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Sample records for gene allelic frequencies

  1. Biased gene conversion skews allele frequencies in human populations, increasing the disease burden of recessive alleles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-10-02

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications.

  2. Biased Gene Conversion Skews Allele Frequencies in Human Populations, Increasing the Disease Burden of Recessive Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Gene conversion results in the nonreciprocal transfer of genetic information between two recombining sequences, and there is evidence that this process is biased toward G and C alleles. However, the strength of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) in human populations and its effects on hereditary disease have yet to be assessed on a genomic scale. Using high-coverage whole-genome sequences of African hunter-gatherers, agricultural populations, and primate outgroups, we quantified the effects of GC-biased gene conversion on population genomic data sets. We find that genetic distances (FST and population branch statistics) are modified by gBGC. In addition, the site frequency spectrum is left-shifted when ancestral alleles are favored by gBGC and right-shifted when derived alleles are favored by gBGC. Allele frequency shifts due to gBGC mimic the effects of natural selection. As expected, these effects are strongest in high-recombination regions of the human genome. By comparing the relative rates of fixation of unbiased and biased sites, the strength of gene conversion was estimated to be on the order of Nb ≈ 0.05 to 0.09. We also find that derived alleles favored by gBGC are much more likely to be homozygous than derived alleles at unbiased SNPs (+42.2% to 62.8%). This results in a curse of the converted, whereby gBGC causes substantial increases in hereditary disease risks. Taken together, our findings reveal that GC-biased gene conversion has important population genetic and public health implications. PMID:25279983

  3. Allele frequency net: a database and online repository for immune gene frequencies in worldwide populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F.; Christmas, Stephen; Middleton, Derek; Jones, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    The allele frequency net database (http://www.allelefrequencies.net) is an online repository that contains information on the frequencies of immune genes and their corresponding alleles in different populations. The extensive variability observed in genes and alleles related to the immune system response and its significance in transplantation, disease association studies and diversity in populations led to the development of this electronic resource. At present, the system contains data from 1133 populations in 608 813 individuals on the frequency of genes from different polymorphic regions such as human leukocyte antigens, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, major histocompatibility complex Class I chain-related genes and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The project was designed to create a central source for the storage of frequency data and provide individuals with a set of bioinformatics tools to analyze the occurrence of these variants in worldwide populations. The resource has been used in a wide variety of contexts, including clinical applications (histocompatibility, immunology, epidemiology and pharmacogenetics) and population genetics. Demographic information, frequency data and searching tools can be freely accessed through the website. PMID:21062830

  4. Evaluation of allele frequencies of inherited disease genes in subgroups of American Quarter Horses.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Robert C; Penedo, M Cecilia T; McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Mickelson, James R; Famula, Thomas R; Wagner, Michelle L; Jackson, Mark; Hamilton, Michael J; Nooteboom, Sabine; Bannasch, Danika L

    2009-01-01

    To estimate allele frequencies of the hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS), glycogen branching enzyme deficiency (GBED), hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), and type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) genes in elite performance subgroups of American Quarter Horses (AQHs). Prospective genetic survey. 651 elite performance AQHs, 200 control AQHs, and 180 control American Paint Horses (APHs). Elite performance AQHs successful in 7 competitive disciplines (barrel racing, cutting, halter, racing, reining, western pleasure, and working cow horse) were geno- typed for 5 disease-causing alleles. Age-matched control AQHs and APHs were used to establish comparative whole-breed estimates of allele frequencies. Highest allele frequencies among control AQHs were for type 1 PSSM (0.055) and GBED (0.054), whereas HERDA (0.021) and HYPP (0.008) were less prevalent. Control APHs uniquely harbored LWFS (0.107) and had high prevalence of HYPP (0.025), relative to AQHs. Halter horse subgroups had significantly greater allele frequencies for HYPP (0.299) and PSSM (0.155). Glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, HERDA, and PSSM were found broadly throughout subgroups; cutting subgroups were distinct for HERDA (0.142), and western pleasure subgroups were distinct for GBED (0.132). Racing and barrel racing subgroups had the lowest frequencies of the 5 disease genes. Accurate estimates of disease-causing alleles in AQHs and APHs may guide use of diagnostic genetic testing, aid management of genetic diseases, and help minimize production of affected foals.

  5. Allele and haplotype frequencies at human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in Venezuela's population.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar Fortes, María; Gill, Gisselle; Paredes, María Elena; Gamez, Ligia Elena; Palacios, Marina; Blanca, Isaac; Tassinari, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Population studies represent an integral part and link in understanding the complex chain of host-pathogen interactions, disease pathogenesis, and MHC gene polymorphisms. Genes of Mongoloid, Caucasoid, and Negroid populations have created a distinctive HLA genetic profile in the Venezuelan population. Our objective was to determine the predominant HLA class I and II alleles and haplotype frequencies in the hybrid population of Venezuela. The study population consisted of 486 healthy unrelated native Venezuelans and 180 families. We examined the frequency of HLA A-B-C, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR genes by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Phenotypic, allelic and haplotype frequencies were estimated by direct counting and using the maximum-likelihood method. The predominant HLA class I alleles were A*02, A*24, A*68, B*35, B*44, B*51, B*07, B*15 and Cw*07. Regarding HLA class II, the most frequent alleles were DQB1*03 and DRB1*04, DRB1*15, DRB1*13, DRB1*07. The prevailing haplotype was HLA-A*02B*35 DQB1*03 DRB1*04. Some of these alleles and haplotype frequencies were predominantly present in Amerindians (A*02, A*24, B*35, Cw*07, DRB1*04, A*24 B*35). Previous reports have shown high incidence of A*02, B*44, B*51, DRB1*15, DRB1*13, DRB1*07 alleles in several European populations and A*68, B*07, B*15 alleles in African Americans, which could have contributed to the ethnic admixture of the Venezuelan population. We conclude that our results provide strong evidence that Venezuela's population represents an admixture of the primitive Mongoloid Aborigines, Caucasoid Europeans and Western African Negroid migrants.

  6. Inferring the location of tumor suppressor genes by modeling frequency of allelic loss.

    PubMed

    Sterrett, Andrew; Wright, Fred A

    2007-03-01

    Allelic loss is often part of a multistep process leading to tumorigenesis. Analysis of genomic markers highlights regions of elevated allelic loss, which in turn suggests a nearby tumor suppressor. Furthermore, pooling published analyses to combine evidence can increase the power to detect a tumor suppressor gene. If the pattern of loss for each tumor, or allelotype, is known, a stochastic model proposed by Newton et al. (1998, Statistics in Medicine 17, 1425-1445) can be used to analyze the correlated binary data. Many studies report only incomplete allelotypes, augmented with frequencies of allelic loss (FAL) at each marker, in which the number of informative tumors showing allelic loss is provided along with the number of informative tumors. We describe an extension of the allelotype model to handle FAL data, using a hidden Markov model or a normal approximation to compute the likelihood. The FAL model is illustrated using data from a study of colorectal cancer.

  7. Genotype distribution and allele frequencies of the genes associated with body composition and locomotion traits in Myanmar native horses.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Yu; Moe, Hla Hla; Moe, Kyaw Kyaw; Shimizu, Yuki; Nishioka, Kenji; Shimogiri, Takeshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Kanemaki, Misao; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2017-08-01

    Myanmar native horses are small horses used mainly for drafting carts or carriages in rural areas and packing loads in mountainy areas. In the present study, we investigated genotype distributions and allele frequencies of the LCORL/NCAPG, MSTN and DMRT3 genes, which are associated with body composition and locomotion traits of horses, in seven local populations of Myanmar native horses. The genotyping result of LCORL/NCAPG showed that allele frequencies of C allele associated with higher withers height ranged from 0.08 to 0.27, and 0.13 in average. For MSTN, allele frequencies of C allele associated with higher proportion of Type 2B muscular fiber ranged from 0.05 to 0.23, and 0.09 in average. For DMRT3, allele frequencies of A allele associated with ambling gait ranged from 0 to 0.04, and 0.01 in average. The presences of the minor alleles of these genes at low frequencies suggest a possibility that these horse populations have not been under strong selection pressure for particular locomotion traits and body composition. Our findings of the presence of these minor alleles in Southeast Asian native horses are also informative for considering the origins of these minor alleles associated with body composition and locomotion traits in horse populations. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Allele specific-PCR and melting curve analysis showed relatively high frequency of β-casein gene A1 allele in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cows.

    PubMed

    Gholami, M; Hafezian, S H; Rahimi, G; Farhadi, A; Rahimi, Z; Kahrizi, D; Kiani, S; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Muhammadi, S; Veisi, F; Ghadiri, K; Shetabi, H; Zargooshi, J

    2016-10-31

    There are two allelic forms of A1 and A2 of β-casein gene in dairy cattle. Proteolytic digestion of bovine β-casein A1 type produces bioactive peptide of β-casomorphin-7 known as milk devil. β-casomorphin-7 causes many diseases, including type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease syndrome, sudden death and madness. The aim of the present study was to determine the different allelic forms of β-casein gene in Iranian Holstein, Simmental and native cattle in order to identify A1 and A2 variants. The blood samples were collected randomly and DNA was extracted using modified salting out method. An 854 bp fragment including part of exon 7 and part of intron 6 of β-casein gene was amplified by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). Also, the accuracy of AS-PCR genotyping has been confirmed by melting temperature curve analysis using Real-time PCR machinery. The comparison of observed allele and genotype frequency among the studied breeds was performed using the Fisher exact and Chi-squared test, respectively by SAS program. Obtained results showed the A1 allele frequencies of 50, 51.57, 54.5, 49.4 and 46.6% in Holstein, Simmental, Sistani, Taleshi and Mazandarani cattle populations, respectively. The chi-square test was shown that no any populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for studied marker locus. Comparison and analysis of the test results for allelic frequency showed no any significant differences between breeds (P>0.05). The frequency of observed genotypes only differs significantly between Holstein and Taleshi breeds but no any statistically significant differences were found for other breeds (P>0.05). A relatively high frequency of β-casein A1 allele was observed in Iranian native cattle. Therefore, determine the genotypes and preference alleles A2 in these native and commercial cattle is recommended.

  9. A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, A.

    1996-02-01

    The change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations was analyzed. The implications of these papers is important in terms of the fixation probability of genes because, for the same equilibrium inbreeding coefficient, fixation rates of mutant genes would be larger for partial full-sib mating than for partial selfing. 4 refs.

  10. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of gene polymorphisms associated with meat tenderness in Nellore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M E; Eler, J P; Bonin, M N; Rezende, F M; Biase, F H; Meirelles, F V; Regitano, L C A; Coutinho, L L; Balieiro, J C C; Ferraz, J B S

    2017-02-16

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the allelic and genotypic frequencies of polymorphisms in the µ-calpain and calpastatin genes, and to assess their association with meat tenderness and animal growth in Nellore cattle. We evaluated 605 Nellore animals at 24 months of age, on average, at slaughter. The polymorphisms were determined for the molecular markers CAPN316, CAPN530, CAPN4751, CAPN4753, and UOGACAST1. Analyses of meat tenderness at 7, 14, and 21 days of maturation were performed in samples of longissimus thoracis obtained between the 12th and 13th rib and sheared using a Warner Bratzler Shear Force. Significant effects were observed for meat tenderness at days 7, 14, and 21 of maturation for the marker CAPN4751, at day 21 for the marker CAPN4753, and at days 14 and 21 for the marker UOGCAST1. For genotypic combinations of markers, the results were significant for the combination CAPN4751/UOGCAST1 in the three maturation periods and CAPN4753/UOGCAST1 at days 14 and 21 of maturation.

  11. Mapping Bias Overestimates Reference Allele Frequencies at the HLA Genes in the 1000 Genomes Project Phase I Data

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Débora Y. C.; Aguiar, Vitor R. C.; Bitarello, Bárbara D.; Nunes, Kelly; Goudet, Jérôme; Meyer, Diogo

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have become the standard for data generation in studies of population genomics, as the 1000 Genomes Project (1000G). However, these techniques are known to be problematic when applied to highly polymorphic genomic regions, such as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. Because accurate genotype calls and allele frequency estimations are crucial to population genomics analyses, it is important to assess the reliability of NGS data. Here, we evaluate the reliability of genotype calls and allele frequency estimates of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reported by 1000G (phase I) at five HLA genes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1). We take advantage of the availability of HLA Sanger sequencing of 930 of the 1092 1000G samples and use this as a gold standard to benchmark the 1000G data. We document that 18.6% of SNP genotype calls in HLA genes are incorrect and that allele frequencies are estimated with an error greater than ±0.1 at approximately 25% of the SNPs in HLA genes. We found a bias toward overestimation of reference allele frequency for the 1000G data, indicating mapping bias is an important cause of error in frequency estimation in this dataset. We provide a list of sites that have poor allele frequency estimates and discuss the outcomes of including those sites in different kinds of analyses. Because the HLA region is the most polymorphic in the human genome, our results provide insights into the challenges of using of NGS data at other genomic regions of high diversity. PMID:25787242

  12. Near fixation of 374l allele frequencies of the skin pigmentation gene SLC45A2 in Africa.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Yuasa, Isao

    2013-10-01

    The L374F polymorphism of the SLC45A2 gene, encoding the membrane-associated transporter protein that plays an important role in melanin synthesis, has been suggested to be associated with skin color in human populations. In this study, the detailed distribution of the 374f and 374l alleles has been investigated in 2,581 unrelated subjects from 36 North, East, West, and Central African populations. We found once more the highly significant (p < 0.001) correlation coefficient (r = 0.957) cline of 374f frequencies with degrees of latitude in European and North African populations. Almost all the African populations located below 16° of latitude are fixed for the 374l allele. Peul, Toucouleur, and Soninké populations have 374l allele frequencies of 0.06, 0.03, and 0.03, respectively.

  13. Allele frequencies of three factor VIII gene polymorphisms in Iranian populations and their application in hemophilia A carrier detection.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, S Babak; Seyedna, S Yoosef; Zeinali, Sirous

    2006-05-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a quantitative or qualitative deficiency of blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). ARMS (amplification refractory mutation system) primers were designed to determine allele frequencies of three FVIII gene linked markers, IVS7 nt 27 G/A SNP, BclI/intron 18, and HindIII/intron 19 among 85 normal Iranian women from unrelated families. Then same method was applied to perform carrier detection for hemophilia A families. The allele frequencies of IVS7 nt 27 "G"/"A" allele, BclI "T"/"A" allele, and HindIII "C"/"T" allele among normal women were 0.88/0.12, 0.52/0.48, and 0.48/0.52, respectively. The three polymorphisms were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium, which decreased the overall heterozygosity to 51%. Twenty-one women from 15 unrelated hemophilia A families were referred to us for hemophilia A carrier detection. Taking advantage of these three biallelic polymorphisms in conjunction with multiallelic St14 VNTR (locus DXS52), IVS13 (CA)n STR, and IVS22 (CA)n STR, carrier status was determined in 16 women (16/21 or 76% of the at-risk women) from 11 families (11/15 or 73% of the families). The used ARMS methods are rapid and can easily be applied in conjunction with other FVIII gene linked polymorphisms for indirect mutation detection of hemophilia A where they are informative.

  14. Allelic frequencies and association with carcass traits of six genes in local subpopulations of Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, Takahiro; Ibi, Takayuki; Siqintuya; Kobayashi, Naohiko; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Emi; Imai, Kazumi; Matsui, Mayu; Uemura, Keiichi; Eto, Hisayoshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fujita, Tatsuo; Saito, Yosuke; Komatsu, Tomohiko; Hoshiba, Hiroshi; Mannen, Hideyuki; Sasazaki, Shinji; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is expected to accelerate the genetic improvement of Japanese Black cattle. However, verification of the effects of the genes for MAS in different subpopulations is required prior to the application of MAS. In this study, we investigated the allelic frequencies and genotypic effects for carcass traits of six genes, which can be used in MAS, in eight local subpopulations. These genes are SCD, FASN and SREBP1, which are associated with the fatty acid composition of meat, and NCAPG, MC1R and F11, which are associated with carcass weight, coat color and blood coagulation abnormality, respectively. The frequencies of desirable alleles of SCD and FASN were relatively high and that of NCAPG was relatively low, and NCAPG was significantly associated with several carcass traits, including carcass weight. The proportions of genotypic variance explained by NCAPG to phenotypic variance were 4.83 for carcass weight. We thus confirmed that NCAPG is a useful marker for selection of carcass traits in these subpopulations. In addition, we found that the desirable alleles of six genes showed no negative effects on carcass traits. Therefore, selection using these genes to improve target traits should not have negative impacts on carcass traits. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Triglyceride associated polymorphisms of the APOA5 gene have very different allele frequencies in Pune, India compared to Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Chandak, Giriraj R; Ward, Kirsten J; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Pandit, Anand N; Bavdekar, Ashish; Joglekar, Charu V; Fall, Caroline HD; Mohankrishna, P; Wilkin, Terence J; Metcalf, Bradley S; Weedon, Michael N; Frayling, Timothy M; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2006-01-01

    Background The APOA5 gene variants, -1131T>C and S19W, are associated with altered triglyceride concentrations in studies of subjects of Caucasian and East Asian descent. There are few studies of these variants in South Asians. We investigated whether the two APOA5 variants also show similar association with various lipid parameters in Indian population as in the UK white subjects. Methods We genotyped 557 Indian adults from Pune, India, and 237 UK white adults for -1131T>C and S19W variants in the APOA5 gene, compared their allelic and genotype frequency and determined their association with fasting serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels using univariate general linear analysis. APOC3 SstI polymorphism was also analyzed in 175 Pune Indian subjects for analysis of linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 variants. Results The APOA5 -1131C allele was more prevalent in Indians from Pune (Pune Indians) compared to UK white subjects (allele frequency 20% vs. 4%, p = 0.00001), whereas the 19W allele was less prevalent (3% vs. 6% p = 0.0015). Patterns of linkage disequilibrium between the two variants were similar between the two populations and confirmed that they occur on two different haplotypes. In Pune Indians, the presence of -1131C allele and the 19W allele was associated with a 19% and 15% increase respectively in triglyceride concentrations although only -1131C was significant (p = 0.0003). This effect size was similar to that seen in the UK white subjects. Analysis of the APOC3 SstI polymorphism in 175 Pune Indian subjects showed that this variant is not in appreciable linkage disequilibrium with the APOA5 -1131T>C variant (r2 = 0.07). Conclusion This is the first study to look at the role of APOA5 in Asian Indian subjects that reside in India. The -1131C allele is more prevalent and the 19W allele is less prevalent in Pune Indians compared to UK Caucasians. We confirm that the APOA5 variants are associated with triglyceride levels

  16. Allele and genotype frequencies of polymorphisms in cytokine genes in ethnic Russian individuals from Moscow, Russia.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Alexandra; Voronina, Elena; Zolotukhin, Igor; Filipenko, Maxim

    2017-02-01

    Two hundred and twenty eight ethnic Russian individuals from Moscow, Russia, were genotyped at 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms CCL2 A-2578G; VEGFA C-2578A, G-634C, and C+936T; TNF G+419A and G-308A; IL1A G-889A; IL1RN T+1018C; IL6G-174C and G-572C; IFNG T+874A; IL1B C-511T; IL10 A+1082G; TGFB1 C-509T. Genotypes were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan probes and polymerase chain reaction followed by melting analysis of dual-labeled probe. Genotype distribution was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all studied polymorphisms. Genotype data are available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under identifier AFND 3367 and the population name "Russia Moscow Cytokine". Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G alleles frequency distribution in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Shammaa, Dina M R; Sabbagh, Amira S; Taher, Ali T; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahfouz, Rami A R

    2008-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Increased plasma PAI-1 levels play an essential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular risk and other diseases associated with thrombosis. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 promoter region has been extensively studied in different populations. We studied 160 healthy unrelated Lebanese individuals using a reverse hybridization PCR assay to detect the 5G/5G, 4G/5G and, 4G/4G genotypes of the PAI-1 gene and the frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles. We found that 4G/5G genotype was the most prevalent (45.6%) followed by 5G/5G (36.9%) and 4G/4G (17.5%). The frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles were calculated to be 0.403 and 0.597, respectively. Compared to other ethnic communities, the Lebanese population was found to harbour a relatively high prevalence of the rare 4G allele. This, in turn, may predispose this population to develop cardiovascular diseases and other thrombotic clinical conditions. This study aids to enhance our understanding of the genetic features of the Lebanese population.

  18. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  19. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes.

    PubMed

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-11-11

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome.Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs.Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular

  20. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J.; Getz, Wayne M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Zwaan, Bas J.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  1. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  2. Frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations and 5T allele in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Marchand, E; Verellen-Dumoulin, C; Mairesse, M; Delaunois, L; Brancaleone, P; Rahier, J F; Vandenplas, O

    2001-03-01

    To assess the frequency of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). Case-control study. All subjects in the study were screened for the presence of 13 mutations in the CFTR gene (R117H, 621 + 1G(-)>T, R334 W, Delta F508, Delta I507, 1717-1G(-)>A, G542X, R553X, G551D, R1162X, 3849 + 10kbC(-)>T, W1282X, and N1303K). Moreover, they were also screened for the presence of the 5T variant in intron 8. University hospital and community-based hospital. Twenty-one white patients with ABPA participated in the study. The presence of CFTR mutations was also investigated in 43 white subjects with allergic asthma who did not show sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus and in 142 subjects seeking genetic counseling for diseases other than cystic fibrosis (CF). Six patients with ABPA were found to be heterozygous for one CFTR mutation, including Delta F508 (n = 2), G542X (n = 1), R1162X (n = 1), 1717-1G(-)>A (n = 1), and R117H (n = 1). The 5T allele was not detected in ABPA patients. None of the ABPA patients showed sweat chloride concentrations > 60 mEq/L. The frequency of CFTR mutation carriers was significantly higher in ABPA patients (6 of 21 patients; 28.5%) than in control asthmatic subjects (2 of 43 subjects; 4.6%; p = 0.01) and in subjects seeking genetic counseling (6 of 142 subjects; p < 0.001). These findings indicate that in patients without a clinical diagnosis of CF, CFTR gene mutations could be involved in the development of ABPA, in association with other genetic or environmental factors.

  3. Allele and genotype frequency of a genetic variant in ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene affecting glycemic response to metformin in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Vilvanathan, Saranya; Gurusamy, Umamaheswaran; Mukta, V.; Das, Ashok Kumar; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2014-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequency of a genetic variant in ATM gene affecting glycemic response to metformin in South Indian population. Context: The novel polymorphism in ATM gene (rs11212617), which is implicated to have association with metformin response, exhibits inter-ethnic variability in the allele and genotype frequency distribution. Aims and Design: The objective of the present study is to establish the allele and genotype frequency of rs11212617 single nucleotide polymorphism in ATM gene, in South Indian population and to find if this variant has any role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: The study was performed in 2 cohorts of populations, 112 healthy volunteers and 118 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes by phenol-chloroform method and genotyping was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan assay. Results: In South Indian population, the frequency of major A allele was 0.65 and the minor C allele was 0.35. AA and CC are the homozygous genotypes with frequency of 0.39 and 0.09 respectively. The frequency of heterozygous genotype AC (0.52) was found to be higher than the homozygotes. There was no significant difference in the frequency distribution in the diabetic population, which implies that this variant does not have any causative role in the disease etiology. The frequency distributions were found to be significantly different from the distributions in other ethnic populations such as Caucasians, Chinese, Japanese and Africans. But there was no significant difference when compared with the Gujarati Indians of Houston. Conclusion: The frequency distribution of this novel variant in South Indian population forms a framework for further gene disease association studies to establish the association of this variant with metformin response. Our study could not find any association of this variant with respect to the disease

  4. Allelic and genotypic frequencies in polymorphic Booroola fecundity gene and their association with multiple birth and postnatal growth in Chhotanagpuri sheep

    PubMed Central

    Oraon, Thanesh; Singh, D. K.; Ghosh, Mayukh; Kullu, S. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chhotanagpuri breed of sheep reared for mutton in Jharkhand, India, having problem of low litter size and body weight. The response of genetic improvement for traits with low heritability through traditional selection method is time-consuming. Therefore, marker-assisted selection based on a polymorphism study of suitable candidate gene can response quickly. Thus, this study was aimed at identification of different allelic and genotypic frequencies of Booroola fecundity (FecB) gene and its association with multiple birth and postnatal growth in Chhotanagpuri sheep. Materials and Methods: DNA isolation and gene-specific amplification of FecB gene was performed from blood samples of from 92 Chhotanagpuri lambs maintained under similar feeding and management conditions. Custom nucleotide sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis were performed to identify different genotypes with respect to the target gene. Statistical analysis was performed for determination of allelic and genotypic frequencies of FecB gene polymorphisms and its association with multiple birth and postnatal growth of lambs from birth to 52 weeks age. Results: “AA,” “AB,” and “BB” genotypes were found at locus-1 as it is polymorphic for FecB gene while locus-2 was found to be monomorphic for FecB gene. Higher frequency of “A” allele at locus-1 was found in single born lambs, whereas “B” allele was predominant among multiple born lambs. The lambs having “BB” genotype weighed significantly (p≤0.01) heavier than those of “AB” and “AA” genotype at 52 weeks of age. Conclusion: “BB” genotype has emerged as favored genotype for multiple births and better growth indicator. Therefore, homozygous lambs for “B” allele should be selected and utilized in breeding program for better growth rate. PMID:27956784

  5. A retrospective analysis of allele frequency changes of major genes during 20 years of selection in the Italian Large White pig breed.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, L; Schiavo, G; Scotti, E; Galimberti, G; Calò, D G; Samorè, A B; Gallo, M; Russo, V; Buttazzoni, L

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated whether a selection programme based on boar genetic evaluation obtained with a classical BLUP animal model can change allele frequencies in a pig population. All Italian Large White boars born from 1992 to 2012 with estimated breeding value reliability >0.85 (n = 200) were selected among all boars of this breed. Boars were genotyped with markers in major genes (IGF2 intron3-g.3072G>A, MC4R p.D298N, VRTN PRE1 insertion, PRKAG3 p.I199V and FTO g.276T>G). Genotyping data were analysed grouping boars in eight classes according to their year of birth. To evaluate the influence of time on allele frequencies of the genotyped markers, multinomial logistic regression models were computed. Four of five polymorphic sites (IGF2, MC4R, VRTN and FTO) showed significant (p < 0.01) changes in allele frequencies over time due to a progressive and continuous increase of one allele (associated with higher lean meat content, higher average daily gain and favourable feed: gain ratio) and, consequently, decrease of the other one, following the directional selection of the selection programme of this pig breed. The retrospective analysis that was carried out in Italian Large White boars suggests that selection based on methodologies assuming the infinitesimal model is able to modify in a quite short period of time allele frequencies in major genes, increasing the frequency of alleles explaining a relevant (non-infinitesimal) fraction of the overall genetic variability for production traits. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  7. Polymorphisms and allele frequencies of glutathione S-transferases A1 and P1 genes in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczak-Zielinska, M; Zakerska-Banaszak, O; Tamowicz, B; Sobieraj, I; Drweska-Matelska, N; Szalata, M; Slomski, R; Mikstacki, A

    2015-03-31

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) A1 and P1 are crucial enzymes involved in the biotransformation of drugs, carcinogens, and toxins, and their activity may influence drug response, susceptibility to diseases, and carcinogenesis. The genes encoding these enzymes, GSTA1 and GSTP1, have been examined in many studies because of their genetic variability, which may affect enzymatic activity. The goal of this study was to determine the distribution of the alleles GSTA1*A/*B and GSTP1*A, *B, and *C in the Polish population. A total of 160 subjects from the Polish population were genotyped for 2 polymorphisms (I105V and A114V) in the GSTP1 gene using pyrosequencing. The promoter region of the GSTA1 gene was screened using sequencing. The detected variants were subjected to haplotype analysis. We found that the distribution of the alleles GSTA1*A/*B and GSTP1*A, *B, and *C in the Polish population correspond to the results of studies in Caucasians. Furthermore, we identified additional single nucleotide polymorphisms, excluding 3 well-known changes (G-52A, C-69T, T-567G), which are linked to alleles GSTA1*A/*B, that affect enzyme activity. A total of 4 haplotypes were identified in 160 Polish individuals.

  8. Polymorphism of the bovine POU1F1 gene: allele frequencies and effects on milk production in three Iranian native breeds and Holstein cattle of Iran.

    PubMed

    Zakizadeh, S; Reissmann, M; Rahimi, G; Javaremi, A Nejati; Reinecke, P; Mirae-Ashtiani, S R; Shahrbabak, M Moradi

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the allele frequencies in polymorphic site of exon six of POU1F1 gene in three Iranian native and Holstein cattle. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3 Iranian native cattle breeds, including 97 Mazandarani, 87 Sarabi, 112 Golpaygani and also 110 Holstein cattle. A 451 bp fragment of intron 5 and exon 6 were amplified and digested with HinfI restriction enzyme. Frequencies of allele A were 0.37, 0.27, 0.34 and 0.21 for Mazandarani, Sarabi, Golpaygani and Holstein cattle, respectively. Significant differences in genotype frequencies were found between Mazandarani or Golpaygani and Holstein cattle. No significant differences in genotype frequencies were found between Sarabi and Holstein cattle. Transition A to G in nucleotide 1256 is responsible for HinfI(-) allele. No significant association was observed between POU1F1 polymorphism and milk production. Differences in allelic frequency between native Bos indicus breeds (Mazandarani, Golpaygani) and Holstein at the present study might be due to differences in origin breeds, low number of samples and/or as the effect of natural selection in native breeds.

  9. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-04-22

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency.

  10. Allele frequency and genotype distribution of polymorphisms within disease-related genes is influenced by ethnic population sub-structuring in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Bereir, R E H; Mohamed, H S; Seielstad, M; El Hassani, A M; Khalil, E A G; Peacock, C S; Blackwell, J M; Ibrahim, M E

    2003-09-01

    Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism located within disease associated/causing genes were typed in four populations of different tribal and ethnic affiliation from the Sudan. The genotype and allele frequencies were compared with those of other groups from published and unpublished data of world populations. The combined Sudanese sample conformed with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectation. However, population sub-structuring according to ethnic/linguistic group indicated at least two SNPs in departure from HWE. Differences in allele frequencies and genotype distribution between groups was also noted in three of the four SNPs. The other loci were distributed homogeneously within the populations studied with genotype frequencies in agreement with HWE expectation. These results highlight the importance of inter-population stratification for polymorphic markers, as well as the potential influence of evolutionary history and ethnic variation of loci, in the general distribution of SNPs and other polymorphisms.

  11. Relative frequency of VP4 gene alleles among human rotaviruses recovered over a 10-year period (1982-1991) from Japanese children with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Gunasena, S; Nakagomi, O; Isegawa, Y; Kaga, E; Nakagomi, T; Steele, A D; Flores, J; Ueda, S

    1993-01-01

    The relative frequencies of the Wa (corresponding to serotype P1A), DS-1(P1B), M37(P2), and AU-1(P3) alleles of the VP4 gene from rotaviruses collected from the stools of individuals in Japan between 1982 and 1991 were determined to be 83.1, 15.6, 0, and 1.3%, respectively, by a polymerase chain reaction-based typing assay. Images PMID:8396591

  12. Distribution of FcγR gene polymorphisms among two sympatric populations in Mali: differing allele frequencies, associations with malariometric indices and implications for genetic susceptibility to malaria.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mariama; Amoako-Sakyi, Daniel; Dolo, Amagana; Pearson, Jan-Olov; Gyan, Ben; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Nebie, Issa; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Doumbo, Ogobara; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Bakary, Maiga

    2016-01-19

    Genetic polymorphisms in the complex gene cluster encoding human Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs) may influence malaria susceptibility and pathogenesis. Studying genetic susceptibility to malaria is ideal among sympatric populations because the distribution of polymorphic genes among such populations can help in the identification malaria candidate genes. This study determined the distribution of three FcyRs single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (FcγRIIB-rs1050519, FcγRIIC-rs3933769 and FcγRIIIA-rs396991) among sympatric Fulani and Dogon children with uncomplicated malaria. The association of these SNPs with clinical, malariometric and immunological indices was also tested. This study involved 242 Fulani and Dogon volunteers from Mali age under 15 years. All SNPs were genotyped with predesigned TaqMan(®) SNP Genotyping Assays. Genotypic and allelic distribution of SNPs was compared across ethnic groups using the Fisher exact test. Variations in clinical, malariometric and immunologic indices between groups were tested with Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test where appropriate. The study confirmed known malariometric and immunologic differences between sympatric Fulani and non-Fulani tribes. Parasite density was lower in the Fulani than the Dogon (p < 0.0001). The mutant allele of FcγRIIC (rs3933769) was found more frequently in the Fulani than the Dogon (p < 0.0001) while that of FcγRIIIA (rs396991) occurred less frequently in the Fulani than Dogon (p = 0.0043). The difference in the mutant allele frequency of FcγRIIB (rs1050519) between the two ethnic groups was however not statistically significant (p = 0.064). The mutant allele of rs396991 was associated with high malaria-specific IgG1 and IgG3 in the entire study population and Dogon tribe, p = 0.023 and 0.015, respectively. Parasite burden was lower in carriers of the FcγRIIC (rs3933769) mutant allele than non-carriers in the entire study population (p < 0

  13. The frequency of different CGG-repeat alleles in the FMR-1 gene in the general population and special populations

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A. |; Chalifoux, M.; Wing, M.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome is the most common inherited form of developmental disability and was the first genetic disorder in which the mechanism of mutation is triplet repeat expansion. The normal fragile X mental retardation-1 gene has 6-52 copies of the CGG-repeat; affected males have extensive amplification, coupled with methylation and gene inactivation; and carriers have between about 55 and 200 copies. There is some overlap in the 45-55 repeat range, with some alleles showing stable and othres unstable transmission. There have been several estimates of the incidence of the FRAXA syndrome, based on testing of special populations using chromosome analysis and the range is 1/750-1/2000. Because of the high burden associated with this syndrome, and in the face of discussions about population screening, it is important to know the actual incidence of mutations in this gene, as well as the distribution of unstable repeats above 45 copes. We have initiated a general population screening to examine 50,000 newborn samples using PCR, and have developed a rapid, inexpensive and reliable method for amplifying the CGG-repeat from Guthrie spots. In the first 1600 samples examined, we found 15 alleles with greater than 45 CGG-repeats, with the highest being 61 repeats.

  14. An increased frequency of the 5A allele in the promoter region of the MMP3 gene is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Deguara, Jean; Burnand, Kevin G; Berg, Jonathan; Green, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M; Chinien, Ganesh; Waltham, Matthew; Taylor, Peter; Stern, Rowena F; Stern, Rachel F; Solomon, Ellen; Smith, Alberto

    2007-12-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), is over expressed in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), while inactivation of the gene expressing this enzyme is associated with reduced aneurysm formation in an experimental model. The 5A allele of the 5A/6A polymorphism in the promoter region of the MMP3 gene is associated with enhanced MMP3 expression. This study aimed to determine whether the presence of the 5A allele in the MMP3 promoter is a risk factor for AAA, and if this allele is associated with an increased expression of MMP3 in the aneurysm wall. We compared the frequencies of the 5A and 6A alleles in AAA (n = 405), aortic occlusive disease (AOD) (n = 123) and controls (n = 405). The 5A allele frequency was higher in AAA compared with controls (odds ratio - OR 1.32, P = 0.005) and AOD (OR 1.684, P = 0.0004), but was similar in AOD compared to controls (OR 0.78, P = 0.1). The ORs of the 5A/6A and the 5A/5A genotypes were 1.35 and 1.79, compared with 6A homozygotes. Although wall from 5A homozygotes contained 17% more MMP3 mRNA than homozygotes (P = 0.049) the significance of this was lost when adjusted for age and sex (P = 0.069), and size (P = 0.30). Wall from 5A homozygotes did however contain over 45% more MMP3 protein than heterozygotes (P = 0.009 when corrected for age and sex and P = 0.043 when corrected for aneurysm size). It appears that an abnormality in the MMP3 gene is part of the genetic profile that predisposes to aneurysmal disease.

  15. Robust identification of local adaptation from allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-09-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of "standardized allele frequencies" that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools-a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org.

  16. Stable Allele Frequency Distribution of the Plasmodium falciparum clag Genes Encoding Components of the High Molecular Weight Rhoptry Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Jean Semé Fils; Xangsayarath, Phonepadith; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Kaneko, Osamu

    2012-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Clag protein is a candidate component of the plasmodial surface anion channel located on the parasite-infected erythrocyte. This protein is encoded by 5 separated clag genes and forms a RhopH complex with the other components. Previously, a signature of positive diversifying selection was detected on the hypervariable region of clag2 and clag8 by population-based analyses using P. falciparum originating from Thailand in 1988-1989. In this study, we obtained the sequence of this region of 3 clag genes (clag2, clag8, and clag9) in 2005 and evaluated the changes over time in the frequency distribution of the polymorphism of these gene products by comparison with the sequences obtained in 1988-1989. We found no difference in the frequency distribution of 18 putatively neutral loci between the 2 groups, evidence that the background of the parasite population structure has remained stable over 14 years. Although the frequency distribution of most of the polymorphic sites in the hypervariable region of Clag2, Clag8, and Clag9 was stable over 14 years, we found that a proportion of the major Clag2 group and one amino acid position of Clag8 changed significantly. This may be a response to a certain type of pressure.

  17. Stable Allele Frequency Distribution of the Plasmodium falciparum clag Genes Encoding Components of the High Molecular Weight Rhoptry Protein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Jean Semé Fils; Xangsayarath, Phonepadith; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Kaneko, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Clag protein is a candidate component of the plasmodial surface anion channel located on the parasite-infected erythrocyte. This protein is encoded by 5 separated clag genes and forms a RhopH complex with the other components. Previously, a signature of positive diversifying selection was detected on the hypervariable region of clag2 and clag8 by population-based analyses using P. falciparum originating from Thailand in 1988–1989. In this study, we obtained the sequence of this region of 3 clag genes (clag2, clag8, and clag9) in 2005 and evaluated the changes over time in the frequency distribution of the polymorphism of these gene products by comparison with the sequences obtained in 1988–1989. We found no difference in the frequency distribution of 18 putatively neutral loci between the 2 groups, evidence that the background of the parasite population structure has remained stable over 14 years. Although the frequency distribution of most of the polymorphic sites in the hypervariable region of Clag2, Clag8, and Clag9 was stable over 14 years, we found that a proportion of the major Clag2 group and one amino acid position of Clag8 changed significantly. This may be a response to a certain type of pressure. PMID:23264726

  18. Robust Identification of Local Adaptation from Allele Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Torsten; Coop, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Comparing allele frequencies among populations that differ in environment has long been a tool for detecting loci involved in local adaptation. However, such analyses are complicated by an imperfect knowledge of population allele frequencies and neutral correlations of allele frequencies among populations due to shared population history and gene flow. Here we develop a set of methods to robustly test for unusual allele frequency patterns and correlations between environmental variables and allele frequencies while accounting for these complications based on a Bayesian model previously implemented in the software Bayenv. Using this model, we calculate a set of “standardized allele frequencies” that allows investigators to apply tests of their choice to multiple populations while accounting for sampling and covariance due to population history. We illustrate this first by showing that these standardized frequencies can be used to detect nonparametric correlations with environmental variables; these correlations are also less prone to spurious results due to outlier populations. We then demonstrate how these standardized allele frequencies can be used to construct a test to detect SNPs that deviate strongly from neutral population structure. This test is conceptually related to FST and is shown to be more powerful, as we account for population history. We also extend the model to next-generation sequencing of population pools—a cost-efficient way to estimate population allele frequencies, but one that introduces an additional level of sampling noise. The utility of these methods is demonstrated in simulations and by reanalyzing human SNP data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel populations and pooled next-generation sequencing data from Atlantic herring. An implementation of our method is available from http://gcbias.org. PMID:23821598

  19. [Gene frequencies and heterozygosity of the AB0 and RH blood group alleles in the populations of two cities of the Donetsk region, Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, V N; Chinakh, D G; Avdeev, A V; Kuleba, V V; Afanas'ev, M V

    2003-04-01

    The frequencies of the AB0 and RH blood group alleles and heterozygosity indices were determined for the populations of two large industrial cities of Gorlovka and Mariupol. In the population of Gorlovka the gene frequencies were as follows: AB0*0 = 0.576, AB0*A = 0.266, AB0*B = 0.158, and RH*D = 0.592, in Mariupol the frequencies were AB0*0 = 0.584, AB0*A = 0.265, AB0*B = 0.151, and RH*D = 0.604. In Gorlovka the heterozygosity indices in respect to the AB0 and RH alleles were 0.572 and 0.483, respectively; in Mariupol, 0.566 and 0.478, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two populations in respect to the genetic markers analyzed. However, the heterozygosity values obtained were more similar to the corresponding estimates for some populations of Russia, than for the total population of the Ukraine.

  20. Inferring allele frequency trajectories from ancient DNA indicates that selection on a chicken gene coincided with changes in medieval husbandry practices.

    PubMed

    Loog, Liisa; Thomas, Mark G; Barnett, Ross; Allen, Richard; Sykes, Naomi; Paxinos, Ptolemaios D; Lebrasseur, Ophelie; Dobney, Keith; Peters, Joris; Manica, Andrea; Larson, Greger; Eriksson, Anders

    2017-04-21

    Ancient DNA provides an opportunity to infer the drivers of natural selection by linking allele frequency changes to temporal shifts in environment or cultural practices. However, analyses have often been hampered by uneven sampling and uncertainties in sample dating, as well as being confounded by demographic processes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical framework for quantifying the timing and strength of selection using ancient DNA that explicitly addresses these challenges. We applied this method to time series data for two loci: TSHR and BCDO2, both argued to have undergone strong and recent selection in domestic chickens. The derived variant in TSHR, associated with reduced aggression to conspecifics and faster onset of egg laying, shows strong selection beginning around 1,100 years ago, coincident with archaeological evidence for intensified chicken production and documented changes in egg and chicken consumption. To our knowledge, this is the first example of pre-industrial domesticate trait selection in response to a historically attested cultural shift in food preference. For BCDO2, we find support for selection, but demonstrate that the recent rise in allele frequency could also have been driven by gene flow from imported Asian chickens during more recent breed formations. Our findings highlight that traits found ubiquitously in modern domestic species may not necessarily have originated during the early stages of domestication. In addition our results demonstrate the importance of precise estimation of allele frequency trajectories through time for understanding the drivers of selection. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Genetic variation among the Mapuche Indians from the Patagonian region of Argentina: mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and allele frequencies of several nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Ginther, C; Corach, D; Penacino, G A; Rey, J A; Carnese, F R; Hutz, M H; Anderson, A; Just, J; Salzano, F M; King, M C

    1993-01-01

    DNA samples from 60 Mapuche Indians, representing 39 maternal lineages, were genetically characterized for (1) nucleotide sequences of the mtDNA control region; (2) presence or absence of a nine base duplication in mtDNA region V; (3) HLA loci DRB1 and DQA1; (4) variation at three nuclear genes with short tandem repeats; and (5) variation at the polymorphic marker D2S44. The genetic profile of the Mapuche population was compared to other Amerinds and to worldwide populations. Two highly polymorphic portions of the mtDNA control region, comprising 650 nucleotides, were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. The 39 maternal lineages were defined by two or three generation families identified by the Mapuches. These 39 lineages included 19 different mtDNA sequences that could be grouped into four classes. The same classes of sequences appear in other Amerinds from North, Central, and South American populations separated by thousands of miles, suggesting that the origin of the mtDNA patterns predates the migration to the Americas. The mtDNA sequence similarity between Amerind populations suggests that the migration throughout the Americas occurred rapidly relative to the mtDNA mutation rate. HLA DRB1 alleles 1602 and 1402 were frequent among the Mapuches. These alleles also occur at high frequency among other Amerinds in North and South America, but not among Spanish, Chinese or African-American populations. The high frequency of these alleles throughout the Americas, and their specificity to the Americas, supports the hypothesis that Mapuches and other Amerind groups are closely related.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Huvariome: a web server resource of whole genome next-generation sequencing allelic frequencies to aid in pathological candidate gene selection.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Andrew; McClellan, Elizabeth A; Horsman, Sebastiaan; Hiltemann, Saskia D; Palli, Ivo; Nouwens, Stephan; Koning, Anton Hj; Hoogland, Frits; Reumers, Joke; Heijsman, Daphne; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Kremer, Andreas; Meijerink, Jules; Lambrechts, Diether; van der Spek, Peter J

    2012-11-19

    Next generation sequencing provides clinical research scientists with direct read out of innumerable variants, including personal, pathological and common benign variants. The aim of resequencing studies is to determine the candidate pathogenic variants from individual genomes, or from family-based or tumor/normal genome comparisons. Whilst the use of appropriate controls within the experimental design will minimize the number of false positive variations selected, this number can be reduced further with the use of high quality whole genome reference data to minimize false positives variants prior to candidate gene selection. In addition the use of platform related sequencing error models can help in the recovery of ambiguous genotypes from lower coverage data. We have developed a whole genome database of human genetic variations, Huvariome, determined by whole genome deep sequencing data with high coverage and low error rates. The database was designed to be sequencing technology independent but is currently populated with 165 individual whole genomes consisting of small pedigrees and matched tumor/normal samples sequenced with the Complete Genomics sequencing platform. Common variants have been determined for a Benelux population cohort and represented as genotypes alongside the results of two sets of control data (73 of the 165 genomes), Huvariome Core which comprises 31 healthy individuals from the Benelux region, and Diversity Panel consisting of 46 healthy individuals representing 10 different populations and 21 samples in three Pedigrees. Users can query the database by gene or position via a web interface and the results are displayed as the frequency of the variations as detected in the datasets. We demonstrate that Huvariome can provide accurate reference allele frequencies to disambiguate sequencing inconsistencies produced in resequencing experiments. Huvariome has been used to support the selection of candidate cardiomyopathy related genes which have a

  3. The HLA-C*04: 01/KIR2DS4 gene combination and human leukocyte antigen alleles with high population frequency drive rate of HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Alex; Pérez-Álvarez, Susana; Ibarrondo, Javier; Ganoza, Carmela; Lama, Javier R; Lucchetti, Aldo; Cate, Steven; Hildebrand, William; Bernard, Nicole; Gomez, Lupe; Sanchez, Jorge; Brander, Christian

    2015-03-13

    The objective of this study is to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotypes associated with different risks for HIV acquisition and HIV disease progression. A cross-sectional study of a cohort of 468 high-risk individuals (246 HIV-positive and 222 HIV-negative) from outpatient clinics in Lima (Perú). The cohort was high-resolution HLA and KIR-typed and analysed for potential differences in single-allele frequencies and allele combinations between HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals and for associations with HIV viral load and CD4 cell counts in infected individuals. HLA class I alleles associated with a lack of viral control had a significantly higher population frequency than relatively protective alleles (P = 0.0093), in line with a rare allele advantage. HLA-A02 : 01 and HLA-C04 : 01 were both associated with high viral loads (P = 0.0313 and 0.0001, respectively) and low CD4 cell counts (P = 0.0008 and 0.0087, respectively). Importantly, the association between HLA-C04 : 01 and poor viral control was not due to its linkage disequilibrium with other HLA alleles. Rather, the coexpression of its putative KIR ligand KIR2DS4f was critically linked to elevated viral loads. These results highlight the impact of population allele frequency on viral control and identify a novel association between HLA-C04 : 01 in combination with KIR2DS4f and uncontrolled HIV infection. Our data further support the importance of the interplay of markers of the adaptive and innate immune system in viral control.

  4. Allelic selection of human IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Delgado, C; Fresno, M; Alcina, A

    2000-12-01

    The allelic expression of mouse IL-2 cannot be definitely extrapolated to what might happen in humans. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of allelic expression of the IL-2 gene in non-genetically manipulated human T lymphocytes by following natural allelic polymorphisms. We found a phenotypically silent punctual change in the human IL-2 at position 114 after the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, which represents a dimorphic polymorphism at the first exon of the IL-2 gene. This allowed the study by single-cell PCR of the regulation of the human IL-2 allelic expression in heterozygous CD4(+) T cells, which was found to be tightly controlled monoallelically. These findings may be used as a suitable marker for monitoring the IL-2 allelic contribution to effector activities and in immune responses against different infections or in pathological situations.

  5. Importance of allele frequency estimates in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Taioli, Emanuela; Pedotti, Paola; Garte, Seymour

    2004-09-01

    This study addresses the issue of appropriate allelic frequency estimates in epidemiological studies. Reasons for imprecise estimate of allele frequency may be population stratification, and lack of power of many published studies to define true allele frequencies in the general population. As an example of the lack of power of epidemiological studies, we plot the frequency of GSTM1 deletion versus sample size for the 79 studies from the GSEC pooled analysis. The estimate of allele frequency derived from small groups of controls deviates more from the true frequency than the estimate derived from larger studies. We discuss the possible consequences of not properly defining allele frequencies in the population. This may reflect on the conduct of association studies, on assessment of the effects of multigenic mechanisms, and on the determination of genetic diversity.

  6. The Rh allele frequencies in Gaza city in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    EL-Wahhab Skaik, Younis Abed

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Rh blood group system is the second most clinically significant blood group system. It includes 49 antigens, but only five (D, C, E, c and e) are the most routinely identified due to their unique relation to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) and transfusion reactions. Frequency of the Rh alleles showed variation, with regard to race and ethnic. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to document the Rh alleles’ frequencies amongst males (M) and females (F) in Gaza city in Palestine. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two blood samples (110 M and 122 F) were tested against monoclonal IgM anti-C,anti-c, anti-E, anti-e and a blend of monoclonal/polyclonal IgM/IgG anti-D. The expected Rh phenotypes were calculated using gene counting method. Results: The most frequent Rh antigen in the total sample was e, while the least frequent was E.The order of the combined Rh allele frequencies in both M and F was CDe > cDe > cde > CdE > cDE > Cde > CDE. A significant difference was reported between M and F regarding the phenotypic frequencies (P < 0.05). However, no significance (P > 0.05) was reported with reference to the observed and expected Rh phenotypic frequencies in either M or F students. Conclusion: It was concluded that the Rh antigens, alleles and phenotypes in Gaza city have unique frequencies, which may be of importance to the Blood Transfusion Center in Gaza city and anthropology. PMID:21897594

  7. Mutations of the GLA gene in Korean patients with Fabry disease and frequency of the E66Q allele as a functional variant in Korean newborns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Heo, Sun Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Park, Jung-Young; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kang, Duk-Hee; Choe, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Won-Ho; Yang, Song Hyun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2010-08-01

    Fabry disease is caused by an alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) deficiency. In this study, we identified 28 unrelated Korean families with Fabry disease with 25 distinct mutations in the GLA gene including six novel mutations (p.W47X, p.C90X, p.D61EfsX32, IVS4(-11)T>A, p.D322E and p.W349). Notably, five subjects from four unrelated families carried the p.E66Q variant, previously known as a pathogenic mutation in atypical Fabry disease. Among these patients, only one had proteinuria and two had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy without any other systemic manifestation of Fabry disease. Substantial residual GLA activity was shown both in the leukocytes of p.E66Q patients (19.0-30.3% of normal activity) and in transiently overexpressed COS-7 cells (43.8 + or - 3.03% of normal activity). Although GLA harboring p.E66Q is unstable at neutral pH, the enzyme is efficiently expressed in the lysosomes of COS-7 cells. The location of p.E66 is distant from both the active site and the dimer interface, and has a more accessible surface area than have other mutations of atypical Fabry disease. In addition, the allele frequency of p.E66Q determined in 833 unrelated Korean individuals was remarkably high at 1.046% (95% confidence interval, 0.458-1.634%). These results indicate that p.E66Q is a functional polymorphism rather than a pathogenic mutation.

  8. Global distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.M.; Kidd, J.R.; Livak, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    The dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) is a candidate gene for schizophrenia because the dopaminergic system has been implicated in this neuropsychiatric disorder. Several research groups have reported an association between allelic variants at DRD4 and schizophrenia, while others have been unable to replicate that finding. Knowledge of the appropriate gene frequencies in the underlying populations may resolve these inconsistencies. We have determined the frequencies of 8 different alleles of the 48 bp imperfect tandem repeat of exon 3 at the DRD4 locus in samples from 33 populations around the world. The frequencies vary considerably in the different populations with the most common allele ranging from 16% to 95%. Frequencies and Fst values will be presented for the 3 most common alleles (4-, 7-, and 2- repeat) by continental groupings, but the individual populations vary significantly around the averages. The populations averaged 4.3 alleles (range 2 to 7).

  9. Frequency of FCGR3B Alleles in Thai Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kaset, Chollanot; Leetrakool, Nipapan; Intharanut, Kamphon

    2013-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) are involved in autoimmune and alloimmune neutropenia and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The HNA-1 system is important in immunogenetics, and allele frequencies have been described in different populations. This study investigated the frequency of FCGR3B alleles encoding HNA-1a, HNA-1b, and HNA-1c among Thai blood donors and compared these frequencies with those previously reported for other populations. Methods Eight hundred DNA samples obtained from unrelated healthy blood donors at the National Blood Centre, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, and the Blood Bank, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, were included. Samples were simultaneously typed for each FCGR3B allele using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) technique. Results The frequencies of FCGR3B*1, FCGR3B*2, and FCGR3B*3 alleles in central Thai blood donors were 0.548, 0.452, and 0.004, respectively; only FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles were found in northern Thai blood donors (0.68 and 0.32, respectively). Compared with other Asian populations, central Thais had higher frequencies of the FCGR3B*2 allele (P<0.001), while the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in northern Thais were similar to those previously reported in Taiwanese and Japanese populations. In contrast, the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in the northern Thai population were statistically different from those observed in central Thai, Korean, German, and Turkish populations. Conclusions FCGR3B allele frequencies were significantly different between central and northern Thai blood donors. Our in-house PCR-SSP method is a simple, cost-effective, and convenient method for FCGR3B allele detection. PMID:24205492

  10. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of two new alleles in Iranian buffalo breed.

    PubMed

    Mosafer, J; Heydarpour, M; Manshad, E; Russell, G; Sulimova, G E

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found.

  11. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 Allelic Frequencies and Identification of Two New Alleles in Iranian Buffalo Breed

    PubMed Central

    Mosafer, J.; Heydarpour, M.; Manshad, E.; Russell, G.; Sulimova, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response makes it an attractive candidate gene for associations with disease resistance and susceptibility. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian buffaloes. Heminested PCR-RFLP method was used to identify the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the study herd (12 alleles). Almost 63.50% of the alleles were accounted for by four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2 ∗48, ∗20, ∗21, and obe) in Iranian buffalo. The DRB3.2 ∗48 allele frequency (24.20%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2 ∗20 and DRB3.2 ∗21 are 14.52 and 14.00, respectively, and obe and gbb have a new pattern. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian buffalo and other cattle breed studied. In the Iranian buffaloes studied alleles associated with resistance to various diseases are found. PMID:22454612

  12. Effects of allele frequency estimation on genomic predictions and inbreeding coefficients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic calculations often require estimating allele frequencies, which differ across time due to selection and drift. Data were 50,000 simulated markers and 39,985 actual markers for 2391 genotyped Holstein bulls. Gene content of relatives and gene frequencies in the base (founder) population were ...

  13. FINDbase: a worldwide database for genetic variation allele frequencies updated

    PubMed Central

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Viennas, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Dimitris I.; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; van Baal, Sjozef; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FIND base; http://www.findbase.org) records frequencies of causative genetic variations worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related external resources and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. In addition to the regular data content updates, we report the following significant advances: (i) the systematic collection and thorough documentation of population/ethnic group-specific pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies for 144 markers in 14 genes of pharmacogenomic interest from different classes of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, representing 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide; (ii) the development of new data querying and visualization tools in the expanded FINDbase data collection, built around Microsoft’s PivotViewer software (http://www.getpivot.com), based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net) that facilitates querying of large data sets and visualizing the results; and (iii) the establishment of the first database journal, by affiliating FINDbase with Human Genomics and Proteomics, a new open-access scientific journal, which would serve as a prime example of a non-profit model for sustainable database funding. PMID:21113021

  14. FINDbase: a worldwide database for genetic variation allele frequencies updated.

    PubMed

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Viennas, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Dimitris I; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; van Baal, Sjozef; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzimas, Giannis; Patrinos, George P

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FIND base; http://www.findbase.org) records frequencies of causative genetic variations worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related external resources and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. In addition to the regular data content updates, we report the following significant advances: (i) the systematic collection and thorough documentation of population/ethnic group-specific pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies for 144 markers in 14 genes of pharmacogenomic interest from different classes of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, representing 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide; (ii) the development of new data querying and visualization tools in the expanded FINDbase data collection, built around Microsoft's PivotViewer software (http://www.getpivot.com), based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net) that facilitates querying of large data sets and visualizing the results; and (iii) the establishment of the first database journal, by affiliating FINDbase with Human Genomics and Proteomics, a new open-access scientific journal, which would serve as a prime example of a non-profit model for sustainable database funding.

