finds itself at the center of the nexus. If certain phenomena appear to escape the law, one is obliged to amend the law through the introduction of a series of "small equations." If the calculation of probabilities is deployed, this is to precisely reveal causes which are, at their origin, secret, but which will gradually become less so and eventually conform to laws.

  3. Multi-group dynamic quantum secret sharing with single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongwei; Ma, Haiqiang; Wei, Kejin; Yang, Xiuqing; Qu, Wenxiu; Dou, Tianqi; Chen, Yitian; Li, Ruixue; Zhu, Wu

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel scheme for the realization of single-photon dynamic quantum secret sharing between a boss and three dynamic agent groups. In our system, the boss can not only choose one of these three groups to share the secret with, but also can share two sets of independent keys with two groups without redistribution. Furthermore, the security of communication is enhanced by using a control mode. Compared with previous schemes, our scheme is more flexible and will contribute to a practical application.

  4. Type III secretion needle proteins induce cell signaling and cytokine secretion via Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Danielle L; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2014-06-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  5. Type III Secretion Needle Proteins Induce Cell Signaling and Cytokine Secretion via Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Danielle L.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  6. [Functional distinction of secreting pools of the pancreas and participation of the pancreatic ductal system in the development of the pancreatic secret properties].

    PubMed

    Korot'ko, G F; Voskanian, S E; Gladkiĭ, E Iu; Makarova, T M; Bulgakov, V A

    2002-08-01

    Acute experiments on dogs with separate secretion of the pancreatic enzymes, either stimulated or inhibited, from two lobes of pancreas, and investigation into the character of kinetics of the secretion from 5-7 ductal pools of the pancreas showed the functional specifics, with the device of ductal valves and microdepot of a secret of the pancreas ductal system playing an important role. The conclusion is made that the final secret of pancreas removed to the duodenum is a product of a secret-motor activation of non-equipotentional microregions of the gland, being the components of an intervisceral dynamical mosaic.

  7. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  8. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  9. Secrets of Science. Videos 1-13. [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walt Disney Publishing Group, Burbank, CA. Discover Magazine.

    Discoveries in science and technology are being made at such a rapid pace that it is often difficult for many teachers to stay abreast of new and relevant information. To assist teachers in keeping their students well informed of new discoveries in science, Discover Magazine developed a 13-part video series entitled "Secrets of Science." In each…

  10. Intracellular Action of a Secreted Peptide Required for Fungal Virulence.

    PubMed

    Homer, Christina M; Summers, Diana K; Goranov, Alexi I; Clarke, Starlynn C; Wiesner, Darin L; Diedrich, Jolene K; Moresco, James J; Toffaletti, Dena; Upadhya, Rajendra; Caradonna, Ippolito; Petnic, Sarah; Pessino, Veronica; Cuomo, Christina A; Lodge, Jennifer K; Perfect, John; Yates, John R; Nielsen, Kirsten; Craik, Charles S; Madhani, Hiten D

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication mechanism in which secreted signaling molecules impact population function and gene expression. QS-like phenomena have been reported in eukaryotes with largely unknown contributing molecules, functions, and mechanisms. We identify Qsp1, a secreted peptide, as a central signaling molecule that regulates virulence in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. QSP1 is a direct target of three transcription factors required for virulence, and qsp1Δ mutants exhibit attenuated infection, slowed tissue accumulation, and greater control by primary macrophages. Qsp1 mediates autoregulatory signaling that modulates secreted protease activity and promotes cell wall function at high cell densities. Peptide production requires release from a secreted precursor, proQsp1, by a cell-associated protease, Pqp1. Qsp1 sensing requires an oligopeptide transporter, Opt1, and remarkably, cytoplasmic expression of mature Qsp1 complements multiple phenotypes of qsp1Δ. Thus, C. neoformans produces an autoregulatory peptide that matures extracellularly but functions intracellularly to regulate virulence. PMID:27212659

  11. Secret-Sharing in the Introductory Literature Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Considers how seeking "hidden meanings," attending to the language in which they are embedded, and sharing that experience with students seems to be a viable way to conceive of the essence of literary study. Describes a writing assignment (a "documented critical paper") based on Joseph Conrad's "Secret Sharer." (SG)

  12. Characterization of novel secreted proteins from Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterium that causes disease of agriculturally important crops, including Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Little is known about virulence factors that are necessary for X. fastidiosa to grow and cause disease in the xylem vessels of a plant host. Any protein secreted by the b...

  13. ISG15: leading a double life as a secreted molecule.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-04-12

    ISG15 is a well-known intracellular ubiquitin-like molecule involved in ISGylation. However, a recent study has revived the notion first put forward two decades ago that ISG15 is also a secreted molecule. Human neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes can release ISG15, even though this protein has no detectable signal peptide sequence. ISG15 has also been found in the secretory granules of granulocytes. The mechanism underlying ISG15 secretion is unknown. Secreted ISG15 acts on at least T and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, in which it induces interferon (IFN)-γ production. However, the mechanism by which ISG15 stimulates these cells also remains unclear. ISG15 and IFN-γ seem to define an innate circuit that operates preferentially, but not exclusively, between granulocytes and NK cells. Inherited ISG15 deficiency is associated with severe mycobacterial disease in both mice and humans. This infectious phenotype probably results from the lack of secreted ISG15, because patients and mice with other inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity also display mycobacterial diseases. In addition to raising mechanistic issues, the studies described here pave the way for clinical studies of various aspects, ranging from the use of recombinant ISG15 in patients with infectious diseases to the use of ISG15-blocking agents in patients with inflammatory diseases.

  14. Secret key rates for an encoded quantum repeater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2014-03-01

    We investigate secret key rates for the quantum repeater using encoding [L. Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325] and compare them to the standard repeater scheme by Briegel, Dür, Cirac, and Zoller. The former scheme has the advantage of a minimal consumption of classical communication. We analyze the trade-off in the secret key rate between the communication time and the required resources. For this purpose we introduce an error model for the repeater using encoding which allows for input Bell states with a fidelity smaller than one, in contrast to the model given by L. Jiang et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325]. We show that one can correct additional errors in the encoded connection procedure of this repeater and develop a suitable decoding algorithm. Furthermore, we derive the rate of producing entangled pairs for the quantum repeater using encoding and give the minimal parameter values (gate quality and initial fidelity) for establishing a nonzero secret key. We find that the generic quantum repeater is optimal regarding the secret key rate per memory per second and show that the encoded quantum repeater using the simple three-qubit repetition code can even have an advantage with respect to the resources compared to other recent quantum repeater schemes with encoding.

