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Sample records for gene brca1 dna

  1. Transactivation of repair genes by BRCA1.

    PubMed

    El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a link between the BRCA1 tumor suppressor and transcriptional regulation of a group of genes involved in nucleotide excision repair. There is some controversy regarding the precise mechanism of upregulation of XPE DDB2 or XPC by BRCA1, with some evidence suggesting that p53 is involved in their regulation. Some evidence suggests BRCA1 may stabilize p53 and direct regulation of DNA repair genes, although how BRCA1 stabilizes p53 remains unclear and whether BRCA1 can upregulate DNA repair genes in a p53-independent manner remains a possibility. A transcriptional component to the action of BRCA1 and involvement of XP genes brings up new and interesting questions about breast cancer development and therapy.

  2. BRCA1 in Gene-Specific Coordination of Transcription and DNA Damage Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    understanding of BRCA1’s role in tumor suppression. Cofactor of BRCA1 (COBRA1)is a novel BRCA1- interacting protein identified in our laboratory...gene expression. During the past year, we madesignificant progress in elucidating the role of COBRA1 in breast cancers. By analyzingCOBRA1...

  3. Microelectronic DNA assay for the detection of BRCA1 gene mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hua; Han, Jie; Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 are characterized by predisposition to breast cancer, ovarian cancer and prostate cancer as well as colon cancer. Prognosis for this cancer survival depends upon the stage at which cancer is diagnosed. Reliable and rapid mutation detection is crucial for the early diagnosis and treatment. We developed an electronic assay for the detection of a representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), deletion and insertion in BRCA1 gene by the microelectronics microarray instrumentation. The assay is rapid, and it takes 30 minutes for the immobilization of target DNA samples, hybridization, washing and readout. The assay is multiplexing since it is carried out at the same temperature and buffer conditions for each step. The assay is also highly specific, as the signal-to-noise ratio is much larger than recommended value (72.86 to 321.05 vs. 5) for homozygotes genotyping, and signal ratio close to the perfect value 1 for heterozygotes genotyping (1.04).

  4. Microelectronic DNA assay for the detection of BRCA1 gene mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hua; Han, Jie; Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 are characterized by predisposition to breast cancer, ovarian cancer and prostate cancer as well as colon cancer. Prognosis for this cancer survival depends upon the stage at which cancer is diagnosed. Reliable and rapid mutation detection is crucial for the early diagnosis and treatment. We developed an electronic assay for the detection of a representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), deletion and insertion in BRCA1 gene by the microelectronics microarray instrumentation. The assay is rapid, and it takes 30 minutes for the immobilization of target DNA samples, hybridization, washing and readout. The assay is multiplexing since it is carried out at the same temperature and buffer conditions for each step. The assay is also highly specific, as the signal-to-noise ratio is much larger than recommended value (72.86 to 321.05 vs. 5) for homozygotes genotyping, and signal ratio close to the perfect value 1 for heterozygotes genotyping (1.04).

  5. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-06-12

    BACKGROUND Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. RESULTS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... east ca ncer. What is the BRCA Gene Mutation? BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that suppress malignant ... should. So people with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at a higher risk of getting cancer. ...

  7. Direct DNA binding by Brca1

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Tanya T.; Cortez, David; Bowers, Blair; Elledge, Stephen J.; Gellert, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Brca1 plays an important role in protecting mammalian cells against genomic instability, but little is known about its modes of action. In this work we demonstrate that recombinant human Brca1 protein binds strongly to DNA, an activity conferred by a domain in the center of the Brca1 polypeptide. As a result of this binding, Brca1 inhibits the nucleolytic activities of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, an enzyme implicated in numerous aspects of double-strand break repair. Brca1 displays a preference for branched DNA structures and forms protein–DNA complexes cooperatively between multiple DNA strands, but without DNA sequence specificity. This fundamental property of Brca1 may be an important part of its role in DNA repair and transcription. PMID:11353843

  8. Identification of two novel BRCA1-partner genes in the DNA double-strand break repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, Chiara; Cerri, Iacopo; Evangelista, Monica; Collavoli, Anita; Tancredi, Mariella; Aretini, Paolo; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2013-10-01

    M1775R and A1789T are two missense variants located within the BRCT domains of BRCA1 gene. The M1775R is a known deleterious variant, while the A1789T is an unclassified variant that has been analyzed and classified as probably deleterious for the first time by our group. In a previous study, we described the expression profile of HeLa G1 cells transfected with the two variants and we found that they altered molecular mechanisms critical for cell proliferation and genome integrity. Considering that the mutations in the BRCA1 C terminus (BRCT) domains are associated to a phenotype with an altered ability in the DNA double-strand break repair, we chose three of the genes previously identified, EEF1E1, MRE11A, and OBFC2B, to be tested for an homologous recombination (HR) in vitro assay. For our purpose, we performed a gene expression knockdown by siRNA transfection in HeLa cells, containing an integrated recombination substrate (hprtDRGFP), for each of the target genes included BRCA1. The knockdown of BRCA1, OBFC2B, MRE11A, and EEF1E1 reduces the HR rate, respectively, of 97.6, 28.6, 41.8, and 42.3 % compared to cells transfected with a scrambled negative control duplex and all these differences are statistically significant (P < 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test). Finally, we analyzed the effect of target gene depletion both on HR that on cell survival after DNA-damage induction by ionizing radiation. The clonogenic assay showed that the down-regulation of the target genes reduced the cell survival, but the effect on the HR, is not evident. Only the BRCA1-siRNA confirmed the inhibition effect on HR. Overall these results confirmed the involvement of MRE11A in the HR pathway and identified two new genes, OBFC2B and EEF1E1, which according to these data and the knowledge obtained from literature, might be involved in BRCA1-pathway.

  9. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; Aprelikova, Olga; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sotiriou, Christos; Liu, Edison T; Ropers, H Hilger; Yee, Cindy J; Boyd, Jeff; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-01-01

    Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling). Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P < 0.005 as a cutoff. Forty of 178 total X-chromosome transcripts were differentially expressed between the BRCA1-associated tumors and sporadic cancers with a BRCA2-like molecular profile. Thirty of these 40 genes showed higher mean expression in the BRCA1-associated samples including all 11 transcripts that mapped to Xp11. In contrast, four of 178 total X chromosome transcripts showed significant differential expression between BRCA1-associated and sporadic tumors with a BRCA1-like molecular profile. All four mapped to Xp11 and showed higher mean expression in BRCA1-associated tumors. Re-expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell resulted in the repression of 21 transcripts. Eleven of the 21 (54.5%) transcripts mapped to Xp11. However, there was no significant overlap between these Xp11 genes and those found to be differentially expressed between BRCA1-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer samples. These results demonstrate that BRCA1 mediates the repression of several X chromosome genes, many of which map to the Xp11 locus. PMID:15383145

  10. BRCA1 can stimulate gene transcription by a unique mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, G; Boufaied, N; Moisan, A; Lemieux, K M; Cayanan, C; Monteiro, A N; Gaudreau, L

    2000-09-01

    Most familial breast and ovarian cancers have been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to affect gene transcription but how it does so remains elusive. Here we show that BRCA1 can stimulate transcription without the requirement for a DNA-tethering function in mammalian and yeast cells. Furthermore, the BRCA1 C-terminal region can stimulate transcription of the p53-responsive promoter, MDM2. Unlike many enhancer-specific activators, non-tethered BRCA1 does not require a functional TATA element to stimulate transcription. Our results suggest that BRCA1 can enhance transcription by a function additional to recruiting the transcriptional machinery to a targeted gene.

  11. BRCA1 can stimulate gene transcription by a unique mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Guy; Boufaied, Nadia; Moisan, Annie; Lemieux, Karine M.; Cayanan, Charmagne; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gaudreau, Luc

    2000-01-01

    Most familial breast and ovarian cancers have been linked to mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 has been shown to affect gene transcription but how it does so remains elusive. Here we show that BRCA1 can stimulate transcription without the requirement for a DNA-tethering function in mammalian and yeast cells. Furthermore, the BRCA1 C-terminal region can stimulate transcription of the p53-responsive promoter, MDM2. Unlike many enhancer-specific activators, non-tethered BRCA1 does not require a functional TATA element to stimulate transcription. Our results suggest that BRCA1 can enhance transcription by a function additional to recruiting the transcriptional machinery to a targeted gene. PMID:11256609

  12. BRCA1 and c-Myc associate to transcriptionally repress psoriasin, a DNA damage-inducible gene.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard D; Gorski, Julia J; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; James, Colin R; Moore, Stephen; Mulligan, Karl; Emberley, Ethan D; Lioe, Tong F; Morrison, Patrick J; Mullan, Paul B; Reid, George; Johnston, Patrick G; Watson, Peter H; Harkin, D Paul

    2005-11-15

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that some of the diverse functions associated with BRCA1 may relate to its ability to transcriptionally regulate key downstream target genes. Here, we identify S100A7 (psoriasin), S100A8, and S100A9, members of the S100A family of calcium-binding proteins, as novel BRCA1-repressed targets. We show that functional BRCA1 is required for repression of these family members and that a BRCA1 disease-associated mutation abrogates BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin. Furthermore, we show that BRCA1 and c-Myc form a complex on the psoriasin promoter and that BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin is dependent on functional c-Myc. Finally, we show that psoriasin expression is induced by the topoisomerase IIalpha poison, etoposide, in the absence of functional BRCA1 and increased psoriasin expression enhances cellular sensitivity to this chemotherapeutic agent. Therefore, we identified a novel transcriptional mechanism that is likely to contribute to BRCA1-mediated resistance to etoposide.

  13. BRCA1 in the DNA damage response and at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Eliot M

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) account for about 40-45% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Moreover, a significant fraction of sporadic (non-hereditary) breast and ovarian cancers exhibit reduced or absent expression of the BRCA1 protein, suggesting an additional role for BRCA1 in sporadic cancers. BRCA1 follows the classic pattern of a highly penetrant Knudsen-type tumor suppressor gene in which one allele is inactivated through a germ-line mutation and the other is mutated or deleted within the tumor. BRCA1 is a multi-functional protein but it is not fully understood which function(s) is (are) most important for tumor suppression, nor is it clear why BRCA1-mutations confer a high risk for breast and ovarian cancers and not a broad spectrum of tumor types. Here, we will review BRCA1 functions in the DNA damage response (DDR), which are likely to contribute to tumor suppression. In the process, we will highlight some of the controversies and unresolved issues in the field. We will also describe a recently identified and under-investigated role for BRCA1 in the regulation of telomeres and the implications of this role in the DDR and cancer suppression.

  14. BRCA1 in the DNA damage response and at telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Eliot M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) account for about 40–45% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Moreover, a significant fraction of sporadic (non-hereditary) breast and ovarian cancers exhibit reduced or absent expression of the BRCA1 protein, suggesting an additional role for BRCA1 in sporadic cancers. BRCA1 follows the classic pattern of a highly penetrant Knudsen-type tumor suppressor gene in which one allele is inactivated through a germ-line mutation and the other is mutated or deleted within the tumor. BRCA1 is a multi-functional protein but it is not fully understood which function(s) is (are) most important for tumor suppression, nor is it clear why BRCA1-mutations confer a high risk for breast and ovarian cancers and not a broad spectrum of tumor types. Here, we will review BRCA1 functions in the DNA damage response (DDR), which are likely to contribute to tumor suppression. In the process, we will highlight some of the controversies and unresolved issues in the field. We will also describe a recently identified and under-investigated role for BRCA1 in the regulation of telomeres and the implications of this role in the DDR and cancer suppression. PMID:23802008

  15. Deleting a Single Protein Restores Critical DNA Repair Process in Mice with Brca1 Gene Mutations | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Women who carry a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 gene have up to an 85 percent greater lifetime risk of developing breast cancer than other women, and up to a 40 percent greater chance of developing ovarian cancer. Thus far, no effective therapies have been developed that overcome the susceptibility to cancer caused by mutations in BRCA1.

  16. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Welcsh, Piri L.; Lee, Ming K.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rachel M.; Black, Daniel J.; Mahadevappa, Mamatha; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Warrington, Janet A.; King, Mary-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of BRCA1 caused by inherited mutation and tissue-specific somatic mutation leads to breast and ovarian cancer. Nearly all BRCA1 germ-line mutations involve truncation or loss of the C-terminal BRCT transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that transcriptional regulation is a critical function of the wild-type gene. The purpose of this project was to determine whether there is a link between the role of BRCA1 in transcriptional regulation and its role in tumor suppression. We developed a cell line (in which BRCA1 can be induced) and used microarray analysis to compare transcription profiles of epithelial cells with low endogenous levels of BRCA1 vs. transcription profiles of cells with 2–4-fold higher induced levels of expression of BRCA1. At these levels of expression, BRCA1 did not induce apoptosis. Undirected cluster analysis of six paired experiments revealed 373 genes, the expression of which was altered significantly and consistently by BRCA1 induction. Expression of 62 genes was altered more than 2-fold. BRCA1-regulated genes associated with breast tumorigenesis included the estrogen-responsive genes MYC and cyclin D1, which are overexpressed in many breast tumors; STAT1 and JAK1, key components of the cytokine signal transduction pathway; the extracellular matrix protein laminin 3A; ID4, an inhibitor of DNA-binding transcriptional activators, which in turn negatively regulates BRCA1 expression; and the prohormone stanniocalcin, expression of which is lost in breast tumor cells. Coordinated expression of BRCA1 with ID4 and with stanniocalcin was confirmed in primary breast and ovarian tumors. PMID:12032322

  17. Assessing the RNA effect of 26 DNA variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Mireia; Castellsagué, Joan; Mirete, Marc; Pros, Eva; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Osorio, Ana; Calaf, Mónica; Tornero, Eva; del Valle, Jesús; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Quiles, Francisco; Salinas, Mónica; Velasco, Angela; Teulé, Alex; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2012-04-01

    Comprehensive genetic testing of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 identified approximately 16% of variants of unknown significance (VUS), a significant proportion of which could affect the correct splicing of the genes. Our aim is to establish a workflow for classifying VUS in these complex genes, the first stage of which is splicing analysis. We used a combined approach consisting of five in silico splicing prediction programs and RT-PCR analysis for a set of 26 variants not previously studied at the mRNA level and six variants that had already been studied, four of which were used as positive controls as they were found to affect the splicing of these genes and the other two were used as negative controls. We identified a splicing defect in 8 of the 26 newly studied variants and ruled out splicing alteration in the remaining 18 variants. The results for the four positive and the two negative control variants were consistent with results presented in the literature. Our results strongly suggest that the combination of RNA analysis and in silico programs is an important step towards the classification of VUS. The results revealed a very high correlation between experimental data and in silico programs when using tools for predicting acceptor/donor sites but a lower correlation in the case of tools for identifying ESE elements.

  18. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients.

  19. DNA repair genes implicated in triple negative familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, Marie; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Ponelle, Flora; Viala, Sandrine; Privat, Maud; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bidet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancers, 10 to 15% of cases would be due to hereditary risk. In these familial cases, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are found in only 15% to 20%, meaning that new susceptibility genes remain to be found. Triple-negative breast cancers represent 15% of all breast cancers, and are generally aggressive tumours without targeted therapies available. Our hypothesis is that some patients with triple negative breast cancer could share a genetic susceptibility different from other types of breast cancers. We screened 36 candidate genes, using pyrosequencing, in all the 50 triple negative breast cancer patients with familial history of cancer but no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation of a population of 3000 families who had consulted for a familial breast cancer between 2005 and 2013. Any mutations were also sequenced in available relatives of cases. Protein expression and loss of heterozygosity were explored in tumours. Seven deleterious mutations in 6 different genes (RAD51D, MRE11A, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH6, PALB2) were observed in one patient each, except the RAD51D mutation found in two cases. Loss of heterozygosity in the tumour was found for 2 of the 7 mutations. Protein expression was absent in tumour tissue for 5 mutations. Taking into consideration a specific subtype of tumour has revealed susceptibility genes, most of them in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway. This may provide new possibilities for targeted therapies, along with better screening and care of patients. PMID:26328243

  20. Pathological complete response after cisplatin neoadjuvant therapy is associated with the downregulation of DNA repair genes in BRCA1-associated triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Rys, Janusz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2016-10-18

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is considered a suitable surrogate marker of treatment efficacy in patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pCR as a result of such treatment remain obscure. Using real-time PCR arrays we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in the main mechanisms of DNA repair in 43 pretreatment biopsies of BRCA1-associated TNBCs exhibiting pCR and no pathological complete response (non-pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin. Altogether, 25 genes were significantly differentially expressed between tumors exhibiting pCR and non-pCR, and these genes were downregulated in the pCR group compared to the non-pCR group. A difference in expression level greater than 1.5-fold was detected for nine genes: MGMT, ERCC4, FANCB, UBA1, XRCC5, XPA, XPC, PARP3, and RPA1. The non-homologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways of DNA repair showed the most significant relevance. Expression profile of DNA repair genes associated with pCR was different in the node-positive (20 genes with fold change >1.5) and node-negative (only 3 genes) subgroups. Although BRCA1 germline mutations are the principal defects in BRCA1-associated TNBC, our results indicate that the additional downregulation of other genes engaged in major pathways of DNA repair may play a decisive role in the pathological response of these tumors to cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The results suggest that patients with node-positive BRCA1-associated TNBCs that do not exhibit pCR after cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be candidates for subsequent therapy with PARP inhibitors, whereas UBA1 may be a potential therapeutic target in node-negative subgroup.

  1. c-Myc activates BRCA1 gene expression through distal promoter elements in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The BRCA1 gene plays an important role in the maintenance of genomic stability. BRCA1 inactivation contributes to breast cancer tumorigenesis. An increasing number of transcription factors have been shown to regulate BRCA1 expression. c-Myc can act as a transcriptional activator, regulating up to 15% of all genes in the human genome and results from a high throughput screen suggest that BRCA1 is one of its targets. In this report, we used cultured breast cancer cells to examine the mechanisms of transcriptional activation of BRCA1 by c-Myc. Methods c-Myc was depleted using c-Myc-specific siRNAs in cultured breast cancer cells. BRCA1 mRNA expression and BRCA1 protein expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot, respectively and BRCA1 promoter activities were examined under these conditions. DNA sequence analysis was conducted to search for high similarity to E boxes in the BRCA1 promoter region. The association of c-Myc with the BRCA1 promoter in vivo was tested by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We investigated the function of the c-Myc binding site in the BRCA1 promoter region by a promoter assay with nucleotide substitutions in the putative E boxes. BRCA1-dependent DNA repair activities were measured by a GFP-reporter assay. Results Depletion of c-Myc was found to be correlated with reduced expression levels of BRCA1 mRNA and BRCA1 protein. Depletion of c-Myc decreased BRCA1 promoter activity, while ectopically expressed c-Myc increased BRCA1 promoter activity. In the distal BRCA1 promoter, DNA sequence analysis revealed two tandem clusters with high similarity, and each cluster contained a possible c-Myc binding site. c-Myc bound to these regions in vivo. Nucleotide substitutions in the c-Myc binding sites in these regions abrogated c-Myc-dependent promoter activation. Furthermore, breast cancer cells with reduced BRCA1 expression due to depletion of c-Myc exhibited impaired DNA repair activity. Conclusions The distal

  2. The Cloning of the BRCA1 Gene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    Chromosome 17, Breast-Ovarian Cancer Syndrome 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 21 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY...the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome as well. From 1990-1994, a series of experiments in several laboratories confirmed that BRCA1 was the gene...of mutations present in the families with the breast ovarian cancer syndrome . The objectives of the study were stated as follows: 1) To identify

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA1 Genes and Inherited Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer: Benefits of Genetic Testing.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2010-09-01

    The breast cancer associated genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered in 1994 and 1995 respectively. Since then in addition to our understanding how these proteins function in particular reference to DNA repair, enormous amount of knowledge has been gained regarding genetic epidemiology of inherited breast and ovarian cancer, mutation prevalence among different ethnic groups, presence of founder mutations, varying penetrance, genetic testing and potential management options of mutation carriers. This review will focus on the status of understanding of the role of BRCA1 and BRAC2 mutations among Indian women, structure and biology of these two genes, different methods used for mutation detection and different management options available for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  4. Egr-1 regulates the transcription of the BRCA1 gene by etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon Young; Kim, Chang Gun; Lee, Young Han

    2013-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 encodes a nuclear protein, which functions as a tumor suppressor and is involved in gene transcription and DNA repair processes. Many families with inherited breast and ovarian cancers have mutations in the BRCA1 gene. However, only a few studies have reported on the mechanism underlying the regulation of BRCA1 expression in humans. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of BRCA1 in HeLa cells treated with etoposide. We found that three Egr-1-binding sequences (EBSs) were located at −1031, −1005, and −385 within the enhancer region of the BRCA1 gene. Forced expression of Egr-1 stimulated the BRCA1 promoter activity. EMSA data showed that Egr-1 bound directly to the EBS within the BRCA1 gene. Knockdown of Egr-1 through the expression of a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) attenuated etoposide-induced BRCA1 promoter activity. We conclude that Egr-1 targets the BRCA1 gene in HeLa cells exposed to etoposide. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(2): 92-96] PMID:23433111

  5. Modification of BRCA1-Associated Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk by BRCA1 Interacting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Domchek, Susan M.; Wan, Fei; Friebel, Tara M.; Tran, Teo V.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Garber, Judy E.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Peock, Susan; Evans, D. Gareth; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Easton, Douglas F.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Daly, Mary B.; Isaacs, Claudine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Couch, Fergus J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Freidman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Narod, Steven A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greenberg, Roger; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1 mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Recent studies have identified genes that encode proteins that interact with BRCA1 as modifiers of BRCA1-associated breast cancer. We evaluated a comprehensive set of genes that encode most known BRCA1 interactors to evaluate the role of these genes as modifiers of cancer risk. A cohort of 2,825 BRCA1 mutation carriers was used to evaluate the association of haplotypes at ATM, BRCC36, BRCC45 (BRE), BRIP1 (BACH1/FANCJ), CTIP, ABRA1 (FAM175A), MERIT40, MRE11A, NBS1, PALB2 (FANCN), RAD50, RAD51, RAP80, TOPBP1 and time to breast and ovarian cancer diagnosis. False Discovery Rate (FDR) adjusted p-value for overall association of haplotypes (pFDR) with breast cancer were identified at ATM (pFDR =0.029), BRCC45 (pFDR=0.0.19), BRIP1 (pFDR =0.008), CTIP (pFDR =0.017), MERIT40 (pFDR =0.019), NBS1 (pFDR=0.003), RAD50 (pFDR=0.014), and TOPBP1 (pFDR =0.011) and were associated with breast cancer risk. Haplotypes at ABRA1 (pFDR=0.007), BRCC45 (pFDR=0.016 and pFDR=0.005 in two haplotype blocks) and RAP80 (pFDR<0.001) were associated with ovarian cancer risk. Overall, the data suggest that genomic variation at multiple loci that encode proteins that interact biologically with BRCA1 are associated with modified breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in women who carry BRCA1 mutations. PMID:21799032

  6. Altered BRCA1 and BRCA2 responses and mutation of BRCA1 gene in mice exposed chronically and transgenerationally to aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN).

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Yashmin; Sharan, Rajeshwar N

    2011-01-01

    The Brca1 and Brca2 tumor suppressor genes are involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity as they facilitate error free DNA repair. This study was designed to understand the role of Brca1 and Brca2 in betel nut (BN) induced chronic and transgenerational carcinogenesis in mice. Young male and female Swiss Albino mice were chronically as well as transgenerationally exposed to aqueous extract of betel nut (AEBN) in drinking water (2 mg ml(-1)) for up to 24 weeks. In chronically exposed mice, the levels of Brca1 and Brca2 proteins were elevated to approximately 1.4-fold over the age matched controls after 2 weeks of exposure to AEBN, followed by a decline below the controls. In transgenerationally exposed mice, both Brca1 and Brca2 proteins remained below the controls from the onset of AEBN exposure and rapidly declined further, indicating a loss of tumor suppressor protection. Nucleotide sequencing of exon 11 of Brca1 and exon 27 of Brca2 did not reveal mutation in liver nodules of chronically exposed mice, while a G → C mutation Brca1 was observed in liver nodules as well as in solid tumors developing in transgenerationally exposed mice. Thus, the genomic instability arising due to the lowering in the levels of Brca1 and Brca2 proteins and mutation in exon 11 of Brca1 gene contributed to the increased risk of cancer in mice exposed transgenerationally to AEBN.

  7. Connection between Tumor Suppressor BRCA1 and PTEN in Damaged DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Minami, Akari; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Ogura, Yasunori; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability finally induces cell death or apoptosis. The tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN), is a dual-specificity phosphatase, which has protein phosphatase activity and lipid phosphatase activity that antagonizes PI3K activity. Cells that lack PTEN have constitutively higher levels of PIP3 and activated downstream PI3K/AKT targets. BRCA1, a well-known breast cancer tumor suppressor, is to associate with breast cancer risk and genetic susceptibility. Many studies have demonstrated that PTEN, as well as BRCA1, plays a critical role in DNA damage responses. The BRCA1 functionally cooperates with PTEN and might be an essential blockage in the development of several tumors. Actually, the PTEN and BRCA1 genes are recognized as one of the most frequently deleted and/or mutated in many human cancers. The PI3K/AKT pathway is constitutively active in BRCA1-defective human cancer cells. Loss or decrease of these PTEN or BRCA1 function, by either mutation or reduced expression, has a role in various tumor developments. This review summarizes recent findings of the function of BRCA1 and PTEN involved in genomic stability and cancer cell signaling.

  8. Unsolved mystery: the role of BRCA1 in DNA end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Janapriya; Davis, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 increase a woman's lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1's tumor suppressor function is directly linked to its myriad of functions in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). BRCA1 interacts with an extensive array of DNA damage responsive proteins and plays important roles in DSB repair, mediated by the homologous recombination pathway, and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. However, the role of BRCA1 in the other two DSB repair pathways, classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and alternative NHEJ (A-NHEJ), remains unclear. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on BRCA1's potential role(s) in modulating both C-NHEJ and A-NHEJ. We also present a model showing that BRCA1 contributes to genomic maintenance by promoting precise DNA repair across all cell cycle phases via the direct modulation of DNA end-joining. PMID:27170701

  9. Unsolved mystery: the role of BRCA1 in DNA end-joining.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Davis, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    Heritable mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 increase a woman's lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1's tumor suppressor function is directly linked to its myriad of functions in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). BRCA1 interacts with an extensive array of DNA damage responsive proteins and plays important roles in DSB repair, mediated by the homologous recombination pathway, and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. However, the role of BRCA1 in the other two DSB repair pathways, classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) and alternative NHEJ (A-NHEJ), remains unclear. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on BRCA1's potential role(s) in modulating both C-NHEJ and A-NHEJ. We also present a model showing that BRCA1 contributes to genomic maintenance by promoting precise DNA repair across all cell cycle phases via the direct modulation of DNA end-joining.

  10. The Drosophila mus101 gene, which links DNA repair, replication and condensation of heterochromatin in mitosis, encodes a protein with seven BRCA1 C-terminus domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, R R; Axton, J M; Yamamoto, Y; Saunders, R D; Glover, D M; Henderson, D S

    2000-01-01

    The mutagen-sensitive-101 (mus101) gene of Drosophila melanogaster was first identified 25 years ago through mutations conferring larval hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Other alleles of mus101 causing different phenotypes were later isolated: a female sterile allele results in a defect in a tissue-specific form of DNA synthesis (chorion gene amplification) and lethal alleles cause mitotic chromosome instability that can be observed genetically and cytologically. The latter phenotype presents as a striking failure of mitotic chromosomes of larval neuroblasts to undergo condensation of pericentric heterochromatic regions, as we show for a newly described mutant carrying lethal allele mus101(lcd). To gain further insight into the function of the Mus101 protein we have molecularly cloned the gene using a positional cloning strategy. We report here that mus101 encodes a member of the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) domain superfamily of proteins implicated in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Mus101, which contains seven BRCT domains distributed throughout its length, is most similar to human TopBP1, a protein identified through its in vitro association with DNA topoisomerase IIbeta. Mus101 also shares sequence similarity with the fission yeast Rad4/Cut5 protein required for repair, replication, and checkpoint control, suggesting that the two proteins may be functional homologs. PMID:11014818

  11. Prevalence of BRCA1 gene mutation in breast cancer patients in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Sida; Chen, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhixian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 mutation in breast cancer patients of south China has not been well revealed. This study was to invest the prevalence of BRCA1 gene mutation in breast cancer patients in Guangxi, China, and to try reflecting its relevance in genetic counseling of breast cancer. Methods: In this study, 463 breast cancer patients and 30 healthy women (control group) were involved. Entire sequence and splicing sites of BRCA1 genes were detected by PCR-DNA sequencing. Results: About 8.9% (41/463) patients were with 22 BRCA1 mutations (all in exon 10). The average hospitalized age of BRCA1-associated breast cancer cases was significantly younger (t = -2.965, P = 0.003). The nuclear grade (U = 2321.0, P = 0.030), ER (U = 4343.5, P = 0.041) and CerbB-2 (U = 3894.0, P = 0.038) expression levels, and triple negative breast cancer diagnosing rate (χ2 = 4.719, P = 0.03) were disclosed more in BRCA1-associated patients. Conclusions: The four most frequent BRCA1 mutation (2798 T > C, 3971 G > A, 3971 G > A and 624 C > T) found in female breast cancer cases in Guangxi are all located in exon 10. BRCA1-associated breast cancer cases have earlier onset age, higher nuclear grade and negative ER and CerbB-2 expression. PMID:25337278

  12. Detection of a novel mutation in exon 20 of the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer constitutes 5-10% of all breast cancer cases. Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor-suppressor genes account for the majority of hereditary breast cancer cases. The BRCA1 C-terminal region (BRCT) has a functional duplicated globular domain, which helps with DNA damage repair and cell cycle checkpoint protein control. More than 100 distinct BRCA1 missense variants with structural and functional effects have been documented within the BRCT domain. Interpreting the results of mutation screening of tumor-suppressor genes that can have high-risk susceptibility mutations is increasingly important in clinical practice. This study includes a novel mutation, p.His1746 Pro (c.5237A>C), which was found in BRCA1 exon 20 of a breast cancer patient. In silico analysis suggests that this mutation could alter the stability and orientation of the BRCT domain and the differential binding of the BACH1 substrate.