  15. Quantitative resistance affects the speed of frequency increase but not the diversity of the virulence alleles overcoming a major resistance gene to Leptosphaeria maculans in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Delourme, R; Bousset, L; Ermel, M; Duffé, P; Besnard, A L; Marquer, B; Fudal, I; Linglin, J; Chadœuf, J; Brun, H

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative resistance mediated by multiple genetic factors has been shown to increase the potential for durability of major resistance genes. This was demonstrated in the Leptosphaeria maculans/Brassica napus pathosystem in a 5year recurrent selection field experiment on lines harboring the qualitative resistance gene Rlm6 combined or not with quantitative resistance. The quantitative resistance limited the size of the virulent isolate population. In this study we continued this recurrent selection experiment in the same way to examine whether the pathogen population could adapt and render the major gene ineffective in the longer term. The cultivars Eurol, with a susceptible background, and Darmor, with quantitative resistance, were used. We confirmed that the combination of qualitative and quantitative resistance is an effective approach for controlling the pathogen epidemics over time. This combination did not prevent isolates virulent against the major gene from amplifying in the long term but the quantitative resistance significantly delayed for 5years the loss of effectiveness of the qualitative resistance and disease severity was maintained at a low level on the genotype with both types of resistance after the fungus population had adapted to the major gene. We also showed that diversity of AvrLm6 virulence alleles was comparable in isolates recovered after the recurrent selection on lines carrying either the major gene alone or in combination with quantitative resistance: a single repeat-induced point mutation and deletion events were observed in both situations. Breeding varieties which combine qualitative and quantitative resistance can effectively contribute to disease control by increasing the potential for durability of major resistance genes.

  16. Variation in optineurin (OPTN) allele frequencies between and within populations

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lugo, Rosa M.; Pawar, Hemant; Reed, David M.; Lichter, Paul R.; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Page, Michael; Eadie, James; Azocar, Veronica; Maul, Eugenio; Ntim-Amponsah, Christine; Bromley, William; Obeng-Nyarkoh, Ebenezer; Johnson, A. Tim; Kijek, Theresa Guckian; Downs, Catherine A.; Johnson, Jenae M.; Perez-Grossmann, Rodolfo A.; Guevara-Fujita, Maria-Luisa; Fujita, Ricardo; Wallace, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the extent to which mutations in the optineurin (OPTN) glaucoma gene play a role in glaucoma in different populations. Methods Case-controlled study of OPTN sequence variants in individuals with or without glaucoma in populations of different ancestral origins and evaluate previous OPTN reports. We analyzed 314 subjects with African, Asian, Caucasian and Hispanic ancestries included 229 cases of primary open-angle glaucoma, 51 cases of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma, 33 cases of normal tension glaucoma, and 371 controls. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified OPTN coding exons were resequenced and case frequencies were compared to frequencies in controls matched for ancestry. Results The E50K sequence variant was identified in one individual from Chile with normal tension glaucoma, and the 691_692insAG variant was found in one Ashkenazi Jewish individual from Russia. The R545Q variant was found in two Asian individuals with primary open-angle glaucoma; one of Filipino ancestry and one of Korean ancestry. In addition to presenting OPTN allele frequencies for Caucasian and Asian populations that have been the subject of previous reports, we also present information for populations of Hispanic and black African ancestries. Conclusions Our study contributes additional evidence to support the previously reported association of the OPTN E50K mutation with glaucoma. After finding an additional 691_692insAG OPTN variant, we can still only conclude that this variant is rare. Combined analysis of our data with data from more than a dozen other studies indicates no association of R545Q with glaucoma in most populations. Those same studies disagree in their conclusions regarding the role of M98K in glaucoma. Our analysis of the combined data provides statistically significant evidence of association of M98K with normal tension glaucoma in Asian populations, but not in Caucasian populations; however, the validity of this conclusion is questionable because

  17. Non-Equilibrium Allele Frequency Spectra Via Spectral Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Jody; Chen, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in the analysis of population genomics data consists of isolating signatures of natural selection from background noise caused by random drift and gene flow. Analyses of massive amounts of data from many related populations require high-performance algorithms to determine the likelihood of different demographic scenarios that could have shaped the observed neutral single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency spectrum. In many areas of applied mathematics, Fourier Transforms and Spectral Methods are firmly established tools to analyze spectra of signals and model their dynamics as solutions of certain Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). When spectral methods are applicable, they have excellent error properties and are the fastest possible in high dimension; see [15]. In this paper we present an explicit numerical solution, using spectral methods, to the forward Kolmogorov equations for a Wright-Fisher process with migration of K populations, influx of mutations, and multiple population splitting events. PMID:21376069

  18. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection...

  19. Allele Frequencies at Microsatellite Loci: The Stepwise Mutation Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, A. M.; Slatkin, M.; Freimer, N. B.

    1993-01-01

    We summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. We show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. We show that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. PMID:8454213

  20. Frequency of HLA-A alleles in the Syrian population genotyped by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Madania, A; Ghoury, I; Al-Ashkar, W; Nweder, S; Zarzour, H

    2014-10-01

    HLA-A molecules are highly polymorphic. Their accurate typing at a high-resolution level is crucial for successful organ, bone marrow and cord blood transplantation. Furthermore, several HLA alleles have been involved in susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, allergies, cancers and inflammations. In order to determine common HLA-A alleles in Syria and their frequencies, sequence-based typing (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-A alleles at high resolution (four digit level) among one hundred and thirty randomly selected Syrian individuals. Exons 2, 3 and 4 of the HLA-A gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sbt-engine software was used for allele assignment. Ambiguities were solved using group-specific sequencing primers (GSSPs). We could identify 32 different HLA-A alleles which were divided into 3 groups: high frequency (approximately 10%, A*01:01; A*24:02; A*03:01; A*02:01), moderate frequency (approximately 3%, such as A*02:05, A*31:01 and A*33:01), and low frequency (approximately 1%, such as A*02:11, A*29:01, A*02:02 and A*36:01). Homozygosity rate was higher than expected (11.5% vs. 7.15%). For high frequency alleles, our results show similarity to neighbouring countries. However, 15 alleles (such as A*02:04, A*02:06, A*02:11 and A*02:17) found in our cohort in low frequencies were never reported in some or all neighbouring countries. This is the first report on HLA-A allele frequencies in Syria. In spite of the relatively low number of tested subjects, our results revealed a high degree of diversity, with 32 different alleles, reflecting the high ethnic heterogeneity of the Syrian population. The identification of alleles rarely or never reported in neighbouring countries indicates a higher genetic diversity in Syria.

  1. Dombrock genotyping in Brazilian blood donors reveals different regional frequencies of the HY allele

    PubMed Central

    Piassi, Fabiana Chagas Camargos; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; de Castilho, Lilian Maria; Baleotti Júnior, Wilson; Suzuki, Rodrigo Buzinaro; da Cunha, Débora Moura

    2013-01-01

    Background Dombrock blood group system genotyping has revealed various rearrangements of the Dombrock gene and identified new variant alleles in Brazil (i.e., DO*A-SH, DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL). Because of the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population, interregional differences are expected during the investigation of Dombrock genotypes. Objective The present study aims to determine the frequencies of Dombrock genotypes in blood donors from Minas Gerais and compare the frequencies of the HY and JO alleles to those of another population in Brazil. Methods The frequencies of the DO alleles in Minas Gerais, a southeastern state of Brazil, were determined from the genotyping of 270 blood donors. Genotyping involved polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to identify the 323G>T, 350C>T, 793A>G, and 898C>G mutations, which are related to the HY, JO, DO*A/DO*B, and DO*A-WL/DO*B-WL alleles, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of rare HY and JO alleles were statistically compared using the chi-square test with data from another Brazilian region. Results The HY allele frequency in Minas Gerais (2.4%) was almost twice that of the JO allele (1.5%). The frequency of the HY allele was significantly higher (p-value = 0.001) than that in another Brazilian population and includes a rare homozygous donor with the Hy- phenotype. In addition, the DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL alleles, which were first identified in Brazil, were found in the state of Minas Gerais. Conclusions The data confirm that the frequencies of DO alleles differ between regions in Brazil. The population of Minas Gerais could be targeted in a screening strategy to identify the Hy- phenotype in order to develop a rare blood bank. PMID:24478605

  2. Maintenance of an aminopeptidase allele frequency cline by natural selection.

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, R K; Newell, R I; Immermann, F

    1980-01-01

    The product of the Lap locus in the marine bivalve Mytilus edulis is a neutral, membrane-associated aminopeptidase that is primarily localized on intestinal microvilli and in digestive cell lysosomes. Natural populations are genetically differentiated at the Lap locus between areas of differing salinity. A steep (0.55-0.15) allele frequency cline connects differentiated populations between the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound. We demonstrate an annual gene flow/mortality cycle in cline populations whereby gene frequencies after mortality are correlated with salinity and enzyme activity. The cline is spatially and temporally unstable in immigrants, but stable in residents after mortality. Mortality is nonrandom with regard to the Lap locus; genotype-dependent properties of the aminopeptidase enzyme apparently led to a differential rate of the utilizaiton of nutrient reserves because selected genotypes exhibited an increased rate of tissue weight loss. Aminopeptidase genotypes are differentially adapted to different temperatures and salinities, which provides a mechanism for the relationship among biochemical, physiological, and population phenotypes. PMID:6933563

  3. Population structure of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus as revealed by field manipulation of allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Burton, R S; Swisher, S G

    1984-12-01

    Allele frequencies in natural T. californicus populations were perturbed by introduction of copepods from neighboring differentiated populations. In five experiments, the Gpt (F) allele was introduced into single recipient pools at a frequency of approximately 20%. In each case, the introduced allele declined to low frequencies (<3%) in less than one month, apparently due to dilution by residents of other pools on the same outcrop. In a larger scale experiment, the Pgi (F) was introduced into four pools on a single small rock outcrop; all pools on the outcrop were subsequently monitored. While the allele frequency fell from approximately 40% to 10% during the first six weeks after the transplant, no further change in frequency was observed for the duration of the experiment (16 months). Within six weeks some spread of the allele to non-recipient pools on the same outcrop was observed; by eight months, allele frequencies in all pools on the outcrop were similar. Hence, despite the extensive turnover of subpopulations as single pools evaporate or are washed out, genetic homogeneity and stability of entire outcrops are maintained via extensive inter-pool gene flow; this contrasts sharply with the highly restricted levels of inter-outcrop gene flow.

  4. Frequency of the delta ccr5 deletion allele in the urban Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Passos, G A; Picanço, V P

    1998-04-01

    Studies on screening genes conferring resistance to HIV-1 and AIDS onset have shown a direct relationship between a 32 base pair (bp) deletion in the CCR5 beta-chemokine receptor gene (delta ccr5 mutant allele) and long survival of HIV-1 infected individuals bearing this mutation. These findings led to an interest in studies of delta ccr5 allele distribution in human populations. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 193-bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 161-bp product from the 32-bp deletion allele. In an investigation of the urban Brazilian population we detected a 93% frequency of normal CCR5/CCR5 homozygous individuals and a 7% frequency of CCR5/delta ccr5 heterozygous individuals. The frequency of the delta ccr5 mutant allele in this population is 0.035; however, no homozygous delta ccr5 individual has been detected thus far. This is the first evidence for the contribution of the delta ccr5 allele to the genetic background of the urban Brazilian population, which is characterized by intense ethnic admixture. These findings open perspectives for further studies on the relationship between delta ccr5 allele frequency and AIDS onset in high-risk HIV-1 exposures individuals.

  5. A novel allelic variant of the human TSG-6 gene encoding an amino acid difference in the CUB module. Chromosomal localization, frequency analysis, modeling, and expression.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Hilke A; Mustafa, Zehra; Rugg, Marilyn S; Marsden, Brian D; Cordell, Martin R; Mahoney, David J; Jenkins, Suzanne C; Dowling, Barbara; Fries, Erik; Milner, Caroline M; Loughlin, John; Day, Anthony J

    2002-05-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6) encodes a 35-kDa protein, which is comprised of contiguous Link and CUB modules. TSG-6 protein has been detected in the articular joints of osteoarthritis (OA) patients, with little or no constitutive expression in normal adult tissues. It interacts with components of cartilage matrix (e.g. hyaluronan and aggrecan) and thus may be involved in extracellular remodeling during joint disease. In addition, TSG-6 has been found to have anti-inflammatory properties in models of acute and chronic inflammation. Here we have mapped the human TSG-6 gene to 2q23.3, a region of chromosome 2 linked with OA. A single nucleotide polymorphism was identified that involves a non-synonymous G --> A transition at nucleotide 431 of the TSG-6 coding sequence, resulting in an Arg to Gln alteration in the CUB module (at residue 144 in the preprotein). Molecular modeling of the CUB domain indicated that this amino acid change might lead to functional differences. Typing of 400 OA cases and 400 controls revealed that the A(431) variant identified here is the major TSG-6 allele in Caucasians (with over 75% being A(431) homozygotes) but that this polymorphism is not a marker for OA susceptibility in the patients we have studied. Expression of the Arg(144) and Gln(144) allotypes in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells, and functional characterization, showed that there were no significant differences in the ability of these full-length proteins to bind hyaluronan or form a stable complex with inter-alpha-inhibitor.

  6. Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA: comparison of three PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, Stefan; Hemminki, Kari; Thirumaran, Ranjit Kumar; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Bonn, Stefan; Försti, Asta; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-12-01

    Determination of allele frequency in pooled DNA samples is a powerful and efficient tool for large-scale association studies. In this study, we tested and compared three PCR-based methods for accuracy, reproducibility, cost, and convenience. The methods compared were: (i) real-time PCR with allele-specific primers, (ii) real-time PCR with allele-specific TaqMan probes, and (iii) quantitative sequencing. Allele frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in three different genes were estimated from pooled DNA. The pools were made of genomic DNA samples from 96 cases with basal cell carcinoma of the skin and 96 healthy controls with known genotypes. In this study, the allele frequency estimation made by real-time PCR with allele-specific primers had the smallest median deviation (MD) from the real allele frequency with 1.12% (absolute percentage points) and was also the cheapest method. However; this method required the most time for optimization and showed the highest variation between replicates (SD = 6.47%). Quantitative sequencing, the simplest method, was found to have intermediate accuracies (MD = 1.44%, SD = 4.2%). Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, a convenient but very expensive method, had an MD of 1.47% and the lowest variation between replicates (SD = 3.18%).

  7. Allelic Variation of Gene Expression in Maize HybridsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A.; Zinselmeier, Christopher; Habben, Jeffrey; Bowen, Benjamin A.; Smith, Oscar S.

    2004-01-01

    Allelic expression variation of nonimprinted autosomal genes has recently been uncovered in mouse hybrids and humans. The allelic expression variation is attributed to differences in noncoding DNA sequences and does not involve epigenetic regulation or gene imprinting. This expression variation is suggested to play important roles in determining phenotypic diversity. Virtually nothing is known about such allele-specific expression variation in a hybrid plant where two alleles are compared in the same genetic context. We examined parental transcript accumulation in maize (Zea mays) hybrids using allele-specific RT-PCR analysis. Among 15 genes analyzed, 11 showed differences at the RNA level, ranging from unequal expression of the two alleles (biallelic) to expression of a single allele (monoallelic). Maternal or paternal transmission had little effect on the allele-specific transcript ratio of nearly all genes analyzed, suggesting that parent-of-origin effect was minimal. We analyzed the allelic difference in genetically contrasting hybrids and hybrids under high planting density and drought stress. Whereas a genetically improved modern hybrid expressed both alleles, a less improved old hybrid frequently showed mono-allelic expression. Furthermore, the two alleles in the hybrid responded differentially to abiotic stresses. The results of allele-specific regulation in different tissues in responding to environment and stress suggest an unequivalent function of the parental alleles in the hybrid, which may have an impact on heterosis. PMID:15194819

  8. Reelin gene alleles and susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Liu, X; Zhang, C; Mundo, E; Macciardi, F; Grayson, D R; Guidotti, A R; Holden, J J A

    2002-01-01

    A polymorphic trinucleotide repeat (CGG/GCC) within the human Reelin gene (RELN) was examined as a candidate gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This gene encodes a large extracellular matrix protein that orchestrates neuronal positioning during corticogenesis. The CGG-repeat within the 5' untranslated region of RELN exon 1 was examined in 126 multiple-incidence families. The number of CGG repeats varied from three to 16 in affected individuals and controls, with no expansion or contraction observed during maternal (n = 291) or paternal (n = 287) transmissions in families with autistic probands. Although the frequencies of the RELN alleles and genotypes in affected children were not different from those in the comparison group, a family-based association test (FBAT) showed that the larger RELN alleles (> or = 11 repeats) were transmitted more often than expected to affected children (S = 43, E(S) = 34.5, P = 0.035); this was particularly the case for the 13-repeat RELN allele (S = 22, E(S) = 16, P = 0.034). Affected sib-pair (ASP) analysis found no evidence of excess sharing of RELN alleles in affected siblings. The impact of genotypes with large alleles (> or = 11 repeats) on the phenotypes in individuals with ASD was analyzed by ANOVA in a subset of the families for which results of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised were available. Children with large RELN alleles did not show any difference in scores for questions related to the core symptoms of autistic disorder, but there was a tendency for children with at least one large RELN allele to have an earlier age at first phrase (chi(2) = 3.538, P = 0.06). Thus, although the case-control and affected sib-pair findings did not support a role for RELN in susceptibility to ASD, the more powerful family-based association study demonstrated that RELN alleles with larger numbers of CGG repeats may play a role in the etiology of some cases of ASD, especially in children without delayed phrase speech.

  9. Deleterious Alleles in the Human Genome Are on Average Younger Than Neutral Alleles of the Same Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L.; Francioli, Laurent C.; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Ommen, G. J. B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669–673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans. PMID:23468643

  10. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  11. High-Throughput SNP Allele-Frequency Determination in Pooled DNA Samples by Kinetic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Germer, Søren; Holland, Michael J.; Higuchi, Russell

    2000-01-01

    We have developed an accurate, yet inexpensive and high-throughput, method for determining the allele frequency of biallelic polymorphisms in pools of DNA samples. The assay combines kinetic (real-time quantitative) PCR with allele-specific amplification and requires no post-PCR processing. The relative amounts of each allele in a sample are quantified. This is performed by dividing equal aliquots of the pooled DNA between two separate PCR reactions, each of which contains a primer pair specific to one or the other allelic SNP variant. For pools with equal amounts of the two alleles, the two amplifications should reach a detectable level of fluorescence at the same cycle number. For pools that contain unequal ratios of the two alleles, the difference in cycle number between the two amplification reactions can be used to calculate the relative allele amounts. We demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the assay on samples with known predetermined SNP allele frequencies from 5% to 95%, including pools of both human and mouse DNAs using eight different SNPs altogether. The accuracy of measuring known allele frequencies is very high, with the strength of correlation between measured and known frequencies having an r2 = 0.997. The loss of sensitivity as a result of measurement error is typically minimal, compared with that due to sampling error alone, for population samples up to 1000. We believe that by providing a means for SNP genotyping up to thousands of samples simultaneously, inexpensively, and reproducibly, this method is a powerful strategy for detecting meaningful polymorphic differences in candidate gene association studies and genome-wide linkage disequilibrium scans. PMID:10673283

  12. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-04-30

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population.

  13. Distribution of BoLA-DRB3 allelic frequencies and identification of a new allele in the iranian cattle breed sistani (Bos indicus).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nassiry, M R; Mosafer, J; Mohammadabadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2009-02-01

    The distribution of the frequencies of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles in the Iranian cattle breed Sistani was studied by the PCR-RFLP ("hemi-nested") assay using restriction endonucleases RsaI, HaeIII and BstYI. In the examined cattle breed (65 animals) 32 alleles have been identified one of which being described for the first time (6.15% frequency). The nucleotide sequence of the polymorphic region of exon 2 of this allele has been determined and submitted in the GeneBank database under accession number DQ486519. The submitted sequence has maximum homology (92%) with the previously described sequence DRB3-mRNA from Bos indicus (AccN X79346) and differs from it by 24 nucleotide substitutions which result in 16 amino acid substitutions. The peptide (on the basis of the reconstructed amino acid sequence) has 89% identity to the sequence encoded by the BIDRBF 188 locus (Bos indicus). The results obtained permit the sequence described by us to be considered as a new allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene (DRB3.2**X). The total frequency of the main six alleles (DRB3.2*X, *10, *11, *20, *34 and *X) occurring with a frequency of over 5% is about 60% in Iranian Sistani cattle. Fifteen alleles have <1% frequency. The highest frequency was observed for DRB3.2*8 allele (21.54%) like in other previously described breeds of Bos indicus (up to 23.07%). The Iranian breed Sistani has a high level of similarity by the spectrum of BoLA-DRB3 alleles and their frequencies to other Bos indicus breeds and significantly differs by these criteria from the Bos taurus breeds. The Iranian Sistani herd under study includes alleles associated with to resistance to leukemia (DRB3.2*ll and *23) and to different forms of mastitis (DRB3.2*2, *7, *11, *23 and *24) although their frequencies are low (from 0.77 to 5.37%). On the whole, a high level of diversity of BoLA-DRB3 gene alleles and the availability of alleles associated with resistance to different diseases makes this breed of interest for breeding practice.

  14. Allelic variation in the NPY gene in 14 Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, L V K S; Thangaraj, K; Shah, Anish M; Pardhasaradhi, G; Praveen Kumar, K; Reddy, A G; Papa Rao, A; Mulligan, C J; Singh, Lalji; Rao, V R

    2007-01-01

    NPY is a 36-aminoacid peptide expressed in several areas of the nervous system. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors represent a widely diffused system that is involved in the regulation of multiple biological functions. The human NPY gene is located in chromosome 7. The functional significance of coding Leu7Pro polymorphism in the signal peptide of preproNPY is known. Six hundred and fifty four individuals of 14 ethnic Indian populations were screened for three mutations in the NPY gene, including Leu7Pro. We found that the Pro7 frequencies among the studied populations were much higher than in previous studies from other parts of the world. The highest allele frequency of Pro7 was detected in the Kota population in the Nilgiri Hill region of south India, and this may reflect a founder event in the past or genetic drift. All populations followed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the assayed markers. A total of five haplotypes were observed, only two of which were found to occur with a high frequency in all populations. No linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed across the tested alleles in any population with the exception of Leu7Pro and Ser50Ser in the Badaga population (chi(2) = 13.969; p = 0.0001).

  15. [RHD 1227A allele frequency among Rh negative population and random population].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Jie; Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Xu, Xian-Guo; Ma, Kai-Rong; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Yan, Li-Xing

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the frequency of RHD 1227A allele in Rh negative population and random population, an AS-PCR (allele specific-polymerase chain reaction) method was employed to detect RHD 1227A allele. RHD gene copy was determined by D zygosity test and RHD exon 9 nucleotide sequence analysis. The results showed that among 143 Rh negative donors, forty-one RHD 1227A allele carriers were detected, and 8 (19.51%) out of which were RhCCdee, 32 (78.05%) were RhCcdee, and 1 (2.44%) was RhCcdEe. Thirty-five Rh negative RHD 1227A carriers had RHD gene deletion, and the remaining carriers were RHD 1227A homozygous. Seven (1.43%) individuals were detected with RHD 1227A allele among 489 random donors. They were all G/A heterozygous at RHD 1227 site. Serological test indicated that they were normal Rh positive phenotype. It is concluded that the frequency of RHD 1227A allele is 16.43% among Rh negative population and 0.72% among the random population.

  16. Fast spatial ancestry via flexible allele frequency surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rañola, John Michael; Novembre, John; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Unique modeling and computational challenges arise in locating the geographic origin of individuals based on their genetic backgrounds. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary widely in informativeness, allele frequencies change non-linearly with geography and reliable localization requires evidence to be integrated across a multitude of SNPs. These problems become even more acute for individuals of mixed ancestry. It is hardly surprising that matching genetic models to computational constraints has limited the development of methods for estimating geographic origins. We attack these related problems by borrowing ideas from image processing and optimization theory. Our proposed model divides the region of interest into pixels and operates SNP by SNP. We estimate allele frequencies across the landscape by maximizing a product of binomial likelihoods penalized by nearest neighbor interactions. Penalization smooths allele frequency estimates and promotes estimation at pixels with no data. Maximization is accomplished by a minorize–maximize (MM) algorithm. Once allele frequency surfaces are available, one can apply Bayes’ rule to compute the posterior probability that each pixel is the pixel of origin of a given person. Placement of admixed individuals on the landscape is more complicated and requires estimation of the fractional contribution of each pixel to a person’s genome. This estimation problem also succumbs to a penalized MM algorithm. Results: We applied the model to the Population Reference Sample (POPRES) data. The model gives better localization for both unmixed and admixed individuals than existing methods despite using just a small fraction of the available SNPs. Computing times are comparable with the best competing software. Availability and implementation: Software will be freely available as the OriGen package in R. Contact: ranolaj@uw.edu or klange@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at

  17. The joint allele-frequency spectrum in closely related species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Green, Richard E; Pääbo, Svante; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2007-09-01

    We develop the theory for computing the joint frequency spectra of alleles in two closely related species. We allow for arbitrary population growth in both species after they had a common ancestor. We focus on the case in which a single chromosome is sequenced from one of the species. We use classical diffusion theory to show that, if the ancestral species was at equilibrium under mutation and drift and a chromosome from one of the descendant species carries the derived allele, the frequency spectrum in the other species is uniform, independently of the demographic history of both species. We also predict the expected densities of segregating and fixed sites when the chromosome from the other species carries the ancestral allele. We compare the predictions of our model with the site-frequency spectra of SNPs in the four HapMap populations of humans when the nucleotide present in the Neanderthal DNA sequence is ancestral or derived, using the chimp genome as the outgroup.

  18. Cytochrome P450 2D6 variants in a Caucasian population: Allele frequencies and phenotypic consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Sachse, C.; Brockmoeller, J.; Bauer, S.; Roots, I.

    1997-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) metabolizes many important drugs. CYP2D6 activity ranges from complete deficiency to ultrafast metabolism, depending on at least 16 different known alleles. Their frequencies were determined in 589 unrelated German volunteers and correlated with enzyme activity measured by phenotyping with dextromethorphan or debrisoquine. For genotyping, nested PCR-RFLP tests from a PCR amplificate of the entire CYP2D6 gene were developed. The frequency of the CYP2D6*1 allele coding for extensive metabolizer (EM) phenotype was .364. The alleles coding for slightly (CYP2D6*2) or moderately (*9 and *10) reduced activity (intermediate metabolizer phenotype [IM]) showed frequencies of .324, .018, and .015, respectively. By use of novel PCR tests for discrimination, CYP2D6 gene duplication alleles were found with frequencies of.005 (*1 x 2), .013 (* 2 x 2), and .001 (*4 x 2). Frequencies of alleles with complete deficiency (poor metabolizer phenotype [PM]) were .207 (*4), .020 (*3 and *5), .009 (*6), and .001 (*7, *15, and *16). The defective CYP2D6 alleles *8, *11, *12, *13, and *14 were not found. All 41 PMs (7.0%) in this sample were explained by five mutations detected by four PCR-RFLP tests, which may suffice, together with the gene duplication test, for clinical prediction of CYP2D6 capacity. Three novel variants of known CYP2D6 alleles were discovered: *1C (T{sub 1957}C), *2B (additional C{sub 2558}T), and *4E (additional C{sub 2938}T). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in enzymatic activity measured by the dextromethorphan metabolic ratio (MR) between carriers of EN/PM (mean MR = .006) and IM/PM (mean MR = .014) alleles and between carriers of one (mean MR = .009) and two (mean MR = .003) functional alleles. The results of this study provide a solid basis for prediction of CYP2D6 capacity, as required in drug research and routine drug treatment. 35 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. An historical perspective on "The world-wide distribution of allele frequencies at the human dopamine D4 receptor locus".

    PubMed

    Kidd, Kenneth K; Pakstis, Andrew J; Yun, Libing

    2014-04-01

    Human population genetics is a completely different science today compared to two decades ago, at least at the empiric level. Our paper [Chang (Hum Genet 98:91-101, 1996a)] demonstrated that three different alleles were common when one considered many populations although other low frequency alleles occurred. Because previous work had been largely done on European subjects, our findings involved 36 distinct populations and showed that East Asian populations had nearly lost the 7-repeat allele, and that Native American populations had the highest frequencies of that allele globally, was a significant early empiric demonstration of the potential magnitude of population variation at important genes. There are thousands of loci tested on many of the same populations and the gene frequency pattern seen for the DRD4 7-repeat allele is seen at other loci, arguing that this pattern commonly reflects the pattern of divergence of populations and accumulated random genetic drift.

  20. Natural Selection VS. Random Drift: Evidence from Temporal Variation in Allele Frequencies in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Laurence D.; Barr, Lorraine G.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained monthly samples of two species, Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila persimilis, in a natural population from Napa County, California. In each species, about 300 genes have been assayed by electrophoresis for each of seven enzyme loci in each monthly sample from March 1972 to June 1975. Using statistical methods developed for the purpose, we have examined whether the allele frequencies at different loci vary in a correlated fashion. The methods used do not detect natural selection when it is deterministic (e.g., overdominance or directional selection), but only when alleles at different loci vary simultaneously in response to the same environmental variations. Moreover, only relatively large fitness differences (of the order of 15%) are detectable. We have found strong evidence of correlated allele frequency variation in 13–20% of the cases examined. We interpret this as evidence that natural selection plays a major role in the evolution of protein polymorphisms in nature. PMID:4054608

  1. Estimation of the frequency of hexosaminidase a variant alleles in the American Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D A; Kaback, M M

    1982-05-01

    There appear to be several alleles of the hexosaminidase A (HEX A) gene that lead to different clinical syndromes. In addition to the infantile-onset Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), there is a juvenile-onset and an adult-onset form, which are also characterized by low HEX A levels. There are also apparently healthy adults with low HEX A activity. Based primarily on data from population screening for TSD carrier status, we estimate the allele frequency of the combined variant alleles for which data are available to be about 4.5 x 10(-4) and the frequency of adults showing zero HEX A levels (when tested using artificial substrate) to be about 1:67,000. The implications for population screening and prenatal diagnosis are discussed.

  2. The correlation of HLA allele frequencies and HLA antibodies in sensitized kidney transplantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Q; Wang, C; Zeng, W; Liu, L

    2012-01-01

    The clinical importance of the HLA system is as a transplant antigen. However, correlations between the development and strength of the immune response and HLA genes or specific foreign antigens are not clear. The objectives of this study were to detect HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele frequencies and HLA antibodies in sensitized patients, and to investigate the correlation between the HLA alleles and HLA sensitization. This study included 383 sensitized patients and 1000 unsensitized patients awaiting kidney transplantation from 2001-2010. HLA -A, -B, and -DRB1 typing was performed using sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reactions (SSP-PCR). Arlequin statistical analysis software was used to calculate the HLA allele frequencies among the 2 groups. The anti-HLA-specific antibodies of sensitized patients were identified and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The numbers of identified HLA -A, -B, and -DRB1 alleles were 20, 43, and 14, respectively. The 5 most frequent HLA alleles in the 2 groups were not different: A-02, 11, 24, 33, 26; B-46, 60, 13, 75, 58; and DR-9, 15, 12, 4, 14. Among the sensitized group, the most frequent HLA-specific antibodies were as follows: A-2, 24, 68, 23, 32; B-27, 56, 57, 7, 60; and DR-7, 4, 9, 13, 17. There was little correlation between HLA sensitization and HLA alleles of oneself. High frequency alleles and the specificity of high-frequency HLA antibodies were not consistent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Disentangling the roles of history and local selection in shaping clinal variation of allele frequencies and gene expression in Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Källman, Thomas; Ma, Xiaofei; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Zaina, Giusi; Morgante, Michele; Bousquet, Jean; Eckert, Andrew; Wegrzyn, Jill; Neale, David; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Lascoux, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation is challenging due to the subtle balance among conflicting evolutionary forces that are involved in its establishment and maintenance. One system with which to tease apart these difficulties is clines in adaptive characters. Here we analyzed genetic and phenotypic variation in bud set, a highly heritable and adaptive trait, among 18 populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies), arrayed along a latitudinal gradient ranging from 47°N to 68°N. We confirmed that variation in bud set is strongly clinal, using a subset of five populations. Genotypes for 137 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) chosen from 18 candidate genes putatively affecting bud set and 308 control SNPs chosen from 264 random genes were analyzed for patterns of genetic structure and correlation to environment. Population genetic structure was low (F(ST) = 0.05), but latitudinal patterns were apparent among Scandinavian populations. Hence, part of the observed clinal variation should be attributable to population demography. Conditional on patterns of genetic structure, there was enrichment of SNPs within candidate genes for correlations with latitude. Twenty-nine SNPs were also outliers with respect to F(ST). The enrichment for clinal variation at SNPs within candidate genes (i.e., SNPs in PaGI, PaPhyP, PaPhyN, PaPRR7, and PaFTL2) indicated that local selection in the 18 populations, and/or selection in the ancestral populations from which they were recently derived, shaped the observed cline. Validation of these genes using expression studies also revealed that PaFTL2 expression is significantly associated with latitude, thereby confirming the central role played by this gene in the control of phenology in plants.

  4. Allele frequencies in the VRN-A1, VRN-B1 and VRN-D1 vernalization response and PPD-B1 and PPD-D1 photoperiod sensitivity genes, and their effects on heading in a diverse set of wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Kiss, Tibor; Balla, Krisztina; Veisz, Ottó; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Griffiths, Simon; Isaac, Peter; Karsai, Ildikó

    2014-01-01

    Heading of cereals is determined by complex genetic and environmental factors in which genes responsible for vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity play a decisive role. Our aim was to use diagnostic molecular markers to determine the main allele types in VRN-A1, VRN-B1, VRN-D1, PPD-B1 and PPD-D1 in a worldwide wheat collection of 683 genotypes and to investigate the effect of these alleles on heading in the field. The dominant VRN-A1, VRN-B1 and VRN-D1 alleles were present at a low frequency. The PPD-D1a photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 57 % of the cultivars and was most frequent in Asian and European cultivars. The PPD-B1 photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 22 % of the genotypes from Asia, America and Europe. Nine versions of the PPD-B1-insensitive allele were identified based on gene copy number and intercopy structure. The allele compositions in PPD-D1, PPD-B1 and VRN-D1 significantly influenced heading and together explained 37.5 % of the phenotypic variance. The role of gene model increased to 39.1 % when PPD-B1 intercopy structure was taken into account instead of overall PPD-B1 type (sensitive vs. insensitive). As a single component, PPD-D1 had the most important role (28.0 % of the phenotypic variance), followed by PPD-B1 (12.3 % for PPD-B1_overall, and 15.1 % for PPD-B1_intercopy) and VRN-D1 (2.2 %). Significant gene interactions were identified between the marker alleles within PPD-B1 and between VRN-D1 and the two PPD1 genes. The earliest heading genotypes were those with the photoperiod-insensitive allele in PPD-D1 and PPD-B1, and with the spring allele for VRN-D1 and the winter alleles for VRN-A1 and VRN-B1. This combination could only be detected in genotypes from Southern Europe and Asia. Late-heading genotypes had the sensitivity alleles for both PPD1 genes, regardless of the allelic composition of the VRN1 genes. There was a 10-day difference in heading between the earliest and latest groups under field conditions.

  5. A gene feature enumeration approach for describing HLA allele polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mack, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    HLA genotyping via next generation sequencing (NGS) poses challenges for the use of HLA allele names to analyze and discuss sequence polymorphism. NGS will identify many new synonymous and non-coding HLA sequence variants. Allele names identify the types of nucleotide polymorphism that define an allele (non-synonymous, synonymous and non-coding changes), but do not describe how polymorphism is distributed among the individual features (the flanking untranslated regions, exons and introns) of a gene. Further, HLA alleles cannot be named in the absence of antigen-recognition domain (ARD) encoding exons. Here, a system for describing HLA polymorphism in terms of HLA gene features (GFs) is proposed. This system enumerates the unique nucleotide sequences for each GF in an HLA gene, and records these in a GF enumeration notation that allows both more granular dissection of allele-level HLA polymorphism and the discussion and analysis of GFs in the absence of ARD-encoding exon sequences.

  6. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  7. The allele frequency of CYP2A6*4 in four ethnic groups of China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Cong; Liu, Jin-Hui; Xu, Yi-Song; Chen, Chao; Dai, Peng-Gao

    2015-06-01

    The CYP2A6*4 allele, characterized as the whole deletion of this gene, is closely associated with nicotine dependence, cancer susceptibility, and drug responsiveness. The frequency of this molecular variant differs across populations. Although genetic polymorphisms of CYP2A6*4 and its functional results have been reported in Chinese Han population, the allele frequency of CYP2A6*4 was largely unknown in other Chinese ethnic population. In this study, we investigated the allele frequency of CYP2A6*4 in four main ethnic groups of China based on our newly developed quantitative real-time PCR assay. The frequencies of the CYP2A6*4 allele were 7.9%, 15%, 0% and 2% in Han (N=120), Uighur (N=100), Bouyei (N=100) and Tibetan (N=100) (P<0.0001), respectively. This work greatly expanded our understanding of the distribution of CYP2A6*4 in Chinese population and provided more information of different ethnic population's smoking behavior and also in disease susceptibility and drug response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-03-08

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction.

  9. Observations Suggesting Allelism of the Achondroplasia and Hypochondroplasia Genes

    PubMed Central

    McKusick, Victor A.; Kelly, Thaddeus E.; Dorst, John P.

    1973-01-01

    It is argued that there are at least two alleles at the achondroplasia locus: one responsible for classic achondroplasia and one responsible for hypochondroplasia. Homozygosity for the achondroplasia gene produces a lethal skeletal dysplasia; homozygosity for hypochondroplasia has not been described. We report here a child considered to be a genetic compound for the achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia alleles. Images PMID:4697848

  10. Determination of arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency allele and haplotype frequency in the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Ben Halim, Nizar; Dorboz, Imen; Kefi, Rym; Kharrat, Najla; Eymard-Pierre, Eleonore; Nagara, Majdi; Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Alaya-Bouafif, Nissaf; Rebai, Ahmed; Miladi, Najoua; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ASA) is a lysosomal enzyme involved in the catabolism of cerebroside sulfate. ASA deficiency is associated with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). Low ASA activities have also been reported in a more common condition with no apparent clinical consequences termed ASA pseudo-deficiency (ASA-PD) which is associated with two linked mutations in the ASA gene (c.1049A>G and c.*96A>G). This study aimed to investigate the frequency of the two ASA-PD variants and their linkage disequilibrium (LD) among Tunisians. ASA-PD variants were detected in 129 healthy Tunisians and their frequencies were compared to those described worldwide. The frequency of the PD allele was estimated at 17.4% for the overall sample, with c.1049A>G and c.*96A>G frequencies of 25.6 and 17.4%, respectively. This study also revealed a high LD between the two ASA-PD variants (r(2) = 0.61). Inter-population analysis revealed similarities in the ASA-PD genetic structure between Tunisians and populations from Middle East with c.*96A>G frequencies being the highest in the world. A significant North vs. South genetic differentiation in the ASA-PD frequency was also observed in Tunisian population who seems genetically intermediate between Africans, Middle-Easterners and Europeans. This is the first report on the allele frequency of the ASA-PD in North Africa, revealing a relatively high frequency of the PD allele among Tunisians. This study gives also evidence on the importance of discriminating ASA-PD allele from pathological mutations causing MLD and supporting enzymatic activity testing with both sulfatiduria determination and genetic testing in the differential diagnosis of MLD in the Tunisian population.

  11. Allele frequency of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in wild-caught cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Higashino, Atsunori; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Ikoma, Tomoko; Suzaki, Yuriko; Ami, Yasushi; Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Akari, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A recent study showed that the frequency of an antiretroviral factor TRIM5 gene-derived isoform, TRIMCyp, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) varies widely according to the particular habitat examined. However, whether the findings actually reflect the prevalence of TRIMCyp in wild cynomolgus macaques is still uncertain because the previous data were obtained with captive monkeys in breeding and rearing facilities. Here, we characterized the TRIM5 gene in cynomolgus macaques captured in the wild, and found that the frequency of the TRIMCyp allele was comparable to those in captive monkeys. This suggests that the previous results with captive monkeys do indeed reflect the natural allele frequency and that breeding and rearing facilities may not affect the frequency of TRIM5 alleles. Interestingly, the prevalence of a minor haplotype of TRIMCyp in wild macaques from the Philippines was significantly lower than in captive ones, suggesting that it is advantageous for wild monkeys to possess the major haplotype of TRIMCyp. Overall, our results add to our understanding of the geographic and genetic prevalence of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp. PMID:22969754

  12. Analysis of the CCR5 gene coding region diversity in five South American populations reveals two new non-synonymous alleles in Amerindians and high CCR5*D32 frequency in Euro-Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) molecule is an important co-receptor for HIV. The effect of the CCR5*D32 allele in susceptibility to HIV infection and AIDS disease is well known. Other alleles than CCR5*D32 have not been analysed before, neither in Amerindians nor in the majority of the populations all over the world. We investigated the distribution of the CCR5 coding region alleles in South Brazil and noticed a high CCR5*D32 frequency in the Euro-Brazilian population of the Paraná State (9.3%), which is the highest thus far reported for Latin America. The D32 frequency is even higher among the Euro-Brazilian Mennonites (14.2%). This allele is uncommon in Afro-Brazilians (2.0%), rare in the Guarani Amerindians (0.4%) and absent in the Kaingang Amerindians and the Oriental-Brazilians. R223Q is common in the Oriental-Brazilians (7.7%) and R60S in the Afro-Brazilians (5.0%). A29S and L55Q present an impaired response to β-chemokines and occurred in Afro- and Euro-Brazilians with cumulative frequencies of 4.4% and 2.7%, respectively. Two new non-synonymous alleles were found in Amerindians: C323F (g.3729G > T) in Guarani (1.4%) and Y68C (g.2964A > G) in Kaingang (10.3%). The functional characteristics of these alleles should be defined and considered in epidemiological investigations about HIV-1 infection and AIDS incidence in Amerindian populations. PMID:21637640

  13. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    PubMed

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found.

  14. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  15. Intracellular Population Genetics: Evidence for Random Drift of Mitochondrial Allele Frequencies in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE and SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE

    PubMed Central

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Birky, C. William; Lückemann, Gudrun; Wolf, Klaus

    1980-01-01

    We report evidence for random drift of mitochondrial allele frequencies in zygote clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Monofactorial and bifactorial crosses were done, using strains resistant or sensitive to erythromycin (alleles ER, ES), oligomycin (OR, OS), or diuron (DR, DS). The frequencies of resistant and sensitive cells (and thus the frequencies of the resistant and sensitive alleles) were determined for each of a number of clones of diploid cells arising from individual zygotes. Allele frequencies were extremely variable among these zygote clones; some clones were "uniparental," with mitochondrial alleles from only one parent present. These observations suggest random drift of the allele frequencies in the population of mitochondrial genes within an individual zygote and its diploid progeny. Drift would cease when all the cells in a clone become homoplasmic, due to segregation of the mitochondrial genomes during vegetative cell divisions. To test this, we delayed cell division (and hence segregation) for varying times by starving zygotes in order to give drift more time to operate. As predicted, delaying cell division resulted in an increase in the variance of allele frequencies among the zygote clones and an increase in the proportion of uniparental zygote clones. The changes in form of the allele frequency distributions resembled those seen during random drift in finite Mendelian populations. In bifactorial crosses, genotypes as well as individual alleles were fixed or lost in some zygote clones. However, the mean recombination frequency for a large number of clones did not increase when cell division was delayed. Several possible molecular mechanisms for intracellular random drift are discussed. PMID:7009322

  16. Recovering frequencies of known haplotype blocks from single-nucleotide polymorphism allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Pe'er, Itsik; Beckmann, Jacques S

    2004-01-01

    Prospects for large-scale association studies rely on economical methods and powerful analysis. Representing available SNPs by small subsets and measuring allele frequencies on pooled DNA samples each improve genotyping cost effectiveness, while haplotype analysis may highlight associations in otherwise underpowered studies. This manuscript provides the mathematical framework to integrate these methodologies. PMID:15126415

  17. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage. PMID:26019163

  18. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-05-26

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼ 40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage.

  19. Allelic variation in the squirrel monkey x-linked color vision gene: biogeographical and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Susan; Boinski, Sue; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2002-06-01

    Most Neotropical primate species possess a polymorphic X-linked and a monomorphic autosomal color vision gene. Consequently, populations are composed of both dichromatics and trichromatics. Most theories on the maintenance of this genetic system revolve around possible advantages for foraging ecology. To examine the issue from a different angle, we compared the numbers and relative frequencies of alleles at the X-linked locus among three species of Saimiri representing a wide range of geographical and behavioral variation in the genus. Exons 3, 4, and 5 of the X-linked opsin gene were sequenced for a large number of X chromosomes for all three species. Several synonymous mutations were detected in exons 4 and 5 for the originally reported alleles but only a single nonsynonymous change was detected. Two alleles were found that appeared to be the result of recombination events. The low occurrence of recombinant alleles and absence of mutations in the amino acids critical for spectral tuning indicates that stabilizing selection acts to maintain the combinations of critical sites specific to each allele. Allele frequencies were approximately the same for all Saimiri species, with a slight but significant difference between S. boliviensis and S. oerstedii. No apparent correlation exists between allele frequencies and behavioral or biogeographical differences between species, casting doubt on the speculation that the spectral sensitivities of the alleles have been maintained because they are specifically well-tuned to Saimiri visual ecology. Rather, the spectral tuning peaks might have been maintained because they are as widely spaced as possible within the limited range of middlewave to longwave spectra useful to all primates. This arrangement creates a balance between maximizing the distance between spectral tuning peaks (allowing the color opponency of the visual system to distinguish between peaks) and maximizing the number of alleles within a limited range (yielding

  20. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Igκ and Igλ light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition. PMID:20727027

  1. Genotype and allele frequency of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Payan, Maryam; Tajik, Nader; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) is important in metabolism of wide range of drugs. CYP2C19*17 is a novel variant allele which increases gene transcription and therefore results in ultra-rapid metabolizer phenotype (URM). Distribution of this variant allele has not been well studied worldwide. The aim of present study was to investigate allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population and compare them with other ethnic groups. One hundred eighty healthy unrelated Iranian volunteer took part in this study and were genotyped for CYP2C19 *2, *3, *17 (-3402) by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and CYP2C19*17 (-806) by a nested-PCR assays. The distribution of CYP2C19*17 polymorphism in Iranian population was then compared with other ethnic groups. The CYP2C19*17 allele frequency was 21.6% in Iranian population. Among studied subjects 5.5% were homozygous for CYP2C19*17 and phenotyped as ultra-rapid metabolizers; 28.8% were genotyped as CYP2C19*1*17 (extensive metabolizers) and 3.3% as CYP2C19*2*17 (intermediate metabolizers). The CYP2C19*17 genetic distribution in Iranian population is similar to Middle East or European countries. The high frequency of CYP2C19*17 in Iranian population highlights the importance of this new variant allele in metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates. Thus, future association studies are required to reveal clinical consequence of this genetic polymorphism in carrier individuals.

  2. Genotype and allele frequency of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Payan, Maryam; Tajik, Nader; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) is important in metabolism of wide range of drugs. CYP2C19*17 is a novel variant allele which increases gene transcription and therefore results in ultra-rapid metabolizer phenotype (URM). Distribution of this variant allele has not been well studied worldwide. The aim of present study was to investigate allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2C19*17 in a healthy Iranian population and compare them with other ethnic groups. Methods: One hundred eighty healthy unrelated Iranian volunteer took part in this study and were genotyped for CYP2C19 *2, *3, *17 (-3402) by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and CYP2C19*17 (-806) by a nested-PCR assays. The distribution of CYP2C19*17 polymorphism in Iranian population was then compared with other ethnic groups. Results: The CYP2C19*17 allele frequency was 21.6% in Iranian population. Among studied subjects 5.5% were homozygous for CYP2C19*17 and phenotyped as ultra-rapid metabolizers; 28.8% were genotyped as CYP2C19*1*17 (extensive metabolizers) and 3.3% as CYP2C19*2*17 (intermediate metabolizers). Conclusion: The CYP2C19*17 genetic distribution in Iranian population is similar to Middle East or European countries. The high frequency of CYP2C19*17 in Iranian population highlights the importance of this new variant allele in metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates. Thus, future association studies are required to reveal clinical consequence of this genetic polymorphism in carrier individuals. PMID:26793660

  3. Distribution of the mutated delta 32 allele of the CCR5 gene in a Sicilian population.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, A; D'Angelo, R; Rinaldi, C; De Luca, G; Pino, F; Salpietro, C; Giunta, D E; Saltalamacchia, F; Amato, A

    2005-06-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes a cell-surface chemokine receptor molecule that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutation in this gene may alter the expression or the function of the protein product, thereby altering chemokine binding and/or signalling or HIV-1 infection of cells that normally express CCR5 protein. Individuals homozygous for a 32-bp deletion allele of CCR5 (CCR5 delta32), heritable as a Mendelian trait, are relatively resistant to HIV-1 infection. The CCR5 delta32 mutation is present in the Caucasian population at different frequencies. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of truncated alleles of the CCR5 delta32 gene in a Sicilian population, as the interpopulation variation in CCR5 delta32 frequency may be a significant factor in the prediction of AIDS endemicity in future studies. We examined 901 healthy individuals from several Sicilian provinces. We found a mean (+/- standard deviation) delta32 allele frequency (fr) of 0.04 +/- 0.012. The highest value was observed in the province of Messina, with a mean delta32 allele frequency of 0.06 +/- 0.024, where we collected samples from a cohort of 114 HIV-1-infected individuals. The observed frequency amongst these patients was quite low (fr = 0.03 +/- 0.031) compared to the healthy population, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  4. Predictable allele frequency changes due to habitat fragmentation in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Toby; Nieminen, Marko; Sirén, Jukka; Wong, Swee Chong; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Describing the evolutionary dynamics of now extinct populations is challenging, as their genetic composition before extinction is generally unknown. The Glanville fritillary butterfly has a large extant metapopulation in the Åland Islands in Finland, but declined to extinction in the nearby fragmented southwestern (SW) Finnish archipelago in the 20th century. We genotyped museum samples for 222 SNPs across the genome, including SNPs from candidate genes and neutral regions. SW Finnish populations had significantly reduced genetic diversity before extinction, and their allele frequencies gradually diverged from those in contemporary Åland populations over 80 y. We identified 15 outlier loci among candidate SNPs, mostly related to flight, in which allele frequencies have changed more than the neutral expectation. At outlier loci, allele frequencies in SW Finland shifted in the same direction as newly established populations deviated from old local populations in contemporary Åland. Moreover, outlier allele frequencies in SW Finland resemble those in fragmented landscapes as opposed to continuous landscapes in the Baltic region. These results indicate selection for genotypes associated with good colonization capacity in the highly fragmented landscape before the extinction of the populations. Evolutionary response to habitat fragmentation may have enhanced the viability of the populations, but it did not save the species from regional extinction in the face of severe habitat loss and fragmentation. These results highlight a potentially common situation in changing environments: evolutionary changes are not strong enough to fully compensate for the direct adverse effects of environmental change and thereby rescue populations from extinction. PMID:26903642

  5. Analyses of Allele-Specific Gene Expression in Highly Divergent Mouse Crosses Identifies Pervasive Allelic Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, James J; Zhabotynsky, Vasyl; Sun, Wei; Huang, Shunping; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Kim, Yunjung; Wang, Jeremy R; Morgan, Andrew P; Calaway, John D; Aylor, David L; Yun, Zaining; Bell, Timothy A; Buus, Ryan J; Calaway, Mark E; Didion, John P; Gooch, Terry J; Hansen, Stephanie D; Robinson, Nashiya N; Shaw, Ginger D; Spence, Jason S; Quackenbush, Corey R; Barrick, Cordelia J; Nonneman, Randal J.; Kim, Kyungsu; Xenakis, James; Xie, Yuying; Valdar, William; Lenarcic, Alan B; Wang, Wei; Welsh, Catherine E; Fu, Chen-Ping; Zhang, Zhaojun; Holt, James; Guo, Zhishan; Threadgill, David W; Tarantino, Lisa M; Miller, Darla R; Zou, Fei; McMillan, Leonard; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex human traits are influenced by variation in regulatory DNA through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Since regulatory elements are conserved between humans and mice, a thorough annotation of cis regulatory variants in mice could aid in this process. Here we provide a detailed portrait of mouse gene expression across multiple tissues in a three-way diallel. Greater than 80% of mouse genes have cis regulatory variation. These effects influence complex traits and usually extend to the human ortholog. Further, we estimate that at least one in every thousand SNPs creates a cis regulatory effect. We also observe two types of parent-of-origin effects, including classical imprinting and a novel, global allelic imbalance in favor of the paternal allele. We conclude that, as with humans, pervasive regulatory variation influences complex genetic traits in mice and provide a new resource toward understanding the genetic control of transcription in mammals. PMID:25730764

  6. Polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 gene (CYP1A2) in colorectal cancer patients and controls: allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium and influence on caffeine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Christoph; Bhambra, Upinder; Smith, Gillian; Lightfoot, Tracy J; Barrett, Jennifer H; Scollay, Jenna; Garner, R Colin; Boobis, Alan R; Wolf, C Roland; Gooderham, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    Aim Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the cytochrome P450 enzyme 1A2 gene (CYP1A2) have been reported. Here, frequencies, linkage disequilibrium and phenotypic consequences of six SNPs are described. Methods From genomic DNA, 114 British Caucasians (49 colorectal cancer cases and 65 controls) were genotyped for the CYP1A2 polymorphisms −3858G→A (allele CYP1A2*1C), −2464T→delT (CYP1A2*1D), −740T→G (CYP1A2*1E and *1G), −164A→C (CYP1A2*1F), 63C→G (CYP1A2*2), and 1545T→C (alleles CYP1A2*1B, *1G, *1H and *3), using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. All patients and controls were phenotyped for CYP1A2 by h.p.l.c. analysis of urinary caffeine metabolites. Results In 114 samples, the most frequent CYP1A2 SNPs were 1545T→C (38.2% of tested chromosomes), −164A→C (CYP1A2*1F, 33.3%) and −2464T→delT (CYP1A2*1D, 4.82%). The SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium: the most frequent constellations were found to be −3858G/−2464T/−740T/−164A/63C/1545T (61.8%), −3858G/−2464T/−740T/−164C/63C/1545C (33.3%), and −3858G/−2464delT/−740T/−164A/63C/1545C (3.51%), with no significant frequency differences between cases and controls. In the phenotype analysis, lower caffeine metabolic ratios were detected in cases than in controls. This was significant in smokers (n = 14, P = 0.020), and in a subgroup of 15 matched case-control pairs (P = 0.007), but it was not significant in nonsmokers (n = 100, P = 0.39). There was no detectable association between CYP1A2 genotype and caffeine phenotype. Conclusions (i) CYP1A2 polymorphisms are in linkage disequilibrium. Therefore, only −164A→C (CYP1A2*1F) and −2464T→delT (CYP1A2*1D) need to be analysed in the routine assessment of CYP1A2 genotype; (ii) in vivo CYP1A2 activity is lower in colorectal cancer patients than in controls, and (iii) CYP1A2 genotype had no effect on phenotype (based on the caffeine metabolite ratio). However, this

  7. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. GST M1-T1 null allele frequency patterns in geographically assorted human populations: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Kasthurinaidu, Senthilkumar Pitchalu; Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra; Dave, Dhvani Kirtikumar; Adroja, Divya Anantray

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs.

  9. GST M1-T1 null Allele Frequency Patterns in Geographically Assorted Human Populations: A Phylogenetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thirumurugan; Ayyavoo, Jayachitra

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity in drug metabolism and disposition is mainly considered as the outcome of the inter-individual genetic variation in polymorphism of drug-xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME). Among the XMEs, glutathione-S-transferases (GST) gene loci are an important candidate for the investigation of diversity in allele frequency, as the deletion mutations in GST M1 and T1 genotypes are associated with various cancers and genetic disorders of all major Population Affiliations (PAs). Therefore, the present population based phylogenetic study was focused to uncover the frequency distribution pattern in GST M1 and T1 null genotypes among 45 Geographically Assorted Human Populations (GAHPs). The frequency distribution pattern for GST M1 and T1 null alleles have been detected in this study using the data derived from literatures representing 44 populations affiliated to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America and the genome of PA from Gujarat, a region in western India. Allele frequency counting for Gujarat PA and scattered plot analysis for geographical distribution among the PAs were performed in SPSS-21. The GST M1 and GST T1 null allele frequencies patterns of the PAs were computed in Seqboot, Gendist program of Phylip software package (3.69 versions) and Unweighted Pair Group method with Arithmetic Mean in Mega-6 software. Allele frequencies from South African Xhosa tribe, East African Zimbabwe, East African Ethiopia, North African Egypt, Caucasian, South Asian Afghanistan and South Indian Andhra Pradesh have been identified as the probable seven patterns among the 45 GAHPs investigated in this study for GST M1-T1 null genotypes. The patternized null allele frequencies demonstrated in this study for the first time addresses the missing link in GST M1-T1 null allele frequencies among GAHPs. PMID:25867025

  10. Analysis and frequency of bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) alleles in Iranian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Nassiry, M R; Shahroodi, F Eftekhar; Mosafer, J; Mohammadi, A; Manshad, E; Ghazanfari, S; Mohammad Abadi, M R; Sulimova, G E

    2005-06-01

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune response by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. DRB3 gene has been extensively evaluated as a candidate marker for association with various bovine diseases and immunological traits. This study describes genetic variability in the BoLA-DRB3 in Iranian Holstein cattle. This is the first study of the DNA polymorphism of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Iranian Holstein cattle. Hemi-nested PCR-RFLP method is used for identification the frequency of BoLA-DRB3 alleles. The BoLA-DRB3 locus is highly polymorphic in the studied herd (26 alleles). Almost 67% of the alleles were accounted for four alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*8, *24, *11 and *16) in Iranian Holstein cattle. The DRB3.2*8 allele frequency (26.6%) was higher than the others. The frequencies of the DRB3.2*54, *37, *36, *28, *25, *14, *13, *10, *1 alleles were lower than 1%. Significant distinctions have been found between Iranian Holstein cattle and other cattle breeds studied. In Iranian Holstein cattle the alleles (BoLA-DRB3.2*22, *2 and *16) associated with a lower risk of cystic ovarian disease in Holstein cattle are found. The alleles associated with the resistance to mastitis and to bovine leukemia virus infection BoLA-DRB3.2*11 and *23 are detected with the frequencies 10.4% and 4.4%, respectively. Thus in the Iranian Holstein cows studied are found alleles which are associated with resistance to various diseases. The method of DNA-typing of animals can be used in agricultural practice for BoLA-DRB3 allele genotyping of cattle in order to reduce spreading of alleles providing susceptibility to mastitis or leukemia in cattle herds.