  15. The Secret Identity of Science Education: Masculine and Politically Conservative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Jay

    2011-01-01

    This response to Jesse Bazzul and Heather Sykes' paper, "The secret identity of a biology textbook: straight and naturally sexed," explores their critiques of textbooks and curricula that authoritatively present scientific accounts of the natural world without engaging students in critical thinking. It proposes that we need to go beyond such…

  16. The Secret between Storytelling and Retelling: Tea, School, & Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I will tell two of my personal stories to try to explore the secret or opaque space between the original telling and retelling of stories in narrative inquiry. Based upon my difficult struggles with the two stories of tea, school, and narrative, I suggest that narrative inquiry has to be a complex loop of relationship, reflexivity,…

  17. Adiponectin stimulates proliferation and cytokine secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ogunwobi, Olorunseun Olatunji; Beales, Ian L P

    2006-05-15

    Adiponectin is a recently described mediator secreted by adipose tissue. Here we report the growth promoting and pro-inflammatory actions of adiponectin on colonic epithelial cancer cells. Full-length and globular adiponectin produced an identical stimulation of HT-29 cell growth that was blocked by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A and partially inhibited by a pan-specific protein kinase C inhibitor, but was unaffected by specific inhibition of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin but not full-length adiponectin significantly increased the secretion and mRNA levels of IL-8, GM-CSF and MCP-1. Globular adiponectin doubled IL-1beta-stimulated IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion. Adiponectin-stimulated cytokine secretion was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of NF-kappaB, ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin increased phosphorylation of both ERK and p38 MAP kinase and increased the nuclear translocation of active NF-kappaB. Adiponectin has pro-proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions on colonic epithelial cells; these appear to be differentially activated by the adiponectin isoforms. Adiponectin may have a role in the regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal function, inflammation and colon carcinogenesis.

  18. Anticytolytic screen identifies inhibitors of mycobacterial virulence protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Rybniker, Jan; Chen, Jeffrey M; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Vocat, Anthony; Benjak, Andrej; Boy-Röttger, Stefanie; Zhang, Ming; Székely, Rita; Greff, Zoltán; Orfi, László; Szabadkai, István; Pató, János; Kéri, György; Cole, Stewart T

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires protein secretion systems like ESX-1 for intracellular survival and virulence. The major virulence determinant and ESX-1 substrate, EsxA, arrests phagosome maturation and lyses cell membranes, resulting in tissue damage and necrosis that promotes pathogen spread. To identify inhibitors of Mtb protein secretion, we developed a fibroblast survival assay exploiting this phenotype and selected molecules that protect host cells from Mtb-induced lysis without being bactericidal in vitro. Hit compounds blocked EsxA secretion and promoted phagosome maturation in macrophages, thus reducing bacterial loads. Target identification studies led to the discovery of BTP15, a benzothiophene inhibitor of the histidine kinase MprB that indirectly regulates ESX-1, and BBH7, a benzyloxybenzylidene-hydrazine compound. BBH7 affects Mtb metal-ion homeostasis and revealed zinc stress as an activating signal for EsxA secretion. This screening approach extends the target spectrum of small molecule libraries and will help tackle the mounting problem of antibiotic-resistant mycobacteria.

  19. Effect of sultopride on prolactin secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizuchi, A; Kitagawa, N; Saruta, S; Tokuda, H; Miyachi, Y

    1984-02-01

    Oral administration of sultopride caused a significant and dose-related increase in serum prolactin levels in the rat. Sultopride was 4-6 times as potent as sulpiride in stimulating prolactin secretion. Both drugs produced much greater stimulations of prolactin release in female rats than in male rats, suggesting the sex difference in response to drugs. CB-154, a dopamine agonist, inhibited the sultopride-induced prolactin release. Stereoselective activity of sultopride-isomers was observed in increasing rat prolactin secretion. Sultopride had no significant effects on LH and FSH basal levels in female rats. In a successive study, basal prolactin levels in the male rat were higher at 2-3 days, but lower at 6 and 14 days. Prolactin response 1 hr after sultopride administration was observed throughout the experiments. Sultopride neutralized the dopamine-mediated inhibition of prolactin secretion from the anterior pituitary in vitro. These results suggest that sultopride, like sulpiride, stimulates prolactin secretion by blocking the dopamine receptor in the pituitary.

  20. Identification of protein secretion systems in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Sophie S.; Cury, Jean; Guglielmini, Julien; Néron, Bertrand; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with two cell membranes (diderms) have evolved complex systems for protein secretion. These systems were extensively studied in some model bacteria, but the characterisation of their diversity has lagged behind due to lack of standard annotation tools. We built online and standalone computational tools to accurately predict protein secretion systems and related appendages in bacteria with LPS-containing outer membranes. They consist of models describing the systems’ components and genetic organization to be used with MacSyFinder to search for T1SS-T6SS, T9SS, flagella, Type IV pili and Tad pili. We identified ~10,000 candidate systems in bacterial genomes, where T1SS and T5SS were by far the most abundant and widespread. All these data are made available in a public database. The recently described T6SSiii and T9SS were restricted to Bacteroidetes, and T6SSii to Francisella. The T2SS, T3SS, and T4SS were frequently encoded in single-copy in one locus, whereas most T1SS were encoded in two loci. The secretion systems of diderm Firmicutes were similar to those found in other diderms. Novel systems may remain to be discovered, since some clades of environmental bacteria lacked all known protein secretion systems. Our models can be fully customized, which should facilitate the identification of novel systems. PMID:26979785

  1. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and other specific identification, from the written list of hazardous chemicals, the label, and the...) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the... the chemical's identity available to miners, designated representatives, and health professionals...

  2. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  3. Brain sites mediating corticosteroid feedback inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, L.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the brain mediates stress-induced and circadian increases in ACTH secretion and that corticosteroid concentrations which normalize basal plasma ACTH are insufficient to normalize ACTH responses to circadian or stressful stimuli in adrenalectomized rats. To identify brain sites mediating corticosteroid inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion, two approaches were used. The first compared brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats with differential ACTH responses to stress. Relative to sham-adrenalectomized (SHAM) rats, adrenalectomized rats replaced with low, constant corticosterone levels via a subcutaneous corticosterone pellet (B-PELLET) exhibited elevated and prolonged ACTH responses to a variety of stimuli. Adrenalectomized rate given a circadian corticosterone rhythm via corticosterone in their drinking water exhibited elevated ACTH levels immediately after stress, but unlike B-PELLET rats, terminated stress induced ACTH secretion normally relative to SHAMS. Therefore, the abnormal ACTH responses to stress in B-PELLET rats were due to the lack of both circadian variations and stress-induced increases in corticosterone. Hypoxia was selected as a standardized stimulus for correlating brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake with ACTH secretion. In intact rats, increases in plasma ACTH and decreases in arterial PO{sub 2} correlated with the severity of hypoxia at arterial PCO{sub 2} below 60 mm Hg. Hypoxia PELLET vs. SHAM rats. However, in preliminary experiments, although hypoxia increased brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in most brain regions, plasma ACTH correlated poorly with 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 12% and 10% O{sub 2}.