  13. Identification of BRCA1/2 Founder Mutations in Southern Chinese Breast Cancer Patients Using Gene Sequencing and High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Ng, Enders Kai On; Wong, Chris Lei Po; Law, Fian Bic Fai; Au, Tommy; Wong, Hong Nei; Kurian, Allison W.; West, Dee W.; Ford, James M.; Ma, Edmond Siu Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnic variations in breast cancer epidemiology and genetics have necessitated investigation of the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. Knowledge of BRCA mutations in Chinese populations is still largely unknown. We conducted a multi-center study to characterize the spectra of BRCA mutations in Chinese breast and ovarian cancer patients from Southern China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 651 clinically high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer patients were recruited from the Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry from 2007 to 2011. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation screening was performed using bi-directional sequencing of all coding exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Sequencing results were confirmed by in-house developed full high resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis. Among the 451 probands analyzed, 69 (15.3%) deleterious BRCA mutations were identified, comprising 29 in BRCA1 and 40 in BRCA2. The four recurrent BRCA1 mutations (c.470_471delCT, c.3342_3345delAGAA, c.5406+1_5406+3delGTA and c.981_982delAT) accounted for 34.5% (10/29) of all BRCA1 mutations in this cohort. The four recurrent BRCA2 mutations (c.2808_2811delACAA, c.3109C>T, c.7436_7805del370 and c.9097_9098insA) accounted for 40% (16/40) of all BRCA2 mutations. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm 1 BRCA1 and 3 BRCA2 mutations are putative founder mutations. Rapid HRM mutation screening for a panel of the founder mutations were developed and validated. Conclusion In this study, our findings suggest that BRCA mutations account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Southern Chinese population. Knowing the spectrum and frequency of the founder mutations in this population will assist in the development of a cost-effective rapid screening assay, which in turn facilitates genetic counseling and testing for the purpose of cancer risk assessment. PMID:22970155

  14. Altered DNA Binding and Amplification of Human Breast Cancer Suppressor Gene BRCA1 Induced by a Novel Antitumor Compound, [Ru(η6-p-phenylethacrynate)Cl2(pta)

    PubMed Central

    Chakree, Korawan; Ovatlarnporn, Chitchamai; Dyson, Paul J.; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2012-01-01

    The ruthenium-based complex [Ru(η6-p-phenylethacrynate)Cl2(pta)] (pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo-[3.3.1.1]decane), termed ethaRAPTA, is an interesting antitumor compound. The elucidation of the molecular mechanism of drug activity is central to the drug development program. To this end, we have characterized the ethaRAPTA interaction with DNA, including probing the sequence specific modified DNA structural stability and DNA amplification using the breast cancer suppressor gene 1 (BRCA1) of human breast and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines as models. The preference of ethaRAPTA base binding is in the order A > G > T > C. Once modified, the ethaRAPTA-induced BRCA1 structure has higher thermal stability than the modified equivalents of its related compound, RAPTA-C. EthaRAPTA exhibits a higher efficiency than RAPTA-C in inhibiting BRCA1 amplification. With respect to both compounds, the inhibition of BRCA1 amplification is more effective in an isolated system than in cell lines. These data provide evidence that will help to understand the process of elucidating the pathways involved in the response induced by ethaRAPTA. PMID:23202946

  15. NBA1, a new player in the Brca1 A complex, is required for DNA damage resistance and checkpoint control

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Hurov, Kristen; Hofmann, Kay; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to DNA damage is critical to maintenance of genomic stability and the prevention of cancer. In this study, we employed a genetic screen to identify a gene, NBA1 (new component of the BRCA1 A complex), that is required for resistance to ionizing radiation. The NBA1 protein localizes to sites of DNA damage and is required for G2/M checkpoint control. Proteomic analysis revealed that NBA1 is a component of the BRCA1 A complex, which also contains Brca1/Bard1, Abra1, RAP80, BRCC36, and BRE. NBA1 is required to maintain BRE and Abra1 abundance and for the recruitment of BRCA1 to sites of DNA damage. In depth bioinformatics analysis revealed that the BRCA1 A complex bears striking similarities to the 19S proteasome complex. Furthermore, we show that four members of the BRCA1-A complex possess a polyubiquitin chain-binding capability, thus forming a complex that might facilitate the deubiquitinating activity of the deubiquitination enzyme BRCC36 or the E3 ligase activity of the BRCA1/BARD1 ligase. These findings provide a new perspective from which to view the BRCA1 A complex. PMID:19261749

  16. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.0001). In patients with BRCA1 negative tumours, low XRCC1 or low pol β expression was significantly associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis compared to high XRCC1 or high pol β expressing BRCA1 negative tumours (ps < 0.05). Pre-clinically, BRCA1 negative cancer cells exhibit low mRNA and low protein expression of XRCC1 and pol β. BRCA1-BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sreejith J.; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S.; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Jin, Victor X.; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development. PMID:26941120

  18. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sreejith J; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Jin, Victor X; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-03-04

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development.

  19. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter in peripheral blood DNA is associated with triple-negative and medullary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Narod, Steven A; Lubinski, Jan; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Jakubowska, Anna

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that methylation signatures in blood-derived DNA may correlate with cancer risk. In this study, we evaluated whether methylation of the promoter region of the BRCA1 gene detectable in DNA from peripheral blood cells is a risk factor for breast cancer, in particular for tumors with pathologic features characteristic for cancers with BRCA1 gene mutations. We conducted a case-control study of 66 breast cancer cases and 36 unaffected controls. Cases were triple-negative or of medullary histology, or both; 30 carried a constitutional BRCA1 mutation and 36 did not carry a mutation. Blood for DNA methylation analysis was taken within three months of diagnosis. Methylation of the promoter of the BRCA1 gene was measured in cases and controls using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM). A sample with any detectable level of methylation was considered to be positive. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter was detected in 15 of 66 cases and in 2 of 36 controls (OR 5.0, p = 0.03). Methylation was present in 15 of 36 women with breast cancer and without germline BRCA1 mutation, but in none of 30 women with breast cancer and a germline mutation (p < 0.01). The association between methylation and breast cancer was restricted to women with no constitutional BRCA1 mutation (OR 12.1, p = 0.0006). Methylation of the promoter of the BRCA1 gene detectable in peripheral blood DNA may be a marker of increased susceptibility to triple-negative or medullary breast cancer.

  20. [Advance in researches on BRCA1].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Hua; Ye, Qi-Nong; Huang, Cui-Fen

    2004-05-01

    BRCA1 is one of the most important breast cancer susceptibility genes. It plays key roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint regulation, gene transcription chromatin stability, and cell proliferation. In this paper, advance in basic researches on BRCA1 is reviewed, and the role of BRCA1 in cancer development and progression is discussed, that may facilitate potential clinical application of BRCA1.

  1. [Determination of a BRCA1 gene mutation in a family with hereditary breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Marcela; Faúndez, Paola; Cruz, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Mario; Alvarez, Manuel; Carvallo, Pilar

    2004-02-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of death among women between 40 and 55 years old, in whom the hereditary cases are common. Therefore, the molecular diagnosis of germ line mutations involved in breast cancer susceptibility is relevant. BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been described as the two major genes involved in familial breast/ovarian cancer. We are performing a screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, in a group of 50 high risk Chilean families for breast/ovarian cancer. We have detected a mutation, 3936 C>T, that leads to a truncated protein, in two affected women from one of the families in study. To report the results of the screening for 3936 C>T in healthy relatives of index women. The molecular diagnosis of this mutation was offered to the healthy members of this family, and 17 relatives accepted to be tested. The region of the BRCA1 gene that includes the 3936 C>T mutation, was analyzed through PCR amplification, digestion with restriction enzyme BstNI, and direct sequencing. 3936 C>T DNA mutation was present in 8 relatives. Considering the high risk of having a mutation in the BRCA1 gene, specially in pre-menopausal women, the molecular diagnosis, genetic and clinical counseling are highly relevant. In Chile the molecular diagnosis is still not widely applied.

  2. BRCA1 Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins in DNA Damage Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been shown that BRCA1 regulates one of FA proteins, called FANCD2 , by a process...that BRCA1 ubiquitination of FANCD2 is affected by association with the FANCA protein complex and by association with DNA damage when embedded in...chromatin. Specific aims are that (1) does BRCA1 monoubiquitinate FANCD2 in vivo using purified ubiquitination factors? (2) Do embedding FA proteins in

  3. BRCA1 gene therapy reduces systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ failure and improves survival in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Teoh, H; Quan, A; Creighton, A K; Annie Bang, K W; Singh, K K; Shukla, P C; Gupta, N; Pan, Y; Lovren, F; Leong-Poi, H; Al-Omran, M; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis-related complications and mortality remain a major clinical problem. Increased cell death and unresolved cellular repair have been implicated as key upstream mediators of sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and death. We hypothesised that gene therapy with BRCA1, a critical regulator of DNA damage repair and cell survival, would attenuate the sequelae of sepsis and peritonitis in mice subjected to caecal ligation and perforation (CLP) and thioglycollate stimulation. C57Bl/6J mice underwent sham or CLP surgery 3 days following treatment with either human BRCA1 adenovirus (AdBRCA1) or the adeno-CMV-null vector (Adnull). The 24-h post-CLP mortality was 2.8% vs 17.9% (P<0.001) and the median post-CLP survival was 50.5 vs 33 h (P<0.05) for AdBRCA1- vs Adnull-treated mice, respectively. AdBRCA1 therapy blunted CLP-associated cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic and renal dysfunction and also reduced CLP-elicited double strand breaks and apoptosis in the liver. BRCA1 gene therapy was associated with lower CLP-evoked cardiac and hepatic superoxide generation that in the liver was in part due to improved reactive oxygen species removal. CLP also elevated mesenteric arteriolar and serum intercellular adhesion molecule-1, both of which were partially abrogated with AdBRCA1 administration. Thioglycollate-challenged AdBRCA1-treated mice displayed reduced peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and dampened cytokine elaboration relative to their Adnull-treated counterparts. Taken together, we report a novel role of BRCA1 gene therapy in limiting systemic inflammation, multiple-organ failure and mortality in experimental sepsis.

  4. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  5. DNA methylation profiling to assess pathogenicity of BRCA1 unclassified variants in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Flower, Kirsty J; Shenker, Natalie S; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Goldgar, David E; Parsons, Michael T; Spurdle, Amanda B; Morris, Joanna R; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M

    2015-01-01

    Germline pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 increase risk of developing breast cancer. Screening for mutations in BRCA1 frequently identifies sequence variants of unknown pathogenicity and recent work has aimed to develop methods for determining pathogenicity. We previously observed that tumor DNA methylation can differentiate BRCA1-mutated from BRCA1-wild type tumors. We hypothesized that we could predict pathogenicity of variants based on DNA methylation profiles of tumors that had arisen in carriers of unclassified variants. We selected 150 FFPE breast tumor DNA samples [47 BRCA1 pathogenic mutation carriers, 65 BRCAx (BRCA1-wild type), 38 BRCA1 test variants] and analyzed a subset (n=54) using the Illumina 450K methylation platform, using the remaining samples for bisulphite pyrosequencing validation. Three validated markers (BACH2, C8orf31, and LOC654342) were combined with sequence bioinformatics in a model to predict pathogenicity of 27 variants (independent test set). Predictions were compared with standard multifactorial likelihood analysis. Prediction was consistent for c.5194-12G>A (IVS 19-12 G>A) (P>0.99); 13 variants were considered not pathogenic or likely not pathogenic using both approaches. We conclude that tumor DNA methylation data alone has potential to be used in prediction of BRCA1 variant pathogenicity but is not independent of estrogen receptor status and grade, which are used in current multifactorial models to predict pathogenicity.

  6. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1)-deficient embryos develop normally but are more susceptible to ethanol-initiated DNA damage and embryopathies☆

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Aaron M.; Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer 1 (brca1) gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancers, and heterozygous (+/−) brca1 knockout progeny develop normally, suggesting a negligible developmental impact. However, our results show BRCA1 plays a broader biological role in protecting the embryo from oxidative stress. Sox2-promoted Cre-expressing hemizygous males were mated with floxed brca1 females, and gestational day 8 +/− brca1 conditional knockout embryos with a 28% reduction in protein expression were exposed in culture to the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-initiating drug ethanol (EtOH). Untreated +/− brca1-deficient embryos developed normally, but when exposed to EtOH exhibited increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, γH2AX, which is a marker of DNA double strand breaks that can result from 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, formation, and embryopathies at EtOH concentrations that did not affect their brca1-normal littermates. These results reveal that even modest BRCA1 deficiencies render the embryo more susceptible to drug-enhanced ROS formation, and corroborate a role for DNA oxidation in the mechanism of EtOH teratogenesis. PMID:26629949

  7. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1)-deficient embryos develop normally but are more susceptible to ethanol-initiated DNA damage and embryopathies.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Aaron M; Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    The breast cancer 1 (brca1) gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancers, and heterozygous (+/-) brca1 knockout progeny develop normally, suggesting a negligible developmental impact. However, our results show BRCA1 plays a broader biological role in protecting the embryo from oxidative stress. Sox2-promoted Cre-expressing hemizygous males were mated with floxed brca1 females, and gestational day 8 +/- brca1 conditional knockout embryos with a 28% reduction in protein expression were exposed in culture to the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-initiating drug ethanol (EtOH). Untreated +/- brca1-deficient embryos developed normally, but when exposed to EtOH exhibited increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, γH2AX, which is a marker of DNA double strand breaks that can result from 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, formation, and embryopathies at EtOH concentrations that did not affect their brca1-normal littermates. These results reveal that even modest BRCA1 deficiencies render the embryo more susceptible to drug-enhanced ROS formation, and corroborate a role for DNA oxidation in the mechanism of EtOH teratogenesis.

  8. DNA repair factor BRCA1 depletion occurs in Alzheimer brains and impairs cognitive function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suberbielle, Elsa; Djukic, Biljana; Evans, Mark; Kim, Daniel H.; Taneja, Praveen; Wang, Xin; Finucane, Mariel; Knox, Joseph; Ho, Kaitlyn; Devidze, Nino; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining DNA integrity is vital for all cells and organisms. Defective DNA repair may contribute to neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We found reduced levels of BRCA1, but not of other DNA repair factors, in the brains of AD patients and human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice. Amyloid-β oligomers reduced BRCA1 levels in primary neuronal cultures. In wild-type mice, knocking down neuronal BRCA1 in the dentate gyrus caused increased DNA double-strand breaks, neuronal shrinkage, synaptic plasticity impairments, and learning and memory deficits, but not apoptosis. Low levels of hAPP/Amyloid-β overexpression exacerbated these effects. Physiological neuronal activation increased BRCA1 levels, whereas stimulating predominantly extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors promoted the proteasomal degradation of BRCA1. We conclude that BRCA1 is regulated by neuronal activity, protects the neuronal genome, and critically supports neuronal integrity and cognitive functions. Pathological accumulation of Aβ depletes neuronal BRCA1, which may contribute to cognitive deficits in AD. PMID:26615780

  9. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes associated with the basal-like phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Julia J; James, Colin R; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; Staunton, Kieran Crosbie; Buckley, Niamh E; McDyer, Fionnuala A; Kennedy, Richard D; Wilson, Richard H; Mullan, Paul B; Harkin, D Paul

    2010-08-01

    Expression profiling of BRCA1-deficient tumours has identified a pattern of gene expression similar to basal-like breast tumours. In this study, we examine whether a BRCA1-dependent transcriptional mechanism may underpin the link between BRCA1 and basal-like phenotype. In methods section, the mRNA and protein were harvested from a number of BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer cell lines and from matched isogenic controls. Microarray-based expression profiling was used to identify potential BRCA1-regulated transcripts. These gene targets were then validated (by in silico analysis of tumour samples) by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to confirm recruitment of BRCA1 to specific promoters. In results, we demonstrate that functional BRCA1 represses the expression of cytokeratins 5(KRT5) and 17(KRT17) and p-Cadherin (CDH3) in HCC1937 and T47D breast cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein level. ChIP assays demonstrate that BRCA1 is recruited to the promoters of KRT5, KRT17 and CDH3, and re-ChIP assays confirm that BRCA1 is recruited independently to form c-Myc and Sp1 complexes on the CDH3 promoter. We show that siRNA-mediated inhibition of endogenous c-Myc (and not Sp1) results in a marked increase in CDH3 expression analogous to that observed following the inhibition of endogenous BRCA1. The data provided suggest a model whereby BRCA1 and c-Myc form a repressor complex on the promoters of specific basal genes and represent a potential mechanism to explain the observed overexpression of key basal markers in BRCA1-deficient tumours.

  10. DNA copy number profiling reveals extensive genomic loss in hereditary BRCA1 and BRCA2 ovarian carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kamieniak, M M; Muñoz-Repeto, I; Rico, D; Osorio, A; Urioste, M; García-Donas, J; Hernando, S; Robles-Díaz, L; Ramón y Cajal, T; Cazorla, A; Sáez, R; García-Bueno, J M; Domingo, S; Borrego, S; Palacios, J; van de Wiel, M A; Ylstra, B; Benítez, J; García, M J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies have attempted to characterise genomic changes occurring in hereditary epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOCs) and inconsistent results have been obtained. Given the relevance of DNA copy number alterations in ovarian oncogenesis and growing clinical implications of the BRCA-gene status, we aimed to characterise the genomic profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian tumours. Methods: High-resolution array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation profiling of 53 familial (21 BRCA1, 6 BRCA2 and 26 non-BRCA1/2) and 15 sporadic tumours in combination with supervised and unsupervised analysis was used to define common and/or specific copy number features. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering did not stratify tumours according to their familial or sporadic condition or to their BRCA1/2 mutation status. Common recurrent changes, spanning genes potentially fundamental for ovarian carcinogenesis, regardless of BRCA mutations, and several candidate subtype-specific events were defined. Despite similarities, greater contribution of losses was revealed to be a hallmark of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumours. Conclusion: Somatic alterations occurring in the development of familial EOCs do not differ substantially from the ones occurring in sporadic carcinomas. However, some specific features like extensive genomic loss observed in BRCA1/2 tumours may be of clinical relevance helping to identify BRCA-related patients likely to respond to PARP inhibitors. PMID:23558894

  11. Genetic evaluation of BRCA1-A complex genes with triple-negative breast cancer susceptibility in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Qiao, Feng; Yao, Ling; Cao, Zhi-Gang; Ye, Fu-Gui; Wu, Jiong; Hu, Xin; Wang, Bin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor BRCA1 plays a pivotal role in maintaining genomic stability and tumor suppression. The BRCA1-A complex is required for recruitment of BRCA1 to DNA damage sites, DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Since germline mutations of BRCA1 often lead to breast tumors that are triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) type, we aimed to investigate whether genetic deficiency in genes of the BRCA1-A complex is associated with risk to TNBC development. Results We found that rs7250266 in the promoter region of NBA1 confers a decreased risk to TNBC development, but not to non-TNBC susceptibility. In addition, the haplotypes containing two polymorphisms rs7250266 and rs2278256 are associated with a lower chance of TNBC development specifically. Our studies also showed that the protective alleles of rs7250266 (C > G) and rs2278256 (T > C) down-regulate promoter activity of NBA1 in mammary epithelial cells. Methods We investigated associations between the BRCA1-A complex genes and TNBC developing risk in first case-control study of Chinese Han Women population including 414 patients with TNBC and 354 cancer-free controls. We detected 37 common variants in ABRAXAS, RAP80, BRE, BRCC36 and NBA1/MERIT40 genes encoding the BRCA1-A complex and evaluated their genetic susceptibility to the risk of TNBC. An additional cohort with 652 other types of breast cancer (non-TNBC) cases and 890 controls was used to investigate the associations between TNBC-specific SNPs genotype and non-TNBCs susceptibility. Conclusions Genetic variants in NBA1 may be an important genetic determinant of TNBC susceptibility. Further investigation and validation of these SNPs in larger cohorts may facilitate in predication and prevention of TNBC and in counseling individuals for risk of TNBC development. PMID:26848770

  12. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  13. Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the BRCA1 Gene and Risk of Salivary Gland Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Doan, Phi C.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Polymorphic BRCA1 is a vital tumor suppressor gene within the DNA double-strand break repair pathways, but its association with salivary gland carcinoma (SGC) has yet to be investigated. Materials and Methods In a case-control study of 156 SGC patients and 511 controls, we used unconditional logistical regression analyses to investigate the association between SGC risk and seven common functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (A1988G, A31875G, C33420T, A33921G, A34356G, T43893C and A55298G) in BRCA1. Results T43893C TC/CC genotype was associated with a reduction of SGC risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.55, 95% CI: 0.38–0.80, Bonferroni-adjusted p=0.011), which was more pronounced in women, non-Hispanic whites, and individuals with a family history of cancer in first-degree relatives. The interaction between T43893C and family history of cancer was significant (p=0.009). The GATGGCG and AACAACA haplotypes, both of which carry the T43893C minor allele, were also associated with reduced SGC risk. Conclusion Our results suggest that polymorphic BRCA1, particularly T43893C polymorphism, may protect against SGC. PMID:22503699

  14. BRCA1 Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins in DNA Damage Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    damage. Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been shown that BRCA1 regulates one of FA proteins, called FANCD2 , by a...hypothesize that BRCAI ubiquitination of FANCD2 is affected by association with the FANdA protein complex and by association with DNA damage when embedded in...chromatin. Specific aims are that (1) does BRCA1 monoubiquitinate FANCD2 in vivo using purified ubiquitination factors? (2) Do embedding FA proteins

  15. Molecular insights into the OGG1 gene, a cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers

    PubMed Central

    Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Vaclová, Tereza; Ferreira, Sofia; Urioste, Miguel; Inglada-Perez, Lucia; Soberón, Nora; Blasco, Maria A.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that rs2304277 variant in the OGG1 glycosidase gene of the Base Excision Repair pathway can increase ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers. In the present study, we aimed to explore the role of this genetic variant on different genome instability hallmarks to explain its association with cancer risk. We have evaluated the effect of this polymorphism on OGG1 transcriptional regulation and its contribution to telomere shortening and DNA damage accumulation. For that, we have used a series of 89 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, 74 BRCAX cases, 60 non-carrier controls and 23 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) derived from BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. We have identified that this SNP is associated to a significant OGG1 transcriptional down regulation independently of the BRCA mutational status and that the variant may exert a synergistic effect together with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations on DNA damage and telomere shortening. These results suggest that this variant, could be associated to a higher cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers, due to an OGG1 transcriptional down regulation and its effect on genome instability. PMID:27015555

  16. Identification of a preneoplastic gene expression profile in tubal epithelium of BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Press, Joshua Z; Wurz, Kaitlyn; Norquist, Barbara M; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher; Garcia, Rochelle; Welcsh, Piri; Goff, Barbara A; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2010-12-01

    Microinvasive carcinomas and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasms are commonly discovered within the fallopian tube of BRCA1 mutation carriers at the time of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy, suggesting that many BRCA1-mutated ovarian carcinomas originate in tubal epithelium. We hypothesized that changes in gene expression profiles within the histologically normal fallopian tube epithelium of BRCA1 mutation carriers would overlap with the expression profiles in BRCA1-mutated ovarian carcinomas and represent a BRCA1 preneoplastic signature. Laser capture microdissection of frozen sections was used to isolate neoplastic cells or histologically normal fallopian tube epithelium, and expression profiles were generated on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 gene expression arrays. Normal-risk controls were 11 women wild type for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (WT-FT). WT-FT were compared with histologically normal fallopian tube epithelium from seven women with deleterious BRCA1 mutations who had foci of at least intraepithelial neoplasm within their fallopian tube (B1-FTocc). WT-FT samples were also compared with 12 BRCA1 ovarian carcinomas (B1-CA). The comparison of WT-FT versus B1-FTocc resulted in 152 differentially expressed probe sets, and the comparison of WT-FT versus B1-CA resulted in 4079 differentially expressed probe sets. The BRCA1 preneoplastic signature was composed of the overlap between these two lists, which included 41 concordant probe sets. Genes in the BRCA1 preneoplastic signature included several known tumor suppressor genes such as CDKN1C and EFEMP1 and several thought to be important in invasion and metastasis such as E2F3. The expression of a subset of genes was validated with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry.

  17. DNA-PKcs activates the Chk2-Brca1 pathway during mitosis to ensure chromosomal stability.

    PubMed

    Shang, Z; Yu, L; Lin, Y-F; Matsunaga, S; Shen, C-Y; Chen, B P C

    2014-02-03

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is known to have a critical role in DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is activated when cells enter mitosis and functions in mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is the upstream regulator of the Chk2-Brca1 pathway, which impacts microtubule dynamics, kinetochore attachment and chromosomal segregation in mitosis. Downstream from Chk2, Brca1 promotes monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin to inhibit microtubule nucleation and growth. We found that DNA-PKcs is essential for mitotic Chk2 phosphorylation at Thr68. As in Chk2- and Brca1-deficient cells, loss of DNA-PKcs resulted in chromosome misalignment and lagging during anaphase owing to elevation in microtubule dynamics. Importantly, these mitotic aberrations in DNA-PKcs-defective cells were alleviated by the overexpression of phosphomimetic Chk2 or Brca1 mutant proteins but not their wild-type counterparts. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DNA-PKcs regulates mitotic spindle organization and chromosomal instability via the Chk2-Brca1 signaling pathway.

  18. Searching for large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 gene in a Nigerian population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Huo, Dezheng; Zheng, Yonglan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2010-11-01

    BRCA1/2 germline mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) have widened the mutational spectrum of the BRCA1 gene, but the frequencies vary in different populations. In this study, we want to determine the spectrum of LGRs in BRCA1 gene in Nigerian breast cancer patients. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay was used to screen BRCA1 rearrangements in 352 patients who previously tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and small insertions/deletions. Positive MLPA result was confirmed and located by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of the candidate rearrangement were characterized by sequencing. A novel deletion of BRCA1 exon 21 (c.5277 + 480_5332 + 672del) was detected in 1 out of 352 Nigerian breast cancer patients (0.3% occurrence frequency). Further analysis of breakpoints revealed that the deletion involves two Alu-elements: one AluSg in intron 20 and the AluY in intron 21. These data suggest that while BRCA1 genomic rearrangement exists, they do not contribute significantly to BRCA1-associated risk in the Nigerian population.

  19. DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  20. "DNA Binding Region" of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress.

  1. Hypermethylation of BRCA1 gene: implication for prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in sporadic primary triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Shan, L; Wang, F; Wang, J; Wang, F; Shen, G; Liu, X; Wang, B; Yuan, Y; Ying, J; Yang, H

    2015-04-01

    Paraffin sections from 239 cases of surgical resected mammary gland carcinomas were assessed to determine the role of BRCA1 gene methylation in sporadic triple-negative breast cancer and to evaluate the relationship between BRCA1 gene methylation and clinicopathologic features of triple-negative breast cancer in the National Cancer Center, China. Diagnostic tissues collected from patients received mastectomy in the National Cancer Center from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008 were reviewed. Tissue microarrays were constructed using 239 triple-negative breast cancer cases and stained with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, cytokeratin 5/6, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Methylation status of the BRCA1 promoter was measured by methylation-specific PCR and analyzed against clinicopathologic characteristics, subtypes, and prognosis using standard statistical methods. Among the 239 triple-negative breast cancer cases, 137 (57.3 %) showed methylation of the BRCA1. According to the immunohistochemistry results, triple-negative breast cancer cases were classified into basal-like breast cancer (60.7 %) and non-basal-like breast cancer (39.3 %). The frequency of BRCA1 methylation was significantly higher in basal-like breast cancer subtype (71.7 %) than the non-basal subtype (35.1 %). Thus, BRCA1 methylation is statistically significantly correlated with basal-like breast cancer subtype (p < 0.001). Multivariate analyses further showed that BRCA1 promoter methylation is an independently predictor of overall survival (p = 0.023; HR 2.32; 95 % CI 1.12-4.81) and disease-free survival (p = 0.022; HR 2.36; 95 % CI 1.13-4.90) in triple-negative breast cancer. Here we demonstrated that epigenetic alteration of key tumor suppressor gene can be a promising biomarker for the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer/basal-like breast cancer. Specifically our finding revealed that BRCA1 methylation is closely associated with a

  2. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M; Rades, D; Skawran, B; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J H; Dörk, T

    2001-01-01

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and family history, for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Five frameshift deletions (517delGT in BRCA1; 4772delA, 5946delCT, 6174delT and 8138del5 in BRCA2) were identified in patients with bilateral disease. No further mutations, apart from polymorphisms and 3 rare unclassified variants, were found after scanning the whole BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequence. Three pathogenic BRCA1 mutations (Cys61Gly, 3814del5, 5382insC) were identified in the group of patients with unilateral breast cancer. The frequencies of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants were not different between the 2 groups. In summary, we did not find a significantly increased prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based cohort of German patients with bilateral breast cancer. We conclude that bilaterality of breast cancer on its own is not strongly associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when adjusted for age and family history. The high frequency of bilateral disease in multi-case breast cancer families may be due to a familial aggregation of additional susceptibility factors modifying the penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556836

  3. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in patients with bilateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, D; Bremer, M; Rades, D; Skawran, B; Siebrands, C; Karstens, J H; Dörk, T

    2001-09-14

    Mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been shown to strongly predispose towards the development of contralateral breast cancer in patients from large multi-case families. In order to test the hypothesis that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more frequent in patients with bilateral breast cancer, we have investigated a hospital-based series of 75 consecutive patients with bilateral breast cancer and a comparison group of 75 patients with unilateral breast cancer, pairwise matched by age and family history, for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Five frameshift deletions (517delGT in BRCA1; 4772delA, 5946delCT, 6174delT and 8138del5 in BRCA2) were identified in patients with bilateral disease. No further mutations, apart from polymorphisms and 3 rare unclassified variants, were found after scanning the whole BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequence. Three pathogenic BRCA1 mutations (Cys61Gly, 3814del5, 5382insC) were identified in the group of patients with unilateral breast cancer. The frequencies of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants were not different between the 2 groups. In summary, we did not find a significantly increased prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a hospital-based cohort of German patients with bilateral breast cancer. We conclude that bilaterality of breast cancer on its own is not strongly associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations when adjusted for age and family history. The high frequency of bilateral disease in multi-case breast cancer families may be due to a familial aggregation of additional susceptibility factors modifying the penetrance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

  4. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR), a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  5. The BRCA1 alternative splicing variant Δ14-15 with an in-frame deletion of part of the regulatory serine-containing domain (SCD) impairs the DNA repair capacity in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sevcik, Jan; Falk, Martin; Kleiblova, Petra; Lhota, Filip; Stefancikova, Lenka; Janatova, Marketa; Weiterova, Lenka; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2012-05-01

    The BRCA1 gene codes for a protein involved in the DNA double strand break (DDSB) repair. Alongside the dominant full-length splicing form of BRCA1, numerous endogenously expressed alternative splicing variants of unknown significance have been described in various tissues. Some of them retain the original BRCA1 reading frame but lack several critical BRCA1 structural domains, suggesting an altered function of the resulting protein in the BRCA1-regulated processes. To characterize the effect of the BRCA1Δ14-15 splicing variant (with an in-frame deletion affecting the regulatory serine-containing domain) on the DDSB repair, we constructed the MCF-7 clones stably expressing the analyzed variant with/without a shRNA-mediated downregulation of the endogenous full-length wild-type BRCA1 expression. Our results show that the expression of the BRCA1Δ14-15 variant delays the γ-radiation-induced DDSB repair, alters the kinetics of irradiation-induced foci formation/decomposition and reduces the non-homologous end-joining capacity in MCF-7 cells. Therefore, the BRCA1Δ14-15 is not able to functionally replace the full-length wt BRCA1 in the DDSB repair. Our findings indicate that the endogenously expressed BRCA1 alternative splicing variants may negatively influence genome stability and support the growing evidence of the pathological potential of the sequence variants generated by an altered or misregulated alternative splicing in the process of mammary malignant transformation.