  11. Allele Frequencies for 15 Short Tandem Repeat Loci in Representative Sample of Croatian Population

    PubMed Central

    Projić, Petar; Škaro, Vedrana; Šamija, Ivana; Pojskić, Naris; Durmić-Pašić, Adaleta; Kovačević, Lejla; Bakal, Narcisa; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2007-01-01

    Aim To study the distribution of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci in a representative sample of the Croatian population. Methods A total of 195 unrelated Caucasian individuals born in Croatia, from 14 counties and the City of Zagreb, were sampled for the analysis. All the tested individuals were voluntary donors. Buccal swab was used as the DNA source. AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® was applied to simultaneously amplify 15 STR loci. Total reaction volume was 12.5 μL. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was carried out in PE Gene Amp PCR System Thermal Cycler. Electrophoresis of the amplification products was preformed on an ABI PRISM 3130 Genetic Analyzer. After PCR amplification and separation by electrophoresis, raw data were compiled, analyzed, and numerical allele designations of the profiles were obtained. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, observed and expected heterozygosity, power of discrimination, and power of exclusion were calculated. Bonferroni’s correction was used before each comparative analysis. Results We compared Croatian data with those obtained from geographically neighboring European populations. The significant difference (at P<0.01) in allele frequencies was recorded only between the Croatian and Slovenian populations for vWA locus. There was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all the observed loci. Conclusion Obtained population data concurred with the expected “STR data frame” for this part of Europe. PMID:17696301

  12. A new design without control population for identification of gastric cancer-related allele combinations based on interaction of genes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liu; Liping, Gai; Jian, Yu; Laisui, Yu

    2014-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel approach without control population to examine the relationship between the presence of specific allele combinations at different loci with the onset of gastric cancer. DNA samples were collected from patients with gastric cancer. Alleles from short tandem repeat loci were determined using the STR Profiler Plus PCR amplification kit (15 STR loci). The observed and expected frequencies of specific allele combinations were calculated; statistically significant allele combinations were identified by comparing the observed frequency with the expected frequency. The age at disease onset of patients carrying a specific allele combination was further analysed; allele combinations related to the gastric cancer were effectively identified from the large number of possible allele combinations by cross-validation of the 2 sets of analytical results. A total of 2209 pairwise combinations were obtained by computer counting, of which 11 pairs of genes showed significant differences between the observed and expected frequencies (p<0.05). The p value for the cross-validation was also less than 0.05 for 2 pair of alleles (D8S1179-16 and D5S818-13; D2S1338-23 and D6S1043-11). Gastric cancer onset may be associated with these allele combinations. The new methodology without control group will enable additional discoveries pertaining to the relationship between specific allele combinations at different loci and the onset of complex diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    PubMed

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  14. High anxiety and migraine are associated with the s allele of the 5HTTLPR gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Gonda, Xenia; Rihmer, Zoltan; Juhasz, Gabriella; Zsombok, Terezia; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2007-01-15

    The 5HTTLPR polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene has been associated with anxiety disorders and also migraine, suggesting a common etiological background of these disorders. This association is further supported by the high comorbidity of these disorders. In our study Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the 5HTTLPR genotype were investigated in a cohort of 97 psychiatrically healthy females also including 45 migraineurs. Higher state anxiety scores were significantly associated with the s allele either in the whole sample or when the group was separated into migraineurs and non-migraineurs. Migraineurs also had a significantly higher frequency of the s allele. Our results indicate that even in a healthy population the s allele is associated with a high anxiety endophenotype. The association of migraine with anxiety may be explained by the higher rate of individuals carrying the s allele among migraineurs.

  15. Determination of knockdown resistance allele frequencies in global human head louse populations using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hodgdon, Hilliary E.; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J.; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Aboelghar, Gamal E.; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediculosis is the most prevalent parasitic infestation of humans. Resistance to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides is due to knockdown (kdr)-type point mutations in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel α-subunit gene. Early detection of resistance is crucial for the selection of effective management strategies. RESULTS Kdr allele frequencies of lice from 14 countries were determined using serial invasive signal amplification reaction. Lice collected from Uruguay, UK and Australia had kdr allele frequencies of 100% while lice from Ecuador, Papua New Guinea, South Korea and Thailand had kdr allele frequencies of 0%. The remaining 7 countries investigated, including seven US populations, two Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, Czech Republic, Egypt and Israel, displayed variable kdr allele frequencies, ranging from 11% to 97%. CONCLUSION The newly developed and validated SISAR method is suitable for accurate monitoring of kdr allele frequencies in head lice. Proactive management is needed where kdr-type resistance is not yet saturated. Based on sodium channel insensitivity and its occurrence in louse populations resistant to pyrethrin- and pyrethroid-based pediculicides, the T917I mutation appears a key marker for resistance. Results from the Egyptian population, however, indicate that phenotypic resistance of lice with single or double mutations (M815I and/or L920F) should also be determined. PMID:20564731

  16. Increase of TCR V beta accessibility within E beta regulatory region influences its recombination frequency but not allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Makoto; Wang, Lili; Suzuki, Daisuke; Takeda, Naoki; Shinkai, Yoichi; Habu, Sonoko

    2003-07-15

    Seventy percent of the murine TCRbeta locus (475 kb) was deleted to generate a large deleted TCRbeta (beta(LD)) allele to investigate a possible linkage between germline transcription, recombination frequency, and allelic exclusion of the TCR Vbeta genes. In these beta(LD/LD) mice, the TCRbeta gene locus contained only four Vbeta genes at the 5' side of the locus, and consequently, the Vbeta10 gene was located in the original Dbeta1-Jbeta1cluster within the Ebeta regulatory region. We showed that the frequency of recombination and expression of the Vbeta genes are strongly biased to Vbeta10 in these mutant mice even though the proximity of the other three 5'Vbeta genes was also greatly shortened toward the Dbeta-Jbeta cluster and the Ebeta enhancer. Accordingly, the germline transcription of the Vbeta10 gene in beta(LD/LD) mice was exceptionally enhanced in immature double negative thymocytes compared with that in wild-type mice. During double negative-to-double positive transition of thymocytes, the level of Vbeta10 germline transcription was prominently increased in beta(LD/LD) recombination activating gene 2-deficient mice receiving anti-CD3epsilon Ab in vivo. Interestingly, however, despite the increased accessibility of the Vbeta10 gene in terms of transcription, allelic exclusion of this Vbeta gene was strictly maintained in beta(LD/LD) mice. These results provide strong evidence that increase of Vbeta accessibility influences frequency but not allelic exclusion of the TCR Vbeta rearrangement if the Vbeta gene is located in the Ebeta regulatory region.

  17. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of θ, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between θ, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite θ. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and θ values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics.

  18. Is the Ala12 variant of the PPARG gene an "unthrifty allele"?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Narvaez, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: The thrifty genotype hypothesis proposes that genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes results from the positive selection of "thrifty" alleles in the past. A corollary of this hypothesis is that genetic variants protecting against the development of diabetes are "unthrifty" and thus subject to negative selection during human evolution. Methods: It was assessed whether age estimates of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 allele indicate effects of natural selection. Based on published data from four populations, the date of origin of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 variant was estimated using both allele frequency and linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the C1431T single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 6 of the PPARG gene. Results: The best LD based estimate of the age of the Ala12 allele gave an average of ∼32 000 years with a maximum upper bound of ∼58 000 years. Assuming a population with a growth rate of r = 0.01 per generation, the frequency based estimate of the age of the Ala12 variant gave an average of ∼27 000 years with a maximum upper bound of ∼42 000 years. Discussion: The similarity of both time estimates is consistent with selective equivalence of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 allele and the diabetes susceptible PPARG Pro12 allele. PMID:15994875

  19. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  20. Differences in allele frequencies of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia SNPs in the Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Alex, Livy; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Lye, Say Hean; Bagali, Pramod; Ler, Lian Wee

    2012-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is caused by different interactions of lifestyle and genetic determinants. At the genetic level, it can be attributed to the interactions of multiple polymorphisms, or as in the example of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), it can be the result of a single mutation. A large number of genetic markers, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or mutations in three genes, implicated in autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), viz APOB (apolipoprotein B), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) and PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9), have been identified and characterized. However, such studies have been insufficiently undertaken specifically in Malaysia and Southeast Asia in general. The main objective of this study was to identify ADH variants, specifically ADH-causing mutations and hypercholesterolemia-associated polymorphisms in multiethnic Malaysian population. We aimed to evaluate published SNPs in ADH causing genes, in this population and to report any unusual trends. We examined a large number of selected SNPs from previous studies of APOB, LDLR, PCSK9 and other genes, in clinically diagnosed ADH patients (n=141) and healthy control subjects (n=111). Selection of SNPs was initiated by searching within genes reported to be associated with ADH from known databases. The important finding was 137 mono-allelic markers (44.1%) and 173 polymorphic markers (55.8%) in both subject groups. By comparing to publicly available data, out of the 137 mono-allelic markers, 23 markers showed significant differences in allele frequency among Malaysians, European Whites, Han Chinese, Yoruba and Gujarati Indians. Our data can serve as reference for others in related fields of study during the planning of their experiments.

  1. Frequency analysis of HLA class I alleles in Iranian patients with progressive and non-progressive chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, M; Razavi, S M; Sharifian, R A; Shokri, F

    2014-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a malignant disorder of B cell origin, with low incidence in Asian populations. In this study we investigated the HLA-class I A and B allele frequencies in 87 Iranian CLL patients and 64 healthy controls using sequence specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) technique. Our results showed increased frequencies of HLA-A11:01 (p=0.02) and HLA-B35:01 (p=0.002) alleles and HLA-A11:01/B35:01 haplotype (p=0.036) and decreased frequencies of HLA-A01:01 (p=0.02), HLA-A26:01 (p=0.03), HLA-B65:01 (p=0.03) and HLA-B53:01 (p<0.00001) alleles in CLL patients compared to the control group. Classification of the patients into non-progressive and progressive groups did not reveal significant differences for the frequency of any of the HLA-A and -B alleles or haplotypes between these two subtypes. Comparison between patients with immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes (IGHV) mutated (n=56) and unmutated (n=31) subtypes showed a significant increase in HLA-A32:01 (p=0.05) and HLA-A33:01 (p=0.05) alleles in IGHV unmutated patients compared to IGHV mutated patients. Similarly, a higher frequency of HLA-B52:01 (p=0.037) alleles was observed in CD38(+) compared with CD38(-) patients. Our results obtained from an Iranian population indicate that CLL is associated with distinct HLA class I alleles and haplotypes some of which are linked to disease prognostic factors. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Frequency analysis of the delta32ccr5 HIV resistance allele in a medieval plague mass grave.

    PubMed

    Kremeyer, Barbara; Hummel, Susanne; Herrmann, Bernd

    2005-03-01

    The 32 basepair deletion in the gene for the human chemokine receptor CCR5 (delta32ccr5) conferring resistance against HIV-1 infection is present in Caucasian populations. The mutant allele is believed to have originated by a single mutational event in historic times and to have reached its present population frequency of an average 10 % in Europe through selective pressure by a pathogenic agent. Because of their great impact on European populations, the medieval Plague epidemics have been considered as a possible candidate. To test this hypothesis, we studied the delta32ccr5-frequency in 35 individuals from a mass grave containing victims of the 14th century Plague pandemic in Lübeck, Northern Germany, and compared them to the frequency in a control group from the same burial site, dating from the time before the first Plague pandemic. If the delta32ccr5 allele conferred an at least partial resistance against the medieval Plague, its frequency would be expected to be lower in those that died in the pandemic, than it was in the local population before the arrival of the Plague. The CCR5 locus could be typed successfully for 14 Plague victims and for 20 individuals from the medieval control group. We found a delta32ccr5 allelic frequency of 14.2% and 12.5%, respectively. The difference between these figures is not statistically significant. Furthermore, they are comparable to the delta32ccr5 frequency for nowadays Northern Europe. We therefore conclude that the medieval Plague pandemic has not contributed to an increase in the allelic frequency of the mutant delta32ccr5 allele and that, if there has been a positive selection of this allele, it is likely to have occurred before the 14th century and thus before the arrival of the Plague in Europe.

  3. Allele frequency of ABO blood group antigen and the risk of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narender; Kapoor, Akhil; Kalwar, Ashok; Narayan, Satya; Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Akhender; Mewara, Abhishek; Bardia, Megh Raj

    2014-01-01

    ABO blood group and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus have been reported by many studies, but there is no discipline that had provided association with the genotype and gene frequency by population statics. We conducted a case-control study on 480 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and 480 noncancer patients. ABO blood group was determined by presence of antigen with the help of monoclonal antibody. Chi-square test and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by statistical methods, and gene frequencies were calculated by Hardy-Weinberg model. We observed significant associations between ABO genotype and squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. OR (95% CIs) was 1.69 (1.31-2.19) for presence of B antigen allele relative to its absence (P < 0.0001); in female subgroup OR (95% CIs) observed at 1.84 (1.27-2.65) was statistically significant (P = 0.001). SCC of esophagus shows significant difference in comparison to general population; blood group B is found to be higher in incidence (P = 0.0001). Increased risk of cancer was observed with absence of Rh antigen (P = 0.0001). Relatively increased gene frequency of q[B] allele is observed more significantly in female cancer patients (P = 0.003). Statistically significant association between squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and ABO and Rh genotype is identified by this study. Sex and anatomical site of cancer also present with statistically significant relative association. However, larger randomised trials are required to establish the hypothesis.

  4. The role of climate and out-of-Africa migration in the frequencies of risk alleles for 21 human diseases.

    PubMed

    Blair, Lily M; Feldman, Marcus W

    2015-07-14

    Demography and environmental adaptation can affect the global distribution of genetic variants and possibly the distribution of disease. Population heterozygosity of single nucleotide polymorphisms has been shown to decrease strongly with distance from Africa and this has been attributed to the effect of serial founding events during the migration of humans out of Africa. Additionally, population allele frequencies have been shown to change due to environmental adaptation. Here, we investigate the relationship of Out-of-Africa migration and climatic variables to the distribution of risk alleles for 21 diseases. For each disease, we computed the regression of average heterozygosity and average allele frequency of the risk alleles with distance from Africa and 9 environmental variables. We compared these regressions to a null distribution created by regressing statistics for SNPs not associated with disease on distance from Africa and these environmental variables. Additionally, we used Bayenv 2.0 to assess the signal of environmental adaptation associated with individual risk SNPs. For those SNPs in HGDP and HapMap that are risk alleles for type 2 diabetes, we cannot reject that their distribution is as expected from Out-of-Africa migration. However, the allelic statistics for many other diseases correlate more closely with environmental variables than would be expected from the serial founder effect and show signals of environmental adaptation. We report strong environmental interactions with several autoimmune diseases, and note a particularly strong interaction between asthma and summer humidity. Additionally, we identified several risk genes with strong environmental associations. For most diseases, migration does not explain the distribution of risk alleles and the worldwide pattern of allele frequencies for some diseases may be better explained by environmental associations, which suggests that some selection has acted on these diseases.

  5. Frequencies of HKαα and anti-HKαα Alleles in Chinese Carriers of Silent Deletional α-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man-Yu; Li, Jian; Li, Shu-Chen; Li, Yan; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The HKαα (HongKongαα) allele is an unusual rearrangement of the α-globin gene cluster containing both the -α(3.7) (rightward) and ααα(anti 4.2) crossover deletion/duplication. The anti-HKαα (anti-HongKongαα) allele is the reciprocal product containing both the -α(4.2) (leftward) and ααα(anti 3.7) unequal crossover deletion/duplication. In clinical practice of thalassemia screening, gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) approaches are used to detect the common -α(3.7) and -α(4.2) deletions of α-thalassemia (α-thal). Because the HKαα and anti-HKαα alleles also contain the single α-globin gene deletion, individuals with these alleles would be misdiagnosed as -α(3.7) or -α(4.2) carriers. This would likely produce misleading or incorrect information in genetic counseling. In this study, we investigated the HKαα and anti-HKαα alleles in Chinese carriers of silent deletional α-thal, and reported their frequencies to be 2.27 and 0.35% in -α(3.7) and -α(4.2) carriers, respectively. Given the rarity of the HKαα and anti-HKαα alleles, a routine screening for these two rearrangements are unlikely to be necessary on most occasions.

  6. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Campbell, Ian M; Baggett, Brett C; Soens, Zachry T; Rao, Mitchell M; Hixson, Patricia M; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R

    2013-09-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles.

  7. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  8. Comparison of Prion Allele Frequency found in Suffolk and Targhee Sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a class of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. The objective of this study was to compare genotypic and allelic frequencies among USSES Targhee and Suffolk sheep. A total of 122 sheep were genotyped for codon 171 with allele specific primers in 2 separate...

  9. Frequencies and phenotypic consequences of association of α- and β-thalassemia alleles with sickle-cell disease in Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Abuamer, S; Shome, D K; Jaradat, A; Radhi, A; Bapat, J P; Sharif, K A; Al-Touq, J; Al-Asheeri, A; Al-Ajami, A

    2017-02-01

    Bahrain has high prevalence rates of sickle cell and thalassemia in the population. This study reports the frequencies and phenotypic characteristics of α- and/or β-thalassemia associated with sickle-cell disease (SCD) in a tertiary care hospital. Adult SCD patients (n = 200) were screened for the common α- and β-thalassemia alleles prevalent in the region using molecular techniques. Results of CBC, hemoglobin analysis, and average annual frequencies of severe pain episodes and numbers of transfused red cell units were documented. Patients were grouped on the basis of molecular studies as sickle-cell anemia (SS, n = 131), SS/α-thalassemia with three normal genes (n = 27), SS/α-thalassemia with two normal genes (n = 11), sickle-β-thalassemia (Sβ, n = 23), and Sβ with co-inherited α-thalassemia (n = 8). Identified α-thalassemia determinants were -α(3.7) (n = 52), -α(4.2) (n = 4), α(T-Saudi) α (n = 1), and α(Hph) α (n = 1). All β-thalassemia alleles were β(0) defects. Sickle-thalassemia association resulted in higher hemoglobin, hematocrit, and erythrocyte counts with reduced MCV and reticulocytes. Significant clinical associations were as follows: increased severe pain frequency with α-thalassemia (three-gene group); red cell transfusion with β-thalassemia alleles and female gender. One-third of patients with SCD co-inherited α- and/or β-thalassemia alleles and these associations explained some of the observed phenotypic variability. A low prevalence of nondeletion α-thalassemia alleles was observed in these patients. The most significant disease amelioration occurred in SCD associated with two α-thalassemia alleles. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Association between Age and the 7 Repeat Allele of the Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Anna; Bircher, Julianna; Vereczkei, Andrea; Balota, David A.; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is in part (25%) inherited, and genetic studies aim to uncover allelic variants that play an important role in prolonging life span. Results to date confirm only a few gene variants associated with longevity, while others show inconsistent results. However, GWAS studies concentrate on single nucleotide polymorphisms, and there are only a handful of studies investigating variable number of tandem repeat variations related to longevity. Recently, Grady and colleagues (2013) reported a remarkable (66%) accumulation of those carrying the 7 repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene in a large population of 90–109 years old Californian centenarians, as compared to an ancestry-matched young population. In the present study we demonstrate the same association using continuous age groups in an 18–97 years old Caucasian sample (N = 1801, p = 0.007). We found a continuous pattern of increase from 18–75, however frequency of allele 7 carriers decreased in our oldest age groups. Possible role of gene-environment interaction effects driven by historical events are discussed. In accordance with previous findings, we observed association preferentially in females (p = 0.003). Our results underlie the importance of investigating non-disease related genetic variants as inherited components of longevity, and confirm, that the 7-repeat allele of the dopamine D4 receptor gene is a longevity enabling genetic factor, accumulating in the elderly female population. PMID:27992450

  11. Allelic Variants of Complement Genes Associated with Dense Deposit Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abrera-Abeleda, Maria Asuncion; Nishimura, Carla; Frees, Kathy; Jones, Michael; Maga, Tara; Katz, Louis M.; Zhang, Yuzhou

    2011-01-01

    The alternative pathway of the complement cascade plays a role in the pathogenesis of dense deposit disease (DDD). Deficiency of complement factor H and mutations in CFH associate with the development of DDD, but it is unknown whether allelic variants in other complement genes also associate with this disease. We studied patients with DDD and identified previously unreported sequence alterations in several genes in addition to allelic variants and haplotypes common to patients with DDD. We found that the likelihood of developing DDD increases with the presence of two or more risk alleles in CFH and C3. To determine the functional consequence of this finding, we measured the activity of the alternative pathway in serum samples from phenotypically normal controls genotyped for variants in CFH and C3. Alternative pathway activity was higher in the presence of variants associated with DDD. Taken together, these data confirm that DDD is a complex genetic disease and may provide targets for the development of disease-specific therapies. PMID:21784901

  12. Association study of human VN1R1 pheromone receptor gene alleles and gender.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Constantinos; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Pappa, Magda; Bertolis, George; Gerou, Spiros; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Pheromones are water-soluble chemicals that elicit neuroendocrine and physiological changes, while they also provide information about gender within individuals of the same species. VN1R1 is the only functional pheromone receptor in humans. We have undertaken a large mutation screening approach in 425 adult individuals from the Hellenic population to investigate whether the allelic differences, namely alleles 1a and 1b present in the human VN1R1 gene, are gender specific. Here we show that both VN1R1 1a and 1b alleles are found in chromosomes of both male and female subjects at frequency of 26.35% and 73.65%, respectively. Given the fact that those allelic differences potentially cause minor changes in the protein conformation and its transmembrane domains, as simulated by the TMHMM software, our data suggest that the allelic differences in the human VN1R1 gene are unlikely to be associated with gender and hence to contribute to distinct gender-specific behavior.

  13. Allelic and genotype frequencies of catechol-O-methyltransferase (Val158Met) and CYP2D6*10 (Pro34Ser) single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Baclig, Michael O; Predicala, Rey Z; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Natividad, Filipinas F; Javier, Francis O

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the allelic and genotype frequencies in the genes encoding for catechol-O-methyltransferase and CYP2D6*10 among healthy volunteers and patients clinically diagnosed with cancer pain. PCR-RFLP was used to identify COMT and CYP2D6*10 genotypes. Allelic frequencies among healthy volunteer Filipinos were 0.83 and 0.17 for the COMT Val and COMT Met alleles, respectively. Calculated frequencies in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were 73% for COMT Val/Val, 26% for COMT Val/Met, and 1% for COMT Met/Met genotype. For CYP2D6*10, allelic frequencies in HWE among volunteers were 0.46 for the C allele and 0.54 for the T allele. Twenty percent were identified as homozygous for the wild-type C/C genotype, 56% were identified as heterozygous for the C/T genotype, and 24% were identified as homozygous for the T/T variant genotype. No significant differences in COMT and CYP2D6*10 allele frequencies between cancer patients and healthy volunteers were noted. Our data demonstrated that the allele frequencies of COMT and CYP2D6*10 in the Filipino healthy volunteers were similar with other Asians but markedly different from Caucasian populations. PMID:22724048

  14. Allelic and genotype frequencies of catechol-O-methyltransferase (Val158Met) and CYP2D6*10 (Pro34Ser) single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Predicala, Rey Z; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Daroy, Maria Luisa G; Natividad, Filipinas F; Javier, Francis O

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the allelic and genotype frequencies in the genes encoding for catechol-O-methyltransferase and CYP2D6*10 among healthy volunteers and patients clinically diagnosed with cancer pain. PCR-RFLP was used to identify COMT and CYP2D6*10 genotypes. Allelic frequencies among healthy volunteer Filipinos were 0.83 and 0.17 for the COMT Val and COMT Met alleles, respectively. Calculated frequencies in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were 73% for COMT Val/Val, 26% for COMT Val/Met, and 1% for COMT Met/Met genotype. For CYP2D6*10, allelic frequencies in HWE among volunteers were 0.46 for the C allele and 0.54 for the T allele. Twenty percent were identified as homozygous for the wild-type C/C genotype, 56% were identified as heterozygous for the C/T genotype, and 24% were identified as homozygous for the T/T variant genotype. No significant differences in COMT and CYP2D6*10 allele frequencies between cancer patients and healthy volunteers were noted. Our data demonstrated that the allele frequencies of COMT and CYP2D6*10 in the Filipino healthy volunteers were similar with other Asians but markedly different from Caucasian populations.

  15. [Analysis of association of Col1a1 gene alleles with the development of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, M V; Aseev, M V; Zazerskaia, I E; Kotova, S M; Ivashchenko, T E; Baranov, V S

    2002-12-01

    Allele frequencies of the G-->T polymorphism at the regulatory region of the Collal gene in the population of the northwestern Russia (control group) and in osteoporotic patients were estimated by the RFLP method based on PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis. Three patient groups with radiologically confirmed osteoporosis were examined. Group 1 consisted of 64 patients with severe osteoporosis complicated by fractures (SO); group 2 included 15 children with idiopathic osteoporosis (IO); group 3 consisted of 98 women with postmenopausal osteoporosis developed at the background of estradiol-deficiency state (PMO). The frequency of functionally defective allele s in the control group was 16.7%. It was statistically different from that in the SO patients (48.4%) (P < 0.01) and in the IO children (40%) (P < 0.01). The frequency of allele s in the PMO patients constituted 23.0% and it was similar to that in the control group (P > 0.05). Analysis of the Collal alleles provides early detection of the individuals with hereditary predisposition to osteoporosis and prophylaxis of the disease at the presymptomatic stage.

  16. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Adiconis, Xian; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna; Demissie, Serkalem; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection pressures. Such genetic information is limited in Puerto Ricans, the second largest Hispanic ethnic group in the US, and a group with high prevalence of chronic disease. We determined allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 genes involved in major metabolic and disease-relevant pathways in Puerto Ricans (n = 969, ages 45–75 years) and compared them to similarly aged non-Hispanic whites (NHW) (n = 597). Results Minor allele frequency (MAF) distributions for 45.5% of the SNPs assessed in Puerto Ricans were significantly different from those of NHW. Puerto Ricans carried risk alleles in higher frequency and protective alleles in lower frequency than NHW. Patterns of population differentiation showed that Puerto Ricans had SNPs with exceptional FST values in intronic, non-synonymous and promoter regions. NHW had exceptional FST values in intronic and promoter region SNPs only. Conclusion These observations may serve to explain and broaden studies on the impact of gene polymorphisms on chronic diseases affecting Puerto Ricans. PMID:19682384

  17. Gene-based rare allele analysis identified a risk gene of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Song, Pamela; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Jun Hong; Park, Sun Ah

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a strong propensity to run in families. However, the known risk genes excluding APOE are not clinically useful. In various complex diseases, gene studies have targeted rare alleles for unsolved heritability. Our study aims to elucidate previously unknown risk genes for AD by targeting rare alleles. We used data from five publicly available genetic studies from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). A total of 4,171 cases and 9,358 controls were included. The genotype information of rare alleles was imputed using 1,000 genomes. We performed gene-based analysis of rare alleles (minor allele frequency≤3%). The genome-wide significance level was defined as meta P<1.8×10(-6) (0.05/number of genes in human genome = 0.05/28,517). ZNF628, which is located at chromosome 19q13.42, showed a genome-wide significant association with AD. The association of ZNF628 with AD was not dependent on APOE ε4. APOE and TREM2 were also significantly associated with AD, although not at genome-wide significance levels. Other genes identified by targeting common alleles could not be replicated in our gene-based rare allele analysis. We identified that rare variants in ZNF628 are associated with AD. The protein encoded by ZNF628 is known as a transcription factor. Furthermore, the associations of APOE and TREM2 with AD were highly significant, even in gene-based rare allele analysis, which implies that further deep sequencing of these genes is required in AD heritability studies.

  18. Geographical distribution of pyrethroid resistance allele frequency in head lice (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Ascunce, Marina S; Reed, David; Picollo, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    The human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), is an obligate ectoparasite that causes pediculosis capitis and has parasitized humans since the beginning of humankind. Head louse infestations are widespread throughout the world and have been increasing since the early 1990s partially because of ineffective pediculicides. In Argentina, the overuse of products containing pyrethroids has led to the development of resistant louse populations. Pyrethroid insecticides act on the nervous system affecting voltage-sensitive sodium channels. Three point mutations at the corresponding amino acid sequence positions M815I, T917I, and L920F in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene are responsible for contributing to knockdown resistance (kdr). The management of pyrethroid resistance requires either early detection or the characterization of the mechanisms involved in head louse populations. In the current study, we estimated the distribution of kdr alleles in 154 head lice from six geographical regions of Argentina. Pyrethroid resistance kdr alleles were found in high frequencies ranging from 67 to 100%. Of these, 131 (85.1%) were homozygous resistant, 13 (8.4%) were homozygous susceptible, and 10 (6.5%) were heterozygous. Exact tests for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each location showed that genotype frequencies differed significantly from expectation in four of the six sites studied. These results show that pyrethroid resistance is well established reaching an overall frequency of 88%, thus close to fixation. With 30 yr of pyrethroid-based pediculicides use in Argentina, kdr resistance has evolved rapidly among these head louse populations.

  19. Genetic origin of the Swedish Sami inferred from HLA class I and class II allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Asa; Ingman, Max; Mack, Steven J; Erlich, Henry; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2008-11-01

    Sami of northern Scandinavia are genetic outliers among European populations and their origin has been difficult to determine. In order to study the genetic origin of the Swedish Sami, we have performed high-resolution typing of the class I HLA-A and -B loci and the class II DRB1, DQB1 and DQA1 loci in the northern and southern Swedish Sami. Several of the common class I alleles in Sami (B*0702, B*1501, B*4002 and A*0301) are found at high frequency in other European populations. However, a number of class I and class II alleles (B*4001, A*2402, DRB1*0901 and DRB1*1101) in the Swedish Sami are characteristic of Asian populations. Admixture analyses indicate that 87% of the Sami gene pool is of European origin and that the Asian contribution is 13%. Our HLA analyses indicate a higher proportion of Asian ancestry in the Sami than shown by previous genetic studies.

  20. Statistical Inference in the Wright-Fisher Model Using Allele Frequency Data.

    PubMed

    Tataru, Paula; Simonsen, Maria; Bataillon, Thomas; Hobolth, Asger

    2016-08-02

    The Wright-Fisher model provides an elegant mathematical framework for understanding allele frequency data. In particular, the model can be used to infer the demographic history of species and identify loci under selection. A crucial quantity for inference under the Wright-Fisher model is the distribution of allele frequencies (DAF). Despite the apparent simplicity of the model, the calculation of the DAF is challenging. We review and discuss strategies for approximating the DAF, and how these are used in methods that perform inference from allele frequency data. Various evolutionary forces can be incorporated in the Wright-Fisher model, and we consider these in turn. We begin our review with the basic bi-allelic Wright-Fisher model where random genetic drift is the only evolutionary force. We then consider mutation, migration, and selection. In particular, we compare diffusion-based and moment-based methods in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and analytical tractability. We conclude with a brief overview of the multi-allelic process with a general mutation model. [Allele frequency, diffusion, inference, moments, selection, Wright-Fisher.].

  1. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  2. The Arg160Trp allele of melanocortin-1 receptor gene might protect against vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Széll, Márta; Baltás, Eszter; Bodai, László; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Nikoletta; Dallos, Attila; Pourfarzi, Reza; Simics, Eniko; Kondorosi, Ildikó; Szalai, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Gábor K; Hunyadi, János; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and agouti signaling protein (ASIP) play pivotal roles in the regulation of human pigmentation. We aimed to study whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MC1R and ASIP genes contribute to the pathogenesis of the polygenic pigment skin disorder, vitiligo. The PCR-amplified, full-length MC1R gene was studied with sequence analysis, and the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) SNP of ASIP was detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism. The allele frequency of the ASIP SNP did not show any difference between the skin type, hair color and eye color-matched 97 vitiligo patients and the 59 healthy control individuals. As one of the MC1R polymorphisms showed significantly higher incidence among fair-skinned individuals (Fitzpatrick I+II, n=140) than among dark-skinned individuals (Fitzpatrick III+IV, n=90), both vitiligo patients and controls were divided into two groups and the frequency of the MC1R alleles was studied separately in fair-skinned and dark-skinned subgroups of diseased and healthy groups. C478T, one of the MC1R SNPs studied in 108 fair-skinned vitiligo patients and in 70 fair-skinned healthy control individuals, showed a significant difference (P=0.0262, odds ratio [95% confidence interval]=3.6 [0.0046-0.1003]) in allele frequency between the two groups: the allele frequency was higher in the control group, suggesting protection against vitiligo. Computer prediction of antigenicity has revealed that the Arg160Trp amino acid change caused by this SNP results in a decrease in antigenicity of the affected peptide epitope.

  3. Frequency of the arylsulphatase A pseudodeficiency allele in the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Chabás, A; Castellvi, S; Bayés, M; Balcells, S; Grinberg, D; Vilageliu, L; Marfany, G; Lissens, W; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R

    1993-12-01

    Pseudodeficiency in arylsulphatase A (ASA) is a relatively frequent condition in healthy individuals. It produces a reduction in enzyme activity similar to that found in metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). Unambiguous discrimination between the two conditions cannot be achieved through conventional enzyme activity assays. A PCR method has been developed which detects the pseudodeficiency (pd) allele using a single pair of primers encompassing the mutation site and hair follicles as the source of DNA. The frequency of this allele in the Spanish population has been evaluated and correlations between different genotypes and ASA activity levels have been established. Ten out of 55 individuals were heterozygous for the ASA pd allele, while two were homozygous. The allele frequency was thus 12.7%.

  4. Allele frequency net 2015 update: new features for HLA epitopes, KIR and disease and HLA adverse drug reaction associations.

    PubMed

    González-Galarza, Faviel F; Takeshita, Louise Y C; Santos, Eduardo J M; Kempson, Felicity; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; da Silva, Andrea Luciana Soares; Teles e Silva, André Luiz; Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Alfirevic, Ana; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2015-01-01

    It has been 12 years since the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND; http://www.allelefrequencies.net) was first launched, providing the scientific community with an online repository for the storage of immune gene frequencies in different populations across the world. There have been a significant number of improvements from the first version, making AFND a primary resource for many clinical and scientific areas including histocompatibility, immunogenetics, pharmacogenetics and anthropology studies, among many others. The most widely used part of AFND stores population frequency data (alleles, genes or haplotypes) related to human leukocyte antigens (HLA), killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes (MIC) and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. AFND now contains >1400 populations from more than 10 million healthy individuals. Here, we report how the main features of AFND have been updated to include a new section on 'HLA epitope' frequencies in populations, a new section capturing the results of studies identifying HLA associations with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and one for the examination of infectious and autoimmune diseases associated with KIR polymorphisms-thus extending AFND to serve a new user base in these growing areas of research. New criteria on data quality have also been included. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Allele Mining Strategies: Principles and Utilisation for Blast Resistance Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Yusop, Mohd Rafii; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Azady, Amin; Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Azizi, Parisa; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Allele mining is a promising way to dissect naturally occurring allelic variants of candidate genes with essential agronomic qualities. With the identification, isolation and characterisation of blast resistance genes in rice, it is now possible to dissect the actual allelic variants of these genes within an array of rice cultivars via allele mining. Multiple alleles from the complex locus serve as a reservoir of variation to generate functional genes. The routine sequence exchange is one of the main mechanisms of R gene evolution and development. Allele mining for resistance genes can be an important method to identify additional resistance alleles and new haplotypes along with the development of allele-specific markers for use in marker-assisted selection. Allele mining can be visualised as a vital link between effective utilisation of genetic and genomic resources in genomics-driven modern plant breeding. This review studies the actual concepts and potential of mining approaches for the discovery of alleles and their utilisation for blast resistance genes in rice. The details provided here will be important to provide the rice breeder with a worthwhile introduction to allele mining and its methodology for breakthrough discovery of fresh alleles hidden in hereditary diversity, which is vital for crop improvement.

  6. HLA-DRB1 and -DRB3 allele frequencies and haplotypic associations in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Young; Park, Hyejin; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the frequencies of human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and -DRB3 alleles and DRB1-DRB3 haplotypic associations in 800 Koreans. DRB1 genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) and PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) methods. DRB3 genotyping was done on 447 samples carrying DRB3-associated DRB1 alleles (DRB1*03, *11, *12, *13, and *14) using PCR-SSCP method. The allele frequencies of DRB3*0101, DRB3*0202, and DRB3*0301 were 0.073, 0.136, and 0.120, respectively, and we found one case of a probable new allele (DRB3*01new, 0.001). DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes with frequency (HF) > 0.005 exhibited strong associations between DRB3*0101 and DRB1*1201, *1301, and *1403; between DRB3*0301 and DRB1*1202 and *1302; between DRB3*0202 and DRB1*0301, *1101, *1401, *1405, and *1406 alleles. Most of the DRB1 alleles with frequency > 0.005 were exclusively associated with particular DRB3 alleles with relative linkage disequilibrium values of 1.0, except for DRB1*1201, *1202 and *1301; the rare presence (HF < 0.005) of DRB3*0202 associations were observed for these DRB1 alleles. We also investigated and presented rare DRB1-DRB3 associations in additional 6000 Koreans. Comparison with other ethnic groups revealed that DRB1*0301 and *1301 related DRB1-DRB3 haplotypes vary among different populations, in that Koreans and other Asian populations show less diversity compared with Caucasoids or African Americans.

  7. [Frequency of HLA alleles class I and II in a cohort of northwestern Colombian patients with spondyloarthritis].

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Eliana Patricia; Quintero, Julio César; Aristizábal, Beatriz Helena; Rincón, Olga Lucía; Velásquez, Carlos Jaime; Pinto, Luis Fernando; Márquez, Javier Darío

    2012-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis is a chronic rheumatic disease that affect the axial skeleton and peripheral joints, along with several extra-articular manifestations. The association with HLA-B27 remains one of the strongest known links between these entities and the major histocompatibility complex. However, the global distribution of HLA-B27 varies considerably and furthermore, associations with non-HLA-B27 genes have been described. The frequency of HLA class I and II was determined in a population of patients with spondyloarthritis with respect to detection in the clinical setting and by radiology. A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional, retrospective and prospective study was conducted in 56 patients from northwestern Colombia. Each was diagnosed with spondyloarthritis between 2005 and 2008. In each case, alleles were identified for the loci HLA class I and II (HLA-B; HLADQB1 and HLADRB). The frequency of these alleles in the axial, peripheral, extraarticular and radiological manifestations. The frequency of HLA-B27 was 50% overall, and it was the most frequent allele. The two other alleles were HLA.DRB4*01 at 35.7% and HLA-DQB1*0501 at 28.6%, as detected in each of the clinical and radiological manifestations. A high frequency of HLA-B27 and HLA-DRB4*01 (64.3%) was noted in patients with dactylitis. The alleles HLA-B27, HLA-DRB4*01 and HLA-DQB1*0501 were common in the different subtypes of spondyloarthritis and were frequent in the specific clinical axial, peripheral and extraarticular clinical manifestations, as well as radiological sacroiliitis.

  8. HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Shamsolmoulouk; Mohammadzadeh, Mahsa; Zare Bidoki, Alireza; Meighani, Ghasem; Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Rezaei, Nima

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is known as the most common chronic disease of the oral cavity, which affects a range of 5-25% of the population. RAS appears to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles and haplotypes. This study attempts to survey the distribution of HLA-DRB and -DQB alleles among Iranian RAS patients and healthy controls. In order to evaluate the association of HLA-DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes, 54 patients with RAS and 100 unrelated healthy subjects as control group were investigated. Our data indicated that DRB1*13:17, DRB1*15:01, and DRB5*01 were significantly more frequent in RAS patients in comparison to controls. However, DRB3:01allele frequency was higher in the controls compared to the patients. The significantly frequent allele in the patients compared with the healthy subjects was HLA-DQB1*03:02. However, both HLA-DQB1*02:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01 alleles were most frequent in the healthy individuals rather than the patients. The DRB*04/DQB1*03:01 and DRB*01:01/DQB1*02:01 haplotypes were significantly distributed in healthy subjects compared with patients. However, DRB*07:01/DQB1*03:02 haplotype was found to be significantly frequent in patients than controls. In respect of HLA genes, factors are involved in the incidence of RAS; various HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the related haplotypes are suggested to be the three main RAS susceptibility factors in our population study.

  9. A hypervariable STR polymorphism in the CFI gene: southern origin of East Asian-specific group H alleles.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Isao; Jin, Feng; Harihara, Shinji; Matsusue, Aya; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Akane, Atsushi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya; Chattopadhyay, Prasanta K

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of four populations revealed that a hypervariable short tandem repeat (iSTR) in intron 7 of the human complement factor I (CFI) gene on chromosome 4q was unique, with 17 possible East Asian-specific group H alleles observed at relatively high frequencies. To develop a deeper anthropological and forensic understanding of iSTR, 1161 additional individuals from 11 Asian populations were investigated. Group H alleles of iSTR and c.1217A allele of a SNP in exon 11 of the CFI gene were associated with each other and were almost entirely confined to East Asian populations. Han Chinese in Changsha, southern China, showed the highest frequency for East Asian-specific group H alleles (0.201) among 15 populations. Group H alleles were observed to decrease gradually from south to north in 11 East Asian populations. This expansion of group H alleles provides evidence that southern China and Southeast Asia are a hotspot of Asian diversity and a genetic reservoir of Asians after they entered East Asia. The expected heterozygosity values of iSTR ranged from 0.927 in Thais to 0.874 in Oroqens, higher than those of an STR in the fibrinogen alpha chain (FGA) gene on chromosome 4q. Thus, iSTR is a useful marker for anthropological and forensic genetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level.

  11. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, W.; Stewart, P.; Konold, T.; Street, S.; Langeveld, J.; Windl, O.; Ortiz-Pelaez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  12. Amerindians show no association of PC-1 gene Gln121 allele and obesity: a thrifty gene population genetics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Diego; Fernandez-Honrado, Mercedes; Areces, Cristina; Algora, Manuel; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Coca, Carmen; Arribas, Ignacio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    PC-1 Gln121 gene is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance in European/American Caucasoids and Orientals. We have aimed to correlate for the first time this gene in Amerindians with obesity and their corresponding individuals genotypes with obesity in order to establish preventive medicine programs for this population and also studying the evolution of gene frequencies in world populations. Central obesity was diagnosed by waist circumference perimeter and food intake independent HDL-cholesterol plasma levels were measured. HLA genes were determined in order to more objectively ascertain participants Amerindians origin. 321 Amerindian blood donors who were healthy according to the blood doning parameters were studied. No association was found between PC-1 Gln121 variant and obesity. Significant HDL-cholesterol lower values were found in the PC-1 Lys121 bearing gene individuals versus PC-1 Gln121 bearing gene ones (45.1 ± 12.7 vs. 48.7 ± 15.2 mg/dl, p < 0.05). Population analyses showed a world geographical gradient in the PC-1 Gln121 allele frequency: around 9% in Orientals, 15% in European Caucasoids and 76% in Negroids. The conclusions are: (1) No association of PC-1 Gln121 gene is found with obesity in Amerindians when association is well established in Europeans. (2) PC-1 Gln121 gene is associated to higher levels of HDL-cholesterol than the alternative PC-1 Lys121 allele. This may be specific for Amerindians. (3) Amerindians have an intermediate frequency of this possible PC-1 Gln121 thrifty gene when compared with Negroid African Americans (78.5%) or Han Chinese (7.5%, p < 0.0001). Historical details of African and other groups may support the hypothesis that PC-1 Gln121 is indeed a thrifty gene.

  13. MspI allelic pattern of bovine growth hormone gene in Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus) breeds.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, M; Mukesh, M; Prakash, B; Mishra, B P; Sobti, R C; Singh, Karn P; Singh, Satbir; Ahlawat, S P S

    2007-02-01

    The MspI allelic variation in intron III of the bovine growth hormone (bGH) gene was explored using PCR-RFLP in 750 animals belonging to 17 well-recognized breeds of Indian zebu cattle (Bos indicus) reared in different geographic locations of the country. Restriction digestion analysis of a 329-bp PCR fragment of the bGH intron III region with MspI restriction enzyme revealed two alleles (MspI- and MspI+) and two genotypes (-/- and +/-) across the 17 cattle breeds studied. The allelic frequency varied from 0.67 to 0.94 for MspI (-) and from 0.06 to 0.33 for MspI (+) across the 17 breeds, with a combined average frequency of 0.87 and 0.13, respectively. No animal with +/+ genotype was detected across the samples analyzed. The chi-square test showed that the difference in MspI allelic frequency was not significant (p > 0.05), regardless of the geographic origin, coat color, or utility of the cattle breed. The high MspI (-) allele frequencies obtained for Indian zebu cattle in this study are in sharp contrast to those reported for taurine breeds from northern Europe, Mediterranean countries, and America. Findings of this study further substantiate the hypothesis that the MspI (-) allele has an Indian origin.

  14. Using maximum likelihood to estimate population size from temporal changes in allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, E G; Slatkin, M

    1999-01-01

    We develop a maximum-likelihood framework for using temporal changes in allele frequencies to estimate the number of breeding individuals in a population. We use simulations to compare the performance of this estimator to an F-statistic estimator of variance effective population size. The maximum-likelihood estimator had a lower variance and smaller bias. Taking advantage of the likelihood framework, we extend the model to include exponential growth and show that temporal allele frequency data from three or more sampling events can be used to test for population growth. PMID:10353915

  15. Haplotypic Background of a Private Allele at High Frequency in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Kari B.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Crawford, Michael H.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Boca, Simina M.; Conrad, Donald F.; Tito, Raul Y.; Osipova, Ludmilla P.; Tarskaia, Larissa A.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Malhi, Ripan S.; Smith, David G.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the observation of a high-frequency private allele, the 9-repeat allele at microsatellite D9S1120, in all sampled Native American and Western Beringian populations has been interpreted as evidence that all modern Native Americans descend primarily from a single founding population. However, this inference assumed that all copies of the 9-repeat allele were identical by descent and that the geographic distribution of this allele had not been influenced by natural selection. To investigate whether these assumptions are satisfied, we genotyped 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms across ∼500 kilobases (kb) around D9S1120 in 21 Native American and Western Beringian populations and 54 other worldwide populations. All chromosomes with the 9-repeat allele share the same haplotypic background in the vicinity of D9S1120, suggesting that all sampled copies of the 9-repeat allele are identical by descent. Ninety-one percent of these chromosomes share the same 76.26 kb haplotype, which we call the “American Modal Haplotype” (AMH). Three observations lead us to conclude that the high frequency and widespread distribution of the 9-repeat allele are unlikely to be the result of positive selection: 1) aside from its association with the 9-repeat allele, the AMH does not have a high frequency in the Americas, 2) the AMH is not unusually long for its frequency compared with other haplotypes in the Americas, and 3) in Latin American mestizo populations, the proportion of Native American ancestry at D9S1120 is not unusual compared with that observed at other genomewide microsatellites. Using a new method for estimating the time to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all sampled copies of an allele on the basis of an estimate of the length of the genealogy descended from the MRCA, we calculate the mean time to the MRCA of the 9-repeat allele to be between 7,325 and 39,900 years, depending on the demographic model used. The results support the hypothesis that all

  16. Allele and genotype frequencies of CYP2B6 in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Yuce-Artun, Nazan; Kose, Gulcin; Suzen, H Sinan

    2014-06-01

    Increasing interest in cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) genetic polymorphism was stimulated by revelations of a specific CYP2B6 genotype significantly affecting the metabolism of various drugs in common clinical use in terms of increasing drug efficacy and avoiding adverse drug reactions. The present study aimed to determine the frequencies of CYP2B6*4 CYP2B6*5, CYP2B6*6, CYP2B6*7 and CYP2B6*9 alleles in healthy Turkish individuals (n = 172). Frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms were 516G>T (28%), 785A>G (33%), and 1459C>T (12%). The frequencies of CYP2B6*1, *4, *5, *6, *7, and *9 alleles were 54.3 (95% CI 49.04-59.56), 6.4% (95% CI 3.81-8.99), 11% (95% CI 7.69-14.31), 25.3% (95% CI 20.71-29.89), 0.87% (95% CI -0.11-1.85) and 2.0% (95% CI 0.52-3.48), respectively. Allele *6 was more frequent (25.3%) than the other variant alleles in Turkish subjects. The frequencies of CYP2B6*4, *5, *6, *7, and *9 alleles were similar to European populations but significantly different from that reported for Asian populations. This is the first study to document the frequencies of the CYP2B6*4, *5, *6, *7, *9 alleles in the healthy Turkish individuals and our results could provide clinically useful information on drug metabolism by CYP2B6 in Turkish population.

  17. A novel fluorescent quadruplex STR typing system and the allele frequency distributions in a Thai population.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Toshimichi; Mizutani, Masaki; Uchihi, Rieko; Ohtaki, Hiroyuki; Katsumata, Yoshinao; Waiyawuth, Worawee; Songsivilai, Sirirurg

    2003-01-01

    We have previously reported a new triplex amplification and typing system by silver staining for three short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 9q2h2 (D2S3020), D15S233, and D14S299 without "microvariant" alleles such as .1, .2, and, .3 alleles in the Japanese population. In the present study, we established a new quadruplex system with an additional locus D7S809 using primer sets labeled with fluorescent multi-color dyes. Using this system, we genotyped 183 Thai people, found only one "microvariant" allele (allele 20.2) at D7S809, and calculated allele frequencies and some statistical properties at these four STR loci. From these allele frequencies at four STR loci, we performed three statistical analyses including a homozygosity test, a likelihood ratio test, and an exact test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Deviations from HWE (p < 0.05) were observed only in the two tests at the locus D7S809. In the present study, we compared the allele frequencies at these four loci in the Thai population to those in the Japanese population described previously. Consequently, all observed heterozygosities and power of discrimination (PD) at those loci in the Thai population were higher than 0.8 and 0.9, respectively, and all statistical values for discriminating power in the Thai population were slightly higher than those in the Japanese population. The combined paternity exclusion rate (combined PE) in the Thai population (0.978) was almost the same as that in the Japanese population (0.971). Therefore, this novel PCR amplification and typing system for four STR loci would be a convenient and informative DNA profiling system in the forensic field.

  18. [Polymorphisms of apoB gene 3' VNTR alleles and analysis of lipid level in Tibetan population].

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhao, Y; Cheng, Y

    1999-07-01

    To study the distribution and frequency of apoB gene 3' end alleles and try to find if there is any association with the level of plasma lipids. PCR and gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to analysize the chromsome DNA and PCR products. Totally 20 alleles were found in the Tibetan group and the distribution of alleles was bimode. The HVE32 and HVE34 were most common, and the frequencies of HVE32 and HVE34 were 0.27 and 0.21 respectively. Polymorphism apoB gene resides not only in the variable numbers of the repeat unit, but also in the variation in the oligonucleotide sequence within the repeat units as well as the variation in the arrangement of the repeat units.

  19. Mytilus galloprovincialis-type foot-protein-1 alleles occur at low frequency among mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Koolhaas, Anita; Bol, Anneke; Piersma, Theunis

    2002-11-01

    The presence of M. galloprovincialis-type genes among the population of mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea, historically described as M. edulis, was assessed. We applied the molecular technique in which a fragment of the gene coding for an adhesive protein of the byssus of mussels is amplified by PCR and assayed for length using electrophoresis. Among 321 individual mussels collected in August-October 2001 at 14 sites (5 intertidal, 9 subtidal) widely dispersed over the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 specimens (collected at 5 sites) were found that showed a heterozygote genotype with both the M. edulis- and the M. galloprovincialis-type alleles being amplified; all others were identified as homozygotes for the M. edulis-type allele. Differentiation in frequencies of heterozygotes among sites was not detected. The fact that the M. galloprovincialis-type allele was present at low frequency (0.0093) may be attributed to one of three possible, and not mutually exclusive, causes: incomplete diagnosticity of this marker, an historically stable introgression zone in the Wadden Sea, or a recent invasion.

  20. Frequency of Cry1F resistance alleles in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Farias, Juliano R; Andow, David A; Horikoshi, Renato J; Bernardi, Daniel; Ribeiro, Rebeca da S; Nascimento, Antonio Rb do; Santos, Antonio C Dos; Omoto, Celso

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of resistance alleles is a major factor influencing the rate of resistance evolution. Here, we adapted the F2 screen procedure for Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) with a discriminating concentration assay, and extended associated statistical methods to estimate the frequency of resistance to Cry1F protein in S. frugiperda in Brazil when resistance was not rare. We show that F2 screen is efficient even when the resistance frequency is 0.250. It was possible to screen 517 isoparental lines from 12 populations sampled in five states of Brazil during the first half of 2012. Western Bahia had the highest allele frequency of Cry1F resistance, 0.192, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) between 0.163 and 0.220. All other states had a similar and lower frequency varying from 0.042 in Paraná to 0.080 in Mato Grosso do Sul. The high frequency in western Bahia may be related to year-round availability of maize, the high population density of S. frugiperda, the lack of refuges and the high adoption rate of Cry1F maize. Cry1F resistance alleles were not rare and occurred at frequencies that have already compromised the useful life of TC1507 maize in western Bahia. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Huntington disease reduced penetrance alleles occur at high frequency in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Madore, Steven J.; Gordon, Erynn S.; Gerry, Norman; Davidson, Mark; Slama, Ramy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To directly estimate the frequency and penetrance of CAG repeat alleles associated with Huntington disease (HD) in the general population. Methods: CAG repeat length was evaluated in 7,315 individuals from 3 population-based cohorts from British Columbia, the United States, and Scotland. The frequency of ≥36 CAG alleles was assessed out of a total of 14,630 alleles. The general population frequency of reduced penetrance alleles (36–39 CAG) was compared to the prevalence of patients with HD with genetically confirmed 36–39 CAG from a multisource clinical ascertainment in British Columbia, Canada. The penetrance of 36–38 CAG repeat alleles for HD was estimated for individuals ≥65 years of age and compared against previously reported clinical penetrance estimates. Results: A total of 18 of 7,315 individuals had ≥36 CAG, revealing that approximately 1 in 400 individuals from the general population have an expanded CAG repeat associated with HD (0.246%). Individuals with CAG 36–37 genotypes are the most common (36, 0.096%; 37, 0.082%; 38, 0.027%; 39, 0.000%; ≥40, 0.041%). General population CAG 36–38 penetrance rates are lower than penetrance rates extrapolated from clinical cohorts. Conclusion: HD alleles with a CAG repeat length of 36–38 occur at high frequency in the general population. The infrequent diagnosis of HD at this CAG length is likely due to low penetrance. Another important contributing factor may be reduced ascertainment of HD in those of older age. PMID:27335115

  2. Monooxygenase Levels and Knockdown Resistance (kdr) Allele Frequencies in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Githeko, Andrew K; Githure, John I; Mutunga, James; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid-treated bed nets and indoor spray are important components of malaria control strategies in Kenya. Information on resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis populations is essential to the selection of appropriate insecticides and the management of insecticide resistance. Monooxygenase activity and knockdown resistance (kdr) allele frequency are biochemical and molecular indicators of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. This study determined baseline information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency in anopheline mosquitoes in the western region, the Great Rift Valley-central province region, and the coastal region of Kenya. A total of 1990 field-collected individuals, representing 12 An. gambiae and 22 An. arabiensis populations was analyzed. We found significant among-population variation in monooxygenase activity in An. gambiae and An. arabiensis and substantial variability among individuals within populations. Nine out of 12 An. gambiae populations exhibited significantly higher average monooxygenase activity than the susceptible Kisumu reference strain. The kdr alleles (L1014S) were detected in three An. gambiae populations, and one An. arabiensis population in western Kenya, but not in the Rift Valley-central region and the coastal Kenya region. All genotypes with the kdr alleles were heterozygous, and the conservative estimation of kdr allele frequency was below 1% in these four populations. Information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency reported in this study provided baseline data for monitoring insecticide resistance changes in Kenya during the era when large-scale insecticide-treated bednet and indoor residual spray campaigns were being implemented. PMID:18402140

  3. Neural networks underlying trait aggression depend on MAOA gene alleles.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Wolf, Dhana; Eisner, Patrick D; Habel, Ute; Repple, Jonathan; Vernaleken, Ingo; Schlüter, Thorben; Eggermann, Thomas; Zerres, Klaus; Zepf, Florian D; Mathiak, Klaus

    2017-10-10

    Low expressing alleles of the MAOA gene (MAOA-L) have been associated with an increased risk for developing an aggressive personality. This suggests an MAOA-L-specific neurobiological vulnerability associated with trait aggression. The neural networks underlying this vulnerability are unknown. The present study investigated genotype-specific associations between resting state brain networks and trait aggression (Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire) in 82 healthy Caucasian males. Genotype influences on aggression-related networks were studied for intrinsic and seed-based brain connectivity. Intrinsic connectivity was higher in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) of MAOA-L compared to high expressing allele (MAOA-H) carriers. Seed-based connectivity analyses revealed genotype differences in the functional involvement of this region. MAOA genotype modulated the relationship between trait aggression and VMPFC connectivity with supramarginal gyrus (SMG) and areas of the default mode network (DMN). Separate analyses for the two groups were performed to better understand how the genotype modulated the relationship between aggression and brain networks. They revealed a positive correlation between VMPFC connectivity and aggression in right angular gyrus (AG) and a negative correlation in right SMG in the MAOA-L group. No such effect emerged in the MAOA-H carriers. The results indicate a particular relevance of VMPFC for aggression in MAOA-L carriers; in specific, a detachment from the DMN along with a strengthened coupling to the AG seems to go along with lower trait aggression. MAOA-L carriers may thus depend on a synchronization of emotion regulation systems (VMPFC) with core areas of empathy (SMG) to prevent aggression.