  4. Mechanism of Action of Secreted Newt Anterior Gradient Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grassme, Kathrin S.; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Delgado, Jean-Paul; Godwin, James W.; Kumar, Anoop; Gates, Phillip B.; Brockes, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient (AG) proteins have a thioredoxin fold and are targeted to the secretory pathway where they may act in the ER, as well as after secretion into the extracellular space. A newt member of the family (nAG) was previously identified as interacting with the GPI-anchored salamander-specific three-finger protein called Prod1. Expression of nAG has been implicated in the nerve dependence of limb regeneration in salamanders, and nAG acted as a growth factor for cultured newt limb blastemal (progenitor) cells, but the mechanism of action was not understood. Here we show that addition of a peptide antibody to Prod1 specifically inhibit the proliferation of blastema cells, suggesting that Prod1 acts as a cell surface receptor for secreted nAG, leading to S phase entry. Mutation of the single cysteine residue in the canonical active site of nAG to alanine or serine leads to protein degradation, but addition of residues at the C terminus stabilises the secreted protein. The mutation of the cysteine residue led to no detectable activity on S phase entry in cultured newt limb blastemal cells. In addition, our phylogenetic analyses have identified a new Caudata AG protein called AG4. A comparison of the AG proteins in a cell culture assay indicates that nAG secretion is significantly higher than AGR2 or AG4, suggesting that this property may vary in different members of the family. PMID:27100463

  5. Bioinspired Antifreeze Secreting Frost-Responsive Pagophobic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Prevention of ice and frost accumulation is of interest to transportation, power generation, and agriculture industries. Superhydrophobic and lubricant impregnated pagophobic coatings have been proposed, however, they both fail in frosting conditions. Inspired by functional liquid secretion in natural systems, such as toxin secretion by poison dart frost in response to predator presence, we developed frost-responsive antifreeze secreting pagophobic coatings. These are bi-layered coatings with an inner superhydrophilic ``dermis'' infused with antifreeze and an outer permeable superhydrophobic ``epidermis.'' The superhydrophobic epidermis separates the antifreeze from the environment and prevents ice accumulation by repelling impinging water droplets. In frosting conditions, the antifreeze is secreted from the dermis through pores in the epidermis either due to contact with condensed droplets or temporary switch of the epidermis wettability from hydrophobic to hydrophilic caused by surface icing. Here we demonstrate superior performance of this multifunctional coating in simulated frosting, freezing mist/fog, and freezing spray/rain conditions. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  6. A New Family of Secreted Toxins in Pathogenic Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Anne; Jousset, Agnès B.; Euphrasie, Daniel; Mukorako, Paulette; Boucharlat, Alix; Ducousso, Alexia; Charbit, Alain; Nassif, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The genus Neisseria includes both commensal and pathogenic species which are genetically closely related. However, only meningococcus and gonococcus are important human pathogens. Very few toxins are known to be secreted by pathogenic Neisseria species. Recently, toxins secreted via type V secretion system and belonging to the widespread family of contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins have been described in numerous species including meningococcus. In this study, we analyzed loci containing the maf genes in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and proposed a novel uniform nomenclature for maf genomic islands (MGIs). We demonstrated that mafB genes encode secreted polymorphic toxins and that genes immediately downstream of mafB encode a specific immunity protein (MafI). We focused on a MafB toxin found in meningococcal strain NEM8013 and characterized its EndoU ribonuclease activity. maf genes represent 2% of the genome of pathogenic Neisseria, and are virtually absent from non-pathogenic species, thus arguing for an important biological role. Indeed, we showed that overexpression of one of the four MafB toxins of strain NEM8013 provides an advantage in competition assays, suggesting a role of maf loci in niche adaptation. PMID:25569427

  7. 40 CFR 209.23 - Trade secrets and privileged information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trade secrets and privileged... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE NOISE CONTROL ACT OF 1972 Rules of Practice Governing Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.23...

  8. 40 CFR 209.23 - Trade secrets and privileged information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trade secrets and privileged... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE NOISE CONTROL ACT OF 1972 Rules of Practice Governing Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.23...

  9. 40 CFR 209.23 - Trade secrets and privileged information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Trade secrets and privileged... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE NOISE CONTROL ACT OF 1972 Rules of Practice Governing Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.23...

  10. 40 CFR 209.23 - Trade secrets and privileged information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trade secrets and privileged... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE NOISE CONTROL ACT OF 1972 Rules of Practice Governing Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.23...

  11. 40 CFR 209.23 - Trade secrets and privileged information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trade secrets and privileged... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING PROCEEDINGS UNDER THE NOISE CONTROL ACT OF 1972 Rules of Practice Governing Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.23...

  12. Exemption 4: Trade Secrets under the Freedom of Information Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Holly E.

    Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) protects from disclosure by government agencies privileged and confidential trade secrets and commercial or financial information. Based on early Exemption 4 litigation, courts have devised a "substantial competitive harm test" to decide whether requested information should be covered by the…

  13. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MSDS, provided that the operator— (1) Can support the claim that the chemical's identity is a trade...) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the MSDS information on the properties and effects of the hazardous chemical. (b) The operator must...

  14. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MSDS, provided that the operator— (1) Can support the claim that the chemical's identity is a trade...) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the MSDS information on the properties and effects of the hazardous chemical. (b) The operator must...

  15. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MSDS, provided that the operator— (1) Can support the claim that the chemical's identity is a trade...) Indicates in the MSDS that the chemical's identity is withheld as a trade secret, and (4) Discloses in the MSDS information on the properties and effects of the hazardous chemical. (b) The operator must...

  16. 5 CFR 1312.27 - Top secret control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Top secret control. 1312.27 Section 1312.27 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET OMB DIRECTIVES CLASSIFICATION... intelligence material, which will be processed as prescribed by the controlling agency. (a) Procedures. All...