  6. Alternative splicing of breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 from breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Lixia, Miao; Zhijian, Cao; Chao, Shen; Chaojiang, Gu; Congyi, Zheng

    2007-01-31

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene produce increased susceptibility to these malignancies in certain families. In this study, the forward 1-13 exons of breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 were cloned from breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 by RT-PCR method. Sequence analysis showed that nine BRCA1 splice forms were isolated and characterized, compared with wild-type BRCA1 gene, five splice forms of which were novel. These splice isoforms were produced from the molecular mechanism of 5' and 3' alternative splicing. All these splice forms deleting exon 11b and the locations of alternative splicing were focused on two parts:one was exons 2 and 3, and the other was exons 9 and 10. These splice forms accorded with GT-AG rule. Most these BRCA1 splice variants still kept the original reading frame. Western blot analysis indicated that some BRCA1 splice variants were expressed in ZR-75-30 cell line at the protein level. In addition, we confirmed the presence of these new transcripts of BRCA1 gene in MDA-MB-435S, K562, Hela, HLA, HIC, H9, Jurkat and human fetus samples by RT-PCR analysis. These results suggested that breast cancer associated gene BRCA1 may have unexpectedly a large number of splice variants. We hypothesized that alternative splicing of BRCA1 possibly plays a major role in the tumorigenesis of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Thus, the identification of cancer-specific splice forms will provide a novel source for the discovery of diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and tumor antigens suitable as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. BRCA1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that functions as a tumor suppressor. BRCA1 combines with other tumor suppressors, DNA damage sensors, and signal transducers to form a large multi-subunit protein complex known as the BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex (BASC). BRCA1 associates with RNA polymerase II, and through the C-terminal domain, also interacts with histone deacetylase complexes. This protein thus plays a role in transcription, DNA repair of double-stranded breaks, and recombination. Mutations in this gene are responsible for approximately 40% of inherited breast cancers and more than 80% of inherited breast and ovarian cancers.

  8. The G-quadruplex DNA stabilizing drug pyridostatin promotes DNA damage and downregulates transcription of Brca1 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Moruno-Manchon, Jose F; Koellhoffer, Edward C; Gopakumar, Jayakrishnan; Hambarde, Shashank; Kim, Nayun; McCullough, Louise D; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2017-09-12

    The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA secondary structure formed by four DNA strands containing multiple runs of guanines. G-quadruplexes play important roles in DNA recombination, replication, telomere maintenance, and regulation of transcription. Small molecules that stabilize the G-quadruplexes alter gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that the G-quadruplexes regulate transcription in neurons. We discovered that pyridostatin, a small molecule that specifically stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA complexes, induced neurotoxicity and promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cultured neurons. We also found that pyridostatin downregulated transcription of the Brca1 gene, a gene that is critical for DSB repair. Importantly, in an in vitro gel shift assay, we discovered that an antibody specific to the G-quadruplex structure binds to a synthetic oligonucleotide, which corresponds to the first putative G-quadruplex in the Brca1 gene promoter. Our results suggest that the G-quadruplex complexes regulate transcription in neurons. Studying the G-quadruplexes could represent a new avenue for neurodegeneration and brain aging research.

  9. Effect of TPA and HTLV-1 Tax on BRCA1 and ERE controlled genes expression.

    PubMed

    Jabareen, Azhar; Abu-Jaafar, Aya; Abou-Kandil, Ammar; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2017-07-18

    Interference with the expression and/or functions of the multifunctional tumor suppressor BRCA1 leads to a high risk of breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 expression is usually activated by the estrogen (E2) liganded ERα receptor. Activated ERα is considered as a potent transcription factor which activates various genes expression by 2 pathways. A classical pathway, ERα binds directly to E2-responsive elements (EREs) in the promoters of the responsive genes and a non-classical pathway where ERα indirectly binds with the appropriate gene promoter. In our previous study, HTLV-1Tax was found to strongly inhibit ERα induced BRCA1 expression while stimulating ERα induced ERE dependent genes. TPA is a strong PKC activator which found to induce the expression of HTLV-1. Here we examined the effect of TPA on the expression of BRCA1 and genes controlled by ERE region in MCF-7 cells and on Tax activity on these genes. Our results showed strong stimulatory effect of TPA on both BRCA1 and ERE expression without treatment with E2. Tax did not show any significant effect on these TPA activities. It seems that TPA activation of BRCA1 and ERE expression is dependent on PKC activity but not through the NFκB pathway. However, 53BP1 may be involved in this TPA activity because its overexpression significantly reduced the TPA stimulatory effect on BRCA1 and ERE expression. Additionally, our Chip assay results probably exclude possible involvement of ERα pathway in this TPA activity because TPA did not interfere with the binding of ERα to both BRCA1 promoter and ERE region.

  10. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    PubMed

    Feilotter, Harriet E; Michel, Claire; Uy, Paolo; Bathurst, Lauren; Davey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous) BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  11. Plasmonics nanoprobes: detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Yan, Fei; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the application of plasmonics-based nanoprobes that combine the modulation of the plasmonics effect to change the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a Raman label and the specificity of a DNA hairpin loop sequence to recognize and discriminate a variety of molecular target sequences. Hybridization with target DNA opens the hairpin and physically separates the Raman label from the metal nanoparticle thus reducing the plasmonics effect and quenching the SERS signal of the label. We have successfully demonstrated the specificity and selectivity of the nanoprobes in the detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene in a homogenous solution at room temperature. In addition, the potential application of plasmonics nanoprobes for quantitative DNA diagnostic testing is discussed.

  12. Nucleolar exit of RNF8 and BRCA1 in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Mateo, Francesca; Franke, Kristin; Huen, Michael S.Y.; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S.; Plans, Vanessa; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-11-01

    The induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicits a plethora of responses that redirect many cellular functions to the vital task of repairing the injury, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). We have found that, in the absence of DNA damage, the DSB repair factors RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus. Shortly after exposure of cells to {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci, a traffic that was reverted several hours after the damage. RNF8 interacted through its FHA domain with the ribosomal protein RPSA, and knockdown of RPSA caused a depletion of nucleolar RNF8 and BRCA1, suggesting that the interaction of RNF8 with RPSA is critical for the nucleolar localization of these DDR factors. Knockdown of RPSA or RNF8 impaired bulk protein translation, as did {gamma}-irradiation, the latter being partially countered by overexpression of exogenous RNF8. Our results suggest that RNF8 and BRCA1 are anchored to the nucleolus through reversible interactions with RPSA and that, in addition to its known functions in DDR, RNF8 may play a role in protein synthesis, possibly linking the nucleolar exit of this factor to the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to DNA damage. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus of undamaged cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 are translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ribosomal protein RPSA anchors RNF8 to the nucleolus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 may play previously unsuspected roles in protein synthesis.

  13. Tumor Suppression by BRCA-1: A Critical Role at DNA Replication Forks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    free extracts derived from Xenopus laevis eggs that support: 1. Semi-conservative, cell-cycle regulated DNA replication; 2. Many facets of the DNA...extracts derived from Xenopus laevis eggs that support: 1. Semi-conservative, cell-cycle regulated DNA replication; 2. Many facets of the DNA damage...assess the consequences of complete loss of BRCA1/BARD1 on fork progression and stalling. BODY Cell-free systems derived from Xenopus eggs can

  14. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas vO

    2014-12-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense, silent, and intron variants, which are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance owing to the lack of causal evidence. Variants of unknown clinical significance can potentially have an impact on splicing and therefore functional examinations are warranted to classify whether these variants are pathogenic or benign. Here we validate a mini-gene splicing assay by comparing the results of 24 variants with previously published data from RT-PCR analysis on RNA from blood samples/lymphoblastoid cell lines. The analysis showed an overall concordance of 100%. In addition, we investigated 13 BRCA1 variants of unknown clinical significance or putative variants affecting splicing by in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. Both the in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay classified six BRCA1 variants as pathogenic (c.80+1G>A, c.132C>T (p.=), c.213-1G>A, c.670+1delG, c.4185+1G>A, and c.5075-1G>C), whereas six BRCA1 variants were classified as neutral (c.-19-22_-19-21dupAT, c.302-15C>G, c.547+14delG, c.4676-20A>G, c.4987-21G>T, and c.5278-14C>G) and one BRCA1 variant remained unclassified (c.670+16G>A). In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assays are important for the classification of variants, especially if no RNA is available from the patient. This knowledge is crucial for proper genetic counseling of patients and their family members.

  15. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas vO

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense, silent, and intron variants, which are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance owing to the lack of causal evidence. Variants of unknown clinical significance can potentially have an impact on splicing and therefore functional examinations are warranted to classify whether these variants are pathogenic or benign. Here we validate a mini-gene splicing assay by comparing the results of 24 variants with previously published data from RT-PCR analysis on RNA from blood samples/lymphoblastoid cell lines. The analysis showed an overall concordance of 100%. In addition, we investigated 13 BRCA1 variants of unknown clinical significance or putative variants affecting splicing by in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. Both the in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay classified six BRCA1 variants as pathogenic (c.80+1G>A, c.132C>T (p.=), c.213−1G>A, c.670+1delG, c.4185+1G>A, and c.5075−1G>C), whereas six BRCA1 variants were classified as neutral (c.-19-22_-19-21dupAT, c.302−15C>G, c.547+14delG, c.4676−20A>G, c.4987−21G>T, and c.5278−14C>G) and one BRCA1 variant remained unclassified (c.670+16G>A). In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assays are important for the classification of variants, especially if no RNA is available from the patient. This knowledge is crucial for proper genetic counseling of patients and their family members. PMID:24667779

  16. High proportion of recurrent germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene in breast and ovarian cancer patients from the Prague area

    PubMed Central

    Pohlreich, Petr; Zikan, Michal; Stribrna, Jana; Kleibl, Zdenek; Janatova, Marketa; Kotlas, Jaroslav; Zidovska, Jana; Novotny, Jan; Petruzelka, Lubos; Szabo, Csilla; Matous, Bohuslav

    2005-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been shown to account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of our study was to estimate the incidence and spectrum of pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 genes in high-risk Czech families. Methods A total of 96 Czech families with recurrent breast and/or ovarian cancer and 55 patients considered to be at high-risk but with no reported family history of cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. The entire coding sequence of each gene was analyzed using a combination of the protein truncation test and direct DNA sequencing. Results A total of 35 mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes were identified in high-risk families (36.5%). Pathogenic mutations were found in 23.3% of breast cancer families and in 59.4% of families with the occurrence of both breast and ovarian cancer. In addition, four mutations were detected in 31 (12.9%) women with early onset breast cancer. One mutation was detected in seven (14.3%) patients affected with both a primary breast and ovarian cancer and another in three (33.3%) patients with a bilateral breast cancer. A total of 3 mutations in BRCA1 were identified among 14 (21.4%) women with a medullary breast carcinoma. Of 151 analyzed individuals, 35 (23.2%) carried a BRCA1 mutation and 9 (6.0%) a BRCA2 mutation. One novel truncating mutation was found in BRCA1 (c.1747A>T) and two in BRCA2 (c.3939delC and c.5763dupT). The 35 identified BRCA1 mutations comprised 13 different alterations. Three recurrent mutations accounted for 71.4% of unrelated individuals with detected gene alterations. The BRCA1 c.5266dupC (5382insC) was detected in 51.4% of mutation positive women. The mutations c.3700_3704del5 and c.181T>G (300T>G) contributed to 11.4% and 8.6% of pathogenic mutations, respectively. A total of eight different mutations were identified in BRCA2. The novel c.5763dupT mutation, which appeared in two unrelated families, was the only recurrent

  17. MRN, CtIP, and BRCA1 mediate repair of topoisomerase II-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard; Gottesman, Max; Gautier, Jean

    2016-02-15

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with complex ends poses a special challenge, as additional processing is required before DNA ligation. For example, protein-DNA adducts must be removed to allow repair by either nonhomologous end joining or homology-directed repair. Here, we investigated the processing of topoisomerase II (Top2)-DNA adducts induced by treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent etoposide. Through biochemical analysis in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we establish that the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex, CtIP, and BRCA1 are required for both the removal of Top2-DNA adducts and the subsequent resection of Top2-adducted DSB ends. Moreover, the interaction between CtIP and BRCA1, although dispensable for resection of endonuclease-generated DSB ends, is required for resection of Top2-adducted DSBs, as well as for cellular resistance to etoposide during genomic DNA replication.

  18. [Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Petrović, Bojana; Perović, Milica; Novaković, Ivana; Atanacković, Jasmina; Popović, Branka; Luković, Ljiljana; Petković, Spasoje

    2006-09-01

    Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65%) cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7%) tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5%) tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO) classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IlIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.70), with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the association of this occurrence with a later phase of the disease.

  19. Regulating cardiac energy metabolism and bioenergetics by targeting the DNA damage repair protein BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna K; Shukla, Praphulla C; Yanagawa, Bobby; Quan, Adrian; Lovren, Fina; Pan, Yi; Wagg, Cory S; Teoh, Hwee; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Verma, Subodh

    2013-09-01

    Alterations in cardiac energy and substrate metabolism play a critical role in the development and clinical course of heart failure. We hypothesized that the cardioprotective role of the breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) gene might be mediated in part by alterations in cardiac bioenergetics. We generated cardiomyocyte-specific BRCA1 homozygous and heterozygous knockout mice using the Cre-loxP technology and evaluated the key molecules and pathways involved in glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and mitochondrial bioenergetics. Cardiomyocyte-specific BRCA1-deficient mice showed reduced cardiac expression of glucose and fatty acid transporters, reduced acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase 2 and malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (key enzymes that control malonyl coenzyme A, which in turn controls fatty acid oxidation), and reduced carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, a rate-limiting enzyme for mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and γ and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I levels were also downregulated in these hearts. Rates of glucose and fatty acid oxidation were reduced in the hearts of heterozygous cardiomyocyte-restricted BRCA1-deficient mice, resulting in a decrease in the rate of adenosine triphosphate production. This decrease in metabolism and adenosine triphosphate production occurred despite an increase in 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and AKT activation in the heart. Cardiomyocyte-specific loss of BRCA1 alters critical pathways of fatty acid and glucose metabolism, leading to an energy starved heart. BRCA1-based cell or gene therapy might serve as a novel target to improve cardiac bioenergetics in patients with heart failure. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Swe-Brca; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Beattie, Mary S; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M; Whittemore, Alice S; Daly, Mary B; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A; van Os, Theo A M; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J L; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, A H; van Asperen, Christi J; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Devilee, Peter; Hebon; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R; Healey, Sue; Investigators, Kconfab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Benitez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16), p = 2.7 × 10(-3)) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3)). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  1. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Vaclová, Tereza; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, Rosario; Peterlongo, Paolo; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Duran, Mercedes; Díez, Orland; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Andrés Conejero, Raquel; Soucy, Penny; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; SWE-BRCA; Arver, Brita; Rantala, Johanna; Loman, Niklas; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Beattie, Mary S.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John; Terry, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Infante, Mar; Herráez, Belén; Moreno, Leticia Thais; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Weeman, Kisa; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariette, Frederique; Volorio, Sara; Viel, Alessandra; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Garber, Judy; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Douglas, Fiona; Porteous, Mary; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Morrison, Patrick; Donaldson, Alan; Kennedy, John; Foo, Claire; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hans Jörg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Damiola, Francesca; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Tucker, Kathy; Backes, Floor; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Brewster, Wendy; Wakeley, Katie; Rutherford, Thomas; Caldés, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Rookus, Matti A.; van Os, Theo A. M.; van der Kolk, Lizet; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, A. H.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Devilee, Peter; HEBON; Olah, Edith; Lázaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Menéndez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Maugard, Christine; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Healey, Sue; Investigators, kConFab; Olswold, Curtis; Guidugli, Lucia; Lindor, Noralane; Slager, Susan; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Zhang, Liying; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Berger, Andreas; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shimon, Shani Paluch; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Benitez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase), and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2). Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2) gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03–1.16), p = 2.7×10−3) for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase) gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, p = 4.8×10−3). DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied. PMID:24698998

  2. BRCA-1 Gene Expression and Comparative Proteomic Profile of Primordial Follicles from Young and Adult Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Krishnagiri, Harshini; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh; Rao, A J

    2017-04-03

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that the repair efficiency of DNA double-strand breaks declines with increasing age in rat primordial follicles. In the present study, we extended our studies to buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) wherein we studied the expression of BRCA-1 related DNA repair genes in primordial follicles of young (12 months-22 months) and adult (72-96 months) buffaloes. The relative expression of selected genes, as determined by RT-PCR, revealed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in mRNA levels of BRCA1, MRE11, RAD51, ATM, and H2AX in adult primordial follicles as compared to the young. Western blot analysis revealed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the expression of phosphorylated protein levels of BRCA1 and H2AX in adult buffalo primordial follicles. The protein expression profile of young and adult buffalo primordial follicles revealed differential expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial function, cell survival and cell metabolism. Similar to reports from aging rodent and human primordial follicles, our findings support the fact that impairment of DNA repair may be an universal mechanism involved in oocyte aging.

  3. Detection of genomic variations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by long-range PCR and next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hernan, Imma; Borràs, Emma; de Sousa Dias, Miguel; Gamundi, María José; Mañé, Begoña; Llort, Gemma; Agúndez, José A G; Blanca, Miguel; Carballo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), represent an opportunity to perform genetic testing in a clinical scenario. In this study, we developed and tested a method for the detection of mutations in the large BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes, using long-range PCR (LR-PCR) and NGS, in samples from individuals with a personal and/or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Eleven LR-PCR fragments, between 3000 and 15,300 bp, containing all coding exons and flanking splice junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2, were obtained from DNA samples of five individuals carrying mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2. Libraries for NGS were prepared using an enzymatic (Nextera technology) method. We analyzed five individual samples in parallel by NGS and obtained complete coverage of all LR-PCR fragments, with an average coding sequence depth for each nucleotide of >30 reads, running from ×7 (in exon 22 of BRCA1) to >×150. We detected and confirmed 100% of the mutations that predispose to the risk of cancer, together with other genomic variations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Our approach demonstrates that genomic LR-PCR, together with NGS, using the GS Junior 454 System platform, is an effective method for patient sample analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In addition, this method could be performed in regular molecular genetics laboratories.

  4. Somatic mutations in the BRCA1 gene in Chinese sporadic breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Khoo, U S; Ozcelik, H; Cheung, A N; Chow, L W; Ngan, H Y; Done, S J; Liang, A C; Chan, V W; Au, G K; Ng, W F; Poon, C S; Leung, Y F; Loong, F; Ip, P; Chan, G S; Andrulis, I L; Lu, J; Ho, F C

    1999-08-12

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. Its role in sporadic carcinogenesis is not well defined. Somatic mutations in breast cancers have not been reported and to date there are only three reports of somatic mutations in sporadic ovarian cancers. To investigate the contribution of BRCA1 mutations to sporadic breast and ovarian cancer in the Chinese population, we analysed 62 samples from Chinese women using the protein truncation test. There were 40 cases of breast cancer under age 50 and 22 cases of ovarian cancer, all unselected for family history. There was no age selection for the ovarian cancers. We found two somatic BRCA1 mutations in exon 11, one in a breast cancer and the other in an ovarian cancer, both of which result in truncated proteins. Our results indicate that somatic BRCA1 mutations, like somatic mutations in the BRCA2 gene, though very rare, can be found in both breast and ovarian cancers and support a tumor suppressor function for BRCA1 in sporadic tumors.

  5. Modification of Ovarian Cancer Risk by BRCA1/2 Interacting Genes in a Multicenter Cohort of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Domchek, Susan M.; Wan, Fei; Chuai, Shannon; Friebel, Tara M.; Panossian, Saarene; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; kConFab; Singer, Christian F.; Pfeiler, Georg; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Lynch, Henry T.; Garber, Judy E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Couch, Fergus; Narod, Steven A.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Greenberg, Roger; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Daly, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1/2 mutations confer elevated ovarian cancer (OvCa) risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve OvCa risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is important because no effective early detection for OvCas exists. A cohort of 1,575 BRCA1 and 856 BRCA2 mutation carriers was used to evaluate SNPs and haplotypes at ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CTIP, MRE11, NBS1, RAD50, RAD51, and TOPBP1 in OvCa risk. In BRCA1 carriers, no associations were observed with ATM, BARD1, CTIP, RAD50, RAD51, or TOPBP1. At BRIP1, an association was observed for one haplotype with a multiple testing corrected p-value (pcorr)=0.012, although no individual haplotype was significant. At MRE11, statistically significant associations were observed for one haplotype (pcorr=0.007). At NBS1, we observed a pcorr=0.024 for haplotypes. In BRCA2 carriers, no associations were observed with CTIP, NBS1, RAD50, or TOPBP1. Rare haplotypes at ATM (pcorr=0.044) and BARD1 (pcorr=0.012) were associated with OvCa risk. At BRIP1, two common haplotypes were significantly associated with OvCa risk (pcorr=0.011). At MRE11, we observed a significant haplotype association (pcorr=0.012), and at RAD51, one common haplotype was significantly associated with OvCa risk (pcorr=0.026). Variants in genes that interact biologically with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 may be associated with modified OvCa risk in women who carry BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:19584272

  6. Systematic screening reveals a role for BRCA1 in the response to transcription-associated DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Sarah J.; Rolland, Thomas; Adelmant, Guillaume; Xia, Xianfang; Owen, Matthew S.; Dricot, Amélie; Zack, Travis I.; Sahni, Nidhi; Jacob, Yves; Hao, Tong; McKinney, Kristine M.; Clark, Allison P.; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Joung, J. Keith; Beroukhim, Rameen; Marto, Jarrod A.; Vidal, Marc; Gaudet, Suzanne; Hill, David E.

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a breast and ovarian tumor suppressor. Given its numerous incompletely understood functions and the possibility that more exist, we performed complementary systematic screens in search of new BRCA1 protein-interacting partners. New BRCA1 functions and/or a better understanding of existing ones were sought. Among the new interacting proteins identified, genetic interactions were detected between BRCA1 and four of the interactors: TONSL, SETX, TCEANC, and TCEA2. Genetic interactions were also detected between BRCA1 and certain interactors of TONSL, including both members of the FACT complex. From these results, a new BRCA1 function in the response to transcription-associated DNA damage was detected. Specifically, new roles for BRCA1 in the restart of transcription after UV damage and in preventing or repairing damage caused by stabilized R loops were identified. These roles are likely carried out together with some of the newly identified interactors. This new function may be important in BRCA1 tumor suppression, since the expression of several interactors, including some of the above-noted transcription proteins, is repeatedly aberrant in both breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:25184681

  7. Polo-like kinase 1 mediates BRCA1 phosphorylation and recruitment at DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Chabalier-Taste, Corinne; Canitrot, Yvan; Calsou, Patrick; Larminat, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) caused during DNA replication and by exogenous stresses is critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity. There is growing evidence that the Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) that plays a number of pivotal roles in cell proliferation can directly participate in regulation of DSB repair. In this study, we show that Plk1 regulates BRCA1, a key mediator protein required to efficiently repair DSB through homologous recombination (HR). Following induction of DSB, BRCA1 concentrates in distinctive large nuclear foci at damage sites where multiple DNA repair factors accumulate. First, we found that inhibition of Plk1 shortly before DNA damage sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation and reduces DSB repair by HR. Second, we provide evidence that BRCA1 foci formation induced by DSB is reduced when Plk1 is inhibited or depleted. Third, we identified BRCA1 as a novel Plk1 substrate and determined that Ser1164 is the major phosphorylation site for Plk1 in vitro. In cells, mutation of Plk1 sites on BRCA1 significantly delays BRCA1 foci formation following DSB, recapitulating the phenotype observed upon Plk1 inhibition. Our data then assign a key function to Plk1 in BRCA1 foci formation at DSB, emphasizing Plk1 importance in the HR repair of human cells. PMID:26745677

  8. A portable BRCA1-HAC (human artificial chromosome) module for analysis of BRCA1 tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Kononenko, Artem V; Bansal, Ruchi; Lee, Nicholas C O; Grimes, Brenda R; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2014-12-01

    BRCA1 is involved in many disparate cellular functions, including DNA damage repair, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, gene transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, centrosome function and others. The majority of evidence strongly favors the maintenance of genomic integrity as a principal tumor suppressor activity of BRCA1. At the same time some functional aspects of BRCA1 are not fully understood. Here, a HAC (human artificial chromosome) module with a regulated centromere was constructed for delivery and expression of the 90 kb genomic copy of the BRCA1 gene into BRCA1-deficient human cells. A battery of functional tests was carried out to demonstrate functionality of the exogenous BRCA1. In separate experiments, we investigated the role of BRCA1 in maintenance of heterochromatin integrity within a human functional kinetochore. We demonstrated that BRCA1 deficiency results in a specific activation of transcription of higher-order alpha-satellite repeats (HORs) assembled into heterochromatin domains flanking the kinetochore. At the same time no detectable elevation of transcription was observed within HORs assembled into centrochromatin domains. Thus, we demonstrated a link between BRCA1 deficiency and kinetochore dysfunction and extended previous observations that BRCA1 is required to silence transcription in heterochromatin in specific genomic loci. This supports the hypothesis that epigenetic alterations of the kinetochore initiated in the absence of BRCA1 may contribute to cellular transformation.

  9. [Association between single nucleotide polymorphism of BARD1 gene and BRCA1 gene mutation in epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, W L; Zhao, J Z; Wang, Z Z; Dong, B; Hou, Y Y; Wu, X X; Guo, Y J

    2017-06-25

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of BARD1 gene and BRCA1 gene in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Nineteen EOC patients with BRCA1 gene mutation and 50 EOC cases without BRCA1 gene mutation between January 2016 and October 2016 were collected, and all EOC were diagnosed by pathological method. BARD1 gene variants were detected by next generation sequencing (NGS). The SNP of BARD1 gene was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation. Logistic regression analysis was used to research the clinicopathologic features and BRCA1 gene mutation associated with BARD1 gene SNP. Pearson's chi-square test was used to analyze the association between BARD1 gene Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser with different clinicopathologic features and BRCA1 gene mutation risk. Results: (1) Eight BARD1 gene variants were found in 69 ovarian cancer patients, in which Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser were common variants, and the rate of mutation were all 54% (37/69). (2) There was a significant linear correlation among Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser (all P<0.01). (3) Obvious differences were found in Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser of BARD1 gene between BRCA1(+) and BRCA1(-) (all P<0.05) . (4) No differences were found between BARD1 gene Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser and the clinicopathologic features (all P>0.05), while obvious differences were found in BRCA1 gene mutation compared to the controls group. The risk of BRCA1 mutation in Val507Met and Arg378Ser were more evident in subjects with negative family history, positive menopause history, negative tubal ligation, onset age (≤60 years old) and sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in EOC (all P<0.05), while Pro24Ser was only more evident in positive menopause history of EOC (P<0.05). Conclusions: BARD1 Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser are the common genotypes, which are associated with BRCA1 mutation in EOC. The family history, menopause history, tubal ligation

  10. MSH2/BRCA1 expression as a DNA-repair signature predicting survival in early–stage lung cancer patients from the IFCT-0002 Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levallet, Guénaëlle; Dubois, Fatéméh; Fouret, Pierre; Antoine, Martine; Brosseau, Solenn; Bergot, Emmanuel; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Gounant, Valérie; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Debieuvre, Didier; Molinier, Olivier; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Mazieres, Julien; Quoix, Elisabeth; Pujol, Jean-Louis; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Morin, Franck; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction DNA repair is a double-edged sword in lung carcinogenesis. When defective, it promotes genetic instability and accumulated genetic alterations. Conversely these defects could sensitize cancer cells to therapeutic agents inducing DNA breaks. Methods We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to assess MSH2, XRCC5, and BRCA1 expression in 443 post-chemotherapy specimens from patients randomized in a Phase 3 trial, comparing two neoadjuvant regimens in 528 Stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (IFCT-0002). O6MGMT promoter gene methylation was analyzed in a subset of 208 patients of the same trial with available snap-frozen specimens. Results Median follow-up was from 90 months onwards. Only high BRCA1 (n = 221, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.07-2.34], p = 0.02) and low MSH2 expression (n = 356, HR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11-2.08], p = 0.008) significantly predicted better overall survival (OS) in univariate and multivariate analysis. A bootstrap re-sampling strategy distinguished three patient groups at high (n = 55, low BRCA1 and high MSH2, median OS >96 months, HR = 2.5, 95% CI [1.45-4.33], p = 0.001), intermediate (n = 82, median OS = 73.4 p = 0.0596), and low (high BRCA1 and low MSH2, n = 67, median OS = ND, HR = 0.51, 95% CI [0.31-0.83], p = 0.006) risk of death. Interpretation DNA repair protein expression assessment identified three different groups of risk of death in early-stage lung cancer patients, according to their tumor MSH2 and BRCA1 expression levels. These results deserve prospective evaluation of MSH2/BRCA1 theranostic value in lung cancer patients treated with combinations of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and drugs targeting DNA repair, such as Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PMID:28008145

  11. MSH2/BRCA1 expression as a DNA-repair signature predicting survival in early-stage lung cancer patients from the IFCT-0002 Phase 3 Trial.

