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Sample records for gen iv materials

  1. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  2. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2009-12-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  3. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  4. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  5. Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, M; Marian, J; Martinez, E; Erhart, P

    2009-02-27

    Within the LDRD on 'Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors' basic thermodynamics of the Fe-Cr alloy and accurate atomistic modeling were used to help develop the capability to predict hardening, swelling and embrittlement using the paradigm of Multiscale Materials Modeling. Approaches at atomistic and mesoscale levels were linked to build-up the first steps in an integrated modeling platform that seeks to relate in a near-term effort dislocation dynamics to polycrystal plasticity. The requirements originated in the reactor systems under consideration today for future sources of nuclear energy. These requirements are beyond the present day performance of nuclear materials and calls for the development of new, high temperature, radiation resistant materials. Fe-Cr alloys with 9-12% Cr content are the base matrix of advanced ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels envisaged as fuel cladding and structural components of Gen-IV reactors. Predictive tools are needed to calculate structural and mechanical properties of these steels. This project represents a contribution in that direction. The synergy between the continuous progress of parallel computing and the spectacular advances in the theoretical framework that describes materials have lead to a significant advance in our comprehension of materials properties and their mechanical behavior. We took this progress to our advantage and within this LDRD were able to provide a detailed physical understanding of iron-chromium alloys microstructural behavior. By combining ab-initio simulations, many-body interatomic potential development, and mesoscale dislocation dynamics we were able to describe their microstructure evolution. For the first time in the case of Fe-Cr alloys, atomistic and mesoscale were merged and the first steps taken towards incorporating ordering and precipitation effects into dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies of the transport of self-interstitial, vacancy and

  6. Gen IV Materials Handbook Beta Release for Structural and Functional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Luttrell, Claire

    2006-09-12

    Development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook is briefly summarized up to date. Current status of the Handbook website construction is described. The developed Handbook components and access control of the beta version are discussed for the present evaluation release. Detailed instructions and examples are given to provide guidance for evaluators to browse the constructed parts and use all the currently developed functionalities of the Handbook in evaluation.

  7. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation (2B) Handbook Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2011-08-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  8. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation (4A) Handbook Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2013-09-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  9. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  10. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  11. GEN IV reactors: Where we are, where we should go

    SciTech Connect

    Locatelli, G.; Mancini, M.; Todeschini, N.

    2012-07-01

    GEN IV power plants represent the mid-long term option of the nuclear sector. International literature proposes many papers and reports dealing with these reactors, but there is an evident difference of type and shape of information making impossible each kind of detailed comparison. Moreover, authors are often strongly involved in some particular design; this creates many difficulties in their super-partes position. Therefore it is necessary to put order in the most relevant information to understand strengths and weaknesses of each design and derive an overview useful for technicians and policy makers. This paper presents the state-of the art for GEN IV nuclear reactors providing a comprehensive literature review of the different designs with a relate taxonomy. It presents the more relevant references, data, advantages, disadvantages and barriers to the adoptions. In order to promote an efficient and wide adoption of GEN IV reactors the paper provides the pre-conditions that must be accomplished, enabling factors promoting the implementation and barriers limiting the extent and intensity of its implementation. It concludes outlying the state of the art of the most important R and D areas and the future achievements that must be accomplished for a wide adoption of these technologies. (authors)

  12. A REVIEW ON CURRENT STATUS OF ALLOYS 617 AND 230 FOR GEN IV NUCLEAR REACTOR INTERNALS AND HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Swindeman, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Alloys 617 and 230 are currently identified as two leading candidate metallic materials in the down selection for applications at temperatures above 760 C in the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems. Qualifying the materials requires significant information related to Codification, mechanical behavior modeling, metallurgical stability, environmental resistance, and many other aspects. In the present paper, material requirements for the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems are discussed; certain available information regarding the two alloys under consideration for the intended applications are reviewed and analyzed. Suggestions are presented for further R&D activities for the materials selection.

  13. Considerations of Alloy 617 Application in the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems - Part II: Metallurgical Property Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2010-01-01

    Alloy 617 is currently considered as a leading candidate material for high temperature components in the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Systems. Because of the unprecedented severe working conditions beyond its commercial service experience required by the Gen IV systems, the alloy faces various challenges in both mechanical and metallurgical properties. Following a previous paper discussing the mechanical property challenges, this paper is focused on the challenges and issues in metallurgical properties of the alloy for the intended nuclear application. Considerations are given in details about its metallurgical stability and aging evolution, aging effects on mechanical properties, potential Co hazard, and internal oxidation. Some research and development activities are suggested with discussions on viability to satisfy the Gen IV Nuclear Reactor System needs.

  14. Preliminary Considerations of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Gen IV Nuclear Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2008-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is currently identified as one of the leading candidate materials in the down selection for construction of the Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Because of the stringent requirements in strength, size, safety, design life, and maintenance for the intended nuclear application, qualification of the material demands scrutiny in various aspects such as mechanical properties, data sufficiency, Codification, mechanical behavior modeling, metallurgical stability, environmental resistance, component manufacturability and transportation. In the present paper, history of the material development is briefly reviewed; requirements and challenges for the intended application are discussed; available information on the material is described. Further research and development activities are suggested to facilitate the materials selection.

  15. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  16. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric

    2007-07-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while matrices are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in gloveboxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbothermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphite carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC{sup R} process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the PHENIX reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  17. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  18. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Pekarcikova, M.; Simko, F.; Petriska, M.; Skarba, M.; Mikula, P.; Pupala, M.

    2016-11-01

    Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Progress reports for Gen IV sodium fast reactor activities FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J. E.; Tentner, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-04

    for prevention of progression into severe accident conditions (prevention of core melting) or for mitigation of severe accident consequences (mitigation of the impact of core melting to protect public health and safety). Because design measures for severe accident prevention and mitigation are beyond the normal design basis, established regulatory guidelines and codes do not provide explicit identification of the design performance requirements for severe accident accommodation. The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key issues of R&D plans for the Gen IV systems in general, and for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) in particular. Despite the lack of an unambiguous definition of safety approach applicable for severe accidents, there is an emerging consensus on the need for their consideration for the design. The US SFR program and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in particular have actively studied the potential scenarios and consequences of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA) for SFRs with oxide fuel during the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) programs in the 70s and 80s. Later, the focus of the US SFR safety R&D activities shifted to the prevention of all HCDAs through passive safety features of the SFRs with metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, and the study of severe accident consequences was de-emphasized. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the current SFR safety approach and the role of severe accidents in Japan and France, in preparation for an expected and more active collaboration in this area between the US, Japan, and France.

  20. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremore » evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.« less

  1. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ludewig, Hans; Jo, Jae

    2006-07-01

    A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest is a station blackout simultaneous with a small break (10 sq.inch/0.645 m{sup 2}) in the reactor vessel. The analyses cover the three phases of decay heat removal in a depressurization accident: (1) forced flow cooling by the power conversion unit (PCU) coast down, (2) active forced flow cooling by a battery powered blower, and (3) passive cooling by natural circulation. The blower is part of an emergency cooling system (ECS) that by design is to sustain passive decay heat removal via natural circulation cooling 24 hours after shutdown. The RELAP5 model includes the helium-cooled reactor, the ECS (primary and secondary side), the PCU with all the rotating machinery (turbine and compressors) and the heat transfer components (recuperator, pre-cooler and inter-cooler), and the guard containment that surrounds the reactor and the PCU. The transient analysis has demonstrated the effectiveness of passive decay heat removal by natural circulation cooling when the guard containment pressure is maintained at or above 800 kPa. (authors)

  2. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Katoh, Yutai; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Wilson, Dane F

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural

  3. Materials Research for Superconducting Machinery-IV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    LABORATORIES Preparation of a Handbook on Mechanical , Thermal, Electrical, and Magnetic properties of Materials for Superconducting Machinery. Eldridge, E. A...Properties of Structural Materials Program Area Mechanical Properties 1. Fracture and Fitigue a. Materials Group Second Year Program (FY 75...crack growth rate tests from 4-300 K on structural alloys, and the effects of stress level and frequency. Mechanical , magnetic, electrical loss

  4. Alternative Approaches to Group IV Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedaker, Matthew Loren

    In the pursuit of energy efficiency, there is a demand for systems capable of recovering waste heat. A temperature gradient across a thermoelectric material results in the thermal diffusion of charge carriers from the hot side to the cold side, giving rise to a voltage that can be used to convert waste heat to electricity. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloys are the standard materials used for thermoelectric generators at high temperatures. We report an alternative method for preparing p-type Si1- xGex alloys from a boron-doped silica-germania nanocomposite. This is the first demonstration of the thermoelectric properties of SiGe-based thermoelectrics prepared at temperatures below the alloy's melting point through a magnesiothermic reduction of the (SiO 2)1-x(GeO2) x. We observe a thermoelectric power factor that is competitive with the literature record for the conventionally prepared SiGe. The large grain size in our hot pressed SiGe limits the thermoelectric figure of merit to 0.5 at 800°C for an optimally doped p-type Si80Ge 20 alloy. A phosphorus-doped oxide can yield n-type Si1- xGex; however, the current processing method introduces a background boron content that compensates ~10% of the donor impurities and limits the thermoelectric power factor. Spark plasma sintering of the nano-Si1-xGe x yields a heterogeneous alloy with thermal conductivity lower than that of the hot pressed homogeneous alloy due to a reduction in the average crystallite size. Magnesiothermic reduction in the presence of molten salts allows some control over crystallite growth and the extent of Si-Ge alloying.

  5. Progress in the development of the neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: simulations and experimental validations [ANIMMA--2015-IO-98

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; De Izarra, G.; Elter, Zs.; Pazsit, I.; Verma, V.; Hellesen, C.; Jacobsson, S.; Hamrita, H.; Bakkali, M.; Chapoutier, N.; Scholer, A-C.; Verrier, D.; Cantonnet, B.; Nappe, J-C.; Molinie, P.; Dessante, P.; Hanna, R.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Odic, E.; Jadot, F.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor will rely on high temperature fission chambers installed in the reactor vessel and capable of operating over a wide-range neutron flux. The definition of such a system is presented and the technological solutions are justified with the use of simulation and experimental results. (authors)

  6. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Halsey, William; Hayner, George; Katoh, Yutai; Klett, James William; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Stoller, Roger E; Wilson, Dane F

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  7. Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    de Caro, M S

    2007-10-30

    Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

  8. Status of Alloy 800H in Considerations for the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Swindeman, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Alloy 800 H is currently under consideration for applications in the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) at operational temperatures above 750°C. This paper first describes service requirements of the nuclear system for structural materials; and then an extensive review of Alloy 800 H is given on its codification with respect to development and research history, mechanical behavior and design allowables, metallurgical aging resistance, environmental effect considerations, data requirements and availability, weldments, as well as many other aspects relevant to the intended nuclear application. Finally, further research and development activities to support the materials qualification are suggested.

  9. Tritium Sequestration in Gen IV NGNP Gas Stream via Proton Conducting Ceramic Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanglin Frank; Adams, Thad M.; Brinkman, Kyle; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2011-09-30

    Several types of high-temperature proton conductors based on SrCeO3 and BaCeO3 have been systematically investigated in this project for tritium separation in NGNP applications. One obstacle for the field application is the chemical stability issues in the presence of steam and CO2 for these proton conductors. Several strategies to overcome such issues have been evaluated, including A site doping and B site co-doping method for perovskite-structured proton conductors. Novel zirconium-free proton conductors have also been developed with improved electrical conductivity and enhanced chemical stability. Novel catalytic materials for the proton-conducting separation membranes have been investigated. A tubular geometry proton-conducting membrane has been developed for the proton separation membranes. Total dose rate estimated from tritium decay (beta emission) under realistic membrane operating conditions, combined with electron irradiation experiments, indicates that proton ceramic materials possess the appropriate radiation stability for this application.

  10. The evaluation of the pyrochemistry for the treatment of Gen IV nuclear fuels Inert matrix chlorination studies in the gas phase or molten chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, S.; Péron, F.; Lacquement, J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fuels for the future Gen IV nuclear reactors will be totally different from those of PWR, especially for the GFR concept including a closed cycle. In these reactors, fissile materials (carbides or nitrides of actinides) should be surrounded by an inert matrix. In order to build a reprocessing process scheme, the behavior of the potential inert matrices (silicon carbide, titanium nitride, and zirconium carbide and nitride) was studied by hydro- and pyrometallurgy. This paper deals with the chlorination results at high temperature by pyrometallurgy. For the first time, the reactivity of the matrix towards chlorine gas was assessed in the gas phase. TiN, ZrN and ZrC are very reactive from 400 °C whereas it is necessary to be over 900 °C for SiC to be as fast. In molten chloride melts, the bubbling of chlorine gas is less efficient than in gas phase but it is possible to attack the matrices. Electrochemical methods were also used to dissolve the refractory materials, leading to promising results with TiN, ZrN and ZrC. The massive SiC samples used were not conductive enough to be studied and in this case specific SiC-coated carbon electrodes were used. The key point of these studies was to find a method to separate the matrix compounds from the fissile material in order to link the head to the core of the process (electrochemical separation or liquid-liquid reductive extraction in the case of a pyrochemical reprocessing).

  11. A Qualitative Assessment of Diversion Scenarios for an Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using the GEN IV PR&PP Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Therios, Ike

    2012-01-20

    FAST REACTORS;NUCLEAR ENERGY;NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT;PROLIFERATION;SAFEGUARDS;THEFT; A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

  12. Nanomembrane-based materials for Group IV semiconductor quantum electronics

    PubMed Central

    Paskiewicz, D. M.; Savage, D. E.; Holt, M. V.; Evans, P. G.; Lagally, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Strained-silicon/relaxed-silicon-germanium alloy (strained-Si/SiGe) heterostructures are the foundation of Group IV-element quantum electronics and quantum computation, but current materials quality limits the reliability and thus the achievable performance of devices. In comparison to conventional approaches, single-crystal SiGe nanomembranes are a promising alternative as substrates for the epitaxial growth of these heterostructures. Because the nanomembrane is truly a single crystal, in contrast to the conventional SiGe substrate made by compositionally grading SiGe grown on bulk Si, significant improvements in quantum electronic-device reliability may be expected with nanomembrane substrates. We compare lateral strain inhomogeneities and the local mosaic structure (crystalline tilt) in strained-Si/SiGe heterostructures that we grow on SiGe nanomembranes and on compositionally graded SiGe substrates, with micro-Raman mapping and nanodiffraction, respectively. Significant structural improvements are found using SiGe nanomembranes. PMID:24573089

  13. Nanomembrane-based materials for Group IV semiconductor quantum electronics.

    PubMed

    Paskiewicz, D M; Savage, D E; Holt, M V; Evans, P G; Lagally, M G

    2014-02-27

    Strained-silicon/relaxed-silicon-germanium alloy (strained-Si/SiGe) heterostructures are the foundation of Group IV-element quantum electronics and quantum computation, but current materials quality limits the reliability and thus the achievable performance of devices. In comparison to conventional approaches, single-crystal SiGe nanomembranes are a promising alternative as substrates for the epitaxial growth of these heterostructures. Because the nanomembrane is truly a single crystal, in contrast to the conventional SiGe substrate made by compositionally grading SiGe grown on bulk Si, significant improvements in quantum electronic-device reliability may be expected with nanomembrane substrates. We compare lateral strain inhomogeneities and the local mosaic structure (crystalline tilt) in strained-Si/SiGe heterostructures that we grow on SiGe nanomembranes and on compositionally graded SiGe substrates, with micro-Raman mapping and nanodiffraction, respectively. Significant structural improvements are found using SiGe nanomembranes.

  14. Analysis of cadmium in undissolved anode materials of Mark-IV electro-refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae-Sic; Fredrickson, G.L.; Vaden, D.; Westphal, B.

    2013-07-01

    The Mark-IV electro-refiner (Mk-IV ER) is a unit process in the FCF (Fuel Conditioning Facility), which is primarily assigned to treating the used driver fuels. Mk-IV ER contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation. (authors)

  15. Materials Data on Ca3GeN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Sr2GeN2 (SG:64) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Analysis of Cadmium in Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Guy L. Fredrickson; DeeEarl Vaden; Brian R. Westphal

    2013-10-01

    The Mark-IV electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER) contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation.

  18. Synthesis, structure, and optoelectronic properties of II-IV-V2 materials

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Aaron D.; Fioretti, Angela N.; Toberer, Eric S.; ...

    2017-03-07

    II-IV-V2 materials offer the promise of enhanced functionality in optoelectronic devices due to their rich ternary chemistry. In this review, we consider the potential for new optoelectronic devices based on nitride, phosphide, and arsenide II-IV-V2 materials. As ternary analogs to the III-V materials, these compounds share many of the attractive features that have made the III-Vs the basis of modern optoelectronic devices (e.g. high mobility, strong optical absorption). Control of cation order parameter in the II-IV-V2 materials can produce significant changes in optoelectronic properties at fixed chemical composition, including decoupling band gap from lattice parameter. Recent progress has begun tomore » resolve outstanding questions concerning the structure, dopability, and optical properties of the II-IV-V2 materials. Furthermore, remaining research challenges include growth optimization and integration into heterostructures and devices.« less

  19. Plumbing Specialist IV & V, 3-23. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of a course description, course chart, plan of instruction, lesson plans, study guides, and workbooks for use in training plumbing specialists IV and V. Covered in the course blocks are fixtures and appurtenances and utility equipment. Block IV on fixtures and appurtenances deals with…

  20. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    U AD-A274 325 Semiannual Technical Report U Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their... Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin 414v001---01 Films, Devices and Their Characterization 1114SS S. AUTHOS) N00179 Robert F. Davis, Salah... Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a

  1. Core IV Materials for Metropolitan Agriculture/Horticulture Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul; And Others

    This core curriculum guide consists of materials for use in presenting a 13-unit vocational agriculture course geared toward high school students living in metropolitan areas. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: employment in agricultural occupations, supervised occupational experience, leadership in…

  2. Development of Digital Materials Database for Design and Construction of New Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2008-01-01

    To facilitate materials selection, structural design, and future maintenance of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems, an interactive, internet accessible materials property database, dubbed Gen IV Materials Handbook, has been under development with the support of the United States Department of Energy. The Handbook will provide an authoritative source of information on structural materials needed for the development of various Gen IV nuclear reactor systems along with powerful data analysis and management tools. In this paper, the background, history, framework, major features, contents, and development strategy of the Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Current development status and future plans are also elucidated.

  3. Hydrogen-bond Specific Materials Modification in Group IV Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolk, Norman H.; Feldman, L. C.; Luepke, G.

    2015-09-14

    Executive summary Semiconductor dielectric crystals consist of two fundamental components: lattice atoms and electrons. The former component provides a crystalline structure that can be disrupted by various defects or the presence of an interface, or by transient oscillations known as phonons. The latter component produces an energetic structure that is responsible for the optical and electronic properties of the material, and can be perturbed by lattice defects or by photo-excitation. Over the period of this project, August 15, 1999 to March 31, 2015, a persistent theme has been the elucidation of the fundamental role of defects arising from the presence of radiation damage, impurities (in particular, hydrogen), localized strain or some combination of all three. As our research effort developed and evolved, we have experienced a few title changes, which reflected this evolution. Throughout the project, ultrafast lasers usually in a pump-probe configuration provided the ideal means to perturb and study semiconductor crystals by both forms of excitation, vibrational (phonon) and electronic (photon). Moreover, we have found in the course of this research that there are many interesting and relevant scientific questions that may be explored when phonon and photon excitations are controlled separately. Our early goals were to explore the dynamics of bond-selective vibrational excitation of hydrogen from point defects and impurities in crystalline and amorphous solids, initiating an investigation into the behavior of hydrogen isotopes utilizing a variety of ultrafast characterization techniques, principally transient bleaching spectroscopy to experimentally obtain vibrational lifetimes. The initiative could be divided into three related areas: (a) investigation of the change in electronic structure of solids due to the presence of hydrogen defect centers, (b) dynamical studies of hydrogen in materials and (c) characterization and stability of metastable hydrogen

  4. Modeling a filter press electrolyzer by using two coupled codes within nuclear gen.IV hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Feraud, J.P.; Jomard, F.; Ode, D.; Duhamet, J.; Dehaudt, Ph.; Duterrail Couvat, Y.; Caire, J.P.

    2007-07-01

    Mass production of hydrogen is a major issue for the coming decades particularly to decrease greenhouse gas production. The development of fourth-generation high temperature nuclear reactors has led to renewed interest for hydrogen production. In France, the CEA is investigating new processes using nuclear reactors such as the Westinghouse hybrid cycle. A recent study was devoted to electrical modeling of the hydrogen electrolyzer, which is the key unit of this process. An extensive literature review led to the choice of electrolyte and electrode materials, and the preliminary design of a new cell for production of hydrogen was evaluated. This paper describes an improved model coupling the electrical and thermal phenomena with hydrodynamics in the electrolyzer. The hydrogen electrolyzer chosen here is a filter press design comprising a stack of cathode and anode compartments separated by a membrane. Hydrogen is reduced at the cathode and SO{sub 2} is oxidized at the anode. In a complex reactor of this type the main coupled physical phenomena involved are forced convection of the electrolyte flows, a plume of hydrogen bubbles that modifies the local electrolyte conductivity, and irreversible processes (Joule effect, over-potentials, etc.) that contribute to local overheating. The secondary current distribution was modeled with a commercial FEM code, Flux Expert{sup R}, which was customized with specific finite interfacial elements capable of describing the potential discontinuity associated with the electrochemical over-potential. Since the finite-element method is not capable of properly describing the complex two-phase flows in the cathode compartment, the Fluent{sup R} CFD code was used for thermohydraulic computations. In this way each physical phenomenon was modeled using the best numerical method. The coupling implements an iterative process in which each code computes the physical data it has to transmit to the other one: the two-phase thermohydraulic problem

  5. Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R.; Bolotnov, I. A.; Jansen, K. E.; Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z.

    2012-07-01

    The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

  6. European cross-cutting research on structural materials for Generation IV and transmutation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Alamo, A.; Almazouzi, A.; De Grandis, S.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Henry, J.; Malerba, L.; Rieth, M.

    2009-07-01

    It has been internationally recognized that materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV and advanced fuel cycle initiatives. In Europe, materials studies are considered within the Strategic Research Agenda of the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform. Moreover, the European Commission has recently launched a 7th Framework Programme Research Project, named 'Generation IV and Transmutation Materials', that has the objective of addressing materials issues which are cross-cutting for more than one type of innovative reactor systems. The present work has been prepared with the aim of describing the rationale, the objectives, the work plan and the expected results of this research project.

  7. Project NECESSITIES, Phase III. Volume IV: Teaching Materials for Kindergarten and First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    Phase III, Volume IV, Part A of Project NECESSITIES consists of 10 activities intended for kindergarten-aged American Indian (including Eskimo) children. Some of the supplementary materials needed to teach these activities ("Symbol Formation" and "An Animal Alphabet") are appended. The unit, entitled Learning to Communicate, begins with non-verbal…

  8. Me and My Environment. Unit IV: Transfer and Cycling of Materials in My Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Boulder, CO.

    Presented is the experimental edition of Unit IV: Transfer and Cycling of Materials in My Environment, which consists of 29 life science curriculum activities intended for the 13-to-15-year-old educable mentally retarded child. The curriculum guide is being used in the final field test prior to revision. Stressed throughout the program are…

  9. Type IV kerogens as analogues for organic macromolecular materials in aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites.

    PubMed

    Matthewman, Richard; Martins, Zita; Sephton, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the processes involved in the evolution of organic matter in the early Solar System requires extensive experimental work. The scientifically valuable carbonaceous chondrites are principal targets for organic analyses, but these meteorites are rare. Meteoritic analog materials available in larger quantities, on which experiments can be performed, would be highly beneficial. The bulk of the organic inventory of carbonaceous chondrites is made up of solvent-insoluble macromolecular material. This high-molecular-weight entity provides a record of thermal and aqueous parent-body alteration of precursor organic structures present at the birth of the Solar System. To identify an effective analogue for this macromolecular material, we analyzed a series of terrestrial kerogens by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Type I and II kerogens are unsuitable analogues owing to their highly aliphatic nature. Type III kerogens show some similarities to meteoritic macromolecular materials but display a substantial biological heritage. Type IV kerogens, in this study derived from Mesozoic paleosols and produced by the reworking and oxidation of organic matter, represent an effective analogue. Some isomeric differences exist between meteoritic macromolecular materials and type IV kerogens, and stepped pyrolysis indicates variations in thermal stability. In addition to being a suitable material for novel experimentation, type IV kerogens also have the potential to aid in the optimization of instruments for deployment on Mars.

  10. Use of temporary filling material for index fabrication in Class IV resin composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Duck-Su; Choi, Kyoung-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    When a patient with a fractured anterior tooth visits the clinic, clinician has to restore the tooth esthetically and quickly. For esthetic resin restoration, clinician can use 'Natural Layering technique' and an index for palatal wall may be needed. In this case report, we introduce pre-restoration index technique on a Class IV defect, in which a temporary filling material is used for easy restoration. Chair-side index fabrication for Class IV restoration is convenient and makes a single-visit treatment possible.

  11. CSMP Mathematics for the Upper Primary Grades, Part IV, Student Materials: Worksheets; Galaxy of Problems 1, 2, 3, 4; Fishing for Numbers, Part IV; To Picture; Subtraction Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Ann, MO.

    These are some of the individual materials needed by students using the Comprehensive School Mathematics Program for the Upper Primary Grades, Part IV. The book of "Worksheets" contains materials that are labeled with the same letter and number as the lessons with which they are to be used. The four "Galaxy of Problems"…

  12. Growth and applications of GeSn-related group-IV semiconductor materials

    PubMed Central

    Zaima, Shigeaki; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Taoka, Noriyuki; Kurosawa, Masashi; Takeuchi, Wakana; Sakashita, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We review the technology of Ge1−xSnx-related group-IV semiconductor materials for developing Si-based nanoelectronics. Ge1−xSnx-related materials provide novel engineering of the crystal growth, strain structure, and energy band alignment for realising various applications not only in electronics, but also in optoelectronics. We introduce our recent achievements in the crystal growth of Ge1−xSnx-related material thin films and the studies of the electronic properties of thin films, metals/Ge1−xSnx, and insulators/Ge1−xSnx interfaces. We also review recent studies related to the crystal growth, energy band engineering, and device applications of Ge1−xSnx-related materials, as well as the reported performances of electronic devices using Ge1−xSnx related materials. PMID:27877818

  13. Progress in the development of the neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: simulations and experimental validations [ANIMMA--2015-IO-392

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Izarra, G. de; Elter, Zs.; Verma, V.; Hamrita, H.; Bakkali, M.; Chapoutier, N.; Scholer, A.C.; Verrier, D.; Hellesen, C.; Jacobsson, S.; Pazsit, I.; Cantonnet, B.; Nappe, J.C.; Molinie, P.; Dessante, P.; Hanna, R.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Odic, E.

    2015-07-01

    France has a long experience of about 50 years in designing, building and operating sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) such as RAPSODIE, PHENIX and SUPER PHENIX. Fast reactors feature the double capability of reducing nuclear waste and saving nuclear energy resources by burning actinides. Since this reactor type is one of those selected by the Generation IV International Forum, the French government asked, in the year 2006, CEA, namely the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, to lead the development of an innovative GEN-IV nuclear- fission power demonstrator. The major objective is to improve the safety and availability of an SFR. The neutron flux monitoring (NFM) system of any reactor must, in any situation, permit both reactivity control and power level monitoring from startup to full power. It also has to monitor possible changes in neutron flux distribution within the core region in order to prevent any local melting accident. The neutron detectors will have to be installed inside the reactor vessel because locations outside the vessel will suffer from severe disadvantages; radially the neutron shield that is also contained in the reactor vessel will cause unacceptable losses in neutron flux; below the core the presence of a core-catcher prevents from inserting neutron guides; and above the core the distance is too large to obtain decent neutron signals outside the vessel. Another important point is to limit the number of detectors placed in the vessel in order to alleviate their installation into the vessel. In this paper, we show that the architecture of the NFM system will rely on high-temperature fission chambers (HTFC) featuring wide-range flux monitoring capability. The definition of such a system is presented and the justifications of technological options are brought with the use of simulation and experimental results. Firstly, neutron-transport calculations allow us to propose two in-vessel regions, namely the above-core and under

  14. Uranium(iii) and thorium(iv) alkyl complexes as potential starting materials.

    PubMed

    Behrle, Andrew C; Myers, Alexander J; Rungthanaphatsophon, Pokpong; Lukens, Wayne W; Barnes, Charles L; Walensky, Justin R

    2016-12-13

    The synthesis and characterisation of a rare U(iii) alkyl complex, U[η(4)-Me2NC(H)C6H5]3, using the dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA) ligand has been accomplished. While attempting to prepare the U(iv) compound, reduction to the U(iii) complex occurred. In the analogous Th(iv) system, C-H bond activation of a methyl group of one dimethylamine was observed yielding Th[η(4)-Me2NC(H)C6H5]2[η(5)-(CH2)MeNC(H)C6H5] with a dianionic DMBA ligand. The utility of these complexes as starting materials has been analyzed using a bulky dithiocarboxylate ligand to yield tetravalent actinide species.

  15. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  16. Structure and properties of phosphorene-like IV-VI 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhinan; Wang, Bo; Ou, Liangkai; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-14

    Because of the excellent physical and chemical properties of phosphorene, phosphorene and phosphorene-like materials have attracted extensive attention. Since phosphorus belongs to group V, some group IV-VI compounds could also form phosphorene-like configurations. In this work, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS monolayers were constructed to investigate the structural and electronic properties by employing first-principles computations. Phonon spectra suggest that these monolayers are dynamically stable and could be realized in experiments. These monolayers are all semiconductors with the band gaps of 2.26 ∼ 4.13 eV. Based on the monolayers, GeO, SnO, GeS, and SnS bilayers were also constructed. The band gaps of these bilayers are smaller than those of the corresponding monolayers. Moreover, the optical properties of these monolayers and bilayers were calculated, and the results indicate that the SnO, GeS and SnS bilayers exhibit obvious optical absorption in the visible spectrum. All the results suggest that phosphorene-like IV-VI materials are promising candidates for electronic and optical devices.

  17. High-efficient thermoelectric materials: The case of orthorhombic IV-VI compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guangqian; Gao, Guoying; Yao, Kailun

    2015-01-01

    Improving the thermoelectric efficiency is one of the greatest challenges in materials science. The recent discovery of excellent thermoelectric performance in simple orthorhombic SnSe crystal offers new promise in this prospect [Zhao et al. Nature 508, 373 (2014)]. By calculating the thermoelectric properties of orthorhombic IV-VI compounds GeS,GeSe,SnS, and SnSe based on the first-principles combined with the Boltzmann transport theory, we show that the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity of orthorhombic SnSe are in agreement with the recent experiment. Importantly, GeS, GeSe, and SnS exhibit comparative thermoelectric performance compared to SnSe. Especially, the Seebeck coefficients of GeS, GeSe, and SnS are even larger than that of SnSe under the studied carrier concentration and temperature region. We also use the Cahill's model to estimate the lattice thermal conductivities at the room temperature. The large Seebeck coefficients, high power factors, and low thermal conductivities make these four orthorhombic IV-VI compounds promising candidates for high-efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:26045338

  18. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Frank

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  19. Phonon transport properties of two-dimensional group-IV materials from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuanfeng; Ni, Gang; Zhang, Rongjun; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-12-01

    It has been argued that stanene has lowest lattice thermal conductivity among two-dimensional (2D) group-IV materials because of its largest atomic mass, weakest interatomic bonding, and enhanced ZA phonon scattering due to the breaking of an out-of-plane symmetry selection rule. However, we show that, although the lattice thermal conductivity κ for graphene, silicene, and germanene decreases monotonically with decreasing Debye temperature, unexpected higher κ is observed in stanene. By enforcing all the invariance conditions in 2D materials and including Ge 3 d and Sn 4 d electrons as valence electrons for germanene and stanene, respectively, the lattice dynamics in these materials are accurately described. A large acoustic-optical gap and the bunching of the acoustic-phonon branches significantly reduce phonon scattering in stanene, leading to higher thermal conductivity than germanene. The vibrational origin of the acoustic-optical gap can be attributed to the buckled structure. Interestingly, a buckled system has two competing influences on phonon transport: the breaking of the symmetry selection rule leads to reduced thermal conductivity, and the enlarging of the acoustic-optical gap results in enhanced thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well. In nanoribbons, the κ of silicene, germanene, and stanene is much less sensitive to size effect due to their short intrinsic phonon mean-free paths. This work sheds light on the nature of phonon transport in buckled 2D materials.

  20. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Full first-principles theory of spin relaxation in group-IV materials.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, O D; Windl, W

    2012-10-19

    We present a generally applicable parameter-free first-principles method to determine electronic spin relaxation times and apply it to the technologically important group-IV materials silicon, diamond, and graphite. We concentrate on the Elliott-Yafet mechanism, where spin relaxation is induced by momentum scattering off phonons and impurities. In silicon, we find a ~T(-3) temperature dependence of the phonon-limited spin relaxation time T(1) and a value of 4.3 ns at room temperature, in agreement with experiments. For the phonon-dominated regime in diamond and graphite, we predict a stronger ~T(-5) and ~T(-4.5) dependence that limits T(1) (300 K) to 180 and 5.8 ns, respectively. A key aspect of this Letter is that the parameter-free nature of our approach provides a method to study the effect of any type of impurity or defect on spin transport. Furthermore we find that the spin-mix amplitude in silicon does not follow the E(g)(-2) band gap dependence usually assigned to III-V semiconductors but follows a much weaker and opposite E(g)(0.67) dependence. This dependence should be taken into account when constructing silicon spin transport models.

  2. Full First-Principles Theory of Spin Relaxation in Group-IV Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, O. D.; Windl, W.

    2012-10-01

    We present a generally applicable parameter-free first-principles method to determine electronic spin relaxation times and apply it to the technologically important group-IV materials silicon, diamond, and graphite. We concentrate on the Elliott-Yafet mechanism, where spin relaxation is induced by momentum scattering off phonons and impurities. In silicon, we find a ˜T-3 temperature dependence of the phonon-limited spin relaxation time T1 and a value of 4.3 ns at room temperature, in agreement with experiments. For the phonon-dominated regime in diamond and graphite, we predict a stronger ˜T-5 and ˜T-4.5 dependence that limits T1 (300 K) to 180 and 5.8 ns, respectively. A key aspect of this Letter is that the parameter-free nature of our approach provides a method to study the effect of any type of impurity or defect on spin transport. Furthermore we find that the spin-mix amplitude in silicon does not follow the Eg-2 band gap dependence usually assigned to III-V semiconductors but follows a much weaker and opposite Eg0.67 dependence. This dependence should be taken into account when constructing silicon spin transport models.

  3. Materials testing at the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification site

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, D W; Scoonover, T M

    1980-01-01

    Candidate structural alloy specimens were exposed for about 800 hours to the direct product gas stream from the Hanna IV underground coal gasification experiment. When the specimens were removed from the line, they were coated with a high-sulfur deposit from the product gas. A chemical analysis and the physical appearance of the coatings suggest that they are mixtures of condensed hydrocarbons, coal char, coal ash, and mineral particles from the overburden. Attack on the specimens was primarily corrosion rather than erosion. Mean penetration rates expressed in millimetres per year (mm/y) were calculated from weight loss data. Microscopic examination revealed areas of rather severe local attack on all alloys tested. There was no consistent difference in the amount of material removed from specimens with welds and those without welds. All specimens exposed at 45/sup 0/ to the product gas flow had surface dents from impacting particles, while parallel specimens had none. Energy-dispersive X-ray and Auger electron spectra indicate that the few particles of deposits and/or corrosion products still clinging to the specimen surfaces after cleaning were oxides, rather than sulfides, with significant contents of aluminum and silicon in addition to iron.

  4. Characterization of IV-VI semiconductor materials and devices by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, I.-Na

    Transmission and photoluminescence properties of IV-VI semiconductor materials grown by molecular beam epitaxy (UBE) and liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) were characterized using a vacuum-bench type Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Samples for transmission measurements included Pb1-x EuxSe (x = 0%, 2.44%, 7.32%) and Pb1-xSr xSe (x = 0%, 7.83%, 15.7%, 26.1%) grown by MBE on Si(111) and BaF 2(111) substrates, respectively. Pb1-xSnxSe (x = 0%, 3%, 5%, 6%, 7%, 10%) samples grown by LPE on MBE-prepared Si(100) substrates were also measured. Fundamental absorption edge energies for these alloys were derived from the transmission spectra and their dependence on composition and temperature were reported. Refractive indices for Pb 1-xSrxSe were calculated based on the interference data. Effects of alloy disorder, impurity and free-carrier absorption, and cryogenic cycling are observed in the transmission spectral data. Photoluminescence experiments performed on LPE-grown PbSe, PbTe, PbSeTe, and PbSnSeTe (liquid tin contents of 5% and 40%) epilayers show unusual, strong, and above bandgap emissions at temperatures ranging from cryogenic to above room temperature. These emissions may be the first direct experimental observation of defect states associated with anion (chalcogen) vacancies theorized three decades ago. These measurements provide useful information for designing structures that will be used for fabrication of mid-IR lasers. Emissions from a commercial IV-VI semiconductor PbEuSe diode laser were also obtained using a modular type MR spectrometer. The laser exhibits wide (up to 4 cm-1) continuous wave, single-mode tuning regions between 90 K to 116 K for currents in the range of 400 mA to 1000 mA. This type of mid-IR laser characterization is very useful for designing laser-based molecular spectroscopy instrumentation.

  5. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  6. FY-16 Technology Gap Study Technical Report: Analysis of Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae-Sic; Vaden, DeeEarl; Westphal, Brian Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a sodium cooled fast reactor developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The used fuels from the EBR-II are currently being treated in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Mark IV (Mk-IV) electrorefiner (ER) is a unit process in the FCF, which is primarily assigned to treating the used driver fuels. The stainless steel anode baskets hold the chopped spent driver fuel segments. During electrorefining, the anode baskets are immersed into the electrolyte and the used fuel is dissolved electrochemically. Perforated sides and bottoms allow the flow of the electrolyte into and out of the anode baskets. The steel cathode is also immersed into the electrolyte and collects the reduced products. The active metal contents in the used fuel (e.g., Cs, Sr, lanthanides, Pu, etc.) reacts with uranium cations in the electrolyte and progressively reports to the electrolyte. Noble metals are mostly retained in the cladding hulls. Varying quantities of zirconium are retained in the cladding hulls depending on the operational conditions of the Mk-IV ER. The undissolved anode materials are removed from the anode baskets and stored for subsequent metal waste form processing. These undissolved materials typically include undissolved fuels, stainless steel cladding, and adhering electrolyte. A couple of hulls are retrieved for chemical analysis and used for estimating the composition of the entire undissolved anode materials. The mass balance attempt based on this practice of estimating the undissolved anode materials has been a challenge due to inherently high sampling errors associated with heterogeneous undissolved material compositions. Responding to the prescribed challenge, this report investigates chemical analysis data as a whole and finds noticeable trends in the compositions of undissolved anode material samples with respect to the mass of the whole undissolved anode materials. Based

  7. Evaluation of contrast injection site effectiveness: thoracic CT angiography in children with hand injection of IV contrast material.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Gary R; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various contrast injection sites when performing thoracic CT angiography (CTA) using hand injection of IV contrast material in infants and young children with a small IV catheter. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We used our hospital information system to retrospectively identify consecutive pediatric patients who underwent thoracic CTA with hand injection of contrast material from August 2012 to July 2013. The study indication for thoracic CTA was to evaluate the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature and pulmonary venous vasculature. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of thoracic CTA image quality was performed by two reviewers independently. Qualitative evaluation of thoracic CTA image quality was performed by visual assessment of the degree of contrast enhancement in the ROI on a 4-point scale. Quantitative evaluation was performed by measuring attenuation obtained with the ROI placed within the aorta at two locations (the level of the aortic arch and at the level of the carina) to evaluate the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature. For evaluation of the pulmonary venous system, attenuation measurements were obtained at the center of the left atrium. Six individual injection sites were identified: head, jugular vein, arm vein, hand vein, leg vein, and foot vein. Injection sites were categorized into three regional groups: head-neck region (head vein and jugular veins), upper extremity region (arm and hand veins), and lower extremity region (leg and foot veins). Comparisons of attenuation values between individual and regionally grouped contrast injection sites were determined using the F-test in ANOVA. RESULTS. The study cohort included 50 pediatric patients (29 boys and 21 girls; mean age, 8 months ± 1 year; range, 1 week to 5 years) who underwent a total of 50 thoracic CTA studies for evaluating the thoracic systemic arterial vasculature (n = 38; 76%) or pulmonary venous vasculature

  8. Effect of a laboratory surfactant on compatibility of type IV dental stones with addition-cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Tredwin, Christopher Jeremy; Nesbit, Michael; Butta, Rajeev; Moles, David R

    2008-06-01

    This study compared the effect of a surfactant on surface detail reproduction between combinations of addition-cured silicone impression materials and type IV stones. Six hundred impressions were made of a ruled test block using; Examix-NDS, Doric-Es Flo-Light, Panasil Contact Plus, Extrude Wash and President Plus Jet. Half of the impressions were treated with a surfactant (Aurofilm). Impressions were poured with type IV dental stones; Silky Rock, Fuji Rock, Suprastone and Vel-Mix and the 20 mu line was scored. A laboratory surfactant (Aurofilm) significantly reduced (P<0.01) compatibility with; (i) Examix-NDS and Suprastone, (ii) Examix-NDS and Velmix, (iii) Extrude Wash and Fuji Rock.