  17. Mechanism of Action of Secreted Newt Anterior Gradient Protein.

    PubMed

    Grassme, Kathrin S; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Delgado, Jean-Paul; Godwin, James W; Kumar, Anoop; Gates, Phillip B; Driscoll, Paul C; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient (AG) proteins have a thioredoxin fold and are targeted to the secretory pathway where they may act in the ER, as well as after secretion into the extracellular space. A newt member of the family (nAG) was previously identified as interacting with the GPI-anchored salamander-specific three-finger protein called Prod1. Expression of nAG has been implicated in the nerve dependence of limb regeneration in salamanders, and nAG acted as a growth factor for cultured newt limb blastemal (progenitor) cells, but the mechanism of action was not understood. Here we show that addition of a peptide antibody to Prod1 specifically inhibit the proliferation of blastema cells, suggesting that Prod1 acts as a cell surface receptor for secreted nAG, leading to S phase entry. Mutation of the single cysteine residue in the canonical active site of nAG to alanine or serine leads to protein degradation, but addition of residues at the C terminus stabilises the secreted protein. The mutation of the cysteine residue led to no detectable activity on S phase entry in cultured newt limb blastemal cells. In addition, our phylogenetic analyses have identified a new Caudata AG protein called AG4. A comparison of the AG proteins in a cell culture assay indicates that nAG secretion is significantly higher than AGR2 or AG4, suggesting that this property may vary in different members of the family. PMID:27100463

  18. The Secret of the Svalbard Sea Ice Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Van Woert, Michael L.; Neumann, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    An elongated sea ice feature called the Svalbard sea ice barrier rapidly formed over an area in the Barents Sea to the east of Svalbard posing navigation hazards. The secret of its formation lies in the bottom bathymetry that governs the distribution of cold Arctic waters masses, which impacts sea ice growth on the water surface.

  19. Body and Bulimia Revisited: Reflections on "A Secret Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillmann, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996, the author published "A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia" (Tillmann-Healy, 1996), an account of her struggle with binging and purging from ages 15 to 25. She came to understand bulimia as a communicative act, expressing fear, anxiety, and grief. From 25 to 35, her recovery from bulimia involved…

  20. The Secret of Play: Birth to 12 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ann Pleshette

    2009-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "The Secret of Play: How to Raise Smart, Healthy, Caring Kids From Birth to Age 12" (2008, DK Publishing) by parenting expert Ann Pleshette Murphy. The author draws on child development research to help parents understand how play helps children learn at each stage of development and offers practical suggestions for…

  1. Secret Writing. Keys to the Mysteries of Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Peter

    With a central theme of how people create a means to communicate reliably, and based on language-making exercises that touch students' imaginations, this book aims to interest students in language and how language is made. Since students like codes and ciphers, the book begins with secret writing, which is then used to reveal the foundation of…

  2. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  3. Teaching with Technology: The Secrets of Their Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Victor

    2006-01-01

    In this article, top technologists and educators offer exclusive, unique insights into the most innovative and powerful ways to use technology to motivate students and teachers, and perhaps reinvent the world. The author also reveals what are, according to Alan Kay, one of the earliest pioneers in educational technology, the five secrets of…

  4. Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a book review of "Seed to Seed, The Secret Life of Plants", by Nicholas Harberd. The book is a diary of ruminations/introspections about plant development and about the main research topic of Nick Harberd’s laboratory. His intended audience is initially nonscientists; many of the explanation...

  5. Isolation and characterization of glycoproteins from canine tracheal pouch secretions.

    PubMed

    Liao, T H; Blumenfeld, O O; Park, S S

    1979-04-25

    Canine tracheal pouch secretions were solubilized with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate and visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Intact mucus, and water-soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were shown to be composed of high molecular weight glycoproteins (Mr greater than or equal to 3 . 10(6)) and three major classes of proteins of lower molecular weight (Mr approximately 4 . 10(5), 2 . 10(5), and 6 . 10(4)). When the mucus secretions were further treated with a reducing agent, the glycoproteins were dissociated into subunits which appeared on the gel as three discrete bands. Separation of the high molecular weight glycoproteins from the other proteins was achieved by gel filtration on Biogel A-15m in the presence of 1% dodecyl sulfate following reduction and alkylation of mucus. These glycoproteins were further resolved, using DEAE cellulose chromatography in the presence of 6 M urea, into two protein fractions. Both fractions contained approximately 87% carbohydrate, high amounts of serine and threonine but differed significantly in contents of N-acetyl glucosamine and sialic acid; their mobility on gel electrophoresis was also different. Significant contents of cysteine were noted in both fractions. Results of this study indicate that the canine tracheal pouch preparations provide normal tracheal secretions which bear similarity in structure to the tracheobronchial secretions obtained from human patients. PMID:454656

  6. Is caseinomacropeptide from milk proteins, an inhibitor of gastric secretion?

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Paul; Romé, Véronique; Delaby, Luc; Mendy, François; Roger, Loic; Chayvialle, Jean Alain

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study, in vivo, the effect of the ingestion of not glycosylated caseinomacropeptide (CMP) on gastric secretion. In Experiments #1 and #2, 7 calves fitted with a gastric pouch received either a diet without CMP (C diet) or C diet in which CMP was introduced (equal to and 5 folds that of CMP quantity contained in cow milk, diets CMP1 and CMP5, respectively). In Experiment #3, 2 calves (with gastric pouch) were fed C diet followed by an "iv perfusion" of CMP. In Experiment #4, 25 calves fed either C, CMP1 or CMP5 diets were fitted with a blood catheter for sample collections. The quantities of daily gastric secretions seemed few modified by CMP ingestion but the profile of these secretions was changed along the day. The most important result is that CMP can inhibit gastric secretions (mainly hydrochloric acid) stimulated by the meal, but there was no dose-dependent response. No similar observations were obtained after perfusion of CMP in jugular vein. CMP was not detected in blood. Results obtained in our experiments are not in favor of its significant intestinal absorption. Gastrin, somatostatin and VIP could be implicated in the mechanisms of regulation.

  7. 32 CFR 9.9 - Protection of State secrets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of State secrets. 9.9 Section 9.9 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  8. EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON HUMAN TROPHOBLAST CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Bromodichloromethane on Human Trophoblast Chorionic Gonadotrophin Secretion

    Jiangang Chen1, Twanda L. Thirkill1, Peter N. Lohstroh1, Susan R. Bielmeier2, Michael G. Narotsky3, Deborah S. Best3, Randy A. Harrison3, Kala Natarajan1, Rex A. Pegram3, Gordon C. Dougla...

  9. Altered waveform of plasma nocturnal melatonin secretion in premenstrual depression.

    PubMed

    Parry, B L; Berga, S L; Kripke, D F; Klauber, M R; Laughlin, G A; Yen, S S; Gillin, J C

    1990-12-01

    The nocturnal secretion of plasma melatonin was determined under dim to dark conditions in eight patients with prospectively confirmed premenstrual syndrome and in eight age- and menstrual cycle phase-matched normal control subjects. Plasma samples for melatonin were collected every 30 minutes from 6 PM to 9 AM during the early follicular, late follicular, midluteal and late luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Compared with normal controls, patients with premenstrual syndrome had an earlier (phase-advanced) offset of melatonin secretion, which contributed to a shorter secretion duration and a decreased area under the curve. No statistically significant differences were found between women with premenstrual syndrome and normal controls for melatonin onset or peak concentration, or for estradiol or progesterone levels. The data demonstrate that women with premenstrual syndrome have chronobiological abnormalities of melatonin secretion. The fact that these patients respond to treatments that affect circadian physiology, such as sleep deprivation and phototherapy, suggests that circadian abnormalities may contribute to the pathogenesis of premenstrual syndrome.