    PubMed

    Levallet, Guénaëlle; Dubois, Fatéméh; Fouret, Pierre; Antoine, Martine; Brosseau, Solenn; Bergot, Emmanuel; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Gounant, Valérie; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Debieuvre, Didier; Molinier, Olivier; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Mazieres, Julien; Quoix, Elisabeth; Pujol, Jean-Louis; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Morin, Franck; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard

    2017-01-17

    DNA repair is a double-edged sword in lung carcinogenesis. When defective, it promotes genetic instability and accumulated genetic alterations. Conversely these defects could sensitize cancer cells to therapeutic agents inducing DNA breaks. We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to assess MSH2, XRCC5, and BRCA1 expression in 443 post-chemotherapy specimens from patients randomized in a Phase 3 trial, comparing two neoadjuvant regimens in 528 Stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (IFCT-0002). O6MGMT promoter gene methylation was analyzed in a subset of 208 patients of the same trial with available snap-frozen specimens. Median follow-up was from 90 months onwards. Only high BRCA1 (n = 221, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.07-2.34], p = 0.02) and low MSH2 expression (n = 356, HR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11-2.08], p = 0.008) significantly predicted better overall survival (OS) in univariate and multivariate analysis. A bootstrap re-sampling strategy distinguished three patient groups at high (n = 55, low BRCA1 and high MSH2, median OS >96 months, HR = 2.5, 95% CI [1.45-4.33], p = 0.001), intermediate (n = 82, median OS = 73.4 p = 0.0596), and low (high BRCA1 and low MSH2, n = 67, median OS = ND, HR = 0.51, 95% CI [0.31-0.83], p = 0.006) risk of death. DNA repair protein expression assessment identified three different groups of risk of death in early-stage lung cancer patients, according to their tumor MSH2 and BRCA1 expression levels. These results deserve prospective evaluation of MSH2/BRCA1 theranostic value in lung cancer patients treated with combinations of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and drugs targeting DNA repair, such as Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  12. Genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 gene in Chilean breast cancer families: an MLPA analysis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Faundez, Paola; Carvallo, Pilar

    2011-08-01

    Point mutations and small deletions and insertions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are responsible of about 20% of hereditary breast cancer cases in Chilean population. Studies in other populations have identified the amplification and/or deletion of one or more exons in these genes as the cause of the disease. In this study the authors determined the presence of these types of alterations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, in 74 Chilean families with breast/ovarian cancer that were negative for germline mutations in these genes. Since these alterations are not detectable using the conventional PCR-based methods, the authors use MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) to detect amplifications and/or deletions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The authors identified two different alterations in BRCA1: exon 10 duplication in one family and amplification of exons 3, 5, and 6 in two families. Duplication of exon 10 contains intronic adjacent sequences suggesting gene duplication. The second rearrangement consist of a 4 times amplification of a fragment containing exons 3, 5, and 6 joined together with no introns, suggesting the presence of a processed pseudogene. No alterations were detected in BRCA2. In order to validate the MLPA results and characterize the genomic alterations the authors performed qPCR, long range PCR, and sequencing.

  13. Analysis of BRCA1 and mtDNA haplotypes and mtDNA polymorphism in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Povedano, Cristina; Salgado, Josefa; Gil, Carmen; Robles, Maitane; Patiño-García, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects have been postulated to play an important role in the modulation and/or progression of cancer. In the past decade, a wide spectrum of mtDNA variations have been suggested as potentially sensitive and specific biomarkers for several human cancer types. In this context, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) described as protective or risk variants have been published, in particular in breast cancer, though not without controversy. Moreover, many mtDNA haplogroups have been associated with different phenotypes and diseases. We genotyped 18 SNPs, 15 of them defining European mtDNA haplogroups, including SNPs described as protective or risk variants, 7 SNPs that determine BRCA1 haplotypes and a BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism. We included in this study 90 Caucasian unrelated women with breast cancer with familial criteria and 96 controls. Our aim was to clarify the importance of any of these SNPs, mitochondrial haplogroups and BRCA1 haplotypes in the modulation of breast cancer. We detected no significant differences in the distribution of BRCA1 haplotypes between patients and controls. Haplogroup U and the 12308G variant of mtDNA were overrepresented within the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.036, respectively) compared to breast cancer. Finally, we identified a significant association between the BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism and BRCA1 haplotypes. Specifically, (TTC)6/6 and (TTC)6/7 genotypes with the seven polymorphic site cassette of "H2-like" haplotypes, and the (TTC)7/7 genotype associated with the "H1-like" haplotypes (p < 0.001).

  14. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  15. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2) were validated by real-time RT-PCR. PMID:20223001

  16. Gain of function mutant p53 proteins cooperate with E2F4 to transcriptionally downregulate RAD17 and BRCA1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Fabio; Ganci, Federica; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Sacconi, Andrea; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni; Di Agostino, Silvia

    2015-03-20

    Genomic instability (IN) is a common feature of many human cancers. The TP53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Here, we show that BRCA1 and RAD17 genes, whose derived proteins play a pivotal role in DNA damage repair, are transcriptional targets of gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins. Indeed, high levels of mutp53 protein facilitate DNA damage accumulation and severely impair BRCA1 and RAD17 expression in proliferating cancer cells. The recruitment of mutp53/E2F4 complex onto specific regions of BRCA1 and RAD17 promoters leads to the inhibition of their expression. BRCA1 and RAD17 mRNA expression is reduced in HNSCC patients carrying TP53 mutations when compared to those bearing wt-p53 gene. Furthermore, the analysis of gene expression databases for breast cancer patients reveals that low expression of DNA repair genes correlates significantly with reduced relapse free survival of patients carrying TP53 gene mutations. Collectively, these findings highlight the direct involvement of transcriptionally active gain of function mutant p53 proteins in genomic instability through the impairment of DNA repair mechanisms.

  17. Genetic variations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in dogs with mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Enginler, S O; Akış, I; Toydemir, T S F; Oztabak, K; Haktanir, D; Gündüz, M C; Kırşan, I; Fırat, I

    2014-03-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumour type in female dogs. The formation of the mammary tumours is multifactorial but the high incidence of tumour disease in certain canine breeds suggests a strong genetic component. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important genes significantly associated with mammary tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the variations of these two genes and canine mammary tumours. 5′-untranslated region, intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and exons 12, 24, 27 of BRCA2 were sequenced in order to detect the genetic variations. In addition to six previously identified polymorphisms, six novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. Five of the coding SNPs were synonymous and three of them were non-synonymous. The comparison of the sequences from 25 mammary tumour bearing and 10 tumour free dogs suggested that the two SNPs in intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and two SNPs in exon 24 and exon 27 of BRCA2, which are firstly identified in this study, might be associated with mammary tumour development in dogs. Especially one SNP in exon 9 of BRCA1 and one SNP in exon 24 of BRCA2 were found to be significantly associated with canine mammary tumours.

  18. Genetic variations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in dogs with mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Enginler, S O; Akış, I; Toydemir, T S F; Oztabak, K; Haktanir, D; Gündüz, M C; Kırşan, I; Fırat, I

    2014-03-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumour type in female dogs. The formation of the mammary tumours is multifactorial but the high incidence of tumour disease in certain canine breeds suggests a strong genetic component. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important genes significantly associated with mammary tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the variations of these two genes and canine mammary tumours. 5'-untranslated region, intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and exons 12, 24, 27 of BRCA2 were sequenced in order to detect the genetic variations. In addition to six previously identified polymorphisms, six novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. Five of the coding SNPs were synonymous and three of them were non-synonymous. The comparison of the sequences from 25 mammary tumour bearing and 10 tumour free dogs suggested that the two SNPs in intron 8 and exon 9 of BRCA1 and two SNPs in exon 24 and exon 27 of BRCA2, which are firstly identified in this study, might be associated with mammary tumour development in dogs. Especially one SNP in exon 9 of BRCA1 and one SNP in exon 24 of BRCA2 were found to be significantly associated with canine mammary tumours.

  19. Levels of DNA Methylation Vary at CpG Sites across the BRCA1 Promoter, and Differ According to Triple Negative and "BRCA-Like" Status, in Both Blood and Tumour DNA.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Sarah L; Burghel, George J; Chambers, Philip; Al-Baba, Shadi; Connley, Daniel D; Brock, Ian W; Cramp, Helen E; Dotsenko, Olena; Wilks, Octavia; Wyld, Lynda; Cross, Simon S; Cox, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer is typically an aggressive and difficult to treat subtype. It is often associated with loss of function of the BRCA1 gene, either through mutation, loss of heterozygosity or methylation. This study aimed to measure methylation of the BRCA1 gene promoter at individual CpG sites in blood, tumour and normal breast tissue, to assess whether levels were correlated between different tissues, and with triple negative receptor status, histopathological scoring for BRCA-like features and BRCA1 protein expression. Blood DNA methylation levels were significantly correlated with tumour methylation at 9 of 11 CpG sites examined (p<0.0007). The levels of tumour DNA methylation were significantly higher in triple negative tumours, and in tumours with high BRCA-like histopathological scores (10 of 11 CpG sites; p<0.01 and p<0.007 respectively). Similar results were observed in blood DNA (6 of 11 CpG sites; p<0.03 and 7 of 11 CpG sites; p<0.02 respectively). This study provides insight into the pattern of CpG methylation across the BRCA1 promoter, and supports previous studies suggesting that tumours with BRCA1 promoter methylation have similar features to those with BRCA1 mutations, and therefore may be suitable for the same targeted therapies.

  20. Large genomic rearrangement of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in familial breast cancer patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ja Young; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Choi, Su-Youn; Shin, Inkyung; Park, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yu, Jong Han; Ko, Beom Seok; Ku, Bo Kyung; Son, Byung Ho

    2014-06-01

    We screened large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Korean, familial breast cancer patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to identify BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in 226 Korean familial breast cancer patients with risk factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, who previously tested negative for point mutations in the two genes. We identified only one large deletion (c.4186-1593_4676-1465del) in BRCA1. No large rearrangements were found in BRCA2. Our result indicates that large genomic rearrangement in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes does not seem like a major determinant of breast cancer susceptibility in the Korean population. A large-scale study needs to validate our result in Korea.

  1. The Contribution of Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations to Familial Ovarian Cancer: No Evidence for Other Ovarian Cancer–Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gayther, Simon A.; Russell, Paul; Harrington, Patricia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    1999-01-01

    Summary To establish the contribution of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations to familial ovarian cancer, we have analyzed both genes in DNA samples obtained from an affected individual in each of 112 families containing at least two cases of epithelial ovarian cancer. Germline mutations were found in 43% of the families; BRCA1 mutations were approximately four times more common than BRCA2 mutations. The extent of family history of ovarian and breast cancers was strongly predictive of BRCA1-mutation status. Segregation analysis suggests that a combination of chance clustering of sporadic cases and insensitivity of mutation detection may account for the remaining families; however, the contribution of other genes cannot be excluded. We discuss the implications for genetic testing and clinical management of familial ovarian cancer arising from the data presented in these studies. PMID:10486320

  2. Alteration of BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of RNA Pol III-dependent genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Yanmei; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2015-02-01

    Emerging evidence has indicated that alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular Pol III gene production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. We have reported that alcohol intake increases Pol III gene transcription to promote cell transformation and tumor formation in vitro and in vivo. Studies revealed that tumor suppressors, pRb, p53, PTEN and Maf1 repress the transcription of Pol III genes. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its mutation is tightly related to breast cancer development. However, it is not clear whether BRCA1 expression affects alcohol-induced transcription of Pol III genes. At the present studies, we report that restoring BRCA1 in HCC 1937 cells, which is a BRCA1 deficient cell line, represses Pol III gene transcription. Expressing mutant or truncated BRCA1 in these cells does not affect the ability of repression on Pol III genes. Our analysis has demonstrated that alcohol induces Pol III gene transcription. More importantly, overexpression of BRCA1 in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer cells (MCF-7) decreases the induction of tRNA(Leu) and 5S rRNA genes by alcohol, whereas reduction of BRCA1 by its siRNA slightly increases the transcription of the class of genes. This suggests that BRCA1 is associated with alcohol-induced deregulation of Pol III genes. These studies for the first time demonstrate the role of BRCA1 in induction of Pol III genes by alcohol and uncover a novel mechanism of alcohol-associated breast cancer.

  3. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J J P; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V O; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Basil, Jack B; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A; Moysich, Kirsten B; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription.

  4. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Barbany Bustinza, Gisela; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J.J.P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Giraud, Sophie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Eisinger, François; Bressac de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Delnatte, Capucine; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alex; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Buys, Saundra; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne-Catharina; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Johannsson, Oskar; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Basil, Jack B.; Blank, Stephanie; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Isaacs, Claudine; Blanco, Ignacio; Gayther, Simon A.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Fiebig, Britta; Caldes, Trinidad; Laframboise, Rachel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA1 gene would modify the risk of breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 mutations. A total of 9874 BRCA1 mutation carriers were available in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) for haplotype analyses of BRCA1. Women carrying the rare allele of single nucleotide polymorphism rs16942 on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 were at decreased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.77–0.95, P = 0.003). Promoter in vitro assays of the major BRCA1 haplotypes showed that common polymorphisms in the regulatory region alter its activity and that this effect may be attributed to the differential binding affinity of nuclear proteins. In conclusion, variants on the wild-type copy of BRCA1 modify risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1 mutations, possibly by altering the efficiency of BRCA1 transcription. PMID:21890493

  5. Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies enhance sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in BRCA1-mutated and PTEN-wild-type triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Bamdad, Mahchid; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Aubel, Corinne

    2017-05-01

    Increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is recognized as a promising therapeutic target, specifically through the use of selective EGFR inhibitors combined with chemotherapies. TNBC is characterized by genetic instability that leads to increased sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. We analyzed the effect of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; cetuximab and panitumumab) in combination with chemotherapeutic agents (docetaxel, cisplatin, and epirubicin) on EGFR-expressing TNBC cell lines that have different mutation statuses for one oncogene (KRAS) and two tumor suppressor genes (PTEN and BRCA1). Both mAbs failed to improve the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapies in the KRAS mutant cell line (MDA-MB-231) and PTEN-null cell lines (HCC-1937 and MDA-MB-468). In contrast, mAbs combined with DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin or epirubicin) had a synergistic effect in the BRCA1-mutant cell line SUM-1315 (wild-type KRAS and PTEN). The reintroduction of wild-type BRCA1 into SUM-1315 cells abolished this synergism. The improved effect of combination therapy was associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and inhibition of the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK1/2 proteins. These results suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated TNBC without genetic alterations in the PTEN and KRAS genes may have improved therapeutic responses to anti-EGFR mAbs combined with DNA-damaging agents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of genetic variations in miRNA-binding sites of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as risk factors for the development of early-onset and/or familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Elif; Cecener, Gulsah; Polatkan, Volkan; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Ak, Secil; Tasdelen, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    Although genetic markers identifying women at an increased risk of developing breast cancer exist, the majority of inherited risk factors remain elusive. Mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene confer a substantial increase in breast cancer risk, yet routine clinical genetic screening is limited to the coding regions and intron- exon boundaries, precluding the identification of mutations in noncoding and untranslated regions. Because 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphisms disrupting microRNA (miRNA) binding can be functional and can act as genetic markers of cancer risk, we aimed to determine genetic variation in the 3'UTR of BRCA1/BRCA2 in familial and early-onset breast cancer patients with and without mutations in the coding regions of BRCA1/ BRCA2 and to identify specific 3'UTR variants that may be risk factors for cancer development. The 3'UTRs of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were screened by heteroduplex analysis and DNA sequencing in 100 patients from 46 BRCA1/2 families, 54 non-BRCA1/2 families, and 47 geographically matched controls. Two polymorphisms were identified. SNPs c.*1287C>T (rs12516) (BRCA1) and c.*105A>C (rs15869) (BRCA2) were identified in 27% and 24% of patients, respectively. These 2 variants were also identified in controls with no family history of cancer (23.4% and 23.4%, respectively). In comparison to variations in the 3'UTR region of the BRCA1/2 genes and the BRCA1/2 mutational status in patients, there was a statistically significant relationship between the BRCA1 gene polymorphism c.*1287C>T (rs12516) and BRCA1 mutations (p=0.035) by Fisher's Exact Test. SNP c.*1287C>T (rs12516) of the BRCA1 gene may have potential use as a genetic marker of an increased risk of developing breast cancer and likely represents a non-coding sequence variation in BRCA1 that impacts BRCA1 function and leads to increased early-onset and/or familial breast cancer risk in the Turkish population.

  7. Estimates of the gene frequency of BRCA1 and its contribution to breast and ovarian cancer incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Peto, J.

    1995-12-01

    The majority of multiple-case families that segregate both breast and ovarian cancer in a dominant fashion are due to mutations in the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q. In this paper, we have combined penetrance estimates for BRCA1 with the results of two population-based genetic epidemiological studies to estimate the gene frequency of BRCA1. On the assumption that the excess risk of ovarian cancer in first degree relatives of breast cancer patients and the breast cancer excess in relatives of ovarian cancer patients are both entirely accounted for by BRCA1, we estimate that the BRCA1 gene frequency is 0.0006 (95% confidence interval [0.0002-0.001]) and that the proportion of breast cancer cases in the general population due to BRCA1 is 5.3% below age 40 years, 2.2% between ages 40 and 49 years, and 1.1% between ages 50 and 70 years. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 5.7%, 4.6%, and 2.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of breast cancer families with less than four cases and no ovarian cancer are not due to rare highly penetrant genes such as BRCA1 but are more likely to be due either to chance or to more common genes of lower penetrance. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Detection of Germline Mutations in Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Using Multi-Gene Panels: Beyond BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Ji Eun; Park, Hyung Seok; Lee, Seung-Tae; Park, Ji Soo; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji

    2017-09-27

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows simultaneous sequencing of multiple cancer susceptibility genes and may represent a more efficient and less expensive approach than sequential testing. We assessed the frequency of germline mutations in individuals with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), using multi-gene panels and NGS. Patients with EOC (n=117) with/without a family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited consecutively, from March 2016 to December 2016. Germline DNA was sequenced using 35-gene NGS panel, in order to identify mutations. Upon the detection of a genetic alteration using the panel, results were cross-validated using direct sequencing. Thirty-eight patients (32.5%) had 39 pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations in eight genes, including BRCA1 (n=21), BRCA2 (n=10), BRIP1 (n=1), CHEK2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=1), POLE (n=1), RAD51C (n=2), and RAD51D (n=2). Among 64 patients with a family history of cancer, 27 (42.2%) had 27 pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations, and six (9.3%) had mutations in genes other than BRCA1/2, such as CHECK2, MSH2, POLE, and RAD51C. Fifty-five patients (47.0%) were identified to carry only variants of uncertain significance. Using the multi-gene panel test, we found that, of all patients included in our study, 32.5% had germline cancer-predisposing mutations. NGS was confirmed to substantially improve the detection rates of a wide spectrum of mutations in EOC patients compared with those obtained with the BRCA1/2 testing alone.

  9. 53BP1 inhibits homologous recombination in Brca1-deficient cells by blocking resection of DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, Samuel F.; Callén, Elsa; Wong, Nancy; Chen, Hua-Tang; Polato, Federica; Gunn, Amanda; Bothmer, Anne; Feldhahn, Niklas; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Cao, Liu; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Finkel, Toren; Nussenzweig, Michel; Stark, Jeremy M.; Nussenzweig, André

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Defective DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) is thought to be a major contributor to tumorigenesis in individuals carrying Brca1 mutations. Here we show that DNA breaks in Brca1-deficient cells are aberrantly joined into complex chromosome rearrangements by a process dependent on the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors, 53BP1 and DNA Ligase 4. Loss of 53BP1 alleviates hypersensitivity of Brca1 mutant cells to PARP inhibition and restores error-free repair by HR. Mechanistically, 53BP1 deletion promotes ATM-dependent processing of broken DNA ends to produce recombinogenic single-stranded DNA competent for HR. In contrast, Lig4 deficiency does not rescue the HR defect in Brca1 mutant cells, but prevents the joining of chromatid breaks into chromosome rearrangements. Our results illustrate that HR and NHEJ compete to process DNA breaks that arise during DNA replication, and that shifting the balance between these pathways can be exploited to selectively protect or kill cells harboring Brca1 mutations. PMID:20362325

  10. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 DAMD17-03-1-0272 Final Report Boyer...characterization of DBC-1 and its role in the regulation of ER expression and survival funcion in breast cancer cells. Dr. Trauernicht authored a manuscript on DBC...is an impor- tant area for future investigation. Tumor Susceptibility Is Tissue-Specific DNA damage response pathways that converge on BRCA-1 and 2

  11. Compensatory functions and interdependency of the DNA-binding domain of BRCA2 with the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex.

    PubMed

    Al Abo, Muthana; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Hirota, Kouji; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Yamazoe, Mitsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 are key players in cellular tolerance to chemotherapeutic agents, including camptothecin, cisplatin, and PARP inhibitor. The N-terminal segment of BRCA2 interacts with PALB2, thus contributing to the formation of the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex. To understand the role played by BRCA2 in this complex, we deleted its N-terminal segment and generated BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells. Although previous studies have suggested that BRCA1-PALB2 plays a role in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites, BRCA2(Δ)(N) mutant cells displayed a considerably milder phenotype than did BRCA2(-/-) null-deficient cells. We hypothesized that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of BRCA2 might compensate for a defect in BRCA2(ΔN) that prevented stable interaction with PALB2. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the DBD of BRCA2 in wild-type and BRCA2(Δ)(N) cells. Remarkably, although the resulting BRCA2(Δ)(DBD) cells displayed a moderate phenotype, the BRCA2(Δ)(N+ΔDBD) cells displayed a very severe phenotype, as did the BRCA2(-/-) cells, suggesting that the N-terminal segment and the DBD play a substantially overlapping role in the functionality of BRCA2. We also showed that the formation of both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD is required for efficient recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. Our study revealed the essential role played by both the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex and the DBD in the functionality of BRCA2, as each can compensate for the other in the recruitment of BRCA2 to DNA-damage sites. This knowledge adds to our ability to accurately predict the efficacy of antimalignant therapies for patients carrying mutations in the BRCA2 gene.

  12. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  13. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-02-04

    BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR.

  14. Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in Central and South American populations.

    PubMed

    Jara, Lilian; Morales, Sebastian; de Mayo, Tomas; Gonzalez-Hormazabal, Patricio; Carrasco, Valentina; Godoy, Raul

    2017-10-06

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. A major advance in the understanding of the genetic etiology of BC was the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) genes, which are considered high-penetrance BC genes. In non-carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, disease susceptibility may be explained of a small number of mutations in BRCA1/2 and a much higher proportion of mutations in ethnicity-specific moderate- and/or low-penetrance genes. In Central and South American populations, studied have focused on analyzing the distribution and prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations and other susceptibility genes that are scarce in Latin America as compared to North America, Europe, Australia, and Israel. Thus, the aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge regarding pathogenic BRCA variants and other BC susceptibility genes. We conducted a comprehensive review of 47 studies from 12 countries in Central and South America published between 2002 and 2017 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of mutations and pathogenic variants in BRCA1/2 and other BC susceptibility genes. The studies on BRCA1/2 mutations screened a total of 5956 individuals, and studies on susceptibility genes analyzed a combined sample size of 11,578 individuals. To date, a total of 190 different BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations in Central and South American populations have been reported in the literature. Pathogenic mutations or variants that increase BC risk have been reported in the following genes or genomic regions: ATM, BARD1, CHECK2, FGFR2, GSTM1, MAP3K1, MTHFR, PALB2, RAD51, TOX3, TP53, XRCC1, and 2q35.

  15. Expression profile of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in premenopausal Mexican women with breast cancer: clinical and immunohistochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Loredo-Pozos, Gloria; Chiquete, Erwin; Oceguera-Villanueva, Antonio; Panduro, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E

    2009-01-01

    Low BRCA1 gene expression is associated with increased invasiveness and influences the response of breast carcinoma (BC) to chemotherapeutics. However, expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes has not been completely characterized in premenopausal BC. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical correlates of BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression in young BC women. We studied 62 women (mean age 38.8 years) who developed BC before the age of 45 years. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and that of HER-2 and p53 proteins by immunohistochemistry. Body mass index (BMI) > or = 27 (52%) and a declared family history of BC (26%) were the main risk factors. Ductal infiltrative adenocarcinoma was found in 86% of the cases (tumor size >5 cm in 48%). Disease stages I-IV occurred in 2, 40, 55, and 3%, respectively (73% implicating lymph nodes). Women aged < or = 35 years (24%) had more family history of cervical cancer, stage III/IV disease, HER-2 positivity, and lower BRCA1 expression than older women (P < 0.05). BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression correlated in healthy, but not in tumor tissues (TT). Neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2 expression was associated with tumor histology, differentiation, nodal metastasis or p53 and HER-2 expression. After multivariate analysis, only disease stage explained BRCA1 mRNA levels in the lowest quartile. Premenopausal BC has aggressive clinical and molecular characteristics. Low BRCA1 mRNA expression is associated mainly with younger ages and advanced clinical stage of premenopausal BC. BRCA2 expression is not associated with disease severity in young BC women.

  16. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive ageing to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I.; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K.; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy E.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franke, Lude L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Keller, Margaux F.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Goncalo; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M.; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chapman, J. Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Eicher, John D.; Fasching, Peter A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Girotto, Giorgia G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank B.; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E.; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian’an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Ben M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Olson, Janet E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Pirastu, Nicola N.; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Scott, Robert A.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T.; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B.H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Gasparini, Paolo P.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Price, Alkes L.; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A.; Ong, Ken K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R.B.; Murray, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ~70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two harbouring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in/near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses revealed a major association with DNA damage-response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomisation analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (~6% risk increase per-year, P=3×10−14), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure, rather than DDR mechanisms. PMID:26414677

  17. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Day, Felix R; Ruth, Katherine S; Thompson, Deborah J; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D; Elks, Cathy E; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A; Franke, Lude L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Keller, Margaux F; McArdle, Patrick F; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Smith, Jennifer A; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chapman, J Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M; Eicher, John D; Fasching, Peter A; Faul, Jessica D; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Girotto, Giorgia G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian'an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Benjamin M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Olson, Janet E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pirastu, Nicola N; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Scott, Robert A; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B H R; Wright, Alan F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Gasparini, Paolo P; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C; Reiner, Alex P; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Price, Alkes L; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A; Ong, Ken K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M; Perry, John R B; Murray, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms.

  18. Detoxification: A Novel Function of BRCA1 in Tumor Suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Hong, Young Bin; Kim, Hee Jeong; Rodriguez, Olga C.; Nath, Raghu G.; Tilli, Elena M.; Albanese, Christopher; Chung, Fung-Lung; Kwon, Sang Hoon; Bae, Insoo

    2011-01-01

    Our studies found that BRCA1 levels negatively correlate with DNA adducts induced by Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Pulse-chase experiments showed that the increase in BaP-induced DNA adducts in BRCA1 knockdown cells may not be associated with BRCA1’s function in nucleotide excision repair activity; rather, it may be associated with its function in modulating transcriptional regulation. BRCA1 knockdown in MCF-10A cells significantly attenuated the induction of CYP1A1 following BaP treatment indicating that the increase in BaP-induced adducts in BRCA1 knockdown cells is not CYP1A1 dependent. However, our study shows that BRCA1 defective cells may still be able to biotransform BaP by regulating other CYP enzymes, including CYP1B1. Knockdown of BRCA1 also severely affected the expression levels of two types of uridine diphosphate glucorunyltransferase (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9) and NRF2. Both UGTs are known as BaP-specific detoxification enzymes, and NRF2 is a master regulator of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Thus, we concluded that the increased amount of BaP-induced DNA adducts in BRCA1 knockdown cells is strongly associated with its loss of functional detoxification. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that BRCA1 is recruited to the promoter/enhancer sequences of UGT1A1, UGT1A9, and NRF2. Regulation of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9 expression showed that the induction of DNA adducts by BaP is directly affected by their expression levels. Finally, overexpression of UGTs, NRF2, or ARNT significantly decreased the amount of BaP-induced adducts in BRCA1-deficient cells. Overall, our results suggest that BRCA1 protects cells by reducing the amount of BaP-induced DNA adducts possibly via transcriptional activation of detoxification gene expression. PMID:21507987

  19. BRCA1-like signature in triple negative breast cancer: Molecular and clinical characterization reveals subgroups with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Severson, Tesa M; Peeters, Justine; Majewski, Ian; Michaut, Magali; Bosma, Astrid; Schouten, Philip C; Chin, Suet-Feung; Pereira, Bernard; Goldgraben, Mae A; Bismeijer, Tycho; Kluin, Roelof J C; Muris, Jettie J F; Jirström, Karin; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Wessels, Lodewyk; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, René; Simon, Iris M; Linn, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Triple negative (TN) breast cancers make up some 15% of all breast cancers. Approximately 10-15% are mutant for the tumor suppressor, BRCA1. BRCA1 is required for homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair and deficiency results in genomic instability. BRCA1-mutated tumors have a specific pattern of genomic copy number aberrations that can be used to classify tumors as BRCA1-like or non-BRCA1-like. BRCA1 mutation, promoter methylation, BRCA1-like status and genome-wide expression data was determined for 112 TN breast cancer samples with long-term follow-up. Mutation status for 21 known DNA repair genes and PIK3CA was assessed. Gene expression and mutation frequency in BRCA1-like and non-BRCA1-like tumors were compared. Multivariate survival analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. BRCA1 germline mutation was identified in 10% of patients and 15% of tumors were BRCA1 promoter methylated. Fifty-five percent of tumors classified as BRCA1-like. The functions of genes significantly up-regulated in BRCA1-like tumors included cell cycle and DNA recombination and repair. TP53 was found to be frequently mutated in BRCA1-like (P < 0.05), while PIK3CA was frequently mutated in non-BRCA1-like tumors (P < 0.05). A significant association with worse prognosis was evident for patients with BRCA1-like tumors (adjusted HR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.30-8.48, P = 0.01). TN tumors can be further divided into two major subgroups, BRCA1-like and non-BRCA1-like with different mutation and expression patterns and prognoses. Based on these molecular patterns, subgroups may be more sensitive to specific targeted agents such as PI3K or PARP inhibitors.