  4. Extensive allelic variation in gene expression in populus F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L

    2007-12-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides F(1) hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F(1) hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid-parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes.

  5. Extensive Allelic Variation in Gene Expression in Populus F1 Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides F1 hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F1 hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid–parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes. PMID:18073418

  6. Mutant allele frequencies in domestic cat populations in Arkansas and Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Shostell, J M; Staudinger, J; Ruiz-Garcia, M

    2005-01-01

    We conducted surveys of mutant allele frequencies of four cat populations in Arkansas and Tennessee during 2002. Our calculations and analyses support that Southwestern cat populations were relatively more genetically similar to each other than compared to cat populations in other areas of North America. However, the cat population of Fort Smith is slightly different from the other cat populations studied in the Southwestern United States. Although there is a clear significant spatial geographic pattern for many mutant coat allele frequencies in the United States and Canada cat populations (d, l, S, and W), our results revealed that there is not a significant isolation-by-distance model affecting these cat populations. Our data also support the historical migration hypothesis because our calculated allele frequencies were genetically similar to cat populations located in ancestral areas of Europe. Different phenograms, including new European cat genetic profiles, showed that the Southwestern cat populations studied are of a clear British origin. Therefore, migration routes of early Arkansas and Tennessee settlers help explain the similarities of allele frequencies among domestic cat populations.

  7. Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs) of Populations via Genotyping by Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Stephen; Czaban, Adrian; Studer, Bruno; Panitz, Frank; Bendixen, Christian; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) is an excellent tool for characterising genetic variation between plant genomes. To date, its use has been reported only for genotyping of single individuals. However, there are many applications where resolving allele frequencies within populations on a genome-wide scale would be very powerful, examples include the breeding of outbreeding species, varietal protection in outbreeding species, monitoring changes in population allele frequencies. This motivated us to test the potential to use GBS to evaluate allele frequencies within populations. Perennial ryegrass is an outbreeding species, and breeding programs are based upon selection on populations. We tested two restriction enzymes for their efficiency in complexity reduction of the perennial ryegrass genome. The resulting profiles have been termed Genome Wide Allele Frequency Fingerprints (GWAFFs), and we have shown how these fingerprints can be used to distinguish between plant populations. Even at current costs and throughput, using sequencing to directly evaluate populations on a genome-wide scale is viable. GWAFFs should find many applications, from varietal development in outbreeding species right through to playing a role in protecting plant breeders’ rights. PMID:23469194

  8. Autosomal STR allele frequencies for the CODIS system from a large random population sample in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Ismael A; Villouta, Pamela; Herrera, Sandra; Melo, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    The thirteen autosomal STR loci of the CODIS system were typed from DNA of 732 unrelated male individuals sampled from different locations in Chile. This is the first report of allele frequencies for the thirteen STRs loci defined in the CODIS system from the Chilean population.

  9. High frequency of HLA-B44 allelic losses in human solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Teresa; Maleno, Isabel; Lopez-Nevot, Miguel Angel; Redondo, Maximino; Fernandez, Maria Angustias; Collado, Antonia; Garrido, Federico

    2003-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I downregulation, a frequent phenomenon observed in a variety of human tumors, favors tumor immune escape from T-lymphocyte recognition. However, it is not known whether a particular HLA class I allele is lost more frequently than others. To address this question we analyzed HLA class I expression in tumor tissues derived from 300 patients diagnosed as having breast, colorectal, or laryngeal carcinomas. Cryostatic tumor sections and a broad panel of anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies were used. We found that the HLA-B44 allele was lost more frequently than other HLA class I alleles, and that the difference was not related with changes in HLA-B44 allele frequencies between patients and controls. In addition, we observed that 35% of the HLA-B44 negative tumors presented HLA haplotype loss associated with loss of heterozygosity. These tests were performed on DNA samples obtained from microdissected tumor tissues. The results seem to indicate that HLA class I allelic losses are not randomly distributed during tumor development but that some HLA class I alleles, and HLA-B44 in particular, are more frequently downregulated and may play an important role in immune escape mechanisms.

  10. Estimating the Effective Population Size from Temporal Allele Frequency Changes in Experimental Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jónás, Ágnes; Taus, Thomas; Kosiol, Carolin; Schlötterer, Christian; Futschik, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The effective population size (Ne) is a major factor determining allele frequency changes in natural and experimental populations. Temporal methods provide a powerful and simple approach to estimate short-term Ne. They use allele frequency shifts between temporal samples to calculate the standardized variance, which is directly related to Ne. Here we focus on experimental evolution studies that often rely on repeated sequencing of samples in pools (Pool-seq). Pool-seq is cost-effective and often outperforms individual-based sequencing in estimating allele frequencies, but it is associated with atypical sampling properties: Additional to sampling individuals, sequencing DNA in pools leads to a second round of sampling, which increases the variance of allele frequency estimates. We propose a new estimator of Ne, which relies on allele frequency changes in temporal data and corrects for the variance in both sampling steps. In simulations, we obtain accurate Ne estimates, as long as the drift variance is not too small compared to the sampling and sequencing variance. In addition to genome-wide Ne estimates, we extend our method using a recursive partitioning approach to estimate Ne locally along the chromosome. Since the type I error is controlled, our method permits the identification of genomic regions that differ significantly in their Ne estimates. We present an application to Pool-seq data from experimental evolution with Drosophila and provide recommendations for whole-genome data. The estimator is computationally efficient and available as an R package at https://github.com/ThomasTaus/Nest. PMID:27542959

  11. Detection of Imprinted Genes by Single-Cell Allele-Specific Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Federico A; Stamoulis, Georgios; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Borel, Christelle; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2017-03-02

    Genomic imprinting results in parental-specific gene expression. Imprinted genes are involved in the etiology of rare syndromes and have been associated with common diseases such as diabetes and cancer. Standard RNA bulk cell sequencing applied to whole-tissue samples has been used to detect imprinted genes in human and mouse models. However, lowly expressed genes cannot be detected by using RNA bulk approaches. Here, we report an original and robust method that combines single-cell RNA-seq and whole-genome sequencing into an optimized statistical framework to analyze genomic imprinting in specific cell types and in different individuals. Using samples from the probands of 2 family trios and 3 unrelated individuals, 1,084 individual primary fibroblasts were RNA sequenced and more than 700,000 informative heterozygous single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) were genotyped. The allele-specific coverage per gene of each SNV in each single cell was used to fit a beta-binomial distribution to model the likelihood of a gene being expressed from one and the same allele. Genes presenting a significant aggregate allelic ratio (between 0.9 and 1) were retained to identify of the allelic parent of origin. Our approach allowed us to validate the imprinting status of all of the known imprinted genes expressed in fibroblasts and the discovery of nine putative imprinted genes, thereby demonstrating the advantages of single-cell over bulk RNA-seq to identify imprinted genes. The proposed single-cell methodology is a powerful tool for establishing a cell type-specific map of genomic imprinting. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PoMo: An Allele Frequency-Based Approach for Species Tree Estimation

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Nicola; Schrempf, Dominik; Kosiol, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete lineage sorting can cause incongruencies of the overall species-level phylogenetic tree with the phylogenetic trees for individual genes or genomic segments. If these incongruencies are not accounted for, it is possible to incur several biases in species tree estimation. Here, we present a simple maximum likelihood approach that accounts for ancestral variation and incomplete lineage sorting. We use a POlymorphisms-aware phylogenetic MOdel (PoMo) that we have recently shown to efficiently estimate mutation rates and fixation biases from within and between-species variation data. We extend this model to perform efficient estimation of species trees. We test the performance of PoMo in several different scenarios of incomplete lineage sorting using simulations and compare it with existing methods both in accuracy and computational speed. In contrast to other approaches, our model does not use coalescent theory but is allele frequency based. We show that PoMo is well suited for genome-wide species tree estimation and that on such data it is more accurate than previous approaches. PMID:26209413

  13. Allele frequency data of 15 autosomal STR loci in four major population groups of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lucassen, Anton; Ehlers, Karen; Grobler, Paul J; Shezi, Adeline L

    2014-03-01

    Allele frequency distributions for 15 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined using the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler Plus™ PCR amplification kit. There was little evidence of departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or association of alleles of different loci in the population samples. The probability of identity values for the different populations range from 1/3.3 × 10(17) (White) to 1/1.88 × 10(18) (Coloured). The combined probability of paternal exclusion for the different population groups ranges from 0.9995858 (Coloured) to 0.9997874 (Indian).

  14. Characterization of 12 silent alleles of the human butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Primo-Parmo, S. L.; Bartels, C. F.; Wiersema, B.; van der Spek, A. F.; Innis, J. W.; La Du, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    The silent phenotype of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), present in most human populations in frequencies of approximately 1/100,000, is characterized by the complete absence of BChE activity or by activity <10% of the average levels of the usual phenotype. Heterogeneity in this phenotype has been well established at the phenotypic level, but only a few silent BCHE alleles have been characterized at the DNA level. Twelve silent alleles of the human butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE) have been identified in 17 apparently unrelated patients who were selected by their increased sensitivity to the muscle relaxant succinylcholine. All of these alleles are characterized by single nucleotide substitutions or deletions leading to distinct changes in the structure of the BChE enzyme molecule. Nine of the nucleotide substitutions result in the replacement of single amino acid residues. Three of these variants, BCHE*33C, BCHE*198G, and BCHE*201T, produce normal amounts of immunoreactive but enzymatically inactive BChE protein in the plasma. The other six amino acid substitutions, encoded by BCHE*37S, BCHE*125F, BCHE*170E, BCHE*471R, and BCHE*518L, seem to cause reduced expression of BChE protein, and their role in determining the silent phenotype was confirmed by expression in cell culture. The other four silent alleles, BCHE*271STOP, BCHE*500STOP, BCHE*FS6, and BCHE*I2E3-8G, encode BChES truncated at their C-terminus because of premature stop codons caused by nucleotide substitutions, a frame shift, or altered splicing. The large number of different silent BCHE alleles found within a relatively small number of patients shows that the heterogeneity of the silent BChE phenotype is high. The characterization of silent BChE variants will be useful in the study of the structure/function relationship for this and other closely related enzymes. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554068

  15. How allele frequency and study design affect association test statistics with misrepresentation errors.

    PubMed

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Ghodsi, Mansoureh; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate the effect of genotyping errors on the type-I error of a general association test based on genotypes, showing that, in the presence of errors in the case and control samples, the test statistic asymptotically follows a scaled non-central $\\chi ^2$ distribution. We give explicit formulae for the scaling factor and non-centrality parameter for the symmetric allele-based genotyping error model and for additive and recessive disease models. They show how genotyping errors can lead to a significantly higher false-positive rate, growing with sample size, compared with the nominal significance levels. The strength of this effect depends very strongly on the population distribution of the genotype, with a pronounced effect in the case of rare alleles, and a great robustness against error in the case of large minor allele frequency. We also show how these results can be used to correct $p$-values.

  16. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  17. Evaluating Mendelian nephrotic syndrome genes for evidence for risk alleles or oligogenicity that explain heritability.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Brendan D; Gillies, Christopher E; Robertson, Catherine C; Kretzler, Matthias; Otto, Edgar; Vega-Wagner, Virginia; Sampson, Matthew G

    2017-03-01

    More than 30 genes can harbor rare exonic variants sufficient to cause nephrotic syndrome (NS), and the number of genes implicated in monogenic NS continues to grow. However, outside the first year of life, the majority of affected patients, particularly in ancestrally mixed populations, do not have a known monogenic form of NS. Even in those children classified with a monogenic form of NS, there is phenotypic heterogeneity. Thus, we have only discovered a fraction of the heritability of NS-the underlying genetic factors contributing to phenotypic variation. Part of the "missing heritability" for NS has been posited to be explained by patients harboring coding variants across one or more previously implicated NS genes, insufficient to cause NS in a classical Mendelian manner, but that nonetheless have a sufficient impact on protein function to cause disease. However, systematic evaluation in patients with NS for rare or low-frequency risk alleles within single genes, or in combination across genes ("oligogenicity"), has not been reported. To determine whether, compared with a reference population, patients with NS have either a significantly increased burden of protein-altering variants ("risk-alleles"), or a unique combination of them ("oligogenicity"), in a set of 21 genes implicated in Mendelian forms of NS. In 303 patients with NS enrolled in the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE), we performed targeted amplification paired with next-generation sequencing of 21 genes implicated in monogenic NS. We created a high-quality variant call set and compared it with a variant call set of the same genes in a reference population composed of 2,535 individuals from phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. We created both a "stringent" and a "relaxed" pathogenicity-filtering pipeline, applied them to both cohorts, and computed the burden of variants in the entire gene set per cohort, the burden of variants in the entire gene set per individual, the burden of variants

  18. No evidence for strong recent positive selection favoring the 7 repeat allele of VNTR in the DRD4 gene.

    PubMed

    Naka, Izumi; Nishida, Nao; Ohashi, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The human dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene contains a 48-bp variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) in exon 3, encoding the third intracellular loop of this dopamine receptor. The DRD4 7R allele, which seems to have a single origin, is commonly observed in various human populations and the nucleotide diversity of the DRD4 7R haplotype at the DRD4 locus is reduced compared to the most common DRD4 4R haplotype. Based on these observations, previous studies have hypothesized that positive selection has acted on the DRD4 7R allele. However, the degrees of linkage disequilibrium (LD) of the DRD4 7R allele with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the DRD4 locus have not been evaluated. In this study, to re-examine the possibility of recent positive selection favoring the DRD4 7R allele, we genotyped HapMap subjects for DRD4 VNTR, and conducted several neutrality tests including long range haplotype test and iHS test based on the extended haplotype homozygosity. Our results indicated that LD of the DRD4 7R allele was not extended compared to SNP alleles with the similar frequency. Thus, we conclude that the DRD4 7R allele has not been subjected to strong recent positive selection.

  19. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-04-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines.

  20. Allelic Diversity and Geographical Distribution of the Gene Encoding Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-3 in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sawaswong, Vorthon; Simpalipan, Phumin; Siripoon, Napaporn; Harnyuttanakorn, Pongchai; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) of malaria parasites play critical roles during the erythrocyte invasion and so are potential candidates for malaria vaccine development. However, because MSPs are often under strong immune selection, they can exhibit extensive genetic diversity. The gene encoding the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum displays 2 allelic types, K1 and 3D7. In Thailand, the allelic frequency of the P. falciparum msp-3 gene was evaluated in a single P. falciparum population in Tak at the Thailand and Myanmar border. However, no study has yet looked at the extent of genetic diversity of the msp-3 gene in P. falciparum populations in other localities. Here, we genotyped the msp-3 alleles of 63 P. falciparum samples collected from 5 geographical populations along the borders of Thailand with 3 neighboring countries (Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia). Our study indicated that the K1 and 3D7 alleles coexisted, but at different proportions in different Thai P. falciparum populations. K1 was more prevalent in populations at the Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders, whilst 3D7 was more prevalent at the Thailand-Laos border. Global analysis of the msp-3 allele frequencies revealed that proportions of K1 and 3D7 alleles of msp-3 also varied in different continents, suggesting the divergence of malaria parasite populations. In conclusion, the variation in the msp-3 allelic patterns of P. falciparum in Thailand provides fundamental knowledge for inferring the P. falciparum population structure and for the best design of msp-3 based malaria vaccines. PMID:25925176

  1. Allelic polymorphism in IL-1 beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) genes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bioque, G; Crusius, J B; Koutroubakis, I; Bouma, G; Kostense, P J; Meuwissen, S G; Peña, A S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that allele 2 of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene is over-represented in ulcerative colitis (UC). Healthy individuals carrying allele 2 of this gene have increased production of IL-1Ra protein. Since the final outcome of the biological effects of IL-1 beta may depend on the relative proportion of these two cytokines, we have studied if a TaqI polymorphism in the IL-1 beta gene, which is relevant to IL-1 beta protein production, may be involved in the genetic susceptibility to UC and Crohn's disease (CD), in association with the established IL-1Ra gene polymorphism. Polymorphisms in the closely linked genes for IL-1 beta and IL-1Ra were typed in 100 unrelated Dutch patients with UC, 79 with CD, and 71 healthy controls. The polymorphic regions in exon 5 of the IL-1 beta gene and in intron 2 of the IL-1Ra gene, were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. The IL-1 beta allele frequencies in UC and CD patients did not differ from those in healthy controls. In order to study if the IL-1 beta gene polymorphism might participate synergistically with the IL-1Ra gene polymorphism in susceptibility to UC and CD, individuals were distributed into carriers and non-carriers of allele 2 of the genes encoding IL-1 beta and IL-1Ra, in each of the patient groups and controls. Results indicated a significant association of this pair of genes, estimated by the odds ratio (OR) after performing Fisher's exact test, in the UC group (P = 0.023, OR = 2.81), as well as in the CD group (P = 0.01, OR = 3.79). Thus, non-carriers of IL-1 beta allele 2 were more often present in the subgroup of patients carrying the IL-1Ra allele 2. By contrast, no association of these alleles was detected in the group of healthy controls (P = 1.00, OR = 0.92). These results suggest that the IL-1 beta/IL-1Ra allelic cluster may participate in defining the biological basis of predisposition to chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:7586694

  2. Allele frequency data for 15 autosomal STR loci in eight Indonesian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Daniel, Runa; Sarre, Stephen D; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Sudoyo, Herawati; Suryadi, Helena; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Walsh, Simon J; Widodo, Putut T; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and cultural history can affect the genetic characteristics of a population and influences the frequency of different variants at a particular genetic marker (allele frequency). These characteristics directly influence the strength of forensic DNA evidence and make the availability of suitable allele frequency information for every discrete country or jurisdiction highly relevant. Population sub-structure within Indonesia has not been well characterised but should be expected given the complex geographical, linguistic and cultural architecture of the Indonesian population. Here we use forensic short tandem repeat (STR) markers to identify a number of distinct genetic subpopulations within Indonesia and calculate appropriate population sub-structure correction factors. This data represents the most comprehensive investigation of population sub-structure within Indonesia to date using these markers. The results demonstrate that significant sub-structure is present within the Indonesian population and must be accounted for using island specific allele frequencies and corresponding sub-structure correction factors in the calculation of forensic DNA match statistics.

  3. Allele frequencies of microsatellite loci for genetic characterization of a Sicilian bovine population.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, M; Reale, S; Lupo, T; Vitale, F; Caracappa, S

    2015-01-30

    Short tandem repeats are used as an effective method to trace DNA markers in genotyping. Using a standardized kit, we tested 11 microsatellite markers recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) in a sample of 495 Sicilian cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the allele frequencies in the Sicilian cattle population to provide a reference database and at the same time to assess the use of the ISAG microsatellite panel for pedigree analysis. DNA samples were collected from blood and amplified in an 11-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); PCR products were injected in a 3130 Genetic Analyzer. All loci showed high mean polymorphism information content (0.768), and the observed mean heterozygosity was less than the expected value (0.732 vs 0.794, respectively). The exact test for Hardy-Weinberg proportions, allele number, and inbreeding coefficient were calculated. Our results indicated that equilibrium was not always maintained. The observed mean homozygote value exceeded the expected value (132.81 vs 102.14), but no evidence for allele dropout was found. These results could be explained by a non-random mating; further studies using a larger number of animals could confirm or invalidate this hypothesis. The probability of identity and exclusion of a locus were also estimated and proved to be useful in paternity testing. The ISAG microsatellite panel is useful to screen the Sicilian bovine kinship. Currently, an allele frequency database is being constructed.

  4. Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Ceceña, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusié-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcón-Riquelme, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus. PMID:20848568

  5. dbQSNP: a database of SNPs in human promoter regions with allele frequency information determined by single-strand conformation polymorphism-based methods.

    PubMed

    Tahira, Tomoko; Baba, Shingo; Higasa, Koichiro; Kukita, Yoji; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2005-08-01

    We present a database, dbQSNP (http://qsnp.gen.kyushu-u.ac.jp/), that provides sequence and allele frequency information for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the promoter regions of human genes, which were defined by the 5' ends of full-length cDNA clones. We searched for the SNPs in these regions by sequencing or single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The allele frequencies of the identified SNPs in two ethnic groups were quantified by SSCP analyses of pooled DNA samples. The accuracy of our estimation is supported by strong correlations between the frequencies in our data and those in other databases for the same ethnic groups. The frequencies vary considerably between the two ethnic groups studied, suggesting the need for population-based collections and allele frequency determination of SNPs, in, e.g., association studies of diseases. We show profiles of SNP densities that are characteristic of transcription start site regions. A fraction of the SNPs revealed a significantly different allele frequency between the groups, suggesting differential selection of the genes involved.

  6. Vitamin D receptor alleles: Cloning and characterization of the VDR gene and RT-PCR of VDR cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Javed, A.A.; Huang, Y.; Bombard, A.T.

    1994-09-01

    Vitamin D{sub 3} receptors (VDR) function as regulators through the action of the ligand 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D{sub 3}. The receptor specifically finds its ligand and exerts it effect on the regulation of the expression of target genes. It has been shown that mutations in the VDR gene affect the function of the receptors and cause a corresponding disorder state. Recently, it has been reported that common allelic variations found normally in the Caucasian (Australian) population pose varying degrees of risk for osteoporosis. We present here the cloning of the VDR gene and RT-PCR of VDR cDNA. Studies are in progress to establish allele frequency in the Black, Hispanic and Caucasian populations to systematically study the influence of allele types and to develop a risk profile for osteoporosis. The present method for detection of various alleles is based on RFLP analysis. We are developing PCR-based methods for the rapid detection and typing of alleles.

  7. The joint allele frequency spectrum of multiple populations: a coalescent theory approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua

    2012-03-01

    The allele frequency spectrum is a series of statistics that describe genetic polymorphism, and is commonly used for inferring population genetic parameters and detecting natural selection. Population genetic theory on the allele frequency spectrum for a single population has been well studied using both coalescent theory and diffusion equations. Recently, the theory was extended to the joint allele frequency spectrum (JAFS) for three populations using diffusion equations and was shown to be very useful in inferring human demographic history. In this paper, I show that the JAFS can be analytically derived with coalescent theory for a basic model of two isolated populations and then extended to multiple populations and various complex scenarios, such as those involving population growth and bottleneck, migration, and positive selection. Simulation study is used to demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of the theoretical model. The coalescent theory-based approach for the JAFS can characterize the demographic history with comprehensive statistical models as the diffusion approach does, and in addition gains several novel advantages: the computational complexity of calculating the JAFS with coalescent theory is reduced, and thus it is feasible to analytically obtain the JAFS for multiple populations; the hitchhiking effect can be efficiently modeled in coalescent theory, enabling the development of methodologies for detecting selection via multi-population polymorphism data. As an alternative to the diffusion approximation approach, the coalescent theory for the JAFS also provides a foundation for population genetic inference with the advent of large-scale genomic polymorphism data.

  8. Detection of Allelic Frequency Differences between the Sexes in Humans: A Signature of Sexually Antagonistic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lucotte, Elise A.; Laurent, Romain; Heyer, Evelyne; Ségurel, Laure; Toupance, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Sexually antagonistic (SA) selection, a form of selection that can occur when both sexes have different fitness optima for a trait, is a major force shaping the evolution of organisms. A seminal model developed by Rice (Rice WR. 1984. Sex chromosomes and the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Evolution 38:735–742.) predicts that the X chromosome should be a hotspot for the accumulation of loci under SA selection as compared with the autosomes. Here, we propose a methodological framework designed to detect a specific signature of SA selection on viability, differences in allelic frequencies between the sexes. Applying this method on genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in human populations where no sex-specific population stratification could be detected, we show that there are overall significantly more SNPs exhibiting differences in allelic frequencies between the sexes on the X chromosome as compared with autosomes, supporting the predictions of Rice’s model. This pattern is consistent across populations and is robust to correction for potential biases such as differences in linkage disequilibrium, sample size, and genotyping errors between chromosomes. Although SA selection is not the only factor resulting in allelic frequency differences between the sexes, we further show that at least part of the identified X-linked loci is caused by such a sex-specific processes. PMID:27189992

  9. Rh phenotype, allele and haplotype frequencies among 51,857 blood donors in North India.

    PubMed

    Makroo, Raj; Gupta, Richa; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Rosamma, Nakamatathil L

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to provide information on the frequencies of Rh antigens, alleles, phenotypes, and haplotypes from our region in India and to compare them with those from other races. This observational study was conducted on blood donors from March 2009 to August 2011 using a fully automated system for Rh typing of blood cells. The data were collected and calculations done to determine the antigen, phenotypes, allele and haplotype frequencies. The chi square test was used for comparisons between the results of our study and those of other studies. A total of 51,857 donors were included in this study. The most common Rh antigen found was "e". DCCee was the most prevalent phenotype in our study with the phenotype distribution being significantly different between our study and other studies from different regions of the world. We have determined the prevalence of Rh antigens and Rh phenotypes in the North Indian blood donor population and derived the allele and haplotype frequencies in the same population. The Rh blood group distribution in this population was different from that in other populations.

  10. Adaptations to new environments in humans: the role of subtle allele frequency shifts.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Angela M; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Witonsky, David B; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2010-08-27

    Humans show tremendous phenotypic diversity across geographically distributed populations, and much of this diversity undoubtedly results from genetic adaptations to different environmental pressures. The availability of genome-wide genetic variation data from densely sampled populations offers unprecedented opportunities for identifying the loci responsible for these adaptations and for elucidating the genetic architecture of human adaptive traits. Several approaches have been used to detect signals of selection in human populations, and these approaches differ in the assumptions they make about the underlying mode of selection. We contrast the results of approaches based on haplotype structure and differentiation of allele frequencies to those from a method for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms strongly correlated with environmental variables. Although the first group of approaches tends to detect new beneficial alleles that were driven to high frequencies by selection, the environmental correlation approach has power to identify alleles that experienced small shifts in frequency owing to selection. We suggest that the first group of approaches tends to identify only variants with relatively strong phenotypic effects, whereas the environmental correlation methods can detect variants that make smaller contributions to an adaptive trait.

  11. New CODIS core loci allele frequencies for 96,400 Brazilian individuals.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Vitor R C; de Castro, Amanda M; Almeida, Vanessa C O; Malta, Frederico S V; Ferreira, Alessandro C S; Louro, Iúri D

    2014-11-01

    We have reported the allele frequencies of 15 STR loci, including the original 13 CODIS core loci, in over 100,000 Brazilian individuals. A new CODIS core loci has been proposed, but the recently established Brazilian Integrated Network of DNA Databases made a decision in 2010 to postpone the implementation of this new set of loci due to the lack of allele frequency data for the Brazilian population. We aimed to report allele frequencies of 20 loci, estimated from 96,400 Brazilian individuals undergoing paternity testing during 2011-2013. The percentage of missing data was less than 0.6% for all loci, except for CSF1PO (3.15%) and D7S820 (2.5%). The dropout rates estimated by the MicroDrop software were 0.013 for CSF1PO, 0.000037 for D7S820 and less than 0.000001 for other loci. Small missing data percentages and dropout rates reflect the high quality of the data.

  12. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 allele associations in an Albanian patient population with rheumatoid arthritis: correlations with the specific autoantibody markers and inter-population DRB1 allele frequency variability.

    PubMed

    Prifti-Kurti, Margarita; Nunes, José Manuel; Shyti, Erkena; Ylli, Zamira; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Sulcebe, Genc

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis and its specific autoantibodies varies in different populations. This variability depends on the genetic polymorphism of the immune response genes among which the HLA system plays a major role. In this context, we studied the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 first-level allele frequencies in 100 Albanian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and taking into account their rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticitrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) serologic subgroups, we compared them with the respective frequencies in a population of 191 Albanian individuals without known pathology. No differences were found between the controls and the RA patient group as a whole, but three statistically significant differences were found: an increase in DRB1*04 among ACPA+, RF+ and ACPA+/RF+ patients, a significant decrease in DRB1*11 among ACPA+/RF+ and also a decrease in DRB1*13 among RF+ patient subgroups. Comparing allele frequencies of putatively associated RA alleles in different European populations revealed a significant negative correlation between the RA predisposing DRB1*04 and protective DRB1*11 allele frequencies. A statistically significant correlation was also found between RA prevalence rates and DRB1*04 as well as DRB1*11 frequencies. The relatively low frequencies of DRB1*04 and high DRB1*11 in the Albanian population might explain the rather low positivity rate of ACPA and RF antibodies among the Albanian RA patients. These specific association patterns suggest that this first study of RA in an Albanian population should be followed up to include second level or higher definition of HLA alleles and to compare RA patterns among European populations.

  13. DEMETER DNA glycosylase establishes MEDEA polycomb gene self-imprinting by allele-specific demethylation.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Mary; Huh, Jin Hoe; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Penterman, Jon; Choi, Yeonhee; Harada, John J; Goldberg, Robert B; Fischer, Robert L

    2006-02-10

    MEDEA (MEA) is an Arabidopsis Polycomb group gene that is imprinted in the endosperm. The maternal allele is expressed and the paternal allele is silent. MEA is controlled by DEMETER (DME), a DNA glycosylase required to activate MEA expression, and METHYLTRANSFERASE I (MET1), which maintains CG methylation at the MEA locus. Here we show that DME is responsible for endosperm maternal-allele-specific hypomethylation at the MEA gene. DME can excise 5-methylcytosine in vitro and when expressed in E. coli. Abasic sites opposite 5-methylcytosine inhibit DME activity and might prevent DME from generating double-stranded DNA breaks. Unexpectedly, paternal-allele silencing is not controlled by DNA methylation. Rather, Polycomb group proteins that are expressed from the maternal genome, including MEA, control paternal MEA silencing. Thus, DME establishes MEA imprinting by removing 5-methylcytosine to activate the maternal allele. MEA imprinting is subsequently maintained in the endosperm by maternal MEA silencing the paternal allele.

  14. A Novel Dominant Transformer Allele of the Sex-Determining Gene Her-1 of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Trent, C.; Wood, W. B.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized a novel dominant allele of the sex-determining gene her-1 of Caenorhabditis elegans. This allele, called n695, results in the incomplete transformation of XX animals into phenotypic males. Previously characterized recessive her-1 alleles transform XO animals into phenotypic hermaphrodites. We have identified five new recessive her-1 mutations as intragenic suppressors of n695. Three of these suppressors are weak, temperature-sensitive alleles. We show that the recessive her-1 mutations are loss-of-function alleles, and that the her-1(n695) mutation results in a gain-of-function at the her-1 locus. The existence of dominant and recessive alleles that cause opposite phenotypic transformations demonstrates that the her-1 gene acts to control sexual identity in C. elegans. PMID:3220248

  15. Allelic drop-out in the LDLR gene affects mutation detection in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Laios, Eleftheria; Glynou, Kyriaki

    2008-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a monogenic disorder caused by mutations in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. We observed allelic drop-out during LDLR genotyping and aimed at redesigning mutation detection. The NanoChip microelectronic array technology and PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used. Allele drop-out caused false homozygous diagnoses and was overcome using PCR primers without polymorphisms in the primer binding site. This report presents the importance of allele drop-out in LDLR genotyping.

  16. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L.; Chiang, Jennifer H.; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  17. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes.

  18. Beyond orchids and dandelions: Testing the 5HTT “risky” allele for evidence of phenotypic capacitance and frequency dependent selection

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Dalton; Rauscher, Emily; Siegal, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of behaviorally deleterious genes in the human population poses an interesting question for population genetics: If certain alleles at these loci are deleterious, why have they survived in the population? We consider evidence for phenotypic capacitance and/or frequency dependent selection for an allele that has been putatively shown to have negative associations with human behaviors (the “short” 5-HTT promoter region allele) yet which has persisted in human and non-human primate populations. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we compare sibling and twin variation in depression by 5-HTT genotype (specified in several ways) and investigate sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. In support of the “orchid / dandelion” hypothesis, we find evidence that the short allele increases variation in phenotypes in response to environmental (or genetic) differences (i.e. acts as a perturbation of a phenotypic capacitor). Further, we also find some evidence that the effects of allelic variation at this locus are moderated by the genetic environment of the sibship unit (i.e. may be susceptible to frequency dependent selection). We discuss implications of these findings for genetic models in general, specifically with respect to stable unit treatment value assumption violations (i.e. non-independence of units of analysis). PMID:23701535

  19. No differences of butyrylcholinesterase protein activity and allele frequency in Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Keller, Stefanie; Michelis, Joan; Koehler, Niklas; Stransky, Elke; Becker, Clemens; Schulte, Claudia; Melms, Arthur; Gasser, Thomas; Berg, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) genotypes and protein (BuChE) activity, especially in combination with Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), have been investigated as risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease (AD) and may be associated with the rate of progression of cognitive decline. Despite similar pathologic (e.g. amyloid deposition) and neurochemical (e.g. cholinergic deficits) aspects between AD and Lewy body diseases (LBD), scarce data is obtainable about BChE genotypes and BuChE activity in LBD. We measured BuChE activity levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 114 LBD subjects (59 of them were demented) and 31 elderly controls. We found higher CSF BuChE activity in males compared to females, and a negative correlation of serum BuChE activity with age and cognitive function. Demented LBD patients, non-demented LBD patients and controls did not differ significantly with regard to serum and CSF BuChE activity. Furthermore, BChE K variant and ApoE4 allele frequencies were determined. The BChE K variant was significantly associated with lower serum activity; the same trend was observable in CSF. The subgroups did not differ significantly with regard to BChE K/ApoE4 occurrence. These data confirm and extend previous results on the relationship between BChE gene and BuChE activity, and argue rather against a major impact of BuChE on LBD-associated pathologies.

  20. Altered enzymatic activity and allele frequency of OMI/HTRA2 in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Westerlund, Marie; Behbahani, Homira; Gellhaar, Sandra; Forsell, Charlotte; Belin, Andrea Carmine; Anvret, Anna; Zettergren, Anna; Nissbrandt, Hans; Lind, Charlotta; Sydow, Olof; Graff, Caroline; Olson, Lars; Ankarcrona, Maria; Galter, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    The serine-protease OMI/HTRA2, required for several cellular processes, including mitochondrial function, autophagy, chaperone activity, and apoptosis, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Western blot quantification of OMI/HTRA2 in frontal cortex of patients with AD (n=10) and control subjects (n=10) in two separate materials indicated reduced processed (active, 35 kDa) OMI/HTRA2 levels, whereas unprocessed (50 kDa) enzyme levels were not significantly different between the groups. Interestingly, the specific protease activity of OMI/HTRA2 was found to be significantly increased in patients with AD (n=10) compared to matched control subjects (n=10) in frontal cortex in two separate materials. Comparison of OMI/HTRA2 mRNA levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus, two brain areas particularly affected by AD, indicated similar levels in patients with AD (n=10) and matched control subjects (n=10). In addition, we analyzed the occurrence of the OMI/HTRA2 variants A141S and G399S in Swedish case-control materials for AD and PD and found a weak association of A141S with AD, but not with PD. In conclusion, our genetic, histological, and biochemical findings give further support to an involvement of OMI/HTRA2 in the pathology of AD; however, further studies are needed to clarify the role of this gene in neurodegeneration.—Westerlund, M., Behbahani, H., Gellhaar, S., Forsell, C., Carmine Belin, A., Anvret, A., Zettergren, A., Nissbrandt, H., Lind, C., Sydow, O., Graff, C., Olson, L., Ankarcrona, M., Galter, D. Altered enzymatic activity and allele frequency of OMI/HTRA2 in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21163861

  1. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL underwent genotyping. In case of conflicting results, SERPINA1 gene sequencing was performed. Results: Of the 926 COPD patients studied, 85 had DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL, and 24 (2.6% of the study sample) had serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL. Genotype distribution in this subset of 24 patients was as follows: PI*MS, in 3 (12.5%); PI*MZ, in 13 (54.2%); PI*SZ, in 1 (4.2%); PI*SS, in 1 (4.2%); and PI*ZZ, in 6 (25.0%). In the sample as a whole, the overall prevalence of AATD was 2.8% and the prevalence of the PI*ZZ genotype (severe AATD) was 0.8% Conclusions: The prevalence of AATD in COPD patients in Brazil is similar to that found in most countries and reinforces the recommendation that AAT levels be measured in all COPD patients. PMID:27812629

  2. Consequences of selection for improving production traits on the frequency of deleterious alleles for fitness.

    PubMed

    Kearney, J F; Navarro, P; Haley, C S; Villanueva, B

    2009-03-01

    In this study the effect of artificial selection on BLUP EBV for production traits on the allele frequencies of a pleiotropic QTL affecting both production and disease susceptibility was investigated. Stochastic simulations were used to model artificial selection on a production trait that is controlled, in part, by a biallelic QTL that also controls susceptibility to disease. The QTL allele increasing production also increased susceptibility to disease. Different modes of action and proportions of variation accounted for by the QTL were assessed for the production trait. The main results indicated that alleles that confer susceptibility to the disease could be maintained in the population over a long period, depending on the mode of action of the QTL. In addition, the results of the study indicate that, under various conditions, it is possible to find pleiotropic QTL that control 2 traits despite these traits appearing to be uncorrelated. Therefore, in practice, an estimate of the genetic correlation between 2 traits may be misleading when the presence of such a QTL exists. The results of this study have implications for breeding programs. For example, if a pleiotropic QTL exists that favors heterozygotes for a production trait, it would be very difficult to remove disease susceptibility alleles via traditional selection methods.

  3. Wide allelic heterogeneity with predominance of large IDS gene complex rearrangements in a sample of Mexican patients with Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A; García-de Teresa, B; González-Del Angel, A; Berumen, J; Guardado-Estrada, M; Fernández-Hernández, L; Navarrete-Martínez, J I; Maza-Morales, M; Rius-Domínguez, R

    2016-05-01

    Hunter syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is caused by pathogenic variants in the IDS gene. This is the first study that examines the mutational spectrum in 25 unrelated Mexican MPSII families. The responsible genotype was identified in 96% of the families (24/25) with 10 novel pathogenic variants: c.133G>C, c.1003C>T, c.1025A>C, c.463_464delinsCCGTATAGCTGG, c.754_767del, c.1132_1133del, c.1463del, c.508-1G>C, c.1006+1G>T and c.(-217_103del). Extensive IDS gene deletions were identified in four patients; using DNA microarray analysis two patients showed the loss of the entire AFF2 gene, and epilepsy developed in only one of them. Wide allelic heterogeneity was noted, with large gene alterations (e.g. IDS/IDSP1 gene inversions, partial to extensive IDS deletions, and one chimeric IDS-IDSP1 allele) that occurred at higher frequencies than previously reported (36% vs 18.9-29%). The frequency of carrier mothers (80%) is consistent with previous descriptions (>70%). Carrier assignment allowed molecular prenatal diagnoses. Notably, somatic and germline mosaicism was identified in one family, and two patients presented thrombocytopenic purpura and pancytopenia after idursulfase enzyme replacement treatment. Our findings suggest a wide allelic heterogeneity in Mexican MPSII patients; DNA microarray analysis contributes to further delineation of the resulting phenotype for IDS and neighboring loci deletions.

  4. Allele frequency distribution for 15 autosomal STR loci in Afridi Pathan population of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sabahat; Ali, Shahnaz; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Haque, Ikramul

    2009-11-01

    Allele frequencies of the 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D3S1358, THO1, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D5S818 and FGA were determined in Afridi Pathan population of Uttar Pradesh, India. All the 15 STR loci studied were found to be highly polymorphic with respect to observed heterozygosity values. Adherence to the expectations of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was confirmed for all the loci with an exception of TPOX and FGA. The allele 12 in CSF1PO was found to be most frequent. The power of discrimination was found to be high ranging from a minimum of 0.858 for the locus CSFIPO to maximum of 0.962 for the locus FGA, thereby facilitating the validation and efficiency of these STR markers in human identification. Population differentiation test between the studied and neighboring populations revealed significant differences at several loci suggesting the endogamous nature of the studied population. To the best of our knowledge, Afridi Pathan population has not been explored genetically for generating forensic data on STR markers. Therefore, STR allele frequency data of this unique population is a valuable contribution to the existing DNA database on Indian populations.

  5. Serum lipid levels and M/L55 allele distribution of HDL paraoxonase gene in Saami and Finnish men.

    PubMed

    Malin, R; Lehtinen, S; Luoma, P; Näyhä, S; Hassi, J; Koivula, T; Lehtimäki, T

    2001-01-01

    Paraoxonase (PON) is an antioxidative enzyme, which eliminates lipid peroxides. The mutation in codon 55 of PON1 gene causes a change of methionine (M-allele) to leucine (L-allele) and influences PON activity. The Saami are a population living in the northern part of Fennoscandia. In previous studies their death rate from coronary artery disease (CAD) was found to be low. We compared PON M/L55 allele frequencies of 68 Saami and 68 Finnish men and related the PON genotypes to plasma lipid levels and to the levels of autoantibodies against oxidized LDL. The M/L55 genotypes were determined by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. ELISA was used to measure antibodies against oxidized LDL. The L- and M-allele frequencies were 64% and 36% in Saami population and 64% and 36% in Finnish men, respectively (p = NS, Fisher's exact test). There were also no significant differences in plasma lipid levels or in antibody levels against oxidized LDL between PON genotypes or between Saami and Finnish men. Our results indicate that the PON M/L55 genotype is not associated with plasma lipid levels or the levels of autoantibodies against oxidized LDL in these populations. The Saami men have the same PON M/L55 allele distribution as the Finnish men and the PON genotype might thus not be one factor protecting Saami against CAD.

  6. [High frequency of ancestral allele of the TJP1 polymorphism rs2291166 in Mexican population, conformational effect and applications in surgery and medicine].

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Topete-González, Luz Rosalba; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Mazariegos-Rubi, Manuel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra

    2016-01-01

    TJP1 gene encodes a ZO-1 protein that is required for the recruitment of occludins and claudins in tight junction, and is involved in cell polarisation. It has different variations, the frequency of which has been studied in different populations. In Mexico there are no studies of this gene. These are required because their polymorphisms can be used in studies associated with medicine and surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of alleles and genotypes of rs2291166 gene polymorphism TJP1 in Mexico Mestizos population, and to estimate the conformational effect of an amino acid change. A total of 473 individuals were included. The rs2291166 polymorphism was identified PASA PCR-7% PAGE, and stained with silver nitrate. The conformational effect of amino acid change was performed in silico, and was carried out with servers ProtPraram Tool and Search Database with Fasta. The most frequent allele in the two populations is the ancestral allele (T). A genotype distribution similar to other populations was found. The polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg, p>0.05. Changing aspartate to alanine produced a conformational change. The study reveals a high frequency of the ancestral allele at rs2291166 polymorphism in the Mexican population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide detection of allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Park, Yon Mi; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2014-11-10

    Allelic variations in gene expression influence many biological responses and cause phenotypic variations in humans. In this study, Illumina Human Exome BeadChips containing more than 240,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to identify changes in allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found 17 monoallelically expressed genes, 58 allelic imbalanced genes, and 7 genes showing allele substitution. In addition, we also detected 33 differentially expressed genes following LPS treatment in vitro using these human exome SNP chips. However, alterations in allelic gene expression following LPS treatment were detected in only three genes (MLXIPL, TNC, and MX2), which were observed in one cell line sample only, indicating that changes in allelic gene expression following LPS stimulation of liver cells are rare events. Among a total of 75 genes showing allelic expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, either monoallelic or imbalanced, 43 genes (57.33%) had expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data, indicating that high-density exome SNP chips are useful and reliable for studying allelic gene expression. Furthermore, most genes showing allelic expression were regulated by cis-acting mechanisms and were also significantly associated with several human diseases. Overall, our study provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with and without LPS stimulation and potential clues for the cause of human disease due to alterations in allelic gene expression.

  8. Analysis of HLA DQ alpha allele and genotype frequencies in populations from Florida.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Feuer, W J; Nippes, D C; Hutto, S C; Barnes, K S; Coffman, D; Livingston, S H; Ginsberg, L; Glidewell, D E

    1994-05-01

    HLA DQ alpha allele and genotype frequencies for Caucasian, African American, Haitian, and Hispanic populations in Florida have been estimated. The Florida laboratories involved in these studies collected donor samples from a variety of sites including clinical laboratories, victim and suspect standards, blood banks, county jail detainees, and laboratory personnel. We have determined that the Caucasian and African American DQ alpha genotype frequencies do not deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg expectations and as a result of this heterogeneity analyses, data from the four Florida Caucasian populations may be combined and data from the four Florida African American populations may be combined to form two large HLA DQ alpha genotype frequency databanks. Further, data from the Florida Haitian population may be combined with the Florida African American population. Comparison of the combined Florida Caucasian populations, combined Florida African American populations, the Palm Beach Sheriff's Office (PBSO) Hispanic, and PBSO Haitian population with other databases does not support combination because allele frequency distributions are heterogeneous.

  9. The non-equilibrium allele frequency spectrum in a Poisson random field framework.

    PubMed

    Kaj, Ingemar; Mugal, Carina F

    2016-10-01

    In population genetic studies, the allele frequency spectrum (AFS) efficiently summarizes genome-wide polymorphism data and shapes a variety of allele frequency-based summary statistics. While existing theory typically features equilibrium conditions, emerging methodology requires an analytical understanding of the build-up of the allele frequencies over time. In this work, we use the framework of Poisson random fields to derive new representations of the non-equilibrium AFS for the case of a Wright-Fisher population model with selection. In our approach, the AFS is a scaling-limit of the expectation of a Poisson stochastic integral and the representation of the non-equilibrium AFS arises in terms of a fixation time probability distribution. The known duality between the Wright-Fisher diffusion process and a birth and death process generalizing Kingman's coalescent yields an additional representation. The results carry over to the setting of a random sample drawn from the population and provide the non-equilibrium behavior of sample statistics. Our findings are consistent with and extend a previous approach where the non-equilibrium AFS solves a partial differential forward equation with a non-traditional boundary condition. Moreover, we provide a bridge to previous coalescent-based work, and hence tie several frameworks together. Since frequency-based summary statistics are widely used in population genetics, for example, to identify candidate loci of adaptive evolution, to infer the demographic history of a population, or to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanics of speciation events, the presented results are potentially useful for a broad range of topics.

  10. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor 4G allele frequency is associated with chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Katrancioglu, N; Manduz, S; Ozen, F; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Karahan, O; Ozdemir, O; Berkan, O

    2010-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a common disease associated with poor quality of life. Genetic polymorphisms causing coagulation abnormalities may account for some of the CVI pathogenesis. Type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is responsible for fibrinolytic system regulation, and plasma levels of PAI-1 are strongly correlated with PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism. The association between PAI-1 4G/5G gene polymorphism and CVI was investigated. In 34 consecutive patients with clinically overt CVI, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in three cases (8.8%); the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 28 (82.4%). In 34 age- and sex-matched controls, the PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism was detected in one case (2.9%) and the 4G/5G polymorphism was detected in 14 cases (41.2%). The PAI-1 4G allele was found significantly more frequently in CVI patients than in controls. The 4G allele was associated with a 3.25-fold increase in CVI risk. Thus, a relationship between CVI and the PAI-1 4G allele is apparent.

  11. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  12. Molecular definition of an allelic series of mutations disrupting the mouse Lmx1a (dreher) gene.

    PubMed

    Chizhikov, Victor; Steshina, Ekaterina; Roberts, Richard; Ilkin, Yesim; Washburn, Linda; Millen, Kathleen J

    2006-10-01

    Mice homozygous for the dreher (dr) mutation are characterized by pigmentation and skeletal abnormalities and striking behavioral phenotypes, including ataxia, vestibular deficits, and hyperactivity. The ataxia is associated with a cerebellar malformation that is remarkably similar to human Dandy-Walker malformation. Previously, positional cloning identified mutations in LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha gene (Lmx1a) in three dr alleles. Two of these alleles, however, are extinct and unavailable for further analysis. In this article we report a new spontaneous dr allele and describe the Lmx1a mutations in this and six additional dr alleles. Strikingly, deletion null, missense, and frameshift mutations in these alleles all cause similar cerebellar malformations, suggesting that all dr mutations analyzed to date are null alleles.

  13. [Prevalence of alleles of polymorphic variants Leu33Pro and Leu66Arg gene ITGB3 among inhabitants of Siberia].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, I A; Babushkina, N P; Minaĭcheva, L I; Markova, V V; Kulish, E V; Salakhov, R R; Makeeva, O A; Puzyrev, V P

    2013-08-01

    The frequency of the polymorphic variant T196C (Leu33Pro, rs5918) of ITGB3 gene was studied in several groups of inhabitants of Siberia, including pregnant women with reproductive disorders (n = 186), patients with acute coronary syndrome (n = 330), and population control (n = 858). The frequency of the rare PLA2 allele among residents of Tomsk and Kemerovo was 14.7 and 15.0% respectively. There were no differences in the allele and genotype frequencies of polymorphic variant between patients with acute coronary syndrome and the control group (p = 0.925, p = 0.622). The highest frequency of abnormal PLA2 allele (22.1%) and the PLA2/PLA2 genotype (8.8%) was observed among women, who had miscarried, which was significantly different from the frequency of this allele and genotype in the control group (14.7%, p = 0.017; 2.1%, p = 0.0009). Sequencing showed that all samples with the nonspecific band had the polymorphic rs5918 variant and rs36080296 mutations (T216G, Leu66Arg). The frequency of the rs36080296 mutation among the residents of Siberia was 0.51%. Among the women with reproductive disorders, the frequency of rs36080296 was 2.7%, while in the group who suffered from miscarriages, it was 4.4%; this was different from the frequency in the control group (0.08%, p = 0.2 x 10(-6)). The accumulation of mutations was also observed among men with acute coronary syndrome (0.6%), but the differences from the control group (0%) had no statistical significance.

  14. Large-scale profiling and identification of potential regulatory mechanisms for allelic gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robin Dong-Woo; Song, Min-Young; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2013-01-01

    Allelic variation in gene expression is common in humans and this variation is associated with phenotypic variation. In this study, we employed high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs to identify genes with allelic gene expression in cells from colorectal cancer cell lines. We found 2 monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2 and MYLK4), 32 genes with an allelic imbalance in their expression, and 13 genes showing allele substitution by RNA editing. Among a total of 34 allelically expressed genes in colorectal cancer cells, 15 genes (44.1%) were associated with cis-acting eQTL, indicating that large portions of allelically expressed genes are regulated by cis-acting mechanisms of gene expression. In addition, potential regulatory variants present in the proximal promoter regions of genes showing either monoallelic expression or allelic imbalance were not tightly linked with coding SNPs, which were detected with allelic gene expression. These results suggest that multiple rare variants could be involved in the cis-acting regulatory mechanism of allelic gene expression. In the comparison with allelic gene expression data from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) family B cells, 12 genes showed B-cell specific allelic imbalance and 1 noncoding SNP showed colorectal cancer cell-specific allelic imbalance. In addition, different patterns of allele substitution were observed between B cells and colorectal cancer cells. Overall, our study not only indicates that allelic gene expression is common in colorectal cancer cells, but our study also provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in colorectal cancer cells.

  15. Upper bounds on FST in terms of the frequency of the most frequent allele and total homozygosity: the case of a specified number of alleles.

    PubMed

    Edge, Michael D; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2014-11-01

    FST is one of the most frequently-used indices of genetic differentiation among groups. Though FST takes values between 0 and 1, authors going back to Wright have noted that under many circumstances, FST is constrained to be less than 1. Recently, we showed that at a genetic locus with an unspecified number of alleles, FST for two subpopulations is strictly bounded from above by functions of both the frequency of the most frequent allele (M) and the homozygosity of the total population (HT). In the two-subpopulation case, FST can equal one only when the frequency of the most frequent allele and the total homozygosity are 1/2. Here, we extend this work by deriving strict bounds on FST for two subpopulations when the number of alleles at the locus is specified to be I. We show that restricting to I alleles produces the same upper bound on FST over much of the allowable domain for M and HT, and we derive more restrictive bounds in the windows M∈[1/I,1/(I-1)) and HT∈[1/I,I/(I(2)-1)). These results extend our understanding of the behavior of FST in relation to other population-genetic statistics.

  16. SNP-based large-scale identification of allele-specific gene expression in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Young; Kim, Hye-Eun; Kim, Sun; Choi, Ick-Hwa; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2012-02-10

    Polymorphism and variations in gene expression provide the genetic basis for human variation. Allelic variation of gene expression, in particular, may play a crucial role in phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. To identify genes with allelic expression in human cells, we genotyped genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from 31 immortalized B cell lines from three Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) families using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips containing 13,900 exonic SNPs. We identified seven SNPs in five genes with monoallelic expression, 146 SNPs in 125 genes with allelic imbalance in expression with preferentially higher expression of one allele in a heterozygous individual. The monoallelically expressed genes (ERAP2, MDGA1, LOC644422, SDCCAG3P1 and CLTCL1) were regulated by cis-acting, non-imprinted differential allelic control. In addition, all monoallelic gene expression patterns and allelic imbalances in gene expression in B cells were transmitted from parents to offspring in the pedigree, indicating genetic transmission of allelic gene expression. Furthermore, frequent allele substitution, probably due to RNA editing, was also observed in 21 genes in 23 SNPs as well as in 48 SNPs located in regions containing no known genes. In this study, we demonstrated that allelic gene expression is frequently observed in human B cells, and SNP chips are very useful tools for detecting allelic gene expression. Overall, our data provide a valuable framework for better understanding allelic gene expression in human B cells.

  17. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic selection makes it possible to reduce pedigree-based inbreeding over best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) by increasing emphasis on own rather than family information. However, pedigree inbreeding might not accurately reflect loss of genetic variation and the true level of inbreeding due to changes in allele frequencies and hitch-hiking. This study aimed at understanding the impact of using long-term genomic selection on changes in allele frequencies, genetic variation and level of inbreeding. Methods Selection was performed in simulated scenarios with a population of 400 animals for 25 consecutive generations. Six genetic models were considered with different heritabilities and numbers of QTL (quantitative trait loci) affecting the trait. Four selection criteria were used, including selection on own phenotype and on estimated breeding values (EBV) derived using phenotype-BLUP, genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results For each selection criterion, hitch-hiking in the vicinity of the QTL appeared more extensive when accuracy of selection was higher and the number of QTL was lower. When inbreeding was measured by pedigree information, selection on genomic BLUP EBV resulted in lower levels of inbreeding than selection on phenotype BLUP EBV, but this did not always apply when inbreeding was measured by runs of homozygosity. Compared to genomic BLUP, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso led to less genetic drift, reduced loss of favourable alleles and more effectively controlled the rate of both pedigree and genomic inbreeding in all simulated scenarios. In addition, selection on EBV from Bayesian Lasso showed a higher selection differential for mendelian sampling terms than selection on

  18. HLA genes in Cubans and the detection of Amerindian alleles.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Roberto; Moscoso, Juan; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Manuel; Suarez, Jose; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Pacheco, Remedios; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2007-03-01

    Caribbean Islands including Cuba were first inhabited by Meso-American and later by Arawak-speaking Amerindians from nowadays Venezuela. Spanish invaders brought to almost extinction to the Amerindian population after 1492. Black slaves from West Africa were taken into Cuba by Europeans. The degree of admixture among populations is approached. HLA alleles were studied by DNA techniques. Comparison with other worldwide populations (a total of 14.094 chromosomes) included genetic distances, Neighbour-Joining dendrograms, correspondence analyses and calculation of extended haplotypes. While African-European HLA features were clearly found, Amerindian HLA characteristics are less evident, indicating that Amerindian devastation was particularly marked after 1492 AD. However, typical Amerindian alleles have been found in our Cuban sample, i.e. DRB1*0403, DRB1*0404, DRB1*0407, DRB1*0411, DRB1*0802 and DRB1*1602. The presence of Amerindian alleles in Cubans [corrected] may have a bear in the making up of transplantation registries (both for bone marrow and solid organ transplantation) at the regional level and also be important for epidemiological studies of diseases linked to HLA.

  19. A new insight into CFTR allele frequency in Brazil through next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Luisa M; Ribeiro, Roberto; Niewiadonski, Vivian D T; Sabino, Ester; Yamamoto, Guilherme L; Bertola, Débora R; Gaburo, Nelson; da Silva Filho, Luiz Vicente R F

    2017-10-01

    As of 2013, fewer than 20% of patients in the Brazilian CF Registry had two CFTR mutations identified. The aim of this study was to sequence the coding region of the CFTR in Brazilian CF patients and determine the frequency of mutations in this cohort. Patients with CF and those with suspected atypical CF or CFTR-related disorders were invited to enroll. Total DNA was extracted from blood samples, quantified, and purified. Library preparation was performed using Ion Xpress™ Plus gDNA and Amplicon Library preparation kits (Life Technologies), as well as sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform (Life Technologies). A total of 141 patients were enrolled, and 45 mutations were identified. Among 126 CF patients, we identified mutations in 97.2% of alleles. The three most common mutations were F508del, G542X, and 3120 + 1G->A. Five novel pathogenic mutations were also identified. Next generation sequencing (NGS) allowed the identification of mutations in most CF alleles and confirmed allelic heterogeneity in our population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison of allele frequencies of eight STR loci from Argentinian Amerindian and European populations.