  10. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  11. A new family of secreted toxins in pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Anne; Jousset, Agnès B; Euphrasie, Daniel; Mukorako, Paulette; Boucharlat, Alix; Ducousso, Alexia; Charbit, Alain; Nassif, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The genus Neisseria includes both commensal and pathogenic species which are genetically closely related. However, only meningococcus and gonococcus are important human pathogens. Very few toxins are known to be secreted by pathogenic Neisseria species. Recently, toxins secreted via type V secretion system and belonging to the widespread family of contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins have been described in numerous species including meningococcus. In this study, we analyzed loci containing the maf genes in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and proposed a novel uniform nomenclature for maf genomic islands (MGIs). We demonstrated that mafB genes encode secreted polymorphic toxins and that genes immediately downstream of mafB encode a specific immunity protein (MafI). We focused on a MafB toxin found in meningococcal strain NEM8013 and characterized its EndoU ribonuclease activity. maf genes represent 2% of the genome of pathogenic Neisseria, and are virtually absent from non-pathogenic species, thus arguing for an important biological role. Indeed, we showed that overexpression of one of the four MafB toxins of strain NEM8013 provides an advantage in competition assays, suggesting a role of maf loci in niche adaptation.

  12. The Secret Club Project: Exploring Miscarriage through the Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seftel, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Examines art as a means to understand the physical and emotional loss of miscarriage. "The Secret Club Project," an innovative exhibit featuring 10 women artists' visual responses to miscarriage, is described. Rituals related to pregnancy loss are reviewed, as well as artists' and art therapists' use of the creative process to move through grief.…

  13. Minireview: Dopaminergic Regulation of Insulin Secretion from the Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    Ustione, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous dopamine inhibits insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, but the lack of dopaminergic neurons in pancreatic islets has led to controversy regarding the importance of this effect. Recent data, however, suggest a plausible physiologic role for dopamine in the regulation of insulin secretion. We review the literature underlying our current understanding of dopaminergic signaling that can down-regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. In this negative feedback loop, dopamine is synthesized in the β-cells from circulating l-dopa, serves as an autocrine signal that is cosecreted with insulin, and causes a tonic inhibition on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. On the whole animal scale, l-dopa is produced by cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and its concentration in the blood plasma increases following a mixed meal. By reviewing the outcome of certain types of bariatric surgery that result in rapid amelioration of glucose tolerance, we hypothesize that dopamine serves as an “antiincretin” signal that counterbalances the stimulatory effect of glucagon-like peptide 1. PMID:23744894

  14. The rhythmic secretion of mating-induced prolactin secretion is controlled by prolactin acting centrally.

    PubMed

    Helena, Cleyde V; McKee, De'Nise T; Bertram, Richard; Walker, Ameae M; Freeman, Marc E

    2009-07-01

    Artificial copulomimetic cervical stimulation (CS) induces an immediate release of oxytocin (OT) and prolactin (PRL) followed by a daily PRL rhythm characterized by nocturnal and diurnal surges. Although we have shown that the initial release of PRL is induced by the immediate release of OT, we tested whether the PRL that is released in response to CS is responsible for the initiation and maintenance of the subsequent PRL surges. Thus, we injected OVX rats centrally or peripherally with ovine PRL (oPRL) at 2200 h. Central oPRL induced PRL surges in OVX rats that were similar in size and timing to those of CS rats, whereas peripheral oPRL induced surges that were of smaller amplitude and delayed. We then infused a PRL antagonist (S179D, 0.1 ng/h) centrally into OVX and OVX-CS rats and measured the release of endogenous PRL and the activity of neuroendocrine dopaminergic neurons. Central infusion of S179D did not influence basal PRL secretion in OVX rats but prevented the expression of the CS-induced PRL surges and the accompanying noontime increase of CS-induced dopaminergic activity when continued for 3 d. However, central infusion of S179D only on the day of CS did not prevent the daily rhythm of PRL surges. These results demonstrate that PRL acts centrally to induce the PRL rhythm and that PRL in the brain is essential for the maintenance but not for the initiation of the CS-induced rhythmic PRL surges.

  15. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  16. Circadian interleukin-6 secretion and quantity and depth of sleep.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, A N; Papanicolaou, D A; Bixler, E O; Lotsikas, A; Zachman, K; Kales, A; Prolo, P; Wong, M L; Licinio, J; Gold, P W; Hermida, R C; Mastorakos, G; Chrousos, G P

    1999-08-01

    Patients with pathologically increased daytime sleepiness and fatigue have elevated levels of circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6). The latter is an inflammatory cytokine, which causes sickness manifestations, including somnolence and fatigue, and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In this study, we examined: 1) the relation between serial measurements of plasma IL-6 and quantity and depth of sleep, evaluated by polysomnography; and 2) the effects of sleep deprivation on the nyctohemeral pattern of IL-6 secretion. Eight healthy young male volunteers were sampled for 24 h twice, at the baseline state, after a normal night's sleep and after total overnight sleep deprivation. At the baseline state, IL-6 was secreted in a biphasic circadian pattern with two nadirs at 0800 and 2100 and two zeniths at 1900 and 0500 (P < 0.01). The baseline amount of sleep correlated negatively with the overall daytime secretion of the cytokine (P < 0.05). Also, depth of sleep at baseline correlated negatively with the postdeprivation increase of daytime secretion of IL-6 (P < 0.05). Sleep deprivation changed the temporal pattern of circadian IL-6 secretion but not the overall amount. Indeed, during the post-deprivation period, the mean daytime (0800-2200 h) levels of IL-6 were significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas the nighttime (2200-0600 h) levels were lower than the predeprivation values. Thus, sleep-deprived subjects had daytime oversecretion and nighttime under-secretion of IL-6; the former might be responsible for their daylong somnolence and fatigue, the latter for the better quality (depth) of their sleep. These data suggest that a good night's sleep is associated with decreased daytime secretion of IL-6 and a good sense of well-being and that good sleep is associated with decreased exposure of tissues to the proinflammatory and potentially detrimental actions of IL-6. Sleep deprivation increases daytime IL-6 and causes somnolence and fatigue during the next day