  20. Lack of correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.S.; Giraldez, R.A.; Flom, K.

    1994-09-01

    We examined 4{mu}m paraffin-embedded tissue sections from twenty female breast tumors for the presence of HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification. The study population consisted of ten BRCA1 carriers and ten non-BRCA1 carriers. Carrier status was assessed through linkage analysis. Detection of HER-2/neu gene amplification was performed blinded with respect to BRCA1 status. Forty cells representing at least two different areas of each tumor were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a HER-2/neu cosmid probe. We did not find any cases which showed the typical HER-2/neu gene amplification profile (homogeneous distribution of cells with > 4 signals per cell). In half of the cases, small foci that appeared amplified were identified as clusters of cells with > 4 signals. Modifying our analysis to compensate for this, cases were considered to be amplified if nine or more cells out of forty contained over four HER-2/neu signals. For the 10 BRCA1 carrier positive samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Similarly, of the 10 BRCA1 carrier negative samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Therefore, we found no statistical correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and amplification of the HER-2/neu gene in the tumors studied.

  1. Upregulation of the BRCA1 gene in human germ cells and in preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Giscard d'Estaing, Sandrine; Perrin, Delphine; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Guérin, Jean François; Dante, Robert

    2005-09-01

    The quantification of BRCA1 messenger RNA molecules by a quantitative competitive one-step reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method indicates that BRCA1 is upregulated both in human male and female germ cells and in preimplantation embryos. Because BRCA1 is involved in several pathways that participate in preserving intact chromosome and genome integrity, these data suggest that BRCA1 dysfunction might alter human embryogenesis or fertility.

  2. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in breast cancer families: Are there more breast cancer-susceptibility genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Serova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Putet, N.

    1997-03-01

    To estimate the proportion of breast cancer families due to BRCA1 or BRCA2, we performed mutation screening of the entire coding regions of both genes supplemented with linkage analysis of 31 families, 8 containing male breast cancers and 23 site-specific female breast cancer. A combination of protein-truncation test and SSCP or heteroduplex analyses was used for mutation screening complemented, where possible, by the analysis of expression level of BRCA1 and BRCA2 alleles. Six of the eight families with male breast cancer revealed frameshift mutations, two in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. Although most families with female site-specific breast cancers were thought to be due to mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2, we identified only eight mutations in our series of 23 site-specific female breast cancer families (34%), four in BRCA1 and four in BRCA2. According to the posterior probabilities calculated for mutation-negative families, based on linkage data and mutation screening results, we would expect 8-10 site-specific female breast cancer families of our series to be due to neither BRCA1 nor BRCA2. Thus, our results suggest the existence of at least one more major breast cancer-susceptibility gene. 24 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. [Evaluation of stomatognathic system in BRCA1 gene mutation carriers before and after prophylactic adnexectomy--part II: evaluation of stomatognathic system in BRCA1 gene mutation carriers after prophylactic adnexectomy].

    PubMed

    Chruściel-Nogalska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Prophylactic adnexectomy is widely used for cancer risk reduction in women with BRCA1 gene mutations. Adnexectomy significantly reduces ovarian/ salpinx/peritoneum cancer risk to 5% and breast cancer risk to 30-40%. The aim of the study was evaluation of influence of prophylactic adnexectomy in BRCAI gene female mutation carriers on stomatognathic system. Thirty BRCA1 gene female mutation carriers aged 43-56 years, patients of the Hereditary Cancer Center in Szczecin, one year after prophylactic adnexectomy have been studied. The control group consisted the same patients, but had been studied before adnexectomy. Females with BRCA1 gene mutations have not received any hormone replacement therapy since the adnexectomy. They were divided into 2 subgroups: Y--women before menopause and Z--women aftermenopause. The complete dental exam was performed in all patients. Additionally, panoramic radiograms were performed. Patients after prophylactic oophorectomy revealed higher rates of periodontal pockets 4-5 mm deep and increase of complaints such as: gingival bleeding following brushing, oral dryness and burning. In conclusion, especially premenopausal women with BRCA1 gene mutations after surgical menopause should use short-term hormone replacement therapy to alleviate oral discomfort. Short-term hormone replacement therapy use does not negate the protective effect of prophylactic adnexectomy on breast cancer risk reduction in BRCA1 gene mutation carriers.

  4. Multicolor FISH mapping with Alu-PCR-amplified YAC clone DNA determines the order of markers in the BRCA1 region on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.J.; Glover, T.W.; Barcroft, C.L.; Guo, Sun Wei; Boehnke, M.; Chandrasekharappa, S.; Collins, F.S. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI ); Lynch, E.D. ); Hayes, S. ); Weber, B.L. )

    1993-09-01

    A gene designated BRCA1, implicated in the susceptibility to early-onset familial breast cancer, has recently been localized to chromosome 17q12-q21. To date, the order of DNA markers mapped within this region has been based on genetic linkage analysis. The authors report the use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish a physically based map of five polymorphic DNA markers and 10 cloned genes spanning this region. Three cosmid clones and Alu-PCR-Generated products derived from 12 yeast artificial chromosome clones representing each of these markers were used in two-color mapping experiments to determine an initial proximity of markers relative to each other on metaphase chromosomes. Interphase mapping was then employed to determine the order and orientation of closely spaced loci by direct visualization of fluorescent signals following hybridization of three probes, each detected in a different color. Statistical analysis of the combined data suggests that the order of markers in the BRCA1 regions is cen-THRA1-TOP2-GAS-OF2-17HSD-248yg9-RNU2-OF3-PPY/p131-EPB3-Mfd188-WNT3-HOX2-GP3A-tel. This map is consistent with that determined by radiation-reduced hybrid mapping and will facilitate positional cloning strategies in efforts to isolate and characterize the BRCA1 gene. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Intrinsic LINE-1 Hypomethylation and Decreased Brca1 Expression are Associated with DNA Repair Delay in Irradiated Thyroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Penha, Ricardo Cortez Cardoso; Lima, Sheila Coelho Soares; Boroni, Mariana; Ramalho-Oliveira, Renata; Viola, João P; de Carvalho, Denise Pires; Fusco, Alfredo; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation greatly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), especially during childhood, mainly due to gradual inactivation of DNA repair genes and DNA damages. Recent molecular characterization of PTC revealed DNA methylation deregulation of several promoters of DNA repair genes. Thus, epigenetic silencing might be a plausible mechanism for the activity loss of tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Herein, we investigated the impact of ionizing radiation on global methylation and CpG islands within promoter regions of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) genes, as well as its effects on gene expression, using two well-established normal differentiated thyroid cell lines (FRTL5 and PCCL3). Our data reveal that X-ray exposure promoted G2/M arrest in normal thyroid cell lines. The FRTL5 cells displayed a slower kinetics of double-strand breaks (DSB) repair and a lower long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) methylation than the PCCL3 cells. Nevertheless, acute X-ray exposure does not alter the expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ pathways, apart from the downregulation of Brca1 in thyroid cells. On the other hand, HR and NHEJ gene expressions were upregulated in radiation-induced senescent thyroid cells. Taken together, these data suggest that FRTL5 cells intrinsically have less efficient DNA DSB repair machinery than PCCL3 cells, as well as genomic instability, which could predispose the FRTL5 cells to unrepaired DSB lesions and, therefore, gene mutations.

  6. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  7. Limited significance of family history for presence of BRCA1 gene mutation in Polish breast and ovarian cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Izabela; Ratajska, Magdalena; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Dabrowska, Michalina; Nowakowska, Dorota; Niwinska, Anna; Rachtan, Jadwiga; Steffen, Jan; Limon, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    It is estimated that about 5-10% of ovarian and 2-5% of all breast cancer patients are carriers of a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. Most families with detected BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation are qualified for molecular testing on the basis of family history of breast or ovarian cancers. The purpose of our study was to establish the frequency of positive family history of cancer in a series of Polish consecutive breast and ovarian cancer patients in two groups, with and without the BRCA1 gene mutations. We analysed the prevalence of four of the most common BRCA1 mutations: 5382insC (c.5266dupC), 300T>G (p.181T>G), 185delAG (c.68_69delAG) and 3819del5 (c.3700_3704del5). The patient group consisted of 1,845 consecutive female breast and 363 ovarian cancer cases. 19 out of 37 (51%) of BRCA1-positive ovarian cancer patients and 21 out of 55 (39%) BRCA1-positive breast cancer had negative family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer among first- and second-degree relatives. In ovarian cancer patients, negative family history was more frequent in those with 300T>G BRCA1 gene mutation than in 5382insC carriers. This finding indicates the necessity of searching for 300T>G mutation in families with a single diagnosis of ovarian cancer in family. The high frequency of mutations detected in breast cancer patients lacking obvious family history shows that breast cancer patients should be qualified for genetic testing on the basis of wide clinical and pathological criteria.

  8. [Evaluation of stomatognathic system in BRCA1 gene mutation carriers before and after prophylactic adnexectomy--part I: evaluation of stomatognathic system in youth BRCA1 gene mutation carriers].

    PubMed

    Chruściel-Nogalska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Identification of abnormalities of stomatognathic organ can be useful in diagnostics of genetic disorders including genetic syndromes with predisposition to malignancy. Until now, no studies have been performed in order to find whether BRCA1 gene mutation might correlate with stomatognathic abnormalities. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether any characteristic changes within masticatory system may be found in healthy BRCA1 gene mutation carriers. Thirty BRCA1 gene female mutation carriers aged 21-39 years, citizens of Szczecin, have been studied. The studied women were healthy patients of the Hereditary Cancer Center, Szczecin, Poland, who never underwent any chemoprevention or prophylactic adnexectomy. The control group constituted 60 healthy, age-matched, randomly selected females from general practitioner offices of the Szczecin Shipyard Outpatient Department "Porta Medyk Sp. z o.o.". The complete dental exam was performed in all studied women. Additionally, panoramic radiograms were performed. The significant differences between studied and control groups have been found in the frequency of malocclusion and in the status of periodontium. Significantly more sextants with periodontal pockets 4-5 mm deep were found in the group of patients with mutation than in the control group. The incidence of moderate and severe malocclusion was more than twofold lower in the BRCA1 group when compared with the control group. It supports conclusion that incidence of moderate and severe malocclusion is at least not increased among BRCA1 carriers. For the rest of the studied parameters significant differences between studied and control groups were not found.

  9. DNA-testing for BRCA1/2 prior to genetic counselling in patients with breast cancer: design of an intervention study, DNA-direct.

    PubMed

    Sie, Aisha S; Spruijt, Liesbeth; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2012-05-08

    Current practice for patients with breast cancer referred for genetic counseling, includes face-to-face consultations with a genetic counselor prior to and following DNA-testing. This is based on guidelines regarding Huntington's disease in anticipation of high psychosocial impact of DNA-testing for mutations in BRCA1/2 genes. The initial consultation covers generic information regarding hereditary breast cancer and the (im)possibilities of DNA-testing, prior to such testing. Patients with breast cancer may see this information as irrelevant or unnecessary because individual genetic advice depends on DNA-test results. Also, verbal information is not always remembered well by patients. A different format for this information prior to DNA-testing is possible: replacing initial face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake procedure) by telephone, written and digital information sent to patients' homes (DNA-direct procedure). In this intervention study, 150 patients with breast cancer referred to the department of Clinical Genetics of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre are given the choice between two procedures, DNA-direct (intervention group) or DNA-intake (usual care, control group). During a triage telephone call, patients are excluded if they have problems with Dutch text, family communication, or of psychological or psychiatric nature. Primary outcome measures are satisfaction and psychological distress. Secondary outcome measures are determinants for the participant's choice of procedure, waiting and processing times, and family characteristics. Data are collected by self-report questionnaires at baseline and following completion of genetic counseling. A minority of participants will receive an invitation for a 30 min semi-structured telephone interview, e.g. confirmed carriers of a BRCA1/2 mutation, and those who report problems with the procedure. This study compares current practice of an intake consultation (DNA-intake) to a home informational

  10. Repair versus Checkpoint Functions of BRCA1 Are Differentially Regulated by Site of Chromatin Binding.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    The product of the Brca1 tumor-suppressor gene is involved in multiple aspects of the cellular DNA damage response (DDR), including activation of cell-cycle arrests and DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Prior reports demonstrated that BRCA1 recruitment to areas of DNA breakage depended on RAP80 and the RNF8/RNF168 E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we extend these findings by showing that RAP80 is only required for the binding of BRCA1 to regions flanking the DSB, whereas BRCA1 binding directly to DNA breaks requires Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1). These differential recruitment mechanisms differentially affect BRCA1 functions: (i) RAP80-dependent recruitment of BRCA1 to chromatin flanking DNA breaks is required for BRCA1 phosphorylation at serine 1387 and 1423 by ATM and, consequently, for the activation of S and G(2) checkpoints; and (ii) BRCA1 interaction with NBS1 upon DSB induction results in an NBS1-dependent recruitment of BRCA1 directly to the DNA break and is required for nonhomologous end-joining repair. Together, these findings illustrate that spatially distinct fractions of BRCA1 exist at the DSB site, which are recruited by different mechanisms and execute different functions in the DDR.

  11. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers. PMID:24704793

  12. Isolation of Genomic Targets for the Suspected DNA-Binding Protein BRCA1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    2116. 7. Scully R, Ganesan S, Brown M, De Caprio JA, Cannistra SA, Feunteun J, Schnitt S & Livingston DM (1996). Location of BRCA1 in human breast and... DI (1996). BRCA1 protein products: antibody specificity. Nature Genet 13: 264-265. 15. Taylor RM, Wickstead B, Cronin S & Caldecott KW (1998). Role...Gould AP, Brookman JJ, Strutt DI & White RAH (1990). Targets of homeotic control in Drosophila. Nature 348: 308-312. 29. Hurlin PJ, Ayer DE

  13. BRCA1 gene variant p.P142H associated with male breast cancer: a two-generation genealogic study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Claudio; Strambi, Silvia; Piccini, Lorenzo; Rossi, Leonardo; Aretini, Paolo; Caligo, Adelaide

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer occurs rarely in male patient. BRCA1 gene mutation seems to be related to male breast cancer, but its role is not clearly defined. We have identified in a male patient affected by breast cancer the BRCA1 gene variant p.P142H. We performed a literature research using the keywords "male breast cancer", "male breast cancer mutations" and "BRCA" and we reviewed the cases. We found ew other studies regarding BRCA1 variant p.P142H, about female subjects. At the moment, BRCA1 gene variant p.P142H is not certainly classified as neutral or deleterious. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 and PALB2 mutation gene has been performed on our patient. Segregation analysis for this p.P142H BRCA1 variant has been extended to the second generation of the family. Genetic tests revealed a clear inheritance regarding the BRCA1 gene p. P142H variant. Of the eight patients with this specific genetic mutation, four presented breast cancer (bilateral in one case), two female and two male. None of the subjects in the family without the BRCA1 gene variant p. P142H presented breast cancer or other BRCA1 gene mutation-related cancers. Our analysis suggests that the BRCA1 gene variant p.P142H mutation is related with male breast cancer. Starting from these data, it can be inferred that more studies on MBC and its relation with the BRCA1 gene mutation P142H variant must be undertaken to improve prognostic and therapeutic strategies.

  14. BRCA1 deficient embryonic stem cells display a decreased homologous recombination frequency and an increased frequency of non-homologous recombination that is corrected by expression of a brca1 transgene.

    PubMed

    Snouwaert, J N; Gowen, L C; Latour, A M; Mohn, A R; Xiao, A; DiBiase, L; Koller, B H

    1999-12-20

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that has been classified as a tumor suppressor based on the fact that women carrying a mutated copy of the BRCA1 gene are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The association of BRCA1 with RAD51 has led to the hypothesis that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. We describe here the generation and analysis of murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines in which both copies of the murine homologue of the human BRCA1 gene have been disrupted by gene targeting. We show that exogenous DNA introduced into these BRCA1 deficient cells by electroporation is randomly integrated into the genome at a significantly higher rate than in wild type ES cells. In contrast, integration of exogenous DNA by homologous recombination occurs in BRCA1 deficient cells at a significantly lower rate than in wild type controls. When BRCA1 expression is re-established at 5-10% of normal levels by introduction of a Brca1 transgene into BRCA1 deficient ES cells, the frequency of random integration is reduced to wild type levels, although the frequency of homologous recombination is not significantly improved. These results suggest that BRCA1 plays a role in determining the response of cells to double stranded DNA breaks.

  15. BRCA1 as target for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Romagnolo, Alberto P G; Romagnolo, Donato F; Selmin, Ornella I

    2015-01-01

    The Breast Cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor involved in basic cellular functions necessary for cell replication and DNA synthesis, but reduced expression of BRCA1, due to mutations or epigenetic inactivation, leads to impaired mammary gland differentiation and increased risk of breast cancer development. Although BRCA1 acts as a tumor suppressor and is present in all cells, where it is essential for the maintenance of the genome integrity, it is still not clear why mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to breast and ovarian, but not to other types of cancer. In the first part of this review, we briefly discuss the function and regulation of the BRCA1 protein, including its role associated with familial and sporadic breast cancer. The second part is an overview of the therapeutic compounds used for breast cancer treatment targeting BRCA1, and the natural food components that hold potential preventive effect against those types of breast cancer in which BRCA1 expression is either reduced or lacking. Further studies elucidating the interactions between dietary compounds and cellular pathways, involved in regulation of BRCA1expression, are necessary for the development of strategies that may successfully prevent or treat breast cancer.

  16. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the p53 pathway genes modify cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers of Jewish-Ashkenazi descent.

    PubMed

    Yarden, Ronit I; Friedman, Eitan; Metsuyanim, Sally; Olender, Tzvia; Ben-Asher, Edna; Papa, Moshe Z

    2010-06-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with a significantly increased lifetime risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer. However, incomplete penetrance and substantial variability in age of disease onset among carriers of the same mutation suggests the involvement of additional modifier genes and/or environmental factors. Somatic inactivating mutations in the p53 gene and genes of the p53 pathway often accompany BRCA1/2-associated tumors. Therefore, we assessed whether these genes are modifiers of penetrance. We genotyped Jewish-Ashkenazi women for functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the AKT1 (C>T rs3730358) and the PERP (C>T rs2484067) genes that affect p53-mediated apoptosis, as well as two tag-SNPs in the CHEK2 (C>T rs743184) and the ZBRK1/ZNF350 (G>A rs2278414) genes that encode for proteins involved in growth arrest following DNA damage. The study population included 138 healthy women, 148 breast/ovarian cancer BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, 121 asymptomatic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and 210 sporadic noncarrier breast cancer patients. Utilizing lambda(2) and Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a hazard ratio (HR) of 3.23 (95% CI: 1.44-54, P = 0.0184) for the TT genotype of AKT (rs3730358), HR = 2.105 (95% CI: 1.049-7.434, P = 0.039) for CHEK2 CC genotype (rs743184), and HR = 2.4743 (95% CI: 1.205-11.53, P = 0.022) for the AG genotype of ZBRK1/ZNF350 (rs2278414). No significant association between PERP variants and cancer was identified HR = 0.662 (95% CI: 0.289-1.324, P = 0.261). Our results suggest that genes that act upstream of p53, or participate in the DNA damage response, may modify the risk of cancer in women with mutant BRCA1/2 alleles.

  17. Relationship between Caffeine and Levels of DNA Repair and Oxidative Stress in Women with and without a BRCA1 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Dina; Chen, Zhou; Vallis, Katherine; Poll, Aletta; Ainsworth, Peter; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk among women with a BRCA1 mutation. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether major contributors of caffeine intake are associated with a reduction in DNA damage and/or oxidative stress in women with and without a BRCA1 mutation. Coffee, tea, soda and total caffeine consumption was collected by a dietary history questionnaire, and DNA repair capacity in lymphocytes was assessed by the comet assay (tail moments), micronucleus test (per 1,000 binucleated cells) and analysis of γ-H2AX staining (nuclear foci). The thiobarbituric acid-malondialdehyde and DTNB assays were used to estimate serum lipid peroxidation (µmol/l) and protein oxidation (µmol/l), respectively. Among all women, high levels of caffeine and caffeinated coffee intake were associated with significantly lower levels of micronuclei (138.50 vs. 97.67, p = 0.04, and 138.12 vs. 97.70, p = 0.04). There was no significant relationship between caffeine, coffee, tea and soda intake and the other markers of DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress among all women and in analyses stratified by BRCA1 mutation status. The chemopreventive effects of coffee and/or caffeine may be associated with improved capacity to efficiently repair DNA damage. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Frequency of 5382insC mutation of BRCA1 gene among breast cancer patients: an experience from Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Bhattacharyya, Deboshree; Bose, Chinmoy Kr; Choudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the number one cancer in females pushing the cervical cancer to the second position. The mutations in two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are frequently associated with familial breast cancer. The main objective of the study was to determine the frequency of the mutation 5382insC in BRCA1 of eastern Indian breast cancer patients and also study the hormonal receptor status and histopathology of the patients. Altogether 92 patients affected with breast cancer were included in this study. ARMS-PCR based amplification was used to detect the presence of mutation. The mutations were considered only after pedigree analysis. Out of 92 patients (age range: 20-77 years) with family history (57 individuals) and without family history (35 individuals) were screened. Fifty controls have been systematically investigated. Seven patients and two family members were found to be carriers of 5382insC mutation in BRCA1 gene. We have found 42.64 % ER(-)/PR(-) cancer and 20.58 % triple negative cancer. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common histology among the investigated individuals. The presented data confirm a noticeable contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in BC development in Eastern India, which may justify an extended BRCA1 5382insC testing within this patient population. We found HER-2/neu negativity and BRCA1 positivity associated with familial breast cancer. From the hospital's patient history, it was revealed that the age of menarche plays an important role in development of breast cancer.

  19. Molecular analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer Spanish families

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, A; Barroso, A; Martínez, B; Cebrián, A; Román, J M San; Lobo, F; Robledo, M; Benítez, J

    2000-01-01

    It is estimated that about 5–10% of breast cancer cases may be due to inherited predisposition. Until now, two main susceptibility genes have been identified: BRCA1 and BRCA2. The first linkage and mutational studies suggested that mutations in these two genes would account for the majority of high-risk breast cancer families, but recent studies show how the proportion of families due to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations strongly depends on the population and the types of family analyzed. It is now clear that, in the context of families with a modest cancer profile, which are the most commonly found in the clinical practice, the percentage of mutations found is much lower than that suggested by the first studies. In the present study, we analyze a group of 32 Spanish families, which contatined at least three cases of female breast cancer (at least one of them diagnosed before the age of 50 years), for the presence of mutations in the BRCA genes. The total proportion of mutations was low (25%), although the percentage of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was higher, considering the breast and ovarian cancer families and the male breast cancer families respectively. Our results are in agreement with the idea that a great proportion of moderate-risk cancer families could be due to low penetrance susceptibility genes distinct from BRCA1 or BRCA2. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755399

  20. BRCA1 affects lipid synthesis through its interaction with acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Karen; Dizin, Eva; Ray, Hind; Luquain, Céline; Lefai, Etienne; Foufelle, Fabienne; Billaud, Marc; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Venezia, Nicole Dalla

    2006-02-10

    Germ line alterations in BRCA1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 1) are associated with an increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1 acts as a scaffold protein implicated in multiple cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA repair, and ubiquitination. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumorigenesis are not yet fully understood. We have recently demonstrated that BRCA1 interacts in vivo with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA) through its tandem of BRCA1 C terminus (BRCT) domains. To understand the biological function of the BRCA1.ACCA complex, we sought to determine whether BRCA1 is a regulator of lipogenesis through its interaction with ACCA. We showed here that RNA inhibition-mediated down-regulation of BRCA1 expression induced a marked increase in the fatty acid synthesis. We then delineated the biochemical characteristics of the complex and found that BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated and inactive form of ACCA (P-ACCA). Finally, we demonstrated that BRCA1 affects lipid synthesis by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. These results suggest that BRCA1 affects lipogenesis through binding to P-ACCA, providing a new mechanism by which BRCA1 may exert a tumor suppressor function.

  1. Characterisation of unclassified variants in the BRCA1/2 genes with a putative effect on splicing.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Rita Dias; van Roozendaal, Kees; Tserpelis, Demis; Gómez García, Encarna; Blok, Marinus J

    2011-10-01

    A subset of the unclassified variants (UVs) identified during genetic screening of BRCA1/2 genes may affect splicing. We assessed at RNA level the effect of four BRCA1 and ten BRCA2 UVs with a putative splice effect, as predicted in silico. The variants selected for this study were beyond the positions -1, -2 or +1, +2 from the exon, and were not previously described (n = 8) or their effect on splicing was not assessed previously (n = 6). Lymphocytes from UV carriers and healthy controls were cultured and treated with puromycin to prevent nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The relative contribution of each allele to the various transcripts was assessed using combinations of allele-specific and transcript-specific primers. BRCA2 c.425G>T, c.7976+3_7976+4del and c.8754+3G>C give rise to aberrant transcripts BRCA2Δ4, BRCA2Δ17 and retention of 46nt of intron 21, respectively, and were considered pathogenic. BRCA1 c.4987-3C>G gives rise to BRCA1Δ17 that is likely pathogenic; however, residual expression of the full-length transcript from the variant allele could not be excluded. BRCA1 c.692C>T, c.693G>A and BRCA2 c.6935A>T, besides expressing the full-length transcript, increased expression of BRCA1Δ11 and BRCA2Δ12, respectively. As these are naturally occurring isoforms, also observed in controls, the clinical relevance is unclear. The seven remaining UVs did not affect splicing and three intronic variants were therefore classified as neutral. In conclusion, the RNA analysis results clarified the clinical relevance of 6 of the 14 studied UVs and thereby greatly improve the genetic counselling of high-risk breast/ovarian cancer patients carrying these classified variants.

  2. Methylation of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) predicts recurrence in patients with curatively resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Nakano, Kikuo; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Ohdan, Hideki; Okada, Morihito

    2013-02-15

    Even after early detection and curative resection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a significant fraction of patients develop recurrent disease. Molecular biomarkers that can predict the risk of recurrence thus need to be identified to improve clinical outcomes. Using the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, promoter methylation of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) was assessed in cancer tissues from 70 patients with curatively resected stage I NSCLC. The clinical relevance of BRCA1 methylation status was evaluated in terms of outcome of the disease. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter was detected in 13 of 70 patients (18.6%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that BRCA1 methylation was an independent risk factor for recurrence (P = .0197) and that patients with BRCA1 methylation demonstrated significantly poorer recurrence-free survival compared to those without (P = .0139). Cox's proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that BRCA1 methylation was an independent risk factor for recurrence-free survival (P = .0155). Methylated BRCA1 can be a potential biomarker that predicts the prognosis after curative resection of stage I NSCLC. Considering that BRCA1 plays a role in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, it is plausible that identification of methylated BRCA1 could provide information that is clinically relevant to tailored adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  3. High Resolution Melting Analysis is Very Useful to Identify Breast Cancer Type 1 Susceptibility Protein (BRCA1) c.4964_4982del19 (rs80359876) Founder Calabrian Pathogenic Variant on Peripheral Blood and Buccal Swab DNA.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; De Bonis, Maria; De Paolis, Elisa; Gentile, Leonarda; Santonocito, Concetta; Concolino, Paola; Mignone, Flavio; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2017-04-01

    Detection of pathogenic variants in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer-related breast cancer type 1 and type 2 susceptibility proteins (BRCA1/2) genes is an effective strategy in cancer prevention and treatment. Some ethnic and geographical regions show different BRCA1/2 mutation spectrum and prevalence. In Italy, elucidation of founder effect in BRCA1/2 genes can have an impact on the management of hereditary cancer families on a healthcare system level, making genetic testing more affordable and cost effective in certain regions. The purpose of this paper is to develop a rapid, low-cost, high-throughput single-tube technology for genotyping the Italian founder mutation c.4964_4982del19 (rs80359876) in the BRCA1 gene, starting from peripheral blood and/or buccal swab DNA. Heterozygote samples for c.4964_4982del19 variant were easily and unambiguously identified by the altered shape of the melting curves and were clearly distinguished by a change in melting temperature that differed by approximately 5 °C. The same results were obtained both with DNA from peripheral blood than buccal swab. We provide evidence about application of high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) in unambiguously genotyping of the founder BRCA1 c.4964_4982del19 variant (rs80359876) in individuals from the Calabria region of Italy. In fact, HRMA was confirmed to be particularly suitable for the identification of BRCA1 c.4964_4982del19 variant, making this approach useful in clinical molecular diagnostics.