    PubMed

    Sala, A; Penacino, G; Corach, D

    1998-10-01

    Eight STR systems (THO1, FABP, VWA, FES/FPS, HPRTB, F13A1, CSF1PO, and D6S366) were investigated in different ethnic groups of Argentina. Allele and genotype frequencies, power of exclusion, and discriminative power were investigated. Hardy-Weinberg expectations were calculated from heterozygosity levels. FST and G tests demonstrated that significant differences exist among the investigated populations for some of the eight STRs markers. The Wichi Indians are clearly separated from the Mapuche and Tehuelche, who in turn are closer to the European population, suggesting non-Amerindian admixture.

  1. Using Linkage Analysis to Detect Gene-Gene Interaction by Stratifying Family Data on Known Disease, or Disease-Associated, Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Barbara; Greenberg, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Detecting gene-gene interaction in complex diseases is a major challenge for common disease genetics. Most interaction detection approaches use disease-marker associations and such methods have low power and unknown reliability in real data. We developed and tested a powerful linkage-analysis-based gene-gene interaction detection strategy based on conditioning the family data on a known disease-causing allele or disease-associated marker allele. We computer-generated multipoint linkage data for a disease caused by two epistatically interacting loci (A and B). We examined several two-locus epistatic inheritance models: dominant-dominant, dominant-recessive, recessive-dominant, recessive-recessive. At one of the loci (A), there was a known disease-related allele. We stratified the family data on the presence of this allele, eliminating family members who were without it. This elimination step has the effect of raising the “penetrance” at the second locus (B). We then calculated the lod score at the second locus (B) and compared the pre- and post-stratification lod scores at B. A positive difference indicated interaction. We also examined if it was possible to detect interaction with locus B based on a disease-marker association (instead of an identified disease allele) at locus A. We also tested whether the presence of genetic heterogeneity would generate false positive evidence of interaction. The power to detect interaction for a known disease allele was 60–90%. The probability of false positives, based on heterogeneity, was low. Decreasing linkage disequilibrium between the disease and marker at locus A decreased the likelihood of detecting interaction. The allele frequency of the associated marker made little difference to the power. PMID:24690899

  2. Description and Power Analysis of Two Tests for Detecting Recent Population Bottlenecks from Allele Frequency Data

    PubMed Central

    Cornuet, J. M.; Luikart, G.

    1996-01-01

    When a population experiences a reduction of its effective size, it generally develops a heterozygosity excess at selectively neutral loci, i.e., the heterozygosity computed from a sample of genes is larger than the heterozygosity expected from the number of alleles found in the sample if the population were at mutation drift equilibrium. The heterozygosity excess persists only a certain number of generations until a new equilibrium is established. Two statistical tests for detecting a heterozygosity excess are described. They require measurements of the number of alleles and heterozygosity at each of several loci from a population sample. The first test determines if the proportion of loci with heterozygosity excess is significantly larger than expected at equilibrium. The second test establishes if the average of standardized differences between observed and expected heterozygosities is significantly different from zero. Type I and II errors have been evaluated by computer simulations, varying sample size, number of loci, bottleneck size, time elapsed since the beginning of the bottleneck and level of variability of loci. These analyses show that the most useful markers for bottleneck detection are those evolving under the infinite allele model (IAM) and they provide guidelines for selecting sample sizes of individuals and loci. The usefulness of these tests for conservation biology is discussed. PMID:8978083

  3. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2015-10-01

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  4. Identification of novel alleles of the rice blast resistance gene Pi54.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2015-10-26

    Rice blast is one of the most devastating rice diseases and continuous resistance breeding is required to control the disease. The rice blast resistance gene Pi54 initially identified in an Indian cultivar confers broad-spectrum resistance in India. We explored the allelic diversity of the Pi54 gene among 885 Indian rice genotypes that were found resistant in our screening against field mixture of naturally existing M. oryzae strains as well as against five unique strains. These genotypes are also annotated as rice blast resistant in the International Rice Genebank database. Sequence-based allele mining was used to amplify and clone the Pi54 allelic variants. Nine new alleles of Pi54 were identified based on the nucleotide sequence comparison to the Pi54 reference sequence as well as to already known Pi54 alleles. DNA sequence analysis of the newly identified Pi54 alleles revealed several single polymorphic sites, three double deletions and an eight base pair deletion. A SNP-rich region was found between a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and the nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain. Together, the newly identified Pi54 alleles expand the allelic series and are candidates for rice blast resistance breeding programs.

  5. Characterization of allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene MAO-A in trophectoderm cells of bovine embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A R; Aguiar Filho, L F C; Sousa, R V; Sartori, R; Franco, M M

    2015-10-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may affect epigenetic mechanisms and alter the expression of genes related to embryo development and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). We characterized allele-specific expression of the X-linked gene monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) in the trophectoderm (TF) of embryos produced by SCNT. Total RNA was isolated from individual biopsies (N = 25), and the allele-specific expression assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Both paternal and maternal alleles were expressed in the trophectoderm. However, a higher frequency of the mono-allelic expression of a specific allele was observed (N = 17; 68%), with the remaining samples showing the presence of mRNA from both alleles (N = 8; 32%). Considering that MAO-A is subject to XCI in bovine, our results suggest that SCNT may influence XCI because neither an imprinted (mono-allelic expression in all samples) nor a random (presence of mRNA from both alleles in all samples) pattern of XCI was observed in TF. Due to the importance of XCI in mammalian embryo development and its sensitivity to in vitro conditions, X-linked genes subject to XCI are candidates for use in the development of embryo quality molecular markers for assisted reproduction.

  6. Identification of alleles of carotenoid pathway genes important for zeaxanthin accumulation in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Uitdewilligen, Jan G. A. M. L.; Kloosterman, Bjorn A.; Hutten, Ronald C. B.; Visser, Richard G. F.; van Eck, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the genetics and molecular biology of orange flesh colour in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). To this end the natural diversity in three genes of the carotenoid pathway was assessed by SNP analyses. Association analysis was performed between SNP haplotypes and flesh colour phenotypes in diploid and tetraploid potato genotypes. We observed that among eleven beta-carotene hydroxylase 2 (Chy2) alleles only one dominant allele has a major effect, changing white into yellow flesh colour. In contrast, none of the lycopene epsilon cyclase (Lcye) alleles seemed to have a large effect on flesh colour. Analysis of zeaxanthin epoxidase (Zep) alleles showed that all (diploid) genotypes with orange tuber flesh were homozygous for one specific Zep allele. This Zep allele showed a reduced level of expression. The complete genomic sequence of the recessive Zep allele, including the promoter, was determined, and compared with the sequence of other Zep alleles. The most striking difference was the presence of a non-LTR retrotransposon sequence in intron 1 of the recessive Zep allele, which was absent in all other Zep alleles investigated. We hypothesise that the presence of this large sequence in intron 1 caused the lower expression level, resulting in reduced Zep activity and accumulation of zeaxanthin. Only genotypes combining presence of the dominant Chy2 allele with homozygosity for the recessive Zep allele produced orange-fleshed tubers that accumulated large amounts of zeaxanthin. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-010-9647-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20490894

  7. Lower Frequency of HLA-DRB1 Type 1 Diabetes Risk Alleles in Pediatric Patients with MODY

    PubMed Central

    López-Euba, Tamara; Velayos, Teresa; Martínez de LaPiscina, Idoia; Bilbao, José Ramón; Rica, Itxaso; Castaño, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes in a cohort of pediatric patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of MODY. Materials and Methods 160 families with a proband diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 74 families with a molecular diagnosis of MODY (61 GCK-MODY and 13 HNF1A-MODY) were categorized at high definition for HLA-DRB1 locus. According to the presence or absence of the susceptible HLA-DRB1 alleles for type 1 diabetes, we considered three different HLA-DRB1 genotypes: 0 risk alleles (no DR3 no DR4); 1 risk allele (DR3 or DR4); 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4). Results Compared with type 1 diabetes, patients with MODY carried higher frequency of 0 risk alleles, OR 22.7 (95% CI: 10.7–48.6) and lower frequency of 1 or 2 risk alleles, OR 0.53 (95% CI: 0.29–0.96) and OR 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02–0.18), respectively. Conclusions The frequency of HLA-DRB1 risk alleles for type 1 diabetes is significantly lower in patients with MODY. In children and adolescents with diabetes, the presence of 2 risk alleles (DR3 and/or DR4) reduces the probability of MODY diagnosis, whereas the lack of risk alleles increases it. Therefore, we might consider that HLA-DRB1 provides additional information for the selection of patients with high probability of monogenic diabetes. PMID:28052112

  8. Initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis poplar in a field population of Chrysomela tremulae.

    PubMed Central

    Génissel, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Courtin, Claudine; Pilate, Gilles; Lorme, Philippe; Bourguet, Denis

    2003-01-01

    Globally, the estimated total area planted with transgenic plants producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins was 12 million hectares in 2001. The risk of target pests becoming resistant to these toxins has led to the implementation of resistance-management strategies. The efficiency and sustainability of these strategies, including the high-dose plus refuge strategy currently recommended for North American maize, depend on the initial frequency of resistance alleles. In this study, we estimated the initial frequencies of alleles conferring resistance to transgenic Bt poplars producing Cry3A in a natural population of the poplar pest Chrysomela tremulae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We used the F(2) screen method developed for detecting resistance alleles in natural pest populations. At least three parents of the 270 lines tested were heterozygous for a major Bt resistance allele. We estimated mean resistance-allele frequency for the period 1999-2001 at 0.0037 (95% confidence interval = 0.00045-0.0080) with a detection probability of 90%. These results demonstrate that (i) the F(2) screen method can be used to detect major alleles conferring resistance to Bt-producing plants in insects and (ii) the initial frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Bt toxin can be close to the highest theoretical values that are expected prior to the use of Bt plants if considering fitness costs and typical mutation rates. PMID:12737656

  9. CYP2C9 allelic variants and frequencies in a pediatric sickle cell disease cohort: implications for NSAIDs pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jaja, Cheedy; Patel, Niren; Scott, Stuart A; Gibson, Robert; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2014-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used to treat pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are metabolized by the CYP2C9 enzyme. Racial differences in CYP2C9 allele frequencies impact NSAIDs efficacy and safety. We determined the frequencies of CYP2C9 alleles in an African American pediatric SCD cohort. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 30 patients aged between 7 and 17 years. Genotyping of nine CYP2C9 alleles (*1,*2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *8, *11, and *13) was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR assays and the Tag-It™ Mutation Detection System. The wild type *1 allele frequency was 0.850. The most common variant allele detected was CYP2C9*8 (0.067). The combined frequency of the *2, *5, *6, *8, and *11 variants was 0.151. Seventy percent of the study cohort were predicted extensive metabolizers (*1/*1) and 30% were intermediate metabolizers due mainly to the *1/*8 genotype. Analysis of CYP2C9 using an expanded assay panel facilitated improved classification of predicted drug metabolic phenotypes in our cohort. However, the pharmacokinetic effects of the CYP2C9*5,*6,*8, and *11 alleles on NSAIDs metabolism has not been evaluated and underscores the need for studies on substrate-specific effects of variant alleles common in populations with genetic susceptibility to SCD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. CYP2C9 Allelic Variants and Frequencies in a Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease Cohort: Implications for NSAIDs Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niren; Scott, Stuart A.; Gibson, Robert; Kutlar, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used to treat pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are metabolized by the CYP2C9 enzyme. Racial differences in CYP2C9 allele frequencies impact NSAIDs efficacy and safety. We determined the frequencies of CYP2C9 alleles in an African American pediatric SCD cohort. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 30 patients aged between 7 and 17 years. Genotyping of nine CYP2C9 alleles (*1,*2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *8, *11, and *13) was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism‐PCR assays and the Tag‐It™ Mutation Detection System. The wild type *1 allele frequency was 0.850. The most common variant allele detected was CYP2C9*8 (0.067). The combined frequency of the *2, *5, *6, *8, and *11 variants was 0.151. Seventy percent of the study cohort were predicted extensive metabolizers (*1/*1) and 30% were intermediate metabolizers due mainly to the *1/*8 genotype. Analysis of CYP2C9 using an expanded assay panel facilitated improved classification of predicted drug metabolic phenotypes in our cohort. However, the pharmacokinetic effects of the CYP2C9*5,*6,*8, and *11 alleles on NSAIDs metabolism has not been evaluated and underscores the need for studies on substrate‐specific effects of variant alleles common in populations with genetic susceptibility to SCD. PMID:24889181

  11. Extent of differential allelic expression of candidate breast cancer genes is similar in blood and breast.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana-Teresa; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Lee, Alvin J X; O'Reilly, Martin; Jones, Linda; Caldas, Carlos; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2009-01-01

    Normal gene expression variation is thought to play a central role in inter-individual variation and susceptibility to disease. Regulatory polymorphisms in cis-acting elements result in the unequal expression of alleles. Differential allelic expression (DAE) in heterozygote individuals could be used to develop a new approach to discover regulatory breast cancer susceptibility loci. As access to large numbers of fresh breast tissue to perform such studies is difficult, a suitable surrogate test tissue must be identified for future studies. We measured differential allelic expression of 12 candidate genes possibly related to breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA1, BRCA2, C1qA, CCND3, EMSY, GPX1, GPX4, MLH3, MTHFR, NBS1, TP53 and TRXR2) in breast tissue (n = 40) and fresh blood (n = 170) of healthy individuals and EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (n = 19). Differential allelic expression ratios were determined by Taqman assay. Ratio distributions were compared using t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test, for mean ratios and variances respectively. We show that differential allelic expression is common among these 12 candidate genes and is comparable between breast and blood (fresh and transformed lymphoblasts) in a significant proportion of them. We found that eight out of nine genes with DAE in breast and fresh blood were comparable, as were 10 out of 11 genes between breast and transformed lymphoblasts. Our findings support the use of differential allelic expression in blood as a surrogate for breast tissue in future studies on predisposition to breast cancer.

  12. Allelic polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions of HLA-DQB genes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Class II genes of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are highly polymorphic. Allelic variation of structural genes provides diversity in immune cell interactions, contributing to the formation of the T cell repertoire and to susceptibility to certain autoimmune diseases. We now report that allelic polymorphism also exists in the promoter and upstream regulatory regions (URR) of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes. Nucleotide sequencing of these regulatory regions of seven alleles of the DQB locus reveals a number of allele-specific polymorphisms, some of which lie in functionally critical consensus regions thought to be highly conserved in class II promoters. These sequence differences also correspond to allelic differences in binding of nuclear proteins to the URR. Fragments of the URR of two DQB alleles were analyzed for binding to nuclear proteins extracted from human B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B- LCL). Gel retardation assays showed substantially different banding patterns to the two promoters, including prominent variation in nuclear protein binding to the partially conserved X box regions and a novel upstream polymorphic sequence element. Comparison of these two polymorphic alleles in a transient expression system demonstrated a marked difference in their promoter strengths determined by relative abilities to initiate transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in human B-LCL. Shuttling of URR sequences between alleles showed that functional variation corresponded to both the X box and upstream sequence polymorphic sites. These findings identify an important source of MHC class II diversity, and suggest the possibility that such regulatory region polymorphisms may confer allelic differences in expression, inducibility, and/or tissue specificity of class II molecules. PMID:1985121

  13. Allele frequencies for 13 STRs loci in a Western Anatolia population and their forensic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Baransel Isir, Aysun; Ozkorkmaz, Abdulmuttalip; Pehlivan, Sacide

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that STRs have become powerful tools in forensic case work. To profile DNA samples from 104 Turkish males for 13 autosomal, STR markers intended for human identification purposes and to estimate the allele frequency distribution in forensic cases in a Turkish population. Thirteen autosomal STR loci, namely D3S1358, D2S1338, D16S539, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, TH01, D13S317, D7S820, CSF1PO, TPOX, D5S818 and FGA, were analysed in a sample of 104 healthy and unrelated Turkish individuals who have been living in the city of İzmir. All loci were amplified by using AmpFlSTR Identifier Kit. Genetic analysis was carried out on an ABI PRISM 310 Genetic Analyser. For each locus, 6-15 alleles were found with frequencies ranging from 0.005-0.514 and heterozygosities ranging from 0.686-0.868. The PIC value was highly significant (0.999). The 13 STR loci in the AmpFlSTR Identifier Kit are suitable for forensic identification and paternity tests due to high heterozygosity. The observed PD value is sufficiently high for human identification purposes. In conclusion, the 13 STR loci seem to be useful markers for personal identification and forensic case work in the Turkish population. The results also demonstrate the importance of region-specific studies.

  14. Allele frequencies for 15 autosomal STR loci in Fars province population, southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Hedjazi, Arya; Nikbakht, Afrouz; Hosseini, Maryam; Hoseinzadeh, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid

    2013-07-01

    Allele frequency data at 15 short tandem repeat loci, D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, THO1, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, VWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA have been determined for unrelated individuals in a population sample of Iranian Fars individuals. With exception of the D13S317 (P-value=0.0458) and TPOX (P-value=0.0477), no deviation from HWE were found in the study population using the exact test. The most discriminating loci were FGA (PD=0.965) and D2S1338 (PD=0.964). These data can be used for estimating the frequency of short tandem repeat profiles in a population of Fars province individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    The site frequency spectrum (SFS) has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the “phylogenetically-conditioned SFS” or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans. PMID:27977673

  16. Allelic inclusion in a pre-B-cell line that generates immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, G; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1987-01-01

    In a pre-B-cell line that rearranges its heavy chain gene segments in vitro, we found that the rate of productive rearrangement on one allele was not influenced by the presence of heavy chain protein encoded by the other allele. This shows that allelic exclusion of heavy chain genes is not regulated at the genetic level. Images PMID:3103122

  17. Integrating the genetic and physical maps of Arabidopsis thaliana: identification of mapped alleles of cloned essential (EMB) genes.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David; Sweeney, Colleen; Muralla, Rosanna

    2009-10-08

    The classical genetic map of Arabidopsis includes more than 130 genes with an embryo-defective (emb) mutant phenotype. Many of these essential genes remain to be cloned. Hundreds of additional EMB genes have been cloned and catalogued (www.seedgenes.org) but not mapped. To facilitate EMB gene identification and assess the current level of saturation, we updated the classical map, compared the physical and genetic locations of mapped loci, and performed allelism tests between mapped (but not cloned) and cloned (but not mapped) emb mutants with similar chromosome locations. Two hundred pairwise combinations of genes located on chromosomes 1 and 5 were tested and more than 1100 total crosses were screened. Sixteen of 51 mapped emb mutants examined were found to be disrupted in a known EMB gene. Alleles of a wide range of published EMB genes (YDA, GLA1, TIL1, AtASP38, AtDEK1, EMB506, DG1, OEP80) were discovered. Two EMS mutants isolated 30 years ago, T-DNA mutants with complex insertion sites, and a mutant with an atypical, embryo-specific phenotype were resolved. The frequency of allelism encountered was consistent with past estimates of 500 to 1000 EMB loci. New EMB genes identified among mapped T-DNA insertion mutants included CHC1, which is required for chromatin remodeling, and SHS1/AtBT1, which encodes a plastidial nucleotide transporter similar to the maize Brittle1 protein required for normal endosperm development. Two classical genetic markers (PY, ALB1) were identified based on similar map locations of known genes required for thiamine (THIC) and chlorophyll (PDE166) biosynthesis. The alignment of genetic and physical maps presented here should facilitate the continued analysis of essential genes in Arabidopsis and further characterization of a broad spectrum of mutant phenotypes in a model plant.

  18. Allele frequency distribution of CYP2C9 2 and CYP2C9 3 polymorphisms in six Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Sandoval-García, Emmanuel; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; González-Ibarra, Miriam; Solano-Solano, Gloria; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A; Parra, Esteban J; Cruz, Miguel; Valladares-Salgado, Adán

    2013-07-10

    Allele frequency differences of functional CYP2C9 polymorphisms are responsible for some of the variation in drug response observed in human populations. The most relevant CYP2C9 functional variants are CYP2C9*2 (rs1799853) and CYP2C9 3 (rs1057910). These polymorphisms show variation in allele frequencies among different population groups. The present study aimed to analyze these polymorphisms in 947 Mexican-Mestizo from Mexico City and 483 individuals from five indigenous Mexican populations: Nahua, Teenek, Tarahumara, Purepecha and Huichol. The CYP2C9*2 allele frequencies in the Mestizo, Nahua and Teenek populations were 0.051, 0.007 and 0.005, respectively. As for CYP2C9 3, the allelic frequencies in the Mestizo, Nahua and Teenek populations were 0.04, 0.005 and 0.005, respectively. The CYP2C9 2 and CYP2C9 3 alleles were not observed in the Tarahumara, Purepecha and Huichol populations. These findings are in agreement with previous studies reporting very low allele frequencies for these polymorphisms in American Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Allelic gene expression imbalance of bovine IGF2, LEP and CCL2 genes in liver, kidney and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Olbromski, R; Siadkowska, E; Zelazowska, B; Zwierzchowski, L

    2013-02-01

    Allelic expression imbalance (AEI) is an important genetic factor being the cause of differences in phenotypic traits that can be heritable. Studying AEI can be useful in searching for factors that modulate gene expression and help to understand molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic changes. Although it was commonly recognized in many species and we know many genes show allelic expression imbalance, this phenomena was not studied on a larger scale in cattle. Using the pyrosequencing method we analyzed a set of 29 bovine genes in order to find those that have preferential allelic expression. The study was conducted in three tissues: liver, pituitary and kindey. Out of the studied group of genes 3 of them-LEP (leptin), IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2), CCL2 (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2) showed allelic expression imbalance.

  20. The fear gene stathmin alleles generated heterosis on feed efficiency parameters in Peking ducks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Hong; Zhang, Hai Yan; Zhang, Chun Lei; Chen, Hong; Fang, Xing Tang; Zhang, Yun Sheng; Hou, Shui Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Stathmin is an inhibitor of microtubule formation, as highly expressed in the lateral nucleus (LA) of the amygdala as well as in the thalamic and cortical structures that send information to the LA about the learned and innate fear. So we assume that STMN1 genetic variation may also affect the physical activity so as to influence the Residual Feed Intake (RFI) of duck. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in duck Stathmin gene were screened by sequencing and genotyped by restriction endonuclease Msp I, EcoR I, Xho I, Taq I, EcoR II. A total of five SNPs (c.187 -15G > A, c.187 -110T > C, c.379 -95G > A, c.379 -318C > T, c.426 C > T) were detected in duck STMN1 gene. The c.187 -15G > A is near the 3' splice site of intron 2, which has a putative effect on the STMN1 pre-mRNA secondary structures. The c.187 -15G > A genotypes had significant effect on RFI of Peking drakes (P < 0.01). Individuals with heterozygous genotypes were more productive than that with homozygous genotypes, which suggested a molecular heterosis in c.187 -15 alleles on RFI. The current study is the first step to confirm the relationship between STMN1 gene polymorphisms and RFI. Supplemental material is available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Animal Biotechnology for a figure of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs and table about frequencies of haploype.

  1. Gene expression allelic imbalance in ovine brown adipose tissue impacts energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Shila; Vuocolo, Tony; Morrison, Janna L; Nicholas, Lisa M; McMillen, Isabella C; Yang, Jean Y H; Buckley, Michael J; Tellam, Ross L

    2017-01-01

    Heritable trait variation within a population of organisms is largely governed by DNA variations that impact gene transcription and protein function. Identifying genetic variants that affect complex functional traits is a primary aim of population genetics studies, especially in the context of human disease and agricultural production traits. The identification of alleles directly altering mRNA expression and thereby biological function is challenging due to difficulty in isolating direct effects of cis-acting genetic variations from indirect trans-acting genetic effects. Allele specific gene expression or allelic imbalance in gene expression (AI) occurring at heterozygous loci provides an opportunity to identify genes directly impacted by cis-acting genetic variants as indirect trans-acting effects equally impact the expression of both alleles. However, the identification of genes showing AI in the context of the expression of all genes remains a challenge due to a variety of technical and statistical issues. The current study focuses on the discovery of genes showing AI using single nucleotide polymorphisms as allelic reporters. By developing a computational and statistical process that addressed multiple analytical challenges, we ranked 5,809 genes for evidence of AI using RNA-Seq data derived from brown adipose tissue samples from a cohort of late gestation fetal lambs and then identified a conservative subgroup of 1,293 genes. Thus, AI was extensive, representing approximately 25% of the tested genes. Genes associated with AI were enriched for multiple Gene Ontology (GO) terms relating to lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function and the extracellular matrix. These functions suggest that cis-acting genetic variations causing AI in the population are preferentially impacting genes involved in energy homeostasis and tissue remodelling. These functions may contribute to production traits likely to be under genetic selection in the population.

  2. Gene expression allelic imbalance in ovine brown adipose tissue impacts energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfar, Shila; Vuocolo, Tony; Morrison, Janna L.; Nicholas, Lisa M.; McMillen, Isabella C.; Yang, Jean Y. H.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Heritable trait variation within a population of organisms is largely governed by DNA variations that impact gene transcription and protein function. Identifying genetic variants that affect complex functional traits is a primary aim of population genetics studies, especially in the context of human disease and agricultural production traits. The identification of alleles directly altering mRNA expression and thereby biological function is challenging due to difficulty in isolating direct effects of cis-acting genetic variations from indirect trans-acting genetic effects. Allele specific gene expression or allelic imbalance in gene expression (AI) occurring at heterozygous loci provides an opportunity to identify genes directly impacted by cis-acting genetic variants as indirect trans-acting effects equally impact the expression of both alleles. However, the identification of genes showing AI in the context of the expression of all genes remains a challenge due to a variety of technical and statistical issues. The current study focuses on the discovery of genes showing AI using single nucleotide polymorphisms as allelic reporters. By developing a computational and statistical process that addressed multiple analytical challenges, we ranked 5,809 genes for evidence of AI using RNA-Seq data derived from brown adipose tissue samples from a cohort of late gestation fetal lambs and then identified a conservative subgroup of 1,293 genes. Thus, AI was extensive, representing approximately 25% of the tested genes. Genes associated with AI were enriched for multiple Gene Ontology (GO) terms relating to lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function and the extracellular matrix. These functions suggest that cis-acting genetic variations causing AI in the population are preferentially impacting genes involved in energy homeostasis and tissue remodelling. These functions may contribute to production traits likely to be under genetic selection in the population. PMID:28665992

  3. Effects of sequence variation on differential allelic transcription factor occupancy and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Timothy E.; Gertz, Jason; Pauli, Florencia; Kucera, Katerina S.; Varley, Katherine E.; Newberry, Kimberly M.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Mortazavi, Ali; Williams, Brian A.; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E.; Wold, Barbara; Willard, Huntington F.; Myers, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    A complex interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and the genome regulates transcription. However, connecting variation in genome sequence with variation in TF binding and gene expression is challenging due to environmental differences between individuals and cell types. To address this problem, we measured genome-wide differential allelic occupancy of 24 TFs and EP300 in a human lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. Overall, 5% of human TF binding sites have an allelic imbalance in occupancy. At many sites, TFs clustered in TF-binding hubs on the same homolog in especially open chromatin. While genetic variation in core TF binding motifs generally resulted in large allelic differences in TF occupancy, most allelic differences in occupancy were subtle and associated with disruption of weak or noncanonical motifs. We also measured genome-wide differential allelic expression of genes with and without heterozygous exonic variants in the same cells. We found that genes with differential allelic expression were overall less expressed both in GM12878 cells and in unrelated human cell lines. Comparing TF occupancy with expression, we found strong association between allelic occupancy and expression within 100 bp of transcription start sites (TSSs), and weak association up to 100 kb from TSSs. Sites of differential allelic occupancy were significantly enriched for variants associated with disease, particularly autoimmune disease, suggesting that allelic differences in TF occupancy give functional insights into intergenic variants associated with disease. Our results have the potential to increase the power and interpretability of association studies by targeting functional intergenic variants in addition to protein coding sequences. PMID:22300769

  4. Variant allele frequency enrichment analysis in vitro reveals sonic hedgehog pathway to impede sustained temozolomide response in GBM.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nidhan K; Chandra, Vikas; Sarkar-Roy, Neeta; Das, Tapojyoti; Bhattacharya, Rabindra N; Tripathy, Laxmi N; Basu, Sunandan K; Kumar, Shantanu; Das, Subrata; Chatterjee, Ankita; Mukherjee, Ankur; Basu, Pryiadarshi; Maitra, Arindam; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Basu, Analabha; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-01-21

    Neoplastic cells of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) may or may not show sustained response to temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. We hypothesize that TMZ chemotherapy response in GBM is predetermined in its neoplastic clones via a specific set of mutations that alter relevant pathways. We describe exome-wide enrichment of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) in neurospheres displaying contrasting phenotypes of sustained versus reversible TMZ-responses in vitro. Enrichment of VAFs was found on genes ST5, RP6KA1 and PRKDC in cells showing sustained TMZ-effect whereas on genes FREM2, AASDH and STK36, in cells showing reversible TMZ-effect. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) revealed that these genes alter cell-cycle, G2/M-checkpoint-regulation and NHEJ pathways in sustained TMZ-effect cells whereas the lysine-II&V/phenylalanine degradation and sonic hedgehog (Hh) pathways in reversible TMZ-effect cells. Next, we validated the likely involvement of the Hh-pathway in TMZ-response on additional GBM neurospheres as well as on GBM patients, by extracting RNA-sequencing-based gene expression data from the TCGA-GBM database. Finally, we demonstrated TMZ-sensitization of a TMZ non-responder neurosphere in vitro by treating them with the FDA-approved pharmacological Hh-pathway inhibitor vismodegib. Altogether, our results indicate that the Hh-pathway impedes sustained TMZ-response in GBM and could be a potential therapeutic target to enhance TMZ-response in this malignancy.

  5. Highly Connected Populations and Temporal Stability in Allelic Frequencies of a Harvested Crab from the Southern Pacific Coast

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Hernandez, Noemi; Veliz, David; Riveros, Marcela P; Fuentes, Juan P.; Pardo, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    For marine invertebrates with a benthic adult form and a planktonic larva phase, the connectivity among populations is mainly based on larval dispersal. While an extended larval phase will promote gene flow, other factors such as an intensive fishery and geographical barriers could lead to changes in genetic variability. In this study, the population genetic structure of the commercial crab Metacarcinus edwardsii was analyzed along 700 km of the Chilean coast. The analysis, based on eight microsatellite loci genotyped from megalopae and adult crabs, considered temporal and spatial patterns of genetic variation. The results showed no evidence of spatial patterns in genetic structure, suggesting high connectivity among the sampling sites. The temporal analysis showed no evidence of changes in allele frequencies and no evidence of a recent bottleneck. The lack of spatial structure and allele variation over time could be explained by the interaction of factors such as i) low reproductive variance due to the capability of females to store sperm in the seminal receptacle, which can be used for successive broods, ii) high larval dispersal and iii) high individual reproductive output. Using our data as priors, a genetic modelling approach coincided, predicting this temporal and spatial stability. The same analysis showed that a reduction in population size leads to the loss of genetic variability in populations, as well as of the genetic cohesiveness between populations, pointing out the importance management for species under exploitation, such as M. edwardsii. PMID:27814382

  6. Highly Connected Populations and Temporal Stability in Allelic Frequencies of a Harvested Crab from the Southern Pacific Coast.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernandez, Noemi; Veliz, David; Riveros, Marcela P; Fuentes, Juan P; Pardo, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    For marine invertebrates with a benthic adult form and a planktonic larva phase, the connectivity among populations is mainly based on larval dispersal. While an extended larval phase will promote gene flow, other factors such as an intensive fishery and geographical barriers could lead to changes in genetic variability. In this study, the population genetic structure of the commercial crab Metacarcinus edwardsii was analyzed along 700 km of the Chilean coast. The analysis, based on eight microsatellite loci genotyped from megalopae and adult crabs, considered temporal and spatial patterns of genetic variation. The results showed no evidence of spatial patterns in genetic structure, suggesting high connectivity among the sampling sites. The temporal analysis showed no evidence of changes in allele frequencies and no evidence of a recent bottleneck. The lack of spatial structure and allele variation over time could be explained by the interaction of factors such as i) low reproductive variance due to the capability of females to store sperm in the seminal receptacle, which can be used for successive broods, ii) high larval dispersal and iii) high individual reproductive output. Using our data as priors, a genetic modelling approach coincided, predicting this temporal and spatial stability. The same analysis showed that a reduction in population size leads to the loss of genetic variability in populations, as well as of the genetic cohesiveness between populations, pointing out the importance management for species under exploitation, such as M. edwardsii.

  7. Genetic Diversity and Allelic Frequency of Glutamate-Rich Protein (GLURP) in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Kimberley C; Thomas, Bolaji N

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate-rich protein is a Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) antigen found in all stages of the parasite and has been reported to induce clinical immunity. The R0 and R2 regions have been found to exhibit a high degree of conservation, therefore serving as a good vaccine design material. We assayed the genetic diversity of Pf glurp genes in the R0 and R2 regions, as well as evaluated the role of seasonality on allelic frequency. A total of 402 genomic DNA samples, extracted from filter paper blood samples, were screened by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of Pf glurp R0 and R2 regions, in addition to fragment analysis of the polymorphic regions to identify allelic diversity of the parasite population. We found an extensive heterogeneity in the R2 region in general, and this heterogeneity is seasonally dependent, indicative of region plasticity. The R0 region displayed genetic conservation, as expected. We conclude that positive genotyping results with glurp R0 region should be seen as indicative of an active Pf infection, requiring adequate treatment. In addition, we advocate extending the possibility that an R0 region genotypic positivity could serve as diagnostic tool, thereby reducing cases of untreated or poorly treated infection, contributory to recrudescence or treatment failure. PMID:25452699

  8. Genetics of unstable alleles of the X chromosome genes isolated from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster during the outburst of mutation yellow in 1982 to 1991 in Uman`

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, I.K.; Skibitskii, E.E.

    1995-08-01

    In 1982, a local increase of frequency of mutation yellow-2, which lasted for a decade, occurred in a population of Drosophila melanogaster from Uman` (Ukraine). Genetic properties (phenotypic difference, mutability, and pecularities of complementation) of alleles yellow-2, isolated from the population during the mutation outburst, and of their revertants, were studied. Allelic diversity, which reflected molecular differences in allele structure, was shown to appear. In addition to mutation yellow, isolated in 1990 from the Uman` population, mutational properties of other sex-linked genes (dusky, miniature, rudimentary, singed, and vermilion) isolated from natural populations in 1986 to 1990, were analyzed. Based on these data, the conclusion was drawn that the presence of unstable alleles in populations is not a sufficient condition for mutation outbursts. Comparative analysis of properties of yellow alleles obtained in different periods of the outburst continues. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Frequency detection of imidacloprid resistance allele in Aphis gossypii field populations by real-time PCR amplification of specific-allele (rtPASA).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cui, Li; Xu, Xibao; Rui, Changhui

    2015-11-01

    The Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is one of the most serious pests worldwide, and imidacloprid has been widely used to control this insect pest. Just like other classes of insecticides, the resistance to imidacloprid has been found in A. gossypii. An amino acid mutation (R81T) in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) beta1 subunit was detected in the imidacloprid-resistant A. gossypii collected from Langfang (LF) and Dezhou (DZ) cities. To estimate the R81T mutation frequency of A. gossypii field populations, a simple, rapid and accurate rtPASA (real-time PCR amplification of specific allele) protocol was developed. The performance of the rtPASA protocol was evaluated by comparing with the data generated by a cPASA (competitive PCR amplification of specific allele) method from 50 individual genotypes. The R81T allele frequencies of the LF population (34.7%±1.3%) and DZ population (45.2%±5.2%) estimated by the rtPASA protocol matched the frequencies (LF 38.1%, DZ 48.2%) deduced by the cPASA method in specimens. The results indicated that the rtPASA format was applicable for the detection of mutation associated with imidacloprid resistance and will allow rapid and efficient monitoring of A. gossypii resistance in field populations in a high throughput format.

  10. Linkage disequilibrium in the insulin gene region: Size variation at the 5{prime} flanking polymorphism and bimodality among {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} alleles

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, R.E.; Spielman, R.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 5{prime} flanking polymorphism (5{prime}FP), a hypervariable region at the 5{prime} end of the insulin gene, has {open_quotes}class 1{close_quotes} alleles (650-900 bp long) that are in positive linkage disequilibrium with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The authors report that precise sizing of the 5{prime}FP yields a bimodal frequency distribution of class 1 allele lengths. Class 1 alleles belonging to the lower component (650-750 bp) of the bimodal distribution were somewhat more highly associated with IDDM than were alleles from the upper component (760-900 bp), but the difference was not statistically significant. They also examined 5{prime}FP length variation in relation to allelic variation at nearby polymorphisms. At biallelic RFLPs on both sides of the 5{prime}FP, they found that one allele exhibits near-total association with the upper component of the 5FP class 1 distribution. Such associations represent a little-known but potentially wide-spread form of linkage disequilibrium. In this type of disequilibrium, a flanking allele has near-complete association with a single mode of VNTR alleles whose lengths represent consecutive numbers of tandem repeats (CNTR). Such extreme disequilibrium between a CNTR mode and flanking alleles may originate and persist because length mutations at some VNTR loci usually add or delete only one or two repeat units. 22 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E.

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  12. [Analysis of allelic content of genes responsible for baking properties in allocytoplasmic wheat hybrids].

    PubMed

    Klimushina, M V; Divashuk, M G; Mukhammed, T A K; Semenov, O G; Karlov, G I

    2013-05-01

    A collection comprised of allocytoplasmic hybrids of mild wheat (ACPH) was screened for the allelic state of genes responsible for baking properties (high-molecular glutenins, puroindolines, and Waxy). The possibility of the introgression of the Waxy gene of T. timopheevii into the mild wheat genome was demonstrated in several ACPH samples using the set of molecular markers. Allelic gene variants responsible for the baking properties were revealed for 22 ACPH samples, which make it possible to detect the most challenging samples for both molecular-genetic research and applied science.

  13. Prevalence of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and allele frequency in patients with COPD in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rodrigo; Zillmer, Laura Russo; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Manzano, Beatriz; Ivanaga, Ivan Teruaki; Fritscher, Leandro; Lundgren, Fernando; Miravitlles, Marc; Gondim, Heicilainy Del Carlos; Santos, Gildo; Alves, Marcela Amorim; Oliveira, Maria Vera; Souza, Altay Alves Lino de; Sales, Maria Penha Uchoa; Jardim, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD), as well as allele frequency, in COPD patients in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study involving 926 COPD patients 40 years of age or older, from five Brazilian states. All patients underwent determination of AAT levels in dried blood spot (DBS) samples by nephelometry. Those with DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL underwent determination of serum AAT levels. Those with serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL underwent genotyping. In case of conflicting results, SERPINA1 gene sequencing was performed. Of the 926 COPD patients studied, 85 had DBS AAT levels ≤ 2.64 mg/dL, and 24 (2.6% of the study sample) had serum AAT levels of < 113 mg/dL. Genotype distribution in this subset of 24 patients was as follows: PI*MS, in 3 (12.5%); PI*MZ, in 13 (54.2%); PI*SZ, in 1 (4.2%); PI*SS, in 1 (4.2%); and PI*ZZ, in 6 (25.0%). In the sample as a whole, the overall prevalence of AATD was 2.8% and the prevalence of the PI*ZZ genotype (severe AATD) was 0.8. The prevalence of AATD in COPD patients in Brazil is similar to that found in most countries and reinforces the recommendation that AAT levels be measured in all COPD patients. Determinar a prevalência da deficiência de alfa 1-antitripsina (AAT), bem como a frequência alélica, em pacientes com DPOC no Brasil. Estudo transversal com 926 pacientes com DPOC, com 40 anos ou mais, oriundos de cinco estados brasileiros. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a dosagem de AAT em amostras de sangue seco por meio de nefelometria. Aqueles em que a concentração de AAT no sangue seco foi ≤ 2,64 mg/dl foram submetidos a dosagem sérica de AAT. Aqueles em que a concentração sérica de AAT foi < 113 mg/dl foram submetidos a genotipagem. Quando os resultados foram discrepantes, foi realizado o sequenciamento do gene SERPINA1. Dos 926 pacientes com DPOC estudados, 85 apresentaram concentração de AAT em sangue seco ≤ 2,64 mg/dl, e 24 (2,6% da amostra) apresentaram

  14. Testing for Ancient Selection Using Cross-population Allele Frequency Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Racimo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A powerful way to detect selection in a population is by modeling local allele frequency changes in a particular region of the genome under scenarios of selection and neutrality and finding which model is most compatible with the data. A previous method based on a cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) uses an outgroup population to detect departures from neutrality that could be compatible with hard or soft sweeps, at linked sites near a beneficial allele. However, this method is most sensitive to recent selection and may miss selective events that happened a long time ago. To overcome this, we developed an extension of XP-CLR that jointly models the behavior of a selected allele in a three-population tree. Our method - called “3-population composite likelihood ratio” (3P-CLR) - outperforms XP-CLR when testing for selection that occurred before two populations split from each other and can distinguish between those events and events that occurred specifically in each of the populations after the split. We applied our new test to population genomic data from the 1000 Genomes Project, to search for selective sweeps that occurred before the split of Yoruba and Eurasians, but after their split from Neanderthals, and that could have led to the spread of modern-human-specific phenotypes. We also searched for sweep events that occurred in East Asians, Europeans, and the ancestors of both populations, after their split from Yoruba. In both cases, we are able to confirm a number of regions identified by previous methods and find several new candidates for selection in recent and ancient times. For some of these, we also find suggestive functional mutations that may have driven the selective events. PMID:26596347

  15. Testing for Ancient Selection Using Cross-population Allele Frequency Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Racimo, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    A powerful way to detect selection in a population is by modeling local allele frequency changes in a particular region of the genome under scenarios of selection and neutrality and finding which model is most compatible with the data. A previous method based on a cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) uses an outgroup population to detect departures from neutrality that could be compatible with hard or soft sweeps, at linked sites near a beneficial allele. However, this method is most sensitive to recent selection and may miss selective events that happened a long time ago. To overcome this, we developed an extension of XP-CLR that jointly models the behavior of a selected allele in a three-population tree. Our method - called "3-population composite likelihood ratio" (3P-CLR) - outperforms XP-CLR when testing for selection that occurred before two populations split from each other and can distinguish between those events and events that occurred specifically in each of the populations after the split. We applied our new test to population genomic data from the 1000 Genomes Project, to search for selective sweeps that occurred before the split of Yoruba and Eurasians, but after their split from Neanderthals, and that could have led to the spread of modern-human-specific phenotypes. We also searched for sweep events that occurred in East Asians, Europeans, and the ancestors of both populations, after their split from Yoruba. In both cases, we are able to confirm a number of regions identified by previous methods and find several new candidates for selection in recent and ancient times. For some of these, we also find suggestive functional mutations that may have driven the selective events.

  16. Distribution of allelic and genotypic frequencies of IL1A, IL4, NFKB1 and PAR1 variants in Native American, African, European and Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    Amador, Marcos A T; Cavalcante, Giovanna C; Santos, Ney P C; Gusmão, Leonor; Guerreiro, João F; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Santos, Sidney

    2016-02-16

    The inflammatory response plays a key role at different stages of cancer development. Allelic variants of the interleukin 1A (IL1A), interleukin 4 (IL4), nuclear factor kappa B1 (NFKB1) and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) genes may influence not only the inflammatory response but also susceptibility to cancer development. Among major ethnic or continental groups, these polymorphic variants present different allelic frequencies. In admixed populations, such as the Brazilian population, data on distribution of these polymorphisms are limited. Here, we collected samples of cancer-free individuals from the north, northeast, midwest, south and southeast regions of Brazil and from the three main groups that gave rise to the Brazilian population: Native Americans from the Brazilian Amazon, Africans and Europeans. We describe the allelic distributions of four IL1A (rs3783553), IL4 (rs79071878), NFKB1 (rs28362491) and PAR1 (rs11267092) gene polymorphisms, which the literature describes as polymorphisms with a risk of cancer or worse prognosis for cancer. The genotypic distribution of the four polymorphisms was statistically distinct between Native Americans, Africans and Europeans. For the allelic frequency of these polymorphisms, the Native American population was the most distinct among the three parental populations, and it included the greatest number of alleles with a risk of cancer or worse prognosis for cancer. The PAR1 gene polymorphism allelic distribution was similar among all Brazilian regions. For the other three markers, the northern region population was statistically distinct from other Brazilian region populations. The IL1A, IL4, NFKB1 and PAR1 gene polymorphism allelic distributions are homogeneous among the regional Brazilian populations, except for the northern region, which significantly differs from the other four Brazilian regions. Among the parental populations, the Native American population exhibited a higher incidence of alleles with risk of

  17. Variation in meiotic recombination frequencies between allelic transgenes inserted at different sites in the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Susan; Kohl, Kathryn P; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-08-07

    Meiotic crossovers are distributed nonrandomly across the genome. Classic studies in Drosophila suggest that the position of a gene along a chromosome arm can affect the outcome of the recombination process, with proximity to the centromere being associated with lower crossing over. To examine this phenomenon molecularly, we developed an assay that measures meiotic crossovers and noncrossover gene conversions between allelic transgenes inserted into different genomic positions. To facilitate collecting a large number of virgin females, we developed a useful genetic system that kills males and undesired classes of females. We found that the recombination frequency at a site in the middle of the X chromosome, where crossovers are normally frequent, was similar to the frequency at the centromere-proximal end of the euchromatin, where crossovers are normally infrequent. In contrast, we recovered no recombinants--crossovers or noncrossovers--at a site on chromosome 4 and at a site toward the distal end of the X chromosome. These results suggest that local sequence or chromatin features have a stronger impact on recombination rates in this transgene assay than position along the chromosome arm.

  18. Variation in Meiotic Recombination Frequencies Between Allelic Transgenes Inserted at Different Sites in the Drosophila melanogaster Genome

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Susan; Kohl, Kathryn P.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic crossovers are distributed nonrandomly across the genome. Classic studies in Drosophila suggest that the position of a gene along a chromosome arm can affect the outcome of the recombination process, with proximity to the centromere being associated with lower crossing over. To examine this phenomenon molecularly, we developed an assay that measures meiotic crossovers and noncrossover gene conversions between allelic transgenes inserted into different genomic positions. To facilitate collecting a large number of virgin females, we developed a useful genetic system that kills males and undesired classes of females. We found that the recombination frequency at a site in the middle of the X chromosome, where crossovers are normally frequent, was similar to the frequency at the centromere-proximal end of the euchromatin, where crossovers are normally infrequent. In contrast, we recovered no recombinants—crossovers or noncrossovers—at a site on chromosome 4 and at a site toward the distal end of the X chromosome. These results suggest that local sequence or chromatin features have a stronger impact on recombination rates in this transgene assay than position along the chromosome arm. PMID:23797104

  19. Allelic forms of the alpha- and beta-chain genes encoding DQw1-positive heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Turco, E; Care, A; Compagnone-Post, P; Robinson, C; Cascino, I; Trucco, M

    1987-01-01

    On chromosome 6, in the HLA region, the DQ subregion is located immediately centromeric to the DR subregion. Even though only three serological specificities to date have been officially recognized (DQw1, DQw2, and DQw3), it seems likely that the phenotypical polymorphism expressed by DQ molecules is much more complex. There are reasons to believe that fixed alpha-beta combinations exist, each of them associated with a different DR allele. DQw1 is a determinant present on DQ molecules that are found associated with DR1-, DR2-, and DRw6-positive haplotypes. By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, we recognized three allelic DQ-alpha and three allelic DQ-beta patterns associated with DQw1. In addition, one of these alpha/beta pairs associated with DR1, two with DR2, and a fourth with DRw6. We have obtained evidence using nucleotide sequencing that there are as many allelic forms of DQ-alpha and DQ-beta genes as there are different molecular DQ-alpha and DQ-beta patterns. The DQ-alpha and DQ-beta chains of DQw1-positive molecules each are encoded by at least three distinctly different allelic genes, and particular alpha/beta gene combinations are associated with the same DR alleles as their corresponding molecular alpha/beta pairs.

  20. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KOHYAMA, Moeko; TADA, Naomi; MITSUI, Hiroko; TOMIOKA, Hitomi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko; YABUKI, Akira; RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  1. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Allele and haplotype frequencies for HLA-DQ in Iranian celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Romanos, Jihane; Rostami, Kamran; Ganji, Azita; Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad Javad; Bakhshipour, Ali-Reza; Zojaji, Homayoun; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad-Reza; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and -DQ8 in Iranian celiac disease (CD) patients and compare them to healthy Iranian controls. METHODS: To predict the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 genes, we used six previously reported HLA-tagging single nucleotide polymorphism to determine HLA genotypes in 59 Iranian patients with ‘biopsy-confirmed’ CD and in 151 healthy Iranian individuals. To test the transferability of the method, 50 cases and controls were also typed using a commercial kit that identifies individual carriers of DQ2, DQ7 and DQ8 alleles. RESULTS: In this pilot study 97% of CD cases (n = 57) and 58% of controls (n = 87) were carriers of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 heterodimers, either in the homozygous or heterozygous state. The HLA-DQ pattern of these 57 CD patients: heterozygous DQ2.2 (n = 14) and homozygous DQ2.2 (n = 1), heterozygous DQ2.5 (n = 33) and homozygous DQ2.5 (n = 8), heterozygous DQ8 (n = 13) and homozygous DQ8 (n = 2). Two CD patients were negative for both DQ2 and DQ8 (3%). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DQ8 in our CD population was higher than that reported in other populations (25.4%). As reported in other populations, our results underline the primary importance of HLA-DQ alleles in the Iranian population’s susceptibility to CD. PMID:24876751

  3. Utilizing Ethnic-Specific Differences in Minor Allele Frequency to Recategorize Reported Pathogenic Deafness Variants

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, A. Eliot; Eppsteiner, Robert W.; Booth, Kevin T.; Ephraim, Sean S.; Gurrola, José; Simpson, Allen; Black-Ziegelbein, E. Ann; Joshi, Swati; Ravi, Harini; Giuffre, Angelica C.; Happe, Scott; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Azaiez, Hela; Bayazit, Yildirim A.; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.; Gazquez, Irene; Tamayo, Marta L.; Gelvez, Nancy Y.; Leal, Greizy Lopez; Jalas, Chaim; Ekstein, Josef; Yang, Tao; Usami, Shin-ichi; Kahrizi, Kimia; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Najmabadi, Hossein; Scheetz, Todd E.; Braun, Terry A.; Casavant, Thomas L.; LeProust, Emily M.; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnic-specific differences in minor allele frequency impact variant categorization for genetic screening of nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL) and other genetic disorders. We sought to evaluate all previously reported pathogenic NSHL variants in the context of a large number of controls from ethnically distinct populations sequenced with orthogonal massively parallel sequencing methods. We used HGMD, ClinVar, and dbSNP to generate a comprehensive list of reported pathogenic NSHL variants and re-evaluated these variants in the context of 8,595 individuals from 12 populations and 6 ethnically distinct major human evolutionary phylogenetic groups from three sources (Exome Variant Server, 1000 Genomes project, and a control set of individuals created for this study, the OtoDB). Of the 2,197 reported pathogenic deafness variants, 325 (14.8%) were present in at least one of the 8,595 controls, indicating a minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.00006. MAFs ranged as high as 0.72, a level incompatible with pathogenicity for a fully penetrant disease like NSHL. Based on these data, we established MAF thresholds of 0.005 for autosomal-recessive variants (excluding specific variants in GJB2) and 0.0005 for autosomal-dominant variants. Using these thresholds, we recategorized 93 (4.2%) of reported pathogenic variants as benign. Our data show that evaluation of reported pathogenic deafness variants using variant MAFs from multiple distinct ethnicities and sequenced by orthogonal methods provides a powerful filter for determining pathogenicity. The proposed MAF thresholds will facilitate clinical interpretation of variants identified in genetic testing for NSHL. All data are publicly available to facilitate interpretation of genetic variants causing deafness. PMID:25262649

  4. No association between an allele at the D sub 2 dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, J.; Krystal, J.; Kennedy, J.L. West Haven Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CT ); O'Malley, S.; Risch, N.; Merikangas, K.; Kidd, K.K. ); Kranzler, H.R. )

    1991-10-02

    The author attempted to replicate a positive allelic association between the A1 allele of DRD2 (the D{sub 2} dopamine receptor locus) and alcoholism that has been reported. They compared allele frequencies at the previously described Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism system of DRD2 in alcoholics and random population controls.

  5. Frequency of the Fc gamma RIIIA-158F allele in African American patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Oh, M; Petri, M A; Kim, N A; Sullivan, K E

    1999-07-01

    Defects in genes involved in immune complex clearance constitute one of the most common gene defects identified in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Defects in early complement components, complement receptors, and Fc receptors have all been implicated in the susceptibility to SLE. Recently, the role of functionally relevant Fc receptor polymorphisms in the etiology of SLE has been investigated. Specifically, a polymorphism of FC gamma RIII, termed Fc gamma RIIIA-158F, has been found to be associated with SLE in 2 largely Caucasian populations and appeared to constitute a risk factor for nephritis. We investigated the association of the Fc gamma RIIIA-158F and Fc gamma RIIIA-131R polymorphisms with SLE in an African American study population. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and allele-specific PCR was used to genotype patients with SLE and controls. There was no difference in Fc gamma RIIIA-158F or Fc gamma RIIA-131R gene frequencies in the SLE populations compared to controls. There was no significant association between Fc gamma RIIIA-158F or Fc gamma RIIA-131R and any specific clinical or laboratory variable. In our African American study population, there did not appear to be any association of Fc gamma RIIA-158F or Fc gamma RIIA-131R with SLE.

  6. Initial frequency of alleles for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in field populations of Heliothis virescens

    PubMed Central

    Gould, F.; Anderson, A.; Jones, A.; Sumerford, D.; Heckel, D. G.; Lopez, J.; Micinski, S.; Leonard, R.; Laster, M.

    1997-01-01

    The risk of rapid pest adaptation to an insecticide is highly dependent on the initial frequency of resistance alleles in field populations. Because we have lacked empirical estimates of these frequencies, population–genetic models of resistance evolution have relied on a wide range of theoretical estimates. The recent commercialization of genetically engineered cotton that constitutively produces an insecticidal protein derived from the biocontrol agent, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has raised concern that we lack data needed to quantify the risk of insect pests such as Heliothis virescens rapidly adapting to this ecologically valuable class of toxins. By individually mating over 2,000 male H. virescens moths collected in four states to females of a Bt toxin-resistant laboratory strain, and screening F1 and F2 offspring for tolerance of the toxic protein, we were able to directly estimate the field frequency of alleles for resistance as 1.5 × 10−3. This high initial frequency underscores the need for caution in deploying transgenic cotton to control insect pests. Our single-pair mating technique greatly increases the efficiency of detecting recessive resistance alleles. Because alleles that decrease target site sensitivity to Bt toxins and other insecticides are often recessive, this technique could be useful in estimating resistance allele frequencies in other insects exposed to transgenic insecticidal crops or conventional insecticides. PMID:11038613

  7. Sensory gating and alpha-7 nicotinic receptor gene allelic variants in schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura F; Leonard, Sherry; Hall, Mei-Hua; Tregellas, Jason R; Freedman, Robert; Olincy, Ann

    2007-07-05

    Single nucleotide allelic variants in the promoter region of the chromosome 15 alpha-7 acetylcholine nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) are associated with both schizophrenia and the P50 auditory evoked potential sensory gating deficit. The purpose of this study was to determine if CHRNA7 promoter allelic variants are also associated with abnormal P50 ratios in persons with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. P50 auditory evoked potentials were recorded in a paired stimulus paradigm in 17 subjects with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. The P50 test to conditioning ratio was used as the measure of sensory gating. Mutation screening of the CHRNA7 promoter region was performed on the subjects' DNA samples. Comparisons to previously obtained data from persons with schizophrenia and controls were made. Subjects with schizophrenia, regardless of allele status, had an abnormal mean P50 ratio. Subjects with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type and a variant allele had an abnormal mean P50 ratio, whereas those schizoaffective subjects with the common alleles had a normal mean P50 ratio. Normal control subjects had a normal mean ratio, but controls with variant alleles had higher P50 ratios. In persons with bipolar type schizoaffective disorder, CHRNA7 promoter region allelic variants are linked to the capacity to inhibit the P50 auditory evoked potential and thus are associated with a type of illness genetically and biologically more similar to schizophrenia.