  17. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, has emerged recently as a pivotal signal in the regulation of fertility. Although the actions of leptin in the control of reproductive function are thought to be exerted mainly at the hypothalamic level, the potential direct effects of leptin at the pituitary and gonadal level have been poorly characterised. In the present study, we first assessed the ability of leptin to regulate testicular testosterone secretion in vitro. Secondly, we aimed to evaluate whether leptin can modulate basal gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) release by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted male rats. To attain the first goal, testicular slices from prepubertal and adult rats were incubated with increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Assuming that in vitro testicular responsiveness to leptin may be dependent on the background leptin levels, testicular tissue from both food-deprived and normally-fed animals was used. Furthermore, leptin modulation of stimulated testosterone secretion was evaluated by incubation of testicular samples with different doses of leptin in the presence of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). In addition, analysis of leptin actions on pituitary function was carried out using hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult male rats incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations (10(-9)-10(-7) M) of recombinant leptin. Serum testosterone levels, and basal and hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by incubated testicular tissue were significantly decreased by fasting in prepubertal and adult male rats. However, a significant reduction in circulating LH levels was only evident in adult fasted rats. Doses of 10(-9)-10(-7) M leptin had no effect on basal or hCG-stimulated testosterone secretion by testes from prepubertal rats, regardless of the nutritional state of the donor animal. In contrast, leptin significantly decreased basal and hCG-induced testosterone secretion by testes from fasted and fed

  18. Cell secretion from the adult lamprey supraneural body tissues possesses cytocidal activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yue; Wang, Shiyue; Ba, Wei; Li, Qingwei

    2015-01-01

    The supraneural body was identified in the adult lamprey, and its secretions induced the death of a variety of tumor cells but had no effect on normal cells. The cell secretions from different lamprey tissues were separated, and these secretions killed human tumor cells to varying degrees. The cell secretions induced remarkable cell morphological alterations such as cell blebbing, and the plasma membrane was destroyed by the secretions. In addition, the secretions induced morphological alterations of the mitochondria, cytoskeletal structure, and endoplasmic reticulum, eventually leading to cell death. These observations suggest the presence of a novel protein in the lamprey and the possibility of new applications for the protein in the medical field.

  19. Does ethanol inhibit LH secretion in the rat?

    PubMed

    Ellingboe, J; Shaw, D G; Skupny, A S; Sikorski, M A

    1987-01-01

    A prevailing view among those studying neuroendocrine effects of ethanol is that acute doses suppress luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion, and consequently inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) release in the rat. This phenomenon has not been observed in primates, and has been thought to be a species difference. The experimental procedures, however, have involved ethanol administration by oral or intragastric (ig) routes in humans and monkeys, but intraperitoneal (ip) or carotid artery injection in rats. It has also been suggested that inhibition of LH secretion by ethanol in rats is mediated by endogenous opioid peptides (EOP), because the effect can be reversed by the opiate antagonist naloxone. An alternative explanation is that ip ethanol injection might stress rats sufficiently to activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (H-P-A) and EOP systems that are well known to inhibit hormonal activities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (H-P-G) axis. Presented here are preliminary results from experiments with male rats. When ethanol is administered ig, under relatively stress-free conditions, it does not inhibit LH secretion in gonadally intact or castrated males. In contrast, ip injection of the same ethanol dose (2.0 g/kg body wt) causes pronounced inhibition of LH secretion and concomitant increases in plasma prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone--indicative of a stress response. Furthermore, when ip ethanol administration is preceded by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) antagonist (alpha-helical ovine CRF residues 9 to 41), the effects of ethanol on LH and corticosterone are blocked. These results indicate that it may be stress, rather than ethanol per se, that inhibits LHRH and LH secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Gas mediators involved in modulating duodenal HCO3(-) secretion.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Aihara, E; Kimura, M; Dogishi, K; Hara, T; Hayashi, S

    2012-01-01

    The secretion of HCO3(-) in the duodenum is increased by mucosal acidification, and this process is modulated by gas mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon monoxide (CO), in addition to prostaglandins (PGs). The secretion is increased by NOR3 (NO donor), NaHS (H2S donor), and CORM-2 (CO donor). The HCO3(-) responses to NOR3 and CORM-2 are attenuated by indomethacin, while that to NaHS is mitigated by indomethacin and L-NAME as well as sensory deafferentation. NOR3 and CORM-2 increase mucosal PGE2 production, while H2S increases mucosal PGE2 content and luminal NO release. The HCO3(-) response to mucosal acidification is attenuated by indomethacin, propargylglycine, and SnPP, each inhibiting PG, H2S and CO production, respectively. The acid-induced duodenal damage is worsened when either PG, H2S or CO is lacking. These findings suggest that 1) NO, H2S, and CO, generated endogenously or exogenously, stimulate HCO3(-) secretion in the duodenum; 2) the stimulatory action of NO and CO is mediated, at least partly, by endogenous PGs, while that of H2S is mediated by PGs and NO as well as sensory neurons; 3) these gas mediators are involved in the local regulation of acid-induced HCO3(-) secretion, in addition to endogenous PGs; 4) the acid-induced duodenal damage is worsened by agents inhibiting the endogenous production of NO, H2S or CO. It is assumed that these gas mediators play a role in maintaining the integrity of the duodenal mucosa by modulating the secretion of HCO3(-).

  1. Niacin stimulates adiponectin secretion through the GPR109A receptor.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Lukasova, Martina; Offermanns, Stefan; Zhang, Youyan; Cao, Guoqing; Judd, Robert L

    2009-03-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) has recently been shown to increase serum adiponectin concentrations in men with the metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which niacin regulates the intracellular trafficking and secretion of adiponectin. Since niacin appears to exert its effects on lipolysis through receptor (GPR109A)-dependent and -independent pathways, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the role of the recently identified GPR109A receptor in adiponectin secretion. Initial in vivo studies in rats demonstrated that niacin (30 mg/kg po) acutely increases serum adiponectin concentrations, whereas it decreases NEFAs. Further in vitro studies demonstrated an increase in adiponectin secretion and a decrease in lipolysis in primary adipocytes following treatment with niacin or beta-hydroxybutyrate (an endogenous ligand of the GPR109A receptor), but these effects were blocked when adipocytes were pretreated with pertussis toxin. Niacin had no effect on adiponectin secretion or lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which have limited cell surface expression of the GPR109A receptor. To further substantiate these in vitro findings, wild-type and GPR109A receptor knockout mice were administered a single dose of niacin or placebo, and serum was obtained for the determination of adiponectin and NEFA concentrations. Serum adiponectin concentrations increased and serum NEFAs decreased in the wild-type mice within 10 min following niacin administration. However, niacin administration had no effect on adiponectin and NEFA concentrations in the GPR109A receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that the GPR109A receptor plays an important role in the dual regulation of adiponectin secretion and lipolysis.