  4. Mutational analysis of BRCA1/2 gene and pathologic characteristics from Kazakh population with sporadic breast cancer in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, S Y; Aisimutula, D; Li, H F; Hu, Y; Du, X; Li, J; Luan, M X

    2015-10-27

    Mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, but no large-scale research have examined the BRCA1/2 mutations in Chinese Kazakh women. We evaluated the frequency and distributions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations in Kazakh sporadic breast cancer patients and healthy women in China. The association between the clinical-pathologic features of Kazakh breast cancer patients and BRCA1/2 mutations were also investigated. Two unclassified variants (T539M and T1915M) and 16 polymorphisms were detected in this study, 4 of which (G356A, His743, Asn991Asp, Val1269) were detected more frequently in breast cancer patients than in healthy controls. We observed a higher prevalence of BRCA1/2 common sequence alterations and a large number of Kazakh women carrying multiple co-existing BRCA1/2 mutations. The prevalence of BRCA1 mutations was similar to that of BRCA2 mutations. Although no significant differences were observed, BRCA1/2 carriers were generally younger at diagnosis of wild-type breast cancer patients. BRCA1-associated Kazakh sporadic breast cancers present with high tumor grade, early stage, negative lymph node status, absence of estrogen receptor expression and progesterone-positive status. Estrogen receptor expression was the only predominant histological type in BRCA2 carriers. In this study, we determined the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation status and determined the association with clinical-pathologic characteristics in a Chinese Kazakh population. Larger population-based screening studies screening the entire coding region of BRCA1/2 are required to evaluate the breast cancer risk induced by the sequence alterations detected in this study.

  5. Exome Sequencing of Germline DNA from Non-BRCA1/2 Familial Breast Cancer Cases Selected on the Basis of aCGH Tumor Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hilbers, Florentine S.; Meijers, Caro M.; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; van Galen, Michiel; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of familial breast cancer risk (∼70%) cannot be explained by mutations in the known predisposition genes, primarily BRCA1 and BRCA2. Underlying genetic heterogeneity in these cases is the probable explanation for the failure of all attempts to identify further high-risk alleles. While exome sequencing of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases is a promising strategy to detect new high-risk genes, rational approaches to the rigorous pre-selection of cases are needed to reduce heterogeneity. We selected six families in which the tumours of multiple cases showed a specific genomic profile on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Linkage analysis in these families revealed a region on chromosome 4 with a LOD score of 2.49 under homogeneity. We then analysed the germline DNA of two patients from each family using exome sequencing. Initially focusing on the linkage region, no potentially pathogenic variants could be identified in more than one family. Variants outside the linkage region were then analysed, and we detected multiple possibly pathogenic variants in genes that encode DNA integrity maintenance proteins. However, further analysis led to the rejection of all variants due to poor co-segregation or a relatively high allele frequency in a control population. We concluded that using CGH results to focus on a sub-set of families for sequencing analysis did not enable us to identify a common genetic change responsible for the aggregation of breast cancer in these families. Our data also support the emerging view that non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer families have a very heterogeneous genetic basis. PMID:23383274

  6. [BRCA1 and BRCA2 - pathologists starting kit].

    PubMed

    Škapa, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 is involved in the pathogenesis of malignant tumors, especially breast and ovarian carcinoma. BRCA1/2 genes may be inactivated by germinal and somatic mutations or epigenetic changes. Germinal mutations are responsible for the hereditary breast and ovarian carcinoma syndrome. Defects of BRCA1/2 genes lead to the failure of homologous recombination, the basic mechanism for DNA double strand break repair. The resultant genomic instability is associated with a high risk of malignant transformation of the cell, but it also results in a higher sensitivity of tumors to platinum-based chemotherapeutic compounds which damage DNA structure directly. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) are the next generation of antitumor agents aimed on the suppression of DNA single strand break repair. In homologous recombination deficient tumors, PARP inhibitors lead to accumulation of DNA damage and death of neoplastic cells through the mechanism of synthetic lethality. Platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors are effective not only against tumors with germinal and somatic BRCA1/2 mutations but also against sporadic carcinomas with epigenetic BRCA1/2 inactivation or with defects of other independent genes involved in the control of homologous recombination. This phenomenon is represented by the term "BRCAness". Mutational analysis is used for the assessment of BRCA1/2 status, but it is complicated by the prominent length of BRCA1/2 genes and a wide spectrum of possible genetic alterations. Therefore, next generation sequencing seems to represent an optimal approach for BRCA1/2 evaluation nowadays. Development of reliable diagnostic tests for BRCAness in sporadic tumors and efforts to reverse platinum and PARP inhibitors resistance represent the key objectives of the forthcoming research.

  7. miR-638 mediated regulation of BRCA1 affects DNA repair and sensitivity to UV and cisplatin in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaohui; Peng, Jin; Fu, Yebo; An, Shejuan; Rezaei, Katayoon; Tabbara, Sana; Teal, Christine B; Man, Yan-gao; Brem, Rachel F; Fu, Sidney W

    2014-09-17

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents 15 to 20% of all types of breast cancer; however, it accounts for a large number of metastatic cases and deaths, and there is still no effective treatment. The deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in breast cancer has been widely reported. We previously identified that miR-638 was one of the most deregulated miRNAs in breast cancer progression. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that miR-638 directly targets BRCA1. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-638 in breast cancer prognosis and treatment. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples were microdissected into normal epithelial and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cells, and total RNA was isolated. Several breast cancer cell lines were used for the functional analysis. miR-638 target genes were identified by TARGETSCAN-VERT 6.2 and miRanda. The expression of miR-638 and its target genes was analyzed by real-time qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was employed to confirm the specificity of miR-638 target genes. The biological function of miR-638 was analyzed by MTT chemosensitivity, matrigel invasion and host cell reactivation assays. The expression of miR-638 was decreased in IDC tissue samples compared to their adjacent normal controls. The decreased miR-638 expression was more prevalent in non-TNBC compared with TNBC cases. miR-638 expression was significantly downregulated in breast cancer cell lines compared to the immortalized MCF-10A epithelial cells. BRCA1 was predicted as one of the direct targets of miR-638, which was subsequently confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Forced expression of miR-638 resulted in a significantly reduced proliferation rate as well as decreased invasive ability in TNBC cells. Furthermore, miR-638 overexpression increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, ultraviolet (UV) and cisplatin, but not to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and epirubicin exposure in TNBC cells. Host

  8. Recurrent germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in high risk families in Israel.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Yael; Simeonov, Monica; Herskovitz, Liron; Kushnir, Anya; Shimon-Paluch, Shani; Kaufman, Bella; Zidan, Jamal; Friedman, Eitan

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of germline mutations among Jewish non Ashkenazi high risk breast/ovarian cancer families includes a few predominant mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG and Tyr978X) and BRCA2 (8765delAG). A few additional recurring mutations [A1708E, 981delAT, C61G (BRCA1) R2336P, and IVS2 + 1G > A (BRCA2)] have been reported in Jewish non Ashkenazi families. The 4153delA*BRCA1 C61G*BRCA1 and the 4075delGT*BRCA2 has been reported to recur in Russian/Polish non Jews and Ashkenazim, respectively. The rate of these recurring mutations has not been reported in Israeli high risk families. Genotyping for these recurring mutations by restriction enzyme digest and sequencing method was applied to high risk, predominantly cancer affected, unrelated Israeli individuals of Ashkenazi (n = 827), non Ashkenazi (n = 2,777), non Jewish Caucasians (n = 193), and 395 of mixed ethnicity. Jewish participants included 827 Ashkenazi, 804 Balkans, 847 North Africans, 234 Yemenites, and 892 Asians (Iraq and Iran). Age at diagnosis of breast cancer (median ± SD) (n = 2,484) was 47.2 ± 9.6 for all women participants. Males (n = 236) were also included, of whom 24 had breast cancer and 35 had pancreatic cancer. Overall, 8/282 (2.8%) of the Balkan cases carried the BRCA1*A1708E mutation, 4/180 (2.2%) the R2336P mutation, and 0/270 the IVS2 + 1G > A BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Of North Africans, 7/264 (2.65%) carried the BRCA1*981delAT mutation. The BRCA1*C61G mutation was detected in 3/269 Ashkenazi, non Ashkenazi, and non Jewish Russians; the BRCA1*Tyr978X mutation was detected in 23/3220 individuals of non Ashkenazi origin, exclusively of Asian ethnicity (23/892, 2.6% of the Asians tested). The BRCA1*4153delA mutation was noted in 2/285 non Jewish Caucasians, and none of the Ashkenazim (n = 500) carried the BRCA2*4075delGT mutation. Jewish high risk families of North African, Asian, and Balkan descent should be screened for the 981delAT, Tyr978X, A1708E BRCA1, and the R2336P BRCA2 mutations

  9. The Leu33Pro polymorphism in the ITGB3 gene does not modify BRCA1/2-associated breast or ovarian cancer risks: results from a multicenter study among 15,542 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Anna; Rozkrut, Dominik; Antoniou, Antonis; Hamann, Ute; Lubinski, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Integrins containing the beta(3) subunit are key players in tumor growth and metastasis. A functional Leu33Pro polymorphism (rs5918) in the beta(3) subunit of the integrin gene (ITGB3) has previously been suggested to act as a modifier of ovarian cancer risk in Polish BRCA1 mutation carriers. To investigate the association further, we genotyped 9,998 BRCA1 and 5,544 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 34 studies from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for the ITGB3 Leu33Pro polymorphism. Data were analysed within a Cox-proportional hazards framework using a retrospective likelihood approach. There was marginal evidence that the ITGB3 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.23, p-trend 0.05). However, when the original Polish study was excluded from the analysis, the polymorphism was no longer significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.19, p-trend 0.25). There was no evidence of an association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.89-1.32). The polymorphism was not associated with breast cancer risk for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The ITGB3 Leu33Pro polymorphism does not modify breast or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  10. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Iha; Avraham, Hava Karsenty . E-mail: havraham@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-07-01

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation.

  11. Identification of a new complex rearrangement affecting exon 20 of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Jesús; Campos, Olga; Velasco, Angela; Darder, Esther; Menéndez, Mireia; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Tornero, Eva; Blanco, Ignacio; Izquierdo, Angel; Brunet, Joan; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a novel complex rearrangement in the BRCA1 gene. The genomic rearrangement was identified using one of the two commercially available MLPA BRCA1 kits but was not confirmed with the other. In this report, we present the full characterization at the DNA and RNA levels of a new partial deletion of exon 20 of BRCA1. This is a complex deletion with four breakpoints which promotes aberrant splicing with partial deletion of exon 20 plus the insertion of a cryptic exon corresponding to a fragment of intron 20. The aberrant splicing generates an abnormal transcript with a frameshift that will result in a truncated BRCA1 protein.

  12. Candidate gene analysis of BRCA1/2 mutation-negative high-risk Russian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Preobrazhenskaya, Elena V; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Zaitseva, Olga A; Yatsuk, Olga S; Tiurin, Vladislav I; Strelkova, Tatiana N; Togo, Alexandr V; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-04-10

    Twenty one DNA repair genes were analyzed in a group of 95 BC patients, who displayed clinical features of hereditary disease predisposition but turned out to be negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 entire coding region as well as for founder disease-predisposing alleles in CHEK2, NBN/NBS1 and ATM genes. Full-length sequencing of CHEK2 and NBN/NBS1 failed to identify non-founder mutations. The analysis of TP53 revealed a woman carrying the R282W allele; further testing of additional 108 BC patients characterized by a very young age at onset (35 years or earlier) detected one more carrier of the TP53 germ-line defect. In addition, this study confirmed non-random occurrence of PALB2 truncating mutations in Russian hereditary BC patients. None of the studied cases carried germ-line defects in recently discovered hereditary BC genes, BRIP1, FANCC, MRE11A and RAD51C. The analysis of genes with yet unproven BC-predisposing significance (BARD1, BRD7, CHEK1, DDB2, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, PARP1, PARP2, RAD51, RNF8, WRN) identified single women carrying a protein-truncating allele, WRN R1406X. DNA sequencing of another set of 95 hereditary BC cases failed to reveal additional WRN heterozygous genotypes. Since WRN is functionally similar to the known BC-predisposing gene, BLM, it deserves to be analyzed in future hereditary BC studies. Furthermore, this investigation revealed a number of rare missense germ-line variants, which are classified as probably protein-damaging by online in silico tools and therefore may require further consideration.

  13. Rare germline large rearrangements in the BRCA1/2 genes and eight candidate genes in 472 patients with breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, E; Jesson, B; Briaux, A; Nogues, C; Chabaud, V; Demange, L; Sokolowska, J; Coulet, F; Barouk-Simonet, E; Bignon, Y J; Bonnet, F; Bourdon, V; Bronner, M; Caputo, S; Castera, L; Delnatte, C; Delvincourt, C; Fournier, J; Hardouin, A; Muller, D; Peyrat, J P; Toulas, C; Uhrhammer, N; Vidal, V; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Bieche, I; Lidereau, R

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary breast cancers account for up to 5-10 % of breast cancers and a majority are related to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. However, many families with breast cancer predisposition do not carry any known mutations for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. We explored the incidence of rare large rearrangements in the coding, noncoding and flanking regions of BRCA1/2 and in eight other candidate genes--CHEK2, BARD1, ATM, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, RAP80 and PALB2. A dedicated zoom-in CGH-array was applied to screen for rearrangements in 472 unrelated French individuals from breast-ovarian cancer families that were being followed in eight French oncogenetic laboratories. No new rearrangement was found neither in the genomic regions of BRCA1/2 nor in candidate genes, except for the CHEK2 and BARD1 genes. Three heterozygous deletions were detected in the 5' and 3' flanking regions of BRCA1. One large deletion introducing a frameshift was identified in the CHEK2 gene in two families and one heterozygous deletion was detected within an intron of BARD1. The study demonstrates the usefulness of CGH-array in routine genetic analysis and, aside from the CHEK2 rearrangements, indicates there is a very low incidence of large rearrangements in BRCA1/2 and in the other eight candidate genes in families already explored for BRCA1/2 mutations. Finally, next-generation sequencing should bring new information about point mutations in intronic and flanking regions and also medium size rearrangements.

  14. NF-κB regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1-CtIP complexes.

    PubMed

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-κB is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-κB can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-κB in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-κB targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-κB required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-κB interacts with CtIP-BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-κB activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP-BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-κB-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-κB-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-κB activation.

  15. BRCA1/FANCD2/BRG1-Driven DNA Repair Stabilizes the Differentiation State of Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Bierie, Brian; Li, Andrew G; Pathania, Shailja; Toomire, Kimberly; Dimitrov, Stoil D; Liu, Ben; Gelman, Rebecca; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Feunteun, Jean; Polyak, Kornelia; Livingston, David M

    2016-07-21

    An abnormal differentiation state is common in BRCA1-deficient mammary epithelial cells, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report a convergence between DNA repair and normal, cultured human mammary epithelial (HME) cell differentiation. Surprisingly, depleting BRCA1 or FANCD2 (Fanconi anemia [FA] proteins) or BRG1, a mSWI/SNF subunit, caused HME cells to undergo spontaneous epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant differentiation. This also occurred when wild-type HMEs were exposed to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand crosslinks (repaired by FA proteins), but not in response to double-strand breaks. Suppressed expression of ΔNP63 also occurred in each of these settings, an effect that links DNA damage to the aberrant differentiation outcome. Taken together with somatic breast cancer genome data, these results point to a breakdown in a BRCA/FA-mSWI/SNF-ΔNP63-mediated DNA repair and differentiation maintenance process in mammary epithelial cells that may contribute to sporadic breast cancer development.

  16. Use of expression data and the CGEMS genome-wide breast cancer association study to identify genes that may modify risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Waddell, Nic; Ten Haaf, Anette; Grimmond, Sean; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2008-11-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confer an increased lifetime risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but variable penetrance suggests that cancer susceptibility is influenced in part by modifier genes. Microarray expression profiling was conducted for 69 irradiated lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from healthy controls, or from cancer-affected women with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer carrying pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, or with no BRCA1/2 mutations (BRCAX). Genes discriminating between BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX and controls were stratified based on irradiation response and/or cell cycle involvement. Gene lists were aligned against genes tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined by the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Breast Cancer Whole Genome Association Scan to be nominally associated with breast cancer risk. Irradiation responsive genes whose expression correlated with BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation status were more likely to be tagged by risk-associated SNPs in the CGEMS dataset (BRCA1, P = 0.0005; BRCA2, P = 0.01). In contrast, irradiation responsive genes correlating with BRCAX status were not enriched in the CGEMS dataset. Classification of expression data by involvement in cell cycle processes did not enrich for genes tagged by risk-associated SNPs, for BRCA1, BRCA2 or BRCAX groups. Using a novel combinatorial approach, we have identified a subset of irradiation responsive genes as high priority candidate BRCA1/2 modifier genes. Similar approaches may be used to identify genes and underlying genetic risk factors that interact with exogenous stimulants to cause or modify any disease, without a priori knowledge of the pathways involved.

  17. Molecular analysis of the eighteen most frequent mutations in the BRCA1 gene in 63 Chilean breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Jara, Lilian; Ampuero, Sandra; Santibáñez, Eudocia; Seccia, Lorena; Rodríguez, Juan; Lay-Son, Mario Bustamante Guillermo; Ojeda, José Manuel; Reyes, José Miguel; Blanco, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    BRCA1 gene mutations account for nearly all families with multiple cases of both early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer and about 30% of hereditary breast cancer. Although to date more than 1,237 distinct mutations, polymorphisms, and variants have been described, several mutations have been found to be recurrent in this gene. We have analyzed 63 Chilean breast/ovarian cancer families for eighteen frequent BRCA1 mutations. The analysis of the five exons and two introns in which these mutations are located was made using mismatch PCR assay, ASO hybridization assay, restriction fragment analysis, allele specific PCR assay and direct sequentiation techniques. Two BRCA1 mutations (185delAG and C61G) and one variant of unknown significance (E1250K) were found in four of these families. Also, a new mutation (4185delCAAG) and one previously described polymorphism (E1038G) were found in two other families. The 185delAG was found in a 3.17% of the families and the others were present only in one of the families of this cohort. Therefore these mutations are not prominent in the Chilean population. The variant of unknown significance and the polymorphism detected could represent a founder effect of Spanish origin.

  18. A high incidence of BRCA1 mutations in 20 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Serova, O.; Montagna, M.; Sylla, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 breast-ovarian cancer families, the majority of which show positive evidence of linkage to chromosome 17q12, for germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 mutations cosegregating with breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility were identified in 16 families, including 1 family with a case of male breast cancer. Nine of these mutations have not been reported previously. The majority of mutations were found to generate a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated BRCA1 protein of 2%-88% of the expected normal length. Two mutations altered the RING finger domain. Sequencing of genomic DNA led to the identification of a mutation in the coding region of BRCA1 in 12 families, and cDNA analysis revealed an abnormal or missing BRCA1 transcript in 4 of the 8 remaining families. A total of eight mutations were associated with a reduced quantity of BRCA1 transcript. We were unable to detect BRCA1 mutations in 4 of the 20 families, but only 1 of these was clearly linked to BRCA1. It is expected that the majority of clear examples of the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome will be associated with germ-line mutations in the coding region of BRCA1. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    polymerase II holoenzyme components, including the RNA polymerase II large subunit, RPBI , and human Mediator proteins CDK8, Cyclin C, and Med7. Significantly...57 59 61 63 6M BRCA1-"- RadS0 -’• Monomer - N * * * l- IExtraI.t: Itrcal+ + + - "+ + " + - + + Wlt’ell-.,- Brcal- + - + + - + + + + MgZ+ t(InN) RPBI ...additional investigation, for the proteins indicated to the left of the blot ( RPBI : large subunit of RNA polymerase I1). The cell-free system for NHEJ

  20. A high proportion of DNA variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is associated with aberrant splicing in breast/ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sanz, David J; Acedo, Alberto; Infante, Mar; Durán, Mercedes; Pérez-Cabornero, Lucía; Esteban-Cardeñosa, Eva; Lastra, Enrique; Pagani, Franco; Miner, Cristina; Velasco, Eladio A

    2010-03-15

    Most BRCA1/2 mutations are of unknown clinical relevance. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that there can be deleterious effects through the disruption of the splicing process. We have investigated the effect of aberrant splicing of BRCA1/2 on hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC). DNA variants were analyzed with splicing prediction programs to select putative splicing mutations. Splicing assays of 57 genetic variants were done by lymphocyte reverse transcription-PCR and/or hybrid minigenes in HeLa and nontumor breast epithelial cells. Twenty-four BRCA1/2 variants of Spanish HBOC patients were bioinformatically preselected. Functional assays showed that 12 variants induced anomalous splicing patterns, 6 of which accounted for 58.5% of BRCA1 families. To further evaluate the defective splicing of BRCA1/2, we analyzed 31 Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC) and two artificial variants that were generated by mutagenesis. Sixteen variants induced different degrees of aberrant splicing. Altogether, anomalous splicing was caused by 28 BRCA1/2 variants of all types, indicating that any DNA change can disrupt pre-mRNA processing. We show that a wide range of regulatory elements can be involved, including the canonical and cryptic splice sites, the polypyrimidine tract, and splicing enhancers/silencers. Twenty mutations were predicted to truncate the BRCA proteins and/or to delete essential domains, thus supporting a role in HBOC. An important fraction of DNA variants of BRCA1/2 presents splicing aberrations that may represent a relevant disease-causing mechanism in HBOC. The identification of splicing disruptions by functional assays is a valuable tool to discriminate between benign polymorphisms and pathogenic mutations.

  1. CtIP-BRCA1 modulates the choice of DNA double-strand break repair pathway throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Maximina H.; Hiom, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is tightly regulated during the cell cycle. In G1 phase, the absence of a sister chromatid means that repair of DSB occurs through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ)1. These pathways often involve loss of DNA sequences at the break site and are therefore error-prone. In late S and G2 phases, even though DNA end-joining pathways remain functional2, there is an increase in repair of DSB by homologous recombination (HR), which is mostly error-free3,4. Consequently, the relative contribution of these different pathways to DSB repair in the cell cycle has a profound influence on the maintenance of genetic integrity. How then are DSB directed for repair by different, potentially competing, repair pathways? Here we identify a role for CtIP in this process in DT40. We establish that CtIP is not only required for repair of DSB by HR in S/G2 phase, but also for MMEJ in G1. The function of CtIP in HR, but not MMEJ, is dependent on the phosphorylation of serine residue 327 and recruitment of BRCA1. Cells expressing CtIP protein that cannot be phosphorylated at serine 327 are specifically defective in HR and exhibit decreased level of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) after DNA damage, while MMEJ remains unaffected. Our data support a model in which phosphorylation of serine 327 of CtIP as cells enter S-phase and the recruitment of BRCA1 functions as a molecular switch to shift the balance of DSB repair from error-prone DNA end-joining to error-free homologous recombination (Supplementary Fig. 1). PMID:19357644

  2. BRCA1 polymorphism in breast cancer patients from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Jaure, Omar; Alonso, Eliana N; Braico, Diego Aguilera; Nieto, Alvaro; Orozco, Manuela; Morelli, Cecilia; Ferro, Alejandro M; Barutta, Elena; Vincent, Esteban; Martínez, Domingo; Martínez, Ignacio; Maegli, Maria Ines; Frizza, Alejandro; Kowalyzyn, Ruben; Salvadori, Marisa; Ginestet, Paul; Gonzalez Donna, Maria L; Balogh, Gabriela A

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in females in Argentina, with an incidence rate similar to that in the USA. However, the contribution of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in breast cancer incidence has not yet been investigated in Argentina. In order to evaluate which BRCA1 polymorphisms or mutations characterize female breast cancer in Argentina, the current study enrolled 206 females with breast cancer from several hospitals from the southeast of Argentina. A buccal smear sample was obtained in duplicate from each patient and the DNA samples were processed for polymorphism analysis using the single-strand conformational polymorphism technique. The polymorphisms in BRCA1 were investigated using a combination of 15 primers to analyze exons 2, 3, 5, 20 and 11 (including the 11.1 to 11.12 regions). The BRCA1 mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Samples were successfully examined from 154 females and, among these, 16 mutations were identified in the BRCA1 gene representing 13.9% of the samples analyzed. One patient was identified with a polymorphism in exon 2 (0.86%), four in exon 20 (3.48%), four in exon 11.3 (3.48%), one in exon 11.7 (0.86%), two in exon 11.8 (1.74%), one in exon 11.10 (0.86%) and one in exon 11.11 (0.86%). The most prevalent alteration in BRCA1 was located in exon 11 (11 out of 16 patients; 68.75%). The objective of our next study is to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in the BRCA2 gene and analyze the BRCA1 gene in the healthy relatives of BRCA1 mutation carriers.

  3. BRCA1 polymorphism in breast cancer patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    JAURE, OMAR; ALONSO, ELIANA N.; BRAICO, DIEGO AGUILERA; NIETO, ALVARO; OROZCO, MANUELA; MORELLI, CECILIA; FERRO, ALEJANDRO M.; BARUTTA, ELENA; VINCENT, ESTEBAN; MARTÍNEZ, DOMINGO; MARTÍNEZ, IGNACIO; MAEGLI, MARIA INES; FRIZZA, ALEJANDRO; KOWALYZYN, RUBEN; SALVADORI, MARISA; GINESTET, PAUL; GONZALEZ DONNA, MARIA L.; BALOGH, GABRIELA A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in females in Argentina, with an incidence rate similar to that in the USA. However, the contribution of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in breast cancer incidence has not yet been investigated in Argentina. In order to evaluate which BRCA1 polymorphisms or mutations characterize female breast cancer in Argentina, the current study enrolled 206 females with breast cancer from several hospitals from the southeast of Argentina. A buccal smear sample was obtained in duplicate from each patient and the DNA samples were processed for polymorphism analysis using the single-strand conformational polymorphism technique. The polymorphisms in BRCA1 were investigated using a combination of 15 primers to analyze exons 2, 3, 5, 20 and 11 (including the 11.1 to 11.12 regions). The BRCA1 mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Samples were successfully examined from 154 females and, among these, 16 mutations were identified in the BRCA1 gene representing 13.9% of the samples analyzed. One patient was identified with a polymorphism in exon 2 (0.86%), four in exon 20 (3.48%), four in exon 11.3 (3.48%), one in exon 11.7 (0.86%), two in exon 11.8 (1.74%), one in exon 11.10 (0.86%) and one in exon 11.11 (0.86%). The most prevalent alteration in BRCA1 was located in exon 11 (11 out of 16 patients; 68.75%). The objective of our next study is to evaluate the prevalence of mutations in the BRCA2 gene and analyze the BRCA1 gene in the healthy relatives of BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:25624909

  4. BRCA1 epigenetic inactivation predicts sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Olafur A.; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Martí, Lola; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer development. Both genes are involved in DNA repair, and tumors harboring genetic defects in them are thought to be more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents used in chemotherapy. However, as only a minority of breast and ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, few patients are likely to benefit from these pharmacogenetic biomarkers. Herein, we show that, in cancer cell lines and xenografted tumors, BRCA1 CpG island promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing also predicts enhanced sensitivity to platinum-derived drugs to the same extent as BRCA1 mutations. Most importantly, BRCA1 hypermethylation proves to be a predictor of longer time to relapse and improved overall survival in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin. PMID:23069641

  5. Suppression and recovery of BRCA1-mediated transcription by HP1γ via modulation of promoter occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Duk; Park, Mi Ae; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) is a chromatin protein involved in gene silencing. Herein, we show that HP1γ interacts with breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) and regulates BRCA1-mediated transcription via modulation of promoter occupancy and histone modification. We used several HP1γ mutants and small interfering RNAs for histone methyltransferases to show that BRCA1–HP1γ interaction, but not methylated histone binding, is important in HP1γ repression of BRCA1-mediated transcription. Time-lapse studies on promoter association and histone methylation after DNA damage revealed that HP1γ accumulates at the promoter before DNA damage, but BRCA1 is recruited at the promoter after the damage while promoter-resident HP1γ is disassembled. Importantly, HP1γ assembly recovers after release from the damage in a BRCA1–HP1γ interaction-dependent manner and targets SUV39H1. HP1γ/SUV39H1 restoration at the promoter results in BRCA1 disassembly and histone methylation, after which transcription repression resumes. We propose that through interaction with BRCA1, HP1γ is guided to the BRCA1 target promoter during recovery and functions in the activation-repression switch and recovery from BRCA1-mediated transcription in response to DNA damage. PMID:23074186

  6. The role of BRCA1 in homologous recombination repair in response to replication stress: significance in tumorigenesis and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Germ line mutations in breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1) predispose women to breast and ovarian cancers. Although BRCA1 is involved in many important biological processes, the function of BRCA1 in homologous recombination (HR) mediated repair is considered one of the major mechanisms contributing to its tumor suppression activity, and the cause of hypersensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors when BRCA1 is defective. Mounting evidence suggests that the mechanism of repairing DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by HR is different than the mechanism operating when DNA replication is blocked. Although BRCA1 has been recognized as a central component in HR, the precise role of BRCA1 in HR, particularly under replication stress, has remained largely unknown. Given the fact that DNA lesions caused by replication blockages are the primary substrates for HR in mitotic cells, functional analysis of BRCA1 in HR repair in the context of replication stress should benefit our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis associated with BRCA1 deficiencies, as well as the development of therapeutic approaches for cancer patients carrying BRCA1 mutations or reduced BRCA1 expression. This review focuses on the current advances in this setting and also discusses the significance in tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. PMID:23388117

  7. BRCA1/2-negative hereditary triple-negative breast cancers exhibit BRCAness.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers are sensitive to poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and platinum compounds mainly due to their deficiency in DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR). However, approximately only 15% of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are BRCA1/2-associated. TNBCs that exhibit BRCAness (a phenotype reflecting impaired HR in BRCA1/2-negative tumors) are also regarded sensitive to PARP inhibitors and platinum compounds. Thus, we hypothesized that hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs may exhibit BRCAness. To find a subset of hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs among 360 TNBCs, we first identified a group of 41 hereditary TNBCs by analyzing the family histories of the patients. Next, we tested this group for the presence of germline BRCA1/2 mutations, and finally, we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in HR and five other major mechanisms of DNA damage repair between BRCA1/2-associated and BRCA1/2-negative subgroups of hereditary TNBCs using real-time PCR arrays. Approximately 73% of the hereditary TNBCs were BRCA1/2-associated and 27% were BRCA1/2-negative. The expression levels of the analyzed genes showed no significant differences between these two subgroups indicating the BRCAness of the BRCA1/2-negative hereditary TNBCs and thereby distinguishing a novel subset of TNBCs as a potential target for PARP inhibitors or platinum-based therapy. The results show the significance of family history in selecting patients with TNBC for therapies directed at incompetent DNA repair (e.g., PARP inhibitors and/or platinum-based therapies) and indicate that a relatively simple strategy for broadening the target group for these modes of treatment is to identify patients with hereditary TNBCs. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Screening of the BRCA1 gene in Brazilian patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer via high-resolution melting reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Eneida Santos; Soares, Bárbara Luisa; Lemos, Sara; Rosa, Reginaldo Cruz Alves; Rodrigues, Angélica Nogueira; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto; de Oliveira Lopes, Débora; dos Santos, Luciana Lara

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the profile of BRCA1 mutations among cancer-affected Brazilian women from the Midwest region of Minas Gerais state with clearly defined risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. In this Brazilian region, the first Center for Hereditary Cancer Control began operation in 2011, and 90% of patients receive assistance from the public health service. Eighteen patients at high risk for HBOC were subjected to molecular analysis. Primers were designed for 22 coding exons of the gene; DNA was extracted; and real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting reaction was performed. The amplicons were sequenced to confirm the identified profiles. Only exon 11 was directly sequenced due its length. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was performed for those patients in whom no pathogenic mutations were found. Among the 14 alterations identified in this study, the c.5263_5264insC pathogenic mutation was present in two patients (11.1%). Four alterations showed no clinical relevance; one exhibited inconclusive clinical relevance according to the examined databases; and eight alterations presented a divergent classification between the databases. No deletions or duplications were found using the MLPA technique. The HRM methodology was highly sensitive in identifying variants in the BRCA1 gene and can dramatically reduce the amount of sequencing required to identify germline mutations in BRCA genes, enabling cheaper tests and increasing their availability to Brazilian women assisted by the public health service.