  9. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  10. Computational discovery and characterization of polymorphic two-dimensional IV-V materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Michael; Sinnott, Susan B.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2016-11-01

    First-principles calculations predict the stability and properties of two-dimensional (2D) group IV-V MX compounds (M = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; X = P, As, Sb, Bi) in two distinct crystallographic configurations: a low symmetry Cm layer inspired by the layered bulk structures of SiP, SiAs, GeP, and GeAs, and a high symmetry P 6 ¯ m 2 structure previously predicted for 2D SiP. The calculations predict that the Cm structure is more stable for X = As, Sb, and Bi, and the P 6 ¯ m 2 structure for X = P. The electronic properties of the two structures are quite different. Specifically, the Cm band gaps are systematically larger by about 15% for most compounds, and the band offsets indicate that all of these compounds in the Cm crystal structure will form type II heterojunctions in contact with their P 6 ¯ m 2 polymorphs. Pourbaix diagrams predict that a few of the 2D IV-V compounds are stable when exposed to water.

  11. Stability and electronic structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group-IV materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusalem, Filipe; Marques, Marcelo; Teles, Lara K.; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    We study six different two-dimensional (2D) allotropes of carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin by means of the ab initio density functional theory for the ground state and approximate methods to calculate their electronic structures, including quasiparticle effects. Four of the investigated allotropes are based on dumbbell geometries, one on a kagome lattice, and one on the graphenelike hexagonal structure for comparison. Concerning carbon, our calculations of the cohesive energies clearly show that the hexagonal structure (graphene) is most stable. However, in the case of Si and Ge, the dumbbell structures, particularly the large honeycomb dumbbell (LHD) geometries, are energetically favored compared to the s p2/s p3 -bonded hexagonal lattice (i.e., silicene and germanene). The main reason for this is the opening of a band gap in the honeycomb dumbbell arrangements. The LHD sheet crystals represent indirect semiconductors with a K →Γ gap of about 0.5 eV. In the Sn case we predict the MoS2-like symmetry to be more stable, in contrast to the stanene and LHD geometries predicted in literature. Our results for freestanding group-IV layers shine new light on recent experimental studies of group-IV overlayers on various substrates.

  12. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume IV - pictures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  14. The conflicting role of buckled structure in phonon transport of 2D group-IV and group-V materials.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Dequan; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Ni, Gang; Zhu, Yongyuan; Zhu, Heyuan

    2017-03-20

    Controlling heat transport through material design is one important step toward thermal management in 2D materials. To control heat transport, a comprehensive understanding of how structure influences heat transport is required. It has been argued that a buckled structure is able to suppress heat transport by increasing the flexural phonon scattering. Using a first principles approach, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of 2D mono-elemental materials with a buckled structure. Somewhat counterintuitively, we find that although 2D group-V materials have a larger mass and higher buckling height than their group-IV counterparts, the calculated κ of blue phosphorene (106.6 W mK(-1)) is nearly four times higher than that of silicene (28.3 W mK(-1)), while arsenene (37.8 W mK(-1)) is more than fifteen times higher than germanene (2.4 W mK(-1)). We report for the first time that a buckled structure has three conflicting effects: (i) increasing the Debye temperature by increasing the overlap of the pz orbitals, (ii) suppressing the acoustic-optical scattering by forming an acoustic-optical gap, and (iii) increasing the flexural phonon scattering. The former two, corresponding to the harmonic phonon part, tend to enhance κ, while the last one, corresponding to the anharmonic part, suppresses it. This relationship between the buckled structure and phonon behaviour provides insight into how to control heat transport in 2D materials.

  15. L-Lactide Ring-Opening Polymerization with Tris(acetylacetonate)Titanium(IV) for Renewable Material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da Hee; Yoo, Ji Yun; Ko, Young Soo

    2016-05-01

    A new Ti-type of catalyst for L-lactide polymerization was synthesized by reaction of titanium(IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) with acetylacetone (AA). Moreover, PLA was prepared by the bulk ring-opening polymerization using synthesized Ti catalyst. Polymerization behaviors were examined depending on monomer/catalyst molar ratio, polymerization temperature and time. The structure of synthesized catalysts was verified with FT-IR and 1H NMR and the properties of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were examined by GPC, DSC and FT-IR. There existed about 30 minutes of induction time at the monomer/catalyst molar ratio of 300. The molecular weight (MW) increased as monomer/catalyst molar ratio increased. The MW increased almost linearly as polymerization progressed. Increasing polymerization temperature increased the molecular weight of PLLA as well as monomer/catalyst molar ratio. The melting point (T(m)) of polymers was in the range of 142 to 167 degrees C. Lower T(m) was expected to be resulted from relatively lower molecular weight.

  16. Cartel: Annotations and Analyses of Bilingual Multicultural Materials. Winter 1976-77. Vol. IV, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This is an informative listing for educators, librarians, and others interested in materials for bilingual multicultural education. There are two main sections, annotations and analyses. Annotated entries are arranged under the following headings: (1) assessment and evaluation; (2) bibliographies; (3) classroom resources; (4) English as a second…

  17. Masonry Specialist III & IV, 3-20. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of a course description, plan of instruction, study guides, and workbooks for use in training masonry specialists. Covered in the course blocks are laying concrete blocks, stone, and bricks as well as plaster, stucco, and tile. Course block III, on laying concrete blocks, stone, and bricks,…

  18. Electronic Principles IV, 7-8. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This fourth of 10 blocks of student and teacher materials for a secondary/postsecondary level course in electronic principles comprises one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Prerequisites are the previous blocks. This block on…

  19. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials.

  20. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  1. Electroabsorption modulators for CMOS compatible optical interconnects in III-V and group IV materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Jonathan Edgar

    While electrical systems excel at information processing, photonics is useful in systems for high-bandwidth, low-loss signal transmission. As photonics technology has become increasingly widespread and has been deployed at shorter distance scales than traditional long-haul networks, it has become important to efficiently integrate photonics components with electrical integrated circuits. Optoelectronic modulators used as transmitters are an important class of device for use in optical interconnects. Many optoelectronic modulator designs use waveguides. Coupling light into waveguides requires a difficult alignment step. This dissertation will describe a number of optoelectronic modulators that do not have the tight alignment constraints associated with waveguide-based modulators. The eased alignment constraints may be important for the practical manufacturing and packaging of systems using optical interconnects. Most currently deployed photonics technologies also use substrates other than silicon and materials incompatible with CMOS manufacturing. Recently we discovered a strong quantum-confined Stark effect in Ge/SiGe quantum well structures that can be used to create efficient optoelectronic modulators on silicon substrates. Optoelectronic modulators using this technology can be fabricated with conventional CMOS foundry processes, possibly on the same chips as CMOS circuits. In this dissertation, an optical interconnect operating in the C-band will be presented. We believe this is the first such device employing an optical transmitter flip-chip bonded to silicon CMOS. A number of novel modulators will be presented, which are fabricated on silicon substrates, and employ Ge/SiGe quantum well structures. These modulators include a novel architecture known as the side-entry modulator, which is designed for monolithic integration with electronics. One side-entry modulator achieved over 3 dB of contrast in the telecommunications C-band for a voltage swing of 1V. Such a

  2. Local Environment of Terbium(III) Ions in Layered Nanocrystalline Zirconium(IV) Phosphonate-Phosphate Ion Exchange Materials.

    PubMed

    Terban, Maxwell W; Shi, Chenyang; Silbernagel, Rita; Clearfield, Abraham; Billinge, Simon J L

    2017-08-07

    The structures of Zr(IV) phosphonate-phosphate based, unconventional metal organic framework materials have been determined using atomic pair distribution function analysis of high energy, X-ray total scattering diffraction data. They are found to form as nanocrystalline layers of Zr phosphate, similar to the bulk, but with a high degree of interlayer disorder and intermediate intralayer order extending around 5 nm. These materials are of interest for their high selectivity for 3+ lanthanide ions. To investigate the mechanism of the selectivity, we utilize difference pair distribution function analysis to extract the local structural environment of Tb(3+) ions loaded into the framework. The ions are found to sit between the layers in a manner resembling the local environment of Tb in Scheelite-type terbium phosphate. By mapping this local structure onto that of the refined structure for zirconium-phenyl-phosphonate, we show how dangling oxygens from the phosphate groups, acting like nose hairs, are able to reorient to provide a friendly intercalation environment for the Tb(3+) ions.

  3. Comparative computational studies of Li, Na, and Mg insertion in elemental group IV materials and oxides: Material choices for post-lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrain, Fleur Cornelie Graciette

    In search for effective anode materials for sodium- and magnesium-ion batteries, we use density functional theory calculations to rationalize the storage characteristics of key anode material candidates. Specifically, we provide the first consistent study of sodium and magnesium versus lithium for their insertion and diffusion in elemental group IV materials and in titanium dioxides. For the different ion-host material systems we compute the intercalation energies for the insertion of the ion in the host material as well as the migration barriers for the ion diffusion. These storage properties are essential as they inform experimentalists about theoretical limits of performance of the material itself. Those properties are computed for lithium, sodium, and magnesium in the most stable phase of carbon, silicon, germanium, tin, lead, and titanium dioxides. A few less stable phases are also investigated, specifically alpha tin, the anatase and bronze structures of titanium dioxide, as well as the amorphous phases of carbon silicon, and titanium dioxide. These less stable phases are also critically important as they can (i) spontaneously form upon ion intercalation and deintercalation or (ii) they can provide better storage properties and in such cases it can be possible to stabilize them as electrode material. We also investigate doping as a strategy to tune the storage properties of electrode materials. Specifically, we consider the effect of p-doping on silicon and germanium. We find that it facilitates considerably the insertion of lithium, sodium, and magnesium in the host material without changing significantly their migration barriers for diffusion. We build a comprehensive picture of the interaction of Li, Na, and Mg with potential electrode materials by considering effects which affect the electrode performance but are generally neglected in theoretical studies. Specifically, we estimate the effect of phonons (on silicon and tin) as well as the effect of

  4. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance

  5. Me and My Environment, Unit IV: Transfer and Cycling of Materials in My Environment, Experimental Edition 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Boulder, CO.

    The experimental 1973-74 edition of Unit IV consists of 28 life science curriculum activities for 13- to 16-year-old educable mentally handicapped children. The role of the teacher in continuing field trials is noted and environmental themes and elements, inquiry skills, problem solving skills, and applicational behaviors and attitudes are…

  6. Comparative evaluation of few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type IV gypsum die materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Nunna, Venkata Narayana; Manne, Sanjay Dutt

    2012-01-01

    To compare and evaluate few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type-IV gypsum die material. In the present study, dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength of three die materials like epoxy resin (Diemet-E), resin-modified gypsum (Synarock) and conventional type-IV gypsum (Ultrarock) are analyzed. For dimensional accuracy, master die (Bailey's die) is used and calibrations were made with digital microscope. For surface detail reproduction and transverse strength, rectangular stainless steel master die (Duke's die) was used and calibrations were made with Toolmaker's microscope and Instron universal testing machine respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the means and standard deviation for groups of each test. The results of the study showed statistically significant difference among these materials in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength. Epoxy resin exhibited superiority in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength and is nearest to the standards of accurate die material.

  7. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2008-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 260 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  8. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2011-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 380,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  9. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bi-monthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  10. Using GenBank.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David

    2007-01-01

    GenBank(R) is a comprehensive database of publicly available DNA sequences for more than 205,000 named organisms and for more than 60,000 within the embryophyta, obtained through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure, and domain information and the biomedical journal literature through PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available through FTP. GenBank usage scenarios ranging from local analyses of the data available through FTP to online analyses supported by the NCBI Web-based tools are discussed. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  11. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2007-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 240 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov).

  12. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2006-01-01

    GenBank (R) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available DNA sequences for more than 205 000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the Web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  13. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W

    2009-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300,000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank(R) staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  14. GenBank.

    PubMed

    Benson, Dennis A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J; Ostell, James; Wheeler, David L

    2005-01-01

    GenBank is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available DNA sequences for more than 165,000 named organisms, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the EMBL Data Library in the UK and the DNA Data Bank of Japan helps to ensure worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through NCBI's retrieval system, Entrez, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI Homepage at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  15. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 280 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assign accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:24217914

  16. Using GenBank.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Eric W; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    GenBank(®) is a comprehensive database of publicly available DNA sequences for 300,000 named organisms, more than 110,000 within the embryophyta, obtained through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, as well as the biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. GenBank usage scenarios ranging from local analyses of the data available via FTP to online analyses supported by the NCBI web-based tools are discussed. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov .

  17. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Cavanaugh, Mark; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    GenBank® (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:23193287

  18. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    GenBank® (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 340 000 formally described species. Recent developments include a new starting page for submitters, a shift toward using accession.version identifiers rather than GI numbers, a wizard for submitting 16S rRNA sequences, and an Identical Protein Report to address growing issues of data redundancy. GenBank organizes the sequence data received from individual laboratories and large-scale sequencing projects into 18 divisions, and GenBank staff assign unique accession.version identifiers upon data receipt. Most submitters use the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the nuccore, nucest, and nucgss databases of the Entrez retrieval system, which integrates these records with a variety of other data including taxonomy nodes, genomes, protein structures, and biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. PMID:26590407

  19. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 300 000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Database in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bi-monthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:19910366

  20. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Clark, Karen; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 250 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI home page: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:22144687

  1. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for more than 380 000 organisms named at the genus level or lower, obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and accession numbers are assigned by GenBank staff upon receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, begin at the NCBI Homepage: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:21071399

  2. Synthesis and characterization of a new cation exchanger-zirconium(IV)iodotungstate: separation and determination of metal ion contents of synthetic mixtures, pharmaceutical preparations and standard reference material.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Syed A; Alimuddin; Islam, Aminul

    2009-12-15

    Samples of zirconium(IV)iodotungstate have been synthesized under varying mixing order and ratios of aqueous solution of potassium iodate, sodium tungstate and zirconium oxychloride at pH 1. A tentative formula was proposed on the basis of chemical composition, FTIR and thermogravimetric studies. The material shows a capacity of 0.68 meq g(-1) (for K+) which can be retained up to 200 degrees C. pH titration data reveal its monofunctional behavior. The distribution coefficient values of metal ions have been determined in various solvent systems. A number of important and analytically difficult quantitative separations of metal ions have been achieved using columns packed with this exchanger. In order to demonstrate practical utility of this material, Hg2+ and Pb2+ have been selectively separated and determined in the synthetic mixtures. Assay of Al3+ and Mg2+ in commercial tablets and analysis of lead in the standard reference material have also been attempted.

  3. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    GenBank® (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for over 300 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assign accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. PMID:25414350

  4. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Dennis A.; Cavanaugh, Mark; Clark, Karen; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Lipman, David J.; Ostell, James; Sayers, Eric W.

    2017-01-01

    GenBank® (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for 370 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or the NCBI Submission Portal. GenBank staff assign accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Nucleotide database, which links to related information such as taxonomy, genomes, protein sequences and structures, and biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. Recent updates include changes to policies regarding sequence identifiers, an improved 16S submission wizard, targeted loci studies, the ability to submit methylation and BioNano mapping files, and a database of anti-microbial resistance genes. PMID:27899564

  5. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  6. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  7. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  8. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  9. GenBank

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Christian; Cinkosky, Michael J.; Fischer, William M.; Gilna, Paul; Hayden, Jamie E.-D.; Keen, Gifford M.; Kelly, Michael; Kristofferson, David; Lawrence, Julie

    1992-01-01

    The GenBank nucleotide sequence database now contains sequence data and associated annotation corresponding to 85,000,000 nucleotides in 67,000 entries from a total of 3,000 organisms. The input stream of data coming into the database is primarily as direct submissions from the scientific community on electronic media, with little or no data being keyboarded from the printed page by the databank staff. The data are maintained in a relational database management system and are made available in flatfile form through on-line access, and through various network and off-line computer-readable media. The data are also distributed in relational form through satellite copies at a number of institutions in the U.S. and elsewhere. In addition, GenBank provides the U.S. distribution center for the BIOSCI electronic bulletin board service. PMID:1598235

  10. Status of materials handbooks for particle accelerator and nuclear reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart; Rogers, Berylene; Ren, Weiju; Philip, Rittenhouse

    2008-01-01

    In support of research and development for accelerator applications, a materials handbook was developed in August of 1998 funded by the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. This handbook, presently called Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Materials Handbook, Materials Data for Particle Accelerator Applications, has just issued Revision 5 and contains detailed information showing the effects of irradiation on many properties for a wide variety of materials. Development of a web-accessible materials database for Generation IV Reactor Programs has been ongoing for about three years. This handbook provides a single authoritative source for qualified materials data applicable to all Generation IV reactor concepts. A beta version of this Gen IV Materials Handbook has been completed and is presently under evaluation.

  11. Sodium fast reactor evaluation: Core materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byoung Oon; Raison, J. P.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Carmack, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Program the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper the status of available and developmental materials for SFR core cladding and duct applications is reviewed. To satisfy the Generation IV SFR fuel requirements, an advanced cladding needs to be developed. The candidate cladding materials are austenitic steels, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. A large amount of irradiation testing is required, and the compatibility of cladding with TRU-loaded fuel at high temperatures and high burnup must be investigated. The more promising F/M steels (compared to HT9) might be able to meet the dose requirements of over 200 dpa for ducts in the GEN-IV SFR systems.

  12. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  13. TrafficGen Architecture Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    distribution unlimited. 2 Fig. 1 TrafficGen user interface The TrafficGen user’s guide details specific features and their use. TrafficGen is available...model is the foundation for the timeline-based user interface and for generating commands for integration with external applications. 3. User... Interface The user interface of this application is comprised of several sets of MVC classes and other support classes. Working together, they present

  14. Synthesis of Ge1-xSnx alloys by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting: Towards a group IV direct bandgap material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Smillie, Lachlan A.; Akey, Austin J.; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The germanium-tin (Ge1-xSnx) material system is expected to be a direct bandgap group IV semiconductor at a Sn content of 6.5 - 11 at . % . Such Sn concentrations can be realized by non-equilibrium deposition techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy or chemical vapour deposition. In this report, the combination of ion implantation and pulsed laser melting is demonstrated to be an alternative promising method to produce a highly Sn concentrated alloy with a good crystal quality. The structural properties of the alloys such as soluble Sn concentration, strain distribution, and crystal quality have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, x ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that it is possible to produce a high quality alloy with up to 6.2 at . % Sn . The optical properties and electronic band structure have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The introduction of substitutional Sn into Ge is shown to either induce a splitting between light and heavy hole subbands or lower the conduction band at the Γ valley. Limitations and possible solutions to introducing higher Sn content into Ge that is sufficient for a direct bandgap transition are also discussed.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of NpCl4(DME)2 and PuCl4(DME)2 neutral transuranic An(IV) starting materials.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Sean D; Brown, Jessie L; Scott, Brian L; Gaunt, Andrew J

    2014-01-28

    The 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) solvento adducts of Np(iv) and Pu(iv) tetrachloride have been prepared and isolated in good and moderate yields, respectively, along with single-crystal structural determinations. These neutral molecules are expected to provide alternative synthetic pathways in the pursuit of non-aqueous and organometallic complexes.

  16. Arctocypris fuhrmanni, n. gen., n. sp. (Crustacea, Ostracoda, Eucypridinae) from Spitsbergen (Norway).

    PubMed

    Petkovski, Trajan K; Scharf, Burkhard; Keyser, Dietmar

    2016-01-14

    Material from Spitsbergen (Norway) collected by Spitzenberger (1996) was reinvestigated. A new genus Arctocypris and a new species Arctocypris. fuhrmanni n. gen. n. sp. are described in the present paper. A key to the genera of the subfamily Eucypridinae is provided. At the moment Arctocypris n. gen. comprises four species: Arctocypris arctica (Olofsson, 1918) comb. nov.; A. dulcifons (Diebel & Pietrzeniuk, 1969) comb. nov.; A. foveata (Delorme, 1968) comb. nov. and Arctocypris fuhrmanni n. gen., n. sp.

  17. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  18. Interoperability of Materials Database Systems in Support of Nuclear Energy Development and Potential Applications for Fuel Cell Material Selection

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Lianshan; Austin, Timothy; Ren, Weiju

    2015-01-01

    Materials database interoperability has been of great interest in recent years for information exchange in support of research and development (R&D). In response to data and knowledge sharing needs of the GenIV International Forum (GIF) for global collaboration in nuclear energy R&D, the European Commission JRC Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC-IET) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have established a materials database interoperability project that develops techniques for automated materials data exchange between systems hosted at the two institutes MatDB Online at JRC IET and the Gen IV Materials Handbook at ORNL, respectively. The work to enable automatedmore » exchange of data between the two systems leverages the XML data import and export functionalities of both systems in combination with recently developed standards for engineering materials data. The preliminary results of data communication between the two systems have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of materials database interoperability, which constructs an interoperation framework that can be seamlessly integrated into the high-throughput First Principles material databases and thus advance the discovery of novel materials in fuel cell applications.« less

  19. Interoperability of Materials Database Systems in Support of Nuclear Energy Development and Potential Applications for Fuel Cell Material Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lianshan; Austin, Timothy; Ren, Weiju

    2015-01-01

    Materials database interoperability has been of great interest in recent years for information exchange in support of research and development (R&D). In response to data and knowledge sharing needs of the GenIV International Forum (GIF) for global collaboration in nuclear energy R&D, the European Commission JRC Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC-IET) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have established a materials database interoperability project that develops techniques for automated materials data exchange between systems hosted at the two institutes MatDB Online at JRC IET and the Gen IV Materials Handbook at ORNL, respectively. The work to enable automated exchange of data between the two systems leverages the XML data import and export functionalities of both systems in combination with recently developed standards for engineering materials data. The preliminary results of data communication between the two systems have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of materials database interoperability, which constructs an interoperation framework that can be seamlessly integrated into the high-throughput First Principles material databases and thus advance the discovery of novel materials in fuel cell applications.

  20. LFR Demonstrator Materials Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, M

    2006-08-02

    Interest in fast reactor development has increased with the Department of Energy's introduction of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) [1]. The GNEP program plans development of a sodium cooled Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) that can be used to reduce the amount spent LWR fuel in storage and the number of high level waste sites needed for expansion of nuclear power throughout the world over the 21st century. In addition, the program proposes to make nuclear power more available while reducing the proliferation concerns by revising policies and technology for control of weapons useable materials. This would be accomplished with establishment of new institutional arrangements based on selective siting of reprocessing, enrichment and waste disposal facilities. The program would also implement development of small reactors suitable for use in developing countries or remote regions with small power grids. Over the past several years, under the Department of Energy (DOE) NERI and GEN IV programs research has been conducted on small lead cooled reactors. The Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) [2] is the most recent version of this type of reactor and research is continuing on it in the GEN IV program in parallel with GNEP. SSTAR is a small (10MWe-100MWe) reactor that is fueled once for life. It complements the GNEP program very well in that it serves one of the world markets not currently addressed by large reactors and its development requirements are similar to those for the ABRs. In particular, the fuel and structural materials for these fast spectrum reactors share common thermal and neutron environments. The coolants, sodium in ABR and lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in SSTAR, are the major developmental difference. This report discusses the status of structural materials for fast reactor core and primary system components and selected aspects of their development.

  1. Technical Appendices to the National Day Care Study: Background Materials. Final Report of the National Day Care Study. Volume IV-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruopp, Richard; And Others

    This final report of the National Day Care Study (NDCS), Volume IV-A, contains three papers that help to set a context for interpreting overall study results. "Research Issues in Day Care, A Focused Review of the Literature" focuses on effects of group care and regulatable characteristics of the day care environment. The second paper,…

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  3. 25 Years of GenBank

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Unique DNA database has helped advance scientific discoveries worldwide Since ... GenBank? Basically, GenBank is the biggest database of DNA in the world. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the ...

  4. Introduction to GenCade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    16-18 October 2012 5 GenCade Conceptual Processes: Coastal Sediment Dynamics Flood shoal ~150,000 m3/yr D50 = 0.27 (W) 0.38 (E) Moriches...offset • LMOVY 0.0 Leftward shoreline displacement velocity • D50 0.33 Grain size diameter in millimeters • BERMHT 2 Average berm height • DCLOS 8

  5. Irradiation embrittlement characterization of the EUROFER 97 material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytka, M.; Brumovsky, M.; Falcnik, M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper summarizes original results of irradiation embrittlement study of EUROFER 97 material that has been proposed as one candidate of structural materials for future fusion energy systems and GEN IV. Test specimens were manufactured from base metal as well as from weld metal and tested in initial unirradiated condition and also after neutron irradiation. Irradiation embrittlement was characterized by testing of toughness properties at transition temperature region - static fracture toughness and dynamic fracture toughness properties, all in sub-size three-point bend specimens (27 × 4 × 3 mm 3). Testing and evaluation was performed in accordance with ASTM and ESIS standards, fracture toughness KJC and KJd data were also evaluated with the "Master curve" approach. Moreover, J- R dependencies were determined and analyzed. The paper compares unirradiated and irradiated properties as well as changes in transition temperature shifts of these material parameters. Discussion about the correlation between static and dynamic properties is also given. Results from irradiation of EUROFER 97 show that this steel - base metal as well as weld metal - is suitable as a structural material for reactor pressure vessels of innovative nuclear systems - fusion energy systems and GEN IV. Transition temperature shifts after neutron irradiation by 2.5 dpa dose show a good agreement in the case of EUROFER 97 base material for both static and dynamic fracture toughness tests. From the results it can be concluded that there is a low sensitivity of weld metal to neutron irradiation embrittlement in comparison with EUROFER 97 base metal.

  6. Summary of CPAS Gen II Parachute Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Moore, James W.; Olson, Leah M.; Ray, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is currently under development by NASA and Lockheed Martin. Like Apollo, Orion will use a series of parachutes to slow its descent and splashdown safely. The Orion parachute system, known as the CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), is being designed by NASA, the Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG), and Airborne Systems. The first generation (Gen I) of CPAS testing consisted of thirteen tests and was executed in the 2007-2008 timeframe. The Gen I tests provided an initial understanding of the CPAS parachutes. Knowledge gained from Gen I testing was used to plan the second generation of testing (Gen II). Gen II consisted of six tests: three singleparachute tests, designated as Main Development Tests, and three Cluster Development Tests. Gen II required a more thorough investigation into parachute performance than Gen I. Higher fidelity instrumentation, enhanced analysis methods and tools, and advanced test techniques were developed. The results of the Gen II test series are being incorporated into the CPAS design. Further testing and refinement of the design and model of parachute performance will occur during the upcoming third generation of testing (Gen III). This paper will provide an overview of the developments in CPAS analysis following the end of Gen I, including descriptions of new tools and techniques as well as overviews of the Gen II tests.

  7. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  8. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  9. Aircraft Environmental System Mechanic, 2-9. Block IV--Utility Systems and Flight Line Maintenance. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This publication contains a teaching guide and student instructional materials for conducting a high school or adult vocational education course to train persons to perform duties as an aircraft environmental systems mechanic. The instructional design for this course is self-paced and/or small group-paced. Instructor materials contained in the…

  10. Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement IV (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus, OH.

    Presented are abstracts and indexes to selected print and non-print materials related to wastewater treatment and water quality education. Also included are procedures to illustrate how instructors and curriculum developers in the water quality control field can locate instructional materials to meet very general or highly specific requirements in…

  11. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  12. Characterization of Caramel Colour IV.

    PubMed

    Licht, B H; Shaw, K; Smith, C; Mendoza, M; Orr, J; Myers, D V

    1992-05-01

    A large number of commercial Caramel Colour IV samples were characterized in order to assess the uniformity of the class and to provide data to be used in specifications development. Owing to the chemical and physical complexity of caramel colour it was not feasible to perform detailed analysis of all constituents for assessment of uniformity. Instead, selected parameters were evaluated and judgements were made with respect to compositional uniformity based on the similarities of these parameters among the various samples. As Caramel Colour IV is required by the food industry in a range of colour intensities, there must be a range of properties that differ from sample to sample, but that are sufficiently similar for the material to still be considered as part of the Caramel Colour IV class. Fractions as well as whole caramel were analysed using selected spectrophotometric, chromatographic and chemical techniques. Samples were fractionated based on molecular weight and polarity. The data presented here provide evidence for the uniformity in composition of Caramel Colour IV with respect to molecular weight distribution, to nitrogen and sulphur content and their distribution throughout the fractions, to absorbance properties and to specific low molecular weight compounds. Thus, it can be concluded that Caramel Colour IV exhibits compositional uniformity within the range of colour intensity required by the food industry worldwide.

  13. An evaluation and comparison of the efficacy of nanocrystalline calcium sulfate bone grafts (NanoGen) and medical-grade calcium sulfate bone grafts (DentoGen) in human extraction sockets.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bindiya; Gautam, D K; Horowitz, Robert A; Jain, Ashish; Mahajan, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Grafting a fresh extraction socket is essential for successful regeneration of bone and maximizing volume preservation. Various synthetic grafts have been used to simulate bone formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate clinical, histomorphometric, and radiographic healing at 1-month, 3-month, and 4-month time points after tooth extraction with placement of calcium sulfate hemihydrate putty bone grafts NanoGen and DentoGen to determine their efficacy in ridge preservation following tooth extraction. Sixty subjects who were in need of extraction were recruited. The subjects were randomly assigned their group based on computer software for both the test groups (NanoGen and DentoGen). DentoGen is a medical-grade calcium sulfate hemihydrate with particle of 30 µm, and NanoGen is a nanocrystalline version of DentoGen with particle size 400 µm to 800 µm. Data were recorded at 1, 3, and 4 months after extraction socket grafting. Bone biopsies were taken at 4 months for histomorphometric analysis. The mean percentage of bone formed by NanoGen was 51.19 ± 9.53% and by DentoGen 50.67 ± 16.16% after 4 months. No statistically significant difference was noted in the mean bone formation by NanoGen and DentoGen at various time intervals; no bone graft remnants of DentoGen were found at 4 months. The mean percentage of bone graft remnants left after 4 months for NanoGen was 6.83 ± 16% in the maxilla and 7.38 ± 21% in the mandible. The mean percentage of soft tissue formed was significantly higher with DentoGen in mandibular socket sites. On radiographic evaluation the mean percentage of socket fill with DenoGen was found to be 23.1 ± 11.65%, 50 ± 9.6%, and 76.7 ± 11% and with NanoGen was 29.2 ± 12.8%, 52.8 ± 15.6%, and 76.47 ± 12.43% at 1 month, 3 months, and 4 months postoperative intervals, respectively. Both the materials investigated in the study showed excellent bone forming capacity, but the nanocrystalline version (NanoGen) of calcium sulfate

  14. From AWE-GEN to AWE-GEN-2d: a high spatial and temporal resolution weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Nadav; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A new weather generator, AWE-GEN-2d (Advanced WEather GENerator for 2-Dimension grid) is developed following the philosophy of combining physical and stochastic approaches to simulate meteorological variables at high spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 2 km x 2 km and 5 min for precipitation and cloud cover and 100 m x 100 m and 1 h for other variables variable (temperature, solar radiation, vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure and near-surface wind). The model is suitable to investigate the impacts of climate variability, temporal and spatial resolutions of forcing on hydrological, ecological, agricultural and geomorphological impacts studies. Using appropriate parameterization the model can be used in the context of climate change. Here we present the model technical structure of AWE-GEN-2d, which is a substantial evolution of four preceding models (i) the hourly-point scale Advanced WEather GENerator (AWE-GEN) presented by Fatichi et al. (2011, Adv. Water Resour.) (ii) the Space-Time Realizations of Areal Precipitation (STREAP) model introduced by Paschalis et al. (2013, Water Resour. Res.), (iii) the High-Resolution Synoptically conditioned Weather Generator developed by Peleg and Morin (2014, Water Resour. Res.), and (iv) the Wind-field Interpolation by Non Divergent Schemes presented by Burlando et al. (2007, Boundary-Layer Meteorol.). The AWE-GEN-2d is relatively parsimonious in terms of computational demand and allows generating many stochastic realizations of current and projected climates in an efficient way. An example of model application and testing is presented with reference to a case study in the Wallis region, a complex orography terrain in the Swiss Alps.

  15. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Groundwater by Persulfate: Decomposition by Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-Containing Oxides and Aquifer Materials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Persulfate (S2O82–) is being used increasingly for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants in groundwater, despite an incomplete understanding of the mechanism through which it is converted into reactive species. In particular, the decomposition of persulfate by naturally occurring mineral surfaces has not been studied in detail. To gain insight into the reaction rates and mechanism of persulfate decomposition in the subsurface, and to identify possible approaches for improving its efficacy, the decomposition of persulfate was investigated in the presence of pure metal oxides, clays, and representative aquifer solids collected from field sites in the presence and absence of benzene. Under conditions typical of groundwater, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides catalytically converted persulfate into sulfate radical (SO4•–) and hydroxyl radical (HO•) over time scales of several weeks at rates that were 2–20 times faster than those observed in metal-free systems. Amorphous ferrihydrite was the most reactive iron mineral with respect to persulfate decomposition, with reaction rates proportional to solid mass and surface area. As a result of radical chain reactions, the rate of persulfate decomposition increased by as much as 100 times when benzene concentrations exceeded 0.1 mM. Due to its relatively slow rate of decomposition in the subsurface, it can be advantageous to inject persulfate into groundwater, allowing it to migrate to zones of low hydraulic conductivity where clays, metal oxides, and contaminants will accelerate its conversion into reactive oxidants. PMID:25133603

  16. In situ chemical oxidation of contaminated groundwater by persulfate: decomposition by Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-containing oxides and aquifer materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Bruton, Thomas A; Doyle, Fiona M; Sedlak, David L

    2014-09-02

    Persulfate (S2O8(2-)) is being used increasingly for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants in groundwater, despite an incomplete understanding of the mechanism through which it is converted into reactive species. In particular, the decomposition of persulfate by naturally occurring mineral surfaces has not been studied in detail. To gain insight into the reaction rates and mechanism of persulfate decomposition in the subsurface, and to identify possible approaches for improving its efficacy, the decomposition of persulfate was investigated in the presence of pure metal oxides, clays, and representative aquifer solids collected from field sites in the presence and absence of benzene. Under conditions typical of groundwater, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides catalytically converted persulfate into sulfate radical (SO4(•-)) and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) over time scales of several weeks at rates that were 2-20 times faster than those observed in metal-free systems. Amorphous ferrihydrite was the most reactive iron mineral with respect to persulfate decomposition, with reaction rates proportional to solid mass and surface area. As a result of radical chain reactions, the rate of persulfate decomposition increased by as much as 100 times when benzene concentrations exceeded 0.1 mM. Due to its relatively slow rate of decomposition in the subsurface, it can be advantageous to inject persulfate into groundwater, allowing it to migrate to zones of low hydraulic conductivity where clays, metal oxides, and contaminants will accelerate its conversion into reactive oxidants.

  17. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials Part IV: Case study of oxo-biodegradable polyethylene commercial bag - Aging in biotic and abiotic environment.

    PubMed

    Musioł, Marta; Rydz, Joanna; Janeczek, Henryk; Radecka, Iza; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2017-06-01

    The public awareness of the quality of environment stimulates the endeavor to safe polymeric materials and their degradation products. The aim of the forensic engineering case study presented in this paper is to evaluate the aging process of commercial oxo-degradable polyethylene bag under real industrial composting conditions and in distilled water at 70°C, for comparison. Partial degradation of the investigated material was monitored by changes in molecular weight, thermal properties and Keto Carbonyl Bond Index and Vinyl Bond Index, which were calculated from the FTIR spectra. The results indicate that such an oxo-degradable product offered in markets degrades slowly under industrial composting conditions. Even fragmentation is slow, and it is dubious that biological mineralization of this material would occur within a year under industrial composting conditions. The slow degradation and fragmentation is most likely due to partially crosslinking after long time of degradation, which results in the limitation of low molecular weight residues for assimilation. The work suggests that these materials should not be labeled as biodegradable, and should be further analyzed in order to avoid the spread of persistent artificial materials in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A More Perfect Union: The American Government. Materials for Using American Issues Forum in the American History Classroom, Topic IV, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This booklet presents a set of secondary-level classroom strategies for examining American history in light of the issues identified by the American Issues Forum. Emphasis is on examination of the role and actions of the President of the United States. These materials, called modules, form Part II of the topic, "A More Perfect Union: The…

  19. A More Perfect Union: The American Government. Materials for Using American Issues Forum in the American History Classroom, Topic IV, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Gail F.

    This booklet presents teacher-developed units of study on the American government for eleventh-grade students. The materials are Part I of a set of classroom strategies intended to help secondary students examine American history in light of the issues identified by the American Issues Forum. Students analyze the U.S. Constitution, draw cartoons,…

  20. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry standardization project for measurements of apolipoproteins A-I and B. IV. Comparability of apolipoprotein B values by use of International Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, S M; Albers, J J; Kennedy, H; Mei, J V; Henderson, L O; Hannon, W H

    1994-04-01

    We performed temporal and thermal stability studies on SP3-07, a liquid-stabilized reference material for apolipoprotein (apo) B, selected during the previous phase of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry project on standardization of apolipoprotein measurements. Results indicate that SP3-07 stored at -70 degrees C has the long-term stability required for a reference material. We assigned an accuracy-based apo B value of 1.22 g/L to SP3-07, using a nephelometric method that was calibrated with freshly isolated low-density lipoprotein for which the apo B mass value was determined by a standardized sodium dodecyl sulfate-Lowry procedure. Using a common protocol, the study participants transferred the assigned mass value from SP3-07 to the individual calibrators of the analytical systems and measured the apo B concentration of 20 fresh-frozen samples obtained from individual donors and covering a clinically relevant range of apo B values. The among-laboratory CV on these samples, analyzed by 25 analytical systems, ranged from 3.1% to 6.7%. These results demonstrate the lack of matrix effects of SP3-07 and its ability to provide accurate and comparable apo B values in a variety of immunochemical methods. On the basis of the outcome of these studies, the World Health Organization has endorsed SP3-07 as the International Reference Material for Apolipoprotein B.