  2. Subtilisin-like protease-1 secreted through type IV secretion system contributes to high virulence of Streptococcus suis 2

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Supeng; Li, Ming; Rao, Xiancai; Yao, Xinyue; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Min; Wang, Jing; Peng, Yizhi; Tang, Jiaqi; Hu, Fuquan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that triggered two outbreaks of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) in China. Our previous research demonstrated that a type IV secretion system (T4SS) harbored in the 89K pathogenicity island contributes to the pathogenicity of S. suis 2. In the present study, a shotgun proteomics approach was employed to identify the effectors secreted by T4SS in S. suis 2, and surface-associated subtilisin-like protease-1 (SspA-1) was identified as a potential virulence effector. Western blot analysis and pull-down assay revealed that SspA-1 secretion depends on T4SS. Knockout mutations affecting sspA-1 attenuated S. suis 2 and impaired the pathogen’s ability to trigger inflammatory response in mice. And purified SspA-1 induced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 in THP-1 cells directly. SspA-1 is the first T4SS virulence effector reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Overall, these findings allow us to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of T4SS and STSS. PMID:27270879

  3. Subtilisin-like protease-1 secreted through type IV secretion system contributes to high virulence of Streptococcus suis 2.

    PubMed

    Yin, Supeng; Li, Ming; Rao, Xiancai; Yao, Xinyue; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Min; Wang, Jing; Peng, Yizhi; Tang, Jiaqi; Hu, Fuquan; Zhao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that triggered two outbreaks of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) in China. Our previous research demonstrated that a type IV secretion system (T4SS) harbored in the 89K pathogenicity island contributes to the pathogenicity of S. suis 2. In the present study, a shotgun proteomics approach was employed to identify the effectors secreted by T4SS in S. suis 2, and surface-associated subtilisin-like protease-1 (SspA-1) was identified as a potential virulence effector. Western blot analysis and pull-down assay revealed that SspA-1 secretion depends on T4SS. Knockout mutations affecting sspA-1 attenuated S. suis 2 and impaired the pathogen's ability to trigger inflammatory response in mice. And purified SspA-1 induced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 in THP-1 cells directly. SspA-1 is the first T4SS virulence effector reported in Gram-positive bacteria. Overall, these findings allow us to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of T4SS and STSS. PMID:27270879

  4. Extracellular vesicles secreted from cancer cell lines stimulate secretion of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and EMMPRIN.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Kendrick, Agnieszka A; Bahmed, Karim; Dahl, Kristin D; Pearson, Chad G; Robinson, William A; Robinson, Steven E; Graner, Michael W; Eisenmesser, Elan Z

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key contributors to cancer where they play an integral role in cell-cell communication and transfer pro-oncogenic molecules to recipient cells thereby conferring a cancerous phenotype. Here, we purified EVs using straightforward biochemical approaches from multiple cancer cell lines and subsequently characterized these EVs via multiple biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, we used fluorescence microscopy to directly show internalization of EVs into the recipient cells within a few minutes upon addition of EVs to recipient cells. We confirmed that the transmembrane protein EMMPRIN, postulated to be a marker of EVs, was indeed secreted from all cell lines studied here. We evaluated the response to EV stimulation in several different types of recipient cells lines and measured the ability of these purified EVs to induce secretion of several factors highly upregulated in human cancers. Our data indicate that purified EVs preferentially stimulate secretion of several proteins implicated in driving cancer in monocytic cells but only harbor limited activity in epithelial cells. Specifically, we show that EVs are potent stimulators of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and induce the secretion of extracellular EMMPRIN, which all play a role in driving immune evasion, invasion and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, by using a comprehensive approach that includes biochemical, biological, and spectroscopic methods, we have begun to elucidate the stimulatory roles.

  5. Salt secretion is linked to acid-base regulation of ionocytes in seawater-acclimated medaka: new insights into the salt-secreting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sian-Tai; Horng, Jiun-Lin; Chen, Po-Yen; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Lin, Li-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Ionocytes in the skin and gills of seawater (SW) teleosts are responsible for both salt and acid secretion. However, the mechanism through which ionocytes secrete acid is still unclear. Here, we hypothesized that apical Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHE2/3), carbonic anhydrase (CA2-like), and basolateral HCO3(-)/Cl(-) exchanger (AE1) are involved in acid secretion. In addition, the hypothesized involvement of basolateral AE1 suggested that acid secretion may be linked to Cl(-) secretion by ionocytes. The scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) was used to measure H(+) and Cl(-) secretion by ionocytes in the skin of medaka larvae acclimated to SW. Treatment with inhibitors of NHE, CA, and AE suppressed both H(+) and Cl(-) secretion by ionocytes. Short-term exposure to hypercapnic SW stimulated both H(+) and Cl(-) secretion. mRNA of CA2-like and AE1 were localized to ionocytes in the skin. Branchial mRNA levels of NKCC1a, CA2-like, and AE1a increased together with the salinity to which fish were acclimated. In addition, both AE1a and AE1b mRNA increased in fish acclimated to acidified (pH 7) SW; NKCC1a mRNA increased in fish acclimated to pH 9 SW. This study reveals the mechanism of H(+) secretion by ionocytes, and refines our understanding of the well-established mechanism of Cl(-) secretion by ionocytes of SW fish. PMID:27511107

  6. Salt secretion is linked to acid-base regulation of ionocytes in seawater-acclimated medaka: new insights into the salt-secreting mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sian-Tai; Horng, Jiun-Lin; Chen, Po-Yen; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Lin, Li-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Ionocytes in the skin and gills of seawater (SW) teleosts are responsible for both salt and acid secretion. However, the mechanism through which ionocytes secrete acid is still unclear. Here, we hypothesized that apical Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE2/3), carbonic anhydrase (CA2-like), and basolateral HCO3−/Cl− exchanger (AE1) are involved in acid secretion. In addition, the hypothesized involvement of basolateral AE1 suggested that acid secretion may be linked to Cl− secretion by ionocytes. The scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) was used to measure H+ and Cl− secretion by ionocytes in the skin of medaka larvae acclimated to SW. Treatment with inhibitors of NHE, CA, and AE suppressed both H+ and Cl− secretion by ionocytes. Short-term exposure to hypercapnic SW stimulated both H+ and Cl− secretion. mRNA of CA2-like and AE1 were localized to ionocytes in the skin. Branchial mRNA levels of NKCC1a, CA2-like, and AE1a increased together with the salinity to which fish were acclimated. In addition, both AE1a and AE1b mRNA increased in fish acclimated to acidified (pH 7) SW; NKCC1a mRNA increased in fish acclimated to pH 9 SW. This study reveals the mechanism of H+ secretion by ionocytes, and refines our understanding of the well-established mechanism of Cl− secretion by ionocytes of SW fish. PMID:27511107