  9. BRCA1: a new candidate gene for bovine mastitis and its association analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms and milk somatic cell score.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhengrong; Chu, Guiyan; Dan, Yang; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Gao, Huijiang; Li, Junya; Xu, Shangzhong; Liu, Zhihua

    2012-06-01

    Bovine mastitis is a very complex and common disease of dairy cattle and a major source of economic losses to the dairy industry worldwide. In this study, the bovine breast cancer 1, early onset gene (BRCA1) was taken as a candidate gene for mastitis resistance. The main object of this study was to investigate whether the BRCA1 gene was associated with mastitis in cattle. Through DNA sequencing, Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and Created Restriction Site PCR (CRS-PCR) methods, three SNPs (G22231T, T25025A, and C28300A) were detected and twenty-four combinations of these SNPs were observed. The single SNP and their genetic effects on somatic cell score (SCS) were evaluated and a significant association with SCS was found in C28300A. The mean of genotype EE was significantly lower than those of genotypes EF and FF. The results of combined genotypes analysis of three SNPs showed that BBDDFF genotype with the highest SCS were easily for the mastitis susceptibility, whereas AACCEE genotype with the lowest SCS were favorable for the mastitis resistance. The information provided in the present study will be very useful for improving mastitis resistance in dairy cattle by marker-assisted selection.

  10. HE4 Serum Levels in Patients with BRCA1 Gene Mutation Undergoing Prophylactic Surgery as well as in Other Benign and Malignant Gynecological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cymbaluk-Płoska, Aneta; Strojna, Aleksandra; Menkiszak, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We assess the behavior of serum concentrations of HE4 marker in female carriers of BRCA1 and assess the diagnostic usefulness of HE4 in ovarian and endometrial cancer. Methods. A total of 619 women with BRCA1 gene mutation, ovarian, endometrial, metastatic, other gynecological cancers, or benign gynecological diseases were included. Intergroup comparative analyses were carried out, the BRCA1 gene carriers subgroup was subjected to detailed analysis, and ROC curves were determined for the assessment of diagnostic usefulness of HE4 in ovarian and endometrial cancer. Results. Statistically lower serum HE4 and CA 125 levels were observed in BRCA1 gene mutation premenopausal carriers. Occult ovarian/fallopian tube cancer was found 3.6%. Each of those patients was characterized by slightly elevated levels of either CA 125 (63.9 and 39.4 U/mL) or HE4 (79 pmol/L). The ROC-AUC curves were 0.892 and 0.894 for diagnostic usefulness of ovarian cancer and 0.865 for differentiation of endometrial cancer from endometrial polyps. Conclusions. Patients with BRCA1 gene mutations have relatively low serum HE4 levels. Even the slightest elevation in HE4 or CA 125 levels in female BRCA1 carriers undergoing prophylactic surgery should significantly increase oncological alertness. The HE4 marker is valuable in ovarian and uterine cancer diagnosis. PMID:28182133

  11. BRCA1 Expression is an Important Biomarker for Chemosensitivity: Suppression of BRCA1 Increases the Apoptosis via Up-regulation of p53 and p21 During Cisplatin Treatment in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Akiko; Wang, Cuiju; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Osada, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Toshio; Konishi, Ikuo

    2006-01-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor which plays a crucial role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, and its abnormality is responsible for hereditary ovarian cancer syndrome. It has recently been reported that reduced expression of BRCA1 is also common in sporadic ovarian carcinoma via its promoter hypermethylation, and that ovarian carcinoma patients negative for BRCA1 expression showed favorable prognosis. To address if BRCA1 expression plays a role in the chemotherapeutic response, we analyzed the effect of BRCA1 suppression on the sensitivity to cisplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer cells. Specific siRNA for BRCA1 gene was transfected into 3 ovarian cancer cell lines with various p53 status. Reduced expression of BRCA1 by transfection of BRCA1-siRNA resulted in a 5.3-fold increase in sensitivity to cisplatin in p53-wild A2780 cells, but not in p53-mutated A2780/CDDP and p53-deleted SKOV3 cells. Regarding the sensitivity to paclitaxel, BRCA1 suppression caused no significant changes in all the 3 cell lines. For ionizing radiation sensitivity, BRCA1 suppression also showed a significant higher sensitivity in A2780 cells. Growth curve and cell cycle analyses showed no significant differences between BRCA1-siRNA-transfected A2780 cells and control cells. However, cisplatin treatment under suppression of BRCA1 showed a significantly increased apoptosis along with up-regulation of p53 and p21 in A2780 cells. Accordingly, reduced expression of BRCA1 enhances the cisplatin sensitivity and apoptosis via up-regulation of p53 and p21, but does not affect the paclitaxel sensitivity. Expression of BRCA1 might be an important biomarker for cisplatin resistance in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:19690636

  12. BRCA1 is an essential regulator of heart function and survival following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Praphulla C.; Singh, Krishna K.; Quan, Adrian; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Teoh, Hwee; Lovren, Fina; Cao, Liu; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Pan, Yi; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Yanagawa, Bobby; Gupta, Aanika; Deng, Chu-Xia; Coles, John G.; Leong-Poi, Howard; Stanford, William L.; Parker, Thomas G.; Schneider, Michael D.; Finkel, Toren; Verma, Subodh

    2011-01-01

    The tumour suppressor BRCA1 is mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancer but its role in protecting other tissues from DNA damage has not been explored. Here we show a new role for BRCA1 as a gatekeeper of cardiac function and survival. In mice, loss of BRCA1 in cardiomyocytes results in adverse cardiac remodelling, poor ventricular function and higher mortality in response to ischaemic or genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, loss of cardiomyocyte BRCA1 results in impaired DNA double-strand break repair and activated p53-mediated pro-apoptotic signalling culminating in increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, whereas deletion of the p53 gene rescues BRCA1-deficient mice from cardiac failure. In human adult and fetal cardiac tissues, ischaemia induces double-strand breaks and upregulates BRCA1 expression. These data reveal BRCA1 as a novel and essential adaptive response molecule shielding cardiomyocytes from DNA damage, apoptosis and heart dysfunction. BRCA1 mutation carriers, in addition to risk of breast and ovarian cancer, may be at a previously unrecognized risk of cardiac failure. PMID:22186889

  13. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Clare; Lai, Stella; Doherty, Elaine; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub) for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible. PMID:26052455

  14. [Analysis of mutations in genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 among patients with breast and ovarian cancer in northern Portugal and Galicia].

    PubMed

    Duarte, F; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J F; Soares, R; Seixas, C; Cortizo-Torres, M E; Pérez-Villanueva, J; Schmitt, F C

    2002-05-01

    To detect mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by means of the protein truncation test (PTT) in a population in northern Portugal and Galicia with breast and ovarian cancer. Prospective study. Patients in northern Portugal and Galicia with family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer.Patients. A total of 76 women with family history of breast cancer according to the BCLC criteria (Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium) were studied at IPATIMUP. Five cases (6.5%) with changes in the normal sequence in genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were identified; three of these mutations occurred in the gene BRCA1 and the other two in the gene BRCA2. Two out of the three mutations found in the gene BRCA1 were de novo mutations. Changes detected in the normal sequence in the gene BRCA2 were mutations reported for the first time among the study population, according to the information obtained through the BCIC database (Breast Cancer Information Core). This was the first study in detecting individuals carrying mutations in the susceptibility breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 among the population of northern Portugal and Galicia.

  15. A whole-genome massively parallel sequencing analysis of BRCA1 mutant oestrogen receptor negative and positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Weigelt, Britta; Wilkerson, Paul M; Manie, Elodie; Grigoriadis, Anita; A’Hern, Roger; van der Groep, Petra; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Popova, Tatiana; Mariani, Odette; Turaljic, Samra; Furney, Simon J; Marais, Richard; Rodruigues, Daniel-Nava; Flora, Adriana C; Wai, Patty; Pawar, Vidya; McDade, Simon; Carroll, Jason; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Swanton, Charles; van Diest, Paul; Delattre, Olivier; Lord, Christopher J; Foulkes, William D; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Ashworth, Alan; Stern, Marc Henri; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 encodes a tumour suppressor protein that plays pivotal roles in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and transcriptional regulation. BRCA1 germline mutations confer a high risk of early-onset breast and ovarian cancer. In >80% of cases, tumours arising in BRCA1 germline mutation carriers are oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative, however up to 15% are ER-positive. It has been suggested that BRCA1 ER-positive breast cancers constitute sporadic cancers arising in the context of a BRCA1 germline mutation rather than being causally related to BRCA1 loss-of-function. Whole-genome massively parallel sequencing of ER-positive and ER-negative BRCA1 breast cancers, and their respective germline DNAs, was used to characterise the genetic landscape of BRCA1 cancers at base-pair resolution. Only BRCA1 germline mutations and somatic loss of the wild-type allele, and TP53 somatic mutations were recurrently found in the index cases. BRCA1 breast cancers displayed a mutational signature consistent with that caused by lack of HR DNA repair in both ER-positive and ER-negative cases. Sequencing analysis of independent cohorts of hereditary BRCA1 and sporadic non-BRCA1 breast cancers for the presence of recurrent pathogenic mutations and/or homozygous deletions found in the index cases revealed that DAPK3, TMEM135, KIAA1797, PDE4D and GATA4 are potential additional drivers of breast cancers. This study demonstrates that BRCA1 pathogenic germline mutations coupled with somatic loss of the wild-type allele are not sufficient for hereditary breast cancers to display an ER-negative phenotype, and has led to the identification of three potential novel breast cancer genes (i.e. DAPK3, TMEM135 and GATA4). PMID:22362584

  16. Differential Gene Expression of BRCA1,ERBB2 and TP53 biomarkers between Human Breast Tissue and Peripheral Blood Samples of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zghair, Abdulrazzaq Neamah; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kassim, Arkan; Alfaham, Mohmmad; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a most common malignancy especially in Iraqi women accounting for high morbidity and mortality. Mutations in BRCA1 gene is one of the important genetic predisposing factors inbreast cancer. Similarly ERBB2 and TP53 are also key prognostic markers in breast cancer treatment.We were interested to explore the gene expression profiles of BRCA1, ERBB2 and TP53 in breast cancer women patients from Iraq so as to assess the potential of such markers in breast cancer treatment. The mRNA levels were significantly over-expressed in tumor tissues in comparison to normal ones with p values (p<0.005) observed between malignant BRCA1 and control tissue samples. Similarly significant difference (p<0.001) was observed between malignant ERBB2 in comparison to control, and malignant TP53 and benign tissue samples as well. However in blood samples, no considerable expression of these markers was observed. Out of three selected genes, ERBB2 expression was significantly expressed in comparison to BRCA1 and TP53 in cancer tissue. Mutation analysis of BRCA1, ERBB2 and TP53 has been made to find out the region most susceptible to mutations in these genes The BRCA1 exon 11, ERBB2 16 and TP53 exon 5 displayed increased chances of having mutations. We can conclude from the study that differential gene expression of BRCA1, ERBB2 and TP53 at mRNA levels may act as a diagnostic marker of circulating tumor cells having important prognostic value in breast cancer patients.

  17. Enhancement of BRCA1 gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Cocca, Claudia; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2003-08-21

    BRCA1 has been linked to the genetic susceptibility of a majority of familial breast and ovarian cancers. Several lines of evidence indicate that BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor and its expression is downregulated in sporadic breast and ovarian cancer cases. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in the regulation of BRCA1 gene expression might lead to new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of these tumors. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has well-established roles in the regulation of adipocyte development and glucose homeostasis. More recently, it has been shown that ligands of PPARgamma have a potent antitumorigenic activity in breast cancer cells. In the present study we have found that two distinct ligands of PPARgamma; 15-deoxy-delta-(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15dPG-J2) and rosiglitazone, increase the levels of BRCA1 protein in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that, after treatment with 15dPG-J2, the BRCA1 protein is mainly localized in the nucleus. Functional analysis by transient transfection of different 5'-flanking region fragments, as well as gel mobility shift assays and mutagenic analysis, suggests that the effects of 15dPG-J2 and rosiglitazone are mediated through a functional DR1 located between the nucleotides -241 and -229, which is a canonical PPARgamma type response element. Our data suggest that PPARgamma is a crucial gene regulating BRCA1 gene expression and might therefore be important for the BRCA1 regulatory pathway involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic breast and ovarian cancer.

  18. BRCA1 Mutation: A Predictive Marker for Radiation Therapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Charlene; Zhang, Junran

    2015-10-01

    DNA repair, in particular, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is essential for the survival of both normal and cancer cells. An elaborate repair mechanism has been developed in cells to efficiently repair the damaged DNA. The pathways predominately involved in DSB repair are homologous recombination and classic nonhomologous end-joining, although the alternative NHEJ pathway, a third DSB repair pathway, could also be important in certain contexts. The protein of BRCA1 encoded by the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 regulates all DSB repair pathways. Given that DSBs represent the most biologically significant lesions induced by ionizing radiation and that impaired DSB repair leads to radiation sensitivity, it has been expected that cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations should benefit from radiation therapy. However, the clinical data have been conflicting and inconclusive. We provide an overview about the current status of the data regarding BRCA1 deficiency and radiation therapy sensitivity in both experimental models and clinical investigations. In addition, we discuss a strategy to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, the pharmacologic drugs being investigated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  19. High prevalence of GPRC5A germline mutations in BRCA1-mutant breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Bulanova, Daria R; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Aleksakhina, Svetlana N; Preobrazhenskaya, Elena V; Ivantsov, Alexandr O; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Yanus, Grigoriy A; Zaitseva, Olga A; Yatsuk, Olga S; Togo, Alexandr V; Kota, Poojitha; Dixon, J Michael; Larionov, Alexey A; Kuznetsov, Sergey G; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2014-05-15

    In a search for new breast cancer (BC) predisposing genes, we performed a whole exome sequencing analysis using six patient samples of familial BC and identified a germline inactivating mutation c.183delG [p. Arg61fs] in an orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A. An extended case-control study revealed a tenfold enrichment for this mutation in BC patients carrying the 5382insC allele of BRCA1, the major founder mutation in the Russian population, compared to wild-type BRCA1 BC cases [6/117 (5.1%) vs. 8/1578 (0.5%), p = 0.0002]. In mammary tumors (n = 60), the mRNA expression of GPRC5A significantly correlated with that of BRCA1 (p = 0.00018). In addition, the amount of GPRC5A transcript was significantly lower in BC obtained from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 17) compared to noncarriers (n = 93) (p = 0.026). Accordingly, a siRNA-mediated knockdown of either BRCA1 or GPRC5A in the MDA-MB-231 human BC cell line reduced expression of GPRC5A or BRCA1, respectively. Knockdown of GPRC5A also attenuated radiation-induced BRCA1- and RAD51-containing nuclear DNA repair foci. Taken together, these data suggest that GPRC5A is a modifier of BC risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and reveals a functional interaction of these genes.

  20. Emerging roles of BRCA1 alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Orban, T I; Olah, E

    2003-08-01

    Germline mutations of the BRCA1 gene predispose individuals mainly to the development of breast and/or ovarian cancer. However, the exact function of the gene is still unclear, although the encoded proteins are involved in various cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation and DNA repair pathways. Several BRCA1 splice variants are found in different tissues, but in spite of intense investigations, their regulation and possible functions are poorly understood at the moment. This review summarises current knowledge on the roles of these splice variants and the mechanisms responsible for their formation. Because alternative splicing is now widely accepted as an important source of genetic diversity, elucidating the functions of the BRCA1 splice variants would help in the understanding of the exact role(s) of this tumour suppressor. This should help to resolve the current paradox that, despite its seemingly vital cellular functions, mutations of this gene are associated with tissue specific tumour formation predominantly in the breast and the ovary.

  1. Interpersonal Responses Among Sibling Dyads Tested for BRCA1/BRCA2 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Heidi A.; Croyle, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy W.; Smith, Ken R.; Ruiz, John M.; Kircher, John C.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The familial context plays an important role in psychosocial responses to genetic testing. The purpose of this study was to compare sibling pairs with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results on measures of affect, interpersonal responses, and physiological reactions. Design Forty-nine sibling dyads with different combinations of BRCA1/BRCA2 test results (i.e., mixed, positive, negative) completed a questionnaire, and 35 of the dyads also participated in a laboratory-based discussion of genetic testing. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome variables included participant reports of supportive actions toward their sibling, state anger and anxiety, perceptions of sibling behavior, and electrodermal responses. Results Compared to positive and negative dyads, mixed pairs reported less friendly general support actions, noted more anger, and perceived their sibling to be less friendly and more dominant during the interactions. In comparisons between same-result (i.e., positive, negative) pairs, positive dyads reported more dominant support behaviors and perceived their sibling to be friendlier during the interactions. Conclusion Data suggest that siblings who have different test results may experience more interpersonal strain than siblings who have the same test result. Future research on genetic testing and family relationships can expand upon these findings. PMID:18230020

  2. Nup153 and Nup50 promote recruitment of 53BP1 to DNA repair foci by antagonizing BRCA1-dependent events.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Douglas R; Howa, Amanda C; Werner, Theresa L; Ullman, Katharine S

    2017-10-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are typically repaired through either the high-fidelity process of homologous recombination (HR), in which BRCA1 plays a key role, or the more error-prone process of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which relies on 53BP1. The balance between NHEJ and HR depends, in part, on whether 53BP1 predominates in binding to damage sites, where it protects the DNA ends from resection. The nucleoporin Nup153 has been implicated in the DNA damage response, attributed to a role in promoting nuclear import of 53BP1. Here, we define a distinct requirement for Nup153 in 53BP1 intranuclear targeting to damage foci and report that Nup153 likely facilitates the role of another nucleoporin, Nup50, in 53BP1 targeting. The requirement for Nup153 and Nup50 in promoting 53BP1 recruitment to damage foci induced by either etoposide or olaparib is abrogated in cells deficient for BRCA1 or its partner BARD1, but not in cells deficient for BRCA2. Together, our results further highlight the antagonistic relationship between 53BP1 and BRCA1, and place Nup153 and Nup50 in a molecular pathway that regulates 53BP1 function by counteracting BRCA1-mediated events. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Luring BRCA1 to the scene of the crime.

    PubMed

    Baer, Richard

    2013-05-13

    To preserve genome stability, BRCA1 must be recruited to sites of DNA damage, where BRCA1 facilitates repair of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and Yu report that BRCA1 recruitment involves a novel interaction between its partner protein BARD1 and poly(ADP-ribose) chains at the DSB.

  4. Reduced BRCA1 transcript levels in freshly isolated blood leukocytes from BRCA1 mutation carriers is mutation specific.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Rania; Pettapiece-Phillips, Rachael; Salmena, Leonardo; Kotlyar, Max; Jurisica, Igor; Narod, Steven A; Akbari, Mohammad R; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2016-08-17

    BRCA1 mutation carriers face a high lifetime risk of developing both breast and ovarian cancer. Haploinsufficiency is thought to predispose these women to cancer by reducing the pool of available BRCA1 transcript and protein, thereby compromising BRCA1 function. Whether or not cancer-free BRCA1 mutation carriers have lower messenger (m)RNA transcript levels in peripheral blood leukocytes has not been evaluated. The primary aim of this study was to characterize an association between BRCA1 mutation status and BRCA1 mRNA leukocyte expression levels among healthy women with a BRCA1 mutation. RNA was extracted from freshly isolated peripheral blood leukocytes of 58 cancer-free, female participants (22 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36 non-carriers). The expression levels of 236 cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, were quantified using the Human Cancer Reference gene panel from the Nanostring Technologies nCounter Analysis System. Multivariate modeling demonstrated that carrying a BRCA1 mutation was the most significant predictor of BRCA1 mRNA levels. BRCA1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in BRCA1 mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (146.7 counts vs. 175.1 counts; P = 0.002). Samples with BRCA1 mutations within exon 11 had lower BRCA1 mRNA levels than samples with mutations within the 5' and 3' regions of the BRCA1 gene (122.1 counts vs. 138.9 and 168.6 counts, respectively; P = 0.003). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of gene expression profiles from freshly isolated blood leukocytes revealed that BRCA1 mutation carriers cluster more closely with other BRCA1 mutation carriers than with BRCA1 wild-type samples. Moreover, a set of 17 genes (including BRCA1) previously shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, were differentially expressed between BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers. Overall, these findings support the concept of BRCA1 haploinsufficiency wherein a specific mutation results in dosage-dependent alteration of BRCA1 at the

  5. Prophylactic window therapy with the clinical poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib delays BRCA1-deficient mammary tumour formation in mice.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Marieke; van der Burg, Eline; van der Gulden, Hanneke; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Bouwman, Peter; Jonkers, Jos

    2017-03-01

    Women with heterozygous germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumour suppressor gene are strongly predisposed to developing early-onset breast cancer through loss of the remaining wild-type BRCA1 allele and inactivation of TP53. Although tumour prevention strategies in BRCA1-mutation carriers are still limited to prophylactic surgery, several therapeutic strategies have been developed to target the DNA repair defects (also known as 'BRCAness') of BRCA1-deficient tumours. In particular, DNA-damaging agents such as platinum drugs and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors show strong activity against BRCA1-mutated tumours. However, it is unclear whether drugs that target BRCAness can also be used to prevent tumour formation in BRCA1-mutation carriers, especially as loss of wild-type BRCA1 may not be the first event in BRCA1-associated tumourigenesis. We performed prophylactic treatments in a genetically engineered mouse model in which de novo development of BRCA1-deficient mammary tumours is induced by stochastic loss of BRCA1 and p53. We found that prophylactic window therapy with nimustine, cisplatin or olaparib reduced the amount and size of mammary gland lesions, and significantly increased the median tumour latency. Similar results were obtained with intermittent prophylactic treatment with olaparib. Importantly, prophylactic window therapy with nimustine and cisplatin resulted in an increased fraction of BRCA1-proficient mammary tumours, suggesting selective survival and malignant transformation of BRCA1-proficient lesions upon prophylactic treatment with DNA-damaging agents. Prophylactic therapy with olaparib significantly prolonged mammary tumour-free survival without any significant increase in the fraction of BRCA1-proficient tumours, warranting the evaluation of this PARP inhibitor in prophylactic trials in BRCA1-mutation carriers. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016

  6. CX-5461 is a DNA G-quadruplex stabilizer with selective lethality in BRCA1/2 deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Di Antonio, Marco; McKinney, Steven; Mathew, Veena; Ho, Brandon; O'Neil, Nigel J; Santos, Nancy Dos; Silvester, Jennifer; Wei, Vivien; Garcia, Jessica; Kabeer, Farhia; Lai, Daniel; Soriano, Priscilla; Banáth, Judit; Chiu, Derek S; Yap, Damian; Le, Daniel D; Ye, Frank B; Zhang, Anni; Thu, Kelsie; Soong, John; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Tsai, Angela Hsin Chin; Osako, Tomo; Algara, Teresa; Saunders, Darren N; Wong, Jason; Xian, Jian; Bally, Marcel B; Brenton, James D; Brown, Grant W; Shah, Sohrab P; Cescon, David; Mak, Tak W; Caldas, Carlos; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Phil; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-02-17

    G-quadruplex DNAs form four-stranded helical structures and are proposed to play key roles in different cellular processes. Targeting G-quadruplex DNAs for cancer treatment is a very promising prospect. Here, we show that CX-5461 is a G-quadruplex stabilizer, with specific toxicity against BRCA deficiencies in cancer cells and polyclonal patient-derived xenograft models, including tumours resistant to PARP inhibition. Exposure to CX-5461, and its related drug CX-3543, blocks replication forks and induces ssDNA gaps or breaks. The BRCA and NHEJ pathways are required for the repair of CX-5461 and CX-3543-induced DNA damage and failure to do so leads to lethality. These data strengthen the concept of G4 targeting as a therapeutic approach, specifically for targeting HR and NHEJ deficient cancers and other tumours deficient for DNA damage repair. CX-5461 is now in advanced phase I clinical trial for patients with BRCA1/2 deficient tumours (Canadian trial, NCT02719977, opened May 2016).

  7. CX-5461 is a DNA G-quadruplex stabilizer with selective lethality in BRCA1/2 deficient tumours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Di Antonio, Marco; McKinney, Steven; Mathew, Veena; Ho, Brandon; O'Neil, Nigel J.; Santos, Nancy Dos; Silvester, Jennifer; Wei, Vivien; Garcia, Jessica; Kabeer, Farhia; Lai, Daniel; Soriano, Priscilla; Banáth, Judit; Chiu, Derek S.; Yap, Damian; Le, Daniel D.; Ye, Frank B.; Zhang, Anni; Thu, Kelsie; Soong, John; Lin, Shu-chuan; Tsai, Angela Hsin Chin; Osako, Tomo; Algara, Teresa; Saunders, Darren N.; Wong, Jason; Xian, Jian; Bally, Marcel B.; Brenton, James D.; Brown, Grant W.; Shah, Sohrab P.; Cescon, David; Mak, Tak W.; Caldas, Carlos; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Phil; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplex DNAs form four-stranded helical structures and are proposed to play key roles in different cellular processes. Targeting G-quadruplex DNAs for cancer treatment is a very promising prospect. Here, we show that CX-5461 is a G-quadruplex stabilizer, with specific toxicity against BRCA deficiencies in cancer cells and polyclonal patient-derived xenograft models, including tumours resistant to PARP inhibition. Exposure to CX-5461, and its related drug CX-3543, blocks replication forks and induces ssDNA gaps or breaks. The BRCA and NHEJ pathways are required for the repair of CX-5461 and CX-3543-induced DNA damage and failure to do so leads to lethality. These data strengthen the concept of G4 targeting as a therapeutic approach, specifically for targeting HR and NHEJ deficient cancers and other tumours deficient for DNA damage repair. CX-5461 is now in advanced phase I clinical trial for patients with BRCA1/2 deficient tumours (Canadian trial, NCT02719977, opened May 2016). PMID:28211448

  8. Identification of BRCA1 and 2 Other Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17 Through Positional Cloning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    Molecular cloning , DNA sequence analysis, and1 biochemical characterization of a novel 65-kDa FK506-hinding protein (FKBP65). J Biol Chem 270, 29336...S., Wong, K., Chan, R., Lau, C., Tsao, S., Knapp, R., and Berkowitz, R. (1994). Molecular cloning of differentially expressed genes in human

  9. Interaction of BRCA1 With the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    of the non - homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) repair. Though the kinase activity of DNA- PKcs is essential for...1998) Homologous recombination and non - homologous end - joining pathways of DNA double-strand break repair have overlapping roles in the maintenance of

  10. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  11. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.