  1. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  2. Emissivity of Candidate Materials for VHTR Applicationbs: Role of Oxidation and Surface Modification Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Cao, Guoping; Kulcinski, Gerald

    2011-07-25

    The Generation IV (GEN IV) Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative was instituted by the Department of Energy (DOE) with the goal of researching and developing technologies and materials necessary for various types of future reactors. These GEN IV reactors will employ advanced fuel cycles, passive safety systems, and other innovative systems, leading to significant differences between these future reactors and current water-cooled reactors. The leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to be built at Idaho National Lab (INL) in the United States is the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Due to the high operating temperatures of the VHTR, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) will partially rely on heat transfer by radiation for cooling. Heat expulsion by radiation will become all the more important during high temperature excursions during off-normal accident scenarios. Radiant power is dictated by emissivity, a material property. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program Plan [1] has identified emissivity and the effects of high temperature oxide formation on emissivity as an area of research towards the development of the VHTR.

  3. A REVIEW PAPER ON AGING EFFECTS IN ALLOY 617 FOR GEN IVNUCLEAR REACTOR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Swindeman, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    To understand the response of Alloy 617 to long-time exposure conditions and determine the supplementary data needs for structural components in Gen IV nuclear reactors, the literature of aging and aging effects in the alloy was reviewed. Most of the reviewed data were produced in connection with the international research effort supporting High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) projects in the 1970s and 1980s. Topics considered included microstructural changes, hardness, tensile properties, toughness, creep-rupture, fatigue, and crack growth. It became clear that, for the long-time, very high temperature conditions of the Gen IV reactors, a significant effort would be needed to fully understand and characterize property changes. Several topics for further research were recommended.

  4. Gen-X : Science Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyl, J. S.; Generation-X Team

    2004-08-01

    Charting the development of the first objects from very early times into the structure we see in the Universe today is a sweeping goal of cosmology. X-ray observations are a key factor in achieving this goal: these first objects are expected to be powerful sources of X-rays and X-rays penetrate both the haze of the high z intergalactic medium, and the dust and gas expected around high z objects. These scientific goals drive the mission parameters of Generation-X, giving it an unrivaled combination of spatial, spectral resolution and sensitivity. Not only will Gen-X observe the birth of the first black holes, stars and galaxies, trace their evolution and the elements they produce. It will also probe more nearby phenomena with unparalleled precision, exploring both the most extreme objects in the universe (such as supermassive black holes, magnetars and microquasars) and the more mundane but equally important (such as protoplanetary disks and sun-like stars). Gen-X will be an extraordinarily powerful X-ray observatory for all of astrophysics.

  5. Tabasconura tapijulapana gen. nov. sp. nov. (Collembola: Neanuridae) from Tabasco, México.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Vargas, José G; Catalán, Elihú

    2015-04-14

    Tabasconura gen. nov. (Neanuridae) and type species T. tapijulapana sp. nov., are described and illustrated. The new genus possesses all characters of the tribe Sensillanurini Cassagnau, and is characterised by the presence of slightly elongated tubercles on the body and also elongation and thickening of the sensillum S2 as well as S7 on antennal segment IV. Development of S7 is a character of the tribe.

  6. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  7. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  8. Synthesis, crystal structure, physico-chemical characterization of a new hybrid material, (2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1,4-diium hexachlorostannate(IV) monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, S. Belhaj; da Silva, Pedro Sidónio Pereira; Lefebvre, F.; Ben Nasr, C.; Ammar, S.; Mrad, M. L.

    2017-06-01

    The new organic-inorganic compound [C6H16N2O](SnCl6).H2O was synthesized and single crystals were grown from an aqueous solution through these slow evaporation technique. The atomic arrangement can be described by organic-inorganic layers parallel to the (a, c) plane. These layers are connected via hydrogen bonds (Osbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯Cl) to build a three dimensional arrangement. The 13C and 15N CP-MAS NMR spectra are in agreement with the X-ray structure. The vibrational absorption bands were identified by infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. DFT calculations allowed the attribution of the IR bands. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated for intermolecular interactions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS) is a technique for analyzing the surface chemistry of a compound. It was employed to measure the elemental composition and electronic state of the elements within a material. The DSC profile shows endothermic peaks centered at approximately 343, 370 and 552 K.

  9. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  10. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous catheter - home; Port - home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... is given quickly, all at once. A slow infusion, which means the medicine is given slowly over ...

  11. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  12. Proposal of the genera Anaerococcus gen. nov., Peptoniphilus gen. nov. and Gallicola gen. nov. for members of the genus Peptostreptococcus.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, T; Kawamura, Y; Li, N; Li, Z Y; Zhao, L; Shu, S

    2001-07-01

    Members of genus Peptostreptococcus have previously been found to be distantly related to the type species, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence similarities. They were divided into three major phylogenetic groups, and their peptidoglycan structure and biochemical traits differed between groups. The reclassification of the species of these three groups into three new genera, Peptoniphilus gen. nov., Anaerococcus gen. nov. and Gallicola gen. nov., is proposed. The genus Peptoniphilus gen. nov. includes the following butyrate-producing, non-saccharolytic species that use peptone and amino acids as major energy sources: Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus comb. nov. (type species), Peptoniphilus lacrimaris comb. nov., Peptoniphilus harei comb. nov., Peptoniphilus indolicus comb. nov. and Peptoniphilus ivorii comb. nov. The genus Anaerococcus gen. nov. contains the saccharolytic, butyrate-producing species Anaerococcus prevotii comb. nov. (type species), Anaerococcus tetradius comb. nov., Anaerococcus lactolyticus comb. nov., Anaerococcus hydrogenalis comb. nov., Anaerococcus vaginalis comb. nov. and Anaerococcus octavius sp. nov. The genus Gallicola gen. nov. contains a single species, Gallicola barnesae comb. nov.

  13. AutoGen Version 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy E.; Khanampornpan, Teerapat; Fisher, Forest W.

    2010-01-01

    Version 5.0 of the AutoGen software has been released. Previous versions, variously denoted Autogen and autogen, were reported in two articles: Automated Sequence Generation Process and Software (NPO-30746), Software Tech Briefs (Special Supplement to NASA Tech Briefs), September 2007, page 30, and Autogen Version 2.0 (NPO- 41501), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 10 (October 2007), page 58. To recapitulate: AutoGen (now signifying automatic sequence generation ) automates the generation of sequences of commands in a standard format for uplink to spacecraft. AutoGen requires fewer workers than are needed for older manual sequence-generation processes, and greatly reduces sequence-generation times. The sequences are embodied in spacecraft activity sequence files (SASFs). AutoGen automates generation of SASFs by use of another previously reported program called APGEN. AutoGen encodes knowledge of different mission phases and of how the resultant commands must differ among the phases. AutoGen also provides means for customizing sequences through use of configuration files. The approach followed in developing AutoGen has involved encoding the behaviors of a system into a model and encoding algorithms for context-sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. This version of AutoGen addressed the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) primary science phase (PSP) mission phase. On previous Mars missions this phase has more commonly been referred to as mapping phase. This version addressed the unique aspects of sequencing orbital operations and specifically the mission specific adaptation of orbital operations for MRO. This version also includes capabilities for MRO s role in Mars relay support for UHF relay communications with the MER rovers and the Phoenix lander.

  14. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  15. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  16. Rhenium(IV) sulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Michael; Hansen, Thomas W; Jacobsen, Claus J H

    2002-10-02

    Rhenium(IV) sulfide, ReS(2), has been prepared with nanotubular morphology by carbon nanotube templating. A multiwall carbon nanotube material was impregnated with solutions of NH(4)ReO(4) or ReCl(5), followed by drying and sulfidation with H(2)S at 1000 degrees C. The composite material synthesized was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Like previously described MS(2) nanotube compounds, ReS(2) has a layered structure consisting of S-M-S layers. Re atoms in ordinary ReS(2) are octahedrally coordinated with S, and tetranuclear metal clusters are present as a consequence of metal-metal bonds.

  17. Debroyerella gen. nov. and Ulladulla gen. nov., two new lysianassoid genera (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Lysianassoidea).

    PubMed

    Lowry, J K; Kilgallen, N M

    2015-02-19

    Two new genera and a new species of lysianassoid amphipods are described. Debroyerella gen. nov. is described for three Antarctic species previously assigned to the genus Cheirimedon. Ulladulla gen. nov. is described to accommodate the new species U. selje, from Australian waters. Diagnostic descriptions are given for the genera and all species are described in full.

  18. Unleashing Gen Y: Marketing Mars to Millennials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, Bart D.; Hidalgo, Loretta; Kloberdanz, Cassie

    2007-01-01

    Space advocates need to engage Generation Y (born 1977-1999).This outreach is necessary to recruit the next generation of scientists and engineers to explore Mars. Space advocates in the non-profit, private, and government sectors need to use a combination of technical communication, marketing, and politics, to develop messages that resonate with Gen Y. Until now, space messages have been generated by and for college-educated white males; Gen Y is much more diverse, including as much as one third minorities. Young women, too, need to be reached. My research has shown that messages emphasizing technology, fun, humor, and opportunity are the best means of reaching the Gen Y audience of 60 million (US population is 300 million). The important things space advocates must avoid are talking down to this generation, making false promises, or expecting them to "wait their turn" before they can participate. This is the MTV generation! We need to find ways of engaging Gen Y now to build a future where human beings can live and work on the planet Mars. In addition to the messages themselves, advocates need to keep up with Gen Y' s social networking and use of iPods, cell phones, and the Internet. NASA and space advocacy groups can use these tools for "viral marketing," where young people share targeted space-related information via cell phones or the Internet because they like it. Overall, Gen Y is a socially dynamic and media-savvy group; advocates' space messages need to be sincere, creative, and placed in locations where Gen Y lives. Mars messages must be memorable!

  19. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  20. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  1. Little Jiffy, Mark IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Henry F.; Rice, John

    1974-01-01

    In this paper three changes and one new development for the method of exploratory factor analysis (a second generation Little Jiffy) developed by Kaiser are described. Following this short description a step-by-step computer algorithm of the revised method, dubbed Little Jiffy, Mark IV is presented. (MP)

  2. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  3. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  4. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  5. Three new anascosporic genera of the Saccharomycotina: Danielozyma gen. nov., Deakozyma gen. nov. and Middelhovenomyces gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P; Robnett, Christie J

    2014-05-01

    Three new non-ascosporic, ascomycetous yeast genera are proposed based on their isolation from currently described species and genera. Phylogenetic placement of the genera was determined from analysis of nuclear gene sequences for D1/D2 large subunit rRNA, small subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor-1α and RNA polymerase II, subunits B1 and B2. The new taxa are: Deakozyma gen. nov., type species Deakozyma indianensis sp. nov. (type strain NRRL YB-1937, CBS 12903); Danielozyma gen. nov., type species Danielozyma ontarioensis comb. nov. (type strain NRRL YB-1246, CBS 8502); D. litseae comb. nov. (type strain NRRL YB-3246, CBS 8799); Middelhovenomyces gen. nov., type species Middelhovenomyces tepae comb. nov. (type strain NRRL Y-17670, CBS 5115) and M. petrohuensis comb. nov. (type strain NRRL Y-17663, CBS 8173).

  6. LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

    2008-12-19

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  7. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  8. Review Paper: Review of Instrumentation for Irradiation Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bong Goo Kim; Joy L. Rempe; Jean-François Villard; Steinar Solstadd

    2011-11-01

    Over 50 years of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation testing has led to many countries developing significant improvements in instrumentation to monitor physical parameters and to control the test conditions in material test reactors (MTRs). Recently, there is increased interest to irradiate new materials and reactor fuels for advanced pressurized water reactors and Gen-IV reactor systems, such as sodium-cooled fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, supercritical water-cooled reactors, and gas-cooled fast reactors. This review paper documents the current state of instrumentation technologies in MTRs in the world and summarizes ongoing research efforts to deploy new sensors. As described in this paper, a wide range of sensors is available to measure key parameters of interest during fuels and materials irradiations in MTRs. Ongoing development efforts focus on providing MTR users a wider range of parameter measurements with smaller, higher accuracy sensors.

  9. Tools for Designing, Evaluating, and Certifying NextGen Technologies and Procedures: Automation Roles and Responsibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    Barbara Kanki from NASA Ames Research Center will discuss research that focuses on the collaborations between pilots, air traffic controllers and dispatchers that will change in NextGen systems as automation increases and roles and responsibilities change. The approach taken by this NASA Ames team is to build a collaborative systems assessment template (CSAT) based on detailed task descriptions within each system to establish a baseline of the current operations. The collaborative content and context are delineated through the review of regulatory and advisory materials, policies, procedures and documented practices as augmented by field observations and interviews. The CSAT is developed to aid the assessment of key human factors and performance tradeoffs that result from considering different collaborative arrangements under NextGen system changes. In theory, the CSAT product may be applied to any NextGen application (such as Trajectory Based Operations) with specified ground and aircraft capabilities.

  10. FORTRAN IV Digital Filter Design Programs. Digital Systems Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuss, E.; And Others

    The goals of the Digital Systems Education Project (DISE) include the development and distribution of educational/instructional materials in the digital systems area. Toward that end, this document contains three reports: (1) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for Low-Pass Butterworth and Chebychev Digital Filters; (2) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for…

  11. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  12. Thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Talcott, Noel A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    New thermoelectric materials comprise highly [111]-oriented twinned group IV alloys on the basal plane of trigonal substrates, which exhibit a high thermoelectric figure of merit and good material performance, and devices made with these materials.

  13. GenEng: A dialogue-based natural language interface to the GenBank

    SciTech Connect

    Karimi, E.

    1993-12-31

    To sequence all the genes in human DNA and analyze their functions, the Human Genome Project has been collecting a large body of data in data banks such as GenBank{copyright}. One of the important issues concerning computational biologists is the availability of the tools which can provide easy and efficient access to these data banks. In this paper, the author will give a brief overview of different approaches to the design of a relational database interface. The paper concentrates on the design of GenEng, a dialogue based natural language interface for information retrieval from the GenBank relational database.

  14. Colon Cancer on The Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colon Cancer on the Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials And an old adversary -- the obesity epidemic -- may ... their early 50s and younger -- Gen Xers and millennials -- are experiencing significant increases in colon and rectal ...

  15. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  16. VIEW OF GEN. LOGAN STATUE LOOKING SOUTHWEST WITH VISTA AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF GEN. LOGAN STATUE LOOKING SOUTHWEST WITH VISTA AS TO THE GEN. THOMAS STATUE DOWN VERMONT AVENUE AND THE GEN. SCOTT STATUE DOWN RHODE ISLAND AVENUE IN THE BACKGROUND - Logan Circle, Vermont Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue, & Thirteenth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 75 FR 56654 - RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) SUMMARY: The FAA published a... public of a meeting of RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee. The Agenda in that notice has been revised....

  18. 75 FR 54221 - RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-22098] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA NextGen... NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). DATES: The meeting will be held September 23, 2010, from 8:30 a.m....

  19. 77 FR 2342 - Fifth Meeting: RTCA, Next Gen Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Fifth Meeting: RTCA, Next Gen Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA, NextGen... RTCA, NextGen Advisory Committee. DATES: The meeting will be held February 3, 2012, from 9:30...

  20. VitisGen: accelerating grape cultivar improvement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    VitisGen is a multiple institute collaborative project funded by the USDA SCRI program, with a long term goal to accelerate grape cultivar improvement by using cutting-edge molecular marker technologies, rigorous centralized facilities to characterize traits, and molecular breeding expertise. The ge...

  1. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  2. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  3. Optimized, Competitive Supercritical-CO2 Cycle GFR for Gen IV Service

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Driscoll; P. Hejzlar; G. Apostolakis

    2008-09-08

    An overall plant design was developed for a gas-cooled fast reactor employing a direct supercritical Brayton power conversion system. The most important findings were that (1) the concept could be capital-cost competitive, but startup fuel cycle costs are penalized by the low core power density, specified in large part to satisfy the goal of significatn post-accident passive natural convection cooling; (2) active decay heat removal is preferable as the first line of defense, with passive performance in a backup role; (3) an innovative tube-in-duct fuel assembly, vented to the primpary coolant, appears to be practicable; and (4) use of the S-Co2 GFR to support hydrogen production is a synergistic application, since sufficient energy can be recuperated from the product H2 and 02 to allow the electrolysis cell to run 250 C hotter than the reactor coolant, and the water boilers can be used for reactor decay heat removal. Increasing core poer density is identified as the top priority for future work on GFRs of this type.

  4. GEN-IV BENCHMARKING OF TRISO FUEL PERFORMANCE MODELS UNDER ACCIDENT CONDITIONS MODELING INPUT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise Paul

    2016-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: • The modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release. • The modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments. • The comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from “Case 5” of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. “Case 5” of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to “effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model” [IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary. 09/2016: Tables 6 and 8 updated. AGR-2 input data added

  5. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  6. The Integrated Airport: Building a Successful NextGen Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick-Recascino, Christina; Sweigard, Doug; Lester, Wade

    2009-02-18

    This presentation will describe a unique public-private partnership - the Integrated Airport - that was created to engage in research and testing related to NextGen Technology deployment. NextGen refers to the program that will be initiated to modernize the US National Airspace. As with any major, multi-decade initiative, such as NextGen, integration of work efforts by multiple partners in the modernization is critical for success. This talk will focus on the development of the consortium, how the consortium plans for NextGen initiatives, the series of technology demonstrations we have produced and plans for the future of NextGen testing and implementation.

  7. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  8. Afrojoyeuxia gen. n. and Hunkeleriella gen. n., two new genera of cestodes (Cyclophyllidea: Anoplocephalidae) from African rodents.

    PubMed

    Haukisalmi, Voitto

    2013-11-01

    Based on the study of type material, two new genera of cestodes (Cyclophyllidea: Anoplocephalidae) are proposed for Paranoplocephala Lüihe, 1910 sensu lato species from African rodents. Afrojoyeuxia gen. n., proposed for A. gundii (Joyeux, 1923) comb. n. from Ctenodactylus gundi (Rothmann) (Hystricomorpha: Ctenodactylidae), is characterized by a high length/width ratio of mature proglottids, longitudinally extensive testicular field positioned anterior to the female glands, an ovoid or subspherical cirrus-sac and a thick, conical cirrus. Hunkeleriella gen. n., proposed for H. dasymidis (Hunkeler, 1972) comb. n. from Dasymys incomtus (Sundevall) (Myomorpha: Muridae), differs from related genera mainly by its short (10-20 mm) and wide strobila and neck, unilateral genital pores (exceptionally with a few changes per strobila), the position of the genital pores (slightly anterior to the middle of proglottid margin) and initially tube-like early uterus (later reticulated). Parandrya Gulyaev et Chechulin, 1996, earlier suggested to be a junior synonym of Paranoplocephala, is considered to be a valid, independent genus. Evidence of non-monophyly and need for a taxonomic revision of Paranoplocephala sensu lato, as well as the phylogenetic position of A. gundii and H. dasymidis are discussed.

  9. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC (collectively...

  10. Safety Assurance in NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HarrisonFleming, Cody; Spencer, Melissa; Leveson, Nancy; Wilkinson, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The generation of minimum operational, safety, performance, and interoperability requirements is an important aspect of safely integrating new NextGen components into the Communication Navigation Surveillance and Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) system. These requirements are used as part of the implementation and approval processes. In addition, they provide guidance to determine the levels of design assurance and performance that are needed for each element of the new NextGen procedures, including aircraft, operator, and Air Navigation and Service Provider. Using the enhanced Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness for InTrail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) as an example, this report describes some limitations of the current process used for generating safety requirements and levels of required design assurance. An alternative process is described, as well as the argument for why the alternative can generate more comprehensive requirements and greater safety assurance than the current approach.

  11. GenCade: Introduction, Background, and Formulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-07

    Draft, ft Wood Wood chips Flour Other US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® GenCade Matagorda Ship Channel, TX CMS Shark River Inlet...morphology change Habitat Change • Regional Sediment Management • Beach fills • Inlet bypassing • Channel maintenance • Unifying technology for...to SLR • Habitat evolution (Piping Plover; vegetation) Project Planning & Design 13th Annual CIRP Technology-Transfer Workshop, March 7, 2012 7

  12. JPDO Portfolio Analysis of NextGen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    consideration of environmental issues MITRE Fleet Forecast + new aircraft (Continuous Low Emissions Energy and Noise (CLEEN) MITRE Fleet Forecast...measures and monetizes the impacts of local air quality, climate change and noise levels near major airports and compares a NextGen scenario to a baseline...assumptions seem to be consistent with existing practices for defining new Area Navigation ( RNAV )/RNP and CDA procedures today. Note that this approach

  13. GEN3D Ver. 1.37

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-04

    GEN3D is a three-dimensional mesh generation program. The three-dimensional mesh is generated by mapping a two-dimensional mesh into threedimensions according to one of four types of transformations: translating, rotating, mapping onto a spherical surface, and mapping onto a cylindrical surface. The generated three-dimensional mesh can then be reoriented by offsetting, reflecting about an axis, and revolving about an axis. GEN3D can be used to mesh geometries that are axisymmetric or planar, but, due to three-dimensional loading or boundary conditions, require a three-dimensional finite element mesh and analysis. More importantly, it can be used to mesh complex three-dimensional geometries composed of several sections when the sections can be defined in terms of transformations of two dimensional geometries. The code GJOIN is then used to join the separate sections into a single body. GEN3D reads and writes twodimensional and threedimensional mesh databases in the GENESIS database format; therefore, it is compatible with the preprocessing, postprocessing, and analysis codes used by the Engineering Analysis Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  14. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  15. Fabrication of stable and regenerable amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MnFe2O4@SiO2-NH2) as a potential material for Pt(IV) recovery from acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, D Harikishore Kumar; Wei, Wei; Lin, Shuo; Song, Myung-Hee; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2017-03-08

    MnFe2O4@SiO2-NH2 magnetic nanocomposite (AFMNC) adsorbent with a particle size of ~50 nm was successfully synthesized using a facile approach. The as-prepared composite particles showed a fast binding of Pt(IV) with easy magnetic solid-liquid separation. The kinetic data were fitted to both pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order rate models, indicating that AFMNC exhibited a much higher rate of Pt(IV) binding (0.125 g mg-1 min-1) compared with commercial ion exchange resin Amberjet 4200 (0.0002 g mg-1 min-1). The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model with a relatively high sorption capacity of 380 mg/g. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis demonstrated the presence of platinum chloride after sorption on AFMNC, suggesting an adsorbate-adsorbent anion-exchange interaction. In addition, due to its magnetic characteristics, AFMNC can be easily separated from the aqueous medium after sorption process. The novel nanocomposite (AFMNC) may facilitate recovery of Pt(IV) from waste solutions.

  16. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  17. Improving IV-A/IV-D Interface. Trainer Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Child Support Enforcement, Chevy Chase, MD.

    Effective interface between the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (IV-A) and the Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs is a key factor in assisting families in becoming self-sufficient, reducing welfare expenditures, and enforcing parental responsibility to support their children. Consequently, overcoming the procedural, technological,…

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  19. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  20. Generic classification of the Archiborborinae (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae), with a revision of Antrops Enderlein, Coloantrops gen. nov., Maculantrops gen. nov., Photoantrops gen. nov., and Poecilantrops gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Kits, Joel H; Marshall, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    The Archiborborinae comprise a diverse clade of flies in the family Sphaeroceridae. We here revise the generic classification, redefining the genus Antrops Enderlein and naming 5 new genera: Boreantrops gen. nov., Coloantrops gen. nov., Maculantrops gen. nov., Photoantrops gen. nov., and Poecilantrops gen. nov. The genus Archiborborus, until recently a paraphyletic assemblage including most of the described species in the subfamily, is treated as a junior synonym of Antrops (syn. nov.) We revise the genera Antrops (53 species, including 40 sp. nov.: Antrops anovariegatus, Antrops aurantifemur, Antrops baeza, Antrops bellavista, Antrops biflavus, Antrops bucki, Antrops carpishensis, Antrops cochabamba, Antrops cochinoca, Antrops coniobaptos, Antrops coroico, Antrops cotopaxi, Antrops didactylos, Antrops diversipennis, Antrops eurus, Antrops fulgiceps, Antrops fuliginosus, Antrops guandera, Antrops guaramacalensis, Antrops inca, Antrops juninensis, Antrops mucarensis, Antrops niger, Antrops papallacta, Antrops pecki, Antrops podocarpus, Antrops quadrilobus, Antrops siberia, Antrops sierrazulensis, Antrops tachira, Antrops tequendama, Antrops tetrastichus, Antrops tumbrensis, Antrops unduavi, Antrops variegatus, Antrops versabilis, Antrops vittatus, Antrops yungas, and Antrops zongo and the following comb. nov.: Antrops annulatus (Richards), Antrops chaetosus (Richards), Antrops femoralis (Blanchard), Antrops hirtus (Bigot), Antrops maculipennis (Duda), Antrops maximus (Richards), Antrops microphthalmus (Richards), Antrops quadrinotus (Bigot), Antrops setosus (Duda), Antrops simplicimanus (Richards), Antrops nitidicollis (Becker), and Antrops orbitalis (Duda)), Coloantrops (1 species: Coloantrops daedalus, sp. nov.), Maculantrops (2 species, Maculantrops hirtipes (Macquart) comb. nov. and Maculantrops altiplanus, sp. nov.), Photoantrops (1 species: Pho-toantrops echinus sp. nov.), and Poecilantrops (10 species: Poecilantrops baorucensis, Poecilantrops boraceiensis

  1. High Tc ferrimagnetic organic-inorganic hybrid materials with MnII-L-MnII and MnII-NC-NbIV linkages (L=pyrazine, pyrazine-N,N'-dioxide, bipyrimidine).

    PubMed

    Podgajny, Robert; Pinkowicz, Dawid; Korzeniak, Tomasz; Nitek, Wojciech; Rams, Michał; Sieklucka, Barbara

    2007-11-26

    A series of heterobimetallic, cyano-bridged 3D inorganic-organic hybrid networks with MnII-L-MnII and MnII-NC-NbIV linkages are reported. Reaction of [Mn(H2O)6]2+ with [Nb(CN)8]4- in the presence of organic linker L (pyrazine (pyz), pyrazine-N,N'-dioxide (pzdo), and 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpym)) in H2O affords {MnII2(pz)2(H2O)4[NbIV(CN)8]}.pz.3H2O (1), {MnII2(pzdo)(H2O)4[NbIV(CN)8]}.5H2O (2), and {MnII2(bpym)(H2O)2[NbIV(CN)8]} (3), respectively. 1-3 were examined by X-ray crystallography and vibrational and magnetochemical studies. 1 is characterized by the coexistence of 3D inorganic cyano-bridged and 1D organic [Mn-(micro-pyz)]n2n+ sublattices along with the presence of monocoordinated and crystallization molecules of pyrazine. Assemblies 2 and 3 exhibit dimeric {MnII2-(micro-L)}4+ coordination motifs. The magnetic behavior of heterobimetallic 1-3 complexes is dominated by antiferromagnetic coupling between MnII and NbIV centers mediated by cyano bridges, resulting in long-range ferrimagnetic ordering with a high TC of 27 (1), 37 (2), and 50 K (3). The magneto-structural correlation leads to the conclusion that the magnitude of TC is related to the type of coordination polyhedra of [Nb(CN)8] moieties (SAPR (1), intermediate between SAPR and DD (2), and DD (3)), the relative number of cyano bridges per Mn2Nb unit, and coexistence of inorganic and organic connectivity. FC/ZFC responses appear to be sensitive to the degree of organic connectivity. The discussion of magneto-structural correlation is based on the spin-density properties of adequate heterobimetallic systems containing octacyanometalates.

  2. Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P E; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M J

    2008-11-10

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermochemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenge are not insurmountable and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  3. An Gen2 Based Security Authentication Protocol for RFID System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoluo; Wang, Liangmin; Mao, Dongmei; Zhan, Yongzhao

    EPC Class-1 Generation-2 specification(Gen2 in brief) has been accepted as the standard for RFID tags under grant number ISO18000-6C. However, Gen2 does not pay due attention to security. For this reason, a Gen2 based security authentication protocol is developed in this paper. In details, we study the security requirements presented in the current Gen2 based RFID authentication protocols[7-13]. Then we point out the security flaws of Chien's mutual authentication protocol[7], and improve the protocol based on a 11 security requirements. Our improved protocol merely uses CRC and PRNG operations supported by Gen2 and meets the 11 security requirements. In contrast to the similar work [14,15] on Chien's protocol or other Gen2 based schemes, our protocol is more secure and our security analysis is much more comprehensive and qualitative.

  4. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  5. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  6. Nuclear Geoplosics Sourcebook. Volume IV. Part II. Empirical Analysis of Nuclear and High-Explosive Cratering and Ejecta

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    IV-3-108 IV-3.54 Geologic cross section of the Sierra Madera Caldera showing the ring depression around the central uplift .. IV-3-109 IV...the central mound was shown to be composed of folded material and not fallback. DISTANT PLAIN 6 exhibited a central mound and showed an uplifted ...Sierra Madera meteor impact crater in Texas (Reference IV-3.71). The Sierra Madera calculation was performed by assuming that the impact corresponded to

  7. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju; Yang, Li

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M =Sn or Ge, X =Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS2 and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique ``puckered'' C2v symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  8. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, Christopher R.; McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-12-30

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric

  9. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barsoum, Michel; Bentzel, Grady; Tallman, Darin J.; Sindelar, Robert; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda; Hoffman, Elizabeth

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na, the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  10. A high-precision rule-based extraction system for expanding geospatial metadata in GenBank records

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher, Davy; Rivera, Robert; Beard, Rachel; Firago, Mari; Wallstrom, Garrick; Scotch, Matthew; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Objective The metadata reflecting the location of the infected host (LOIH) of virus sequences in GenBank often lacks specificity. This work seeks to enhance this metadata by extracting more specific geographic information from related full-text articles and mapping them to their latitude/longitudes using knowledge derived from external geographical databases. Materials and Methods We developed a rule-based information extraction framework for linking GenBank records to the latitude/longitudes of the LOIH. Our system first extracts existing geospatial metadata from GenBank records and attempts to improve it by seeking additional, relevant geographic information from text and tables in related full-text PubMed Central articles. The final extracted locations of the records, based on data assimilated from these sources, are then disambiguated and mapped to their respective geo-coordinates. We evaluated our approach on a manually annotated dataset comprising of 5728 GenBank records for the influenza A virus. Results We found the precision, recall, and f-measure of our system for linking GenBank records to the latitude/longitudes of their LOIH to be 0.832, 0.967, and 0.894, respectively. Discussion Our system had a high level of accuracy for linking GenBank records to the geo-coordinates of the LOIH. However, it can be further improved by expanding our database of geospatial data, incorporating spell correction, and enhancing the rules used for extraction. Conclusion Our system performs reasonably well for linking GenBank records for the influenza A virus to the geo-coordinates of their LOIH based on record metadata and information extracted from related full-text articles. PMID:26911818

  11. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  12. Back to the FutureGen?

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-04-15

    After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  13. STUDIES IN METABOLIC SPECTRA IV.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lorraine; Snell, J. F.

    1962-01-01

    Cheng, Lorraine (Radiobiochemistry Department, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Maywood, N. J.) and J. F. Snell. Studies in metabolic spectra. IV. Effects of tetracyclines, some of their derivatives, and chloramphenicol on accumulation of glutamic acid in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:711–719. 1962.—Escherichia coli strain 21 was incubated in the Warburg apparatus at 37 C with sodium acetate-2-C14 and 0.1 μmole/ml of various test compounds. Up to 1 hr, de novo C14-glutamic acid (synthesized from the C14-acetate precursor) accumulation in the fermentation broth was found to be a common phenomenon for the control cells and cells treated with oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol. Subsequently, C14-glutamic acid continued to accumulate in the broth of the inhibited cells, but began to disappear from the broth of the control cells. During the first half hour, the rate of accumulation was most rapid in the presence of oxytetracycline. At 3 hr the total de nova C14-glutamic acid was found to be the same whether cells were treated with oxytetracycline or not. However, the distribution of this glutamic acid was different. In the oxytetracycline-treated cells, more than 87% of the total de nova C14-glutamic acid was in the broth, and only 13% was incorporated into the cell residue. In the control cells, no C14-glutamic acid was found in the broth, although 67% was in the cell residue. The possibility that the tetracyclines and chloramphenicol have different modes of action, and that oxytetracycline inhibits the incorporation of d-glutamic acid into the cell wall and membrane material in E. coli 21, was discussed. PMID:13878663

  14. Towards an International Culture: Gen Y Students and SNS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a small-scale investigation into the Internet user behaviour of generation Y (Gen Y) students, with particular reference to social networking sites. The study adds to the literature on cross-cultural Internet user behaviour with specific reference to Gen Y and social networking. It compares how a cohort of…

  15. Towards an International Culture: Gen Y Students and SNS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a small-scale investigation into the Internet user behaviour of generation Y (Gen Y) students, with particular reference to social networking sites. The study adds to the literature on cross-cultural Internet user behaviour with specific reference to Gen Y and social networking. It compares how a cohort of…

  16. The Integrated Airport: Building a Successful NextGen Testbed

    ScienceCinema

    Frederick-Recascino, Christina [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, United States; Sweigard, Doug [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Lester, Wade [ERAU

    2016-07-12

    This presentation will describe a unique public-private partnership - the Integrated Airport - that was created to engage in research and testing related to NextGen Technology deployment.  NextGen refers to the program that will be initiated to modernize the US National Airspace.  As with any major, multi-decade initiative, such as NextGen, integration of work efforts by multiple partners in the modernization is critical for success.  This talk will focus on the development of the consortium, how the consortium plans for NextGen initiatives, the series of technology demonstrations we have produced and plans for the future of NextGen testing and implementation. 

  17. The Integrated Airport: Building a Successful NextGen Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick-Recascino, Christina; Sweigard, Doug; Lester, Wade

    2009-02-18

    This presentation will describe a unique public-private partnership - the Integrated Airport - that was created to engage in research and testing related to NextGen Technology deployment.  NextGen refers to the program that will be initiated to modernize the US National Airspace.  As with any major, multi-decade initiative, such as NextGen, integration of work efforts by multiple partners in the modernization is critical for success.  This talk will focus on the development of the consortium, how the consortium plans for NextGen initiatives, the series of technology demonstrations we have produced and plans for the future of NextGen testing and implementation. 

  18. Proposal for two new genera, Brevibacillus gen. nov. and Aneurinibacillus gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Shida, O; Takagi, H; Kadowaki, K; Komagata, K

    1996-10-01

    16S rRNA gene sequences of the type strains of 11 species belonging to the Bacillus brevis and Bacillus aneurinolyticus groups were determined. On the basis of the results of gene sequence analyses, these species were separated into two clusters. The B. brevis cluster included 10 species, namely, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus agri, Bacillus centrosporus, Bacillus choshinensis, Bacillus parabrevis, Bacillus reuszeri, Bacillus formosus, Bacillus borstelensis, Bacillus laterosporus, and Bacillus thermoruber. Bacillus aneurinolyticus and Bacillus migulanus belonged to the B. aneurinolyticus cluster. Moreover, the two clusters were phylogenetically distinct from other Bacillus, Amphibacillus, Sporolactobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Alicyclobacillus species. On the basis of our data, we propose reclassification of the B. brevis cluster as Brevibacillus gen. nov. and reclassification of the B. aneurinolyticus cluster as Aneurinibacillus gen. nov. By using 16S rRNA gene sequence alignments, two specific PCR amplification primers were designed for differentiating the two new genera from each other and from other aerobic, endospore-forming organisms.

  19. NextGen Future Safety Assessment Game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancel, Ersin; Gheorghe, Adian; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The successful implementation of the next generation infrastructure systems requires solid understanding of their technical, social, political and economic aspects along with their interactions. The lack of historical data that relate to the long-term planning of complex systems introduces unique challenges for decision makers and involved stakeholders which in turn result in unsustainable systems. Also, the need to understand the infrastructure at the societal level and capture the interaction between multiple stakeholders becomes important. This paper proposes a methodology in order to develop a holistic approach aiming to provide an alternative subject-matter expert (SME) elicitation and data collection method for future sociotechnical systems. The methodology is adapted to Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) decision making environment in order to demonstrate the benefits of this holistic approach.

  20. NextGen Future Safety Assessment Game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancel, Ersin; Gheorghe, Adrian; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2011-01-01

    The successful implementation of the next generation infrastructure systems requires solid understanding of their technical, social, political and economic aspects along with their interactions. The lack of historical data that relate to the long-term planning of complex systems introduces unique challenges for decision makers and involved stakeholders which in turn result in unsustainable systems. Also, the need to understand the infrastructure at the societal level and capture the interaction between multiple stakeholders becomes important. This paper proposes a methodology in order to develop a holistic approach aiming to provide an alternative subject-matter expert (SME) elicitation and data collection method for future sociotechnical systems. The methodology is adapted to Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) decision making environment in order to demonstrate the benefits of this holistic approach.

  1. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  2. FinEstBeaMS - A wide-range Finnish-Estonian Beamline for Materials Science at the 1.5 GeV storage ring at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pärna, R.; Sankari, R.; Kukk, E.; Nõmmiste, E.; Valden, M.; Lastusaari, M.; Kooser, K.; Kokko, K.; Hirsimäki, M.; Urpelainen, S.; Turunen, P.; Kivimäki, A.; Pankratov, V.; Reisberg, L.; Hennies, F.; Tarawneh, H.; Nyholm, R.; Huttula, M.

    2017-07-01

    The FinEstBeaMS beamline is under construction at the 1.5 GeV storage ring of the MAX IV Laboratory at Lund, Sweden. It has been designed to cover an unusually wide energy range from ultraviolet (4.3 eV) to soft X-rays (1000 eV) but experiments will also be possible at the Mg and Al Kα energies. Instead of having two different insertion devices and optical schemes for low and high photon energy regions, we have based our design on a single long-period, elliptically polarizing undulator and a plane grating monochromator. This solution will provide very good conditions for planned experiments in the whole photon energy region. The beamline will have two branches: one will mainly be used to investigate free atoms, molecules and clusters with photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy as well as solids with photoluminescence spectroscopy whereas the other one will be dedicated to ultra-high vacuum studies of surfaces and interfaces, utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This paper focuses on the optical design of the beamline and general design concepts of the gas phase and solid state end stations.

  3. Formation and characterization of high surface area thermally stabilized titania/silica composite materials via hydrolysis of titanium(IV) tetra-isopropoxide in sols of spherical silica particles.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Kamal M S; Elsamahy, Ahmed A; Elanany, Mohamed S

    2002-05-15

    A direct synthetic route leading to titania particles dispersed on nonporous spherical silica particles has been investigated; 5, 10, and 20% (w/w) titania/silica sols mixtures were achieved via hydrolyzation of titanium tetra-isopropxide solution in the mother liquor of a freshly prepared sol of spherical silica particles (Stöber particles). Titania/silica materials were produced by subsequent drying and calcination of the xerogels so obtained for 3 h at 400 and 600 degrees C. The materials were investigated by means of thermal analyses (TGA and DSC), FT-IR, N(2) gas adsorption-desorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In spite of the low surface area (13.1 m(2)/g) of the pure spherical silica particles calcined at 400 degrees C, high surface area and mesoporous texture titania/silica materials were obtained (e.g., S(BET) ca. 293 m(2)/g for the 10% titania/silica calcined at 400 degrees C). Moreover, the materials were shown to be amorphous toward XRD up to 600 degrees C, while reasonable surface areas were preserved. It has been concluded that dispersion of titania particles onto the surface of the nonporous spherical silica particles increase their roughness, therefore leading to composite materials of less firm packing and mesoporosity.