  7. T3SEdb: data warehousing of virulence effectors secreted by the bacterial Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effectors of Type III Secretion System (T3SS) play a pivotal role in establishing and maintaining pathogenicity in the host and therefore the identification of these effectors is important in understanding virulence. However, the effectors display high level of sequence diversity, therefore making the identification a difficult process. There is a need to collate and annotate existing effector sequences in public databases to enable systematic analyses of these sequences for development of models for screening and selection of putative novel effectors from bacterial genomes that can be validated by a smaller number of key experiments. Results Herein, we present T3SEdb http://effectors.bic.nus.edu.sg/T3SEdb, a specialized database of annotated T3SS effector (T3SE) sequences containing 1089 records from 46 bacterial species compiled from the literature and public protein databases. Procedures have been defined for i) comprehensive annotation of experimental status of effectors, ii) submission and curation review of records by users of the database, and iii) the regular update of T3SEdb existing and new records. Keyword fielded and sequence searches (BLAST, regular expression) are supported for both experimentally verified and hypothetical T3SEs. More than 171 clusters of T3SEs were detected based on sequence identity comparisons (intra-cluster difference up to ~60%). Owing to this high level of sequence diversity of T3SEs, the T3SEdb provides a large number of experimentally known effector sequences with wide species representation for creation of effector predictors. We created a reliable effector prediction tool, integrated into the database, to demonstrate the application of the database for such endeavours. Conclusions T3SEdb is the first specialised database reported for T3SS effectors, enriched with manual annotations that facilitated systematic construction of a reliable prediction model for identification of novel effectors. The T3SEdb represents a

  8. Software Review: "The Secret Codes of C.Y.P.H.E.R.: Operation Wildlife."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bober, Marcie

    1992-01-01

    Describes "The Secret Codes of C.Y.P.H.E.R.: Operation Wildlife," a software program for language arts classrooms that joins natural science and communication/cryptography topics in a secret-agent interactive setting. (SR)

  9. Prkar1a in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Stratakis, C; Kirschner, L

    2012-09-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing worldwide with significant consequences on individual quality of life as well as economic burden on states' healthcare costs. While origins of the pathogenesis of T2DM are poorly understood, an early defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells is considered a hallmark of T2DM. Upon a glucose stimulus, insulin is secreted in a biphasic manner with an early first-phase burst of insulin, which is followed by a second, more sustained phase of insulin output. First phase insulin secretion is diminished early in T2DM as well is in subjects who are at risk of developing T2DM. An effective treatment of T2DM with incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or its long acting peptide analogue exendin-4 (E4), restores first-phase and augments second-phase glucose stimulated insulin secretion. This effect of incretin action occurs within minutes of GLP-1/E4 infusion in T2DM humans. An additional important consideration is that incretin hormones augment GSIS only above a certain glucose threshold, which is slightly above the normal glucose range. This ensures that incretin hormones stimulate GSIS only when glucose levels are high, while they are ineffective when insulin levels are below a certain threshold. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor, which is highly expressed on pancreatic β-cells, stimulates 2 -distinct intracellular signaling pathways: a) the cAMP-protein kinase A branch and b) the cAMP-EPAC2 (EPAC=exchange protein activated by cAMP) branch. While the EPAC2 branch is considered to mediate GLP-1 effects on first-phase GSIS, the PKA branch is necessary for the former branch to be active. However, how these 2 branches interplay and converge and how their effects on insulin secretion and insulin vesicle exocytosis are coordinated is poorly understood.Thus, at the outset of our studies we have a poorly understood intracellular interplay of cAMP-dependent signaling

  10. Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Peterson, E.K.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves was investigated by a labelling technique using protein-bound iodine125 and food dye. Wolves deposited secretions on some but not all scats. Adult males, especially the alpha male, deposited anal-sac secretions more frequently while defecating than did females or juveniles. Secretions sometimes also were deposited independently of defecation, suggesting a dual role in communication by these substances.

  11. 49 CFR 801.54 - Trade secrets and commercial or financial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 801.54 Trade secrets and commercial or financial information. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), trade secrets and items containing commercial or financial information that are obtained from a person and are... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trade secrets and commercial or...

  12. 10 CFR 9.28 - Predisclosure notification procedures for information containing trade secrets or confidential...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... containing trade secrets or confidential commercial or financial information. 9.28 Section 9.28 Energy... notification procedures for information containing trade secrets or confidential commercial or financial... secrets or confidential commercial or financial information, or the NRC believes the information...

  13. 40 CFR 350.15 - Public petitions requesting disclosure of chemical identity claimed as trade secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of chemical identity claimed as trade secret. 350.15 Section 350.15 Protection of Environment... chemical identity claimed as trade secret. (a) The public may request the disclosure of chemical identity... address of the company claiming the chemical identity as trade secret; and (3) A copy of the submission...

  14. Confidentiality Issues when Minor Children Disclose Family Secrets in Family Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurdy, Kenneth G.; Murray, Kenneth C.

    2003-01-01

    The literature addressing ethical issues involved in the disclosure of family secrets in counseling has typically focused on secrets disclosed by adults, ignoring the ethical issues surrounding individual disclosure by minor children and confidentiality within the family counseling context. This article explores family secrets, confidentiality…

  15. A Bacterial Pathogen uses Distinct Type III Secretion Systems to Alternate between Host Kingdom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of eukaryotes often secrete proteins directly into host cells via a needle-like protein channel called a ‘type III secretion system’ (T3SS). Bacteria that are adapted to either animal or plant hosts use phylogenetically distinct T3SSs for secreting proteins. Here, ...

  16. Trade Secrets in the Legal Studies Curriculum--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Trade secrets can be a valuable company asset because of their potential to last forever. Unfortunately, along with such a significant benefit, there is also a significant risk--the risk that the trade secret can be lost in an instant if it is not sufficiently protected. Companies must be vigilant in protecting these secrets. However, the law is…

  17. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States Secret Service D... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. D Appendix D to Subpart C of Part 1—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service. It sets...

  18. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States Secret Service D... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. D Appendix D to Subpart C of Part 1—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service. It sets...

  19. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States Secret Service D... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. D Appendix D to Subpart C of Part 1—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service. It sets...

  20. 31 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - United States Secret Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States Secret Service D... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. D Appendix D to Subpart C of Part 1—United States Secret Service 1. In general. This appendix applies to the United States Secret Service. It sets...