  8. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  9. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  10. Knockdown Resistance Allele Frequencies in North American Head Louse (Anoplura: Pediculidae) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyong Sup; Previte, Domenic J.; Hodgdon, Hilliary E.; Poole, Bryan C.; Kwon, Deok Ho; El-Ghar, Gamal E. Abo; Lee, Si Hyeock; Clark, J. Marshall

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the extent and frequency of a knockdown-type resistance allele (kdr type) in North American populations of human head lice. Lice were collected from 32 locations in Canada and the United States. DNA was extracted from individual lice and used to determine their zygosity using the serial invasive signal amplification technique to detect the kdr-type T917I (TI) mutation, which is most responsible for nerve insensitivity that results in the kdr phenotype and permethrin resistance. Previously sampled sites were resampled to determine if the frequency of the TI mutation was changing. The TI frequency was also reevaluated using a quantitative sequencing method on pooled DNA samples from selected sites to validate this population genotyping method. Genotyping substantiated that TI occurs at high levels in North American lice (88.4%). Overall, the TI frequency in U.S. lice was 84.4% from 1999 to 2009, increased to 99.6% from 2007 to 2009, and was 97.1% in Canadian lice in 2008. Genotyping results using the serial invasive signal amplification reaction (99.54%) and quantitative sequencing (99.45%) techniques were highly correlated. Thus, the frequencies of TI in North American head louse populations were found to be uniformly high, which may be due to the high selection pressure from the intensive and widespread use of the pyrethrins- or pyrethroid-based pediculicides over many years, and is likely a main cause of increased pediculosis and failure of pyrethrins- or permethrin-based products in Canada and the United States. Alternative approaches to treatment of head lice infestations are critically needed. PMID:24724296

  11. Frequency distribution of Q188R, N314D, Duarte 1, and Duarte 2 GALT variant alleles in an Indian galactosemia population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Thapa, Babu R; Kaur, Gurjit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-12-01

    Classical galactosemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) gene. The Q188R and N314D mutations are the most frequently cited GALT gene mutations. N314D is further associated with two variants, Duarte 1 and Duarte 2. Nevertheless, no reports are available on the clinical and molecular spectrum of galactosemia from the Indian population. The present study was designed to establish the frequency of these two most common mutations and their variants in Indian galactosemia patients so as to determine a single most common mutation/polymorphism for establishing the DNA-based diagnosis of galactosemia. Three alleles were found to be present at a frequency of 0.036 (Q188R), 0.40 (N314D), and 0.39 (D2); no D1 alleles were found. A significantly higher frequency of the Duarte 2 allele in our population suggests the presence of a milder form of galactosemia, which can be well managed by early diagnosis and dietary management.

  12. Patterns of variation among distinct alleles of the Flag silk gene from Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Linden E; White, Sheryl; Nuñez-Farfán, Juan; Vargas, Jesus

    2007-02-20

    Spider silk proteins and their genes are very attractive to researchers in a wide range of disciplines because they permit linking many levels of organization. However, hypotheses of silk gene evolution have been built primarily upon single sequences of each gene each species, and little is known about allelic variation within a species. Silk genes are known for their repeat structure with high levels of homogenization of nucleotide and amino acid sequence among repeated units. One common explanation for this homogeneity is gene convergence. To test this model, we sequenced multiple alleles of one intron-exon segment from the Flag gene from four populations of the spider Nephila clavipes and compared the new sequences to a published sequence. Our analysis revealed very high levels of heterozygosity in this gene, with no pattern of population differentiation. There was no evidence of gene convergence within any of these alleles, with high levels of nucleotide and amino acid substitution among the repeating motifs. Our data suggest that minimally, there is relaxed selection on mutations in this gene and that there may actually be positive selection for heterozygosity.

  13. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (FST coefficients) to the present database ranged from FST = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to FST = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21637540

  14. Allelic frequencies and statistical data obtained from 12 codis STR loci in an admixed population of the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    da Costa Francez, Pablo Abdon; Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins Ribeiro; Frazão, Gleycianne Furtado; Dos Reis Borges, Nathalia Danielly; Dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2011-01-01

    The allelic frequencies of 12 short tandem repeat loci were obtained from a sample of 307 unrelated individuals living in Macapá, a city in the northern Amazon region, Brazil. These loci are the most commonly used in forensics and paternity testing. Based on the allele frequency obtained for the population of Macapá, we estimated an interethnic admixture for the three parental groups (European, Native American and African) of, respectively, 46%, 35% and 19%. Comparing these allele frequencies with those of other Brazilian populations and of the Iberian Peninsula population, no significant distances were observed. The interpopulation genetic distances (F(ST) coefficients) to the present database ranged from F(ST) = 0.0016 between Macapá and Belém to F(ST) = 0.0036 between Macapá and the Iberian Peninsula.

  15. [Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in togolese population: description of high frequency of rare allele Pi(F) in isolated ethnic group].

    PubMed

    Tete-Benissan, A; Gbeassor, M

    2011-10-01

    The study, which is a ethnobiologic characterization, investigated α(1)-antitrypsin gene polymorphism in the togolese ethnic groups. We aimed to determine the existence of rare or deficient alleles predisposing to pulmonary or hepatic genetic diseases. We focused our study on healthy subjects of two samples by comparing 205 Adélé from relative isolated ethnic group alive in mountain region and 255 subjects from pluriethnic population living on Atlantic coastal region. Data analysis was performed by α(1)-antitrypsin level quantification and serum isoelectric focusing. The two alleles Pi(M) et Pi(F) frequencies are respectively 0.834 and 0.166 in Adélé; 0.989 and 0.011 in the subjects from pluriethnic population. Phenotypes MM and FM distribution in the two groups is significantly different (p<0.001). However, α(1)-antitrypsin polymorphism does not significantly influence proteinic and lipidic profiles of the subjects in the two samples. The Pi(F) allele of α(1) antitrypsin is rare allele in the world global populations. Its very high frequency in Adélé explained by preferential endogamic marriage in this ethnic group. Compared to the subjects from pluriethnic population, more than 30 Adélé subjects present a higher risk to develop pulmonary diseases according to isoform F properties. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlling for P-value inflation in allele frequency change in experimental evolution and artificial selection experiments.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Petri; Rønning, Bernt; Kvalnes, Thomas; Hagen, Ingerid J; Ringsby, Thor Harald; Billing, Anna M; Pärn, Henrik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Husby, Arild; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Jensen, Henrik

    2016-11-04

    Experimental evolution studies can be used to explore genomic response to artificial and natural selection. In such studies, loci that display larger allele frequency change than expected by genetic drift alone are assumed to be directly or indirectly associated with traits under selection. However, such studies report surprisingly many loci under selection, suggesting that current tests for allele frequency change may be subject to P-value inflation and hence be anticonservative. One factor known from genomewide association (GWA) studies to cause P-value inflation is population stratification, such as relatedness among individuals. Here, we suggest that by treating presence of an individual in a population after selection as a binary response variable, existing GWA methods can be used to account for relatedness when estimating allele frequency change. We show that accounting for relatedness like this effectively reduces false-positives in tests for allele frequency change in simulated data with varying levels of population structure. However, once relatedness has been accounted for, the power to detect causal loci under selection is low. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of P-value inflation in allele frequency change in empirical data spanning multiple generations from an artificial selection experiment on tarsus length in two free-living populations of house sparrow and correct for this using genomic control. Our results indicate that since allele frequencies in large parts of the genome may change when selection acts on a heritable trait, such selection is likely to have considerable and immediate consequences for the eco-evolutionary dynamics of the affected populations.

  17. Gene deletion and allelic replacement in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Sellem, Carole H; Coppin, Evelyne; Boivin, Antoine; Maas, Marc F P M; Debuchy, Robert; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    2008-04-01

    Gene replacement via homologous recombination is a fundamental tool for the analysis of gene function. However, this event is rare in organisms like the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. We show here that deletion of the PaKu70 gene is an efficient strategy for improving gene manipulation in this organism. By using the DeltaPaKu70 strain, it is now possible (1) to produce deletion mutants with an efficiency of 100%, (2) to achieve allelic exchange by introducing a mutated allele associated with a selection cassette at the locus, (3) to introduce a mutation in a gene without co-insertion of a selectable marker and without any modification of the target locus.

  18. Allelic association of human dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, K.; Sheridan, P.J.; Montgomery, A.; Jagadeeswaran, P.; Nogami, H.; Briggs, A.H. ); Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.; Cohn, J.B. )

    1990-04-18

    In a blinded experiment, the authors report the first allelic association of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in alcoholism. From 70 brain samples of alcoholics and nonalcoholics, DNA was digested with restriction endonucleases and probed with a clone that contained the entire 3{prime} coding exon, the polyadenylation signal, and approximately 16.4 kilobases of noncoding 3{prime} sequence of the human dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene ({lambda}hD2G1). In the present samples, the presence of A1 allele of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene correctly classified 77% of alcoholics, and its absence classified 72% of nonalcoholics. The polymorphic pattern of this receptor gene suggests that a gene that confers susceptibility to at least one form of alcoholism is located on the q22-q23 region of chromosome 11.

  19. The homozygosity index (HI) approach reveals high allele frequency for Wilson disease in the Sardinian population

    PubMed Central

    Gialluisi, Alessandro; Incollu, Simona; Pippucci, Tommaso; Lepori, Maria Barbara; Zappu, Antonietta; Loudianos, Georgios; Romeo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in pathological progressive copper accumulation in liver and other tissues. The worldwide prevalence (P) is about 30/million, while in Sardinia it is in the order of 1/10 000. However, all of these estimates are likely to suffer from an underdiagnosis bias. Indeed, a recent molecular neonatal screening in Sardinia reported a WD prevalence of 1:2707. In this study, we used a new approach that makes it possible to estimate the allelic frequency (q) of an autosomal recessive disorder if one knows the proportion between homozygous and compound heterozygous patients (the homozygosity index or HI) and the inbreeding coefficient (F) in a sample of affected individuals. We applied the method to a set of 178 Sardinian individuals (3 of whom born to consanguineous parents), each with a clinical and molecular diagnosis of WD. Taking into account the geographical provenance of the parents of every patient within Sardinia (to make F computation more precise), we obtained a q=0.0191 (F=7.8 × 10−4, HI=0.476) and a corresponding prevalence P=1:2732. This result confirms that the prevalence of WD is largely underestimated in Sardinia. On the other hand, the general reliability and applicability of the HI approach to other autosomal recessive disorders is confirmed, especially if one is interested in the genetic epidemiology of populations with high frequency of consanguineous marriages. PMID:23486543

  20. Colloquium paper: human adaptations to diet, subsistence, and ecoregion are due to subtle shifts in allele frequency.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Angela M; Witonsky, David B; Ehler, Edvard; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Beall, Cynthia; Gebremedhin, Amha; Sukernik, Rem; Utermann, Gerd; Pritchard, Jonathan; Coop, Graham; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2010-05-11

    Human populations use a variety of subsistence strategies to exploit an exceptionally broad range of ecoregions and dietary components. These aspects of human environments have changed dramatically during human evolution, giving rise to new selective pressures. To understand the genetic basis of human adaptations, we combine population genetics data with ecological information to detect variants that increased in frequency in response to new selective pressures. Our approach detects SNPs that show concordant differences in allele frequencies across populations with respect to specific aspects of the environment. Genic and especially nonsynonymous SNPs are overrepresented among those most strongly correlated with environmental variables. This provides genome-wide evidence for selection due to changes in ecoregion, diet, and subsistence. We find particularly strong signals associated with polar ecoregions, with foraging, and with a diet rich in roots and tubers. Interestingly, several of the strongest signals overlap with those implicated in energy metabolism phenotypes from genome-wide association studies, including SNPs influencing glucose levels and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, several pathways, including those of starch and sucrose metabolism, are enriched for strong signals of adaptations to a diet rich in roots and tubers, whereas signals associated with polar ecoregions are overrepresented in genes associated with energy metabolism pathways.

  1. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B.; Firth, H.; Child, A.

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Inferring microevolutionary patterns from allele-size frequency distributions of minisatellite loci: a worldwide study of the APOB 3' hypervariable region polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Destro-Bisol, G; Capelli, C; Belledi, M

    2000-10-01

    The availability of numerous population and molecular data makes the apolipoprotein B 3' hypervariable region (APOB 3' HVR) polymorphism ideal for a pilot study of the relationships between the allele-size frequency distributions (referred to as allele-size distributions) of minisatellite loci and the microevolutionary processes underlying their present-day polymorphism in human populations. In this paper, we present a worldwide APOB 3' HVR study, based on published and unpublished data, which refers to 36 populations. We systematically compare APOB 3' HVR within-group diversity (in terms of heterozygosity, number of alleles, and allele-size variance) in numerous human populations, including African, European, Asian, Amerindian, Australomelanesian, and Polynesian groups. Overall, our analyses indicate a greater APOB 3' HVR diversity in Africans than non-Africans. Then, we compare APOB 3' HVR allele-size distributions. The APOB 3' HVR allele-size distribution is found to be quasi-unimodal in Africans and bimodal or nonunimodal in non-African populations. The analysis of the distribution of pairwise comparisons suggests that Africans expanded earlier and/or that their ancestral population was larger than other continental groups. As a final step, we examine APOB 3' HVR interpopulational relationships by using three genetic distances. The F(ST) genetic distance, which assumes genetic drift as being the agent that differentiates populations, provides results that are more congruent with established anthropological knowledge than mutation-based distances (D(SW) and R(ST)). We hypothesize that the ancestral population was characterized by a high heterozygosity, an extended range of allele size, and a quasi-unimodal allele-size distribution centered on allele *37, features persisting in examined African populations. Sampling processes during "out-of-Africa" migrations would be responsible for the decrease in APOB 3' HVR gene diversity and the nonunimodal allele

  3. Interactions between WHITE Genes Carried by a Large Transposing Element and the ZESTE1 Allele in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Gubb, D.; Roote, J.; McGill, S.; Shelton, M.; Ashburner, M.

    1986-01-01

    TE146, a large transposing element of Drosophila melanogaster, carries two copies of the white and roughest genes in tandem. In consequence, z1 w 11E4; TE146(Z)/+ flies have a zeste (lemon-yellow) eye color. However, one in 103 TE146 chromosomes mutates to a red-eyed form. The majority of these "spontaneous red" (SR) derivatives of TE146 have only one copy of the white gene and are, cytologically, two- to three-banded elements, rather than six-banded as their progenitor. The SR forms of TE146 are also unstable and give zeste-colored forms with a frequency of about one in 104. One such "spontaneous zeste" (SZ) derivative carries duplicated white genes as an inverted, rather than a tandem, repeat. The genetic instability of this inverted repeat form of TE146 is different from that of the original tandem repeat form. In particular, the inverted repeat form frequently produces derivatives with internal rearrangements of the TE and gives a much lower frequency of SR forms. In addition, two novel features of the interaction between w+ alleles in a zeste background have been found. First, copies of w + can become insensitive to suppression by zeste even when paired. Second, an inversion breakpoint may disrupt the pairing between two adjacent w+ alleles, necessary for their suppression by zeste, without physically separating them. PMID:17246318

  4. Gene polymorphisms of novel immunotolerant molecule BTLA: distribution of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes in Polish Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Anna; Woszczyk, Dariusz; Strzała, Tomasz; Szczepańska, Anna; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Frydecka, Irena; Karabon, Lidia

    2015-02-01

    B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is one of the members of immunoglobulin superfamily which, like CTLA-4 and PD-1, is involved in down regulation of immune response. Despite the important role of BTLA in maintaining immune homeostasis, relatively little studies were devoted to the relationship of polymorphisms in the gene encoding BTLA with susceptibility to autoimmune disease and cancer. Moreover, all published works were done in Asian populations. BTLA gene is located on chromosome 3 in q13.2 and consists of five exons. The aim of this study was to investigate the alleles, genotypes and haplotypes frequency of selected BTLA gene polymorphisms in Caucasian population originating from Poland. For this study, the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were chosen on the basis of literature data. Additionally, the tag dSNP under linkage equilibrium r (2) > 0.8 and available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) for Caucasian population of rare alleles at a frequency greater than 5 % have been chosen using the NCBI database. The ten BTLA SNPs investigated were: rs1844089, rs2705535, rs9288952, rs9288953, rs1982809, rs2633580, rs2705511, rs2705565, rs76844316, rs16859633. For all SNPs selected on the basis of literature data the significantly different distributions of genotypes between Asian and Caucasian populations were observed.

  5. Different Alleles of a Gene Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase (PaLAR3) Influence Resistance against the Fungus Heterobasidion parviporum in Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Nemesio-Gorriz, Miguel; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Ihrmark, Katarina; Källman, Thomas; Olson, Åke; Lascoux, Martin; Stenlid, Jan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Elfstrand, Malin

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that fungal diseases are a growing menace for conifers in modern silviculture, only a very limited number of molecular markers for pathogen resistance have been validated in conifer species. A previous genetic study indicated that the resistance of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to Heterobasidion annosum s.l., a pathogenic basidiomycete species complex, is linked to a quantitative trait loci that associates with differences in fungal growth in sapwood (FGS) that includes a gene, PaLAR3, which encodes a leucoanthocyanidin reductase. In this study, gene sequences showed the presence of two PaLAR3 allelic lineages in P. abies. Higher resistance was associated with the novel allele, which was found in low frequency in the four P. abies populations that we studied. Norway spruce plants carrying at least one copy of the novel allele showed a significant reduction in FGS after inoculation with Heterobasidion parviporum compared to their half-siblings carrying no copies, indicating dominance of this allele. The amount of (+) catechin, the enzymatic product of PaLAR3, was significantly higher in bark of trees homozygous for the novel allele. Although we observed that the in vitro activities of the enzymes encoded by the two alleles were similar, we could show that allele-specific transcript levels were significantly higher for the novel allele, indicating that regulation of gene expression is responsible for the observed effects in resistance, possibly caused by differences in cis-acting elements that we observe in the promoter region of the two alleles.

  6. Two bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter region of the horse tumour necrosis factor alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Matiasovic, J; Lukeszová, L; Horín, P

    2002-08-01

    Primers based on GenBank sequences within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the human and horse tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) genes were designed and used to amplify a 522-bp product. Sequencing of five clones derived from five independent PCRs obtained from three different animals of three different breeds (Old Kladruber, Akhal-Teke and Shetland Pony) revealed a high level of sequence identity to the TNF-alpha promoter regions of other species. The existing GenBank horse sequences were confirmed and extended upstream by 230 nucleotides. Based on the sequence obtained, a new horse-specific forward primer was designed to amplify a 213-bp PCR product, which was screened for polymorphism using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Three allelic variants of the horse TNF-alpha gene were identified and sequenced (GenBank accession numbers ADF 349558-60). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms explained the existence of the three SSCP alleles detected: C/T and T/C single base pair substitutions at positions 137 and 147, respectively. Differences in allelic frequencies between Old Kladruber and Akhal-Teke breeds were observed.

  7. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Lee, Jong-Min; Alonso, Isabel; Gusella, James F; Smoller, Jordan W; Sklar, Pamela; MacDonald, Marcy E; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that are caused by huntingtin gene (HTT) CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles of 36 or more units. A greater than expected prevalence of incompletely penetrant HTT CAG repeat alleles observed among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder raises the possibility that another mood disorder, bipolar disorder, could likewise be associated with Huntington's disease. We assessed the distribution of HTT CAG repeat alleles in a cohort of individuals with bipolar disorder. HTT CAG allele sizes from 2,229 Caucasian individuals diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were compared to allele sizes in 1,828 control individuals from multiple cohorts. We found that HTT CAG repeat alleles > 35 units were observed in only one of 4,458 chromosomes from individuals with bipolar disorder, compared to three of 3,656 chromosomes from control subjects. These findings do not support an association between bipolar disorder and Huntington's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Distribution of DI*A and DI*B Allele Frequencies and Comparisons among Central Thai and Other Populations

    PubMed Central

    Nathalang, Oytip; Panichrum, Puangpaka; Intharanut, Kamphon; Thattanon, Phatchira; Nathalang, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Alloantibodies to the Diego (DI) blood group system, anti-Dia and anti-Dib are clinically significant in causing hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), especially in Asian populations with Mongolian ancestry. This study aimed to report the frequency of the DI*A and DI*B alleles in a Central Thai population and to compare them with those of other populations previously published. Altogether, 1,011 blood samples from unrelated healthy blood donors at the National Blood Centre, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok were included. Only 391 samples were tested with anti-Dia by conventional tube technique. All samples were genotyped for DI*A and DI*B alleles using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) technique. The DI phenotyping and genotyping results were in 100% concordance. The DI*A and DI*B allele frequencies among 1,011 Central Thais were 0.0183 (37/2,022) and 0.9817 (1,985/2,022), respectively. Allele frequencies were compared between Central Thai and other populations. Our data shows that DI*A and DI*B allele frequencies are similar to Southeast Asian, Brazilian, Southern Brazilian and American Native populations; whereas, these frequencies significantly differ from those reported in East Asian, Italian, Alaska Native/Aleut, Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and Filipino populations (P<0.05), corresponding to the results of a matrix of geometric genetic distances. This study confirms that the prevalence of DI*A and DI*B alleles among Central Thais is similar to Southeast Asians and different to others populations of the world. A PCR-based identification of DI genotyping should overcome some of the serological limitations in transfusion medicine and provides a complementary tool for further population-genetic studies. PMID:27764238

  9. Regulatory Divergence between Parental Alleles Determines Gene Expression Patterns in Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. PMID:25819221

  10. Regulatory divergence between parental alleles determines gene expression patterns in hybrids.

    PubMed

    Combes, Marie-Christine; Hueber, Yann; Dereeper, Alexis; Rialle, Stéphanie; Herrera, Juan-Carlos; Lashermes, Philippe

    2015-03-29

    Both hybridization and allopolyploidization generate novel phenotypes by conciliating divergent genomes and regulatory networks in the same cellular context. To understand the rewiring of gene expression in hybrids, the total expression of 21,025 genes and the allele-specific expression of over 11,000 genes were quantified in interspecific hybrids and their parental species, Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides using RNA-seq technology. Between parental species, cis- and trans-regulatory divergences affected around 32% and 35% of analyzed genes, respectively, with nearly 17% of them showing both. The relative importance of trans-regulatory divergences between both species could be related to their low genetic divergence and perennial habit. In hybrids, among divergently expressed genes between parental species and hybrids, 77% was expressed like one parent (expression level dominance), including 65% like C. eugenioides. Gene expression was shown to result from the expression of both alleles affected by intertwined parental trans-regulatory factors. A strong impact of C. eugenioides trans-regulatory factors on the upregulation of C. canephora alleles was revealed. The gene expression patterns appeared determined by complex combinations of cis- and trans-regulatory divergences. In particular, the observed biased expression level dominance seemed to be derived from the asymmetric effects of trans-regulatory parental factors on regulation of alleles. More generally, this study illustrates the effects of divergent trans-regulatory parental factors on the gene expression pattern in hybrids. The characteristics of the transcriptional response to hybridization appear to be determined by the compatibility of gene regulatory networks and therefore depend on genetic divergences between the parental species and their evolutionary history. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, V; Zweiniger, C; Surendranath, V; Lang, K; Schöfl, G; Dahl, A; Winkler, S; Lange, V; Böhme, I; Schmidt, A H

    2017-08-01

    The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5'- to 3'-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly accurate HLA full-length consensus sequences. Remaining conflicts are resolved using the R package DR2S (Dual Redundant Reference Sequencing). Given the relatively high throughput of this strategy, we have developed the semi-automated web service TypeLoader, to aid in the submission of sequences to the EMBL-ENA and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. In the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database release 3.24.0 (April 2016; prior to the submission of the sequences described here), only 5.2% of all known HLA alleles have been fully characterised together with intronic and UTR sequences. So far, we have applied our strategy to characterise and submit 1056 HLA alleles, thereby more than doubling the number of fully characterised alleles. Given the increasing application of next generation sequencing (NGS) for full gene characterisation in clinical practice, extending the HLA database concomitantly is highly desirable. Therefore, we propose this dual redundant sequencing strategy as a workflow for submission of novel full-length alleles and characterisation of sequences that are as yet incomplete. This would help to mitigate the predominance of partially known alleles in the database. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Protective Effect of R Allele of PON1 Gene on the Coronary Artery Disease in the Presence of Specific Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Balcerzyk, Anna; Zak, Iwona; Krauze, Jolanta

    2008-01-01

    Background: Genetic susceptibility to CAD may be determined by polymorphic variants of genes encoding isoforms involved in the processes important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, including lipids disorders. Participation of single polymorphic variants is relatively small, however its significance may increase in the presence of specific genetic or environmental background. Aim: The aim of the study was an evaluation a possible association between single polymorphic variants of PON1, APOE, ABCA1 and PPARA genes and CAD and looking for specific multigene genotype patterns which differentiate study groups. Materials and methods: We studied 358 subjects:178 patients with angiographically confirmed CAD and 180 blood donors without history of CAD. Polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. Results: We observed statistically significant differences in the frequencies of R allele and R allele carriers of PON1 gene between CAD and controls. The distribution of genotypes and alleles of other analyzed genes did not differentiate the study groups, however the presence of specific genotypes (APOE– ɛ3ɛ3, ɛ3ɛ2, ABCA1 – AG, PPARA – GG) increased the protective effect of R allele. Conclusion: The present study revealed an independent protective association between carrier-state of PON1 R allele and CAD. This protective effect was especially strong in the presence of specific genotype arrangements of other analyzed genes. PMID:18219093

  13. Protective effect of R allele of PON1 gene on the coronary artery disease in the presence of specific genetic background.

    PubMed

    Balcerzyk, Anna; Zak, Iwona; Krauze, Jolanta

    2008-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to CAD may be determined by polymorphic variants of genes encoding isoforms involved in the processes important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, including lipids disorders. Participation of single polymorphic variants is relatively small, however its significance may increase in the presence of specific genetic or environmental background. The aim of the study was an evaluation a possible association between single polymorphic variants of PON1, APOE, ABCA1 and PPARA genes and CAD and looking for specific multigene genotype patterns which differentiate study groups. We studied 358 subjects:178 patients with angiographically confirmed CAD and 180 blood donors without history of CAD. Polymorphisms were genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. We observed statistically significant differences in the frequencies of R allele and R allele carriers of PON1 gene between CAD and controls. The distribution of genotypes and alleles of other analyzed genes did not differentiate the study groups, however the presence of specific genotypes (APOE& ndash; epsilon3epsilon3, epsilon3epsilon2, ABCA1 - AG, PPARA - GG) increased the protective effect of R allele. The present study revealed an independent protective association between carrier-state of PON1 R allele and CAD. This protective effect was especially strong in the presence of specific genotype arrangements of other analyzed genes.

  14. New alleles of the wheat domestication gene Q reveal multiple roles in growth and reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Julian R; Finnegan, E Jean; Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Trevaskis, Ben; Swain, Steve M

    2017-06-01

    The advantages of free threshing in wheat led to the selection of the domesticated Q allele, which is now present in almost all modern wheat varieties. Q and the pre-domestication allele, q, encode an AP2 transcription factor, with the domesticated allele conferring a free-threshing character and a subcompact (i.e. partially compact) inflorescence (spike). We demonstrate that mutations in the miR172 binding site of the Q gene are sufficient to increase transcript levels via a reduction in miRNA-dependent degradation, consistent with the conclusion that a single nucleotide polymorphism in the miRNA binding site of Q relative to q was essential in defining the modern Q allele. We describe novel gain- and loss-of-function alleles of Q and use these to define new roles for this gene in spike development. Q is required for the suppression of 'sham ramification', and increased Q expression can lead to the formation of ectopic florets and spikelets (specialized inflorescence branches that bear florets and grains), resulting in a deviation from the canonical spike and spikelet structures of domesticated wheat. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Several Different Lactase Persistence Associated Alleles and High Diversity of the Lactase Gene in the Admixed Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Deise C.; Santos, Sidney E. B.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K. C.; Hutz, Mara H.

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The −13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The −13779*C,−13910*T, −13937*A, −14010*C, −14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was −13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The −13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the −13910*T allele is an oversimplification. PMID:23029545

  16. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification.

  17. High allele frequency of CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910) in a Negrito's subtribe population in Malaysia; Aboriginal people of Jahai.

    PubMed

    Rosdi, Rasmaizatul Akma; Mohd Yusoff, Narazah; Ismail, Rusli; Soo Choon, Tan; Saleem, Mohamed; Musa, Nurfadhlina; Yusoff, Surini

    2016-09-01

    CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms modulate inter-individual variations in the human body's responses to various endogenous and exogenous drug substrates. To date, little is known about the CYP2C9 gene polymorphisms among the aboriginal populations of the world, including those in Malaysia. To characterise and compare the CYP2C9 polymorphisms (CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2C9*4 and CYP2C9*5) between one of Malaysia's aboriginal populations, Jahai, with the national major ethnic, Malay. To also compare the allele frequencies from these two populations with available data of other aboriginal populations around the world. The extracted DNA of 155 Jahais and 183 Malays was genotyped for CYP2C9 polymorphisms using a nested multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. The results were confirmed by DNA direct sequencing. Genotyping results revealed that CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*4 and CYP2C9*5 were absent in Jahais, while only the latter two were absent in Malays. The CYP2C9*3 allelic frequency in Jahais was 36.2%, making them the most frequent carriers of the allele thus far reported in any ethnic group from Southeast Asia. The high frequency of CYP2C9*3 and the absence of CYP2C9*2 in Jahais suggest that genetic drift may be occurring in this ethnic group. This is the first study to determine the CYP2C9 polymorphisms in an aboriginal population in Malaysia.

  18. The allelic relationship of genes giving resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus in blackgram.

    PubMed

    Verma, R P; Singh, D P

    1986-09-01

    The allelic relationship of resistance genes for MYMV was studied in blackgram (V. mungo (L.) Hepper). The resistant donors to MYMV - 'Pant U84' and 'UPU 2', and their F1, F2 and F3 generations - were inoculated artificially using an insect vector, whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.). The two recessive genes previously reported for resistance were found to be the same in both donors.

  19. Inference of population structure using multilocus genotype data: linked loci and correlated allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Falush, Daniel; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2003-01-01

    We describe extensions to the method of Pritchard et al. for inferring population structure from multilocus genotype data. Most importantly, we develop methods that allow for linkage between loci. The new model accounts for the correlations between linked loci that arise in admixed populations ("admixture linkage disequilibium"). This modification has several advantages, allowing (1) detection of admixture events farther back into the past, (2) inference of the population of origin of chromosomal regions, and (3) more accurate estimates of statistical uncertainty when linked loci are used. It is also of potential use for admixture mapping. In addition, we describe a new prior model for the allele frequencies within each population, which allows identification of subtle population subdivisions that were not detectable using the existing method. We present results applying the new methods to study admixture in African-Americans, recombination in Helicobacter pylori, and drift in populations of Drosophila melanogaster. The methods are implemented in a program, structure, version 2.0, which is available at http://pritch.bsd.uchicago.edu. PMID:12930761

  20. Allele frequencies of D21S11, FGA, TH01, and VWA in populations of the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Huckenbeck, W; Scheil, H G; Schmidt, H D; Efremovska, L; Mikerezi, I

    2004-12-01

    This study is part of an extensive investigation of the genetic relationship between Balkan populations, especially the Aromuns. Allele frequencies of four STRs (D21S11, FGA, TH01, VWA) from Macedonians (Skopje), Gramostian Aromuns from the Stip region (Macedonia), Moskopolian Aromuns from Krusevo (Macedonia), and Musequiar Aromuns from Dukasi (Albania) are presented.

  1. Magnitude and Allele Frequency of Cry1F Resistance in Field Populations of the Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos-Amaya, O F; Tavares, C S; Rodrigues, J V C; Souza, T C; Rodrigues-Silva, N; Guedes, R N C; Alves, A P; Pereira, E J G

    2017-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn producing the Cry1F protein was the first highly efficacious Bt corn deployed against the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil, but reduced efficacy of this technology against the fall armyworm has been reported in some regions of the country. Here, we surveyed Cry1F resistance allele frequency and susceptibility of eight S. frugiperda populations collected in 2013 from non-Bt fields in different regions of Brazil. In F1 screen experiments, the overall frequency of the Cry1F resistance alleles in Brazilian populations was estimated at 0.24, with 95% credibility interval between 0.18 and 0.25. In concentration-response bioassays, five of the eight populations surveyed exhibited significant resistance levels, which were over 32 times higher than that of the standard susceptible laboratory strain. The estimates of Cry1F resistance allele frequency were positively correlated with those of median effective or lethal concentrations (i.e., EC50 or LC50). These results show that the allelic frequency and the magnitude of Cry1F resistance are high in field populations of S. frugiperda in Brazil, indicating a challenging situation for resistance management. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  3. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections.

  4. Genome-wide transcript analysis of maize hybrids: allelic additive gene expression and yield heterosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Yang, Xiaofeng; Crasta, Oswald; Zinselmeier, Christopher; Smith, Oscar S; Bowen, Ben

    2006-09-01

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, has been widely exploited in plant breeding for many decades, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we applied genome-wide transcript profiling to gain a global picture of the ways in which a large proportion of genes are expressed in the immature ear tissues of a series of 16 maize hybrids that vary in their degree of heterosis. Key observations include: (1) the proportion of allelic additively expressed genes is positively associated with hybrid yield and heterosis; (2) the proportion of genes that exhibit a bias towards the expression level of the paternal parent is negatively correlated with hybrid yield and heterosis; and (3) there is no correlation between the over- or under-expression of specific genes in maize hybrids with either yield or heterosis. The relationship of the expression patterns with hybrid performance is substantiated by analysis of a genetically improved modern hybrid (Pioneer hybrid 3394) versus a less improved older hybrid (Pioneer hybrid 3306) grown at different levels of plant density stress. The proportion of allelic additively expressed genes is positively associated with the modern high yielding hybrid, heterosis and high yielding environments, whereas the converse is true for the paternally biased gene expression. The dynamic changes of gene expression in hybrids responding to genotype and environment may result from differential regulation of the two parental alleles. Our findings suggest that differential allele regulation may play an important role in hybrid yield or heterosis, and provide a new insight to the molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms of heterosis.

  5. The role of allelic variation in estrogen receptor genes and major depression in the Nurses Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, K.; Agnew-Blais, J.; Roberts, A.; Hamilton, A.; De Vivo, I.; Ranu, H.; Koenen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of exogenous and endogenous sex hormones in the etiology of depression remains elusive, in part because sex hormone variation is often correlated with behaviors, life stage changes, and other factors that may influence depression. Estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and beta (ESR2) are known to regulate gene expression and estrogen response in areas of the brain associated with major depression and are unlikely to be correlated with exogenous factors that may influence depression. Methods We examined whether functional polymorphisms in these genes are associated with lifetime major depression and chronic major depression among a sample of women from the Nurses’ Health Study II (N=2,576). DSM-IV depressive disorder symptoms were assessed by structured interview in 2007. Genotyping was performed on DNA extracted from blood using Taq-man. Results Women with the AA alleles of ESR2 RS4986938 had the higher prevalence of lifetime major depression than women with other allele frequencies (36.7% for those with AA versus 28.5% with GA and 29.1% with GG, p=0.02) and chronic major depression (14.7% for those with AA versus 9.3% with GA and 9.1 % with GG, p=0.01). History of post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use modified the association of ESR1 polymorphism RS2234693 with any lifetime depression; specifically, those with the TT allele had the highest risk of lifetime depression among PMH users, and the lowest risk of depression among non-PMH users (p-value for interaction=0.02). Further, carriers of the AA alleles in ESR1 polymorphism RS9340799 had increased prevalence of lifetime major depression only among lifetime PMH-users (p=0.007). Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that estrogen receptor polymorphisms influence risk for major depression; the role of estrogen receptors and other sex steroid-related genetic factors may provide unique insights into etiology. PMID:26169989

  6. Transcription factor ATF-3 regulates allele variation phenotypes of the human SLC11A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Taka, Styliani; Gazouli, Maria; Politis, Panagotis K; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Anagnou, Nicholas P

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the human solute carrier family 11 member 1 (SLC11A1) gene predispose to susceptibility to infectious/inflammatory diseases and cancer. Human susceptibility to these diseases exhibits allelic association with a polymorphic regulatory Z-DNA-forming microsatellite of a (GT/AC)n repeat. The carriage of different alleles may influence chromatin remodeling and accessibility by transcription factors. Of particular importance is the binding site for the Activating Protein 1 (AP-1) elements, (ATF-3 and c-Jun), adjacent to the 5' sequence of the Z-DNA-forming polymorphism. The aim of the study was to characterize the transcriptional mechanisms controlling different alleles of SLC11A1 expression by ATF-3 and c-Jun. Allele 2, [T(GT)5AC(GT)5AC(GT)10GGCAGA(G)6], and Allele 3, [T(GT)5AC(GT)5AC(GT)9GGCAGA(G)6], were subcloned into the PGL2Basic vector. Transient transfections of THP-1 cells with the constructs, in the presence or absence of pATF-3 were preformed. Luciferase expression was determined. To document the recruitment of ATF-3 and c-Jun, to the polymorphic promoter alleles in vivo, we performed ChIP assays with transient transfected THP-1 cells treated with or without lipopolyssacharides. Our data documented that ATF-3 suppresses the transcriptional activation of Allele-3, and this suppression is enhanced in the presence of lipopolyssacharides. Our findings suggest that ATF-3 and c-Jun may influence heritable variation in SLC11A1-dependent innate resistance to infection and inflammation both within and between populations.

  7. Powerful Identification of Cis-regulatory SNPs in Human Primary Monocytes Using Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Maouche, Seraya; Göring, Harald H. H.; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Enström, Camilla; Brocheton, Jessy; Proust, Carole; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Jolley, Jennifer; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Foad, Nicola; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Stephens, Jonathan; Gwilliam, Rhian; Rice, Catherine M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Pastinen, Tomi; Deloukas, Panos; Goodall, Alison H.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Cambien, François; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs) by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers. PMID:23300628

  8. How species evolve collectively: implications of gene flow and selection for the spread of advantageous alleles

    PubMed Central

    MORJAN, CARRIE L.; RIESEBERG, LOREN H.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that species are held together through gene flow has been challenged by observations that migration is too restricted among populations of many species to prevent local divergence. However, only very low levels of gene flow are necessary to permit the spread of highly advantageous alleles, providing an alternative means by which low-migration species might be held together. We re-evaluate these arguments given the recent and wide availability of indirect estimates of gene flow. Our literature review of FST values for a broad range of taxa suggests that gene flow in many taxa is considerably greater than suspected from earlier studies and often is sufficiently high to homogenize even neutral alleles. However, there are numerous species from essentially all organismal groups that lack sufficient gene flow to prevent divergence. Crude estimates on the strength of selection on phenotypic traits and effect sizes of quantitative trait loci (QTL) suggest that selection coefficients for leading QTL underlying phenotypic traits may be high enough to permit their rapid spread across populations. Thus, species may evolve collectively at major loci through the spread of favourable alleles, while simultaneously differentiating at other loci due to drift and local selection. PMID:15140081

  9. Ribosomal protein genes are highly enriched among genes with allele-specific expression in the interspecific F1 hybrid catfish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailu; Wang, Ruijia; Liu, Shikai; Peatman, Eric; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Jiang, Chen; Li, Chao; Li, Yun; Zeng, Qifan; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific hybrids provide a rich source for the analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE). In this work, we analyzed ASE in F1 hybrid catfish using RNA-Seq datasets. While the vast majority of genes were expressed with both alleles, 7-8 % SNPs exhibited significant differences in allele ratios of expression. Of the 66,251 and 177,841 SNPs identified from the datasets of the liver and gill, 5420 (8.2 %) and 13,390 (7.5 %) SNPs were identified as significant ASE-SNPs, respectively. With these SNPs, a total of 1519 and 3075 ASE-genes were identified. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (RP) were highly enriched among ASE genes. Parent-of-origin was determined for 27 and 30 ASE RP genes in the liver and gill, respectively. The results indicated that genes from both channel catfish and blue catfish were involved in ASE. However, each RP gene appeared to be almost exclusively expressed from only one parent, indicating that ribosomes in the hybrid catfish were in the "hybrid" form. Overall representation of RP transcripts among the transcriptome appeared lower in the F1 hybrid catfish than in channel catfish or blue catfish, suggesting that the "hybrid" ribosomes may work more efficiently for translation in the F1 hybrid catfish.

  10. Allelic dropout in the ENG gene, affecting the results of genetic testing in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817-3T>G in ENG) initially seemed to be homozygous for the mutation. To explore the possibility of allelic dropout causing a false result in this patient. Mutation analysis of additional family members was performed and haplotype analysis carried out. New primers were designed to reveal the presence of a possible sequence variant, which could explain the presumed allelic dropout. Allelic dropout caused by a six-nucleotide duplication close to the standard reverse primer was the assumed cause of a false homozygous diagnosis. Sequence variants outside of the primer regions can be the cause of allelic dropout, creating unforeseen errors in genotyping. Our finding emphasizes the need for careful quality control in all molecular genetic studies.

  11. A pseudodeficiency allele (D152N) of the human beta-glucuronidase gene.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R; Islam, M R; Sly, W; Chabas, A; Wevers, R; de Jong, J; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1995-10-01

    We present evidence that a 480G-->A transition in the coding region of the beta-glucuronidase gene, which results in an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine substitution at amino acid position 152 (D152N), produces a pseudodeficiency allele (GUSBp) that leads to greatly reduced levels of beta-glucuronidase activity without apparent deleterious consequences. The 480G-->A mutation was found initially in the pseudodeficient mother of a child with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPSVII), but it was not on her disease-causing allele, which carried the L176F mutation. The 480G-->A change was also present in an unrelated individual with another MPSVII allele who had unusually low beta-glucuronidase activity, but whose clinical symptoms were probably unrelated to beta-glucuronidase deficiency. This individual also had an R357X mutation, probably on his second allele. We screened 100 unrelated normal individuals for the 480G-->A mutation with a PCR method and detected one carrier. Reduced beta-glucuronidase activity following transfection of COS cells with the D152N cDNA supported the causal relationship between the D152N allele and pseudodeficiency. The mutation reduced the fraction of expressed enzyme that was secreted. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the reduced activity in COS cells was due to accelerated intracellular turnover of the D152N enzyme. They also suggested that a potential glycosylation site created by the mutation is utilized in approximately 50% of the enzyme expressed.

  12. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 432 healthy unrelated individuals from Albania.

    PubMed

    Sulcebe, Genc; Shyti, Erkena

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 allele and haplotype polymorphism in a population of 432 healthy individuals from Albania. First-field HLA genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific priming and/or oligonucleotide methods. The data were analyzed statistically using gene counting and Arlequin software packages. No deviation from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database and they can serve as a reference database for further HLA-based population genetics studies including the Albanian population. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. OutLyzer: software for extracting low-allele-frequency tumor mutations from sequencing background noise in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Etienne; Goardon, Nicolas; Brault, Baptiste; Rousselin, Antoine; Paimparay, Germain; Legros, Angelina; Fouillet, Robin; Bruet, Olivia; Tranchant, Aurore; Domin, Florian; San, Chankannira; Quesnelle, Céline; Frebourg, Thierry; Ricou, Agathe; Krieger, Sophie; Vaur, Dominique; Castera, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Highlighting tumoral mutations is a key step in oncology for personalizing care. Considering the genetic heterogeneity in a tumor, software used for detecting mutations should clearly distinguish real tumor events of interest that could be predictive markers for personalized medicine from false positives. OutLyzer is a new variant-caller designed for the specific and sensitive detection of mutations for research and diagnostic purposes. It is based on statistic and local evaluation of sequencing background noise to highlight potential true positive variants. 130 previously genotyped patients were sequenced after enrichment by capturing the exons of 22 genes. Sequencing data were analyzed by HaplotypeCaller, LofreqStar, Varscan2 and OutLyzer. OutLyzer had the best sensitivity and specificity with a fixed limit of detection for all tools of 1% for SNVs and 2% for Indels. OutLyzer is a useful tool for detecting mutations of interest in tumors including low allele-frequency mutations, and could be adopted in standard practice for delivering targeted therapies in cancer treatment. PMID:27825131

  15. Differential Recognition of Highly Divergent Downy Mildew Avirulence Gene Alleles by RPP1 Resistance Genes from Two Arabidopsis Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rehmany, Anne P.; Gordon, Anna; Rose, Laura E.; Allen, Rebecca L.; Armstrong, Miles R.; Whisson, Stephen C.; Kamoun, Sophien; Tyler, Brett M.; Birch, Paul R.J.; Beynon, Jim L.

    2005-01-01

    The perception of downy mildew avirulence (Arabidopsis thaliana Recognized [ATR]) gene products by matching Arabidopsis thaliana resistance (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica [RPP]) gene products triggers localized cell death (a hypersensitive response) in the host plant, and this inhibits pathogen development. The oomycete pathogen, therefore, is under selection pressure to alter the form of these gene products to prevent detection. That the pathogen maintains these genes indicates that they play a positive role in pathogen survival. Despite significant progress in cloning plant RPP genes and characterizing essential plant components of resistance signaling pathways, little progress has been made in identifying the oomycete molecules that trigger them. Concluding a map-based cloning effort, we have identified an avirulence gene, ATR1NdWsB, that is detected by RPP1 from the Arabidopsis accession Niederzenz in the cytoplasm of host plant cells. We report the cloning of six highly divergent alleles of ATR1NdWsB from eight downy mildew isolates and demonstrate that the ATR1NdWsB alleles are differentially recognized by RPP1 genes from two Arabidopsis accessions (Niederzenz and Wassilewskija). RPP1-Nd recognizes a single allele of ATR1NdWsB; RPP1-WsB also detects this allele plus three additional alleles with divergent sequences. The Emco5 isolate expresses an allele of ATR1NdWsB that is recognized by RPP1-WsB, but the isolate evades detection in planta. Although the Cala2 isolate is recognized by RPP1-WsA, the ATR1NdWsB allele from Cala2 is not, demonstrating that RPP1-WsA detects a novel ATR gene product. Cloning of ATR1NdWsB has highlighted the presence of a highly conserved novel amino acid motif in avirulence proteins from three different oomycetes. The presence of the motif in additional secreted proteins from plant pathogenic oomycetes and its similarity to a host-targeting signal from malaria parasites suggest a conserved role in pathogenicity. PMID

  16. Differential recognition of highly divergent downy mildew avirulence gene alleles by RPP1 resistance genes from two Arabidopsis lines.

    PubMed

    Rehmany, Anne P; Gordon, Anna; Rose, Laura E; Allen, Rebecca L; Armstrong, Miles R; Whisson, Stephen C; Kamoun, Sophien; Tyler, Brett M; Birch, Paul R J; Beynon, Jim L

    2005-06-01

    The perception of downy mildew avirulence (Arabidopsis thaliana Recognized [ATR]) gene products by matching Arabidopsis thaliana resistance (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica [RPP]) gene products triggers localized cell death (a hypersensitive response) in the host plant, and this inhibits pathogen development. The oomycete pathogen, therefore, is under selection pressure to alter the form of these gene products to prevent detection. That the pathogen maintains these genes indicates that they play a positive role in pathogen survival. Despite significant progress in cloning plant RPP genes and characterizing essential plant components of resistance signaling pathways, little progress has been made in identifying the oomycete molecules that trigger them. Concluding a map-based cloning effort, we have identified an avirulence gene, ATR1NdWsB, that is detected by RPP1 from the Arabidopsis accession Niederzenz in the cytoplasm of host plant cells. We report the cloning of six highly divergent alleles of ATR1NdWsB from eight downy mildew isolates and demonstrate that the ATR1NdWsB alleles are differentially recognized by RPP1 genes from two Arabidopsis accessions (Niederzenz and Wassilewskija). RPP1-Nd recognizes a single allele of ATR1NdWsB; RPP1-WsB also detects this allele plus three additional alleles with divergent sequences. The Emco5 isolate expresses an allele of ATR1NdWsB that is recognized by RPP1-WsB, but the isolate evades detection in planta. Although the Cala2 isolate is recognized by RPP1-WsA, the ATR1NdWsB allele from Cala2 is not, demonstrating that RPP1-WsA detects a novel ATR gene product. Cloning of ATR1NdWsB has highlighted the presence of a highly conserved novel amino acid motif in avirulence proteins from three different oomycetes. The presence of the motif in additional secreted proteins from plant pathogenic oomycetes and its similarity to a host-targeting signal from malaria parasites suggest a conserved role in pathogenicity.

  17. Allele distributions at hybrid incompatibility loci facilitate the potential for gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US.

    PubMed

    Craig, Stephanie M; Reagon, Michael; Resnick, Lauren E; Caicedo, Ana L

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of independent mutations over time in two populations often leads to reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation between diverging populations may be reinforced by barriers that occur either pre- or postzygotically. Hybrid sterility is the most common form of postzygotic isolation in plants. Four postzygotic sterility loci, comprising three hybrid sterility systems (Sa, s5, DPL), have been recently identified in Oryza sativa. These loci explain, in part, the limited hybridization that occurs between the domesticated cultivated rice varieties, O. sativa spp. japonica and O. sativa spp. indica. In the United States, cultivated fields of japonica rice are often invaded by conspecific weeds that have been shown to be of indica origin. Crop-weed hybrids have been identified in crop fields, but at low frequencies. Here we examined the possible role of these hybrid incompatibility loci in the interaction between cultivated and weedy rice. We identified a novel allele at Sa that seemingly prevents loss of fertility in hybrids. Additionally, we found wide-compatibility type alleles at strikingly high frequencies at the Sa and s5 loci in weed groups, and a general lack of incompatible alleles between crops and weeds at the DPL loci. Our results suggest that weedy individuals, particularly those of the SH and BRH groups, should be able to freely hybridize with the local japonica crop, and that prezygotic factors, such as differences in flowering time, have been more important in limiting weed-crop gene flow in the past. As the selective landscape for weedy rice changes due to increased use of herbicide resistant strains of cultivated rice, the genetic barriers that hinder indica-japonica hybridization cannot be counted on to limit the flow of favorable crop genes into weeds.

  18. Allelic expression of mammalian imprinted genes in a matrotrophic lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Oliver W; Brandley, Matthew C; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that results in the differential expression of genes depending on their parent of origin. It occurs in both plants and live-bearing mammals, with imprinted genes typically regulating the ability of an embryo to manipulate the maternal provision of nutrients. Genomic imprinting increases the potential for selection to act separately on paternally and maternally expressed genes, which increases the number of opportunities that selection can facilitate embryonic control over maternal nutrient provision. By looking for imprinting in an independent matrotrophic lineage, the viviparous lizard Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii (Scincidae), we test the hypothesis that genomic imprinting facilitates the evolution of substantial placental nutrient transport to embryos (matrotrophy). We sequenced transcriptomes from the embryonic component of lizard placentae to determine whether there are parent-of-origin differences in expression of genes that are imprinted in mammals. Of these genes, 19 had sufficiently high expression in the lizard to identify polymorphisms in transcribed sequences. We identified bi-allelic expression in 17 genes (including insulin-like growth factor 2), indicating that neither allele was imprinted. These data suggest that either genomic imprinting has not evolved in this matrotrophic skink or, if it has, it has evolved in different genes to mammals. We outline how these hypotheses can be tested. This study highlights important differences between mammalian and reptile pregnancy and the absence of any shared imprinting genes reflects fundamental differences in the way that pregnancy has evolved in these two lineages.

  19. Structural analysis of substitution patterns in alleles of human immunoglobulin VH genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Vargas-Madrazo, Enrique

    2005-05-01

    The diversity in repertoires of antibodies (Abs) needed in response to the antigen challenge is produced by evolutionary and somatic processes. The mechanisms operating at a somatic level have been studied in great detail. In contrast, neither the mechanisms nor the strategies of diversification at an evolutionary level have yet been understood in similar detail. Particularly, the substitution patterns in alleles of immunoglobulin genes (Igs) have not been systematically studied. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of studies which link the analysis at a genetic level of the diversification of repertoires with the structural consequences at the protein level of the changes in DNA information. For the purpose of systematically characterizing the strategies of evolutionary diversification through sequence variation at alleles, in this work, we built a database for all the alleles of the IGHV locus in humans reported until now. Based on these data, we performed diverse analyses of substitution patterns and linked these results with studies at the protein level. We found that the sequence diversification in different alleles does not operate with equal intensity for all V genes. Our studies, both of the number of substitutions and of the type of amino acid change per sub-segment of the V-REGION evidenced differences in the selective pressure to which these regions are exposed. The implications of these results for understanding the evolutionary diversification strategies, as well as for the somatic generation of antibody repertoires are discussed.

  20. Null alleles of the aldolase B gene in patients with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; Tunçman, G; Cross, N C; Vidailhet, M; Bökesoy, I; Gitzelmann, R; Cox, T M

    1994-06-01

    We report three new mutations in the gene for aldolase B that are associated with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Two nonsense mutations create opal termination codons: R3op (C-->T, Arg3-->ter, exon 2) was found in homozygous form in four affected members of a large consanguineous Turkish pedigree and R59op (C-->T, Arg59-->ter, exon 3) was found on one allele in a woman of Austrian origin known to harbour one copy of the east European mutation, N334K (Asn334-->Lys). The third mutation occurred in a French HFI patient known to be heterozygous for the widespread mutation, A174D (Ala174-->Asp): a single mutation, G-->A, in the consensus acceptor site 3' of intron 6 was found on the remaining allele. These mutations are predicted to abrogate synthesis of functional protein and thus represent null alleles of aldolase B. The mutant alleles can be readily detected in the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) or (for R59op and 3' intron 6) by digestion of amplified genomic fragments with DdeI or A1wNI, respectively, to facilitate direct diagnosis of HFI by molecular analysis of aldolase B genes.

  1. Expanding the Repertoire of Gene Tools for Precise Manipulation of the Clostridium difficile Genome: Allelic Exchange Using pyrE Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Sheryl; Collery, Mark M.; Janoir, Clare; Collignon, Anne; Cartman, Stephen T.; Minton, Nigel P.

    2013-01-01

    Sophisticated genetic tools to modify essential biological processes at the molecular level are pivotal in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare associated disease. Here we have developed an efficient procedure for making precise alterations to the C. difficile genome by pyrE-based allelic exchange. The robustness and reliability of the method was demonstrated through the creation of in-frame deletions in three genes (spo0A, cwp84, and mtlD) in the non-epidemic strain 630Δerm and two genes (spo0A and cwp84) in the epidemic PCR Ribotype 027 strain, R20291. The system is reliant on the initial creation of a pyrE deletion mutant, using Allele Coupled Exchange (ACE), that is auxotrophic for uracil and resistant to fluoroorotic acid (FOA). This enables the subsequent modification of target genes by allelic exchange using a heterologous pyrE allele from Clostridium sporogenes as a counter-/negative-selection marker in the presence of FOA. Following modification of the target gene, the strain created is rapidly returned to uracil prototrophy using ACE, allowing mutant phenotypes to be characterised in a PyrE proficient background. Crucially, wild-type copies of the inactivated gene may be introduced into the genome using ACE concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele. This allows complementation studies to be undertaken at an appropriate gene dosage, as opposed to the use of multicopy autonomous plasmids. The rapidity of the ‘correction’ method (5–7 days) makes pyrE− strains attractive hosts for mutagenesis studies. PMID:23405251

  2. Frequency Specific Effects of ApoE ε4 Allele on Resting-State Networks in Nondemented Elders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Li, Zhenzhen; Neuroimaging Initiative, Alzheimer's Disease

    2017-01-01

    We applied resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 allele effects on functional connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN). Considering the frequency specific effects of functional connectivity, we decomposed the brain network time courses into two bands: 0.01–0.027 Hz and 0.027–0.08 Hz. All scans were acquired by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroscience Initiative (ADNI). Thirty-two nondemented subjects were divided into two groups based on the presence (n = 16) or absence (n = 16) of the ApoE ε4 allele. We explored the frequency specific effects of ApoE ε4 allele on the default mode network (DMN) and the salience network (SN) functional connectivity. Compared to ε4 noncarriers, the DMN functional connectivity of ε4 carriers was significantly decreased while the SN functional connectivity of ε4 carriers was significantly increased. Many functional connectivities showed significant differences at the lower frequency band of 0.01–0.027 Hz or the higher frequency band of 0.027–0.08 Hz instead of the typical range of 0.01–0.08 Hz. The results indicated a frequency dependent effect of resting-state signals when investigating RSNs functional connectivity. PMID:28396874

  3. Allele frequency of hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia in American Quarter horses in Brazil determined by quantitative real-time PCR with high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Badial, Peres R; Oliveira-Filho, José P; Winand, Nena J; Borges, Alexandre S

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) is a genetic disorder that occurs in the American Quarter horse (AQH) and is caused by a c.115G>A missense mutation in the peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB) gene. Using a quantitative real-time PCR high resolution melting analysis genotyping assay for the PPIB mutation, the estimated HERDA allele and carrier frequencies in a sample of Brazilian AQHs were 2.9% and 5.8%, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene Deletion by Fluorescence-Reported Allelic Exchange Mutagenesis in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Konrad E.; Wolf, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although progress in Chlamydia genetics has been rapid, genomic modification has previously been limited to point mutations and group II intron insertions which truncate protein products. The bacterium has thus far been intractable to gene deletion or more-complex genomic integrations such as allelic exchange. Herein, we present a novel suicide vector dependent on inducible expression of a chlamydial gene that renders Chlamydia trachomatis fully genetically tractable and permits rapid reverse genetics by fluorescence-reported allelic exchange mutagenesis (FRAEM). We describe the first available system of targeting chlamydial genes for deletion or allelic exchange as well as curing plasmids from C. trachomatis serovar L2. Furthermore, this approach permits the monitoring of mutagenesis by fluorescence microscopy without disturbing bacterial growth, a significant asset when manipulating obligate intracellular organisms. As proof of principle, trpA was successfully deleted and replaced with a sequence encoding both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-lactamase. The trpA-deficient strain was unable to grow in indole-containing medium, and this phenotype was reversed by complementation with trpA expressed in trans. To assess reproducibility at alternate sites, FRAEM was repeated for genes encoding type III secretion effectors CTL0063, CTL0064, and CTL0065. In all four cases, stable mutants were recovered one passage after the observation of transformants, and allelic exchange was limited to the specific target gene, as confirmed by whole-genome sequencing. Deleted sequences were not detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) from isogenic mutant populations. We demonstrate that utilization of the chlamydial suicide vector with FRAEM renders C. trachomatis highly amenable to versatile and efficient genetic manipulation. PMID:26787828

  5. Identification of strong allele association and candidate cDNAs for the Spinal Muscular Atrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, C.J.; Carpten, J.; Fuerst, P.