  4. The haemosporidian parasites of bats with description of Sprattiella alecto gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Landau, I; Chavatte, J M; Karadjian, G; Chabaud, A; Beveridge, I

    2012-05-01

    Four species of Haemoproteidae were found in Pteropus alecto Temminck, 1837 in Queensland, Australia: i) Johnsprentia copemani, Landau et al., 2012; ii) Sprattiella alecto gen. nov., sp. nov., characterised by schizonts in the renal vessels; iii) Hepatocystis levinei, Landau et al., 1985, originally described from Pteropus poliocephalus Temminck, 1825 and, experimentally from Culicoides nubeculosus and found in this new host and for which features of the hepatic schizonts are reported; iv) gametocytes of Hepatocystis sp. which are illustrated but cannot be assigned to a known species. A tentative interpretation of phylogenetic characters of haemosporidians of bats is provided from the morphology of the gametocytes and localisation of the tissue stages with respect to recent data on the phylogeny of bats.

  5. Life cycle of Schizochytriodinium calani nov. gen. nov. spec., a dinoflagellate parasitizing copepod eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbrächter, Malte

    1988-09-01

    During the Polarstern-cruise ARK IV/2 June 1987, in the Fram Strait, dinophytes parasitizing copepod eggs were observed. In the laboratory on board, vegetative reproduction was documented and re-infection of Calanus glacialis and C. hyperboreus eggs was experimentally established. During food uptake, a primary cyst produces successively several secondary cysts, all separating immediately after formation from the primary cyst. In every one of these free floating secondary cysts up to 256 dinospores are formed by palintomy. Re-infection only occurred after a “maturation time” of at least 2 days after formation of the dinospores. The life cycle is compared to that of other similar parasitic dinophyte genera: Apodinium Chatton, Chytriodinium Chatton, Dissodinium Klebs in Pascher and Myxodinium Cachon, Cachon & Bouquaheux. As the taxon under discussion does not fit in with any species or genus known so far, it is described as Schizochytriodinium calani nov. gen. nov. spec.

  6. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  7. Head-Worn Displays for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Arthur, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The operating concepts emerging under the Next Generation air transportation system (NextGen) require new technology and procedures - not only on the ground-side - but also on the flight deck. Flight deck display and decision support technologies are specifically targeted to overcome aircraft safety barriers that might otherwise constrain the full realization of NextGen. One such technology is the very lightweight, unobtrusive head-worn display (HWD). HWDs with an integrated head-tracking system are being researched as they offer significant potential benefit under emerging NextGen operational concepts. Two areas of benefit for NextGen are defined. First, the HWD may be designed to be equivalent to the Head-Up Display (HUD) using Virtual HUD concepts. As such, these operational credits may be provided to significantly more aircraft for which HUD installation is neither practical nor possible. Second, the HWD provides unique display capabilities, such as an unlimited field-of-regard. These capabilities may be integral to emerging NextGen operational concepts, eliminating safety issues which might otherwise constrain the full realization of NextGen. The paper details recent research results, current HWD technology limitations, and future technology development needed to realize HWDs as a enabling technology for NextGen.

  8. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part IV. Relevance of materials standards to problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.R.; Schutte, W.C.

    1981-02-01

    The insulation industry is essentially self-regulated; therefore, the question arises as to whether or not increased public regulation would be effective in controlling problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam as residential insulation. The relevancy of public regulation to controlling problems such as off-gassing of formaldehyde associated with the use of the products through the introduction of materials standards and quality assurance of manufacture and installation is discussed. The use of urea-formaldehyde insulation may be divided into three phases-manufacture, installation, and behavioral phases. The relevance of materials standards and quality assurance for each phase is discussed.

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    PubMed Central

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale–fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed. PMID:21208975

  10. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    PubMed

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  11. The MAX IV imaging concept.

    PubMed

    Matěj, Zdeněk; Mokso, Rajmund; Larsson, Krister; Hardion, Vincent; Spruce, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The MAX IV Laboratory is currently the synchrotron X-ray source with the beam of highest brilliance. Four imaging beamlines are in construction or in the project phase. Their common characteristic will be the high acquisition rates of phase-enhanced images. This high data flow will be managed at the local computing cluster jointly with the Swedish National Computing Infrastructure. A common image reconstruction and analysis platform is being designed to offer reliable quantification of the multidimensional images acquired at all the imaging beamlines at MAX IV.

  12. Total System Performance Assessment: Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    SciTech Connect

    P.D. Mattie

    1999-06-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to document total system performance assessment modeling of Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) Feature IV. Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations for EDA IV are based on the TSPA-VA Base Case which has been modified with a quartz sand invert, quartz sand backfill, line loading and 21 PWR waste packages that have 2-cm thick titanium grade 7 corrosion resistant material (CRM) drip shields that are placed over a 30 cm thick carbon steel (A5 16) waste package with an integral filler material (CRWMS M&O 1999a & 1999b). This document details the changes and assumptions made to the VA reference Performance Assessment Model (CRWMS M&O 1998a) to incorporate the design changes detailed for EDA IV. The performance measure for this evaluation is the expected value dose-rate history at 20 km from the repository boundary.

  13. The spatial organization of Descemet's membrane-associated type IV collagen in the avian cornea

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The organization of type IV collagen in the unconventional basement membrane of the corneal endothelium (Descemet's membrane) was investigated in developing chicken embryos using anti-collagen mAbs. Both immunofluorescence histochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were performed. In mature embryos (greater than 15 d of development), the type IV collagen of Descemet's membrane was present as an array of discrete aggregates of amorphous material at the interface between Descemet's membrane and the posterior corneal stroma. Immunoreactivity for type IV collagen was also observed in the posterior corneal stroma as irregular plaques of material with a morphology similar to that of the Descemet's membrane-associated aggregates. This arrangement of Descemet's membrane-associated type IV collagen developed from a subendothelial mat of type IV collagen-containing material. This mat, in which type IV collagen-specific immunoreactivity was always discontinuous, first appeared at the time a confluent endothelium was established, well before the onset of Descemet's membrane formation. Immunoelectron microscopy of mature corneas revealed that the characteristic nodal matrix of Descemet's membrane itself was unreactive for type IV collagen, but was penetrated at intervals by projections of type IV collagen-containing material. These projections frequently appeared to contact cell processes from the underlying corneal endothelium. This spatial arrangement of type IV collagen suggests that it serves to suture the corneal endothelium/Descemet's membrane to the dense interfacial matrix of the posterior stroma. PMID:2182654

  14. Contribution of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) Collagen IV to the Mechanical Properties of the Glomerular Basement Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a vital part of the blood-urine filtration barrier in the kidneys. In healthy GBMs, the main tension-resisting component is alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) type IV collagen, but in some diseases it is replaced by other collagen IV isoforms. As a result, the GBM becomes leaky and disorganized, ultimately resulting in kidney failure. Our goal is to understanding the biomechanical aspects of the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains and how their absence could be responsible for (1) the initial injury to the GBM and (2) progression to kidney failure. A combination of experiments and computational models were designed for that purpose. A model basement membrane was used to compare experimentally the distensibility of tissues with the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains present and missing. The experiments showed basement membranes containing alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains were less distensible. It has been postulated that the higher level of lateral cross-linking (supercoiling) in the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks contributes additional strength/stability to basement membranes. In a computational model of supercoiled networks, we found that supercoiling greatly increased the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreased the permeability, which is well suited for the needs of the GBM. It is also known that the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks are more protected from enzymatic degradation, and we explored their significance in GBM remodeling. Our simulations showed that the more protected network was needed to prevent the system from entering a dangerous feedback cycle due to autoregulation mechanisms in the kidneys. Overall, the work adds to the evidence of biomechanical differences between the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks and other collagen IV networks, points to supercoiling as the main source of biomechanical differences, discusses the suitability of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV

  15. AtGEN1 and AtSEND1, two paralogs in Arabidopsis, possess holliday junction resolvase activity.

    PubMed

    Bauknecht, Markus; Kobbe, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are physical links between homologous DNA molecules that arise as central intermediary structures during homologous recombination and repair in meiotic and somatic cells. It is necessary for these structures to be resolved to ensure correct chromosome segregation and other functions. In eukaryotes, including plants, homologs of a gene called XPG-like endonuclease1 (GEN1) have been identified that process HJs in a manner analogous to the HJ resolvases of phages, archaea, and bacteria. Here, we report that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a eukaryotic organism, has two functional GEN1 homologs instead of one. Like all known eukaryotic resolvases, AtGEN1 and Arabidopsis single-strand DNA endonuclease1 both belong to class IV of the Rad2/XPG family of nucleases. Their resolvase activity shares the characteristics of the Escherichia coli radiation and UV sensitive C paradigm for resolvases, which involves resolving HJs by symmetrically oriented incisions in two opposing strands. This leads to ligatable products without the need for further processing. The observation that the sequence context influences the cleavage by the enzymes can be interpreted as a hint for the existence of sequence specificity. The two Arabidopsis paralogs differ in their preferred sequences. The precise cleavage positions observed for the resolution of mobile nicked HJs suggest that these cleavage positions are determined by both the substrate structure and the sequence context at the junction point. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Taxonomy of the Proisotoma complex. V. Sexually dimorphic Ephemerotoma gen. nov. (Collembola: Isotomidae).

    PubMed

    Potapov, Mikhail; Kahrarian, Morteza; Deharveng, Louis; Shayanmehr, Masoumeh

    2015-12-03

    A new genus is proposed based on a new species from Iran, Ephemerotoma skarzynskii gen. et sp. nov., and three known species: E. huadongensis (Chen, 1985) comb. nov., E. multituberculata (Martynova, 1971) comb. nov. and E. porcella (Ellis, 1976) comb. nov. The genus shares the characters of Subisotoma Stach and Proctostephanus Börner and is distributed in southern areas of Eurasia (Eastern Mediterranean, Iran, Tajikistan, China). Ephemerotoma gen. nov. belongs to the Proisotoma-complex and is characterized by a simple maxillary palp, only 4 guards on labial papilla E and 2 prelabral chaetae. Four s-chaetae on Abd.V are arranged in two rows, two anterior and two posterior chaetae. All members of Ephemerotoma gen. nov. are redescribed or discussed based on type or fresh material, and a key to species of the genus is given. Scutisotoma potapovi Xie & Chen, 2008 is considered a synonym of E. huadongensis, while Proisotoma anopolitana is moved to the genus Proctostephanus. Sexual dimorphism is described for three species.

  17. 76 FR 22162 - Third Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Recommendations to be Considered for Submission to FAA, NextGen Performance Metrics. Preliminary Reports on Key NextGen Performance Indicators. NextGen Measurement Methodology. Review Recommendations to be... Federal Aviation Administration Third Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal...

  18. Impact of material thicknesses on fission observables obtained with the FALSTAFF experimental setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thulliez, L.; Doré, D.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Legou, P.; Kebbiri, M.; Piret, Y.; Mols, J. P.; Combet, M.; Riallot, M.; Marcel, A.; Farget, F.; Pancin, J.; Frégeau, M. O.; Ledoux, X.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Goupillère, D.; Oberstedt, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the past years, the fission studies have been mainly focused on thermal fission because most of the current nuclear reactors work in this energy domain. With the development of GEN-IV reactor concepts, mainly working in the fast energy domain, new nuclear data are needed. The FALSTAFF spectrometer under development at CEA-Saclay, France, is a two-arm spectrometer which will provide mass yields before (2V method) and after (EV method) neutron evaporation and consequently will have access to the neutron multiplicity as a function of mass. The axial ionization chamber, in addition to the kinetic energy value, will measure the energy loss profile of the fragment along its track. This energy loss profile will give information about the fragment nuclear charge. This paper will focus on recent developments on the FALSTAFF design. A special attention will be paid to the impact of the detector material thickness on the uncertainty of different observables.

  19. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians;…

  20. The PLATO IV Communications System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based educational system contains its own communications hardware and software for operating plasma-panel graphics terminals. Key echoing is performed by the central processing unit: every key pressed at a terminal passes through the entire system before anything appears on the terminal's screen. Each terminal is guaranteed…

  1. Radiation Monitor,IV-TEPC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-30

    View of radiation monitor,Intra-Vehicular Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (IV-TEPC),relocated to NOD2 P3,Part Number (P/N): SEG33120960-301,Serial Number (S/N): 1002,in the Node 2. Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  2. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  3. EPCGen2 Pseudorandom Number Generators: Analysis of J3Gen

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Alberto; Munilla, Jorge; Fúster-Sabater, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cryptographic security of J3Gen, a promising pseudo random number generator for low-cost passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags. Although J3Gen has been shown to fulfill the randomness criteria set by the EPCglobal Gen2 standard and is intended for security applications, we describe here two cryptanalytic attacks that question its security claims: (i) a probabilistic attack based on solving linear equation systems; and (ii) a deterministic attack based on the decimation of the output sequence. Numerical results, supported by simulations, show that for the specific recommended values of the configurable parameters, a low number of intercepted output bits are enough to break J3Gen. We then make some recommendations that address these issues. PMID:24721767

  4. 98. SWITCH HOUSE MAIN LOBBY, GEN 3 CIRCUIT BREAKER, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. SWITCH HOUSE MAIN LOBBY, GEN 3 CIRCUIT BREAKER, VIEW OF OPPOSITE SIDE FROM HAER No. PA-505-97 - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  5. 1. GENERAL VIEW. Statues: Maj. Gen George Meade by Daniel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW. Statues: Maj. Gen George Meade by Daniel Chester French, south side; Maj. Gen. John Reynolds by Charles Grafly, north side. Equestrian Statues: Maj. Gen George B. McClellan by Edward C. Potter, south side; Maj. Gen Winfield S. Hancock by J.Q.A. Ward, north side. The statue at the base of northern inner pedestal is Richard Smith, a type founder and donor of the Memorial. The niches are filled with eight colossal busts including Union generals, admirals, Pennsylvania governor, Memorial's architects (John T. and James H. Windrim), and executor of Smith's will. The frieze is carved with the names of eighty-four prominent Pennsylvania participants in the Civil War. - Smith Memorial Arch, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. New sequestrate fungi from Guyana: Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. (Boletaceae, Boletales).

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew E; Amses, Kevin R; Elliott, Todd F; Obase, Keisuke; Aime, M Catherine; Henkel, Terry W

    2015-12-01

    Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. are described as new to science. These sequestrate, hypogeous fungi were collected in Guyana under closed canopy tropical forests in association with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) host tree genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae), Aldina (Fabaceae subfam. Papilionoideae), and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Molecular data place these fungi in Boletaceae (Boletales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) and inform their relationships to other known epigeous and sequestrate taxa within that family. Macro- and micromorphological characters, habitat, and multi-locus DNA sequence data are provided for each new taxon. Unique morphological features and a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 185 taxa across the order Boletales justify the recognition of the three new genera.

  7. Selective solid-phase extraction of trace thorium(IV) using surface-grafted Th(IV)-imprinted polymers with pyrazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Lin, Canrong; Wang, Hongqing; Wang, Yuyuan; Cheng, Zhiqiang

    2010-04-15

    A new pyrazole derivative 1-phenyl-3-methylthio-4-cyano-5-acrylicacidcarbamoyl-pyrazole (PMTCAACP) was synthesized and chosen as a complexing monomer for the preparation of surface-grafted ion-imprinted polymers for selective solid-phase extraction of thorium(IV). The silica gel, modified with maleic anhydride, was prepared as a carrier material. In the ion-imprinting process, Th(IV) was complexed with PMTCAACP, and then imprinted in the polymers grafted to the surface of modified silica gel. Subsequently, the template Th(IV) ions were removed with 6 mol/L HCl solution. The obtained ion-imprinted particles for Th(IV) showed specific recognition, and rapid adsorption and desorption kinetics process. The maximum static and total dynamic adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted polymers (IIPs) for Th(IV) was 64.8 and 37.4 mg/g, respectively. The relative selectivity coefficient values of the imprinted adsorbent for Th(IV)/U(VI), Th(IV)/Ce(III), Th(IV)/La(III), and Th(IV)/Zr(IV) were 72.9, 89.6, 93.8, and 137.2 times greater than non-imprinted matrix, respectively. The interference effect of common cations tested did not interfere with the recovery of Th(IV). The enhancement factor of 20.2, the detection limit of 0.43 microg/L, and the precision of 2.47% (n=7) of the method under the optimized conditions were obtained. Additionally, the calibration curve (r=0.9993) was linear in the range of 1.43-103 microg/L of thorium(IV). The prepared IIPs were shown to be promising for solid-phase extraction coupled with UV-vis spectrophotometry for determination of trace Th(IV) in real samples.

  8. Skryjelites auritus gen. et sp. nov. and Quasimolites quasimodo gen. et sp. nov.--two new middle Cambrian hyolithids (?Mollusca) from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Valent, Martin; Fatka, Oldřich; Szabad, Michal; Micka, Václav; Marek, Ladislav

    2015-08-28

    Two new endemic genera and species of extinct group of Hyolitha, Skryjelites auritus gen. et sp. nov. and Quasimolites quasimodo gen. et sp. nov. are described and illustrated from the Buchava Formation of the Barrandian area (Czech Republic).

  9. J-Integral characterization of the nozzle steels from intermediate test vessels IV-5 and IV-9

    SciTech Connect

    Auten, T.A.; Macdonald, B.D.; Scavone, D.W.; Bozik, D.

    1994-10-01

    Reported here are the results of elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests performed on low alloy steels from the nozzles of the intermediate test vessels IV-5 and IV-9 from the Heavy Steel Section Technology Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These vessels had been given prototypic nozzle corner flaw tests prior to the development of the ASTM E-813 standard test procedure for J-integral testing. The objective of this work is to provide J-integral material test support for future elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of the nozzles. J-integral tests at 88{degrees}C (190{degrees}F) of the IV-5 nozzle material produced stable ductile tearing. The tearing resistance data are expected to support analysis of the observed similar stable tearing response of the nozzle corner flaw. J-integral tests at 24{degrees}C (75{degrees}F) of the IV-9 nozzle produced elastic-plastic fracture instability preceded by stable tearing. A similar response was observed in the IV-9 nozzle corner flaw test. It will be a major and important challenge to develop a fracture mechanics rationale that reconciles these small specimen and nozzle corner flaw test results. These test results are being made available to allow their use by a wide variety of organizations in developing such a rationale, which would be a significant contribution to quantifying the flaw tolerance of reactor pressure vessels.

  10. SEQ-GEN: A comprehensive multimission sequencing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salcedo, Jose; Starbird, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    SEQ-GEN is a user-interactive computer program used to plan and generate a sequence of commands for spacecraft. Desired activities are specified by the user of SEQ-GEN; SEQ-GEN in turn expands these activities, deriving the spacecraft commands necessary to accomplish the desired activities. SEQ-GEN models the effects on the spacecraft of the commands, predicting the state as a function of time, flagging any conflicts and rule violations. These states, conflicts, and violations are viewable both graphically and textually at the user's request. SEQ-GEN also displays the entire sequence graphically, showing each requested activity as a bar on its graphical timeline. SEQ-GEN immediately revalidates the sequence, updating its models and calculations along with its displays based on these changes. Because it has the ability to recalculate spacecraft states immediately, the user is able to perform 'what-if' sessions easily. SEQ-GEN, a multimission tool, is adaptable to any flight project. A flight project writes its adaptation files containing project unique information including in its simplest form, only spacecraft commands. For more involved projects the adaptation files may also contain flight and mission rules, description of the spacecraft and ground models, and the definition of activities. SEQ-GEN operates at whatever level of detail the adaptation files imply. Simple adaptations are straight forward to do. There is, however, no limit to the complexity of activity definitions or of spacecraft models: both may involve unlimited logical decision points. Commands and activities may involve any number of parameters of a wide variety of data types, including integer, float, time, boolean, and character strings. SEQ-GEN will be used by the Mars Pathfinder, Cassini, and VIM (Voyager Interstellar Mission) project in an effort to speed up adaptation time and to keep sequence generation costs down. SEQ-GEN is hosted on UNIX workstations. It uses MOTIF and X for windowing

  11. A new tardigrade, Mutaparadoxipus duodigifinis gen. nov., sp. nov. (Heterotardigrada: Arthrotardigrada), from the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Gross, Vladimir; Miller, William R; Hochberg, Rick

    2014-07-10

    A new genus and species of Arthrotardigrada is described from Florida, USA based on its unique adhesive pad/claw combinations. Mutaparadoxipus duodigifinis gen. nov., sp. nov., is characterized by well-developed, ventral secondary clavae that are adjacent to the mouth, pointed lateral and caudal alae, seminal receptacles with coiled ducts opening lateral to the gonopore, and all legs with digits bearing proximal adhesive pads. Distal claws are present on digits I-III of legs I-III, but are missing from digit IV. On leg IV, distal claws are present only on digits II & III. A single accessory point is present on claws II & III only. This is the fourth species discovered to date with proximal adhesive pads, increasing support for a clade of adhesive-padded arthrotardigrades, and is likely the sister taxon of Paradoxipus orzeliscoides. The incomplete set of claws may represent an evolutionary step in a progressive loss of claws hypothesized to have occurred within the Halechiniscidae. The subfamily Orzeliscinae is amended as a result.

  12. Taxonomy and phylogeny of Laburnicola gen. nov. and Paramassariosphaeria gen. nov. (Didymosphaeriaceae, Massarineae, Pleosporales).

    PubMed

    Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N; Jones, Evan Benjamin Gareth; Camporesi, Erio; Dissanayake, Asha J; Kamolhan, Sutakorn; Mortimer, Peter E; Xu, Jianchu; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A; Hyde, Kevin D

    2016-11-01

    Laburnicola gen. nov., with four new species, Paramassariosphaeria gen. nov., with a new species and Montagnula saikhuensis sp. nov. are introduced in this paper. The phylogeny of these taxa and genera of Didymosphaeriaceae are resolved based on analysis of combined LSU, SSU, and ITS sequence data. Laburnicola is characterized by obpyriform, immersed ascomata, with a peridium fused to the host tissues, long pedicellate asci and ellipsoidal to fusoid ascospores, whose central cells have longitudinal septa and a rugged surface. Paramassariosphaeria is characterized by globose to subglobose ascomata, papillate ostioles, a peridium comprising pseudoparenchymatous cells of textura angularis, cylindric-clavate to clavate, pedicellate asci and brown, curved-fusoid ascospores, with multiple transverse septa and a mucilaginous sheath. Montagnula saikhuensis has immersed ascomata, with a peridium fused to the host tissues, long pedicellate asci and blackish brown, ellipsoidal ascospores with a single septum. The relationship of these taxa with other Didymosphaeriaceae species is discussed based on comparative morphology and phylogenetic analysis. Munkovalsaria appendiculata and Munkovalsaria donacina are transferred to the genus Montagnula.

  13. Uranium(IV) Complexation by Natural Organic Matter Controls Speciation in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bone, S.; Dynes, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Jones, M. E.; Bargar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Uranium contaminates groundwater at many sites throughout the United States. At the aquifer in Rifle, CO, U(IV) has been found to accumulate in natural organic matter (NOM)-rich sediments comprising buried alluvial material. We expect that NOM, which is composed of detrital plant material and microbial biomass and necromass, profoundly influences the speciation of U(IV). Specifically, we hypothesize that NOM forms stable complexes with U(IV) (i.e., "noncrystalline" U(IV)), particularly through organic phosphorus moieties associated with bacteria and exopolymeric substances (EPS). Complexation with NOM can help to explain why noncrystalline U(IV) is more abundant in the subsurface than the mineral uraninite (UO2). The abundance and relative reactivity of non-crystalline U(IV) suggests that it drives U fate and transport in the subsurface. W are examining the reduction of U(VI) and subsequent complexation of U(IV) in model NOM systems comprising homogenized, partially degraded plant material, which is analogous to the detrital plant material abundant in Rifle sediments, and its associated microbial consortia. We employ a suite of spectroscopic (X-ray absorption spectroscopies) and microscopic (scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry) tools that allow us to identify the number and types of coordinating ligands and the distribution of U with respect to NOM components, including bacterial cells, plant matter and entrained minerals. In preliminary experiments we found that 50 - 100 % of U(VI) was reduced to U(IV) within several days. Furthermore, NOM was observed to sorb both U(VI), as a carbonyl complex, and U(IV), possibly as a phosphoryl complex. Further microscopic analyses are designed to elucidate whether U(IV)-P complexes are associated with bacteria or EPS. Our research suggests a new, more complicated model for U(IV) speciation in subsurface sediments, in which complexation by NOM, as

  14. PHASE I MATERIALS PROPERTY DATABASE DEVELOPMENT FOR ASME CODES AND STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Lin, Lianshan

    2013-01-01

    To support the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes and Standard (BPVC) in modern information era, development of a web-based materials property database is initiated under the supervision of ASME Committee on Materials. To achieve efficiency, the project heavily draws upon experience from development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook and the Nuclear System Materials Handbook. The effort is divided into two phases. Phase I is planned to deliver a materials data file warehouse that offers a depository for various files containing raw data and background information, and Phase II will provide a relational digital database that provides advanced features facilitating digital data processing and management. Population of the database will start with materials property data for nuclear applications and expand to data covering the entire ASME Code and Standards including the piping codes as the database structure is continuously optimized. The ultimate goal of the effort is to establish a sound cyber infrastructure that support ASME Codes and Standards development and maintenance.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS IV does not affect intelligence. The life expectancy of individuals with MPS IV ... qualified healthcare professional . About Selection Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map Customer Support USA.gov ...

  16. Two New Freshwater Woloszynskioids Asulcocephalium miricentonis gen. et sp. nov. and Leiocephalium pseudosanguineum gen. et sp. nov. (Suessiaceae, Dinophyceae) Lacking an Apical Furrow Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Moestrup, Øjvind; Jordan, Richard W; Iwataki, Mitsunori

    2015-12-01

    Two new woloszynskioid dinoflagellates, Asulcocephalium miricentonis gen. et sp. nov. and Leiocephalium pseudosanguineum gen. et sp. nov., are described from Japanese freshwater ponds on the basis of bright field and fluorescence light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and molecular phylogeny inferred from rDNA sequences. Asulcocephalium miricentonis has a spherical anterior nucleus and chloroplast with a pyrenoid penetrated by the cytoplasm. This species has 9-12 latitudinal series of amphiesmal vesicles (AVs), including an apparently large AV on the right ventral side of the epicone. Leiocephalium pseudosanguineum has a U-shaped nucleus in the epicone and chloroplasts without a pyrenoid. This species has at least 24 latitudinal series of AVs. The characteristic features of both species were brick-like material (type E) in the eyespot and the lack of an apical furrow. These features coincide with those of Polarella glacialis, but the two species differ in cell shape, number and arrangement of AVs, shape of resting cysts, and habitats; i.e., P. glacialis has been reported only from marine cold waters. Molecular phylogeny revealed that A. miricentonis and L. pseudosanguineum were positioned in the Suessiaceae and closely related to Piscinoodinium sp., but their relationship to Polarella and other reported taxa was not supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphology and molecular evaluation of Iphinoe spelaeobios gen. nov., sp. nov. and Loriellopsis cavernicola gen. nov., sp. nov., two stigonematalean cyanobacteria from Greek and Spanish caves.

    PubMed

    Lamprinou, V; Hernández-Mariné, M; Canals, T; Kormas, K; Economou-Amilli, A; Pantazidou, A

    2011-12-01

    Caves have generally been found to host phototrophic micro-organisms from various taxonomic groups, with cyanobacteria comprising an important group that have adapted to these stable and highly specific environments. A polyphasic study based on aspects of classical morphology and molecular data revealed two new monospecific genera from fresh material of Greek and Spanish caves. Both taxa are characterized by obligatory true branching (T-type, V-type and false branching), the presence of heterocysts, and reproduction by hormocysts and akinetes. They shared some similarities in their morphological characteristics as revealed by light, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, but phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the two phylotypes were different (89.8% similarity); this represents an example of shared morphology in genetically different strains of cave-adapted species. Phenotypic and genetic traits strongly support classification of the phylotypes as independent taxa in the order Stigonematales (the most differentiated and complicated group of cyanobacteria), family Loriellaceae Geitl 1925. Hence, the names Iphinoe spelaeobios Lamprinou and Pantazidou gen. nov., sp. nov. and Loriellopsis cavernicola Hernández-Mariné and Canals gen. nov., sp. nov. are proposed.

  18. Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases and PHA-producing Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei

    2015-08-01

    This review highlights the recent investigations of class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases, the newest classification of PHA synthases. Class IV synthases are prevalent in organisms of the Bacillus genus and are composed of a catalytic subunit PhaC (approximately 40 kDa), which has a PhaC box sequence ([GS]-X-C-X-[GA]-G) at the active site, and a second subunit PhaR (approximately 20 kDa). The representative PHA-producing Bacillus strains are Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus; the nucleotide sequence of phaC and the genetic organization of the PHA biosynthesis gene locus are somewhat different between these two strains. It is generally considered that class IV synthases favor short-chain-length monomers such as 3-hydroxybutyrate (C4) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (C5) for polymerization, but can polymerize some unusual monomers as minor components. In Escherichia coli expressing PhaRC from B. cereus YB-4, the biosynthesized PHA undergoes synthase-catalyzed alcoholytic cleavage using endogenous and exogenous alcohols. This alcoholysis is thought to be shared among class IV synthases, and this reaction is useful not only for the regulation of PHA molecular weight but also for the modification of the PHA carboxy terminus. The novel properties of class IV synthases will open up the possibility for the design of new PHA materials.

  19. Stage IV-S neuroblastoma. Results with definitive therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.H.; Thomas, P.R.; Perez, C.A.; Vietti, T.J.

    1984-05-15

    The results of management of 14 patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma are reported. The treatment policy, although not consistent over this time span, in general used a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or infrequently one modality alone. Twelve of 14 (86%) survived more than 6 years. One patient, with a solitary mediastinal primary tumor, died of rapidly progressive disease at three months. The other death occurred in a 4.5-year-old presenting with hepatomegaly at diagnosis followed by skeletal dissemination 2.5 years later. Thirteen of the patients were younger than 1 year of age. Of the 11 patients that received radiotherapy, 4 experienced mild asymptomatic scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis at 3 to 12 years after initial therapy. A review of the literature indicates that spontaneous regression in this tumor is very frequent; therefore, it is recommended that for the common presentation of massive hepatomegaly in an infant, close observation is warranted, unless life threatening complications occur. However, initial therapeutic intervention may be indicated in those patients with life threatening presentations. This data did not substantiate the necessity for complete surgical excision of the primary tumor, as has been suggested by others.

  20. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Bio-Gen with biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of class II furcation defects: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    JENABIAN, Niloofar; HAGHANIFAR, Sina; MABOUDI, Avideh; BIJANI, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective Treatment of furcation defects are thought to be challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic parameters of Bio-Gen with Biocollagen compared with Bio-Gen with connective tissue in the treatment of Class II furcation defects. Material and Methods In this clinical trial, 24 patients with Class II furcation defect on a buccal or lingual mandibular molar were recruited. After oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing and achievement of acceptable plaque control, the patients were randomly chosen to receive either connective tissue and Bio-Gen (case group) or Biocollagen and Bio-Gen (control group). The following parameters were recorded before the first and re-entry surgery (six months later): vertical clinical attachment level (VCAL), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), horizontal probing depth (HPD), vertical probing depth (VPD), gingival recession (GR), furcation vertical component (FVC), furcation to alveolar crest (FAC), fornix to base of defect (FBD), and furcation horizontal component (FHC) were calculated at the time of first surgery and during re-entry. A digital periapical radiograph was taken in parallel before first surgery and re-entry. The radiographs were then analyzed by digital subtraction. The differences with p value <0.05 were considered significant. Results Only the mean changes of FAC, FHC, mean of FHC, FBD in re-entry revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups. HPD, VPD, FBD, FAC, and FHC showed statistically significant differences after 6 months in the case group. However, in the control group, statistically significant differences were found in GR and HPD. We did not observe any significant difference in radiographic changes among the two groups. Conclusion The results of this trial indicate that better clinical outcomes can be obtained with connective tissue grafts in combination with bone material compared with a resorbable barrier with bone material

  1. Learning Directory 1970-71. A Comprehensive Guide to Instructional Materials in All Media. Volume I, Users Guide, Source Index, Instructional Materials Index A-Boun; Volume II, Bourq-Dros; Volume III, Drou-Gree; Volume IV, Greg-Mari; Volume V, Mark-Pisc; Volume VI, Pise-Smel; Volume VII, Smer-Z, 0-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., New York, NY.

    Over 200,000 distinct items of instructional material are indexed in this seven volume annual directory. They are presented in 600,000 entries under more than 225,000 different topics. Information in the directory is divided into two sections: the instructional materials index and the source index. The instructional materials index is organized…

  2. Oxovanadium(IV) silsesquioxane complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohde, Christian; Limberg, Christian; Stösser, Reinhard; Demeshko, Serhiy

    2010-03-01

    In the context of a potential modeling of reduced oxovanadium species occurring on the surfaces of silica-supported vanadia catalysts in the course of its turnover, the incompletely condensed silsesquioxane H(3)(c-pentyl)T(7) was reacted with Cl(4)V(THF)(2) (where THF = tetrahydrofuran) in the presence of triethylamine. Precipitation of 3 equiv of HNEt(3)Cl seemed to point to the clean formation of [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(IV)Cl)] (1), which was supported by electron paramagnetic resonance studies performed for the resulting solutions, but further analytical and spectroscopic investigations showed that the processes occurring at that stage are more complex than that and even include the formation of [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(V)O)](2) as a side product. Storage of a red-brown hexane solution of this product mixture reproducibly led to the precipitation of blue crystals belonging to the chloride-free compound [((c-pentyl)T(7))(2)(V(IV)=O)(3)(THF)(2)] (2), as revealed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Performing the same reaction in the presence of 2 equiv of pyridine leads to an analogous product, where the THF ligands are replaced by pyridine. Subsequent investigations showed that the terminal oxo ligands at the vanadium centers are, on the one hand, due to the presence of adventitious water; on the other hand, the [(c-pentyl)T(7)](3-) ligand also acted as a source of O(2-). The results of SQUID measurements performed for 2 can be interpreted in terms of a ferromagnetic coupling between the vanadyl units. Exposing 2 to a dioxygen atmosphere resulted in its immediate oxidation to yield the V(V) complex [((c-pentyl)T(7))(V(V)O)](2), which may model a fast reoxidation reaction of oxovanadium(IV) trimers on silica surfaces.

  3. GenAnneal: Genetically modified Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, Isaac E.

    2006-05-01

    A modification of the standard Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm is presented for finding the global minimum of a continuous multidimensional, multimodal function. We report results of computational experiments with a set of test functions and we compare to methods of similar structure. The accompanying software accepts objective functions coded both in Fortran 77 and C++. Program summaryTitle of program:GenAnneal Catalogue identifier:ADXI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXI_v1_0 Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Installation: University of Ioannina, Greece on Linux based machines Programming language used:GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data: 200 KB No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:84 885 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:14 896 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques are frequently trapped in local minima. Global optimization is hence the appropriate tool. For example, solving a non-linear system of equations via optimization, employing a "least squares" type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions (i.e. they are far from zero). Typical running time: Depending on the objective function. Method of solution: We modified the process of step selection that the traditional Simulated

  4. PREPARATION OF OXOPORPHINATOMANGANESE (IV) COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, I.; Otvos, J.; Calvin, M.

    1980-07-01

    Oxo-manganese-tetraphenylporphyrin (O=Mn{sup IV}-TPP) has been prepared by an oxygen-transfer reaction from iodosylbenzene to MnIITPP and characterized by its i.r. and field desorption mass spectra, which are identical to those of the product obtained by direct oxidation of Mn{sup III}(TPP) in an aqueous medium; it transfers oxygen to triphenylphosphine to produce triphenylphosphine oxide, and it is suggested that similar intermediates are important in oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450 as well as in the photosynthetic evolution of oxygen.

  5. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  6. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  7. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  8. CDC Group IV c-2: a New Ralstonia Species Close to Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Goujon, Christophe P.; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    1999-01-01

    CDC group IV c-2, an environmental gram-negative bacillus recently proposed for inclusion in the genus Ralstonia, has been isolated in several human infections. Biochemical characterization and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing with phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize eight clinical isolates and four type strains. Other typing tools, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, were also used. PFGE typing of clinical isolates was unsuccessful because the DNA was degraded, and RAPD analysis was poorly discriminatory. In contrast, the type strains were clearly distinguished with both PFGE and RAPD analysis. All of the 16S rDNA sequences were identical. Comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences to the GenBank sequences showed that they were consistent with CDC group IV c-2 belonging to the genus Ralstonia. The closest matches were obtained with Ralstonia eutropha. However, four differences in 32 biochemical tests separated R. eutropha from CDC group IV c-2, which suggests that CDC group IV c-2 is a new species of the genus Ralstonia. PMID:10325323

  9. Determination of Stoichiometry in Lanthanum Strontium Manganates(III)(IV) by Wet Chemical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, I. G. Krogh; Andersen, E. Krogh; Norby, P.; Skou, E.

    1994-12-01

    Wet chemical analyses and powder diffractometry were used to characterize lanthanum strontium manganates(III)(IV) with a composition La1-xSrxMnO3+δ (0.00 ≤ x ≤ 0.50). Two series prepared by different thermal treatments were investigated. In series I the materials were calcined in air. These materials were hexagonal. In series II the materials were prepared from series I materials by calcination in a nitrogen atmosphere. Series II materials with 0.00 ≤ x < 0.20 were orthorhombic. For x ≥ 0.20, series II materials were hexagonal. For series I δ decreases with increasing x until x = 0.30, where it becomes almost zero (and remains 0 for x > 0.30. For series I the molar ratio Mn(IV)/Mn(IV) + Mn(III) is a nearly constant 0.3 in the range 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 0.20. For series II δ is near zero in the whole range. For these materials the ratio Mn(IV)/Mn(IV) + Mn(III) increases with x. The changes of unit cell volumes with x is shown to be consistent with the found composition of the materials. The observed and calculated densities of the materials are consistent with cation vacancies. Full descriptions of procedures for syntheses and analyses are reported.

  10. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html.

  11. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  12. Dural tear post mastoidectomy repaired with Dura Gen.

    PubMed

    Wong, C Y; Khairi, M D M; Mohamed, S A; Irfan, M

    2010-12-01

    Dural exposure may occur during the course of thinning the tegmen tympani and tegmen mastoideum in mastoid procedure. If large area of dura is exposed or lacerated, cerebrospinal fluid and brain herniation may enter the mastoid cavity. We report a case of a patient with injured dura mater and tegmen mastoideum during mastoidectomy for chronic suppurative otitis media with cholesteatoma managed by using DuraGen. The dura mater and tegmen defect healed totally showing the success of the procedure. A collagen matrix like DuraGen is an option for repairing dural tear in mastoid region.

  13. Introducing AstroGen: the Astronomy Genealogy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2016-12-01

    The Astronomy Genealogy Project (AstroGen), a project of the Historical Astronomy Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS), will soon appear on the AAS website. Ultimately, it will list the world's astronomers with their highest degrees, theses for those who wrote them, academic advisors (supervisors), universities, and links to the astronomers or their obituaries, their theses when online, and more. At present the AstroGen team is working on those who earned doctorates with astronomy-related theses. We show what can be learned already, with just ten countries essentially completed.

  14. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of II-IV-V(2) semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chung

    1998-11-01

    The II-IV-V2 chalcopyrite semiconductors are isostructural and isoelectronic analogues of the III-V semiconductors. Like the III-V materials the compounds have potential applications in nonlinear optics, optoelectronics and solar energy conversion. The naturally abundant elements and high absorption coefficients in many of the II-IV-V2's make these materials more attractive for large scale applications. Our study focused on the investigation of the basic electrical and optical properties of a number of II-IV- V2 materials by photoelectrochemical methods and photoluminescence. A variety of single crystals in II-IV- V2 family such as ZnSiAs2, CdSiAs2, CdSiP2, ZnSiP2, CdGeP2, ZnGeP2, and ZnSnP2 have been synthesized by chemical vapor transport (CVT) and Bridgman growth techniques. Intentional doping with S, Se, Al, Ga and In of the crystals resulted in complex behavior. In some systems compensation with intrinsic acceptors was observed and in other systems the change of doping type and controllable doping levels were observed. The bandgap, doping level, band position, quantum yield and current voltage behavior in various electrolytes for many of the II-IV-V2 semiconductors have been determined using photoelectrochemical methods. Hall effect measurements of doping density have been used to compare with values obtained from Mott-Schottky analysis. Frequency and pH dependence of the Mott-Schottky plots were observed. The minority diffusion length of II-IV-V2 calculated from quantum yield and absorption coefficient data at the onset of photocurrent matches well to the prediction from the Gartner Model. Polarization dependent photoluminescence has been used for the study of interband transitions and optical anisotropy in CdSiAs2 and CdSiP2 crystals. The electrode surfaces of CdSiAs2 crystals treated by wet chemical etchants were investigated and characterized by XPS. 31P solid state MAS NMR studies of the II-IV- P2 compounds gave very sharp 31P resonances and revealed

  16. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Large excitonic effects in group-IV sulfide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Blair R.; Alhassan, Saeed M.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Large exciton binding energies are a distinguishing feature of two-dimensional semiconductors because of reduced screening, potentially leading to unique optoelectronic applications. Here we use electronic structure methods to calculate the properties of a two-dimensional material class: group-IV monosulfides including SiS, GeS, and SnS. Bulk SiS is predicted to be a metastable layered material. Quasiparticle excitations are calculated with the G0W0 method and the Bethe-Salpeter equation is are used to include electron-hole interactions. For monolayers, strongly bound excitons are found below the quasiparticle absorption edge. The predicted excitonic binding energies are as high as 0.7 eV. Due to large excitonic effects, these group-IV sulfide monolayers have great potential for nanoscale optoelectronic applications.

  18. Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems Interim Status Report on Pre-conceptual LFR Design Studies and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W G; Brown, N W; Smith, C F; Sienicki, J J; Moisseytsev, A V; Kim, S J; Smith, M A; Yang, W S; Williamson, M; Li, N

    2005-02-09

    Previous pre-conceptual core neutronics and system thermal hydraulics calculations initiated the investigation of viability of a Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) lead-cooled small modular fast reactor concept.1 The calculations indicated that a single-phase natural circulation SSTAR reactor concept with good core reactor physics performance, good system thermal hydraulics performance, and a high Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle efficiency of 40 % may be viable at an electrical power of 18 MWe (45 MWt). Pre-conceptual studies of SSTAR viability have continued with the objective of improving the system thermal hydraulic performance and raising the plant efficiency as well as extending the neutronics analysis. This effort has been motivated by several considerations. First, the initial Pre-conceptual studies were focused upon a ''pancake'' core having a height-to-diameter of 0.5. It was found that a compact core with high average burn up could be realized with a height-to-diameter ratio of 0.8. Second, the initial assumed reactor vessel height of 12.2 meters limited the height of the Pb-to-CO{sub 2} in-reactor heat exchangers (HXs) which reduced the efficiency of supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle power converter. It was found that by increasing the reactor vessel height to 18 meters, the greater driving head for single-phase natural circulation would offset both the greater pressure drop of the 0.8 height-to-diameter ratio core as well as the pressure drop of taller HXs. This has enabled the plant efficiency to be increased from 40 to 43 % and the plant electrical power to be raised from 18 to 20 MWe. Third, reactivity feedback coefficients, which had previously not been generated for SSTAR, have now been calculated for the core. The reactivity feedback coefficients provide a basis for future investigation of the autonomous load following and passive shutdown behavior of the reactor. The current status of SSTAR and the Pre-conceptual viability studies are described below.

  19. Novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure and temperature sensor designed for high-temperature gen-IV reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M. E.; Fielder, R. S.; Davis, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    A novel, fiber optic, hybrid pressure-temperature sensor is presented. The sensor is designed for reliable operation up to 1050 C, and is based on the high-temperature fiber optic sensors already demonstrated during previous work. The novelty of the sensors presented here lies in the fact that pressure and temperature are measured simultaneously with a single fiber and a single transducer. This hybrid approach will enable highly accurate active temperature compensation and sensor self-diagnostics not possible with other platforms. Hybrid pressure and temperature sensors were calibrated by varying both pressure and temperature. Implementing active temperature compensation resulted in a ten-fold reduction in the temperature-dependence of the pressure measurement. Sensors were also tested for operability in a relatively high neutron radiation environment up to 6.9x10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}. In addition to harsh environment survivability, fiber optic sensors offer a number of intrinsic advantages for nuclear power applications including small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, self diagnostics / prognostics, and smart sensor capability. Deploying fiber optic sensors on future nuclear power plant designs would provide a substantial improvement in system health monitoring and safety instrumentation. Additional development is needed, however, before these advantages can be realized. This paper will highlight recent demonstrations of fiber optic sensors in environments relevant to emerging nuclear power plants. Successes and lessons learned will be highlighted. (authors)

  20. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  1. GenR, an IclR-Type Regulator, Activates and Represses the Transcription of gen Genes Involved in 3-Hydroxybenzoate and Gentisate Catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    The genes required for 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum are closely clustered in three operons. GenR, an IclR-type regulator, can activate the transcription of genKH and genDFM operons in response to 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate, and it can repress its own expression. Footprinting analyses demonstrated that GenR bound to four sites with different affinities. Two GenR-binding sites (DFMn01 and DFMn02) were found to be located between positions −41 and −84 upstream of the −35 and −10 regions of the genDFM promoter, which was involved in positive regulation of genDFM transcription. The GenR binding site R-KHn01 (located between positions −47 and −16) overlapped the −35 region of the genKH promoter sequence and is involved in positive regulation of its transcription. The binding site R-KHn02, at which GenR binds to its own promoter, was found within a footprint extending from position −44 to −67. It appeared to be involved in negative regulation of the activity of the genR promoter. A consensus motif with a 5-bp imperfect palindromic sequence [ATTCC-N7(5)-GGAAT] was identified among all four GenR binding sites and found to be necessary to GenR regulation through site-directed mutagenesis. The results reveal a new regulatory function of the IclR family in the catabolism of aromatic compounds. PMID:23354754

  2. The Solarex Block IV module. [solar array design features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Several innovative concepts were introduced for the Block IV contract. Semicrystalline silicon manufactured by SEMIX Inc. is the basic cell material. A front metallization pattern combined with a wraparound-style interconnect and in-plane stress relief combine to provide a new method to reliably accomplish series-paralleling. Laminated modules using Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) as the encapsulant were manufactured for the first time.

  3. Wideband Holographic Digital Recording and Reproduction. Phase IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    3-24 4 3.2.4 Photodetection Subsystem .. . . . . . . ... . . . 3-31 3.2.5 Recording Material Investigation...Section IV. 3.2.4 Photodetection Subsystem The performance of the detection and threshold electronics is critical to several key system areas, primarily...system’s goals. These inclade: the use of a faster comparator to allow 10 Mb/s operation, the use of a balanced diode bridge to reduce potential error

  4. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  5. Impact of Library Preparation on Downstream Analysis and Interpretation of RNA-Seq Data: Comparison between Illumina PolyA and NuGEN Ovation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhifu; Asmann, Yan W.; Nair, Asha; Zhang, Yuji; Wang, Liguo; Kalari, Krishna R.; Bhagwate, Aditya V.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The sequencing by the PolyA selection is the most common approach for library preparation. With limited amount or degraded RNA, alternative protocols such as the NuGEN have been developed. However, it is not yet clear how the different library preparations affect the downstream analyses of the broad applications of RNA sequencing. Methods and Materials Eight human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) lines with high quality RNA were sequenced by Illumina’s mRNA-Seq PolyA selection and NuGEN ENCORE library preparation. The following analyses and comparisons were conducted: 1) the numbers of genes captured by each protocol; 2) the impact of protocols on differentially expressed gene detection between biological replicates; 3) expressed single nucleotide variant (SNV) detection; 4) non-coding RNAs, particularly lincRNA detection; and 5) intragenic gene expression. Results Sequences from the NuGEN protocol had lower (75%) alignment rate than the PolyA (over 90%). The NuGEN protocol detected fewer genes (12–20% less) with a significant portion of reads mapped to non-coding regions. A large number of genes were differentially detected between the two protocols. About 17–20% of the differentially expressed genes between biological replicates were commonly detected between the two protocols. Significantly higher numbers of SNVs (5–6 times) were detected in the NuGEN samples, which were largely from intragenic and intergenic regions. The NuGEN captured fewer exons (25% less) and had higher base level coverage variance. While 6.3% of reads were mapped to intragenic regions in the PolyA samples, the percentages were much higher (20–25%) for the NuGEN samples. The NuGEN protocol did not detect more known non-coding RNAs such as lincRNAs, but targeted small and “novel” lincRNAs. Conclusion Different library preparations can have significant impacts on downstream analysis and interpretation of RNA-seq data. The NuGEN provides an alternative for limited or

  6. 78 FR 54509 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Next Gen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Tenth Meeting: RTCA Next Gen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA NextGen... of the RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). DATES: The meeting will be held September 19, 2013...

  7. 77 FR 25524 - Sixth Meeting: RTCA, NextGen Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Sixth Meeting: RTCA, NextGen Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of a meeting of RTCA, NextGen... RTCA, NextGen Advisory Committee. DATES: The meeting will be held May 24, 2012, from 9:00 a.m.-3:00...

  8. 78 FR 5860 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Next Gen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighth Meeting: RTCA Next Gen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA NextGen... meeting of the RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). DATES: The meeting will be held February 7,...

  9. 76 FR 54526 - Fourth Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourth Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). DATES:...

  10. 76 FR 3931 - Second Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Second Meeting RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). DATES:...

  11. Substrate preference of Gen endonucleases highlights the importance of branched structures as DNA damage repair intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Bellendir, Stephanie P.; Rognstad, Danielle J.; Morris, Lydia P.; Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Walton, William G.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Ramsden, Dale A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Human GEN1 and yeast Yen1 are endonucleases with the ability to cleave Holliday junctions (HJs), which are proposed intermediates in recombination. In vivo, GEN1 and Yen1 function secondarily to Mus81, which has weak activity on intact HJs. We show that the genetic relationship is reversed in Drosophila, with Gen mutants having more severe defects than mus81 mutants. In vitro, DmGen, like HsGEN1, efficiently cleaves HJs, 5΄ flaps, splayed arms, and replication fork structures. We find that the cleavage rates for 5΄ flaps are significantly higher than those for HJs for both DmGen and HsGEN1, even in vast excess of enzyme over substrate. Kinetic studies suggest that the difference in cleavage rates results from a slow, rate-limiting conformational change prior to HJ cleavage: formation of a productive dimer on the HJ. Despite the stark difference in vivo that Drosophila uses Gen over Mus81 and humans use MUS81 over GEN1, we find the in vitro activities of DmGen and HsGEN1 to be strikingly similar. These findings suggest that simpler branched structures may be more important substrates for Gen orthologs in vivo, and highlight the utility of using the Drosophila model system to further understand these enzymes. PMID:28369583

  12. Substrate preference of Gen endonucleases highlights the importance of branched structures as DNA damage repair intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bellendir, Stephanie P; Rognstad, Danielle J; Morris, Lydia P; Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Walton, William G; Redinbo, Matthew R; Ramsden, Dale A; Sekelsky, Jeff; Erie, Dorothy A

    2017-05-19

    Human GEN1 and yeast Yen1 are endonucleases with the ability to cleave Holliday junctions (HJs), which are proposed intermediates in recombination. In vivo, GEN1 and Yen1 function secondarily to Mus81, which has weak activity on intact HJs. We show that the genetic relationship is reversed in Drosophila, with Gen mutants having more severe defects than mus81 mutants. In vitro, DmGen, like HsGEN1, efficiently cleaves HJs, 5΄ flaps, splayed arms, and replication fork structures. We find that the cleavage rates for 5΄ flaps are significantly higher than those for HJs for both DmGen and HsGEN1, even in vast excess of enzyme over substrate. Kinetic studies suggest that the difference in cleavage rates results from a slow, rate-limiting conformational change prior to HJ cleavage: formation of a productive dimer on the HJ. Despite the stark difference in vivo that Drosophila uses Gen over Mus81 and humans use MUS81 over GEN1, we find the in vitro activities of DmGen and HsGEN1 to be strikingly similar. These findings suggest that simpler branched structures may be more important substrates for Gen orthologs in vivo, and highlight the utility of using the Drosophila model system to further understand these enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. GenStar: A method for de novo drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Sergio H.; Murcko, Mark A.

    1993-02-01

    A novel method, which we call GenStar, has been developed to suggest chemically reasonable structures which fill the active sites of enzymes. The proposed molecules provide good steric contact with the enzyme and exist in low-energy conformations. These structures are composed entirely of sp3 carbons which are grown sequentially, but which can also branch or form rings. User-selected enzyme seed atoms may be used to determine the area in which structure generation begins. Alternatively, GenStar may begin with a predocked `inhibitor core' from which atoms are grown. For each new atom generated by the program, several hundred candidate positions representing a range of reasonable bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles are considered. Each of these candidates is scored, based on a simple enzyme contact model. The selected position is chosen at random from among the highest scoring cases. Duplicate structures may be removed using a variety of criteria. The compounds may be energy minimized and displayed using standard modeling programs. Also, it is possible to analyze the collection of all structures created by GenStar and locate binding motifs for common fragments such as benzene and naphthylene. Tests of the method using HIV protease, FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) and human carbonic anhydrase (HCA-II) demonstrated that structures similar to known potent inhibitors may be generated with GenStar.

  14. A New Parent Generation: Meet Mr. and Mrs. Gen X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Slowly but surely, Generation Xers have been taking over from Baby Boomers as the majority of parents in elementary and secondary education. Gen-X parents and Boomer parents belong to two neighboring generations, each possessing its own location in history and its own peer personality. They are similar in some respects, but clearly different in…

  15. ORPC RivGen controller performance raw data - Igiugig 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jarlath McEntee

    2015-12-18

    Contains raw data for operations of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) RivGen Power System in Igiugig 2015 in Matlab data file format. Two data files capture the data and timestamps for data, including power in, voltage, rotation rate, and velocity.

  16. An electronic flight bag for NextGen avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazo, D. Eyton

    2012-06-01

    The introduction of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) initiative by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will impose new requirements for cockpit avionics. A similar program is also taking place in Europe by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) called the Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) initiative. NextGen will require aircraft to utilize Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) in/out technology, requiring substantial changes to existing cockpit display systems. There are two ways that aircraft operators can upgrade their aircraft in order to utilize ADS-B technology. The first is to replace existing primary flight displays with new displays that are ADS-B compatible. The second, less costly approach is to install an advanced Class 3 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) system. The installation of Class 3 EFBs in the cockpit will allow aircraft operators to utilize ADS-B technology in a lesser amount of time with a decreased cost of implementation and will provide additional benefits to the operator. This paper describes a Class 3 EFB, the NexisTM Flight-Intelligence System, which has been designed to allow users a direct interface with NextGen avionics sensors while additionally providing the pilot with all the necessary information to meet NextGen requirements.

  17. Meet Mr. and Mrs. Gen X: A New Parent Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Slowly but surely, Generation Xers have been taking over from Baby Boomers as the majority of parents in elementary and secondary education. In the early 1990s, Gen Xers began joining parent-teacher associations in the nation's elementary schools. Around 2005, they became the majority of middle school parents. By the fall of 2008, they took over…

  18. A New Parent Generation: Meet Mr. and Mrs. Gen X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Slowly but surely, Generation Xers have been taking over from Baby Boomers as the majority of parents in elementary and secondary education. Gen-X parents and Boomer parents belong to two neighboring generations, each possessing its own location in history and its own peer personality. They are similar in some respects, but clearly different in…

  19. Meet Mr. and Mrs. Gen X: A New Parent Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Slowly but surely, Generation Xers have been taking over from Baby Boomers as the majority of parents in elementary and secondary education. In the early 1990s, Gen Xers began joining parent-teacher associations in the nation's elementary schools. Around 2005, they became the majority of middle school parents. By the fall of 2008, they took over…

  20. Safer Systems: A NextGen Aviation Safety Strategic Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darr, Stephen T.; Ricks, Wendell R.; Lemos, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO), is charged by Congress with developing the concepts and plans for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP), developed by the Safety Working Group of the JPDO, focuses on establishing the goals, objectives, and strategies needed to realize the safety objectives of the NextGen Integrated Plan. The three goal areas of the NASSP are Safer Practices, Safer Systems, and Safer Worldwide. Safer Practices emphasizes an integrated, systematic approach to safety risk management through implementation of formalized Safety Management Systems (SMS) that incorporate safety data analysis processes, and the enhancement of methods for ensuring safety is an inherent characteristic of NextGen. Safer Systems emphasizes implementation of safety-enhancing technologies, which will improve safety for human-centered interfaces and enhance the safety of airborne and ground-based systems. Safer Worldwide encourages coordinating the adoption of the safer practices and safer systems technologies, policies and procedures worldwide, such that the maximum level of safety is achieved across air transportation system boundaries. This paper introduces the NASSP and its development, and focuses on the Safer Systems elements of the NASSP, which incorporates three objectives for NextGen systems: 1) provide risk reducing system interfaces, 2) provide safety enhancements for airborne systems, and 3) provide safety enhancements for ground-based systems. The goal of this paper is to expose avionics and air traffic management system developers to NASSP objectives and Safer Systems strategies.

  1. Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials: Understanding the "New Students."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana

    2003-01-01

    Describes characteristics of the "new" college student, who may be an adult learner from the Baby Boomer era, a high school member of the "Millennial" generation, or a "Gen-Xer." Explores the learning styles of each type of student and discusses the importance of technology to each group. (SLD)

  2. Distributed Generation Market Demand Model (dGen): Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, Benjamin; Gleason, Michael; Preus, Robert; Baring-Gould, Ian; Margolis, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The Distributed Generation Market Demand model (dGen) is a geospatially rich, bottom-up, market-penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of distributed energy resources (DERs) for residential, commercial, and industrial entities in the continental United States through 2050. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed dGen to analyze the key factors that will affect future market demand for distributed solar, wind, storage, and other DER technologies in the United States. The new model builds off, extends, and replaces NREL's SolarDS model (Denholm et al. 2009a), which simulates the market penetration of distributed PV only. Unlike the SolarDS model, dGen can model various DER technologies under one platform--it currently can simulate the adoption of distributed solar (the dSolar module) and distributed wind (the dWind module) and link with the ReEDS capacity expansion model (Appendix C). The underlying algorithms and datasets in dGen, which improve the representation of customer decision making as well as the spatial resolution of analyses (Figure ES-1), also are improvements over SolarDS.

  3. The difficult search for organocerium(iv) compounds.

    PubMed

    Anwander, Reiner; Dolg, Michael; Edelmann, Frank T

    2017-09-15

    This Tutorial Review provides an overview of the historic and current development of the organometallic chemistry of cerium in its oxidation state 4+. Among the tetravalent lanthanide ions, only Ce(4+) forms stable coordination compounds (e.g. (NH4)2[Ce(NO3)6]). Important fields of applications for cerium(iv) compounds include organic synthesis, bioinorganic chemistry, materials science, and industrial catalysis. In sharp contrast, organometallic cerium(iv) compounds are still exceedingly rare. The history of organocerium(iv) compounds is an exciting story of ups and downs. The so-called cerocene (= bis(η(8)-cyclooctatetraenyl) cerium) has been known since 1976. Other early reports e.g. about Cp4Ce (Cp = η(5)-cyclopentadienyl), were later disproven. However, significant progress in this field has been made in recent years through the use of carefully designed ligands and more sophisticated synthesis protocols. Taking the case of organocerium(iv) chemistry, this Tutorial Review also tries to exemplarily show how difficult synthetic and theoretical problems can eventually be solved through newly designed synthesis strategies (e.g. as accomplished for cyclopentadienyl and carbene derivatives) and a rewarding collaboration between synthetic and theoretical chemists (cf. the cerocene problem).

  4. Comparison between NuGEN's WT-Ovation Pico and one-direct amplification systems.

    PubMed

    Morse, Alison M; Carballo, Valentina; Baldwin, Donald A; Taylor, Christopher G; McIntyre, Lauren M

    2010-09-01

    Differential gene expression between groups of homogenous cell types is a biological question whose time has come. RNA can be extracted from small numbers of cells, such as those isolated by laser-capture microdissection, but the small amounts obtained often require amplification to enable whole genome transcriptome profiling by technologies such as microarray analysis and RNA-seq. Recently, advances in amplification procedures make amplification directly from whole cell lysates possible. The aim of this study was to compare two amplification systems for variations in observed RNA abundance attributable to the amplification procedure for use with small quantities of cells isolated by laser-capture microdissection. Arabidopsis root cells undergoing giant cell formation as a result of nematode infestation and uninfested control root cells were laser-captured and used to evaluate two amplification systems. One, NuGEN's WT-Ovation Pico (Pico) amplification system, uses total RNA as starting material, and the other, NuGEN's WT-One-Direct (One-Direct) amplification system, uses lysate containing the captured cells. The reproducibility of whole genome transcript profiling and correlations of both systems were investigated after microarray analysis. The One-Direct system was less reproducible and more variable than the Pico system. The Pico amplification kit resulted in the detection of thousands of differentially expressed genes between giant cells and control cells. This is in marked contrast to the relatively few genes detected after amplification with the One-Direct amplification kit.

  5. Comparison between NuGEN's WT-Ovation Pico and One-Direct Amplification Systems

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Alison M.; Carballo, Valentina; Baldwin, Donald A.; Taylor, Christopher G.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Differential gene expression between groups of homogenous cell types is a biological question whose time has come. RNA can be extracted from small numbers of cells, such as those isolated by laser-capture microdissection, but the small amounts obtained often require amplification to enable whole genome transcriptome profiling by technologies such as microarray analysis and RNA-seq. Recently, advances in amplification procedures make amplification directly from whole cell lysates possible. The aim of this study was to compare two amplification systems for variations in observed RNA abundance attributable to the amplification procedure for use with small quantities of cells isolated by laser-capture microdissection. Arabidopsis root cells undergoing giant cell formation as a result of nematode infestation and uninfested control root cells were laser-captured and used to evaluate two amplification systems. One, NuGEN's WT-Ovation Pico (Pico) amplification system, uses total RNA as starting material, and the other, NuGEN's WT-One-Direct (One-Direct) amplification system, uses lysate containing the captured cells. The reproducibility of whole genome transcript profiling and correlations of both systems were investigated after microarray analysis. The One-Direct system was less reproducible and more variable than the Pico system. The Pico amplification kit resulted in the detection of thousands of differentially expressed genes between giant cells and control cells. This is in marked contrast to the relatively few genes detected after amplification with the One-Direct amplification kit. PMID:20808643

  6. Level IV Ecoregions of Nevada

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  7. Level IV Ecoregions of Wyoming

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  8. Level IV Ecoregions of California

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  9. Level IV Ecoregions of Georgia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  10. Level IV Ecoregions of Louisiana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  11. Level IV Ecoregions of Oklahoma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  12. Level IV Ecoregions of Wisconsin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  13. Level IV Ecoregions of Nebraska

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  14. Level IV Ecoregions of Idaho

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  15. Level IV Ecoregions of Utah

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  16. Level IV Ecoregions of Kansas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  17. Level IV Ecoregions of Colorado

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  18. Level IV Ecoregions of Oregon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of patterns of biotic and abiotic phenomena, including geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels for ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions (Commission for Environmental Cooperation Working Group, 1997). At Level III, the continental United States contains 105 regions whereas the conterminous United States has 85 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2011). Level IV ecoregions are further subdivisions of Level III eco

  19. Optimized Gen-II FeCrAl cladding production in large quantity for campaign testing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Sun, Zhiqian; Pint, Bruce A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2016-06-03

    There are two major objectives in this report; (1) to optimize microstructure control of ATF FeCrAl alloys during tube drawing processes, and (2) to provide an update on the progress of ATF FeCrAl tube production via commercial manufacturers. Experimental efforts have been made to optimize the process parameters balancing the tube fabricability, especially for tube drawing processes, and microstructure control of the final tube products. Lab-scale sheet materials of Gen II FeCrAl alloys (Mo-containing and Nb-containing FeCrAl alloys) were used in the study, combined with a stepwise warm-rolling process and intermediate annealing, aiming to simulate the tube drawing process in a commercial tube manufacturer. The intermediate annealing at 650ºC for 1h was suggested for the tube-drawing process of Mo-containing FeCrAl alloys because it successfully softened the material by recovering the work hardening introduced through the rolling step, without inducing grain coarsening due to recrystallization. The final tube product is expected to have stabilized deformed microstructure providing the improved tensile properties with sufficient ductility. Optimization efforts on Nb-containing FeCrAl alloys focused on the effect of alloying additions and annealing conditions on the stability of deformed microstructure. Relationships between the second-phase precipitates (Fe2Nb-Laves phase) and microstructure stability are discussed. FeCrAl tube production through commercial tube manufacturers is currently in progress. Three different manufacturers, Century Tubes, Inc. (CTI), Rhenium Alloys, Inc. (RAI), and Superior Tube Company, Inc. (STC), are providing capabilities for cold-drawing, warm-drawing, and HPTR cold-pilgering, respectively. The first two companies are currently working on large quantity tube production (expected 250 ft length) of Gen I model FeCrAl alloy (B136Y3, at CTI) and Gen II (C35M4, at RAI), with the process parameters obtained from the experimental

  20. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970 to promote vacuum science and technology in academic, industrial and R&D institutions in India. IVS is a member society of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA). It has organized International and national symposia, short term courses and workshops on different aspects of Vacuum Science and Technology at regular intervals. So far 27 National symposia, 4 International Symposia and 47 courses have been organized at various locations in India. There has been an active participation from R&D establishments, universities and Indian industries during all these events. In view of the current global situation and emerging trends in vacuum technology, the executive committee of the IVS suggested to us that we organize an International Symposium at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata from 15-17 February 2012. At the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre we have a large number of high vacuum systems used in the K130 Cyclotron and K500 Superconducting Cyclotron. Also a large cryogenic system using LHe plant is in operation for cryopanels and a superconducting magnet for K-500 Cyclotron. The main areas covered at the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, design and development of large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and the application of high vacuums in cyclotrons, LINACS and other accelerators. This symposium provided an opportunity for interaction between active researchers and technologists and allowed them to review the current situation, report recent experimental results, share the available expertise and consider the future R&D efforts needed in this area. Keeping the industrial significance of vacuum technology in mind, an exhibition of the vacuum related equipment, accessories, products etc by various suppliers and manufactures was organized alongside the symposium. Participation by a large number of exhibitors

  1. A rapid UPLC method for simultaneous determination of eleven components in ‘Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian’ decoction

    PubMed Central

    An, Rui; You, Lisha; Zhang, Yizhu; Wang, Xinhong; Ma, Yuemin

    2014-01-01

    Background: ‘Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian’ Decoction derived from ‘Shang-Han-Lun’ compiled by Zhang Zhongjing. It is widely used in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis, bacillary dysentery, virus diarrhea. This paper describes a sensitive and specific assay for the determination of the 11-marker compounds using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Objective: To develop an UPLC method for simultaneous determination of 11 bioactive compounds in ‘Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian’ preparations. Materials and Methods: The chromatography analysis was performed on an Agilent Proshell 120 EC-C18 column (4.6 × 50 mm, 2.7 μm) at 30°C with a gradient elution of methanol, 0.5% formic acid and 0.5% ammonium acetate at a flow rate 1.0 ml/min and UV detected at 270 nm. Results: All calibration curves showed good linear regression (r ≥ 0.9993) within tested ranges. Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) fell in the range between 0.0691-1.04 μg/ml and 0.23–3.43 μg/ml, respectively. The mean recovery of each herbal medicine ranged from 96.60 to 102.11%. Conclusion: The method was validated for repeatability, precision, stability, accuracy, and selectivity. The validated method was successfully applied to simultaneous analysis of these active components in ‘Ge-Gen-Qin-Lian’ decoction. PMID:25422547

  2. Metsahovi Radio Observatory - IVS Network Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uunila, Minttu; Zubko, Nataliya; Poutanen, Markku; Kallunki, Juha; Kallio, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Metsahovi Radio Observatory together with Finnish Geodetic Institute officially became an IVS Network Station. Eight IVS sessions were observed during the year. Two spacecraft tracking and one EVN X-band experiment were also performed. In 2012, the Metsahovi VLBI equipment was upgraded with a Digital Base Band Converter, a Mark 5B+, a FILA10G, and a FlexBuff.

  3. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  4. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  5. Improving Detection of IV Infiltrates in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, MD, Colleen; Langer, Melissa; Burke, Susan; El Metwally, MD, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Neonates and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit suffer significant morbidity when intravenous (IV) catheters infiltrate. The underreporting of adverse events through hospital voluntary reporting systems, such as ours, can complicate the monitoring of low incidence events, like IV infiltrates. Based on severe cases of IV infiltrates observed in our neonatal intensive care unit, we attempted to improve the detection of all infiltrates and reduce the incidence of Stage 4 infiltrates. We developed, and initiated the use of, an evidence-based guideline for the improved surveillance, prevention, and management of IV infiltrates, with corresponding educational interventions for faculty and staff. We instituted the use of a checklist for compliance with guidelines, and as a mechanism of surveillance. The baseline incidence rate of IV infiltrates, determined by the voluntary reporting system, was 5 per 1000 line days. Following initiation of the guidelines and checklist, the IV infiltrate rate increased to 9 per 1000 line days. In most months, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved by use of the checklist. During the post-intervention period the rate of Stage 4 infiltrates, as measured by usage of nitroglycerin ointment, was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the detection of IV infiltrates was improved following our quality improvement interventions. Further, use of an evidence-based guideline for managing infiltrates may reduce the most severe infiltrate injuries. PMID:26734388

  6. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  7. 24 CFR Appendixes I-Iv to Subpart B - Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B I Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Appendix I—Annual Contributions Contract “Special Provisions for Turnkey...

  8. 24 CFR Appendixes I-Iv to Subpart B - Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B I Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Appendix I—Annual Contributions Contract “Special Provisions for Turnkey...

  9. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project - Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Gibbson, Murray

    2016-07-12

    An upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by DOE - http://go.usa.gov/ivZ -- will help scientists break through bottlenecks in materials design in order to develop materials with desirable functions.

  10. Comparison of telogen hair analyses: genRES MPX-2SP kit versus genRES MPX-SP1 and genRES MPX-SP2 kits.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Bayer, B; Anslinger, K

    2008-12-01

    STR investigations of telogen hair are invariably difficult due to the small amounts of nuclear DNA and its degradation products. However, in recent years there has been a considerable improvement. This study examined the suitability of a new STR kit with shortened amplicons for the investigation of hair in routine casework. This kit allows the simultaneous amplification of the eight STR-loci D3S1358, VWA, FGA, TH01, SE33, D8S1179, D18S51, and D21S11, and the sex-determining amelogenin system. It was tested against the genRES MPX-SP1 and genRES MPX-SP2 kits. The sensitivity of the new genRES MPX-2SP kit was demonstrated to be inferior to that of the genRES MPX-SP1, but almost equal to that of the genRES MPX-SP2 kit.

  11. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, Hawaii, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa. The NCCR IV presents four main types of data: (1) coastal monitoring data, (2) coastal ocean/ offshore monitoring data, (3) offshore fisheries data, and (4) assessment and advisory data (new to NCCR IV). The NCCR IV relies heavily on coastal monitoring data from EPA’s National Coastal Assessment (NCA) to assess coastal condition by evaluating five indicators of condition—water quality, sediment quality, benthic community condition, coastal habitat loss, and fish tissue contaminants. To assess and report on the condition of the nation's coastal resources

  12. Spectrosmicroscopic and spectroscopic investigation of U(IV) speciation in model mineral-organic matter assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bone, S.; Dynes, J.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Both nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2) and non-crystalline U(IV) occur in anoxic sediments, controlling the fate and transport of U in contaminated aquifers. It is important to distinguish between these forms of U because non-crystalline species are more reactive towards oxidants and aqueous complexing ligands, increasing the likelihood of U re-release into groundwater in the presence of such solutes. Much work has been done to elucidate microbiological and geochemical conditions favoring non-crystalline U(IV) or UO2 formation, primarily in model systems containing a single type of U(VI)-reducing bacterium. Research suggests that microbial biomass, including cell walls and exopolymeric substances (EPS), can adsorb U(IV), likely via phosphoryl groups. Furthermore, conditions that favor EPS formation appear to promote non-crystalline U(IV) formation. Non-crystalline U(IV) formation is also favored in the presence of phosphate. However, U(IV) behavior in complicated systems containing competing U(IV) sorbents has not been studied. Investigations of U(IV) behavior in such systems are needed to understand uranium mobility in natural sediments, which contain multiple sinks for U(IV). We have developed a model system in which the native microbial consortia associated with partially decayed plant roots utilize homogenized root material to facilitate U(VI) reduction during anaerobic incubations. The model is intended to simulate an environment similar to that found in anoxic sediments where buried organic matter drives anaerobic respiration. We use this model to address the following questions: (1) Does U(IV) become associated with organic materials or minerals (or both)? (2) Does U(IV) form complexes with particular ligands, such as P? (3) Is UO2 produced when aqueous U(VI) concentrations are relatively low (~1 μM), which is typical of even contaminated sites? We have found that U(IV) does not form UO2 at low, environmentally relevant U:sorbent ratios. Furthermore

  13. Spectrosmicroscopic and spectroscopic investigation of U(IV) speciation in model mineral-organic matter assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booij, M. J.; Houtenbos, H.; Hoekstra, A. Y. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Both nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2) and non-crystalline U(IV) occur in anoxic sediments, controlling the fate and transport of U in contaminated aquifers. It is important to distinguish between these forms of U because non-crystalline species are more reactive towards oxidants and aqueous complexing ligands, increasing the likelihood of U re-release into groundwater in the presence of such solutes. Much work has been done to elucidate microbiological and geochemical conditions favoring non-crystalline U(IV) or UO2 formation, primarily in model systems containing a single type of U(VI)-reducing bacterium. Research suggests that microbial biomass, including cell walls and exopolymeric substances (EPS), can adsorb U(IV), likely via phosphoryl groups. Furthermore, conditions that favor EPS formation appear to promote non-crystalline U(IV) formation. Non-crystalline U(IV) formation is also favored in the presence of phosphate. However, U(IV) behavior in complicated systems containing competing U(IV) sorbents has not been studied. Investigations of U(IV) behavior in such systems are needed to understand uranium mobility in natural sediments, which contain multiple sinks for U(IV). We have developed a model system in which the native microbial consortia associated with partially decayed plant roots utilize homogenized root material to facilitate U(VI) reduction during anaerobic incubations. The model is intended to simulate an environment similar to that found in anoxic sediments where buried organic matter drives anaerobic respiration. We use this model to address the following questions: (1) Does U(IV) become associated with organic materials or minerals (or both)? (2) Does U(IV) form complexes with particular ligands, such as P? (3) Is UO2 produced when aqueous U(VI) concentrations are relatively low (~1 μM), which is typical of even contaminated sites? We have found that U(IV) does not form UO2 at low, environmentally relevant U:sorbent ratios. Furthermore

  14. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  15. Thyroid follicular adenoma with accumulation of collagen type IV in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Kawasako, K; Doi, T; Kanno, T; Wako, Y; Hamamura, M; Tsuchitani, M

    2014-01-01

    A thyroid tumour was identified in a 10-year-old male common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The tumour was encapsulated by fibrous connective tissue and compressed the adjacent normal thyroid. The tumour was composed of variably sized and irregularly shaped thyroid follicles lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells. Eosinophilic material at the base of the neoplastic cells stained black with periodic acid-methenamine silver and red with periodic acid-Schiff. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that this eosinophilic material was collagen type IV. Ultrastructurally, highly dense and amorphous material was observed at the base of the neoplastic cells. Small vesicles in the basolateral cytoplasm of the neoplastic cells contained similar material to that at the base of the cells. The tumour was diagnosed as a thyroid follicular adenoma with accumulation of collagen type IV. This is the first description of an endocrine tumour with accumulation of collagen type IV in animals.

  16. Superconductivity in intercalated group-IV honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Livas, José A.; Sanna, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the electron-phonon superconductivity of honeycomb M X2 layered structures where X is one element of group IV (C, Si, or Ge) and M is an alkali or an alkaline-earth metal. Among the studied compositions we predict a TC of 7 K in RbGe2, 9 K in RbSi2, and 11 K in SrC2. All these compounds feature a strongly anisotropic superconducting gap. Our results show that despite the different doping levels and structural properties, the three families of materials fall into a similar description of their superconducting behavior. This allows us to estimate an upper critical temperature of about 20 K for the class of intercalated group-IV structures, including intercalated graphite and doped graphene.

  17. Construction and Physics program for MICE next step IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2014-03-01

    The International Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment is progressing towards full demonstration of the feasibility of this cooling technology decisive for neutrino physics and muon colliders. Its next step IV should provide the first precise measurements of emittances and first evidence of cooling. Spectrometer solenoids, muon trackers and absober-FC (focus coil) modules are being assembled to make this possible in 2015. The physics programme of ionization cooling Step IV measurements will be described in detail, with Li-H and a few other promising absorber materials of different shapes. So will the progress of the hardware. The longer term final step V and step VI complete demonstration measurements being simultaneously prepared (re-acceerating RFCC modules, RF cavities inside their own focusing CC (``coupling'' coils) will also be outlined. Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment.

  18. Influence of shelf life on the setting time of type IV gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapsari, M. L.; Irawan, B.; Damiyanti, M.

    2017-08-01

    Although expired materials can exhibit a deterioration in their properties, expired type IV gypsum can still be found on the market. In order to evaluate the influence of the shelf life on its setting time, two groups of type IV gypsum (GC Fuji rock EP) with different expiration dates were used in this research. The setting time tests were done in a mold using a Vicat Needle apparatus. The results of the statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p<0.05) between the two different expiration date groups. Therefore, the shelf life did influence the setting time of the type IV gypsum.

  19. Advanced Vehicle Concepts and Implications for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matt; Smith, Jim; Wright, Ken; Mediavilla Ricky; Kirby, Michelle; Pfaender, Holger; Clarke, John-Paul; Volovoi, Vitali; Dorbian, Christopher; Ashok, Akshay; Reynolds, Tom; Waitz, Ian; Hileman, James; Arunachalam, Sarav; Hedrick, Matt; Vempati, Lakshmi; Laroza, Ryan; denBraven, Wim; Henderson, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a major NASA study of advanced vehicle concepts and their implications for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Comprising the efforts of dozens of researchers at multiple institutions, the analyses presented here cover a broad range of topics including business-case development, vehicle design, avionics, procedure design, delay, safety, environmental impacts, and metrics. The study focuses on the following five new vehicle types: Cruise-efficient short takeoff and landing (CESTOL) vehicles Large commercial tiltrotor aircraft (LCTRs) Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) Very light jets (VLJs) Supersonic transports (SST). The timeframe of the study spans the years 2025-2040, although some analyses are also presented for a 3X scenario that has roughly three times the number of flights as today. Full implementation of NextGen is assumed.