    1994-09-01

    The gene responsible for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) has been localized to a 850kb region on chromosome 5q11.2-q13.3 between the loci D5S823 and K5S557. This region is extremely complex and consequently the isolation of candidate cDNAs has been difficult. We have isolated a unique dinucleotide repeat marker, Ag1-CA, that maps to this interval and identifies 1, 2 or rarely 3 alleles per chromosome. We have conducted allelic association studies to identify the minimal region that should be searched for candidate cDNAs. Ag1-CA demonstrates the strongest allelic association observed to date with SMA (p<10{sup -4}) in at least 3 populations: French Canadian (HSJ), German and American (OSU) and acts to core two consensus haplotypes observed in the French Canadian population. Class 1 (single Ag1-CA allele) and Class II (2 or 3 alleles) chromosomes were found to be significantly different in Type 1 (p=.0003 OSU; .0012 HSJ) and Type II (p=.001 OSU; .001 HSJ) patients and there was no difference between Type III and normals (p=.5 OSU; .25 HSJ). 72% of Type I patients are Class I homozygotes while 78% of Type II patients are Class I/Class II heterozygotes indicating that the allele class marks the clinical severity of this disease. In addition, deletions may be responsible for the allele loss seen in 9% of German Type I SMA families where one parent fails to contribute any alleles of this locus to the affected child. Given the above results and the fact that we have shown this region to be unstable and frequently deleted in YACs, we have cloned greater than 500 kb surrounding the Ag1-CA locus in cosmids and P1 clones with maximum redundancy. Partial sequence data from one clone has revealed an ORF and no strong similarities to known sequences. In order to isolate the full length transcript we have used this clone in cDNA hybridizations and isolated an additional 8 cDNAs. Currently we are analyzing this cDNA in our patient population to determine if it is the SMA gene.

  6. Real-Time PCR Genotyping Assay for GM2 Gangliosidosis Variant 0 in Toy Poodles and the Mutant Allele Frequency in Japan

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; YABUKI, Akira; KOHYAMA, Moeko; MITANI, Sawane; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; UDDIN, Mohammad Mejbah; CHANG, Hye-Sook; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; KISHIMOTO, Miori; YAMABE, Remi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles. PMID:24161966

  7. Neonatal screening for hereditary fructose intolerance: frequency of the most common mutant aldolase B allele (A149P) in the British population.

    PubMed

    James, C L; Rellos, P; Ali, M; Heeley, A F; Cox, T M

    1996-10-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) causes severe and sometimes fatal metabolic disturbances in infants and children but responds to dietary treatment. To determine the practicability of screening newborn infants for HFI, we have investigated the frequency of the most common and widespread mutant allele of aldolase B, A149P, in the neonatal population. The polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify aldolase B exon 5 genomic sequences in DNA present in dried blood specimens preserved on Guthrie cards. The A149P mutation was identified by discriminatory hybridisation to allele specific oligonucleotides and confirmed independently by digestion with the restriction endonuclease BsaHI. Twenty-seven A149P heterozygotes were identified by the molecular analysis of aldolase B genes in blood samples obtained from a random cohort of 2050 subjects born in 1994 and 1995, 1.32 +/- 0.49% (95% confidence level). Although no A149P homozygotes were identified, the data allow the frequency of 1 in 23,000 homozygotes for this allele to be predicted. Our findings have implications for establishing an interventional mass screening programme to identify newborn infants with HFI in the UK.

  8. Identification of genes escaping X inactivation by allelic expression analysis in a novel hybrid mouse model.

    PubMed

    Berletch, Joel B; Ma, Wenxiu; Yang, Fan; Shendure, Jay; Noble, William S; Disteche, Christine M; Deng, Xinxian

    2015-12-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a female-specific mechanism that serves to balance gene dosage between the sexes whereby one X chromosome in females is inactivated during early development. Despite this silencing, a small portion of genes escape inactivation and remain expressed from the inactive X (Xi). Little is known about the distribution of escape from XCI in different tissues in vivo and about the mechanisms that control tissue-specific differences. Using a new binomial model in conjunction with a mouse model with identifiable alleles and skewed X inactivation we are able to survey genes that escape XCI in vivo. We show that escape from X inactivation can be a common feature of some genes, whereas others escape in a tissue specific manner. Furthermore, we characterize the chromatin environment of escape genes and show that expression from the Xi correlates with factors associated with open chromatin and that CTCF co-localizes with escape genes. Here, we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and data analysis pipeline we used to assay allele-specific expression and epigenetic characteristics of genes escaping X inactivation. The data is publicly available through the GEO database under ascension numbers GSM1014171, GSE44255, and GSE59779. Interpretation and discussion of these data are included in a previously published study (Berletch et al., 2015) [1].

  9. The heterogeneous allelic repertoire of human toll-like receptor (TLR) genes.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak

    2009-11-17

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are critical elements of the innate arm of the vertebrate immune system. They constitute a multigenic family of receptors which collectively bind a diverse array of--exogeneous as well as endogeneous--ligands. An exponential burst of knowledge has defined their biological role in fight against infections and generation/modulation of auto-immune disorders. Hence, they could at least be conceptually recognized--despite being structurally unrelated - as innate counterparts to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules--equally recognizing antigenic ligands (albeit structurally more homogeneous i.e., peptides), again derived from self and/or non-self sources--preeminent this time in adaptive immunity. Our great disparities in face of infections and/or susceptibility to auto-immune diseases have provoked an intense search for genetic explanations, in part satisfied by the extraordinary MHC allelic repertoire. An equally in-depth and systematic analysis of TLR diversity is lacking despite numerous independent reports of a growing number of SNPs within these loci. The work described here aims at providing a preliminary picture of the allelic repertoire--and not purely SNPs--of all 10 human TLR coding sequences (with exception of TLR3) within a single cohort of up to 100 individuals. It appears from our work that TLR are unequally polymorphic: TLR2 (DNA alleles: 7/protein alleles: 3), 4 (4/3), 7 (6/3), 8 (9/2) and 9 (8/3) being comparatively least diverse whereas TLR1 (11/10), 5 (14/12), 6 (10/8) and 10 (15/10) show a substantial number of alleles. In addition to allelic assignment of a large number of SNPs, 10 new polymorphic positions were hereby identified. Hence this work depicts a first overview of the diversity of almost all human TLR genes, a prelude for large-scale population genetics as well as genetic association studies.

  10. Epidemiological and Evolutionary Outcomes in Gene-for-Gene and Matching Allele Models

    PubMed Central

    Thrall, Peter H.; Barrett, Luke G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Burdon, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-for-gene (GFG) and matching-allele (MA) models are qualitatively different paradigms for describing the outcome of genetic interactions between hosts and pathogens. The GFG paradigm was largely built on the foundations of Flor’s early work on the flax–flax rust interaction and is based on the concept of genetic recognition leading to incompatible disease outcomes, typical of host immune recognition. In contrast, the MA model is based on the assumption that genetic recognition leads to compatible interactions, which can result when pathogens require specific host factors to cause infection. Results from classical MA and GFG models have led to important predictions regarding various coevolutionary phenomena, including the role of fitness costs associated with resistance and infectivity, the distribution of resistance genes in wild populations, patterns of local adaptation and the evolution and maintenance of sexual reproduction. Empirical evidence (which we review briefly here), particularly from recent molecular advances in understanding of the mechanisms that determine the outcome of host–pathogen encounters, suggests considerable variation in specific details of the functioning of interactions between hosts and pathogens, which may contain elements of both models. In this regard, GFG and MA scenarios likely represent endpoints of a continuum of potentially more complex interactions that occur in nature. Increasingly, this has been recognized in theoretical studies of coevolutionary processes in plant host–pathogen and animal host-parasite associations (e.g., departures from strict GFG/MA assumptions, diploid genetics, multi-step infection processes). However, few studies have explored how different genetic assumptions about host resistance and pathogen infectivity might impact on disease epidemiology or pathogen persistence within and among populations. Here, we use spatially explicit simulations of the basic MA and GFG scenarios to highlight

  11. Association between a high-expressing interferon-gamma allele and a lower frequency of kidney angiomyolipomas in TSC2 patients.

    PubMed

    Dabora, Sandra L; Roberts, Penelope; Nieto, Andres; Perez, Ron; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Franz, David; Bissler, John; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Sims, Katherine; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2002-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a familial hamartoma syndrome in which renal involvement is common and, at times, life threatening. We have investigated the potential effect of a non-TSC gene on renal disease in a cohort of 172 TSC patients with TSC2 mutations. Patients were genotyped for an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) microsatellite polymorphism, within intron 1, for which one common allele (allele 2, with 12 CA repeats) has been shown to have a higher expression of IFN-gamma. A chi(2) analysis was used to examine the association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the development of kidney angiomyolipomas (KAMLs) in this TSC2 cohort. Because of the age-dependent development of KAMLs in TSC, we initially focused on the 127 patients who were >5 years old. Additional subgroup analyses were done to investigate the influence of age and gender. The transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) was also performed in a subset of this cohort (46 probands) for whom parent and/or sibling samples were available for analysis. Both chi(2) analysis and TDT suggested an association between IFN-gamma allele 2 and the absence of KAMLs in patients who have known TSC2 mutations. Among the 127 patients who were >5 years old, KAMLs were present in 95 (75%) and were absent in 32 (25%). In the group with KAML present, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was 56%; in the group with KAML absent, the frequency of IFN-gamma allele 2 was significantly higher, at 78% (P=.02, by chi(2) analysis). The family-based TDT analysis gave similar results, with a TDT statistic (TDT chi2=5.45) corresponding to a P value of.02. Subgroup analyses show that both age and gender may influence the impact of this association. Although these results should be replicated in other populations with TSC, the present study suggests that modifier genes play a role in the variable expression of TSC and also suggests a potential therapy for KAMLs in patients with TSC.

  12. High incidence of allelic loss at 16q12.2 region spanning RBL2/p130 gene in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Priya, Kadam; Jada, Srinivasa Rao; Quah, Boon Long; Quah, Thuan Chong; Lai, Poh San

    2009-04-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common intra-ocular tumor that manifests in early childhood. It is initiated by the inactivation of RB1/p105 gene, a prototype tumor suppressor gene. However, observed recurrent chromosomal aberrations accompanying RB1/p105 mutations suggest the involvement of additional mutational events. Chromosome 16q is one of the loci with recurrent losses which are likely to contain tumor suppressor genes. In this study, allelic loss was demonstrated at a second locus for retinoblastoma, RBL2/p130 on 16q12.2. Using intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs1074182 and rs10748) and flanking extragenic microsatellite markers (D16S411 and D16S408), 40 retinoblastoma tumor samples were analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of these markers was found in 11 (57.9%) out of 19 informative tumors at the RBL2/p130 gene locus and while a total of 15 (78.9%) tumors showed LOH in at least one marker. Deletions extending more than 13 cM across the pericentromeric region of 16q12.1-q13 were inferred from four tumors. Microsatellite instability was observed in two other tumors at the flanking markers. No mutations were found in RBL2/p130 exons 19-22 coding for the protein domain critical for biological activity. This is the first evidence of LOH within RBL2/p130 gene in retinoblastoma. The high frequency of allelic loss provides further evidence on the implication of this gene in retinoblastoma development and/or progression.

  13. Allele-specific gene expression in a wild nonhuman primate population.

    PubMed

    Tung, J; Akinyi, M Y; Mutura, S; Altmann, J; Wray, G A; Alberts, S C

    2011-02-01

    Natural populations hold enormous potential for evolutionary genetic studies, especially when phenotypic, genetic and environmental data are all available on the same individuals. However, untangling the genotype-phenotype relationship in natural populations remains a major challenge. Here, we describe results of an investigation of one class of phenotype, allele-specific gene expression (ASGE), in the well-studied natural population of baboons of the Amboseli basin, Kenya. ASGE measurements identify cases in which one allele of a gene is overexpressed relative to the alternative allele of the same gene, within individuals, thus providing a control for background genetic and environmental effects. Here, we characterize the incidence of ASGE in the Amboseli baboon population, focusing on the genetic and environmental contributions to ASGE in a set of eleven genes involved in immunity and defence. Within this set, we identify evidence for common ASGE in four genes. We also present examples of two relationships between cis-regulatory genetic variants and the ASGE phenotype. Finally, we identify one case in which this relationship is influenced by a novel gene-environment interaction. Specifically, the dominance rank of an individual's mother during its early life (an aspect of that individual's social environment) influences the expression of the gene CCL5 via an interaction with cis-regulatory genetic variation. These results illustrate how environmental and ecological data can be integrated into evolutionary genetic studies of functional variation in natural populations. They also highlight the potential importance of early life environmental variation in shaping the genetic architecture of complex traits in wild mammals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. IDP-ASE: haplotyping and quantifying allele-specific expression at the gene and gene isoform level by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deonovic, Benjamin; Wang, Yunhao; Weirather, Jason; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Au, Kin Fai

    2016-11-28

    Allele-specific expression (ASE) is a fundamental problem in studying gene regulation and diploid transcriptome profiles, with two key challenges: (i) haplotyping and (ii) estimation of ASE at the gene isoform level. Existing ASE analysis methods are limited by a dependence on haplotyping from laborious experiments or extra genome/family trio data. In addition, there is a lack of methods for gene isoform level ASE analysis. We developed a tool, IDP-ASE, for full ASE analysis. By innovative integration of Third Generation Sequencing (TGS) long reads with Second Generation Sequencing (SGS) short reads, the accuracy of haplotyping and ASE quantification at the gene and gene isoform level was greatly improved as demonstrated by the gold standard data GM12878 data and semi-simulation data. In addition to methodology development, applications of IDP-ASE to human embryonic stem cells and breast cancer cells indicate that the imbalance of ASE and non-uniformity of gene isoform ASE is widespread, including tumorigenesis relevant genes and pluripotency markers. These results show that gene isoform expression and allele-specific expression cooperate to provide high diversity and complexity of gene regulation and expression, highlighting the importance of studying ASE at the gene isoform level. Our study provides a robust bioinformatics solution to understand ASE using RNA sequencing data only.

  15. Quantification of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations in the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.F.; Rapaport, J.M.; Dryia, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    New germline mutations in the human retinoblastoma gene preferentially arise on a paternally derived allele. In nonhereditary retinoblastoma, the initial somatic mutation seems to have no such bias. The few previous reports of these phenomena included relatively few cases (less than a dozen new germline or initial somatic mutations), so that the magnitude of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations is not known. Knowledge of the magnitude of the bias is valuable for genetic counseling, since, for example, patients with new germline mutations who reproduce transmit risk for retinoblastoma according to the risk that the transmitted allele has a germline mutation. We sought to quantitate the paternal allele bias and to determine whether paternal age is a factor possibly accounting for it. We studied 311 families with retinoblastoma (261 simplex, 50 multiplex) that underwent clinical genetic testing and 5 informative families recruited from earlier research. Using RFLPs and polymorphic microsatellites in the retinoblastoma gene, we could determine the parental origin of 45 new germline mutations and 44 probable initial somatic mutations. Thirty-seven of the 45 new germline mutations, or 82%, arose on a paternal allele while only 24 of the 44 initial somatic mutations (55%) did so. Increased paternal age does not appear to account for the excess of new paternal germline mutations, since the average age of fathers of children with new germline mutations (29.4 years, n=26, incomplete records on 11) was not significantly different from the average age of fathers of children with maternal germline mutations or somatic initial mutations (29.8 years, n=35, incomplete records on 17).

  16. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  17. Geographical distribution and frequencies of organophosphate-resistant Ace alleles and morphometric variations in olive fruit fly populations.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Ersin; Kandemir, İrfan; Taşkın, Vatan

    2015-11-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, organophosphate (OP) insecticides have been used intensively to control olive fly populations. Acetylcholinesterase (Ace) is the molecular target of OP insecticides, and three resistance-associated mutations that confer different levels of OP insensitivity have been identified. In this study, genotypes of olive fly Ace were determined in field-collected populations from broad geographical areas in Turkey. In addition, the levels of asymmetry of wing and leg characters were compared in these populations. Our study revealed the existence of a genetically smooth stratification pattern in OP resistance allele distribution in the olive fly populations of Turkey. In contrast to earlier findings, the frequency of Δ3Q was found to be lower in the Aegean region, where the populations have been subjected to high selection pressure. Results based on the morphological differences among the samples revealed a similar pattern for both sides and did not demonstrate a clear separation. The frequencies and geographic range of resistance alleles indicate that they were selected in the Aegean coast of Turkey and then spread westward towards Europe. One possible explanation for the absence of morphological asymmetry in olive fly samples might be the presence of modifier allele(s) that compensate for the increase in asymmetry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Detection, Validation, and Downstream Analysis of Allelic Variation in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Daniel C.; Lu, Lu; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Wang, Xusheng; Jagalur, Manjunatha; Morris, John A.; Taylor, William L.; Dietz, Klaus; Simon, Perikles; Williams, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Common sequence variants within a gene often generate important differences in expression of corresponding mRNAs. This high level of local (allelic) control—or cis modulation—rivals that produced by gene targeting, but expression is titrated finely over a range of levels. We are interested in exploiting this allelic variation to study gene function and downstream consequences of differences in expression dosage. We have used several bioinformatics and molecular approaches to estimate error rates in the discovery of cis modulation and to analyze some of the biological and technical confounds that contribute to the variation in gene expression profiling. Our analysis of SNPs and alternative transcripts, combined with eQTL maps and selective gene resequencing, revealed that between 17 and 25% of apparent cis modulation is caused by SNPs that overlap probes rather than by genuine quantitative differences in mRNA levels. This estimate climbs to 40–50% when qualitative differences between isoform variants are included. We have developed an analytical approach to filter differences in expression and improve the yield of genuine cis-modulated transcripts to ∼80%. This improvement is important because the resulting variation can be successfully used to study downstream consequences of altered expression on higher-order phenotypes. Using a systems genetics approach we show that two validated cis-modulated genes, Stk25 and Rasd2, are likely to control expression of downstream targets and affect disease susceptibility. PMID:19884314

  19. Distribution of allelic variants of the chromosomal gene bla OXA-114-like in Achromobacter xylosoxidans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Papalia, Mariana; Galanternik, Laura; Radice, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2013-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly being documented in cystic fibrosis patients. The bla(OXA-114) gene has been recognized as a naturally occurring chromosomal gene, exhibiting different allelic variants. In the population under study, the bla(OXA-114)-like gene was found in 19/19 non-epidemiological-related clinical isolates of A. xylosoxidans with ten different alleles including 1 novel OXA-114 variant.

  20. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  1. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p = 0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%, respectively; p = 0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients.

  2. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage. 2007.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Human mannose- binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p=0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%,respectively; p=0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV- positive patients.

  3. Inclusion of homologous DNA in nuclease-mediated gene targeting facilitates a higher incidence of bi-allelically modified cells

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Benjamin P; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Samuel, Melissa S; Benne, Joshua A; Wells, Kevin D; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Prather, Randall S

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent advancements in gene editing techniques have increased in number and utility. These techniques are an attractive alternative to conventional gene targeting methods via homologous recombination due to the ease of use and the high efficiency of gene editing. We have previously produced cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) knockout (KO) pigs in a Minnesota miniature pig genetic background. These pigs were generated using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) in combination with donor DNA containing a total homology length of 1600 bp (800-bp homology on each arm). Our next aim was to introduce the targeted disruption of alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) in the CMAH KO genetic background and evaluate the effect of donor DNA homology length on meganuclease-mediated gene targeting. Methods Zinc-finger nucleases from a previous CMAH KO experiment were used as a proof of concept to identify a correlation between the length of donor DNA homology and targeting efficiency. Based on those results, experiments were designed to use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to generate bi-allelically modified GGTA1 cells using donor DNAs carrying various lengths of homology. Donor DNA was designed to symmetrically flank the predicted cleavage sites in CMAH and GGTA1 for both ZFN and TALEN cleavage sites, respectively. For both genes, the length of total homology ranged from 60 to 1799 bp. Sialyltransferase gene expression profiles were evaluated in CMAH and GGTA1 double KO pig cells and were compared to wild-type and CMAH KO cells. Results Introduction of donor DNA with ZFNs demonstrated that small amounts of homology (60 bp) could facilitate homology-directed repair during ZFN-mediated targeting of CMAH; however, donor DNA with longer amounts of homology resulted in a higher frequency of homology-directed repair. For the GGTA1 KO experiments that used TALENs and donor DNA, donor DNA alone did not result in detectable bi-allelic

  4. Case-control study of allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci in males with impulsive violent behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Ba, Huajie; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhao, Hanqing; Yu, Haiying; Guo, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an accepted method for detecting associations between genotype and phenotype but it has not previously been used in the study of the genetics of impulsive violent behavior. Compare the prevalence of different polymorphisms in 15 STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818 and FGA) between men with a history of impulsive violence and male control subjects without a history of impulsive violence. The distributions of the alleles of the 15 STR loci were compared between 407 cases with impulsive violent behavior and 415 controls using AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler™ kits. COMPARED TO CONTROLS, THE AVERAGE FREQUENCIES OF THE FOLLOWING ALLELES WERE SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER IN INDIVIDUALS WITH A HISTORY OF VIOLENT BEHAVIOR: allele 10 of TH01 (OR=0.29, 95%CI=0.16-0.52, p<0.0001,), allele 8 of TPOX (OR=0.71, 95%CI=0.58-0.86, p=0.0005), allele 9 of TPOX (OR=0.65, 95%CI=0.47-0.89, p=0.0072) and allele 14 of CSF1PO (OR=0.27, 95%CI=0.11-0.68, p=0.0035). One allele was significantly higher in cases than controls: allele 11 of TPOX (OR=1.79, 95%CI=1.45-2.22, p<0.0001). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first behavioral genetic study that clearly demonstrates a close relationship between specific genetic markers and impulsive aggression in non-psychiatric offenders. Further prospective work will be needed to determine whether or not the alleles identified can be considered risk factors for impulsive aggression and, if so, the underlying mechanisms that result in this relationship.

  5. Frequency of the CCR5 delta 32 mutant allele in HIV-1-positive patients, female sex workers, and a normal population in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Yan, Y P; Shieh, B; Lee, C M; Lin, R Y; Chen, Y M

    1997-12-01

    A specific 32-nucleotide deletion mutant of the CCR5 gene (Accr5), the coreceptor gene for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), can effectively suppress the transmission and pathogenesis of the virus. Individuals homozygous for the delta ccr5 allele resist primary macrophage-tropic HIV-1 infection, despite multiple high-risk sexual exposures. This gene deletion is relatively common among Caucasians but uncommon among Africans, Asians, and South Americans. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to determine the frequency of the delta ccr5 allele in a Taiwanese population with diverse health status and social backgrounds. Subjects included 24 HIV-1-infected persons in the northern and southern parts of Taiwan; 131 HIV-1 high-risk, licensed female sex workers in the northern part of the island (21% of whom were aborigines); and 187 unrelated, healthy, HIV-1-negative individuals in southern Taiwan. PCR with primers encompassing the entire CCR5 gene was used to explore possible deletions at regions other than the 32-nucleotide area in the female sex workers. No ccr5 deletions were detected, indicating that they are rare or absent in the Taiwanese population. This finding implies that delta ccr5 is not likely to be part of the defense against the spread of HIV-1-infection in Taiwanese.

  6. A recombined allele of the lipase gene CEL and its pseudogene CELP confers susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fjeld, Karianne; Johansson, Bente B.; Kirsten, Holger; Ruffert, Claudia; Masson, Emmanuelle; Steine, Solrun J.; Bugert, Peter; Cnop, Miriam; Grützmann, Robert; Mayerle, Julia; Mössner, Joachim; Ringdal, Monika; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Sendler, Matthias; Simon, Peter; Sztromwasser, Paweł; Torsvik, Janniche; Scholz, Markus; Tjora, Erling; Férec, Claude; Witt, Heiko; Lerch, Markus M.; Njølstad, Pål R.; Johansson, Stefan; Molven, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Carboxyl-ester lipase is a digestive pancreatic enzyme encoded by the highly polymorphic CEL gene1. Mutations in CEL cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) with pancreatic exocrine dysfunction2. Here we identified a hybrid allele (CEL-HYB), originating from a crossover between CEL and its neighboring pseudogene CELP. In a discovery cohort of familial chronic pancreatitis cases, the carrier frequency of CEL-HYB was 14.1% (10/71) compared with 1.0% (5/478) in controls (odds ratio [OR] = 15.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.1-46.9, P = 1.3 × 10−6). Three replication studies in non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis cohorts identified CEL-HYB in a total of 3.7% (42/1,122) cases and 0.7% (30/4,152) controls (OR = 5.2, 95% CI = 3.2-8.5, P = 1.2 × 10−11; formal meta-analysis). The allele was also enriched in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Expression of CEL-HYB in cellular models revealed reduced lipolytic activity, impaired secretion, prominent intracellular accumulation and induced autophagy. The hybrid variant of CEL is the first chronic pancreatitis gene identified outside the protease/antiprotease system of pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:25774637

  7. Patients with difficult-to-treat depression do not exhibit an increased frequency of CYP2D6 allele duplication.

    PubMed

    Háber, A; Rideg, O; Osváth, P; Fekete, S; Szücs, F; Fittler, A; Kovács, G L; Miseta, A; Botz, L

    2013-06-01

    The insufficient response of patients to antidepressant medications may result from several factors, including altered drug metabolism. CYP2D6 genotyping may help assess the possible factors that contribute to difficult-to-treat depression. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of CYP2D6 allelic variants and the prevalence of predicted CYP2D6 phenotypes in patients who were suffering from difficult-to-treat depression and compare the data with those for the healthy population of Hungary.55 patients who failed to respond to 2 or more adequate trials of different CYP2D6-dependent antidepressants were selected for genotyping.The prevalence of the predicted CYP2D6 phenotypes in the patient population was 1.8% for the UMs, 80.0% for EMs, 3.6% for IMs and 14.5% for PMs compared with 1.9% for UMs, 83.3% for EMs, 6.5% for IMs and 8.3% for PMs in the Hungarian population.The CYP2D6 allele frequencies and the predicted phenotype distributions in patients with difficult-to-treat depression were not significantly different to those found in the healthy population of Hungary. The cumulative frequency of the CYP2D6*1XN, *2XN and *35XN alleles was 0.9% in the patient population -suggesting that CYP2D6 duplication or multiplication does not play a significant role in antidepressant pharmacotherapy failure in this patient sample. The cumulative frequency of the non-functional alleles (33.5%) and the prevalence of the genetically determined PM phenotype (14.5%) were relatively high in the patient group. These figures draw attention to the possibility of unrecognised and non-reported side effects and non-adherence to drug treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Polymorphism and predictability at the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in Colias butterflies: gradients in allele frequency within single populations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G B

    1976-06-01

    Heterozygosity at the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus of five species of Colias butterflies is widespread in montane populations; alpine and lowland populations are not heterozygous. Within a single demographically characterized population of C. meadii where the population extends from alpine down into montane habitats, a marked cline in allele frequency is seen. Such within-population clines suggest the involvement of strong selection across the marked ecological interface. Thermal factors are the most likely causative agents, but associative overdominance is not excluded.

  9. The Adaptive Change of HLA-DRB1 Allele Frequencies Caused by Natural Selection in a Mongolian Population That Migrated to the South of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lin, Keqin; Liu, Shuyuan; Huang, Kai; Wang, Xiuyun; Chu, Jiayou; Huang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection determines the richness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Changes in the pathogen spectrum may cause corresponding changes in HLA loci. Approximately 700 years ago, a Mongolian population moved from the north of China to the Yunnan region in the south of China. The pathogen spectrum in the south of China differs from that in the north. In this study, changes in the HLA genes in the Yunnan Mongolian population, as well as the underlying mechanism, were investigated. A sequence-based typing method (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-DRB1 in 470 individuals from two Mongolian populations and another five ethnic groups. Meanwhile, 10 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to assess the influence of genetic background on HLA-DRB1 frequencies. The frequencies of certain alleles changed significantly in the Mongolian population that migrated to Yunnan. For example, DRB1*12:02:01 increased from 6.1% to 35.4%. STR analysis excluded the possibility of a recent bottleneck and indicated that 50% of the genetic consistency between northern and southern Mongolians; Tajima's D value for HLA-DRB1 exon2 and dN/dS analysis showed that the HLA-DRB1 genes in both Mongolian populations were under balancing selection. However, the sites under natural selection changed. We proposed that the dramatically change of HLA frequencies in southern Mongolian was caused by a combination of inter-population gene flow and natural selection. Certain diseases specific to the south of China, such as malaria, may be the driving force behind the enhanced DRB1*12:02:01 frequency.

  10. The Adaptive Change of HLA-DRB1 Allele Frequencies Caused by Natural Selection in a Mongolian Population That Migrated to the South of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lin, Keqin; Liu, Shuyuan; Huang, Kai; Wang, Xiuyun; Chu, Jiayou; Huang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection determines the richness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Changes in the pathogen spectrum may cause corresponding changes in HLA loci. Approximately 700 years ago, a Mongolian population moved from the north of China to the Yunnan region in the south of China. The pathogen spectrum in the south of China differs from that in the north. In this study, changes in the HLA genes in the Yunnan Mongolian population, as well as the underlying mechanism, were investigated. A sequence-based typing method (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-DRB1 in 470 individuals from two Mongolian populations and another five ethnic groups. Meanwhile, 10 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to assess the influence of genetic background on HLA-DRB1 frequencies. The frequencies of certain alleles changed significantly in the Mongolian population that migrated to Yunnan. For example, DRB1*12:02:01 increased from 6.1% to 35.4%. STR analysis excluded the possibility of a recent bottleneck and indicated that 50% of the genetic consistency between northern and southern Mongolians; Tajima's D value for HLA-DRB1 exon2 and dN/dS analysis showed that the HLA-DRB1 genes in both Mongolian populations were under balancing selection. However, the sites under natural selection changed. We proposed that the dramatically change of HLA frequencies in southern Mongolian was caused by a combination of inter-population gene flow and natural selection. Certain diseases specific to the south of China, such as malaria, may be the driving force behind the enhanced DRB1*12:02:01 frequency. PMID:26230582

  11. Insecticide Resistance Allele Frequencies in Anopheles gambiae before and after Anti-Vector Interventions in Continental Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Michael R.; Godoy, Adrian; Dion, Kirstin; Matias, Abrahan; Callender, Kevin; Kiszewski, Anthony E.; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Ridl, Frances C.; Powell, Jeffrey R.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Slotman, Michel A.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-malaria interventions that rely on insecticides can be compromised by insecticide-resistance alleles among malaria vectors. We examined frequency changes of resistance alleles at two loci, knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase-1 (ace-1), which confer resistance to pyrethroids and DDT, and carbamates, respectively. A total of 7,059 Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto mosquitoes were analyzed from multiple sites across continental Equatorial Guinea. A subset of sites included samples collected pre-intervention (2007) and post-intervention (2009–2011). Both L1014S and L1014F resistance alleles were observed in almost all pre-intervention collections. In particular, L1014F was already at substantial frequencies in M form populations (17.6–74.6%), and at high frequencies (> 50%) in all but two S form populations. Comparison before and throughout anti-vector interventions showed drastic increases in L1014F, presumably caused by intensified selection pressure imposed by pyrethroids used in vector control efforts. In light of these findings, inclusion of other insecticide classes in any anti-vector intervention can be considered prudent. PMID:23438768

  12. Frequencies distribution of dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthetase mutant alleles associated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum population from Hadhramout Governorate, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-12-22

    Malaria in Yemen is mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 25% of the population is at high risk. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used as monotherapy against P. falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine resistance led to the shift in anti-malarial treatment policy in Yemen to artemisinin-based combination therapy, that is artesunate (AS) plus SP as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria and artemether-lumefantrine as second-line treatment. This study aimed to screen mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthetase (dhps) genes associated with SP resistance among P. falciparum population in Hadhramout governorate, Yemen. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots of 137 P. falciparum isolates collected from a community-based study. DNA was amplified using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes. Sequences were analysed for mutations in Pfdhfr gene codons 51, 59, 108, and 164 and in Pfdhps gene codons 436, 437, and 540. A total of 128 and 114 P. falciparum isolates were successfully sequenced for Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes, respectively. Each Pfdhfr mutant allele (I51 and N108) in P. falciparum population had a frequency of 84%. Pfdhfr R59 mutant allele was detected in one isolate. Mutation at codon 437 (G437) in the Pfdhps gene was detected in 44.7% of falciparum malaria isolates. Frequencies of Pfdhfr double mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps triple mutant genotype (I51C59N108I164-S436G437K540) were 82.8 and 39.3%, respectively. One isolate harboured Pfdhfr triple mutant genotype (I51, R59, N108, I164) and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant genotype (I51R59N108I164-S436G437K540). High frequencies of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps mutant alleles and genotypes in P. falciparum population in Hadhramout, Yemen, highlight the risk of developing resistance for SP, the partner drug of AS, which subsequently will expose the parasite to AS monotherapy increasing then the

  13. Allelic diversity in an NLR gene BPH9 enables rice to combat planthopper variation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Huang, Jin; Wang, Zhizheng; Jing, Shengli; Wang, Yang; Ouyang, Yidan; Cai, Baodong; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Chunxiao; Pan, Yufang; Ma, Rui; Li, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Weihua; Zeng, Ya; Shangguan, Xinxin; Wang, Huiying; Du, Bo; Zhu, Lili; Xu, Xun; Feng, Yu-Qi; He, Sheng Yang; Chen, Rongzhi; Zhang, Qifa; He, Guangcun

    2016-01-01

    Brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål, is one of the most devastating insect pests of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Currently, 30 BPH-resistance genes have been genetically defined, most of which are clustered on specific chromosome regions. Here, we describe molecular cloning and characterization of a BPH-resistance gene, BPH9, mapped on the long arm of rice chromosome 12 (12L). BPH9 encodes a rare type of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing protein that localizes to the endomembrane system and causes a cell death phenotype. BPH9 activates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signaling pathways in rice plants and confers both antixenosis and antibiosis to BPH. We further demonstrated that the eight BPH-resistance genes that are clustered on chromosome 12L, including the widely used BPH1, are allelic with each other. To honor the priority in the literature, we thus designated this locus as BPH1/9. These eight genes can be classified into four allelotypes, BPH1/9-1, -2, -7, and -9. These allelotypes confer varying levels of resistance to different biotypes of BPH. The coding region of BPH1/9 shows a high level of diversity in rice germplasm. Homologous fragments of the nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains exist, which might have served as a repository for generating allele diversity. Our findings reveal a rice plant strategy for modifying the genetic information to gain the upper hand in the struggle against insect herbivores. Further exploration of natural allelic variation and artificial shuffling within this gene may allow breeding to be tailored to control emerging biotypes of BPH. PMID:27791169

  14. Allelic diversity in an NLR gene BPH9 enables rice to combat planthopper variation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Huang, Jin; Wang, Zhizheng; Jing, Shengli; Wang, Yang; Ouyang, Yidan; Cai, Baodong; Xin, Xiu-Fang; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Chunxiao; Pan, Yufang; Ma, Rui; Li, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Weihua; Zeng, Ya; Shangguan, Xinxin; Wang, Huiying; Du, Bo; Zhu, Lili; Xu, Xun; Feng, Yu-Qi; He, Sheng Yang; Chen, Rongzhi; Zhang, Qifa; He, Guangcun

    2016-10-24

    Brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål, is one of the most devastating insect pests of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Currently, 30 BPH-resistance genes have been genetically defined, most of which are clustered on specific chromosome regions. Here, we describe molecular cloning and characterization of a BPH-resistance gene, BPH9, mapped on the long arm of rice chromosome 12 (12L). BPH9 encodes a rare type of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing protein that localizes to the endomembrane system and causes a cell death phenotype. BPH9 activates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signaling pathways in rice plants and confers both antixenosis and antibiosis to BPH. We further demonstrated that the eight BPH-resistance genes that are clustered on chromosome 12L, including the widely used BPH1, are allelic with each other. To honor the priority in the literature, we thus designated this locus as BPH1/9 These eight genes can be classified into four allelotypes, BPH1/9-1, -2, -7, and -9 These allelotypes confer varying levels of resistance to different biotypes of BPH. The coding region of BPH1/9 shows a high level of diversity in rice germplasm. Homologous fragments of the nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains exist, which might have served as a repository for generating allele diversity. Our findings reveal a rice plant strategy for modifying the genetic information to gain the upper hand in the struggle against insect herbivores. Further exploration of natural allelic variation and artificial shuffling within this gene may allow breeding to be tailored to control emerging biotypes of BPH.

  15. A pseudodeficiency allele (D152N) of the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervoort, R.; Liebaers, I.; Lissens, W.

    1995-10-01

    We present evidence that a 480G{r_arrow}A transition in the coding region of the {Beta}glucuronidase gene, which results in an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine substitution at amino acid position 152 (D152N), produces a pseudodeficiency allele (GUSBp) that leads to greatly reduced levels of {Beta}-glucuronidase activity without apparent deleterious consequences. The 48OG{r_arrow}A mutation was found initially in the pseudodeficient mother of a child with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPSVII), but it was not on her disease-causing allele, which carried the L176F mutation. The 480G{r_arrow}A change was also present in an unrelated individual with another MPSVII allele who had unusually low {Beta}-glucuronidase activity, but whose clinical symptoms were probably unrelated to {Beta}-glucuronidase deficiency. This individual also had an R357X mutation, probably on his second allele. We screened 100 unrelated normal individuals for the 480G{r_arrow}A mutation with a PCR method and detected one carrier. Reduced {Beta}-glucuronidase activity following transfection of COS cells with the D152N cDNA supported the causal relationship between the D152N allele and pseudodeficiency. The mutation reduced the fraction of expressed enzyme that was secreted. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the reduced activity in COS cells was due to accelerated intracellular turnover of the D152N enzyme. They also suggested that a potential glycosylation site created by the mutation is utilized in {approximately}50% of the enzyme expressed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunming; Zhao, Lifeng; Niu, Baixiao; Su, Jing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuanling; Zhang, Qunyu; Guo, Jingxin; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Mei, Mantong; Xia, Jixing; Wang, Lan; Wu, Haibin; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2008-12-02

    Sterility is common in hybrids between divergent populations, such as the indica and japonica subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles of the loci interact at the molecular level. Here we show that a locus for indica-japonica hybrid male sterility, Sa, comprises two adjacent genes, SaM and SaF, encoding a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase-like protein and an F-box protein, respectively. Most indica cultivars contain a haplotype SaM(+)SaF(+), whereas all japonica cultivars have SaM(-)SaF(-) that diverged by nucleotide variations in wild rice. Male semi-sterility in this heterozygous complex locus is caused by abortion of pollen carrying SaM(-). This allele-specific gamete elimination results from a selective interaction of SaF(+) with SaM(-), a truncated protein, but not with SaM(+) because of the presence of an inhibitory domain, although SaM(+) is required for this male sterility. Lack of any one of the three alleles in recombinant plants does not produce male sterility. We propose a two-gene/three-component interaction model for this hybrid male sterility system. The findings have implications for overcoming male sterility in inter-subspecific hybrid rice breeding.

  17. Ancient allelism at the cytosolic chaperonin-alpha-encoding gene of the zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Figueroa, F; Mayer, W E; Klein, J

    2000-01-01

    The T-complex protein 1, TCP1, gene codes for the CCT-alpha subunit of the group II chaperonins. The gene was first described in the house mouse, in which it is closely linked to the T locus at a distance of approximately 11 cM from the Mhc. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in which the T homolog is linked to the class I Mhc loci, the TCP1 locus segregates independently of both the T and the Mhc loci. Despite its conservation between species, the zebrafish TCP1 locus is highly polymorphic. In a sample of 15 individuals and the screening of a cDNA library, 12 different alleles were found, and some of the allelic pairs were found to differ by up to nine nucleotides in a 275-bp-long stretch of sequence. The substitutions occur in both translated and untranslated regions, but in the former they occur predominantly at synonymous codon sites. Phylogenetically, the alleles fall into two groups distinguished also by the presence or absence of a 10-bp insertion/deletion in the 3' untranslated region. The two groups may have diverged as long as 3.5 mya, and the polymorphic differences may have accumulated by genetic drift in geographically isolated populations. PMID:10628990

  18. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  19. Systematic morphological profiling of human gene and allele function via Cell Painting.

    PubMed

    Rohban, Mohammad Hossein; Singh, Shantanu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Berthet, Julia B; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Shrestha, Yashaswi; Varelas, Xaralabos; Boehm, Jesse S; Carpenter, Anne E

    2017-03-18

    We hypothesized that human genes and disease-associated alleles might be systematically functionally annotated using morphological profiling of cDNA constructs, via a microscopy-based Cell Painting assay. Indeed, 50% of the 220 tested genes yielded detectable morphological profiles, which grouped into biologically meaningful gene clusters consistent with known functional annotation (e.g., the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK cascade). We used novel subpopulation-based visualization methods to interpret the morphological changes for specific clusters. This unbiased morphologic map of gene function revealed TRAF2/c-REL negative regulation of YAP1/WWTR1-responsive pathways. We confirmed this discovery of functional connectivity between the NF-κB pathway and Hippo pathway effectors at the transcriptional level, thereby expanding knowledge of these two signaling pathways that critically regulate tumor initiation and progression. We make the images and raw data publicly available, providing an initial morphological map of major biological pathways for future study.

  20. Differential distribution of allelic variants in cytokine genes among African Americans and White Americans.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Haggerty, Catherine L; Harger, Gail; Ferrell, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Racial disparities in health are largely unexplained. Because many diseases causing premature mortality among African Americans are mediated by the immune system, the authors explored the race-specific distribution of allelic variants in cytokine genes known to stimulate inflammation. The authors studied women seeking prenatal care and delivering singletons in uncomplicated first births at a US hospital in 1997-2001. A total of 179 African-American women and 396 White women were evaluated for functionally relevant allelic variants in cytokine genes. African-American women were significantly more likely to carry allelic variants known to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines; odds ratios increased with allele dose. Odds ratios for African Americans versus Whites in genotypes up-regulating proinflammatory interleukin (IL) 1 (IL1A-4845G/G, IL1A-889T/T, IL1B-3957C/C, and IL1B-511A/A) ranged from 2.1 to 4.9. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 IL6-174 G/G genotype was 36.5 times (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.8, 151.9) more common among African Americans. Genotypes known to down-regulate the antiinflammatory interleukin-10 (IL10-819 T/T and IL10-1082 A/A) were elevated 3.5-fold (95% CI: 1.8, 6.6) and 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.6, 4.9) in African Americans. Cytokine genotypes found to be more common in African-American women were consistently those that up-regulate inflammation.

  1. A genetic polymorphism in coumarin 7-hydroxylation: Sequence of the human CYP2A genes and identification of variant CYP2A6 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Salguero, P.; Hoffman, S.M.G.; Mohrenweiser, H.

    1995-09-01

    A group of human cytochrome P450 genes encompassing the CYP2A, CYP2B, and CYP2F subfamilies were cloned and assembled into a 350-kb contig localized on the long arm of chromosome 19. Three complete CYP2A genes - CYP2A6, CYP2A7, and CYP2A13 - plus two pseudogenes truncated after exon 5 were identified and sequenced. A variant CYP2A6 allele that differed from the corresponding CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 cDNAs previously sequenced was found and was designated CYP2A6{nu}2. Sequence differences in the CY-P2A6{nu}2 gene are restricted to regions encompassing exons 3, 6, and 8, which bear sequence relatedness with the corresponding exons of the CYP2A7 gene, located downstream and centromeric of CYP2A6{nu}2, suggesting recent gene-conversion events. The sequencing of all the CYP2A genes allowed the design of a PCR diagnostic test for the normal CYP2A6 allele, the CYP2A6{nu}2 allele, and a variant - designated CYP2A6{nu}1 - that encodes an enzyme with a single inactivating amino acid change. These variant alleles were found in individuals who were deficient in their ability to metabolize the CYP2A6 probe drug coumarin. The allelic frequencies of CYP2A6{nu}1 and CYP2A6{nu}2 differed significantly between Caucasian, Asian, and African-American populations. These studies establish the existence of a new cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphism. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Allelic switching of the imprinted IGF2R gene in cloned bovine fetuses and calves.

    PubMed

    Suteevun-Phermthai, T; Curchoe, C L; Evans, A C; Boland, E; Rizos, D; Fair, T; Duffy, P; Sung, L Y; Du, F; Chaubal, S; Xu, J; Wechayant, T; Yang, X; Lonergan, P; Parnpai, R; Tian, X C

    2009-11-01

    Cloned animals often suffer from loss of development to term and abnormalities, typically classified under the umbrella term of Large Offspring Syndrome (LOS). Cattle are an interesting species to study because of the relatively greater success rate of nuclear transfer in this species compared with all species cloned to date. The imprinted insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R; mannose-6-phosphate) gene was chosen to investigate aspects of fetal growth and development in cloned cattle in the present study. IGF2R gene expression patterns in identical genetic clones of several age groups were assessed in day 25, day 45, and day 75 fetuses as well as spontaneously aborted fetuses, calves that died shortly after birth and healthy cloned calves using single stranded conformational polymorphism gel electrophoresis. A variable pattern of IGF2R allelic expression in major organs such as the brain, cotyledon, heart, liver, lung, spleen, kidney and intercotyledon was observed using a G/A transition in the 3'UTR of IGF2R. IGF2R gene expression was also assessed by real time RT-PCR and found to be highly variable among the clone groups. Proper IGF2R gene expression is necessary for survival to term, but is most likely not a cause of early fetal lethality or an indicator of postnatal fitness. Contrary to previous reports of the transmission of imprinting patterns from somatic donor cells to cloned animals within organs in the same cloned animal the paternal allele of IGF2R can be imprinted in one tissue while the maternal allele is imprinted in another tissue. This observation has never been reported in any species in which imprinting has been studied.

  3. Efficient CRISPR-rAAV engineering of endogenous genes to study protein function by allele-specific RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Manuel; Lee, Yeon J; Lönn, Peter; Springer, Aaron D; Meade, Bryan R; Dowdy, Steven F

    2015-04-20

    Gene knockout strategies, RNAi and rescue experiments are all employed to study mammalian gene function. However, the disadvantages of these approaches include: loss of function adaptation, reduced viability and gene overexpression that rarely matches endogenous levels. Here, we developed an endogenous gene knockdown/rescue strategy that combines RNAi selectivity with a highly efficient CRISPR directed recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) mediated gene targeting approach to introduce allele-specific mutations plus an allele-selective siRNA Sensitive (siSN) site that allows for studying gene mutations while maintaining endogenous expression and regulation of the gene of interest. CRISPR/Cas9 plus rAAV targeted gene-replacement and introduction of allele-specific RNAi sensitivity mutations in the CDK2 and CDK1 genes resulted in a >85% site-specific recombination of Neo-resistant clones versus ∼8% for rAAV alone. RNAi knockdown of wild type (WT) Cdk2 with siWT in heterozygotic knockin cells resulted in the mutant Cdk2 phenotype cell cycle arrest, whereas allele specific knockdown of mutant CDK2 with siSN resulted in a wild type phenotype. Together, these observations demonstrate the ability of CRISPR plus rAAV to efficiently recombine a genomic locus and tag it with a selective siRNA sequence that allows for allele-selective phenotypic assays of the gene of interest while it remains expressed and regulated under endogenous control mechanisms.

  4. Selective Retention of an Inactive Allele of the DKK2 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Feng; Li, Ling-Hui; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsou, Mei-Hua; Chuang, Ming-Tai Kiffer; Wu, Keh-Ming; Liao, Tsai-Lien; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Wang, Wei-Jie; Tomita, Angela; Tomita, Beverly; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to identify the functional alleles associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we investigated 152 genes found in the 4q21-25 region that exhibited loss of heterozygosity (LOH). A total of 2,293 pairs of primers were designed for 1,449 exonic and upstream promoter regions to amplify and sequence 76.8–114 Mb on human chromosome 4. Based on the results from analyzing 12 HCC patients and 12 healthy human controls, we discovered 1,574 sequence variations. Among the 99 variants associated with HCC (p < 0.05), four are from the Dickkopf 2 (DKK2) gene: three in the promoter region (g.-967A>T, g.-923C>A, and g.-441T>G) and one in the 5’UTR (c.550T>C). To verify the results, we expanded the subject cohort to 47 HCC cases and 88 healthy controls for conducting haplotype analysis. Eight haplotypes were detected in the non-tumor liver tissue samples, but one major haplotype (TAGC) was found in the tumor tissue samples. Using a reporter assay, this HCC-associated allele registered the lowest level of promoter activity among all the tested haplotype sequences. Retention of this allele in LOH was associated with reduced DKK2 transcription in the HCC tumor tissues. In HuH-7 cells, DKK2 functioned in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, as an antagonist of Wnt3a, in a dose-dependent manner that inhibited Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation. Taken together, the genotyping and functional findings are consistent with the hypothesis that DKK2 is a tumor suppressor; by selectively retaining a transcriptionally inactive DKK2 allele, the reduction of DKK2 function results in unchecked Wnt/β-catenin signaling, contributing to HCC oncogenesis. Thus our study reveals a new mechanism through which a tumor suppressor gene in a LOH region loses its function by allelic selection. PMID:27203079

  5. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Allele-specific expression of mutated in colorectal cancer (MCC) gene and alternative susceptibility to colorectal cancer in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Cao, Yanfei; Huang, Xiaoye; Yu, Tao; Wei, Zhiyun; McGrath, John; Xu, Fei; Bi, Yan; Li, Xingwang; Yang, Fengping; Li, Weidong; Zou, Xia; Peng, Zhihai; Xiao, Yanzeng; Zhang, Yan; He, Lin; He, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among schizophrenia is lower than normal. To explore this potential protective effect, we employed an innovative strategy combining association study with allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis in MCC gene. We first genotyped four polymorphisms within MCC in 312 CRC patients, 270 schizophrenia patients and 270 controls. Using the MassArray technique, we performed ASE measurements in a second sample series consisting of 50 sporadic CRC patients, 50 schizophrenia patients and 52 controls. Rs2227947 showed significant differences between schizophrenia cases and controls, and haplotype analysis reported some significant discrepancies among these three subject groups. ASE values of rs2227948 and rs2227947 presented consistently differences between CRC (or schizophrenia) patients and controls. Of the three groups, highest frequencies of ASE in MCC were concordantly found in CRC group, whereas lowest frequencies of ASE were observed in schizophrenia group. Similar trends were confirmed in both haplotype frequencies and ASE frequencies (i.e. CRC > control > schizophrenia). We provide a first indication that MCC might confer alterative genetic susceptibility to CRC in individuals with schizophrenia promising to shed more light on the relationship between schizophrenia and cancer progression. PMID:27226254

  7. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Mahon, R J; Olsen, K M; Downes, S; Addison, S

    2007-12-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important lepidopteran pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in Australia and the Old World. From 2002, F2 screens were used to examine the frequency of resistance alleles in Australian populations of H. armigera to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAc and Cry2Ab, the two insecticidal proteins present in the transgenic cotton Bollgard II. At that time, Ingard (expressing Cry1Ac) cotton had been grown in Australia for seven seasons, and Bollgard II was about to be commercially released. The principal objective of our study was to determine whether sustained exposure caused an elevated frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac in a species with a track record of evolving resistance to conventional insecticides. No major alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac were found. The frequency of resistance alleles for Cry1Ac was <0.0003, with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0009. In contrast, alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab were found at a frequency of 0.0033 (0.0017, 0.0055). The first isolation of this allele was found before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. For both toxins the experiment-wise detection probability was 94.4%. Our results suggest that alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac are rare and that a relatively high baseline frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab existed before the introduction of Bt cotton containing this toxin.

  8. Allelic variation of soybean flower color gene W4 encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fan; Di, Shaokang; Rojas Rodas, Felipe; Rodriguez Torrico, Tito; Murai, Yoshinori; Iwashina, Tsukasa; Anai, Toyoaki; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2014-03-06

    Flower color of soybean is primarily controlled by six genes, viz., W1, W2, W3, W4, Wm and Wp. This study was conducted to investigate the genetic and chemical basis of newly-identified flower color variants including two soybean mutant lines, 222-A-3 (near white flower) and E30-D-1 (light purple flower), a near-isogenic line (Clark-w4), flower color variants (T321 and T369) descended from the w4-mutable line and kw4 (near white flower, Glycine soja). Complementation tests revealed that the flower color of 222-A-3 and kw4 was controlled by the recessive allele (w4) of the W4 locus encoding dihydroflavonol 4-reductase 2 (DFR2). In 222-A-3, a single base was deleted in the first exon resulting in a truncated polypeptide consisting of 24 amino acids. In Clark-w4, base substitution of the first nucleotide of the fourth intron abolished the 5' splice site, resulting in the retention of the intron. The DFR2 gene of kw4 was not expressed. The above results suggest that complete loss-of-function of DFR2 gene leads to near white flowers. Light purple flower of E30-D-1 was controlled by a new allele at the W4 locus, w4-lp. The gene symbol was approved by the Soybean Genetics Committee. In E30-D-1, a single-base substitution changed an amino acid at position 39 from arginine to histidine. Pale flowers of T369 had higher expression levels of the DFR2 gene. These flower petals contained unique dihydroflavonols that have not yet been reported to occur in soybean and G. soja. Complete loss-of-function of DFR2 gene leads to near white flowers. A new allele of the W4 locus, w4-lp regulates light purple flowers. Single amino acid substitution was associated with light purple flowers. Flower petals of T369 had higher levels of DFR2 gene expression and contained unique dihydroflavonols that are absent in soybean and G. soja. Thus, mutants of the DFR2 gene have unique flavonoid compositions and display a wide variety of flower color patterns in soybean, from near white, light purple

  9. Structure, phylogeny, allelic haplotypes and expression of sucrose transporter gene families in Saccharum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Hu, Weichang; Zhu, Fan; Wang, Liming; Yu, Qingyi; Ming, Ray; Zhang, Jisen

    2016-02-01

    Sugarcane is an economically important crop contributing to about 80% of the world sugar production. Increasing efforts in molecular biological studies have been performed for improving the sugar yield and other relevant important agronomic traits. However, due to sugarcane's complicated genomes, it is still challenging to study the genetic basis of traits, such as sucrose accumulation. Sucrose transporters (SUTs) are critical for both phloem loading in source tissue and sucrose uptaking in sink tissue, and are considered to be the control points for regulating sucrose storage. However, no genomic study for sugarcane sucrose transporter (SsSUT) families has been reported up to date. By using comparative genomics and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), six SUT genes were identified and characterized in S. spontaenum. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two pairs SsSUTs (SsSUT1/SsSUT3 and SsSUT5/SsSUT6) could be clustered together into two separate monocot specific SUT groups, while SsSUT2 and SsSUT4 were separated into the other two groups, with members from both dicot and monocot species. Gene structure comparison demonstrated that the number and position of exons/introns in SUTs were highly conserved among the close orthologs; in contrast, there were variations among the paralogous SUTs in Sacchuarm. Though with the high polyploidy level, gene allelic haplotype comparative analysis showed that the examined four SsSUT members exhibited conservations of gene structures and amino acid sequences among the allelic haplotypes accompanied by variations of intron sizes. Gene expression analyses were performed for tissues from seedlings under drought stress and mature plants of three Saccharum species (S.officinarnum, S.spotaneum and S.robustum). Both SUT1 and SUT4 expressed abundantly at different conditions. SUT2 had similar expression level in all of the examined tissues, but SUT3 was undetectable. Both of SUT5 and SUT6 had lower expression level than other

  10. Identification of Alleles of Puroindoline Genes and Their Effect on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Grain Texture

    PubMed Central

    Štiasna, Klára; Vyhnánek, Tomáš; Trojan, Václav; Mrkvicová, Eva; Hřivna, Luděk; Havel, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Summary Grain hardness is one of the most important quality characteristics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). It is a significant property of wheat grains and relates to milling quality and end product quality. Grain hardness is caused by the presence of puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb). A collection of 25 genotypes of wheat with unusual grain colour (blue aleurone, purple and white pericarp, yellow endosperm) was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the diversity within Pina and Pinb (alleles: Pina-D1a, Pina-D1b, Pinb-D1a, Pinb- -D1b, Pinb-D1c and Pinb-D1d). The endosperm structure was determined by a non-destructive method using light transflectance meter and grain hardness by a texture analyser. Genotype Novosibirskaya 67 and isogenic ANK lines revealed hitherto unknown alleles at the locus for the annealing of primers of Pinb-D1. Allele Pinb-D1c was found to be absent from each genotype. The mealy endosperm ranged from 0 to 100% and grain hardness from 15.10 to 26.87 N per sample. PMID:27904399

  11. Identification of Alleles of Puroindoline Genes and Their Effect on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Grain Texture.

    PubMed

    Presinszká, Mária; Štiasna, Klára; Vyhnánek, Tomáš; Trojan, Václav; Mrkvicová, Eva; Hřivna, Luděk; Havel, Ladislav

    2016-03-01

    Grain hardness is one of the most important quality characteristics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). It is a significant property of wheat grains and relates to milling quality and end product quality. Grain hardness is caused by the presence of puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb). A collection of 25 genotypes of wheat with unusual grain colour (blue aleurone, purple and white pericarp, yellow endosperm) was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the diversity within Pina and Pinb (alleles: Pina-D1a, Pina-D1b, Pinb-D1a, Pinb- -D1b, Pinb-D1c and Pinb-D1d). The endosperm structure was determined by a non-destructive method using light transflectance meter and grain hardness by a texture analyser. Genotype Novosibirskaya 67 and isogenic ANK lines revealed hitherto unknown alleles at the locus for the annealing of primers of Pinb-D1. Allele Pinb-D1c was found to be absent from each genotype. The mealy endosperm ranged from 0 to 100% and grain hardness from 15.10 to 26.87 N per sample.