  20. SimGen: A General Simulation Method for Large Systems.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William R

    2017-02-03

    SimGen is a stand-alone computer program that reads a script of commands to represent complex macromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids, in a structural hierarchy that can then be viewed using an integral graphical viewer or animated through a high-level application programming interface in C++. Structural levels in the hierarchy range from α-carbon or phosphate backbones through secondary structure to domains, molecules, and multimers with each level represented in an identical data structure that can be manipulated using the application programming interface. Unlike most coarse-grained simulation approaches, the higher-level objects represented in SimGen can be soft, allowing the lower-level objects that they contain to interact directly. The default motion simulated by SimGen is a Brownian-like diffusion that can be set to occur across all levels of representation in the hierarchy. Links can also be defined between objects, which, when combined with large high-level random movements, result in an effective search strategy for constraint satisfaction, including structure prediction from predicted pairwise distances. The implementation of SimGen makes use of the hierarchic data structure to avoid unnecessary calculation, especially for collision detection, allowing it to be simultaneously run and viewed on a laptop computer while simulating large systems of over 20,000 objects. It has been used previously to model complex molecular interactions including the motion of a myosin-V dimer "walking" on an actin fibre, RNA stem-loop packing, and the simulation of cell motion and aggregation. Several extensions to this original functionality are described.

  1. Technology evaluation: C242-DM1, ImmunoGen Inc.

    PubMed

    Smith, S

    2001-04-01

    C242-DM1 is a tumor-activated immunotoxin under development by GlaxoSmithKline plc (formerly SmithKline Beecham plc), under licence from ImmunoGen Inc, as a potential treatment for colon tumor. It consists of a colon cancer-specific humanized antibody, C242, conjugated to the maytansine derivative DM1. In preclinical studies, C242-DM1 caused complete tumor regression in animal models of both human pancreatic and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at non-toxic doses. C242-DM1 has also been evaluated in an immunoconjugate combination with J-591 (Cornell University). The J591-DM1 immunoconjugate demonstrated effective, antigen-specific delivery of a highly cytotoxic drug to PSMA-positive Pca cells in vitro and in vivo with low systemic toxicity. Results from studies in monkeys showed that C242-DM1 had no significant toxicity or side effects, when administered at doses higher than those that were previously shown to completely eradicate human colon tumors in mice [271420]. ImmunoGen acquired the right to evaluate, and an option to license, technology related to maytansines from Takeda. In February 1999, ImmunoGen and SmithKline Beecham signed a US $45 million development and commercialization agreement for C242-DM1 [313493]. In August 1997, Immunogen received an SBIR grant to advance development of huC242-DM1 [258356]. EP-00425235, held by ImmunoGen, covers conjugated forms of ansamitocin (maytansine) derivatives. Takeda holds several patents for the production of ansamitocin and its analogs, the first one being JP-53124692.

  2. Sandrewia, n. gen., a problematical plant from the Lower Permian of Texas and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mamay, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Sandrewia, n. gen., monotypified by S. texana, n. sp., is a plant from Lower Permian beds of north-central Texas and east-central Kansas. It is characterized by stout axes with spirally disposed, laxly inserted, petiolate leaves; the laminae are broadly flabelliform with coarse, open venation. The leaves are reminiscent of the vojnovskyalean Nephropsis, of the Permian Petchora Basin, U.S.S.R., but biologic relationships are only speculative because of limited material. However, leaf characteristics render Sandrewia easily identifiable. Its presently limited stratigraphic range, along with floristic associations, indicates it may be a useful guide fossil and supports the author's beliefs regarding important times and places in Paleozoic plant evolution. ?? 1975.

  3. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics

    PubMed Central

    Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the “core team”, facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination. PMID:27347381

  4. The GenABEL Project for statistical genomics.

    PubMed

    Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S

    2016-01-01

    Development of free/libre open source software is usually done by a community of people with an interest in the tool. For scientific software, however, this is less often the case. Most scientific software is written by only a few authors, often a student working on a thesis. Once the paper describing the tool has been published, the tool is no longer developed further and is left to its own device. Here we describe the broad, multidisciplinary community we formed around a set of tools for statistical genomics. The GenABEL project for statistical omics actively promotes open interdisciplinary development of statistical methodology and its implementation in efficient and user-friendly software under an open source licence. The software tools developed withing the project collectively make up the GenABEL suite, which currently consists of eleven tools. The open framework of the project actively encourages involvement of the community in all stages, from formulation of methodological ideas to application of software to specific data sets. A web forum is used to channel user questions and discussions, further promoting the use of the GenABEL suite. Developer discussions take place on a dedicated mailing list, and development is further supported by robust development practices including use of public version control, code review and continuous integration. Use of this open science model attracts contributions from users and developers outside the "core team", facilitating agile statistical omics methodology development and fast dissemination.

  5. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  6. Description of Teunomyces gen. nov. for the Candida kruisii clade, Suhomyces gen. nov. for the Candida tanzawaensis clade and Suhomyces kilbournensis sp. nov.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA sequence analysis has shown that species of the Candida kruisii clade and species of the C. tanzawaensis clade represent phylogenetically circumscribed genera, which are described as Teunomyces gen. nov., type species T. kruisii, and Suhomyces gen. nov., type species S. tanzawaensis. Many of the...

  7. Group-IV midinfrared plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Calandrini, Eugenio; Millar, Ross W.; Giliberti, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The use of heavily doped semiconductors to achieve plasma frequencies in the mid-IR has been recently proposed as a promising way to obtain high-quality and tunable plasmonic materials. We introduce a plasmonic platform based on epitaxial n-type Ge grown on standard Si wafers by means of low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large carrier concentration achieved with P dopants and to the compatibility with the existing CMOS technology, SiGe plasmonics hold promises for mid-IR applications in optoelectronics, IR detection, sensing, and light harvesting. As a representative example, we show simulations of mid-IR plasmonic waveguides based on the experimentally retrieved dielectric constants of the grown materials.

  8. Stage IV work hardening in cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.; Doherty, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The work hardening of fcc metals at large strains is discussed with reference to the linear stress-strain behavior often observed at large strains and known as Stage IV. The experimental evidence shows that Stage IV is a work hardening phenomenon that is found quite generally, even in pure fcc metals subjected to homogeneous deformation. A simple model for Stage IV in pure metals is presented, based on the accumulation of dislocation debris. Experiments are described for large strain torsion tests on four aluminum alloys. The level and extent of Stage IV scaled with the saturation stress that would represent the end of Stage III in the absence of a Stage IV. Reversing the torsion after large prestrains produced transient reductions in the work hardening. The strain rate sensitivity was also measured before and during the transient and found not to vary significantly. The microstructure observed at large strains in an Mg alloy suggest that Stage IV can occur in the absence of microband formation. Previous proposals for the cause of Stage IV are reviewed and found to be not supported by recent experimental data.

  9. Coordination of tetravalent actinides (An = Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV)) with DOTA - from dimers to hexamers.

    PubMed

    Tamain, Christelle; Dumas, Thomas; Hennig, Christoph; Guilbaud, Philippe

    2017-03-10

    Three tetravalent actinide (An(IV)) hexanuclear clusters with the octahedral core [An6(OH)4O4]12+ (An(IV) = U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV)) were structurally characterized in solid state and in aqueous solution using single crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption, IR, Raman and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The observed structure, [An6(OH)4O4(H2O)8(HDOTA)4].HCl/HNO3.nH2O (An = U (I), Np (II), Pu (III)), consists of a An(IV) hexanuclear pseudo-octahedral cluster stabilized by DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) ligands. The six actinide atoms are connected through alternative µ3-O2- and µ3-OH- groups. EXAFS investigations combined with UV-vis spectroscopy evidence the same local structure in moderate acidic and neutral aqueous solutions. The synthesis mechanism was partially elucidated and the main physicochemical properties (pH range stability, solubility and protonation constant) of the cluster were determined. The results underline the importance (i) to consider such polynuclear species in thermodynamic models and (ii) of competing reactions between hydrolysis and complexation. It is interesting to note that the same synthesis route with thorium(IV) leads to the formation of a dimer, Th2(H2O)10(H2DOTA)2.4NO3.xH2O (IV), which contrasts to the structure of the other An(IV) hexamers.

  10. GenCade Version 1 Quick-Start Guide: How to Start a Successful GenCade Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    modeler can easily make changes in the conceptual model and quickly generate new alternatives. The modeler should save new alternatives in different...to double-check that all features defined in the conceptual model are represented in the grid. When the project is saved, changes will be saved in...the control file. Changes made within the GenCade menu will be lost if the grid is regenerated, but changes made in the conceptual model will be

  11. Pantanalinema gen. nov. and Alkalinema gen. nov.: novel pseudanabaenacean genera (Cyanobacteria) isolated from saline-alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Vieira Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Andreote, Ana Paula Dini; Malone, Camila Francieli Silva; Sant'Anna, Célia Leite; Barbiero, Laurent; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The genus Leptolyngbya Anagnostidis & Komárek (1988) was described from a set of strains identified as 'LPP-group B'. The morphology within this group is not particularly informative and underestimates the group's genetic diversity. In the present study, two new pseudanabaenacean genera related to Leptolyngbya morphotypes, Pantanalinema gen. nov. and Alkalinema gen. nov., are described under the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants, based on a polyphasic approach. Pantanalinema gen. nov. (type species Pantanalinema rosaneae sp. nov.) has sheaths and trichomes with slight gliding motility, which distinguish this genus from Alkalinema gen. nov. (type species Alkalinema pantanalense sp. nov.), which possesses trichomes arranged in an ornate (interwoven) pattern. 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema exhibited low identity to each other (≤91.6 %) and to other sequences from known pseudanabaenacean genera (≤94.3 and 93.7 %, respectively). In a phylogenetic reconstruction, six sequences from strains of Pantanalinema and four from strains of Alkalinema formed two separate and robust clades (99 % bootstrap value), with the genera Oculatella and Phormidesmis, respectively, as the closest related groups. 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences and secondary structures of strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema did not correspond to any previous descriptions. The strains of Pantanalinema and Alkalinema were able to survive and produce biomass at a range of pH (pH 4-11) and were also able to alter the culture medium to pH values ranging from pH 8.4 to 9.9. These data indicate that cyanobacterial communities in underexplored environments, such as the Pantanal wetlands, are promising sources of novel taxa.

  12. The determination of uranium (IV) in apatite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Roy S.; Altschuler, Zalman S.

    1956-01-01

    Geologic and mineralogic evidence indicate that the uranium present in apatite may proxy for calcium in the mineral structure as U(IV). An experimental investigation was conducted and chemical evidence was obtained that establishes the presence of U(IV) in apatite. The following analytical procedure was developed for the determination of U(IV). Carbonate-fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.5M orthophosphoric acid and fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.2M hydrochloric acid containing 1.5 g of hydroxylamine hydrochloride per 100 ml. Uranium (IV) is precipitated by cupferron using titanium as a carrier. The uranium in the precipitate is separated by use of the ethyl acetate extraction procedure and determined fluorimetrically. The validity and the limitations of the method have been established by spike experiments.

  13. Level III and IV Ecoregions by State

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information and links to downloadable maps and datasets for Level III and IV ecoregions, listed by state. Ecoregions are areas of general similarity in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources.

  14. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  15. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  16. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  17. The Madagascan endemic myrmicine ants related to Eutetramorium (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): taxonomy of the genera Eutetramorium Emery, Malagidris nom. n., Myrmisaraka gen. n., Royidris gen. n., and Vitsika gen. n.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Barry; Fisher, Brian L

    2014-04-24

    The monophyletic group of myrmicine ant genera related to Eutetramorium is described and its taxonomy is documented. The group is endemic in Madagascar and contains five genera: Eutetramorium Emery, 1899 (3 species, 1 of which is new); Malagidris nom. n., a replacement name for Brunella Forel, 1917, junior homonym of Brunella Smith, G.W. 1909 (Crustacea) (6 species, 5 of which are new); Myrmisaraka gen. n. (2 species, both new); Royidris gen. n. (15 species, 11 of which are new); Vitsika gen. n. (14 species, all of which are new). Keys to the worker caste are provided for all genera, and provisional keys to known males are given for Malagidris and Vitsika.

  18. Peroxiredoxin IV Protects Cells From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung Je; Chang, Hyo Won; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Human peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are known as a family of thiol-specific antioxidant enzymes, among which Prx-I and -II play an important role in protecting cells from irradiation-induced cell death. It is not known whether Prx-IV also protects cells from ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: To evaluate the protective role of Prx-IV in IR, we transfected full-length Prx-IV cDNA into AMC-HN3 cells, which weakly express endogenous Prx-IV, and knocked down the expression of Prx-IV with siRNA methods using AMC-HN7 cells, which express high levels of endogenous Prx-IV. Radiosensitivity profiles in these cells were evaluated using clonogenic assay, FACS analysis, cell viability, and TUNEL assay. Results: Three Prx-IV expressing clones were isolated. Prx-IV regulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and made cells more resistant to IR-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the knockdown of Prx-IV with siRNA made cells more sensitive to IR-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that Prx-IV may play an important role in protecting cells from IR-induced apoptosis in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. J3Gen: A PRNG for Low-Cost Passive RFID

    PubMed Central

    Melià-Seguí, Joan; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin; Herrera-Joancomartí, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Pseudorandom number generation (PRNG) is the main security tool in low-cost passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies, such as EPC Gen2. We present a lightweight PRNG design for low-cost passive RFID tags, named J3Gen. J3Gen is based on a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) configured with multiple feedback polynomials. The polynomials are alternated during the generation of sequences via a physical source of randomness. J3Gen successfully handles the inherent linearity of LFSR based PRNGs and satisfies the statistical requirements imposed by the EPC Gen2 standard. A hardware implementation of J3Gen is presented and evaluated with regard to different design parameters, defining the key-equivalence security and nonlinearity of the design. The results of a SPICE simulation confirm the power-consumption suitability of the proposal. PMID:23519344

  20. J3Gen: a PRNG for low-cost passive RFID.

    PubMed

    Melià-Seguí, Joan; Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin; Herrera-Joancomartí, Jordi

    2013-03-19

    Pseudorandom number generation (PRNG) is the main security tool in low-cost passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) technologies, such as EPC Gen2. We present a lightweight PRNG design for low-cost passive RFID tags, named J3Gen. J3Gen is based on a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) configured with multiple feedback polynomials. The polynomials are alternated during the generation of sequences via a physical source of randomness. J3Gen successfully handles the inherent linearity of LFSR based PRNGs and satisfies the statistical requirements imposed by the EPC Gen2 standard. A hardware implementation of J3Gen is presented and evaluated with regard to different design parameters, defining the key-equivalence security and nonlinearity of the design. The results of a SPICE simulation confirm the power-consumption suitability of the proposal.

  1. The Status of the Construction of MICE Step IV

    SciTech Connect

    Snopok, P.; Overton, E.

    2014-07-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment will provide the demononstration ionization cooling. The experiment is being built in a series of Steps. Step IV, which consists of a tracking spectrometer upstream and downstream of an absorber/focus-coil module will be completed in early in 2015. In this configuration, the emittance of the muon beam upstream and downstream of the absorbed will be measured precisely allowing the emittance reduction and the factors that determine the ionization-cooling effect to be studied in detail. Each tracking spectrometer consists of a scintillating-fibre tracker placed within a 4 T field provided by the superconducting spectrometer solenoid. The muon beam is transported to the absorber/focus-coil module: a 22 liter volume of liquid hydrogen placed inside a superconducting focusing coil. The properties of lithium hydride, and possibly other absorber materials, will also be studied. All the components of Step IV have been manufactured and integration of the experiment in the MICE Hall at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is underway. The construction and performance of Step IV will be described. A full study of ionization cooling will be carried out with Step V of the experiment which will include a short 201 MHz linac module in which beam transport is achieved with a superconducting “coupling-coil”. The status of the preparation of the components of Step V of the experiment will be described briefly.

  2. Polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Friedman, H.A.; Osborne, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    The polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions has been studied spectrophotometrically both to establish the influence of large UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} concentrations on the polymerization rates and, more generally, to review the influence of the major parameters on the polymer reaction. Typically, experiments have been performed at 50{sup 0}C and with 0.05 M Pu in nitric acid solutions that vary in acidity from 0.07 to 0.4 M. An induction period usually precedes the polymer growth stage during which time nucleation of primary hydrolysis products occurs. Uranyl nitrate retards the polymerization reaction by approximately 35% in spite of the counteracting influence of the nitrate ions associated with this solute. The rate of polymer formation, expressed as d(percent polymer)/dt, has been shown to depend on the total plutonium concentration in reactions where the Pu(IV) concentration remained constant; and it is therefore suggested that the polymer reaction rate is not first order with respect to the concentration of plutonium as was previously thought. It has been shown further that accurate acid determinations on stock reagents are essential in order to obtain reliable polymerization experiments. Satisfactory procedures for these analyses did not exist, so appropriate modifications to the iodate precipitation methods were developed. The most ideal plutonium reagent material has been shown to be crystalline Pu(IV) nitrate because it can be added directly to acid solutions without the occurrence of unintentional hydrolysis reactions.

  3. Computational prediction of two-dimensional group-IV mono-chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-07-01

    Density functional calculations determine the structure, stability, and electronic properties of two-dimensional materials in the family of group-IV monochalcogenides, MX (M = Ge, Sn, Pb; X = O, S, Se, Te). Calculations with a van der Waals functional show that the two-dimensional IV-VI compounds are most stable in either a highly distorted NaCl-type structure or a single-layer litharge type tetragonal structure. Their formation energies are comparable to single-layer MoS2, indicating the ease of mechanical exfoliation from their layered bulk structures. The phonon spectra confirm their dynamical stability. Using the hybrid HSE06 functional, we find that these materials are semiconductors with bandgaps that are generally larger than for their bulk counterparts due to quantum confinement. The band edge alignments of monolayer group IV-VI materials reveal several type-I and type-II heterostructures, suited for optoelectronics and solar energy conversion.

  4. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  5. Recent changes in the GenBank On-line Service.

    PubMed Central

    Benton, D

    1990-01-01

    The GenBank On-line Service provides access to the GenBank and EMBL nucleic acid sequence databases and to the Swiss-Prot and GenPept protein sequence databases. Users can query the databases by sequence similarity and annotation keywords and retrieve entries of interest. This access is available through e-mail servers, anonymous FTP, anonymous interactive login, and login to established, password-protected, individual accounts. PMID:2326192

  6. Measurement of the neutron electric form factor GEn in quasielastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Donal Day

    2003-07-15

    We have measured the electric form factor of the neutron, GEn, at two momentum transfers (Q2= 0.5 and Q2= 1.0 GeV/c2) through quasielastic scattering in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Longitudinally polarized electrons scattered from polarized deuterated ammonia and GEn was extracted from the beam-target asymmetry AVed which, in quasielastic kinematics, is particularly sensitive to GEn and insensitive to MEC and FSI.

  7. Astragaloside IV enhances cardioprotection of remote ischemic conditioning after acute myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Songyi; Yu, Peng; Yang, Li; Shi, Haibo; He, Anxia; Chen, Hanyu; Han, Jie; Xie, Liang; Chen, Jiandong; Chen, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) has been shown to be a practical method for protecting the heart from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In the present study, we investigated whether or not the combination of RIC and Astragaloside IV (AS-IV) could improve cardioprotection against acute myocardial infarction (AMI)-induced heart failure (HF) when compared with individual treatments. Material and Methods: A rat model of AMI was established via permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Postoperatively, the rats were randomly grouped into a sham group (n=10), a model group (n=15), an AS-IV alone group (n=15), an RIC alone group (n=15) and a combined treatment group (AS-IV+RIC; n=15). All treatments were administered for 2 weeks. Results: After treatment for 2 weeks, the survival rate was improved, the cardiac function was preserved and the infarcted size was limited in AS-IV alone and RIC alone treatment groups compared to the model group, whereas the combined treatment yielded the most optimal protective effects. Additional studies suggested that AS-IV enhanced the cardioprotective effects of RIC by alleviating myocardial fibrosis, suppressing inflammation, attenuating apoptosis and ameliorating impairment of the myocardial ultrastructural. Conclusion: AS-IV enhances the cardioprotective effects of RIC against AMI-induced HF and ventricular remodeling, which represents a potential therapeutic approach for preserving cardiac function and improving the prognosis of AMI. PMID:27904669

  8. Shatavarins (containing Shatavarin IV) with anticancer activity from the roots of Asparagus racemosus

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Shankar K.; Prakash, Neswi S.; Sundaram, Ramachandran

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The anticancer activity of shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) isolated from the roots of Asparagus racemosus (Wild) was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Material and Methods: The shatavarin IV was isolated from ethyl acetate insoluble fraction (AR-2B) of chloroform:methanol (2:1) (AR-2) extract of A. racemosus roots. The cytotoxicity (in vitro) of shatavarin IV and other shatavarins rich fraction was carried out using of MTT assay using MCF-7 (human breast cancer), HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma), and A-498 (human kidney carcinoma) cell lines. The in vivo anticancer activity of shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) was evaluated against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumor bearing mice. Results: The isolated shatavarin IV (84.69 %) along with shatavarins rich fraction, coded AR-2B containing 5.05% shatavarin IV showed potent cytotoxicity. Oral administration of AR-2B to tumor bearing mice at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 10 days, showed significant reduction in percent increase in body weight, tumor volume, packed cell volume, viable tumor cell count, and increased non-viable cell count when compared to the untreated mice of the EAC control group. The restoration of hematological parameters towards normalcy was also observed. Conclusion: The result suggests that the shatavarins (containing shatavarin IV) rich fraction (AR-2B) exhibits significant anticancer activity in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. PMID:23248403

  9. Resolvase OsGEN1 Mediates DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pingli

    2017-01-01

    Yen1/GEN1 are canonical Holliday junction resolvases that belong to the RAD2/XPG family. In eukaryotes, such as budding yeast, mice, worms, and humans, Yen1/GEN1 work together with Mus81-Mms4/MUS81-EME1 and Slx1-Slx4/SLX1-SLX4 in DNA repair by homologous recombination to maintain genome stability. In plants, the biological function of Yen1/GEN1 remains largely unclear. In this study, we characterized the loss of function mutants of OsGEN1 and OsSEND1, a pair of paralogs of Yen1/GEN1 in rice (Oryza sativa). We first investigated the role of OsGEN1 during meiosis and found a reduction in chiasma frequency by ∼6% in osgen1 mutants, compared to the wild type, suggesting a possible involvement of OsGEN1 in the formation of crossovers. Postmeiosis, OsGEN1 foci were detected in wild-type microspore nuclei, but not in the osgen1 mutant concomitant with an increase in double-strand breaks. Persistent double-strand breaks led to programmed cell death of the male gametes and complete male sterility. In contrast, depletion of OsSEND1 had no effects on plant development and did not enhance osgen1 defects. Our results indicate that OsGEN1 is essential for homologous recombinational DNA repair at two stages of microsporogenesis in rice. PMID:28049740

  10. Phen-Gen: combining phenotype and genotype to analyze rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Javed, Asif; Agrawal, Saloni; Ng, Pauline C

    2014-09-01

    We introduce Phen-Gen, a method that combines patients' disease symptoms and sequencing data with prior domain knowledge to identify the causative genes for rare disorders. Simulations revealed that the causal variant was ranked first in 88% of cases when it was a coding variant-a 52% advantage over a genotype-only approach-and Phen-Gen outperformed other existing prediction methods by 13-58%. If disease etiology was unknown, the causal variant was assigned the top rank in 71% of simulations. Phen-Gen is available at http://phen-gen.org/.

  11. Magnetic properties of clusters in IV-VI and II-IV-V2 diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górska, M.; Kilanski, L.; Podgórni, A.; Dobrowolski, W.; Szymczak, R.; Anderson, J. R.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Marenkin, S. F.; Slynko, V. E.; Slynko, E. I.

    2016-12-01

    We have been studying magnetic properties of magnetic ion clusters in ternary, quaternary, and quinary IV-VI and II-IV-V2 diluted magnetic semiconductors with varying concentrations of different magnetic and non-magnetic cations. We observed clusters of different types, from non-random distribution of magnetic ions in the host lattice to precipitates with the crystalline structure different from that of the host. The size of such precipitates varied from 200 nm to 20 μm. Depending on the type and size of clusters we observed different magnetic properties of the compounds, such as paramagnetic, spin-glass, spin-glass-like, or ferromagnetic states. For example, Zn1-xMnxGeAs2 compounds with x ≤ 0.053 were paramagnetic with evidence of small short-range magnetic interactions, while in the same material with x ≥ 0.078 we observed room-temperature ferromagnetism. In IV-VI DMS clusters usually created a spin-glass or spinglass- like state. However, in some Ge1-x-yPbxMnyTe crystals we observed a co-existence of two very different spin-glasslike states with transition temperatures T1 ≈ 5 K and T2 ≈ 90 K.

  12. Tapironema coronatum n. gen., n. sp. (Trichostrongyloidea-Cooperiidae-Obeliscoidinae), a parasite of Holochilus brasiliensis and Tapirus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Durette-Desset, M C; Chabaud, A G; Sutton, C A

    1997-09-01

    In this paper we provide a description of Tapironema coronatum n. gen. n. sp. (Trichostrongyloidea, Obeliscoidinae) from the cricetid Holochilus brasiliensis or "water rat" in Argentina (Type material) and from Tapirus terrestris in French Guyana (voucher material in poor condition). The new genus is characterized by a corona radiata, an oesophageal tooth, a bilaterally synlophe with about 73 (male), 122 (female) cuticular ridges, a caudal bursa pattern 2-1-2 with rays 5 and 6 parallel and close together and rays 5 longer than rays 3. The most closely related genus is the monospecific Teporingonema Harris, 1985, from a Mexican lagomorph, Romerolagus. The cephalic extremity of this parasite is redescribed after the type-material. The systematic position of Teporingonema amongst the Obeliscoidinae is defined and the hypotheses concerning the origin of this sub family are provided.

  13. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  14. GRAIL and GenQuest Sequence Annotation Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Shah, Manesh B.; Einstein, J. Ralph; Parang, Morey; Snoddy, Jay; Petrov, Sergey; Olman, Victor; Zhang, Ge; Mural, Richard J.; Uberbacher, Edward C.

    1997-12-31

    Our goal is to develop and implement an integrated intelligent system which can recognize biologically significant features in DNA sequence and provide insight into the organization and function of regions of genomic DNA. GRAIL is a modular expert system which facilitates the recognition of gene features and provides an environment for the construction of sequence annotation. The last several years have seen a rapid evolution of the technology for analyzing genomic DNA sequences. The current GRAIL systems (including the e-mail, XGRAIL, JAVA-GRAIL and genQuest systems) are perhaps the most widely used, comprehensive, and user friendly systems available for computational characterization of genomic DNA sequence.

  15. GenCade Application at Onslow Bay, North Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    by Ashley E. Frey, Sophie Munger, Greg L. Williams , Michael J. Wutkowski, and Kevin B. Conner PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering...Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, and Greg L. Williams , Michael J. Wutkowski, and Kevin B. Conner of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Wilmington. Dr...follows: Frey, A.E., Munger, S., Williams , G.L., Wutkowski, M.J. and Conner, K.B. 2012. GenCade Application at Onslow Bay, North Carolina. Coastal and

  16. Ultrastructure and 18S rDNA phylogeny of Apoikia lindahlii comb. nov. (Chrysophyceae) and its epibiontic protists, Filos agilis gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida) and Nanos amicus gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsoo; Yubuki, Naoji; Leander, Brian S; Graham, Linda E

    2010-04-01

    Three heterotrophic stramenopiles--Apoikia lindahlii comb. nov. (Chrysophyceae), Filos agilis gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida), and Nanos amicus gen. et sp. nov. (Bicosoecida)--were isolated from acidic peat bogs. The biflagellate A. lindahlii forms loose irregular colonies from which swimming cells may detach, and produces extensive mucilaginous material containing bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analyses of small subunit rDNA sequences demonstrated that A. lindahlii branches within the Chrysophyceae. While A. lindahlii is an obligate heterotroph, ultrastructural observations revealed a leukoplast in the perinuclear region. The pico-sized uniflagellates F. agilis and N. amicus were isolated from separate lakes and within the mucilage of A. lindahlii, suggesting their close associations in natural habitats. In SSU rDNA phylogenies, F. agilis and N. amicus were closely related to the bicosoecids Adriamonas, Siluania, Paramonas, and Nerada. While Filos, Nanos, and Siluania are similar in light microscopic features, their SSU rDNA gene sequences differed significantly (>8% differences) and were not monophyletic. Both F. agilis and N. amicus have a cytostome/cytopharynx particle ingestion apparatus. Bacterial cells and material similar to the mucilage of A. lindahlii occurred within the food vacuole of F. agilis and N. amicus. The nature of association between A. lindahlii and its epibiontic bicosoecids is discussed.

  17. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Joseph B.

    1984-01-01

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogren. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN.sub.3. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  18. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  19. Extending the Use of Highly Porous and Functionalized MOFs to Th(IV) Capture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Li-Yong; Guo, Wen-Lu; Luo, Shi-Zhong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2017-08-02

    Thorium separation has recently become a hot topic because of the potential application of thorium as a future nuclear fuel, while metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have received much attention in the separation field due to their unique properties. Herein, a highly porous and stable MOF, UiO-66, and its carboxyl derivatives (UiO-66-COOH and UiO-66-(COOH)2) were synthesized and explored for the first time for Th(IV) capture from a weak acidic solution. Although the introduction of carboxyl groups into UiO-66 leads to an obvious decrease in the surface area and pore volume, the adsorbability toward Th(IV) is greatly enhanced. At pH = 3.0, the saturated sorption capacity for Th(IV) into UiO-66-(COOH)2 reached 350 mg/g, representing one of the largest values for Th(IV) capture by solid extraction. Moreover, the functionalized MOFs show fast sorption kinetics and desirable selectivity toward Th(IV) over a range of competing metal ions. A possible mechanism for the selective recognition of Th(IV) by these MOFs was explored on the basis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure and Fourier transform infrared analysis. It is concluded that UiO-66-COOH and UiO-66-(COOH)2 sorb Th(IV) through the coordination of carboxyl anions in the pores of the MOFs, whereas in the case of UiO-66, both the precipitation and the exchange with the organic solvent contribute to the Th(IV) uptake. This study contributes to the assessment of the feasibility of MOFs applied in actinides separation and better understanding of actinides sorption behavior in this kind of hybrid porous solid materials.

  20. IV-VI semiconductor growth on silicon substrates and new mid-infrared laser fabrication methods

    PubMed

    McCann; Chao; Sachar; McAlister; Li; Fang; Wu; Namjou

    1999-09-01

    This paper reviews results from research conducted at the University of Oklahoma on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor (lead salt) epitaxial growth and laser fabrication procedures that can ultimately lead to dramatic increases in mid-IR laser operating temperatures. Work has focused on growth of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures on silicon substrates using buffer layers that contain BaF2. Recent experiments show that it is possible to obtain high crystalline quality IV-VI semiconductor layer structures on (111)-oriented silicon substrates using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or on (100)-oriented silicon using a combination of MBE and liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Experimental data for IV-VI semiconductor layer structures grown on silicon substrates including crystalline quality information as determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements and absorption edge information as determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission measurements are presented. Results show that these materials can be used to fabricate lasers that cover the 3 microns (3333 cm-1) to 16 microns (625 cm-1) spectral range. Removal of IV-VI semiconductor laser structures from the silicon growth substrate by dissolving BaF2 buffer layers with water is also demonstrated. This allows epitaxially-grown laser structures to be sandwiched between two heat sinks with a minimum of thermally resistive IV-VI semiconductor material. Theoretical modeling predicts that IV-VI lasers fabricated this way will have maximum continuous wave (cw) operating temperatures at least 60 degrees higher than those of IV-VI lasers fabricated on PbSe or PbTe substrates.

  1. Review of the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter, emendation of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato, proposal to reclassify selected species of the genus Arthrobacter in the novel genera Glutamicibacter gen. nov., Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov., Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov., Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov., and emended description of Arthrobacter roseus.

    PubMed

    Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter is discussed, from its first description in 1947 to the present state. Emphasis is given to intrageneric phylogeny and chemotaxonomic characteristics, concentrating on quinone systems, peptidoglycan compositions and polar lipid profiles. Internal groups within the genus Arthrobacter indicated from homogeneous chemotaxonomic traits and corresponding to phylogenetic grouping and/or high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities are highlighted. Furthermore, polar lipid profiles and quinone systems of selected species are shown, filling some gaps concerning these chemotaxonomic traits. Based on phylogenetic groupings, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and homogeneity in peptidoglycan types, quinone systems and polar lipid profiles, a description of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato and an emended description of Arthrobacter roseus are provided. Furthermore, reclassifications of selected species of the genus Arthrobacter into novel genera are proposed, namely Glutamicibacter gen. nov. (nine species), Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov. (six species), Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov. (two species), Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. (six species) and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov. (ten species).

  2. Tailoring the Optical Absorption of Water-Stable Zr(IV)- and Hf(IV)-Based Metal-Organic Framework Photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Doan, Tan L H; Nguyen, Ha L; Pham, Hung Q; Pham-Tran, Nguyen-Nguyen; Le, Thach N; Cordova, Kyle E

    2015-12-01

    New Zr(IV)- and Hf(IV)-based metal-organic framework photocatalysts, termed VNU-1 and VNU-2 (where VNU = Vietnam National University), were synthesized and their resulting structures fully characterized. By employing a highly π-conjugated linker, namely 1,4-bis(2-[4-carboxyphenyl]ethynyl)benzene, the optical absorption properties were effectively red-shifted into the visible light region. This strategy, coupled with the high water stability of the materials, led to enhanced MOF-driven photocatalytic degradation, under ultraviolet-visible light, of organic dye pollutants commonly found in wastewater.

  3. Formation of recombinant triple-helical [alpha 1(IV)]2 alpha 2(IV) collagen molecules in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Hori, H; Utani, A; Burbelo, P D; Yamada, Y

    1997-02-03

    Collagen IV molecules represent a major structural component of basement membranes providing a network of support for the supramolecular structure. Like other collagens, collagen IV forms a triple-helical molecule composed of three alpha chains. Six different alpha chains exist for collagen IV, although the most common isoform consists of two alpha 1(IV) and one alpha 2(IV) chain. To understand the molecular mechanism of triple-helical formation of collagen IV, we expressed recombinant alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) mouse collagen chains in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. An expression vector containing the full length cDNA for the mouse alpha 1(IV) chain was stably transfected into CHO cells and a cell line, A222, which expressed recombinant alpha 1(IV) chains was selected. These A222 cells were then infected with a retroviral expression vector containing the mouse alpha 2(IV) chain and a cell line, A222-A2, stably expressing both recombinant alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains was obtained. Immunoprecipitation of A222 cell lysates revealed a high level of alpha 1(IV) chain monomer, which was unable to form a homotrimer. Analysis of A222-A2 cell lysates revealed the presence of both monomeric alpha 2(IV) and alpha 1(IV) chains as well as a higher molecular weight collagen IV species. Second dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that the high molecular weight species was a heterotrimer consisting of two alpha 1(IV) and one alpha 2(IV) chain. This heterotrimer collagen IV species was pepsin-resistant indicating the formation of a stable triple-helical structure. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the monomer alpha 1(IV) chain was secreted, but at a much slower rate than the heterotrimer. Together these results demonstrate that the alpha 1(IV) chain is not capable of forming homotrimers and suggest that the coexpression with the alpha 2(IV) chain is necessary to form a triple-helical structure.

  4. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a soil carbon model (SoilGen2) in two contrasting loess forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. Y.; Finke, P. A.; Wu, H. B.; Guo, Z. T.

    2013-01-01

    To accurately estimate past terrestrial carbon pools is the key to understanding the global carbon cycle and its relationship with the climate system. SoilGen2 is a useful tool to obtain aspects of soil properties (including carbon content) by simulating soil formation processes; thus it offers an opportunity for both past soil carbon pool reconstruction and future carbon pool prediction. In order to apply it to various environmental conditions, parameters related to carbon cycle process in SoilGen2 are calibrated based on six soil pedons from two typical loess deposition regions (Belgium and China). Sensitivity analysis using the Morris method shows that decomposition rate of humus (kHUM), fraction of incoming plant material as leaf litter (frecto) and decomposition rate of resistant plant material (kRPM) are the three most sensitive parameters that would cause the greatest uncertainty in simulated change of soil organic carbon in both regions. According to the principle of minimizing the difference between simulated and measured organic carbon by comparing quality indices, the suited values of kHUM, (frecto and kRPM in the model are deduced step by step and validated for independent soil pedons. The difference of calibrated parameters between Belgium and China may be attributed to their different vegetation types and climate conditions. This calibrated model allows more accurate simulation of carbon change in the whole pedon and has potential for future modeling of carbon cycle over long timescales.

  5. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a soil carbon model (SoilGen2) in two contrasting loess forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. Y.; Finke, P. A.; Wu, H. B.; Guo, Z. T.

    2012-07-01

    To accurately estimate past terrestrial carbon pools is the key to understand the global carbon cycle and its relationship with the climate system. SoilGen2 is a useful tool to obtain aspects of soil properties (including carbon content) by simulating soil formation processes; thus it offers an opportunity for past soil carbon pool reconstruction. In order to apply it to various environmental conditions, parameters related to carbon cycle process in SoilGen2 are calibrated based on 6 soil pedons from two typical loess deposition regions (Belgium and China). Sensitivity analysis using Morris' method shows that decomposition rate of humus (kHUM), fraction of incoming plant material as leaf litter (frecto) and decomposition rate of resistant plant material (kRPM) are 3 most sensitive parameters that would cause the greatest uncertainty in simulated change of soil organic carbon in both regions. According to the principle of minimizing the difference between simulated and measured organic carbon by comparing quality indices, the suited values of kHUM, frecto and kRPM in the model are deduced step by step. The difference of calibrated parameters between Belgium and China may be attributed to their different vegetation types and climate conditions. This calibrated model is improved for better simulation of carbon change in the whole pedon and has potential for future modeling of carbon cycle in paleosols.

  6. Max Phase Materials And Coatings For High Temperature Heat Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Olson, L.; Fuentes, R.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-10-19

    Molten salts have been used as heat transfer fluids in a variety of applications within proposed Gen IV nuclear designs and in advanced power system such as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP). However, operating at elevated temperatures can cause corrosion in many materials. This work developed coating technologies for MAX phase materials on Haynes-230 and characterized the corrosion of the coatings in the presence of commercial MgCl2-KCl molten salt. Cold spraying of Ti2AlC and physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Ti2AlC or Zr2AlC were tested to determine the most effective form of coating MAX phases on structural substrates. Corrosion testing at 850°C for 100 hrs showed that 3.9 μm Ti2AlC by PVD was slightly protective while 117 μm Ti2AlC by cold spray and 3.6 μm Zr2AlC by PVD were completely protective. None of the tests showed decomposition of the coating (Ti or Zr) into the salt

  7. Thermovenabulum ferriorganovorum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zavarzina, D G; Tourova, T P; Kuznetsov, B B; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Slobodkin, A I

    2002-09-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium (strain Z-9801T) was isolated from a terrestrial hydrothermal source in the Uzon caldera on the Kamchatka peninsula. Cells of strain Z-9801T were straight, sometimes branched rods, 0.5-0.6 microm in diameter and 1.5-7.0 microm in length, with peritrichous flagella. The temperature range for growth was 45-76 degrees C, with an optimum at 63-65 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 4.8-8.2, with an optimum at 6.7-6.9. The substrates utilized by strain Z-9801T included peptone, yeast extract, beef extract, Casamino acids, starch, pyruvate, melibiose, sucrose, fructose, maltose, xylose and ribose. The fermentation products from melibiose were ethanol, acetate, H2 and CO2. Strain Z-9801T used H2 in the presence of Fe(III) and an organic electron donor. Strain Z-9801T reduced Fe(III), Mn(IV), nitrate, fumarate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and 9,10-anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonate. The G+C content of strain Z-9801T DNA was 36 mol%. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that the isolated organism forms a separate branch within the Bacillus/Clostridium group. On the basis of physiological properties and phylogenetic analysis, it is proposed that strain Z-9801T (= DSM 14006T = UNIQEM 210T) should be assigned to a novel species of a new genus, Thermovenabulum ferriorganovorum gen. nov., sp. nov.

  8. Smaragdicoccus niigatensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the suborder Corynebacterineae.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoko; Katsuta, Atsuko; Matsuda, Satoru; Peng, Xue; Misawa, Norihiko; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Yokota, Akira; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2007-02-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic approach was applied to determine the taxonomic position of a hydrocarbon-degrading actinomycete, strain Hou_blueT, which was isolated from soil samples collected from an oil spring in Niigata, Japan. The results of 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequence comparisons indicated that strain Hou_blueT represented a novel lineage in the suborder Corynebacterineae. Colonies were malachite green-like in colour on 1/10 trypticase soy agar and the cell morphology was coccoid in all growth phases. The cell-wall diamino acid and sugar indicated chemotype IV and variation A1gamma. The sugars of the peptidoglycan were glycolated. The polar lipids were composed of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and some unspecified glycolipids. The organism contained two novel cyclic forms of menaquinone, smaragdiquinone A-8(H4, omega-cycl) and smaragdiquinone B-8(H4, dicycl). The major fatty acids were cis-9-18 : 1 (34.46 %) and 16 : 0 (25.1 %). Small amounts of 10-methyl-branched fatty acids were also present (10-methyl-17 : 0, 0.17 %), but not tuberculostearic acid (10-methyl-18 : 0), which has been shown to be present in all nocardiae. Gas-chromatographic analysis of the mycolic acid revealed a carbon-chain length of C43-C49. The DNA G+C content was 63.7 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctness, the organism is proposed to represent a novel genus and species, Smaragdicoccus niigatensis gen. nov., sp. nov., with the type strain Hou_blueT (=MBIC 06267T=DSM 44881T).

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  11. Synthesis and Properties of Group IV Graphane Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Joshua

    Similar to how carbon networks can be sculpted into low-dimensional allotropes such as fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene with fundamentally different properties, it is possible to create similar ligand terminated sp3-hybridized honeycomb graphane derivatives containing Ge or Sn that feature unique and tunable properties. Here, we will describe our recent success in the creation of hydrogen and organic-terminated group IV graphane analogues, from the topochemical deintercalation of precursor Zintl phases, such as CaGe2. We will discuss how the optical, electronic, and thermal properties of these materials can be systematically controlled by substituting either the surface ligand or via alloying with other Group IV elements. Additionally, we have also developed an epitopotaxial approach for integrating precise thicknesses of germanane layers onto Ge wafers that combines the epitaxial deposition of CaGe2 precursor phases with the topotactic interconversion into the 2D material. Finally, we will describe our recent efforts on the synthesis and crystal structures of Sn-containing graphane alloys in order to access novel topological phenomena predicted to occur in these graphanes.

  12. Hunting for new restriction enzymes in GenBank

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.J.

    1997-12-01

    Restriction enzyme genes are hard to identify unless their surrounding sequences are available. This is because the best definition of a restriction enzyme gene is an open reading frame, that looks like nothing else in GenBank, but lies close to a DNA methylase gene. There are other clues too, such as nearby reading frames that code control proteins or the DNA specificity subunits of Type I restriction enzymes. We are developing software that searches the daily updates of GenBank to find candidate restriction enzyme genes. This is being followed by bench experiments to see of the predictions are correct. More than 50 potential new restriction enzymes have been predicted and it is quite remarkable that the density of restriction enzyme genes in microbial DNA is greater than one system per 200 Kb. The software development is emphasizing the graphic presentation of the search results. The approach could be used for other situations where a molecular biologist is interested to find new examples of their favorite genes.

  13. Next gen wavelets down-sampling preserving statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold; Miao, Lidan; Chanyagon, Pornchai; Cader, Masud

    2007-04-01

    We extend the 2 nd Gen Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) of Swelden to the Next Generations (NG) Digital Wavelet Transform (DWT) preserving the statistical salient features. The lossless NG DWT accomplishes the data compression of "wellness baseline profiles (WBP)" of aging population at homes. For medical monitoring system at home fronts we translate the military experience to dual usage of veterans & civilian alike with the following three requirements: (i) Data Compression: The necessary down sampling reduces the immense amount of data of individual WBP from hours to days and to weeks for primary caretakers in terms of moments, e.g. mean value, variance, etc., without the artifacts caused by FFT arbitrary windowing. (ii) Lossless: our new NG_DWT must preserve the original data sets. (iii) Phase Transition: NG_DWT must capture the critical phase transition of the wellness toward the sickness with simultaneous display of local statistical moments. According to the Nyquist sampling theory, assuming a band-limited wellness physiology, we must sample the WBP at least twice per day since it is changing diurnally and seasonally. Since NG_DWT, like the 2 nd Gen, is lossless, we can reconstruct the original time series for the physicians' second looks. This technique of NG_DWT can also help stock market day-traders monitoring the volatility of multiple portfolios without artificial horizon artifacts.

  14. GenGIS: A geospatial information system for genomic data

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Donovan H.; Porter, Michael; Churcher, Sylvia; Wang, Suwen; Blouin, Christian; Whalley, Jacqueline; Brooks, Stephen; Beiko, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of genetic sequence data associated with explicit geographic and ecological information is offering new opportunities to study the processes that shape biodiversity. The generation and testing of hypotheses using these data sets requires effective tools for mathematical and visual analysis that can integrate digital maps, ecological data, and large genetic, genomic, or metagenomic data sets. GenGIS is a free and open-source software package that supports the integration of digital map data with genetic sequences and environmental information from multiple sample sites. Essential bioinformatic and statistical tools are integrated into the software, allowing the user a wide range of analysis options for their sequence data. Data visualizations are combined with the cartographic display to yield a clear view of the relationship between geography and genomic diversity, with a particular focus on the hierarchical clustering of sites based on their similarity or phylogenetic proximity. Here we outline the features of GenGIS and demonstrate its application to georeferenced microbial metagenomic, HIV-1, and human mitochondrial DNA data sets. PMID:19635847

  15. GenDecoder: genetic code prediction for metazoan mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Posada, David

    2006-01-01

    Although the majority of the organisms use the same genetic code to translate DNA, several variants have been described in a wide range of organisms, both in nuclear and organellar systems, many of them corresponding to metazoan mitochondria. These variants are usually found by comparative sequence analyses, either conducted manually or with the computer. Basically, when a particular codon in a query-species is linked to positions for which a specific amino acid is consistently found in other species, then that particular codon is expected to translate as that specific amino acid. Importantly, and despite the simplicity of this approach, there are no available tools to help predicting the genetic code of an organism. We present here GenDecoder, a web server for the characterization and prediction of mitochondrial genetic codes in animals. The analysis of automatic predictions for 681 metazoans aimed us to study some properties of the comparative method, in particular, the relationship among sequence conservation, taxonomic sampling and reliability of assignments. Overall, the method is highly precise (99%), although highly divergent organisms such as platyhelminths are more problematic. The GenDecoder web server is freely available from . PMID:16845034

  16. The Berkeley SETI program - SERENDIP IV instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werthimer, Dan; Bowyer, Stuart; Ng, David; Donnelly, Charles; Cobb, Jeff; Lampton, Michael; Airieau, Sabine

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the hardware design of SERENDIP IV, which will be deployed in early 1997 for a 21-cm sky survey at the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center's 305-m radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. SERENDIP IV is a 167 million channel spectrum analyzer, covering a 100-Mhz bandwidth, with 0.6-Hz resolution and a 1.7-s integration time. SERENDIP IV's modular design incorporates a bank of digital mixers and filters to separate the 100 MHz band into 40 2.5 MHz subbands. Each 2.5 MHz subband is further broken down into 0.6 Hz bins by means of a four million point fast Fourier transform. The resulting power spectra are analyzed by 40 high-speed processors. Narrowband signals having power significantly above background noise levels are recorded along with telescope coordinates, time, and frequency. The data are sent in real time to Berkeley for analysis.

  17. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. Polarization and valley switching in monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanakata, Paul Z.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Campbell, David K.; Park, Harold S.

    2016-07-01

    Group-IV monochalcogenides are a family of two-dimensional puckered materials with an orthorhombic structure that is comprised of polar layers. In this article, we use first principles calculations to show the multistability of monolayer SnS and GeSe, two prototype materials where the direction of the puckering can be switched by application of tensile stress or electric field. Furthermore, the two inequivalent valleys in momentum space, which are dictated by the puckering orientation, can be excited selectively using linearly polarized light, and this provides an additional tool to identify the polarization direction. Our findings suggest that SnS and GeSe monolayers may have observable ferroelectricity and multistability, with potential applications in information storage.

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors and diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Christopher H S

    2008-01-01

    Current type 2 diabetes therapies are mainly targeted at stimulating pancreatic beta-cell secretion and reducing insulin resistance. A number of alternative therapies are currently being developed to take advantage of the actions of the incretin hormones Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP). These hormones are released from the small intestine in response to nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. One approach to potentiating their actions is based on inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), the major enzyme responsible for degrading the incretins in vivo. DPP IV exhibits characteristics that have allowed the development of specific orally administered inhibitors with proven efficacy in improving glucose tolerance in animal models of diabetes. A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that DPP IV inhibitors are effective in improving glucose disposal and reducing hemoglobin A1c levels in type 2 diabetic patients and one inhibitor, sitagliptin, is now in therapeutic use, with others likely to receive FDA approval in the near future. Studies aimed at elucidating the mode of action of the inhibitors are still ongoing. Both enhancement of insulin secretion and reduction in glucagon secretion, resulting from the blockade of incretin degradation, are believed to play important roles in DPP IV inhibitor action. Preclinical studies indicate that increased levels of incretins improve beta-cell secretory function and exert effects on beta-cell mitogenesis and survival that can preserve beta-cell mass. Roles for other hormones, neuropeptides and cytokines in DPP IV inhibitor-medicated responses are also possible.

  20. Consistency of IVS nutation time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien; Bizouard, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We give a review of the various VLBI-derived nutation time series provided by the different operational analysis centers of the IVS and three combination centers (IVS, IERS EOP Center, and Rapid Service/Prediction Center). We focus on the stability of small nutation amplitudes, including the free core nutation and other atmospherically-driven nutations, that are of interest for improving Earth models. We discuss the possible origins of the differences (software packaged, inversion methods, analysis configuration including a priori and estimation strategy) and the consequences for scientific exploitation of the data, especially in terms of nutation modeling and inference of the Earth's internal structure.

  1. A Miniaturized Class IV Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Andrew; Tweedie, Andrew; Mathieson, Andrew; Lucas, Margaret

    The class V transducer has found popularity in a diverse range of applications such as surgical and underwater projection systems, where high vibration amplitude for relatively low piezoceramic volume is generated. The class IV transducer offers the potential to attain even higher performance per volume than the class V. In this research, a miniaturized class IV power ultrasonic flextensional transducer is proposed. Simulations were performed using PZFlex finite element analysis, and electrical impedance analysis and experimental modal analysis were conducted for validation, where a high correlation between simulation and experiment has been demonstrated.

  2. CAPE-2 Cubesat - ELaNa IV

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-25

    CAPE-2: Cajun Advanced Picosatellite Experiment – ELaNa IV CAPE-2 was developed by students from the University of Louisiana Lafayette to engage, inspire and educate K-12 students to encourage them to pursue STEM careers. The secondary focus is the technology demonstration of deployed solar panels to support the following payloads: text to speech, voice repeater, tweeting, email, file transfer and data collection from buoys. Launched by NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative on the ELaNa IV mission as an auxiliary payload aboard the U.S. Air Force-led Operationally Responsive Space (ORS-3) Mission on November 19, 2013.

  3. Benchmark Development in Support of Generation-IV Reactor Validation (IRPhEP 2010 Handbook)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs

    2010-06-01

    The March 2010 edition of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) Handbook includes additional benchmark data that can be implemented in the validation of data and methods for Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactor designs. Evaluations supporting sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) efforts include the initial isothermal tests of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) 10B and 10C experiments at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the burn-up reactivity coefficient of Japan’s JOYO reactor. An assessment of Russia’s BFS-61 assemblies at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) provides additional information for lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) systems. Benchmarks in support of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) project include evaluations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland and the start-up core physics tests of Japan’s High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The critical configuration of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the INL which used ternary ceramic fuel, U(18)O2-CaO-ZrO2, is of interest for fuel cycle research and development (FCR&D) and has some similarities to “inert-matrix” fuels that are of interest in GEN-IV advanced reactor design. Two additional evaluations were revised to include additional evaluated experimental data, in support of light water reactor (LWR) and heavy water reactor (HWR) research; these include reactor physics experiments at Brazil’s IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor Facility and the French High Flux Reactor (RHF), respectively. The IRPhEP Handbook now includes data from 45 experimental series (representing 24 reactor facilities) and represents contributions from 15 countries. These experimental measurements represent large investments of infrastructure, experience, and cost that have been evaluated and preserved as benchmarks for the validation of methods and collection of

  4. 45 CFR 1355.21 - E and IV-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... compliance with the Department's regulations listed in 45 CFR 1355.30. (c) The State plans and plan... requirements for titles IV PUBLIC WELFARE Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN.... 1355.21 State plan requirements for titles IV-E and IV-B. (a) The State plans for titles IV-E and...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  9. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081 ...

  10. 40 CFR 144.13 - Prohibition of Class IV wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition of Class IV wells. 144.13... IV wells. (a) The following are prohibited, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section: (1) The construction of any Class IV well. (2) The operation or maintenance of any Class IV well not in...

  11. 40 CFR 144.13 - Prohibition of Class IV wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition of Class IV wells. 144.13... IV wells. (a) The following are prohibited, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section: (1) The construction of any Class IV well. (2) The operation or maintenance of any Class IV well not in...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 266 - Reference Air Concentrations*

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference Air Concentrations* IV Appendix IV to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 266—Reference Air Concentrations* Constituent CAS...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 266 - Reference Air Concentrations*

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reference Air Concentrations* IV Appendix IV to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 266—Reference Air Concentrations* Constituent...

  14. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... Department of Defense published a notice titled Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV. DoD has completed... Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/phaseiii.cfm (DPM SECTION...

  15. VitisGen on the road: mapping the way to the next generation of grapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-NIFA VitisGen project (Award No. 2011-51181-30635) aims to optimize grape cultivar improvement through the integration of grape breeding, cutting edge genomics technology, precision phenotyping, socioeconomic research, and extension. VitisGen is a five-year project involving 25 co-PIs at 11...

  16. 77 FR 54648 - Seventh Meeting: RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Meeting: RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee (NAC). SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the seventh meeting of the RTCA...

  17. How is the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 assay (Cepheid) performing on pooled eSwab medium?

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Stijn; Van Vaerenbergh, Kristien; Boel, An; Vankeerberghen, Anne; De Beenhouwer, Hans

    2015-11-01

    The performance of the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 was compared to the Xpert MRSA on pooled eSwab media from nose, throat, and perineum using broth enriched cultured as gold standard. A lower specificity was found for the Xpert MRSA Gen 3 compared to the Xpert MRSA (91.8% versus 97.9%; P<0.05).

  18. CottonGen: a genomics, genetics and breeding database for cotton research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    CottonGen (http://www.cottongen.org) is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing access to publicly available genomic, genetic and breeding data for cotton. CottonGen supercedes CottonDB and the Cotton Marker Database, with enhanced tools for easier data sharing, mining, vis...

  19. Assessment of Response to Lithium Maintenance Treatment in Bipolar Disorder: A Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) Report

    PubMed Central

    Manchia, Mirko; Adli, Mazda; Akula, Nirmala; Ardau, Raffaella; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Backlund, Lena; Banzato, Claudio EM.; Baune, Bernhard T.; Bellivier, Frank; Bengesser, Susanne; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Brichant-Petitjean, Clara; Bui, Elise; Calkin, Cynthia V.; Cheng, Andrew Tai Ann; Chillotti, Caterina; Cichon, Sven; Clark, Scott; Czerski, Piotr M.; Dantas, Clarissa; Zompo, Maria Del; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla D.; Etain, Bruno; Falkai, Peter; Frisén, Louise; Frye, Mark A.; Fullerton, Jan; Gard, Sébastien; Garnham, Julie; Goes, Fernando S.; Grof, Paul; Gruber, Oliver; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hauser, Joanna; Heilbronner, Urs; Hoban, Rebecca; Hou, Liping; Jamain, Stéphane; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Kassem, Layla; Kato, Tadafumi; Kelsoe, John R.; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Kliwicki, Sebastian; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kusumi, Ichiro; Laje, Gonzalo; Lavebratt, Catharina; Leboyer, Marion; Leckband, Susan G.; López Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Maj, Mario; Malafosse, Alain; Martinsson, Lina; Masui, Takuya; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mondimore, Frank; Monteleone, Palmiero; Nallet, Audrey; Neuner, Maria; Novák, Tomás; O’Donovan, Claire; Ösby, Urban; Ozaki, Norio; Perlis, Roy H.; Pfennig, Andrea; Potash, James B.; Reich-Erkelenz, Daniela; Reif, Andreas; Reininghaus, Eva; Richardson, Sara; Rouleau, Guy A.; Rybakowski, Janusz K.; Schalling, Martin; Schofield, Peter R.; Schubert, Oliver K.; Schweizer, Barbara; Seemüller, Florian; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Severino, Giovanni; Seymour, Lisa R.; Slaney, Claire; Smoller, Jordan W.; Squassina, Alessio; Stamm, Thomas; Steele, Jo; Stopkova, Pavla; Tighe, Sarah K.; Tortorella, Alfonso; Turecki, Gustavo; Wray, Naomi R.; Wright, Adam; Zandi, Peter P.; Zilles, David; Bauer, Michael; Rietschel, Marcella; McMahon, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The assessment of response to lithium maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder (BD) is complicated by variable length of treatment, unpredictable clinical course, and often inconsistent compliance. Prospective and retrospective methods of assessment of lithium response have been proposed in the literature. In this study we report the key phenotypic measures of the “Retrospective Criteria of Long-Term Treatment Response in Research Subjects with Bipolar Disorder” scale currently used in the Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) study. Materials and Methods Twenty-nine ConLiGen sites took part in a two-stage case-vignette rating procedure to examine inter-rater agreement [Kappa (κ)] and reliability [intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)] of lithium response. Annotated first-round vignettes and rating guidelines were circulated to expert research clinicians for training purposes between the two stages. Further, we analyzed the distributional properties of the treatment response scores available for 1,308 patients using mixture modeling. Results Substantial and moderate agreement was shown across sites in the first and second sets of vignettes (κ = 0.66 and κ = 0.54, respectively), without significant improvement from training. However, definition of response using the A score as a quantitative trait and selecting cases with B criteria of 4 or less showed an improvement between the two stages (ICC1 = 0.71 and ICC2 = 0.75, respectively). Mixture modeling of score distribution indicated three subpopulations (full responders, partial responders, non responders). Conclusions We identified two definitions of lithium response, one dichotomous and the other continuous, with moderate to substantial inter-rater agreement and reliability. Accurate phenotypic measurement of lithium response is crucial for the ongoing ConLiGen pharmacogenomic study. PMID:23840348

  20. Characterization and angiogenic potential of xenogeneic bone grafting materials: Role of periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Charlotte; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Camilleri, Josette; Laurent, Patrick; About, Imad

    2016-12-01

    Adequate revascularization is a prerequisite for successful healing of periodontal bone defects. This study characterized three different xenogeneic bone grafting materials: Gen-Os of equine and porcine origins, and anorganic Bio-Oss. We also investigated their angiogenic potential. All materials were composed of poorly crystalline calcium oxide phosphate, with Bio-Oss exhibiting a carbonated phase and larger particle size and both Gen-Os showing the presence of collagen. Both Gen-Os materials significantly enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by PDL cells. A significant increase in endothelial cell proliferation was observed in cultures with both Gen-Os conditioned media, but not with that of Bio-Oss. Finally, angiogenesis was stimulated by both Gen-Os conditioned media as demonstrated by an increased formation of capillary-like structures. Taken together, these findings indicate an enhanced angiogenic potential of both Gen-Os bone grafting materials when applied on PDL cells, most likely by increasing VEGF production.

  1. Painlevé IV coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, David; Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernández C, David J.

    2014-11-15

    A simple way to find solutions of the Painlevé IV equation is by identifying Hamiltonian systems with third-order differential ladder operators. Some of these systems can be obtained by applying supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM) to the harmonic oscillator. In this work, we will construct families of coherent states for such subset of SUSY partner Hamiltonians which are connected with the Painlevé IV equation. First, these coherent states are built up as eigenstates of the annihilation operator, then as displaced versions of the extremal states, both involving the related third-order ladder operators, and finally as extremal states which are also displaced but now using the so called linearized ladder operators. To each SUSY partner Hamiltonian corresponds two families of coherent states: one inside the infinite subspace associated with the isospectral part of the spectrum and another one in the finite subspace generated by the states created through the SUSY technique. - Highlights: • We use SUSY QM to obtain Hamiltonians with third-order differential ladder operators. • We show that these systems are related with the Painlevé IV equation. • We apply different definitions of coherent states to these Hamiltonians using the third-order ladder operators and some linearized ones. • We construct families of coherent states for such systems, which we called Painlevé IV coherent states.

  2. DSM IV, Culture and Child Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Cécile; Measham, Toby; Bathiche-Suidan, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Objective The expanding cultural diversity of children and families with mental health needs raises questions about the cultural appropriateness of diagnostic classifications like the DSM IV. This paper briefly surveys the literature on culture and DSM-IV in child psychiatry, presenting ADHD as an example of the relationship between diagnostic categories and cultural issues, and illustrating some of the clinical dilemmas of differential diagnosis in a migration context. Method a literature review was performed and analysed, and a case vignette was constructed to illustrate key points. Results The literature does not provide a definite answer about the DSM IV cultural validity in child psychiatry. On the one hand it suggests that all diagnostic categories may be found universally. On the other, variations in prevalence rates support the hypothesis of a role for social and cultural factors in the diagnostic process. The clinical formulation may be a useful tool to address the validity issue by modulating the process of diagnosis with a cultural understanding of the symptoms, the patient-therapist alliance and the appropriateness of treatment recommendations. Conclusion Although the DSM IV diagnostic categories may be found cross culturally, clinicians need to be aware of how culture may influence the diagnostic process in child psychiatry. PMID:18516309

  3. The carbonate complexation of plutonium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, D E; Palmer, P D; Newton, T W

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium(IV) carbonate complexes are expected to be of particular importance in typical groundwaters at the Yucca Mountain site of the candidate nuclear waste repository being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. The chemistry of these complexes is also important in the areas of nuclear fuel reprocessing and purification, actinide separations, and environmental studies. This report describes initial experiments performed to determine the identity and equilibrium quotients of plutonium(IV) carbonate complexes. These experiments were performed at pH values between 7.2 and 9.6 using a spectrophotometric method. In addition, a brief review of the published literature on Pu(IV) carbonate complexes is presented. Since Pu(IV) exhibits low solubility in the near-neutral pH range, a complex-competition reaction where citrate ligands compete with carbonate ions for the plutonium will be employed. This will permit us to study the pure carbonate system; study the mixed carbonate/citrate system, and confirm and extend the literature work on the pure citrate system. The current experiments have demonstrated the existence of at least three distinct species in the pH region studied. This work will continue in the extended study of the pure citrate system, followed by the investigation of the citrate/carbonate complex/competition reaction. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. National Coastal Condition Report IV (2012)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NCCR IV data shows an overall condition score of 3.0 for the nation’s coastal waters; although this score has improved substantially since 1990, the overall condition of the nation’s coastal resources continues to be rated fair.

  5. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  6. DSN command system Mark IV-85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorman, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    A functional description of the Deep Space Network Command System and its subsystem is presented. The DSP command system was implemented in 1986. Store and forward command functions are reviewed. Throughput command functions for Earth orbiter missions and subsystems configurations for Mark IV-85 system are summarized.

  7. Nurses' acceptance of Smart IV pump technology.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2010-06-01

    "Smart" intravenous infusion pumps (Smart IV pumps) are increasingly being implemented in hospitals to reduce medication administration errors. This study examines nurses' experience with the implementation and use of a Smart IV pump in an academic hospital. Data were collected in three longitudinal surveys: (a) a pre-implementation survey, (b) a 6-week-post-implementation survey, and (c) a 1-year-post-implementation survey. We examined: (a) the technology implementation process, (b) technical performance of the pump, (c) usability of the pump, and (d) user acceptance of the pump. Initially, nurses had a somewhat positive acceptance of the Smart IV pump technology that significantly increased one year after implementation. User experiences associated with the pump in general improved over time, especially perceptions of pump efficiency. However, user experience with the pump implementation process and pump technical performance did not consistently improve from the pre-implementation survey to the post-implementation survey. Several characteristics of pump technical performance and usability influenced user acceptance at the one-year post-implementation survey. These data may be useful for other institutions to guide implementation and post-implementation follow-up of IV pump use; other institutions could use the survey instrument from this study to evaluate nurses' perceptions of the technology. Our study identified several characteristics of the implementation process that other institutions may need to pay attention to (e.g., sharing information about the implementation process with nurses). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intelsat IV-F5 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An Atlas-Centaur space vehicle lifted off at 5:53 p.m. EDT, June 13, 1972, from Complex 36B carrying an Intelsat Communications Satellite, (Intelsat IV-F5) into Earth orbit. Visible in the foreground is the lighthouse located at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  9. Leveraging Information Technology. Track IV: Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track IV, Support Services, are presented. They include: "Application Development Center" (John F. Leydon); "College Information Management System: The Design and Implementation of a Completely Integrated Office Automation and Student Information System" (Karen L. Miselis);…

  10. Nurses’ Acceptance of Smart IV Pump Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2010-01-01

    Background “Smart” intravenous infusion pumps (Smart IV pumps) are increasingly being implemented in hospitals to reduce medication administration errors. Objectives This study examines nurses’ experience with the implementation and use of a Smart IV pump in an academic hospital. Method Data were collected in three longitudinal surveys: (a) a pre-implementation survey, (b) a 6-week-post-implementation survey, and (c) a 1-year-post-implementation survey. We examined: (a) the technology implementation process, (b) technical performance of the pump, (c) usability of the pump, and (d) user acceptance of the pump. Results Initially, nurses had a somewhat positive acceptance of the Smart IV pump technology that significantly increased one year after implementation. User experiences associated with the pump in general improved over time, especially perceptions of pump efficiency. However, user experience with the pump implementation process and pump technical performance did not consistently improve from the pre-implementation survey to the post-implementation survey. Several characteristics of pump technical performance and usability influenced user acceptance at the one-year post-implementation survey. Discussion These data may be useful for other institutions to guide implementation and post-implementation follow-up of IV pump use; other institutions could use the survey instrument from this study to evaluate nurses’ perceptions of the technology. Our study identified several characteristics of the implementation process that other institutions may need to pay attention to (e.g., sharing information about the implementation process with nurses). PMID:20219423

  11. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist. PMID:21253201

  12. The O IV and S IV intercombination lines in solar and stellar ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Keenan, F. P.; Dufton, P. L.; Kingston, A. E.; Pradhan, A. K.; Zhang, H. L.; Doyle, J. G.; Hayes, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    New calculations of O IV electron density diagnostic emission-line ratios involving the 1399.8, 1401.2, 1404.8, and 14076.4 A transitions are presented. A comparison of these calculations with observational data from a quiet solar region, a sunspot, and an active region obtained with the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS), two flares observed with the SO82B spectrograph on board Skylab, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) of Capella, gives good results using the ratio R(sub 1) = I(1407.4 A)/I(1401.2 A). However, the electron density obtained using the ratio R(sub 2) = I(1407.4 A)/I(1404.8 A) is often an order of magnitude smaller. The O IV 1404.8 A line is blended with the S IV 1404.8 A line, and we investigate whether this ratio may still be used as a density diagnostic if the S IV 1406.1 A line intensity is used to correct for the presence of S IV 1404.8 A, using previous S IV calculations by Dufton et al. We still find systematic differences compared to density determinations from line ratios that do not involve the O IV 1404.8 A line, which we suggest are due to errors in earlier theoretical calculations of the S IV atomic data, and also possibly to previously unconsidered fluorescent pumping of the upper level of the S IV 1404.8 A transition.

  13. 34 CFR 668.22 - Treatment of title IV funds when a student withdraws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Perkins Loan, Direct Loan, FFEL, Federal Pell Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant, National SMART Grant... enrollment and must be consistent with the published materials describing the institution's programs, unless...) Academic Competitiveness Grants. (iii) National SMART Grants. (iv) FSEOG Program aid. (v) TEACH Grants. (j...

  14. 34 CFR 668.22 - Treatment of title IV funds when a student withdraws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Perkins Loan, Direct Loan, FFEL, Federal Pell Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant, National SMART Grant... enrollment and must be consistent with the published materials describing the institution's programs, unless...) Academic Competitiveness Grants. (iii) National SMART Grants. (iv) FSEOG Program aid. (v) TEACH Grants. (j...

  15. 34 CFR 668.22 - Treatment of title IV funds when a student withdraws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Perkins Loan, Direct Loan, FFEL, Federal Pell Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant, National SMART Grant... enrollment and must be consistent with the published materials describing the institution's programs, unless...) Academic Competitiveness Grants. (iii) National SMART Grants. (iv) FSEOG Program aid. (v) TEACH Grants. (j...

  16. Horticulture III, IV, and V. Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education in the horticulture program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for horticulture III, IV, and V. For each task, applicable information pertaining to performance and enabling objectives,…

  17. Adding source positions to the IVS Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, S.; Thaller, D.

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneous estimation of source positions, Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) and station positions in one common adjustment is crucial for a consistent generation of celestial and terrestrial reference frame (CRF and TRF, respectively). VLBI is the only technique to guarantee this consistency. Previous publications showed that the VLBI intra-technique combination could improve the quality of the EOPs and station coordinates compared to the individual contributions. By now, the combination of EOP and station coordinates is well established within the IVS and in combination with other space geodetic techniques (e.g. inter-technique combined TRF like the ITRF). Most of the contributing IVS Analysis Centers (AC) now provide source positions as a third parameter type (besides EOP and station coordinates), which have not been used for an operational combined solution yet. A strategy for the combination of source positions has been developed and integrated into the routine IVS combination. Investigations are carried out to compare the source positions derived from different IVS ACs with the combined estimates to verify whether the source positions are improved by the combination, as it has been proven for EOP and station coordinates. Furthermore, global solutions of source positions, i.e., so-called catalogues describing a CRF, are generated consistently with the TRF similar to the IVS operational combined quarterly solution. The combined solutions of the source positions time series and the consistently generated TRF and CRF are compared internally to the individual solutions of the ACs as well as to external CRF catalogues and TRFs. Additionally, comparisons of EOPs based on different CRF solutions are presented as an outlook for consistent EOP, CRF and TRF realizations.

  18. What Can a Historian Do with AstroGen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    "Astrogen", the Astronomy Genealogy Project, is in the development stage. Patterned after the Mathematics Genealogy Project at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu, it will eventually include most of the world's astronomers, past and present, and provide information about their years of life, highest degrees, universities, and thesis titles. There will also be links to online theses, home pages, and obituaries when these are available. Although a few details remain to be worked out before it becomes public, it is possible to make some use of what has already been compiled. I will give an example, comparing graduates of Harvard University, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Chicago from different decades, with information about their professional careers and publication records. The author welcomes queries about AstroGen and is seeking more participants.

  19. Two-dimensional MHD generator model. [GEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H. K.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Doss, E. D.

    1980-09-01

    A steady state, two-dimensional MHD generator code, GEN, is presented. The code solves the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, using a Von Mises transformation and a local linearization of the equations. By splitting the source terms into a part proportional to the axial pressure gradient and a part independent of the gradient, the pressure distribution along the channel is easily obtained to satisfy various criteria. Thus, the code can run effectively in both design modes, where the channel geometry is determined, and analysis modes, where the geometry is previously known. The code also employs a mixing length concept for turbulent flows, Cebeci and Chang's wall roughness model, and an extension of that model to the effective thermal diffusities. Results on code validation, as well as comparisons of skin friction and Stanton number calculations with experimental results, are presented.

  20. Commissioning and Performance Analysis of WhisperGen Stirling Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradip, Prashant Kaliram

    Stirling engine based cogeneration systems have potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission, due to their high cogeneration efficiency and emission control due to steady external combustion. To date, most studies on this unit have focused on performance based on both experimentation and computer models, and lack experimental data for diversified operating ranges. This thesis starts with the commissioning of a WhisperGen Stirling engine with components and instrumentation to evaluate power and thermal performance of the system. Next, a parametric study on primary engine variables, including air, diesel, and coolant flowrate and temperature were carried out to further understand their effect on engine power and efficiency. Then, this trend was validated with the thermodynamic model developed for the energy analysis of a Stirling cycle. Finally, the energy balance of the Stirling engine was compared without and with heat recovery from the engine block and the combustion chamber exhaust.

  1. Candidate Structural Materials for In-Core VHTR Application

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai; Windes, Will; Smit, Kobus

    2008-01-01

    decreases substantially above {approx}500 C. For the operating temperature (and current maximum code temperature) of the Fort St. Vrain reactor ({approx}760 C) the control rod designed from Alloy 800H would be allowed approximately 20 MPa primary stress. For the anticipated temperature of the VHTR that stress would likely be under 10 MPa in the non-irradiated condition. Selection of VHTR in-core structural material will depend on the ability for the material to withstand extreme temperatures and irradiation. The use of Alloy 800H for control rod applications is preferred, but will require designing with a relatively low strength material which becomes brittle upon modest irradiaton. Presently, more fidelity in both design and the available Alloy 800H database are required to judge the lifetime this alloy will have in service. The only currently envisioned alternative to Alloy 800H are the CFC and SiC/SiC composites, which are currently challenged by code qualification issues. As with Alloy 800H, the composite irradiation data-base is inadequate, though it appears that the CFC service lifetime will be limited due to its anisotropic dimensional change under irradiation to doses somewhat higher than Alloy 800H (1-5 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}), while SiC/SiC composites appear to retain their mechanical properties to doses in excess of the VHTR lifetime dose. As the path to qualification of both CFC and SiC/SiC are similar, it appears that SiC/SiC is more attractive for high-dose Gen IV application unless high thermal conduction is required.

  2. Origin and course of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in iv/iv mice

    PubMed Central

    ICARDO, JOSÉ M.; COLVEE, ELVIRA

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the origin and distribution of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in mice of the iv/iv strain, which show situs inversus and heterotaxia. The coronary arteries were studied by direct observation of the aortic sinuses with the scanning electron microscope, and by examination of vascular corrosion casts. In the normal mouse, the left and right coronaries (LC, RC) arise from the respective Valsalva sinus and course along the ventricular borders to reach the heart apex. Along this course the coronary arteries give off small branches at perpendicular or acute angles to supply the ventricles. The ventricular septum is supplied by the septal artery, which arises as a main branch from the right coronary. Conus arteries arise from the main coronary trunks, from the septal artery and/or directly from the Valsalva sinus. The vascular casts demonstrate the presence of intercoronary anastomoses. The origin of the coronary arteries was found to be abnormal in 84% of the iv/iv mice. These anomalies included double origin, high take-off, slit-like openings and the presence of a single coronary orifice. These anomalies occurred singly or in any combination, and were independent of heart situs. The septal artery originated from RC in most cases of situs solitus but originated predominantly from LC in situs inversus hearts. Except for this anomalous origin no statistical correlation was found between the coronary anomalies and heart situs or a particular mode of heterotaxia. The coronary anomalies observed in the iv/iv mice are similar to those found in human hearts. Most coronary anomalies appear to be due to defective connections between the aortic root and the developing coronaries. iv/iv mice may therefore constitute a good model to study the development of similar anomalies in the human heart. PMID:11693308

  3. New Boletaceae taxa from Guyana: Binderoboletus segoi gen. and sp. nov., Guyanaporus albipodus gen. and sp. nov., Singerocomus rubriflavus gen. and sp. nov., and a new combination for Xerocomus inundabilis.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Terry W; Obase, Keisuke; Husbands, Dillon; Uehling, Jessie K; Bonito, Gregory; Aime, M Catherine; Smith, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Binderoboletus segoi gen. and sp. nov., Guyanaporus albipodus gen. and sp. nov. and Singerocomus rubriflavus gen. and sp. nov. (Boletaceae, Boletales, Basidiomycota) are described from the Pakaraima Mountains and adjacent lowlands of Guyana. Xerocomus inundabilis, originally described from the central Brazilian Amazon and based solely on the type collection, is redescribed from numerous collections from Guyana and transferred into Singerocomus. These boletes occur in Neotropical forests dominated by ectomycorrhizal trees in the genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae), Aldina (Fabaceae subfam. Papilionoideae) and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Three of the species were repeatedly found in a multiyear sporocarp survey in Dicymbe corymbosa-monodominant forest. Macromorphological, micromorphological, habitat and multilocus DNA sequence data are provided for each species. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on a large taxon set across the Boletaceae justifies erection of the new genera.

  4. Hand-held optical imager (Gen-2): improved instrumentation and target detectability.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jean; Decerce, Joseph; Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Nunez, Annie; Roman, Manuela; Traub, Barbara; Flores, Cecilia A; Roberts, Seigbeh M; Hernandez, Estrella; Aguirre, Wenceslao; Kiszonas, Richard; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Hand-held optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards reflectance-based spectroscopic imaging of breast cancer. Recently, a Gen-1 handheld optical imager was developed with capabilities to perform two-dimensional (2-D) spectroscopic as well as three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging studies. However, the imager was bulky with poor surface contact (~30%) along curved tissues, and limited sensitivity to detect targets consistently. Herein, a Gen-2 hand-held optical imager that overcame the above limitations of the Gen-1 imager has been developed and the instrumentation described. The Gen-2 hand-held imager is less bulky, portable, and has improved surface contact (~86%) on curved tissues. Additionally, the forked probe head design is capable of simultaneous bilateral reflectance imaging of both breast tissues, and also transillumination imaging of a single breast tissue. Experimental studies were performed on tissue phantoms to demonstrate the improved sensitivity in detecting targets using the Gen-2 imager. The improved instrumentation of the Gen-2 imager allowed detection of targets independent of their location with respect to the illumination points, unlike in Gen-1 imager. The developed imager has potential for future clinical breast imaging with enhanced sensitivity, via both reflectance and transillumination imaging.