  12. Structure and expression of wild-type and suppressible alleles of the Drosophila purple gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nacksung |; Park, Dongkook; Yim, John

    1996-04-01

    Viable mutant alleles of purple (pr), such as pr{sup bw}, exhibit mutant eye colors. This reflects low 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin (PTP) synthase activity required for pigment synthesis. PTP synthase is also required for synthesis of the enzyme cofactor biopterin; presumably this is why some pr alleles are lethal. The pr{sup bw} eye color phenotype is suppressed by suppressor of sable [su(s)] mutations. The pr gene was cloned to explore the mechanism of this suppression. pr produces two PTP synthase mRNAs: one constitutively from a distal promoter and one in late pupae and young adult heads from a proximal promoter. The latter presumably supports eye pigment synthesis. The pr{sup bw} allele has a 412 retrotransposon in an intron spliced from both mRNAs. However, the head-specific mRNA is reduced > 10-fold in pr{sup bw} and is restored by a su(s) mutation, while the constitutive transcript is barely affected. The Su(s) protein probably alters processing of RNA containing 412. Because the intron containing 412 is the first in the head-specific mRNA and the second in the constitutive mRNA, binding of splicing machinery to nascent transcripts before the 412 insertion is transcribed may preclude the effects of Su(s) protein. 43 refs., 9 figs.

  13. A new allele for aluminium tolerance gene in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanling; Li, Chengdao; Ryan, Peter R; Shabala, Sergey; You, Jianfeng; Liu, Jie; Liu, Chunji; Zhou, Meixue

    2016-03-05

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is the main factor limiting the crop production in acid soils and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is one of the most Al-sensitive of the small-grained cereals. The major gene for Al tolerance in barley is HvAACT1 (HvMATE) on chromosome 4H which encodes a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) protein. The HvAACT1 protein facilitates the Al-activated release of citrate from root apices which protects the growing cells and enables root elongation to continue. A 1 kb transposable element-like insert in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of HvAACT1 is associated with increased gene expression and tolerance and a PCR-based marker is available to score for this insertion. We screened a wide range of barley genotypes for Al tolerance and identified a moderately tolerant Chinese genotype named CXHKSL which did not show the typical allele in the 5' UTR of HvAACT1 associated with tolerance. We investigated the mechanism of Al tolerance in CXHKSL and concluded it also relies on the Al-activated release of citrate from roots. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of double haploid lines generated with CXHKSL and the Al-sensitive variety Gairdner mapped the tolerance locus to the same region as HvAACT1 on chromosome 4H. Our results show that the Chinese barley genotype CXHKSL possesses a novel allele of the major Al tolerance gene HvAACT1.

  14. [Male reproductive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster strains with different alleles of the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, N I; Karpova, N N; Iuneva, A O; Kim, A I

    2003-05-01

    The allelic state of gene flamenco has been determined in a number of Drosophila melanogaster strains using the ovoD test. The presence of an active copy of gypsy in these strains was detected by restriction analysis. Then male reproduction behavior was studied in the strains carrying a mutation in gene flamenco. In these experiments mating success has been experimentally estimated in groups of flies. It has been demonstrated that the presence of mutant allele flamMS decreases male mating activity irrespective of the presence or absence of mutation white. The active copy of gypsy does not affect mating activity in the absence of the mutation in gene flamenco. Individual analysis has demonstrated that that mutation flamMS results in characteristic changes in courtship: flamMS males exhibit a delay in the transition from the orientation stage to the vibration stage (the so-called vibration delay). The role of locus flamenco in the formation of male mating behavior in Drosophila is discussed.

  15. On the use of allelic transmission rates for assessing gene-by-environment interaction in case-parent trios.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Hyung; McNeney, Brad; Graham, Jinko

    2010-09-01

    Allelic transmission rates from parents to cases are frequently stratified by an environmental risk factor E and compared, with heterogeneity interpreted as gene-environment interaction or GxE. Though generally invalid, such analyses continue to appear. We revisit why heterogeneity is not equivalent to GxE in a range of settings not considered previously. The objective is a fuller understanding of the bias in transmission rates and what is driving it. Extending previously published findings, we derive parental mating-type probabilities in cases and use them to obtain transmission rates, which we then compare to GxE. Through simulation, we investigate the practical implications of the bias for a transmission-based test of GxE. We find that general population characteristics distort the picture of GxE obtained from transmission rates: the stratum-specific mating-type probabilities under G - E dependence and the allele frequency under independence. Furthermore, the transmission-based test has inflated error rates relative to a likelihood-based test. Our investigation provides further insight into how and why transmission-based tests and descriptive summaries can mislead about GxE. For exploring GxE, we suggest graphical displays of the transmission rates within parental mating types, as they are robust to population stratification and the penetrance model.

  16. DNA methylation analysis of chromosome 21 gene promoters at single base pair and single allele resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Rohde, Christian; Tierling, Sascha; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Bock, Christoph; Santacruz, Diana; Ragozin, Sergey; Reinhardt, Richard; Groth, Marco; Walter, Jörn; Jeltsch, Albert

    2009-03-01

    Differential DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic signal for gene regulation, development, and disease processes. We mapped DNA methylation patterns of 190 gene promoter regions on chromosome 21 using bisulfite conversion and subclone sequencing in five human cell types. A total of 28,626 subclones were sequenced at high accuracy using (long-read) Sanger sequencing resulting in the measurement of the DNA methylation state of 580427 CpG sites. Our results show that average DNA methylation levels are distributed bimodally with enrichment of highly methylated and unmethylated sequences, both for amplicons and individual subclones, which represent single alleles from individual cells. Within CpG-rich sequences, DNA methylation was found to be anti-correlated with CpG dinucleotide density and GC content, and methylated CpGs are more likely to be flanked by AT-rich sequences. We observed over-representation of CpG sites in distances of 9, 18, and 27 bps in highly methylated amplicons. However, DNA sequence alone is not sufficient to predict an amplicon's DNA methylation status, since 43% of all amplicons are differentially methylated between the cell types studied here. DNA methylation in promoter regions is strongly correlated with the absence of gene expression and low levels of activating epigenetic marks like H3K4 methylation and H3K9 and K14 acetylation. Utilizing the single base pair and single allele resolution of our data, we found that i) amplicons from different parts of a CpG island frequently differ in their DNA methylation level, ii) methylation levels of individual cells in one tissue are very similar, and iii) methylation patterns follow a relaxed site-specific distribution. Furthermore, iv) we identified three cases of allele-specific DNA methylation on chromosome 21. Our data shed new light on the nature of methylation patterns in human cells, the sequence dependence of DNA methylation, and its function as epigenetic signal in gene regulation

  17. Unequal allelic frequencies at the self-incompatibility locus within local populations of Prunus avium L.: an effect of population structure?

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, S; Castric, V; Mariette, S; Vekemans, X

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we investigated the genetic structure and distribution of allelic frequencies at the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus in three populations of Prunus avium L. In line with theoretical predictions under balancing selection, genetic structure at the self-incompatibility locus was almost three times lower than at seven unlinked microsatellites. Furthermore, we found that S-allele frequencies in wild cherry populations departed significantly from the expected isoplethic distribution towards which balancing selection is expected to drive allelic frequencies (i.e. identical frequency equal to the inverse of the number of alleles in the population). To assess whether this departure could be caused either by drift alone or by population structure, we used numerical simulations to compare our observations with allelic frequency distributions expected : (1) within a single deme from a subdivided population with various levels of differentiation; and (2) within a finite panmictic population with identical allelic diversity. We also investigated the effects of sample size and degree of population structure on tests of departure from isoplethic equilibrium. Overall, our results showed that the observed allele frequency distributions were consistent with a model of subdivided population with demes linked by moderate migration rate.

  18. Genetic influences on bone density: Physiological correlates of vitamin D receptor gene alleles in premonopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Nguyen, T.; Morrison, N.

    1995-09-01

    Common vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene alleles have recently been shown to contribute to the genetic variability in bone mass and bone turnover; however, the physiological mechanisms involved are unknown. To examine this, the response to 7 days of 2 {mu}g oral 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25-(OH){sub 2}D] (calcitrol) stimulation was assessed in 21 premenopausal women, homozygous for one or other of the common VDR alleles (bb, N = 11; BB, n = 10). Indices of bone turnover and calcium homeostasis were measured during 2 weeks. Baseline osteocalcin, 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D, type I collagen carboxyterminal telopeptide, and inorganic phosphate levels were significantly higher and spinal bone mineral density was significantly lower in the BB allelic group. After calcitrol administration, similar levels of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D were attained throughout the study in both genotypic groups. The increase in serum osteocalcin levels in the BB group was significantly less than that in the bb group (11% vs. 32%, P = 0.01). The genotype-related baseline difference in osteocalcin levels was not apparent at the similar serum 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D levels. By contrast, the baseline differences in phosphate and type I collagen carboxyterminal telopeptide persisted throughout the study. Serum ionized calcium levels did not differ between genotypes, nor did it move out of normal range values. However, parathyroid hormone was less suppressed in the low bone density group (38% vs. 11%, P = 0.01). These data indicate that the VDR alleles are associated with differences in the vitamin D endocrine system and may have important implications in relation to the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Analysis of Fc gamma receptor II (CD32) polymorphism in populations of African and South Asian ancestry reveals east-west geographic gradients of allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Carrington, C V F; Norman, P J; Vaughan, R W; Kondeatis, E; Ramdath, D D; Hameed, K; Stephens, H A F

    2003-10-01

    Analysis of FcgammaRIIA alleles in Pakistanis and in Trinidadians of South Asian, African and mixed ancestry revealed no significant differences between Trinidadian South Asians and Pakistanis. H131 homozygotes were more common among Trinidadian South Asians than among Africans and those of mixed ancestry. Comparison with other populations revealed east-west geographic gradients of allele frequencies.

  20. The allele frequency of ALDH2*Glu504Lys and ADH1B*Arg47His for the Ryukyu islanders and their history of expansion among East Asians.

    PubMed

    Koganebuchi, Kae; Haneji, Kuniaki; Toma, Takashi; Joh, Keiichiro; Soejima, Hidenobu; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Ishida, Hajime; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Harada, Shoji; Kawamura, Shoji; Oota, Hiroki

    2017-03-01

    A cline of frequencies of the derived allele of the ALDH2 gene, which causes a deficiency of an enzyme and "facial flushing" in humans who drink alcohol, has been known among the people of the Japanese archipelago. This cline is conventionally explained by admixture with immigrants from the Asian continent occurring during the Yayoi period. Previous studies lack sufficient data from the peripheral regions of the indigenous Jomon people, and those data the ADH1B gene that is involved in the Class I ADH gene cluster and contains another variant leading to a functional change. We focused on the southwestern-most people from the Ryukyu Islands (n = 218) and those from northern Kyushu (n = 21) where the Yayoi immigrants likely arrived. We investigated both the Class I ADH and ALDH2 loci, as well as neutral genetic markers. In the Ryukyu Islands, the frequencies of the ancestral alleles in both loci were always higher than those in mainland Japan, while the frequencies of ADH1B were less than those of the derived allele. A haplotype block was not observed in ALDH2 but was in Class I ADH. Our data suggest that the derived allele of ALDH2 came with the Yayoi immigrants from the Asian continent to the Japanese archipelago. However, the derived allele of ADH1B is unlikely to be related to the Yayoi migration. Therefore, we postulate that the expansion of the derived allele of ADHIB in East Asia could be traced back to the last glacial period. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bryś, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of imprinted genes in maize reveals allelic variation for imprinting and limited conservation with other species.

    PubMed

    Waters, Amanda J; Bilinski, Paul; Eichten, Steven R; Vaughn, Matthew W; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Gehring, Mary; Springer, Nathan M

    2013-11-26

    In plants, a subset of genes exhibit imprinting in endosperm tissue such that expression is primarily from the maternal or paternal allele. Imprinting may arise as a consequence of mechanisms for silencing of transposons during reproduction, and in some cases imprinted expression of particular genes may provide a selective advantage such that it is conserved across species. Separate mechanisms for the origin of imprinted expression patterns and maintenance of these patterns may result in substantial variation in the targets of imprinting in different species. Here we present deep sequencing of RNAs isolated from reciprocal crosses of four diverse maize genotypes, providing a comprehensive analysis that allows evaluation of imprinting at more than 95% of endosperm-expressed genes. We find that over 500 genes exhibit statistically significant parent-of-origin effects in maize endosperm tissue, but focused our analyses on a subset of these genes that had >90% expression from the maternal allele (69 genes) or from the paternal allele (108 genes) in at least one reciprocal cross. Over 10% of imprinted genes show evidence of allelic variation for imprinting. A comparison of imprinting in maize and rice reveals that 13% of genes with syntenic orthologs in both species exhibit conserved imprinting. Genes that exhibit conserved imprinting between maize and rice have elevated nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution ratios compared with other imprinted genes, suggesting a history of more rapid evolution. Together, these data suggest that imprinting only has functional relevance at a subset of loci that currently exhibit imprinting in maize.

  3. Strong allelic association between the torsion dystonia gene (DYT1) and loci on chromosome 9q34 in Ashkenazi Jews

    PubMed Central

    Ozelius, Laurie J.; Kramer, Patricia L.; de Leon, Deborah; Risch, Neil; Bressman, Susan B.; Schuback, Deborah E.; Brin, Mitchell F.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Burke, Robert E.; Gusella, James F.; Fahn, Stanley; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1992-01-01

    The DYT1 gene responsible for early-onset, idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, as well as in one large non-Jewish family, has been mapped to chromosome 9q32-34. Using (GT)n and RFLP markers in this region, we have identified obligate recombination events in some of these Jewish families, which further delineate the area containing the DYT1 gene to a 6-cM region bounded by loci AK1 and ASS. In 52 unrelated, affected Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, we have found highly significant linkage disequilibrium between a particular extended haplotype at the ABL-ASS loci and the DYT1 gene. The 4/A12 haplotype for ABL-ASS is present on 69% of the disease-bearing chromosomes among affected Jewish individuals and on only 1% of control Jewish chromosomes (χ2 = 91.07, P « .001). The allelic association between this extended haplotype and DYT1 predicts that these three genes lie within 1–2 cM of each other; on the basis of obligate recombination events, the DYT1 gene is centromeric to ASS. Furthermore, this allelic association supports the idea that a single mutation event is responsible for most hereditary cases of dystonia in the Jewish population. Of the 53 definitely affecteds typed, 13 appear to be sporadic, with no family history of dystonia. However, the proportion of sporadic cases which potentially carry the A12 haplotype at ASS (8/13 [62%]) is similar to the proportion of familial cases with A12 (28/40 [70%]). This suggests that many sporadic cases are hereditary, that the disease gene frequency is greater than 1/15,000, and that the penetrance is lower than 30%, as previously estimated in this population. Most affected individuals were heterozygous for the ABL-ASS haplotype, a finding supporting autosomal dominant inheritance of the DYT1 gene. The ABL-ASS extended-haplotype status will provide predictive value for carrier status in Jewish individuals. This information can be used for molecular diagnosis, evaluation of subclinical

  4. The HLA-B*83:01 allele is generated by a gene conversion event including whole of exon 2 and partial introns 1 and 2 between B*44 and B*56 alleles.

    PubMed

    Cervera, I; Herraiz, M A; Vidart, J A; Peñaloza, J; Martinez-Laso, J

    2011-02-01

    Several studies have indicated the gene conversion as the most important mechanism about the MHC polymorphism generation when intron sequences are studied. The data obtained confirm that the B*83:01 allele is generated by gene conversion event including exon 2 and partial intron 1 and 2 between B*44 and B*56 alleles.

  5. Bards, poets, and cliques: frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of language genes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Reed A

    2011-09-01

    The ability of humans to communicate via language is a complex, adapted phenotype, which undoubtedly has a recently evolved genetic component. However, the evolutionary dynamics of language-associated alleles are poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of such systems, a population-genetics model for language-associated genes is developed. (The model is general and applicable to social interactions other than communication.) When an allele arises that potentially improves the ability of individuals to communicate, it will experience positive frequency-dependent selection because its fitness will depend on how many other individuals communicate the same way. Consequently, new and rare alleles are selected against, posing a problem for the evolutionary origin of language. However, the model shows that if individuals form language-based cliques, then novel language-associated alleles can sweep through a population. Thus, the origin of language ability can be sufficiently explained by Darwinian processes operating on genetic diversity in a finite population of human ancestors.

  6. Genetic comparison of lake sturgeon populations: Differentiation based on allelic frequencies at seven microsatellite loci

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McQuown, E.; Krueger, C.C.; Kincaid, H.L.; Gall, G.A.E.; May, B.

    2003-01-01

    The lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) has recently become a high priority for restoration management because of the near extinction of the species from many areas of North America. The identification of the level of population differentiation that naturally exists among lake sturgeon populations will be useful in the development of management plans to conserve and restore diversity, and in the choice of donor populations to use for re-introduction. Genetic variation among and within 210 lake sturgeon collected from seven locations (St. Lawrence River, Des Prairies River (tributary to the St. Lawrence River), Mattagami River (Hudson Bay drainage), Menominee River (Lake Michigan drainage), Wolf River (Lake Michigan drainage), Niagara River, and Lake Erie) was examined based on allelic variation at seven microsatellite loci (four disomic and three putative tetrasomic). High levels of variability were detected at these loci. Analyses revealed an average of 8.6 alleles per locus (range 5 to 12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity values at the four disomic loci ranging from 0.46 to 0.66. Multivariate factor analysis of Nei's genetic distance values produced three distinct population groups that were organized by geography: 1) Mattagami (northern Quebec), 2) Menominee/ Wolf (Lake Michigan - Wisconsin), and 3) St. Lawrence/ Des Prairies/ Niagara/ Erie (lower Great Lakes). Differences based on G-tests summed over all loci occurred between all possible paired comparisons of the collections (P < 0.01). These analyses indicated that lake sturgeon populations are differentiated within the Great Lakes basin. Managers of this species will need to identify individual populations in their jurisdictions and provide separate consideration for their conservation and rehabilitation.

  7. Maximum-likelihood and markov chain monte carlo approaches to estimate inbreeding and effective size from allele frequency changes.

    PubMed Central

    Laval, Guillaume; SanCristobal, Magali; Chevalet, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian (MCMC algorithm) estimates of the increase of the Wright-Malécot inbreeding coefficient, F(t), between two temporally spaced samples, were developed from the Dirichlet approximation of allelic frequency distribution (model MD) and from the admixture of the Dirichlet approximation and the probabilities of fixation and loss of alleles (model MDL). Their accuracy was tested using computer simulations in which F(t) = 10% or less. The maximum-likelihood method based on the model MDL was found to be the best estimate of F(t) provided that initial frequencies are known exactly. When founder frequencies are estimated from a limited set of founder animals, only the estimates based on the model MD can be used for the moment. In this case no method was found to be the best in all situations investigated. The likelihood and Bayesian approaches give better results than the classical F-statistics when markers exhibiting a low polymorphism (such as the SNP markers) are used. Concerning the estimations of the effective population size all the new estimates presented here were found to be better than the F-statistics classically used. PMID:12871924

  8. Genome-wide screen of genes imprinted in sorghum endosperm, and the roles of allelic differential cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meishan; Li, Ning; He, Wenan; Zhang, Huakun; Yang, Wei; Liu, Bao

    2016-02-01

    Imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon referring to allele-biased expression of certain genes depending on their parent of origin. Accumulated evidence suggests that, while imprinting is a conserved mechanism across kingdoms, the identities of the imprinted genes are largely species-specific. Using deep RNA sequencing of endosperm 14 days after pollination in sorghum, 5683 genes (29.27% of the total 19 418 expressed genes) were found to harbor diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms between two parental lines. The analysis of parent-of-origin expression patterns in the endosperm of a pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids between the two sorghum lines led to identification of 101 genes with ≥ fivefold allelic expression difference in both hybrids, including 85 maternal expressed genes (MEGs) and 16 paternal expressed genes (PEGs). Thirty of these genes were previously identified as imprinted in endosperm of maize (Zea mays), rice (Oryza sativa) or Arabidopsis, while the remaining 71 genes are sorghum-specific imprinted genes relative to these three plant species. Allele-biased expression of virtually all of the 14 tested imprinted genes (nine MEGs and five PEGs) was validated by pyrosequencing using independent sources of RNA from various developmental stages and dissected parts of endosperm. Forty-six imprinted genes (30 MEGs and 16 PEGs) were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR, and the majority of them showed endosperm-specific or preferential expression relative to embryo and other tissues. DNA methylation analysis of the 5' upstream region and gene body for seven imprinted genes indicated that, while three of the four PEGs were associated with hypomethylation of maternal alleles, no MEG was associated with allele-differential methylation.

  9. In Vivo Evaluation of Candidate Allele-specific Mutant Huntingtin Gene Silencing Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Østergaard, Michael E; Watt, Andrew T; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Doty, Crystal N; Villanueva, Erika B; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Xie, Yuanyun; Freier, Susan M; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, Clarence Frank; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant, genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of voluntary motor control, psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive decline, for which there is currently no disease-modifying therapy. HD is caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mutant HTT protein (muHTT) acquires toxic functions, and there is significant evidence that muHTT lowering would be therapeutically efficacious. However, the wild-type HTT protein (wtHTT) serves vital functions, making allele-specific muHTT lowering strategies potentially safer than nonselective strategies. CAG tract expansion is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be targeted by gene silencing reagents such as antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to accomplish allele-specific muHTT lowering. Here we evaluate ASOs targeted to HD-associated SNPs in acute in vivo studies including screening, distribution, duration of action and dosing, using a humanized mouse model of HD, Hu97/18, that is heterozygous for the targeted SNPs. We have identified four well-tolerated lead ASOs that potently and selectively silence muHTT at a broad range of doses throughout the central nervous system for 16 weeks or more after a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. With further validation, these ASOs could provide a therapeutic option for individuals afflicted with HD. PMID:25101598

  10. Beta-thalassemia mutations in Rome. A high frequency of the IVSII-745 allele in subjects of latium origin.

    PubMed

    Massa, A; Cianciulli, P; Cianetti, L; Iazzone, R; Cenci, A; Sorrentino, F; Franco, G; Pecci, G; Papa, G; Peschle, C

    1994-01-01

    We studied the molecular bases of beta-thalassemia in Rome, a city centrally located in Latium, which is a region with a low incidence of beta-carriers. People also come to Rome from other regions for specific or prenatal diagnostic assessment. Only 11 patients (20%) out of 62 characterized beta-thalassemia subjects were of Latium family origin. They presented five mutations with an uncommonly high frequency of the IVSII-745 allele, that was found in homozygosis in 4 unrelated patients from a southeastern area in the province of Frosinone. These data may indicate a founder effect.

  11. Measurement of the human allele frequency spectrum demonstrates greater genetic drift in East Asians than in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Keinan, Alon; Mullikin, James C; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2007-10-01

    Large data sets on human genetic variation have been collected recently, but their usefulness for learning about history and natural selection has been limited by biases in the ways polymorphisms were chosen. We report large subsets of SNPs from the International HapMap Project that allow us to overcome these biases and to provide accurate measurement of a quantity of crucial importance for understanding genetic variation: the allele frequency spectrum. Our analysis shows that East Asian and northern European ancestors shared the same population bottleneck expanding out of Africa but that both also experienced more recent genetic drift, which was greater in East Asians.

  12. Self-recognition in social amoebae is mediated by allelic pairs of tiger genes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shigenori; Benabentos, Rocio; Ho, Hsing-I; Kuspa, Adam; Shaulsky, Gad

    2011-07-22

    Free-living cells of the social amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can aggregate and develop into multicellular fruiting bodies in which many die altruistically as they become stalk cells that support the surviving spores. Dictyostelium cells exhibit kin discrimination--a potential defense against cheaters, which sporulate without contributing to the stalk. Kin discrimination depends on strain relatedness, and the polymorphic genes tgrB1 and tgrC1 are potential components of that mechanism. Here, we demonstrate a direct role for these genes in kin discrimination. We show that a matching pair of tgrB1 and tgrC1 alleles is necessary and sufficient for attractive self-recognition, which is mediated by differential cell-cell adhesion. We propose that TgrB1 and TgrC1 proteins mediate this adhesion through direct binding. This system is a genetically tractable ancient model of eukaryotic self-recognition.

  13. Molecular characterization of an allelic series of mutations in the mouse Nox3 gene.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, John P; Fairfield, Heather E; Spruce, Catrina A; McCarty, Christopher M; Bergstrom, David E

    2011-04-01

    The inner ear consists of the cochlea (the organ of hearing) and the vestibular system (the organs of balance). Within the vestibular system, linear acceleration and gravity are detected by the saccule and utricle. Resting above the neurosensory epithelia of these organs are otoconia, minute proteinaceous and crystalline (calcite) inertial masses that shift under the physical forces imparted by linear movements and gravity. It is the transduction and sensation of these movements and their integration with vision and proprioceptive inputs that contribute to the sensation of balance. It has been proposed that a reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) generating NADPH oxidase comprising the gene products of the Nox3, Noxo1, and Cyba genes plays a critical and constructive role in the process of inner-ear development, specifically, the deposition of otoconia. Inactivation in mouse of any of the NADPH oxidase components encoded by the Nox3, Noxo1, or Cyba gene results in the complete congenital absence of otoconia and profound vestibular dysfunction. Here we describe our use of PCR, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with traditional and high-throughput (HTP) sequencing technologies to extend and complete the molecular characterization of an allelic series of seven mutations in the Nox3 gene. Collectively, the mutation spectrum includes an endogenous retrovirus insertion, two missense mutations, a splice donor mutation, a splice acceptor mutation, premature translational termination, and a small duplication. Together, these alleles provide tools to investigate the mechanisms of otoconial deposition over development, throughout aging, and in various disease states.

  14. Allelic variation of a dehydrin gene cosegregates with chilling tolerance during seedling emergence.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A M; Hall, A E; Close, T J

    1999-11-09

    Dehydrins (DHNs, LEA D-11) are plant proteins present during environmental stresses associated with dehydration or low temperatures and during seed maturation. Functions of DHNs have not yet been defined. Earlier, we hypothesized that a approximately 35-kDa DHN and membrane properties that reduce electrolyte leakage from seeds confer chilling tolerance during seedling emergence of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) in an additive and independent manner. Evidence for this hypothesis was not rigorous because it was based on correlations of presence/absence of the DHN and slow electrolyte leakage with chilling tolerance in closely related cowpea lines that have some other genetic differences. Here, we provide more compelling genetic evidence for involvement of the DHN in chilling tolerance of cowpea. We developed near-isogenic lines by backcrossing. We isolated and determined the sequence of a cDNA corresponding to the approximately 35-kDa DHN and used gene-specific oligonucleotides derived from it to test the genetic linkage between the DHN presence/absence trait and the DHN structural gene. We tested for association between the DHN presence/absence trait and both low-temperature seed emergence and electrolyte leakage. We show that allelic differences in the Dhn structural gene map to the same position as the DHN protein presence/absence trait and that the presence of the approximately 35-kDa DHN is indeed associated with chilling tolerance during seedling emergence, independent of electrolyte leakage effects. Two types of allelic variation in the Dhn gene were identified in the protein-coding region, deletion of one Phi-segment from the DHN-negative lines and two single amino acid substitutions.

  15. Molecular characterization of an allelic series of mutations in the mouse Nox3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, John P.; Fairfield, Heather E.; Spruce, Catrina A.; McCarty, Christopher M.; Bergstrom, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The inner ear consists of the cochlea (the organ of hearing) and the vestibular system (the organs of balance). Within the vestibular system, linear acceleration and gravity are detected by the saccule and utricle. Resting above the neurosensory epithelia of these organs are otoconia, minute proteinaceous and crystalline (calcite) inertial masses that shift under the physical forces imparted by linear movements and gravity. It is the transduction and sensation of these movements and their integration with vision and proprioceptive inputs that contribute to the sensation of balance. It has been proposed that a reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) generating NADPH oxidase comprising the gene products of the Nox3, Noxo1, and Cyba genes plays a critical and constructive role in the process of inner-ear development, specifically, the deposition of otoconia. Inactivation in mouse of any of the NADPH oxidase components encoded by the Nox3, Noxo1, or Cyba gene results in the complete congenital absence of otoconia and profound vestibular dysfunction. Here we describe our use of PCR, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with traditional and high-throughput (HTP) sequencing technologies to extend and complete the molecular characterization of an allelic series of seven mutations in the Nox3 gene. Collectively, the mutation spectrum includes an endogenous retrovirus insertion, two missense mutations, a splice donor mutation, a splice acceptor mutation, premature translational termination, and a small duplication. Together, these alleles provide tools to investigate the mechanisms of otoconial deposition over development, throughout aging, and in various disease states. PMID:21161235

  16. Microarray-based detection of CYP1A1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, GSTT1, GSTM1, MTHFR, MTRR, NQO1, NAT2, HLA-DQA1, and AB0 allele frequencies in native Russians.

    PubMed

    Gra, Olga; Mityaeva, Olga; Berdichevets, Iryna; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Fesenko, Denis; Kurbatova, Olga; Goldenkova-Pavlova, Irina; Nasedkina, Tatyana

    2010-06-01

    Xenobiotic-metabolizing genes (e.g., Cytochromes P450, GST, NAT2, and NQO1), folate metabolism genes (e.g., MTHFR and MTRR), and major histocompatibility complex genes (e.g., HLA-DQA1) play multiple roles in the organism functioning. In addition, AB0 is the most clinically significant high-polymorphic gene in transfusion and transplantation medicine. Epidemiological data show that allele frequencies of these genes exhibit ethnic and geographic diversity. Besides, little is known about frequency distribution of the major polymorphic variants in native Russians. We developed biological microchips that allow us to analyze a spectrum of allelic variants in 12 different genes: CYP1A1, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, GSTT1, GSTM1, MTHFR, MTRR, NQO1, NAT2, HLA-DQA1, and AB0. Using this composite methodological platform we have studied 352 DNA samples from healthy native Russian volunteers. The allelic frequencies of gene polymorphisms obtained are close to allelic frequencies observed in some European populations, as published earlier. These data were used in comparative studies to determine predisposition to tuberculosis, lymphoma, and leukemia in adults and to childhood acute leukemia. The HLA-DQA1 and AB0 allele frequencies were used to estimate forensic population parameters for these loci.

  17. About the origin of European spelt ( Triticum spelta L.): allelic differentiation of the HMW Glutenin B1-1 and A1-2 subunit genes.

    PubMed

    Blatter, R H E; Jacomet, S; Schlumbaum, A

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the origin of European spelt ( Triticum spelta L., genome AABBDD) and its relation to bread wheat ( Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD), we analysed an approximately 1-kb sequence, including a part of the promoter and the coding region, of the high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin B1-1 and A1-2 subunit genes in 58 accessions of hexa- and tetraploid wheat from different geographical regions. Six Glu-B1-1 and five Glu-A1-2 alleles were identified based on 21 and 19 informative sites, respectively, which suggests a polyphyletic origin of the A- and B-genomes of hexaploid wheat. In both genes, a group of alleles clustered in a distinct, so-called beta subclade. High frequencies of alleles from the Glu-B1-1 and Glu-A1-2 beta subclades differentiated European spelt from Asian spelt and bread wheat. This indicates different origins of European and Asian spelt, and that European spelt does not derive from the hulled progenitors of bread wheat. The conjoint differentiation of alleles of the A- and B-genome in European spelt suggests the introgression of a tetraploid wheat into free-threshing hexaploid wheat as the origin of European spelt.

  18. HLA class-I and class-II allele frequencies and two-locus haplotypes in Melanesians of Vanuatu and New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Maitland, K; Bunce, M; Harding, R M; Barnardo, M C N M; Clegg, J B; Welsh, K; Bowden, D K; Williams, T N

    2004-12-01

    HLA class-I and class-II allele frequencies and two-locus haplotypes were examined in 367 unrelated Melanesians living on the islands of Vanuatu and New Caledonia. Diversity at all HLA class-I and class-II loci was relatively limited. In class-I loci, three HLA-A allelic groups (HLA-A*24, HLA-A*34 and HLA-A*11), seven HLA-B alleles or allelic groups (HLA-B*1506, HLA-B*5602, HLA-B*13, HLA-B*5601, HLA-B*4001, HLA-B*4002 and HLA-B*2704) and four HLA-C alleles or allelic groups (HLA-Cw*04, HLA-Cw*01, HLA-Cw*0702 and HLA-Cw*15) constituted more than 90% of the alleles observed. In the class-II loci, four HLA-DRB1 alleles (HLA-DRB1*15, HLA-DRB1*11, HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DRB1*16), three HLA-DRB3-5 alleles (HLA-DRB3*02, HLA-DRB4*01 and HLA-DRB5*01/02) and five HLA-DQB1 alleles (HLA-DQB1*0301, HLA-DQB1*04, HLA-DQB1*05, HLA-DQB1*0601 and HLA-DQB1*0602) constituted over 93, 97 and 98% of the alleles observed, respectively. Homozygosity showed significant departures from expected levels for neutrality based on allele frequency (i.e. excess diversity) at the HLA-B, HLA-Cw, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB3/5 loci on some islands. The locus with the strongest departure from neutrality was HLA-DQB1, homozygosity being significantly lower than expected on all islands except New Caledonia. No consistent pattern was demonstrated for any HLA locus in relation to malaria endemicity.

  19. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  20. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  1. Analysis of a Larger SNP Dataset from the HapMap Project Confirmed That the Modern Human A Allele of the ABO Blood Group Genes Is a Descendant of a Recombinant between B and O Alleles.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masaya; Sato, Mitsuharu; Kitano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The human ABO blood group gene consists of three main alleles (A, B, and O) that encode a glycosyltransferase. The A and B alleles differ by two critical amino acids in exon 7, and the major O allele has a single nucleotide deletion (Δ261) in exon 6. Previous evolutionary studies have revealed that the A allele is the most ancient, B allele diverged from the A allele with two critical amino acid substitutions in exon 7, and the major O allele diverged from the A allele with Δ261 in exon 6. However, a recent phylogenetic network analysis study showed that the A allele of humans emerged through a recombination between the B and O alleles. In the previous study, a restricted dataset from only two populations was used. In this study, therefore, we used a large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) dataset from the HapMap Project. The results indicated that the A101-A201-O09 haplogroup was a recombinant lineage between the B and O haplotypes, containing the intact exon 6 from the B allele and the two critical A type sites in exon 7 from the major O allele. Its recombination point was assumed to be located just behind Δ261 in exon 6.

  2. Inheritance of Cry1F resistance, cross-resistance and frequency of resistant alleles in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Vélez, A M; Spencer, T A; Alves, A P; Moellenbeck, D; Meagher, R L; Chirakkal, H; Siegfried, B D

    2013-12-01

    Transgenic maize, Zea maize L., expressing the Cry1F protein from Bacillus thuringiensis has been registered for Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) control since 2003. Unexpected damage to Cry1F maize was reported in 2006 in Puerto Rico and Cry1F resistance in S. frugiperda was documented. The inheritance of Cry1F resistance was characterized in a S. frugiperda resistant strain originating from Puerto Rico, which displayed >289-fold resistance to purified Cry1F. Concentration-response bioassays of reciprocal crosses of resistant and susceptible parental populations indicated that resistance is recessive and autosomal. Bioassays of the backcross of the F1 generation crossed with the resistant parental strain suggest that a single locus is responsible for resistance. In addition, cross-resistance to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba, Cry2Aa and Vip3Aa was assessed in the Cry1F-resistant strain. There was no significant cross-resistance to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ba and Cry2Aa, although only limited effects were observed in the susceptible strain. Vip3Aa was highly effective against susceptible and resistant insects indicating no cross-resistance with Cry1F. In contrast, low levels of cross-resistance were observed for both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Because the resistance is recessive and conferred by a single locus, an F1 screening assay was used to measure the frequency of Cry1F-resistant alleles from populations of Florida and Texas in 2010 and 2011. A total frequency of resistant alleles of 0.13 and 0.02 was found for Florida and Texas populations, respectively, indicating resistant alleles could be found in US populations, although there have been no reports of reduced efficacy of Cry1F-expressing plants.

  3. Cellular Adhesion Gene SELP Is Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Displays Differential Allelic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Hugo Teixeira, Vitor; Steiner, Anke; Quente, Elfi; Wolfram, Grit; Scholz, Markus; Pierlot, Céline; Migliorini, Paola; Bombardieri, Stefano; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Alves, Helena; Bardin, Thomas; Prum, Bernard; Emmrich, Frank; Cornelis, François

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a key event is infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into the synovial lining, possibly aggravated by dysregulation of cellular adhesion molecules. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms of 14 genes involved in cellular adhesion processes (CAST, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB2, PECAM1, PTEN, PTPN11, PTPRC, PXN, SELE, SELP, SRC, TYK2, and VCAM1) were analyzed for association with RA. Association analysis was performed consecutively in three European RA family sample groups (Nfamilies = 407). Additionally, we investigated differential allelic expression, a possible functional consequence of genetic variants. SELP (selectin P, CD62P) SNP-allele rs6136-T was associated with risk for RA in two RA family sample groups as well as in global analysis of all three groups (ptotal = 0.003). This allele was also expressed preferentially (p<10−6) with a two- fold average increase in regulated samples. Differential expression is supported by data from Genevar MuTHER (p1 = 0.004; p2 = 0.0177). Evidence for influence of rs6136 on transcription factor binding was also found in silico and in public datasets reporting in vitro data. In summary, we found SELP rs6136-T to be associated with RA and with increased expression of SELP mRNA. SELP is located on the surface of endothelial cells and crucial for recruitment, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells into the joint. Genetically determined increased SELP expression levels might thus be a novel additional risk factor for RA. PMID:25147926

  4. Comprehensive genetic testing with ethnic-specific filtering by allele frequency in a Japanese hearing-loss population

    PubMed Central

    Moteki, Hideaki; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Shearer, A Eliot; Sloan, Christina M; Kolbe, Diana L; Nishio, Shin-ya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Usami, Shin-ichi; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel sequencing (TGE+MPS) have made comprehensive genetic testing for non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) possible. After excluding NSHL subjects with causative mutations in GJB2 and the MT-RNR1 (1555A>G) variant by Sanger sequencing, we completed TGE+MPS on 194 probands with presumed NSHL identified across Japan. We used both publicly available minor allele frequency (MAF) datasets and ethnic-specific MAF filtering against an in-house database of 200 normal-hearing Japanese controls. Ethnic-specific MAF filtering allowed us to re-categorize as common 203 variants otherwise annotated as rare or novel in non-Japanese ethnicities. This step minimizes false-positive results and improves the annotation of identified variants. Causative variants were identified in 27% of probands with solve rates of 35%, 35% and 19% for dominant, recessive and sporadic NSHL, respectively. Mutations in MYO15A and CDH23 follow GJB2 as the frequent causes of recessive NSHL; copy number variations in STRC are a major cause of mild-to-moderate NSHL. Ethnic-specific filtering by allele frequency is essential to optimize the interpretation of genetic data. PMID:26346818

  5. Allele frequencies of human platelet antigens in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wan Syafawati, W U; Norhalifah, H K; Zefarina, Z; Zafarina, Z; Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N; Chambers, G K; Edinur, H A

    2015-10-01

    The major aims of this study are to characterise and compile allelic data of human platelet antigen (HPA)-1 to -6 and -15 systems in five Malay sub-ethnic groups in Peninsular Malaysia. HPAs are polymorphic glycoproteins expressed on the surface of platelet membranes and are genetically differentiated across ethnogeographically unrelated populations. Blood samples were obtained with informed consent from 192 volunteers: Banjar (n = 30), Bugis (n = 37), Champa (n = 51), Jawa (n = 39) and Kelantan (n = 35). Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method. In general, frequencies of HPAs in the Malay sub-ethnic groups are more similar to those in Asian populations compared with other more distinct populations such as Indians, Australian Aborigines and Europeans. This study provides the first HPA datasets for the selected Malay sub-ethnic groups. Subsequent analyses including previously reported HPA data of Malays, Chinese and Indians revealed details of the genetic relationships and ancestry of various sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia. Furthermore, the comprehensive HPA allele frequency information from Peninsular Malaysia provided in this report has potential applications for future study of diseases, estimating risks associated with HPA alloimmunization and for developing an efficient HPA-typed donor recruitment strategy. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  6. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population.

  7. Functional screening of willow alleles in Arabidopsis combined with QTL mapping in willow (Salix) identifies SxMAX4 as a coppicing response gene.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Jemma; Ward, Sally P; Hanley, Steven J; Leyser, Ottoline; Karp, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are important biomass crops due to their ability to grow rapidly with low fertilizer inputs and ease of cultivation in short-rotation coppice cycles. They are relatively undomesticated and highly diverse, but functional testing to identify useful allelic variation is time-consuming in trees and transformation is not yet possible in willow. Arabidopsis is heralded as a model plant from which knowledge can be transferred to advance the improvement of less tractable species. Here, knowledge and methodologies from Arabidopsis were successfully used to identify a gene influencing stem number in coppiced willows, a complex trait of key biological and industrial relevance. The strigolactone-related More AXillary growth (MAX) genes were considered candidates due to their role in shoot branching. We previously demonstrated that willow and Arabidopsis show similar response to strigolactone and that transformation rescue of Arabidopsis max mutants with willow genes could be used to detect allelic differences. Here, this approach was used to screen 45 SxMAX1, SxMAX2, SxMAX3 and SxMAX4 alleles cloned from 15 parents of 11 mapping populations varying in shoot-branching traits. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies were locus dependent, ranging from 29.2 to 74.3 polymorphic sites per kb. SxMAX alleles were 98%-99% conserved at the amino acid level, but different protein products varying in their ability to rescue Arabidopsis max mutants were identified. One poor rescuing allele, SxMAX4D, segregated in a willow mapping population where its presence was associated with increased shoot resprouting after coppicing and colocated with a QTL for this trait.

  8. Life satisfaction in the new country: a multilevel longitudinal analysis of effects of culture and 5-HTT allele frequency distribution in country of origin.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Emiko S; Kent, Stephen; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Life satisfaction of migrants to Australia from 17 countries, assessed at 4-5 months, 16-17 months and 3½ years after arrival, was analyzed with a longitudinal, multilevel analysis. The results indicated that migrants were more satisfied, if the national average life satisfaction was higher in their country of origin, after adjustment for individual-level income, age, and sex and a linear temporal trend. Simultaneously, the migrants were also happier if people in their country of origin had a higher frequency of 5-HTT long allele, a genotype known to be associated with resilience under life stresses. These two relationships were independent, suggesting that both culture and gene matter in international transitions.

  9. Life satisfaction in the new country: a multilevel longitudinal analysis of effects of culture and 5-HTT allele frequency distribution in country of origin

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Stephen; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Life satisfaction of migrants to Australia from 17 countries, assessed at 4–5 months, 16–17 months and 3½ years after arrival, was analyzed with a longitudinal, multilevel analysis. The results indicated that migrants were more satisfied, if the national average life satisfaction was higher in their country of origin, after adjustment for individual-level income, age, and sex and a linear temporal trend. Simultaneously, the migrants were also happier if people in their country of origin had a higher frequency of 5-HTT long allele, a genotype known to be associated with resilience under life stresses. These two relationships were independent, suggesting that both culture and gene matter in international transitions. PMID:24532702

  10. Sequence diversification in recessive alleles of two host factor genes suggests adaptive selection for bymovirus resistance in cultivated barley from East Asia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Habekuß, Antje; Hofinger, Bernhard J; Kanyuka, Kostya; Kilian, Benjamin; Graner, Andreas; Ordon, Frank; Stein, Nils

    2017-02-01

    Two distinct patterns of sequence diversity for the recessive alleles of two host factors HvPDIL5 - 1 and HvEIF4E indicated the adaptive selection for bymovirus resistance in cultivated barley from East Asia. Plant pathogens are constantly challenging plant fitness and driving resistance gene evolution in host species. Little is known about the evolution of sequence diversity in host recessive resistance genes that interact with plant viruses. Here, by combining previously published and newly generated targeted re-sequencing information, we systematically analyzed natural variation in a broad collection of wild (Hordeum spontaneum; Hs) and domesticated barleys (Hordeum vulgare; Hv) using the full-length coding sequence of the two host factor genes, HvPDIL5-1 and HvEIF4E, conferring recessive resistance to the agriculturally important Barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV) and Barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV). Interestingly, two types of gene evolution conferred by sequence variation in domesticated barley, but not in wild barley were observed. Whereas resistance-conferring alleles of HvEIF4E exclusively contained non-synonymous amino acid substitutions (including in-frame sequence deletions and insertions), loss-of-function alleles were predominantly responsible for the HvPDIL5-1 conferred bymovirus resistance. A strong correlation between the geographic origin and the frequency of barley accessions carrying resistance-conferring alleles was evident for each of the two host factor genes, indicating adaptive selection for bymovirus resistance in cultivated barley from East Asia.

  11. Allele-specific transcriptional activity of the variable number of tandem repeats of the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with idiopathic achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Michela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Pesce, Marcella; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Annese, Vito; Petruzzelli, Raffaella; Izzo, Paola; Sepulveres, Rossana; Bruzzese, Dario; Esposito, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of genes involved in the regulation of the immune response are risk factors for achalasia, but their contribution to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Nitric oxide is involved both in immune function and inhibitory neurotransmission. Objective The objective of this article is to assess the association and the functional relevance of the CCTTT-inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene promoter polymorphism in achalasia. Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from 181 achalasia patients and 220 controls. Genotyping of the (CCTTT)n repeats was performed by PCR and capillary electrophoresis, and data analyzed by considering the frequency of the different alleles. HT29 cells were transfected with iNOS luciferase promoter-reporter plasmids containing different (CCTTT)n. Results The alleles’ distribution ranged from 7 to 18, with a peak frequency at 12 repeats. Analysis of the allele frequencies revealed that individuals carrying 10 and 13 CCTTT repeats were respectively less and more frequent in achalasia (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.5 and OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–2.4, all p < 0.05). Long repeats were also significantly associated with an earlier onset of the disease (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.13–2.53, p = 0.01). Transfection experiments revealed a similar allele-specific iNOS transcriptional activity. Conclusion The functional polymorphism (CCTTT) of NOS2 promoter is associated with achalasia, likely by an allele-specific modulation of nitric oxide production. PMID:28344787

  12. Systematic morphological profiling of human gene and allele function via Cell Painting

    PubMed Central

    Rohban, Mohammad Hossein; Singh, Shantanu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Berthet, Julia B; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Shrestha, Yashaswi; Varelas, Xaralabos; Boehm, Jesse S; Carpenter, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesized that human genes and disease-associated alleles might be systematically functionally annotated using morphological profiling of cDNA constructs, via a microscopy-based Cell Painting assay. Indeed, 50% of the 220 tested genes yielded detectable morphological profiles, which grouped into biologically meaningful gene clusters consistent with known functional annotation (e.g., the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK cascade). We used novel subpopulation-based visualization methods to interpret the morphological changes for specific clusters. This unbiased morphologic map of gene function revealed TRAF2/c-REL negative regulation of YAP1/WWTR1-responsive pathways. We confirmed this discovery of functional connectivity between the NF-κB pathway and Hippo pathway effectors at the transcriptional level, thereby expanding knowledge of these two signaling pathways that critically regulate tumor initiation and progression. We make the images and raw data publicly available, providing an initial morphological map of major biological pathways for future study. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24060.001 PMID:28315521

  13. Identification of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Genes Involved in Incompatibility with Soybean Plants Carrying the Rj4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Omar M.; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei

    2015-01-01

    Symbioses between leguminous plants and soil bacteria known as rhizobia are of great importance to agricultural production and nitrogen cycling. While these mutualistic symbioses can involve a wide range of rhizobia, some legumes exhibit incompatibility with specific strains, resulting in ineffective nodulation. The formation of nodules in soybean plants (Glycine max) is controlled by several host genes, which are referred to as Rj genes. The soybean cultivar BARC2 carries the Rj4 gene, which restricts nodulation by specific strains, including Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA61. Here we employed transposon mutagenesis to identify the genetic locus in USDA61 that determines incompatibility with soybean varieties carrying the Rj4 allele. Introduction of the Tn5 transposon into USDA61 resulted in the formation of nitrogen fixation nodules on the roots of soybean cultivar BARC2 (Rj4 Rj4). Sequencing analysis of the sequence flanking the Tn5 insertion revealed that six genes encoding a putative histidine kinase, transcriptional regulator, DNA-binding transcriptional activator, helix-turn-helix-type transcriptional regulator, phage shock protein, and cysteine protease were disrupted. The cysteine protease mutant had a high degree of similarity with the type 3 effector protein XopD of Xanthomonas campestris. Our findings shed light on the diverse and complicated mechanisms that underlie these highly host-specific interactions and indicate the involvement of a type 3 effector in Rj4 nodulation restriction, suggesting that Rj4 incompatibility is partly mediated by effector-triggered immunity. PMID:26187957

  14. Enrichment of pathogenic alleles in the brittle cornea gene, ZNF469, in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Judith; Porter, Louise F; Rice, Aine; Vitart, Veronique; Armstrong, David J; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis L; Wright, Alan F; Inglehearn, Chris F; Black, Graeme C; Simpson, David A; Manson, Forbes; Willoughby, Colin E

    2014-10-15

    Keratoconus, a common inherited ocular disorder resulting in progressive corneal thinning, is the leading indication for corneal transplantation in the developed world. Genome-wide association studies have identified common SNPs 100 kb upstream of ZNF469 strongly associated with corneal thickness. Homozygous mutations in ZNF469 and PR domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5) genes result in brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) Types 1 and 2, respectively. BCS is an autosomal recessive generalized connective tissue disorder associated with extreme corneal thinning and a high risk of corneal rupture. Some individuals with heterozygous PRDM5 mutations demonstrate a carrier ocular phenotype, which includes a mildly reduced corneal thickness, keratoconus and blue sclera. We hypothesized that heterozygous variants in PRDM5 and ZNF469 predispose to the development of isolated keratoconus. We found a significant enrichment of potentially pathologic heterozygous alleles in ZNF469 associated with the development of keratoconus (P = 0.00102) resulting in a relative risk of 12.0. This enrichment of rare potentially pathogenic alleles in ZNF469 in 12.5% of keratoconus patients represents a significant mutational load and highlights ZNF469 as the most significant genetic factor responsible for keratoconus identified to date.

  15. Enrichment of pathogenic alleles in the brittle cornea gene, ZNF469, in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Judith; Porter, Louise F.; Rice, Aine; Vitart, Veronique; Armstrong, David J.; Schorderet, Daniel F.; Munier, Francis L.; Wright, Alan F.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Black, Graeme C.; Simpson, David A.; Manson, Forbes; Willoughby, Colin E.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus, a common inherited ocular disorder resulting in progressive corneal thinning, is the leading indication for corneal transplantation in the developed world. Genome-wide association studies have identified common SNPs 100 kb upstream of ZNF469 strongly associated with corneal thickness. Homozygous mutations in ZNF469 and PR domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5) genes result in brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) Types 1 and 2, respectively. BCS is an autosomal recessive generalized connective tissue disorder associated with extreme corneal thinning and a high risk of corneal rupture. Some individuals with heterozygous PRDM5 mutations demonstrate a carrier ocular phenotype, which includes a mildly reduced corneal thickness, keratoconus and blue sclera. We hypothesized that heterozygous variants in PRDM5 and ZNF469 predispose to the development of isolated keratoconus. We found a significant enrichment of potentially pathologic heterozygous alleles in ZNF469 associated with the development of keratoconus (P = 0.00102) resulting in a relative risk of 12.0. This enrichment of rare potentially pathogenic alleles in ZNF469 in 12.5% of keratoconus patients represents a significant mutational load and highlights ZNF469 as the most significant genetic factor responsible for keratoconus identified to date. PMID:24895405

  16. High-resolution HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in 7823 Han marrow donors of Liaoning province, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, L-N; Zhang, S-T; Yu, W-J; Zhou, S-H; Duan, Y; Pan, L-Z; Wang, N; Liu, M

    2017-05-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is the most polymorphic gene cluster in humans. High-resolution donor-recipient matching for HLA genes improves patient survival after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In this study, we analyzed the high-resolution allele and haplotype frequencies at the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci in the Liaoning Han population and analyzed its relationships with other populations. The 3 most frequent alleles at the HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci were A*24:02, A*02:01:01G, A*11:01; B*13:02, B*46:01, B*40:01:01G; DRB1*09:01, DRB1*15:01 and DRB1*07:01, respectively. The most frequent 2-locus haplotypes were A*30:01-B*13:02 and B*13:02-DRB1*07:01. A*30:01-B*13:02-DRB1*07:01 was determined to be the predominant 3-locus haplotype. Hot maps and multiple correspondence analyses based on the frequencies of HLA specificities, which allow statistical visualization of dependent and independent relationships among variables, indicate that the Liaoning Han population is closely related to Northern populations of China and shows relative close relationships with Asian populations. These data will provide an outline of the HLA characteristics of healthy individuals in our region and help bone marrow transplantation patients find suitable HLA-matched donors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Alleles of the maize P gene with distinct tissue specificities encode Myb-homologous proteins with C-terminal replacements.

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S; Athma, P; Peterson, T

    1996-01-01

    The maize P gene is a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis in the pathway leading to the production of a red phlobaphene pigment. Multiple alleles of the P gene confer distinct patterns of pigmentation to specific floral organs, such as the kernel pericarp and cob tissues. To determine the basis of allele-specific pigmentation, we have characterized the gene products and transcript accumulation patterns of the P-wr allele, which specifies colorless pericarps and red cob tissues. RNA transcripts of P-wr are present in colorless pericarps as well as in the colored cob tissues; however, the expression of P-wr in pericarp does not induce the accumulation of transcripts from the C2 and A1 genes, which encode enzymes for flavonoid pigment biosynthesis. The coding sequences of P-wr were compared with the P-rr allele, which specifies red pericarp and red cob. The P-wr and P-rr cDNA sequences are very similar in their 5' regions. There are only two nucleotide changes that result in amino acid differences; both are outside of the Myb-homologous DNA binding domain. In contrast, the 3' coding region of P-rr is replaced by a unique 210-bp sequence in P-wr. The predicted P-wr protein has a C-terminal sequence resembling a cysteine-containing metal binding domain that is not present in the P-rr protein. These results indicate that the differential pericarp pigmentation specified by the P-rr and P-wr alleles does not result from an absence of P-wr transcripts in pericarps. Rather, the allele-specific patterns of P-rr and P-wr pigmentation may be associated with structural differences in the proteins encoded by each allele. PMID:8768374

  18. [Allelic polymorphism of MTHFR, MTR and MTRR genes in patients with cleft lip and/or palate and their mothers].

    PubMed

    Chorna, L B; Akopian, H R; Makukh, H V; Fedoryk, I M

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of common MTHFR, MTR and MTRR genes polymorphisms was evaluated among patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), their mothers and healthy persons from West-Ukrainian region. MTHFR 677TT genotype was shown to increase more than three-fold risk of CL/P and for mothers the risk of having CL/P children may increase two-fold compared with homozygous carriers of MTHFR 677CC genotype (OR = 3.3, OR = 1.92, respectively). The heterozygous MTR 2756AG genotype was associated with 1.5-fold increased risk of CL/P compared with the AA genotype (OR = 1.48). The heterozygous genotype MTRR 66AG was associated with the 5.56-fold increased CL/P risk (OR = 5.56) and for mothers with 2.6-fold increased risk of delivering a CL/P offspring (OR = 2.6). The results showed that MTRR 66G allele is more prevalent than MTRR 66A (wild type) and the MTRR 66GG genotype frequency was significantly lower among CL/P patients and their mothers than in control group among Western Ukrainian inhabitants.

  19. [Cloning and sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene cDNA and identification of a novel allele].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge; Wang, Chang; Zhen, Jianxin; Zhang, Guobin; Xu, Yunping; Deng, Zhihui

    2016-10-01

    To develop an assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 framework gene and determine the genotype of an ethnic Han from southern China. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood sample, and complementary DNA (cDNA) transcript was synthesized by RT-PCR. The entire coding sequence of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was amplified with a pair of KIR2DL1-specific PCR primers. The PCR products with a length of approximately 1.2 kb were then subjected to cloning and haplotype sequencing. A specific target fragment of the KIR2DL1 framework gene was obtained. Following allele separation, a wild-type KIR2DL1*00302 allele and a novel variant allele, KIR2DL1*031, were identified. Sequence alignment with KIR2DL1 alleles from the IPD-KIR Database showed that the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 has differed from the closest allele KIR2DL1*00302 by a non-synonymous mutation at CDS nt 188A>G (codon 42 GAG>GGG) in exon 4, which has caused an amino acid change Glu42Gly. The sequence of the novel allele KIR2DL1*031 was submitted to GenBank under the accession number KP025960 and to the IPD-KIR Database under the submission number IWS40001982. A name KIR2DL1*031 has been officially assigned by the World Health Organization (WHO) Nomenclature Committee. An assay for cDNA cloning and haplotype sequencing of KIR2DL1 has been established, which has a broad applications in KIR studies at allelic level.

  20. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies.

  1. Emergence of New Alleles of the MSP-3α Gene in Plasmodium vivax Isolates from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Deok Hwa; Oh, Jun Seo; Nam, Myoung Hyun; Park, Hae Chul; Lim, Chae Seung; Lee, Won Ja; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Klein, Terry A.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis of the Plasmodium vivax PvMSP-3α gene</