  5. Hand-held optical imager (Gen-2): improved instrumentation and target detectability

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jean; DeCerce, Joseph; Erickson, Sarah J.; Martinez, Sergio L.; Nunez, Annie; Roman, Manuela; Traub, Barbara; Flores, Cecilia A.; Roberts, Seigbeh M.; Hernandez, Estrella; Aguirre, Wenceslao; Kiszonas, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Hand-held optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards reflectance-based spectroscopic imaging of breast cancer. Recently, a Gen-1 handheld optical imager was developed with capabilities to perform two-dimensional (2-D) spectroscopic as well as three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging studies. However, the imager was bulky with poor surface contact (∼30%) along curved tissues, and limited sensitivity to detect targets consistently. Herein, a Gen-2 hand-held optical imager that overcame the above limitations of the Gen-1 imager has been developed and the instrumentation described. The Gen-2 hand-held imager is less bulky, portable, and has improved surface contact (∼86%) on curved tissues. Additionally, the forked probe head design is capable of simultaneous bilateral reflectance imaging of both breast tissues, and also transillumination imaging of a single breast tissue. Experimental studies were performed on tissue phantoms to demonstrate the improved sensitivity in detecting targets using the Gen-2 imager. The improved instrumentation of the Gen-2 imager allowed detection of targets independent of their location with respect to the illumination points, unlike in Gen-1 imager. The developed imager has potential for future clinical breast imaging with enhanced sensitivity, via both reflectance and transillumination imaging. PMID:23224163

  6. Impeding 99Tc(IV) mobility in novel waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Kruger, Albert A.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant, long-lived radioactive fission product whose mobility in the subsurface is largely governed by its oxidation state. Tc immobilization is crucial for radioactive waste management and environmental remediation. Tc(IV) incorporation in spinels has been proposed as a novel method to increase Tc retention in glass waste forms during vitrification. However, experiments under high-temperature and oxic conditions show reoxidation of Tc(IV) to volatile pertechnetate, Tc(VII). Here we examine this problem with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and propose that, at elevated temperatures, doping with first row transition metal can significantly enhance Tc retention in magnetite in the order Co>Zn>Ni. Experiments with doped spinels at 700 °C provide quantitative confirmation of the theoretical predictions in the same order. This work highlights the power of modern, state-of-the-art simulations to provide essential insights and generate theory-inspired design criteria of complex materials at elevated temperatures.

  7. Impeding 99Tc(IV) mobility in novel waste forms

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; ...

    2016-06-30

    Technetium (99Tc) is a long-lived radioactive fission product whose mobility in the subsurface is largely governed by its oxidation state1. Immobilization of Tc in mineral substrates is crucial for radioactive waste management and environmental remediation. Tc(IV) incorporation in spinels2, 3 has been proposed as a novel method to increase Tc retention in glass waste forms. However, experiments with Tc-magnetite under high temperature and oxic conditions showed re-oxidation of Tc(IV) to volatile pertechnetate Tc(VII)O4-.4, 5 Here we address this problem with large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and propose that elevated temperatures, 1st row transition metal dopants can significantly enhance Tcmore » retention in the order Co > Zn > Ni. Experiments with doped spinels at T=700 ºC provided quantitative confirmation of increased Tc retention in the same order predicted by theory. This work highlights the power of modern state-of-the-art simulations to provide essential insights and generate bottom-up design criteria of complex oxide materials at elevated temperatures.« less

  8. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  9. Impeding 99Tc(IV) mobility in novel waste forms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Kruger, Albert A.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant, long-lived radioactive fission product whose mobility in the subsurface is largely governed by its oxidation state. Tc immobilization is crucial for radioactive waste management and environmental remediation. Tc(IV) incorporation in spinels has been proposed as a novel method to increase Tc retention in glass waste forms during vitrification. However, experiments under high-temperature and oxic conditions show reoxidation of Tc(IV) to volatile pertechnetate, Tc(VII). Here we examine this problem with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and propose that, at elevated temperatures, doping with first row transition metal can significantly enhance Tc retention in magnetite in the order Co>Zn>Ni. Experiments with doped spinels at 700 °C provide quantitative confirmation of the theoretical predictions in the same order. This work highlights the power of modern, state-of-the-art simulations to provide essential insights and generate theory-inspired design criteria of complex materials at elevated temperatures. PMID:27357121

  10. Annotations on Mexico's WISC-IV: a validity study.

    PubMed

    Fina, Anthony D; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Hollingworth, Liz

    2012-01-01

    This project seeks to provide evidence on the internal structure of the Escala Wechsler de Inteligencia para Niños-IV (EWIN-IV; Wechsler, 2007a ) through a confirmatory factor analysis and intercorrelational study. Also provided is information on the adaptation process and other sources of validity evidence in support of the EWIN-IV norms. The standardization data for the EWIN-IV were used for all analyses. The factor loadings and correlational patterns found on the EWIN-IV are comparable to those seen in the American versions of the test. The proposed factor and scoring structure of the EWIN-IV was supported.

  11. Mutation and association analysis of GEN1 in breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Clare; Hines, Sarah; Renwick, Anthony; Hughes, Deborah; Pernet, David; Elliott, Anna; Seal, Sheila; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Evans, D. Gareth; Eccles, Diana; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    GEN1 was recently identified as a key Holliday junction resolvase involved in homologous recombination. Somatic truncating GEN1 mutations have been reported in two breast cancers. Together these data led to the proposition that GEN1 is a breast cancer predisposition gene. In this article we have formally investigated this hypothesis. We performed full-gene mutational analysis of GEN1 in 176 BRCA1/2-negative familial breast cancer samples and 159 controls. We genotyped six SNPs tagging the 30 common variants in the transcribed region of GEN1 in 3,750 breast cancer cases and 4,907 controls. Mutation analysis revealed one truncating variant, c.2515_2519del-AAGTT, which was present in 4% of cases and 4% of controls. We identified control individuals homozygous for the deletion, demonstrating that the last 69 amino acids of GEN1 are dispensable for its function. We identified 17 other variants, but their frequency did not significantly differ between cases and controls. Analysis of 3,750 breast cancer cases and 4,907 controls demonstrated no evidence of significant association with breast cancer for six SNPs tagging the 30 common GEN1 variants. These data indicate that although it also plays a key role in double-strand DNA break repair, GEN1 does not make an appreciable contribution to breast cancer susceptibility by acting as a high- or intermediate-penetrance breast cancer predisposition gene like BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 and PALB2 and that common GEN1 variants do not act as low-penetrance susceptibility alleles analogous to SNPs in FGFR2. Furthermore, our analyses demonstrate the importance of undertaking appropriate genetic investigations, typically full gene screening in cases and controls together with large-scale case–control association analyses, to evaluate the contribution of genes to cancer susceptibility. PMID:20512659

  12. DNA clone of human type IV collagenase

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, G.I.; Eisen, A.Z.

    1990-05-08

    This patent relates to type IV collagenase, herein after also referred to as gelatinase. More particularly, the patent relates to the cDNA clone representing the full size human type IV collagenase (gelatinase). Collagens constitute the most abundant proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in mammalian organisms. Collagen and other macromolecules of the ECM are deposited by resident cells and organized into a three-dimensional meshwork. This ECM environment plays an essential role in guiding cell migration, and in cell-to-cell communication during morphogenetic processes. The restructuring of the ECM during remodeling occurs as a cooperative multistep process involving a localized degradation of existing macromolecules, rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, cell translocation, and deposition of new ECM components.

  13. Mariner IV Mission to Mars. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jack N.

    1965-01-01

    This technical report is a series of individual papers documenting the Mariner-Mars project from its beginning in 1962 following the successful Mariner-Venus mission. Part I is pre-encounter data. It includes papers on the design, development, and testing of Mariner IV, as well as papers detailing methods of maintaining communication with and obtaining data from the spacecraft during flight, and expected results during encounter with Mars. Part 11, post-encounter data, to be published later, will consist of documentation of the events taking place during Mariner IV's encounter with Mars and thereafter. The Mariner-Mars mission, the culmination of an era of spacecraft development, has contributed much new technology to be used in future projects.

  14. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    DOEpatents

    Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  15. What Is New in Rome IV

    PubMed Central

    Schmulson, Max J; Drossman, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are diagnosed and classified using the Rome criteria; the criteria may change over time as new scientific data emerge. The Rome IV was released in May 2016. The aim is to review the main changes in Rome IV. FGIDs are now called disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI). Rome IV has a multicultural rather than a Western-culture focus. There are new chapters including multicultural, age-gender-women’s health, intestinal microenvironment, biopsychosocial, and centrally mediated disorders. New disorders have been included although not truly FGIDs, but fit the new definition of DGBI including opioid-induced gastrointestinal hyperalgesia, opioid-induced constipation, and cannabinoid hyperemesis. Also, new FGIDs based on available evidence including reflux hypersensitivity and centrally mediated abdominal pain syndrome. Using a normative survey to determine the frequency of normal bowel symptoms in the general population changes in the time frame for diagnosis were introduced. For irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) only pain is required and discomfort was eliminated because it is non-specific, having different meanings in different languages. Pain is now related to bowel movements rather than just improving with bowel movements (ie, can get worse with bowel movement). Functional bowel disorders (functional diarrhea, functional constipation, IBS with predominant diarrhea [IBS-D], IBS with predominant constipation [IBS-C], and IBS with mixed bowel habits) are considered to be on a continuum rather than as independent entities. Clinical applications such as diagnostic algorithms and the Multidimensional Clinical Profile have been updated. The new Rome IV iteration is evidence-based, multicultural oriented and with clinical applications. As new evidence become available, future updates are expected. PMID:28274109

  16. What is new in Rome IV.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, Max J; Drossman, Douglas Arnold

    2017-03-09

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are diagnosed and classified using the Rome criteria; the criteria may change over time as new scientific data emerge. The Rome IV was released in May 2016. The aim is to review the main changes in Rome IV. FGIDs are now called disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI). Rome IV has a multicultural rather than a Western-culture focus. There are new chapters including multicultural, age-gender-women's health, intestinal microenvironment, biopsychosocial, and centrally mediated disorders. New disorders have been included although not truly FGIDs, but fit the new definition of DGBI including opioid-induced gastrointestinal hyperalgesia, opioid-induced constipation, and cannabinoid hyperemesis. Also, new FGIDs based on available evidence including reflux hypersensitivity and centrally mediatedabdominal pain syndrome. Using a normative survey to determine the frequency of normal bowel symptoms in the general population changes in the time frame for diagnosis were introduced. For irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) only pain is required and discomfort was eliminated because it is non-specific, having different meanings in different languages. Pain is now related to bowel movements rather than just improving with bowel movements (ie, can get worse with bowel movement). Functional bowel disorders (functional diarrhea, functional constipation, IBS with predominant diarrhea [IBS-D], IBS with predominant constipation [IBS-D], and mixed IBS) are considered to be on a continuum rather than as independent entities. Clinical applications such as diagnostic algorithms and the Multidimensional Clinical Profile have been updated. The new Rome IV iteration is evidence-based, multicultural oriented and with clinical applications. As new evidence become available, future updates are expected.

  17. Flexible Manufacturing System Handbook. Volume IV. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    controls. (9) Sets of batteries (one set per vehicle per shift). (3) Battery chargers . (1) Frequency generator. Necessary area controllers. Necessary battery ...When Date Entered)__________________ REPOT DC -U171,NTATON AGEREAD INSTRUCTIONSREPOT DOIJIENTAION AGEBEFORE COMPLETING FORM I. REPORT NUb’EER 2.GOVT...Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 ii FMS Handbook, Volume IV PREFACE This is the fourth volume in a five-volume series designed to answer the

  18. Quicksilver IV: The Real Operation Fortitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    original research, primarily in the British National Archives at Kew Gardens . Chapter 1 provides a brief overview of the Allied deception campaign...Taxable and Glimmer Source: The National Archives, Kew In conjunction with the sea diversionary plans, the Allies also executed four airborne...operations (see figure 3). 18 Figure 3. The Airborne Diversions – Operations Titanic I-IV Source: The National Archives, Kew Titanic I worked

  19. APCS TYPE IV CAMERA POD TEST.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Type IV camera pod was evaluated for adaptation to the A-1E aircraft. Flight tests to evaluate camera pod steadiness were flown with the pod ...mounted on the No. 3 outboard station, the left inboard station, and the centerline station. After confirmation of minimal pod and camera vibration on...camera pod test aircraft. The camera pod photographic coverage of ordnance delivery was accomplished with forward and aft facing, 16mm, Milliken DB-5

  20. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, Alexander Matthew; Jaegers, Peter James

    2016-08-11

    Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.

  1. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  2. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  3. I-V characterization of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veissid, N.; Ranvaud, R.; Fonseca, F. J.

    1981-06-01

    Equivalent circuits were analysed and then I-V characteristics obtained from different solar cells were compared with those from the circuits. The measures were obtained under natural conditions and under artificial conditions (solar simulator made of easily obtained light sources and several filters). The identification of components in the equivalent circuit, together with the theory of photovoltaic conversion, is very important in the optimization of the cell design. A numeric method for determination of the series resistance is proposed.

  4. The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force *EDITED by DR. RICHARD H. KOHN Editorial Abstract: Air...Force chief of staff Gen Ronald Fogleman’s early retirement in 1997 has caused great speculation. Was this a “resignation in protest”? Here for the...COVERED 00-00-2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Early Retirement of Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 5a

  5. gSeaGen: A GENIE-based code for neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, Carla

    2016-04-01

    The gSeaGen code is a GENIE based application to generate neutrino-induced events in an underwater neutrino detector. The gSeaGen code is able to generate events induced by all neutrino flavours, taking into account topological differences between track-type and shower-like events. The neutrino interaction is simulated taking into account the density and the composition of the media surrounding the detector. The main features of gSeaGen will be presented together with some examples of its application within ANTARES and KM3NeT.

  6. GenASiS: A full GR-RMHD simulation framework: overview, goals, and preliminary tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsin, Petr; Budiardja, Reuben; Cardall, Christian; Endeve, Eirik; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2011-04-01

    I present an overview of the General Astrophysics Simulation System (GenASiS). GenASiS is currently under development by a collaboration between researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Florida Atlantic University (FAU) and features a high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics solver, a full general relativistic description of gravity based on the BSSN formalism, and will feature a two-moment multi-frequency neutrino radiation field evolution. We intend to use GenASiS to study core collapse supernovae, neutron star mergers, and their associated gamma-ray bursts.

  7. Multi-PMT Optical Module Designs for IceCube-Gen2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappes, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    IceCube-Gen2 is the planned next generation neutrino telescope at the South Pole incorporating a high-energy array for neutrino astronomy and a dense array (PINGU) aimed at the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy. Here, we present alternative designs to IceCube-Gen2's single-PMT baseline optical module which are currently being developed. These designs feature up to 24 smaller photomultipliers and use glass and gel with enhanced UV transparency to increase the number of detected photons and provide additional information. Thereby, they have the potential to significantly enhance the performance of IceCube-Gen2.

  8. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  9. DNA ligase IV syndrome; a review.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Thomas; Gennery, Andrew R

    2016-10-07

    DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation.Within developing lymphocytes, DNA ligase IV is required to repair programmed DNA double stranded breaks induced during lymphocyte receptor development.Patients with hypomorphic mutations in LIG4 present with a range of phenotypes, from normal to severe combined immunodeficiency. All, however, manifest sensitivity to ionising radiation. Commonly associated features include primordial growth failure with severe microcephaly and a spectrum of learning difficulties, marrow hypoplasia and a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. Diagnostic investigations include immunophenotyping, and testing for radiosensitivity. Some patients present with microcephaly as a predominant feature, but seemingly normal immunity. Treatment is mainly supportive, although haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used in a few cases.

  10. Type IV Pilin Proteins: Versatile Molecular Modules

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, Carmen L.; Nguyen, Ylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Type IV pili (T4P) are multifunctional protein fibers produced on the surfaces of a wide variety of bacteria and archaea. The major subunit of T4P is the type IV pilin, and structurally related proteins are found as components of the type II secretion (T2S) system, where they are called pseudopilins; of DNA uptake/competence systems in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species; and of flagella, pili, and sugar-binding systems in the archaea. This broad distribution of a single protein family implies both a common evolutionary origin and a highly adaptable functional plan. The type IV pilin is a remarkably versatile architectural module that has been adopted widely for a variety of functions, including motility, attachment to chemically diverse surfaces, electrical conductance, acquisition of DNA, and secretion of a broad range of structurally distinct protein substrates. In this review, we consider recent advances in this research area, from structural revelations to insights into diversity, posttranslational modifications, regulation, and function. PMID:23204365

  11. [The quantitative testing of V617F mutation in gen JAK2 using pyrosequencing technique].

    PubMed

    Dunaeva, E A; Mironov, K O; Dribnokhodova, T E; Subbotina, E E; Bashmakova; Ol'hovskiĭ, I A; Shipulin, G A

    2014-11-01

    The somatic mutation V617F in gen JAK2 is a frequent cause of chronic myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. The quantitative testing of relative percentage of mutant allele can be used in establishing severity of disease and its prognosis and in prescription of remedy inhibiting activity of JAK2. To quantitatively test mutation the pyrosequencing technique was applied. The developed technique permits detecting and quantitatively, testing percentage of mutation fraction since 7%. The "gray zone" is presented by samples with percentage of mutant allele from 4% to 7%. The dependence of expected percentage of mutant fraction in analyzed sample from observed value of signal is described by equation of line with regression coefficients y = - 0.97, x = -1.32 and at that measurement uncertainty consists ± 0.7. The developed technique is approved officially on clinical material from 192 patients with main forms of myeloprolific diseases not conditioned by BCR/ABL mutation. It was detected 64 samples with mautant fraction percentage from 13% to 91%. The developed technique permits implementing monitoring of therapy of myeloprolific diseases and facilitates to optimize tactics of treatment.

  12. Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., the oldest member of the giant panda clade.

    PubMed

    Abella, Juan; Alba, David M; Robles, Josep M; Valenciano, Alberto; Rotgers, Cheyenn; Carmona, Raül; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Carnivora: Ursidae: Ailuropodinae), has been one of the most hotly debated topics by mammalian biologists and paleontologists during the last century. Based on molecular data, it is currently recognized as a true ursid, sister-taxon of the remaining extant bears, from which it would have diverged by the Early Miocene. However, from a paleobiogeographic and chronological perspective, the origin of the giant panda lineage has remained elusive due to the scarcity of the available Miocene fossil record. Until recently, the genus Ailurarctos from the Late Miocene of China (ca. 8-7 mya) was recognized as the oldest undoubted member of the Ailuropodinae, suggesting that the panda lineage might have originated from an Ursavus ancestor. The role of the purported ailuropodine Agriarctos, from the Miocene of Europe, in the origins of this clade has been generally dismissed due to the paucity of the available material. Here, we describe a new ailuropodine genus, Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., based on remains from two Middle Miocene (ca. 12-11 Ma) Spanish localities. A cladistic analysis of fossil and extant members of the Ursoidea confirms the inclusion of the new genus into the Ailuropodinae. Moreover, Kretzoiarctos precedes in time the previously-known, Late Miocene members of the giant panda clade from Eurasia (Agriarctos and Ailurarctos). The former can be therefore considered the oldest recorded member of the giant panda lineage, which has significant implications for understanding the origins of this clade from a paleobiogeographic viewpoint.

  13. Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., the Oldest Member of the Giant Panda Clade

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Juan; Alba, David M.; Robles, Josep M.; Valenciano, Alberto; Rotgers, Cheyenn; Carmona, Raül; Montoya, Plinio; Morales, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Carnivora: Ursidae: Ailuropodinae), has been one of the most hotly debated topics by mammalian biologists and paleontologists during the last century. Based on molecular data, it is currently recognized as a true ursid, sister-taxon of the remaining extant bears, from which it would have diverged by the Early Miocene. However, from a paleobiogeographic and chronological perspective, the origin of the giant panda lineage has remained elusive due to the scarcity of the available Miocene fossil record. Until recently, the genus Ailurarctos from the Late Miocene of China (ca. 8–7 mya) was recognized as the oldest undoubted member of the Ailuropodinae, suggesting that the panda lineage might have originated from an Ursavus ancestor. The role of the purported ailuropodine Agriarctos, from the Miocene of Europe, in the origins of this clade has been generally dismissed due to the paucity of the available material. Here, we describe a new ailuropodine genus, Kretzoiarctos gen. nov., based on remains from two Middle Miocene (ca. 12–11 Ma) Spanish localities. A cladistic analysis of fossil and extant members of the Ursoidea confirms the inclusion of the new genus into the Ailuropodinae. Moreover, Kretzoiarctos precedes in time the previously-known, Late Miocene members of the giant panda clade from Eurasia (Agriarctos and Ailurarctos). The former can be therefore considered the oldest recorded member of the giant panda lineage, which has significant implications for understanding the origins of this clade from a paleobiogeographic viewpoint. PMID:23155439

  14. Nicola gen. nov. with redescription of Nicola tetela (Borojevic & Peixinho, 1976) (Porifera: Calcarea: Calcinea: Clathrinida).

    PubMed

    Cóndor-Luján, B; Klautau, M

    2016-04-13

    Guancha tetela was originally described as a species having a peduncle and a skeleton exclusively composed of sagittal triactines. Therefore, according to the most recent phylogeny of Clathrinida, it should be placed in the genus Clathrina. This species was collected on the Northeastern Brazilian coast in 1968 and it was not collected again until 2011 in Curaçao. In this study, we reanalyzed the type material and the new specimens from Curaçao under a morphological-molecular approach. Morphological analysis revealed the presence of tetractines in the skeleton of all the studied specimens, including a slide of the holotype. In the molecular phylogeny G. tetela grouped with genera containing tetractines, but as an independent new lineage, different from all the other genera of Clathrinida. Based on these results, we propose the erection of a new genus, Nicola gen. nov., to include species whose body is composed of tubes without anastomosis nor branches but that run in parallel and coalesce at the apical and basal regions. Moreover, the skeleton is exclusively composed of sagittal triactines and tetractines.

  15. A new captorhinid reptile, Gansurhinus qingtoushanensis, gen. et sp. nov., from the Permian of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisz, Robert R.; Liu, Jun; Li, Jin-Ling; Müller, Johannes

    2011-05-01

    Captorhinids, a clade of Paleozoic reptiles, are represented by a rich fossil record that extends from the Late Carboniferous into the Late Permian. Representatives of this clade dispersed from the equatorial regions of Laurasia into the temperate regions of Pangea during the Middle and Late Permian. This rich fossil record shows that there was an evolutionary trend from faunivorous to omnivorous and herbivorous feeding habits within this clade. The discovery of well-preserved captorhinid materials in the Middle Permian of China allows us to determine that the new taxon, Gansurhinus qingtoushanensis, gen. et sp. nov, is a member of Moradisaurinae, a clade of captorhinids with multiple tooth rows arranged in parallel. The presence of this moradisaurine in the Middle Permian of south central Asia leads us to suggest that paleogeographic changes during the Permian, with part of what is today China becoming a large peninsula of Pangea, allowed these early reptiles as well as other terrestrial vertebrates to extend their geographic ranges to this region of the Late Paleozoic supercontinent.

  16. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  17. Density diagnostics derived from the O iv and S iv intercombination lines observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Dudík, J.; Mason, H. E.; Giunta, A.; Reeves, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    The intensity of the O iv 2s2 2p 2P-2s2p24P and S iv 3 s2 3p 2P-3s 3p24 P intercombination lines around 1400 Å observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provide a useful tool to diagnose the electron number density (Ne) in the solar transition region plasma. We measure the electron number density in a variety of solar features observed by IRIS, including an active region (AR) loop, plage and brightening, and the ribbon of the 22-June-2015 M 6.5 class flare. By using the emissivity ratios of O iv and S iv lines, we find that our observations are consistent with the emitting plasma being near isothermal (logT[K] ≈ 5) and iso-density (Ne ≈ 1010.6 cm-3) in the AR loop. Moreover, high electron number densities (Ne ≈ 1013 cm-3) are obtained during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the S iv line ratio. We note that the S iv lines provide a higher range of density sensitivity than the O iv lines. Finally, we investigate the effects of high densities (Ne ≳ 1011 cm-3) on the ionization balance. In particular, the fractional ion abundances are found to be shifted towards lower temperatures for high densities compared to the low density case. We also explored the effects of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on our diagnostic method. The movie associated to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  19. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model

    PubMed Central

    de Tomas, C.; Cantarero, A.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon–phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range. PMID:25197256

  20. Spray Drying as a Reliable Route to Produce Metastable Carbamazepine Form IV.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, Rebecca A; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Brown, Cameron J; Briggs, Naomi E B; Dunn, Jaclyn; Robertson, John; Nordon, Alison; Florence, Alastair J

    2017-07-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is an active pharmaceutical ingredient used in the treatment of epilepsy that can form at least 5 polymorphic forms. Metastable form IV was originally discovered from crystallization with polymer additives; however, it has not been observed from subsequent solvent-only crystallization efforts. This work reports the reproducible formation of phase pure crystalline form IV by spray drying of methanolic CBZ solution. Characterization of the material was carried out using diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the spray-dried product during the spray drying process. This work demonstrates that spray drying provides a robust method for the production of form IV CBZ, and the combination of high supersaturation and rapid solid isolation from solution overcomes the apparent limitation of more traditional solution crystallization approaches to produce metastable crystalline forms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Planning a Kinetic and Mechanistic Study with Cerium (IV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Samir B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Presents a kinetic study that utilizes a method for varying the concentrations of the possible Ce(IV) species and computing the concentration distribution of the sulfato and hydroxo species of Ce(IV). (MLH)

  2. Characterization of Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat, and proposal for the reclassification of five closely related members of the genus Clostridium into the genera Romboutsia gen. nov., Intestinibacter gen. nov., Terrisporobacter gen. nov. and Asaccharospora gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Fuentes, Susana; Grievink, Wieke; van Niftrik, Laura; Tindall, Brian J; Timmerman, Harro M; Rijkers, Ger T; Smidt, Hauke

    2014-05-01

    A Gram-positive staining, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore-forming obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated CRIBT, was isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat and characterized. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CRIBT were saturated and unsaturated straight-chain C12-C19 fatty acids, with C16:0 being the predominant fatty acid. The polar lipid profile comprised six glycolipids, four phospholipids and one lipid that did not stain with any of the specific spray reagents used. The only quinone was MK-6. The predominating cell-wall sugars were glucose and galactose. The peptidoglycan type of strain CRIBT was A1σ lanthionine-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CRIBT was 28.1 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CRIBT was most closely related to a number of species of the genus Clostridium, including Clostridium lituseburense (97.2%), Clostridium glycolicum (96.2%), Clostridium mayombei (96.2%), Clostridium bartlettii (96.0%) and Clostridium irregulare (95.5%). All these species show very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (<85%) to the type strain of Clostridium butyricum, the type species of the genus Clostridium. DNA-DNA hybridization with closely related reference strains indicated reassociation values below 32%. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic studies, a novel genus, Romboutsia gen. nov., is proposed. The novel isolate CRIBT (=DSM 25109T=NIZO 4048T) is proposed as the type strain of the type species, Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., of the proposed novel genus. It is proposed that C. lituseburense is transferred to this genus as Romboutsia lituseburensis comb. nov. Furthermore, the reclassification into novel genera is proposed for C. bartlettii, as Intestinibacter bartlettii gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. glycolicum, as Terrisporobacter glycolicus gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. mayombei, as Terrisporobacter mayombei gen. nov., comb. nov., and C

  3. Expanding the Ecological Validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV With the Texas Functional Living Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drozdick, Lisa Whipple; Cullum, C. Munro

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale–Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The relationships between TFLS and WAIS-IV and WMS-IV were examined in both normally developing and clinical samples. In general, the highest correlations were between TFLS and measures of general cognitive ability (WAIS-IV FSIQ [Full Scale IQ] and GAI [General Ability Index]) and working memory (WAIS-IV WMI [Working Memory Index] and WMS-IV VWMI [Visual Working Memory Index]). Across the clinical populations, working memory subtests were generally strongly related to TFLS performance, although this relationship was more consistent with WAIS-IV than WMS-IV. Contrast scaled scores are presented for the TFLS based on WAIS-IV or WMS-IV performance. These scores allow the evaluation of functional abilities within the context of cognitive and memory ability, enhancing and expanding the utility of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. PMID:20921288

  4. Expanding the ecological validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV with the Texas functional living scale.

    PubMed

    Whipple Drozdick, Lisa; Munro Cullum, C

    2011-06-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The relationships between TFLS and WAIS-IV and WMS-IV were examined in both normally developing and clinical samples. In general, the highest correlations were between TFLS and measures of general cognitive ability (WAIS-IV FSIQ [Full Scale IQ] and GAI [General Ability Index]) and working memory (WAIS-IV WMI [Working Memory Index] and WMS-IV VWMI [Visual Working Memory Index]). Across the clinical populations, working memory subtests were generally strongly related to TFLS performance, although this relationship was more consistent with WAIS-IV than WMS-IV. Contrast scaled scores are presented for the TFLS based on WAIS-IV or WMS-IV performance. These scores allow the evaluation of functional abilities within the context of cognitive and memory ability, enhancing and expanding the utility of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV.

  5. Uptake of Np(IV) by C-S-H phases and cement paste: an EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Gaona, Xavier; Dähn, Rainer; Tits, Jan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Wieland, Erich

    2011-10-15

    Nuclear waste disposal concepts developed worldwide foresee the use of cementitious materials for the immobilization of long-lived intermediate level waste (ILW). This waste form may contain significant amounts of neptunium-237, which is expected to be present as Np(IV) under the reducing conditions encountered after the closure of the repository. Predicting the release of Np(IV) from the cementitious near field of an ILW repository requires a sufficiently detailed understanding of its interaction with the main sorbing components of hardened cement paste (HCP). In this study, the uptake of Np(IV) by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) and HCP has been investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The EXAFS studies on Np(IV)-doped C-S-H and HCP samples reveal that Np(IV) is predominantly incorporated in the structure of C-S-H phases having different Ca:Si ratios. The two main species identified correspond to Np(IV) in C-S-H with a Ca:Si mol ratio of 1.65 as in fresh cement and with a Ca:Si mol ratio of 0.75 as in highly degraded cement. The local structure of Np(IV) changes with the Ca:Si mol ratio and does not depend on pH. Furthermore, Np(IV) shows the same coordination environment in C-S-H and HCP samples. This study shows that C-S-H phases are responsible for the Np(IV) uptake by cementitious materials and further that incorporation in the interlayer of the C-S-H structure is the dominant uptake mechanism.

  6. [Collagen type IV: major component of basement membranes. Current knowledge].

    PubMed

    Mercier, P; Ekindjian, O G

    1990-01-01

    The collagen family represents the most abundant protein in animals. Type IV collagen ([alpha 1 (IV)]2 alpha 2 (IV)) differs from the other types in several respects and particularly in its distribution, being strictly limited to the basement membranes. Alterations in the structure and functions of basement membranes are observed in a number of diseases, such as tumoral angiogenesis and diabetic nephropathy. This article reviews current structural and pathophysiological knowledge concerning type IV collagen.

  7. Prologue--The pioneering work of the late professor Gen Matsumoto.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tsuda, Ichiro; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2004-06-01

    The late Professor Gen Matsumoto not only accomplished pioneering work of neuroscience such as nerve excitation as a dissipative structure in far-from-equilibrium systems but also inspired many students and young researchers by his sincere and attractive personality.

  8. On the new monotypic wolf spider genus Ovia gen. nov. (Araneae: Lycosidae, Lycosinae).

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Pradeep M; Malamel, Jobi J; Sebastian, Pothalil A

    2017-01-17

    A new monotypic wolf spider genus, Ovia gen. nov. is proposed to accommodate a misplaced species: Pardosa procurva Yu & Song, 1988. Ovia procurva comb. nov. is redescribed, illustrated and designated as the type species for the genus. The subfamily placement of the new genus is discussed and it is considered as a member of Lycosinae Sundevall, 1833 and possibly closely related to Alopecosa Simon, 1885. The presence of an apical process (spur) on the median apophysis is proposed as the putative synapomorphy of Ovia gen. nov. The possible sister-taxon relationship of Ovia gen. nov. with Alopecosa is discussed and evidence on the occurrence of sexual dimorphism and mating plug within the genus are presented. Ovia gen. nov. is assumed to be of Holarctic origin, from which it has migrated to the Indomalayan region. Additionally, a current distribution map for the genus is provided.

  9. 40 CFR 144.23 - Class IV wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class IV wells. 144.23 Section 144.23... INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.23 Class IV wells. (a) Injection into existing Class IV wells is authorized for up to six months after approval or promulgation of...

  10. 34 CFR 85.1018 - Title IV, HEA transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibility for a grant, loan, or work study assistance under a title IV, HEA program. Authority: E.O. 12549... disbursement or delivery of funds provided under a title IV, HEA program to a student or borrower; (b) A certification by an educational institution of eligibility for a loan under a title IV, HEA program;...

  11. 34 CFR 85.1018 - Title IV, HEA transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... responsibility for a grant, loan, or work study assistance under a title IV, HEA program. (Authority: E.O. 12549... disbursement or delivery of funds provided under a title IV, HEA program to a student or borrower; (b) A certification by an educational institution of eligibility for a loan under a title IV, HEA program;...

  12. Topoisomerase IV is a target of quinolones in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Khodursky, A B; Zechiedrich, E L; Cozzarelli, N R

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated that, in Escherichia coli, quinolone antimicrobial agents target topoisomerase IV (topo IV). The inhibition of topo IV becomes apparent only when gyrase is mutated to quinolone resistance. In such mutants, these antibiotics caused accumulation of replication catenanes, which is diagnostic of a loss of topo IV activity. Mutant forms of topo IV provided an additional 10-fold resistance to quinolones and prevented drug-induced catenane accumulation. Drug inhibition of topo IV differs from that of gyrase. (i) Wild-type topo IV is not dominant over the resistant allele. (ii) Inhibition of topo IV leads to only a slow stop in replication. (iii) Inhibition of topo IV is primarily bacteriostatic. These differences may result from topo IV acting behind the replication fork, allowing for repair of drug-induced lesions. We suggest that this and a slightly higher intrinsic resistance of topo IV make it secondary to gyrase as a quinolone target. Our results imply that the quinolone binding pockets of gyrase and topo IV are similar and that substantial levels of drug resistance require mutations in both enzymes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524852

  13. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reserved IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendix IV to Part 600...

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor in Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) is a tumour motility stimulating protein secreted by tumour cells. The protein encoded by this gene is a glycosylated transmembrane protein and a receptor for autocrine motility factor. It has been known to play a role in progression of neoplastic lesions. Basement membranes are specialized extracellular matrices that serve as structural barriers as well as substrates for cellular interactions. The network of type IV collagen is thought to define the scaffold integrating other components such as laminins and perlecan into highly organized supramolecular architecture. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor in odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor was evaluated in 31 odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumour and ameloblastic carcinoma. Normal follicular tissue formed the control. Results: Maximum expression for Type IV Collagen was seen in multicystic ameloblastoma and minimum expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The maximum expression of AMFR was seen in ameloblastic carcinoma and minimum expression in multicystic ameloblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested an association of loss of expression of type IV Collagen with progression of lesion. AMFR expression was found to be associated with the aggressive potential of tumours. PMID:25478440

  15. Sandia octahedral molecular sieves (SOMS): structural and property effects of charge-balancing the M(IV)-substituted (M = Ti, Zr) Niobate framework.

    PubMed

    Nyman, May; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Parise, John B; Maxwell, Robert S; Nenoff, Tina M

    2002-02-27

    Sandia octahedral molecular sieves (SOMS) is an isostructural, variable composition class of ion exchangers with the general formula Na(2)Nb(2-x)M(IV)(x)O (6-x)(OH)(x).H(2)O (M(IV) = Ti, Zr; x = 0.04-0.40) where up to 20% of the framework Nb(V) can be substituted with Ti(IV) or Zr(IV). This class of molecular sieves is easily converted to perovskite through low-temperature heat treatment (500-600 degrees C). This report provides a detailed account of how the charge imbalance of this Nb(V)-M(IV) substitution is compensated. X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld refinement, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, (23)Na MAS NMR, and (1)H MAS NMR were used to determine how the framework anionic charge is cation-balanced over a range of framework compositions. All spectroscopic evidence indicated a proton addition for each M(IV) substitution. Evidences for variable proton content included (1) increasing OH observed by (1)H MAS NMR with increasing M(IV) substitution, (2) increased infrared band broadening indicating increased H-bonding with increasing M(IV) substitution, (3) increased TGA weight loss (due to increased OH content) with increasing M(IV) substitution, (4) no variance in population on the sodium sites (indicated by Rietveld refinement) with variable composition, and (5) no change in the (23)Na MAS NMR spectra with variable composition. Also observed by infrared spectroscopy and (23)Na MAS NMR was increased disorder on the Nb(V)/M(IV) framework sites with increasing M(IV) substitution, evidenced by broadening of these spectral features. These spectroscopic studies, along with ion exchange experiments, also revealed the effect of the Nb(V)/M(IV) framework substitution on materials properties. Namely, the temperature of conversion to NaNb(1-x)M(IV)(x)O(3) (M = Ti, Zr) perovskite increased with increasing Ti in the framework and decreased with increasing Zr in the framework. This suggested that Ti stabilizes the SOMS framework and Zr destabilizes

  16. Using GenCade to Create a Sediment Budget in SBAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    change and sand transport model (Frey et al. 2012a), and the Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) (Dopsovic et al. 2003). Two of the main GenCade...outputs are shoreline change and longshore transport rates, which can be analyzed to develop a sediment budget. A new, automated connection utilizes the...for those who have experience with GenCade and have at least a conceptual knowledge of how to construct a sediment budget. INTRODUCTION: Developed

  17. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12 (GenProtEC).

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1997-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities amongE.coliproteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html .

  18. Integrated Design and Production Reference Integration with ArchGenXML V1.00

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, R H

    2004-07-20

    ArchGenXML is a tool that allows easy creation of Zope products through the use of Archetypes. The Integrated Design and Production Reference (IDPR) should be highly configurable in order to meet the needs of a diverse engineering community. Ease of configuration is key to the success of IDPR. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of using a UML diagram editor to configure IDPR through ArchGenXML and Archetypes.

  19. Description of Teunomyces gen. nov. for the Candida kruisii clade, Suhomyces gen. nov. for the Candida tanzawaensis clade and Suhomyces kilbournensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P; Robnett, Christie J; Blackwell, Meredith

    2016-08-01

    DNA sequence analysis has shown that species of the Candida kruisii clade and species of the C. tanzawaensis clade represent phylogenetically circumscribed genera, which are described as Teunomyces gen. nov., type species T kruisii, and Suhomyces gen. nov., type species S tanzawaensis Many of the species are distributed worldwide and they are often isolated from fungus-feeding insects and their habitats. Included is the description of S. kilbournensis (type strain NRRL Y-17864, CBS 14276), a species found almost exclusively on maize kernels (Zea mays) in IL, USA.

  20. Erections of Changa gen. nov. and Songga gen. nov. of Aolina (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae: Dundubiini) with taxonomic notes and a synonymization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young June

    2016-02-29

    Two new genera, Changa gen. nov. and Songga gen. nov., are erected in the subtribe Aolina Boulard, 2012, with the designations of Cosmopsaltria sita Distant, 1881 and Pomponia scitula Distant, 1888 as the type species, respectively. Khimbya sita (Distant, 1881) becomes Changa sita (Distant, 1881) comb. nov. Haphsa scitula (Distant, 1888) becomes Songga scitula (Distant, 1888) comb. nov. Haphsa jsguillotsi (Boulard, 2005) is transferred to Changa to become Changa jsguillotsi (Boulard, 2005) comb. nov. Haphsa stellata Lee, 2009 syn. nov. is synonymized with Changa sita. Haphsa sulaeyai (Boulard, 2005) is transferred to Macrosemia Kato, 1925 to become Macrosemia sulaeyai (Boulard, 2005) comb. nov. A revised key to the genera of Aolina is provided.