  12. Attenuation of RNA polymerase II pausing mitigates BRCA1-associated R-loop accumulation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chi; Smith, Sabrina; Zhao, Xiayan; Nair, Sreejith J.; Michalek, Joel; Jatoi, Ismail; Lautner, Meeghan; Oliver, Boyce; Wang, Howard; Petit, Anna; Soler, Teresa; Brunet, Joan; Mateo, Francesca; Angel Pujana, Miguel; Poggi, Elizabeth; Chaldekas, Krysta; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Ochoa, Oscar; Chedin, Frederic; Theoharis, Constantine; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Curiel, Tyler J.; Elledge, Richard; Jin, Victor X.; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Most BRCA1-associated breast tumours are basal-like yet originate from luminal progenitors. BRCA1 is best known for its functions in double-strand break repair and resolution of DNA replication stress. However, it is unclear whether loss of these ubiquitously important functions fully explains the cell lineage-specific tumorigenesis. In vitro studies implicate BRCA1 in elimination of R-loops, DNA-RNA hybrid structures involved in transcription and genetic instability. Here we show that R-loops accumulate preferentially in breast luminal epithelial cells, not in basal epithelial or stromal cells, of BRCA1 mutation carriers. Furthermore, R-loops are enriched at the 5′ end of those genes with promoter-proximal RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pausing. Genetic ablation of Cobra1, which encodes a Pol II-pausing and BRCA1-binding protein, ameliorates R-loop accumulation and reduces tumorigenesis in Brca1-knockout mouse mammary epithelium. Our studies show that Pol II pausing is an important contributor to BRCA1-associated R-loop accumulation and breast cancer development. PMID:28649985

  13. Loss of INPP4B causes a DNA repair defect through loss of BRCA1, ATM and ATR and can be targeted with PARP inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura R H; Poulogiannis, George; Viciano, Felipe Cia; Sasaki, Junko; Kofuji, Satoshi; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hochhauser, Daniel; Hartley, John A; Sasaki, Takehiko; Gewinner, Christina A

    2015-04-30

    Treatment options for ovarian cancer patients remain limited and overall survival is less than 50% despite recent clinical advances. The lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) has been described as a tumor suppressor in the PI3K/Akt pathway with loss of expression found most pronounced in breast, ovarian cancer and melanoma. Using microarray technology we identified a DNA repair defect in INPP4B-deficient cells, which we further characterized by comet assays and quantification of γH2AX, RAD51 and 53BP1 foci formation. INPP4B loss resulted in significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition, comparable to loss of BRCA1 in two- and three-dimensional in vitro models, as well as in in vivo xenograft models. Mechanistically, we discovered that INPP4B forms a protein complex with the key players of DNA repair, ATR and BRCA1, in GST pulldown and 293T overexpression assays, and INPP4B loss affects BRCA1, ATM and ATR protein stability resulting in the observed DNA repair defect. Given that INPP4B loss has been found in 40% of ovarian cancer patients, this study provides the rationale for establishing INPP4B as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. Loss of the tumor suppressor inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) results in a DNA repair defect due to concomitant loss of BRCA1, ATR and ATM and can be therapeutically targeted with PARP inhibitors.

  14. AKT Regulates BRCA1 Stability in Response to Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Lyons, Traci R.; Young, Christian D.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Anderson, Steven M.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, with its binding partner BARD1, regulates the cellular response to DNA damage in multiple tissues, yet inherited mutations within BRCA1 result specifically in breast and ovarian cancers. This observation, along with several other lines of evidence, suggests a functional relationship may exist between hormone signaling and BRCA1 function. Our data demonstrates that AKT activation promotes the expression of BRCA1 in response to estrogen and IGF-1 receptor signaling. Further, we have identified a novel AKT phosphorylation site in BRCA1 at S694 which is responsive to activation of these signaling pathways. This rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels appears to occur independently of new protein synthesis and treatment with the clinically utilized proteasome inhibitor bortezomib similarly leads to a rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels. Together, these data suggest that AKT phosphorylation of BRCA1 increases total protein expression by preventing proteasomal degradation. AKT activation also appears to support nuclear localization of BRCA1, and co-expression of activated AKT with BRCA1 decreases radiation sensitivity, suggesting this interaction has functional consequences for BRCA1's role in DNA repair. We conclude that AKT regulates BRCA1 protein stability and function through direct phosphorylation of BRCA1. Further, the responsiveness of the AKT-BRCA1 regulatory pathway to hormone signaling may, in part, underlie the tissue specificity of BRCA1 mutant cancers. Pharmacological targets within this pathway could provide strategies for modulation of BRCA1 protein, which may prove therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:20085797

  15. Germline Mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, and RAD51C, Which Regulate DNA Recombination Repair, in Patients With Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Lott, Paul; Bohorquez, Mabel; Toal, Ted; Estrada, Ana P; Suarez, John J; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Pinto, Carla; Ramos, Irma; Mantilla, Alejandra; Prieto, Rodrigo; Corvalan, Alejandro; Norero, Enrique; Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Carvallo, Pilar; Gonzalez, Luz M; Cock-Rada, Alicia; Solano, Angela; Neffa, Florencia; Della Valle, Adriana; Yau, Chris; Soares, Gabriela; Borowsky, Alexander; Hu, Nan; He, Li-Ji; Han, Xiao-You; Taylor, Philip R; Goldstein, Alisa M; Torres, Javier; Echeverry, Magdalena; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G

    2017-04-01

    Up to 10% of cases of gastric cancer are familial, but so far, only mutations in CDH1 have been associated with gastric cancer risk. To identify genetic variants that affect risk for gastric cancer, we collected blood samples from 28 patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) not associated with mutations in CDH1 and performed whole-exome sequence analysis. We then analyzed sequences of candidate genes in 333 independent HDGC and non-HDGC cases. We identified 11 cases with mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, or RAD51C genes, which regulate homologous DNA recombination. We found these mutations in 2 of 31 patients with HDGC (6.5%) and 9 of 331 patients with sporadic gastric cancer (2.8%). Most of these mutations had been previously associated with other types of tumors and partially co-segregated with gastric cancer in our study. Tumors that developed in patients with these mutations had a mutation signature associated with somatic homologous recombination deficiency. Our findings indicate that defects in homologous recombination increase risk for gastric cancer.

  16. BRCA1 Regulates IFI16 Mediated Nuclear Innate Sensing of Herpes Viral DNA and Subsequent Induction of the Innate Inflammasome and Interferon-β Responses.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipanjan; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Roy, Arunava; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Iqbal, Jawed; Chikoti, Leela; Kumar, Binod; Johnson, Karen E; Chandran, Bala

    2015-06-01

    The innate immune system pattern recognition receptors (PRR) are the first line of host defenses recognizing the various pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and eliciting defenses by regulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18 or interferon β (IFN-β). NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs) are cytoplasmic inflammasome sensors of foreign molecules, including DNA. IFI16, a sequence-independent nuclear innate sensor ALR, recognizes episomal dsDNA genomes of herpes viruses such as KSHV, EBV, and HSV-1 in the infected cell nuclei, forms an inflammasome complex with ASC and procaspase1, and relocates into the cytoplasm leading into Caspase-1 and IL-1β generation. IFI16 also induces IFN-β during HSV-1 infection via the cytoplasmic STING-TBK1-IRF3 pathway. Thus far, whether IFI16 recognizes foreign DNA directly or utilizes other host protein(s) is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1, a DNA damage repair sensor and transcription regulator, is in complex with IFI16 in the host cell nucleus, and their association increases in the presence of nuclear viral genomes during de novo KSHV, EBV and HSV-1 infection, and in latent KSHV or EBV infection, but not by DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by bleomycin and vaccinia virus cytoplasmic dsDNA. BRCA1 is a constituent of the triggered IFI16-inflammasome and is translocated into the cytoplasm after genome recognition along with the IFI16-inflammasome. The absence of BRCA1 abrogated IFI16-viral genome association, inflammasome assembly, IFI16 cytoplasmic localization, and Caspase-1 and IL-1β production. The absence of BRCA1 also abolished the cytoplasmic IFI16-STING interaction, downstream IRF3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of pIRF3 and IFN-β production during de novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection. These findings highlight that BRCA1 plays a hitherto unidentified innate immunomodulatory role by facilitating nuclear foreign DNA sensing by IFI16

  17. BRCA1 Regulates IFI16 Mediated Nuclear Innate Sensing of Herpes Viral DNA and Subsequent Induction of the Innate Inflammasome and Interferon-β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Roy, Arunava; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Iqbal, Jawed; Chikoti, Leela; Kumar, Binod; Johnson, Karen E.; Chandran, Bala

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system pattern recognition receptors (PRR) are the first line of host defenses recognizing the various pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and eliciting defenses by regulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18 or interferon β (IFN-β). NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs) are cytoplasmic inflammasome sensors of foreign molecules, including DNA. IFI16, a sequence-independent nuclear innate sensor ALR, recognizes episomal dsDNA genomes of herpes viruses such as KSHV, EBV, and HSV-1 in the infected cell nuclei, forms an inflammasome complex with ASC and procaspase1, and relocates into the cytoplasm leading into Caspase-1 and IL-1β generation. IFI16 also induces IFN-β during HSV-1 infection via the cytoplasmic STING-TBK1-IRF3 pathway. Thus far, whether IFI16 recognizes foreign DNA directly or utilizes other host protein(s) is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1, a DNA damage repair sensor and transcription regulator, is in complex with IFI16 in the host cell nucleus, and their association increases in the presence of nuclear viral genomes during de novo KSHV, EBV and HSV-1 infection, and in latent KSHV or EBV infection, but not by DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by bleomycin and vaccinia virus cytoplasmic dsDNA. BRCA1 is a constituent of the triggered IFI16-inflammasome and is translocated into the cytoplasm after genome recognition along with the IFI16-inflammasome. The absence of BRCA1 abrogated IFI16-viral genome association, inflammasome assembly, IFI16 cytoplasmic localization, and Caspase-1 and IL-1β production. The absence of BRCA1 also abolished the cytoplasmic IFI16-STING interaction, downstream IRF3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of pIRF3 and IFN-β production during de novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection. These findings highlight that BRCA1 plays a hitherto unidentified innate immunomodulatory role by facilitating nuclear foreign DNA sensing by IFI16

  18. BRCA1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase: the metabolic syndrome of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Joan; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Colomer, Ramon; Graña-Suarez, Begoña; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer-associated mutations affecting the highly-conserved C-terminal BRCT domains of the tumor suppressor gene breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) fully disrupt the ability of BRCA1 to interact with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing de novo fatty acid biogenesis. Specifically, BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated (inactive) form of ACCA (P-ACCA), and the formation of the BRCA1/P-ACCA complex interferes with ACCA activity by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. One of the hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells is a high rate of energy-consuming anabolic processes driving the synthesis of lipids, proteins, and DNA (all of which are regulated by the energy status of the cell). The ability of BRCA1 to stabilize the phosphorylated/inactive form of ACCA strongly suggests that the tumor suppressive function of BRCA1 closely depends on its ability to mimic a cellular-low-energy status, which is known to block tumor cell anabolism and suppress the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, physical exercise and lack of obesity in adolescence have been associated with significantly delayed breast cancer onset for Ashkenazi Jewish women carrying BRCA1 gene mutations. Further clinical work may explore a chemopreventative role of "low-energy-mimickers" deactivating the ACCA-driven "lipogenic phenotype" in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1. This goal might be obtained with current therapeutic approaches useful in treating the metabolic syndrome and associated disorders in humans (e.g., type 2 diabetes and obesity), including metformin, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), calorie deprivation, and exercise. Alternatively, new forthcoming ACCA inhibitors may be relevant in the management of BRCA1-dependent breast cancer susceptibility and development. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. An RNF168 fragment defective for focal accumulation at DNA damage is proficient for inhibition of homologous recombination in BRCA1 deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Meilen C.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168 is a DNA damage response (DDR) factor that promotes monoubiquitination of H2A/H2AX at K13/15, facilitates recruitment of other DDR factors (e.g. 53BP1) to DNA damage, and inhibits homologous recombination (HR) in cells deficient in the tumor suppressor BRCA1. We have examined the domains of RNF168 important for these DDR events, including chromosomal HR that is induced by several nucleases (I-SceI, CAS9-WT and CAS9-D10A), since the inducing nuclease affects the relative frequency of distinct repair outcomes. We found that an N-terminal fragment of RNF168 (1-220/N221*) efficiently inhibits HR induced by each of these nucleases in BRCA1 depleted cells, and promotes recruitment of 53BP1 to DNA damage and H2AX monoubiquitination at K13/15. Each of these DDR events requires a charged residue in RNF168 (R57). Notably, RNF168-N221* fails to self-accumulate into ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF). Furthermore, expression of RNF168 WT and N221* can significantly bypass the role of another E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF8, for inhibition of HR in BRCA1 depleted cells, and for promotion of 53BP1 IRIF. We suggest that the ability for RNF168 to promote H2A/H2AX monoubiquitination and 53BP1 IRIF, but not RNF168 self-accumulation into IRIF, is important for inhibition of HR in BRCA1 deficient cells. PMID:24829461

  20. Yeast Screens Identify the RNA Polymerase II CTD and SPT5 as Relevant Targets of BRCA1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Craig B.; Westmoreland, Tammy J.; Verrier, Carmel S.; Blanchette, Carrie A. B.; Sabin, Tiffany L.; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Mishina, Yuliya V.; Huper, Gudrun; Selim, Alice L.; Madison, Ernest R.; Bailey, Dominique D.; Falae, Adebola I.; Galli, Alvaro; Olson, John A.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Marks, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    BRCA1 has been implicated in numerous DNA repair pathways that maintain genome integrity, however the function responsible for its tumor suppressor activity in breast cancer remains obscure. To identify the most highly conserved of the many BRCA1 functions, we screened the evolutionarily distant eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutants that suppressed the G1 checkpoint arrest and lethality induced following heterologous BRCA1 expression. A genome-wide screen in the diploid deletion collection combined with a screen of ionizing radiation sensitive gene deletions identified mutants that permit growth in the presence of BRCA1. These genes delineate a metabolic mRNA pathway that temporally links transcription elongation (SPT4, SPT5, CTK1, DEF1) to nucleopore-mediated mRNA export (ASM4, MLP1, MLP2, NUP2, NUP53, NUP120, NUP133, NUP170, NUP188, POM34) and cytoplasmic mRNA decay at P-bodies (CCR4, DHH1). Strikingly, BRCA1 interacted with the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) carboxy terminal domain (P-CTD), phosphorylated in the pattern specified by the CTDK-I kinase, to induce DEF1-dependent cleavage and accumulation of a RNAPII fragment containing the P-CTD. Significantly, breast cancer associated BRCT domain defects in BRCA1 that suppressed P-CTD cleavage and lethality in yeast also suppressed the physical interaction of BRCA1 with human SPT5 in breast epithelial cells, thus confirming SPT5 as a relevant target of BRCA1 interaction. Furthermore, enhanced P-CTD cleavage was observed in both yeast and human breast cells following UV-irradiation indicating a conserved eukaryotic damage response. Moreover, P-CTD cleavage in breast epithelial cells was BRCA1-dependent since damage-induced P-CTD cleavage was only observed in the mutant BRCA1 cell line HCC1937 following ectopic expression of wild type BRCA1. Finally, BRCA1, SPT5 and hyperphosphorylated RPB1 form a complex that was rapidly degraded following MMS treatment in wild type but not BRCA1 mutant breast

  1. Treatment related toxicity in BRCA1-associated epithelial ovarian cancer – is DNA repairing impairment associated with more adverse events?

    PubMed Central

    Budryk, Magdalena; Nowara, Elżbieta; Starzyczny-Słota, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The presence of BRCA germline mutations in patients with ovarian cancer has been shown to have predictive and prognostic significance, including increased platinum-sensitivity. The aim of the study was to evaluate if patients with BRCA1-associated ovarian cancer have more treatment related adverse events and, if so, does it have impact on chemotherapy outcomes. Material and methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of 172 patients with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer, treated in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch between 2007 and 2013. Ninety-six of these patients have known BRCA mutation status – 21 patients were BRCA1(+) and 75 BRCA1(–). Analysed treatment related adverse events (AE’s) were: haematological toxicity, nausea/vomiting, neuropathy and mucositis. Results Grade 3–4 haematological AE’s were significantly more common among BRCA1(+) patients (OR = 3.86; 95% CI: 1.14–13.23; p = 0.02). There was no association between BRCA1 mutation status and neuropathy (p = 0.73) or nausea/vomiting (p = 0.91). Occurrence of above mentioned AE’s has no significant association with PFS (p = 0.75, 0.64, 0.97 respectively) and OS (p = 0.64, 0.69, 0.73 respectively). Conclusions Among patients with BRCA1-associated epithelial ovarian cancer we observed significantly more grade 3–4 haematological complications after chemotherapy. However, occurrence of AE’s did not correlate with better outcomes in this subgroup.

  2. Development and validation of a new algorithm for the reclassification of genetic variants identified in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Dmitry; Morris, Brian; Hughes, Elisha; Eggington, Julie M; Esterling, Lisa; Robinson, Brandon S; van Kan, Aric; Fernandes, Priscilla H; Roa, Benjamin B; Gutin, Alexander; Wenstrup, Richard J; Bowles, Karla R

    2014-08-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 sequencing analysis detects variants of uncertain clinical significance in approximately 2 % of patients undergoing clinical diagnostic testing in our laboratory. The reclassification of these variants into either a pathogenic or benign clinical interpretation is critical for improved patient management. We developed a statistical variant reclassification tool based on the premise that probands with disease-causing mutations are expected to have more severe personal and family histories than those having benign variants. The algorithm was validated using simulated variants based on approximately 145,000 probands, as well as 286 BRCA1 and 303 BRCA2 true variants. Positive and negative predictive values of ≥99 % were obtained for each gene. Although the history weighting algorithm was not designed to detect alleles of lower penetrance, analysis of the hypomorphic mutations c.5096G>A (p.Arg1699Gln; BRCA1) and c.7878G>C (p.Trp2626Cys; BRCA2) indicated that the history weighting algorithm is able to identify some lower penetrance alleles. The history weighting algorithm is a powerful tool that accurately assigns actionable clinical classifications to variants of uncertain clinical significance. While being developed for reclassification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants, the history weighting algorithm is expected to be applicable to other cancer- and non-cancer-related genes.

  3. Evolutionary conservation analysis increases the colocalization of predicted exonic splicing enhancers in the BRCA1 gene with missense sequence changes and in-frame deletions, but not polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, Christopher; Wayte, Nicola; Lovelock, Paul K; Tavtigian, Sean V; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Brown, Melissa A

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Aberrant pre-mRNA splicing can be more detrimental to the function of a gene than changes in the length or nature of the encoded amino acid sequence. Although predicting the effects of changes in consensus 5' and 3' splice sites near intron:exon boundaries is relatively straightforward, predicting the possible effects of changes in exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) remains a challenge. Methods As an initial step toward determining which ESEs predicted by the web-based tool ESEfinder in the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 are likely to be functional, we have determined their evolutionary conservation and compared their location with known BRCA1 sequence variants. Results Using the default settings of ESEfinder, we initially detected 669 potential ESEs in the coding region of the BRCA1 gene. Increasing the threshold score reduced the total number to 464, while taking into consideration the proximity to splice donor and acceptor sites reduced the number to 211. Approximately 11% of these ESEs (23/211) either are identical at the nucleotide level in human, primates, mouse, cow, dog and opossum Brca1 (conserved) or are detectable by ESEfinder in the same position in the Brca1 sequence (shared). The frequency of conserved and shared predicted ESEs between human and mouse is higher in BRCA1 exons (2.8 per 100 nucleotides) than in introns (0.6 per 100 nucleotides). Of conserved or shared putative ESEs, 61% (14/23) were predicted to be affected by sequence variants reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core database. Applying the filters described above increased the colocalization of predicted ESEs with missense changes, in-frame deletions and unclassified variants predicted to be deleterious to protein function, whereas they decreased the colocalization with known polymorphisms or unclassified variants predicted to be neutral. Conclusion In this report we show that evolutionary conservation analysis may be used to improve the specificity of an ESE

  4. Targeting the BRCA1/2 tumor suppressors.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Eliot M; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are classic tumor suppressor genes that exhibit an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with high penetrance. BRCA carriers inherit one mutant BRCA allele and one wild-type allele; and the wild-type allele is invariably deleted or mutated within the tumor. These genes function as caretakers in the maintenance of genomic stability, in part, by participating in homology-directed DNA repair (HDR), an error- free mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). PARP1 (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1) is an enzyme that functions in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, where its ability to post-translationally modify histones and DNA damage response proteins is required for repair of single-strand breaks (SSBs). In 2005, it was observed that knockdown of PARP1 or treatment with a small molecule PARP inhibitor was far more toxic to cells with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations than BRCA1/2-competent cells. This observation is an example of "synthetic lethality", a concept whereby two gene mutations combine to cause cell death, when neither mutation alone is lethal. These results spawned the idea to use PARP inhibitors to treat BRCA1/2 mutant cancers. Here, we will review the basic science underlying the discoveries described above, the preclinical research, and the clinical trials designed to exploit the sensitivity of BRCA1/2 mutant tumor cells to PARP inhibitors. We will also describe problems associated with the use of these agents, including development and mechanisms of drug resistance; and we will provide a forward look at new agents and strategies currently under development.

  5. BRCA1/BARD1 E3 ubiquitin ligase can modify histones H2A and H2B in the nucleosome particle.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Amit; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2010-02-01

    BRCA1, the protein product of the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Gene (BRCA1) has been implicated in multiple pathways that preserve genome stability, including cell cycle control, DNA repair, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. BRCA1, in complex with another RING-domain protein BARD1, possesses ubiquitin-ligase activity. Only a few targets for this activity have been identified in vivo. Nucleosomal histones may also be targets in vivo since they can be modified by the BRCA1/BARD1 complex in vitro. Here we demonstrate that the BRCA1/BARD1 complex can ubiquitylate both free H2A and H2B histones and histones in the context of nucleosomal particles. These results raise the possibility that BRCA1/BARD1 can directly affect nucleosomal structure, dynamics, and function through its ability to modify nucleosomal histones.

  6. [Correlation anslysis of sporadic breast cancer and BRCA1 gene plymorphisms in the Han Nationality and the Mongol Nationality of Inner Mongolia Region].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinzhu; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xinlai; BuRi, Gude

    2015-12-08

    To study the correlationship between the BRCA1 gene polymorphisms, especially in 2731 loci (rs799917), and sporadic breast cancer in the Han nationality and the Mongol nationality of the Inner Mongolia region. Using the prospective study method, 103 cases of patients with sporadic breast cancer (case group) and 103 cases of normal physical examination people (control group) were enrolled. PCR and direct sequencing method were used for analyzing the correlationship of 2731 loci polymorphisms of BRCA1 and sporadic breast cancer in our zone. In the case group, the age stratification, pathologic stage, immunohistochemistry and the distribution of lymph node metastasis had no significant difference in two ethnic group (P> 0.05). The age stratification of control group also had no significant difference in two ethnic group (P>0. 05). There was no statistically significant difference in age stratification of the case group and the control group (P>0.05). In the Inner Mongolia region, BRCA1 gene 2731 loci genotypes check out three genotypes: namely TT, CT and CC. The frequencies of genotype TT, CT, CC in the case group were 13.1%, 26.2%, 60.7% ( the Han nationality) and 16.7%, 28.6%, 54.7% (the Mongol nationality), respectively. Meanwhile the frequencies of allele T and allele C were 71.8% and 28.2%. In the control group, the frequencies of genotype TT, CT, CC were 18.0%, 31.1%, 50.9% ( the Han nationality) and 23.8%, 38.1%, 38.1% ( the Mongol nationality), respectively, and the frequencies of allele T and allele C were 62.9% and 37.1%. BRCA1 gene 2 731 loci gene polymorphism had no significant difference in two groups (χ(2)=3.438, P=0.752), but T allele frequency distribution in the case group was significantly increased (χ(2)=4.185, P=0.041). There is no obvious correlation between the BRCA1 gene 2731 loci and sporadic breast cancer in the Han nationality and the Mongol nationality of the Inner Mongolia region. C allele of BRCA1 gene 2731 loci may be one of the

  7. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives. PMID:9643283

  8. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-06-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives.

  9. RNF8 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Ubc13 E2 Conjugating Activity That Is Essential for DNA Double Strand Break Signaling and BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Recruitment

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Ismail, Ismail H.; Edwards, Ross A.; Hura, Greg L.; Xiao, Andrew T.; Tainer, John A.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2016-02-22

    DNA double strand break (DSB) responses depend on the sequential actions of the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 plus E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13 to specifically generate histone Lys-63-linked ubiquitin chains in DSB signaling. In this paper, we defined the activated RNF8-Ubc13~ubiquitin complex by x-ray crystallography and its functional solution conformations by x-ray scattering, as tested by separation-of-function mutations imaged in cells by immunofluorescence. The collective results show that the RING E3 RNF8 targets E2 Ubc13 to DSB sites and plays a critical role in damage signaling by stimulating polyubiquitination through modulating conformations of ubiquitin covalently linked to the Ubc13 active site. Structure-guided separation-of-function mutations show that the RNF8 E2 stimulating activity is essential for DSB signaling in mammalian cells and is necessary for downstream recruitment of 53BP1 and BRCA1. Chromatin-targeted RNF168 rescues 53BP1 recruitment involved in non-homologous end joining but not BRCA1 recruitment for homologous recombination. Finally, these findings suggest an allosteric approach to targeting the ubiquitin-docking cleft at the E2-E3 interface for possible interventions in cancer and chronic inflammation, and moreover, they establish an independent RNF8 role in BRCA1 recruitment.

  10. RNF8 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Ubc13 E2 Conjugating Activity That Is Essential for DNA Double Strand Break Signaling and BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Recruitment

    DOE PAGES

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Ismail, Ismail H.; Edwards, Ross A.; ...

    2016-02-22

    DNA double strand break (DSB) responses depend on the sequential actions of the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 plus E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13 to specifically generate histone Lys-63-linked ubiquitin chains in DSB signaling. In this paper, we defined the activated RNF8-Ubc13~ubiquitin complex by x-ray crystallography and its functional solution conformations by x-ray scattering, as tested by separation-of-function mutations imaged in cells by immunofluorescence. The collective results show that the RING E3 RNF8 targets E2 Ubc13 to DSB sites and plays a critical role in damage signaling by stimulating polyubiquitination through modulating conformations of ubiquitin covalently linked to the Ubc13more » active site. Structure-guided separation-of-function mutations show that the RNF8 E2 stimulating activity is essential for DSB signaling in mammalian cells and is necessary for downstream recruitment of 53BP1 and BRCA1. Chromatin-targeted RNF168 rescues 53BP1 recruitment involved in non-homologous end joining but not BRCA1 recruitment for homologous recombination. Finally, these findings suggest an allosteric approach to targeting the ubiquitin-docking cleft at the E2-E3 interface for possible interventions in cancer and chronic inflammation, and moreover, they establish an independent RNF8 role in BRCA1 recruitment.« less

  11. Metastasizing patent claims on BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Crossman, Colin; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Many patents make claims on DNA sequences; some include claims on oligonucleotides related to the primary patented gene. We used bioinformatics to quantify the reach of one such claim from patent 4,747,282 on BRCA1. We find that human chromosome 1 (which does not contain BRCA1) contains over 300,000 oligonucleotides covered by this claim, and that 80% of cDNA and mRNA sequences contributed to GenBank before the patent application was filed also contain at least one claimed oligonucleotide. Any "isolated" DNA molecules that include such 15 bp nucleotide sequences would fall under the claim as granted by the US Patent and Trademark Office. Anyone making, using, selling, or importing such a molecule for any purpose within the United States would thus be infringing the claim. This claim and others like it turn out, on examination, to be surprisingly broad, and if enforced would have substantial implications for medical practice and scientific research.

  12. Metastasizing patent claims on BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Crossman, Colin; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Many patents make claims on DNA sequences; some include claims on oligonucleotides related to the primary patented gene. We used bioinformatics to quantify the reach of one such claim from patent 4,747,282 on BRCA1. We find that human chromosome 1 (which does not contain BRCA1) contains over 300,000 oligonucleotides covered by this claim, and that 80% of cDNA and mRNA sequences contributed to GenBank before the patent application was filed also contain at least one claimed oligonucleotide. Any “isolated” DNA molecules that include such 15bp nucleotide sequences would fall under the claim as granted by the US Patent and Trademark Office. Anyone making, using, selling, or importing such a molecule for any purpose within the United States would thus be infringing the claim. This claim and others like it turn out, on examination, to be surprisingly broad, and if enforced would have substantial implications for medical practice and scientific research. PMID:20226239

  13. Relationship between three novel SNPs of BRCA1 and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Weidong; YANG, Xu; QIU, Hengbin; ZHANG, Di; WANG, Huanan; HUANG, Jian; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    The BRCA1 gene plays an important role in the development of human breast cancer, and recent research indicated that genetic variations of BRCA1 are also related to canine mammary tumors (CMTs). Here, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we cloned the 5′- and 3′-UTRs of BRCA1. By direct sequencing of the flanking sequences of the 5′- and 3′-UTRs of BRCA1, three previously unreported single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, two (−1228T >C, −1173C >T) in the putative promoter regions and one non-synonymous SNP (63449G >A) in exon 23. Compared with 16 normal samples, the sequences from 34 CMTs suggested that SNP (−1173C >T) was associated with the development of CMTs (odds ratio (OR)=2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–6.15). PMID:26156012

  14. BRIT1/MCPH1 is a DNA damage responsive protein that regulates the Brca1–Chk1 pathway, implicating checkpoint dysfunction in microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Rai, Rekha; Li, Kaiyi; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    BRIT1 [BRCT-repeat inhibitor of hTERT expression], a repressor of human telomerase function, is implicated in cellular immortalization. Here, we find that BRIT1 acts as a regulator of both the intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. When BRIT1 expression is depleted, cells lose the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell cycle arrest and become IR sensitive. BRIT1 is a chromatin-associated protein that forms irradiation-induced nuclear foci that colocalize with γ-H2AX foci. BRIT1 is also required for the expression of both BRCA1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 and phosphorylation of Nbs1. Thus, the checkpoint defects in the absence of BRIT1 are likely to result from its regulation of Nbs1, BRCA1, and Chk1. BRIT1 is identical to the recently discovered MCPH1 gene, found mutant in patients with primary microcephaly. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated-Rad3 related (ATR)–Chk1 pathway is defective in Seckel syndrome, another microcephaly disorder. We propose that the microcephaly observed in patients with MCPH1 deficiencies is due to disruption of the ATR–BRCA1–Chk1 signaling pathway that is also disrupted in Seckel syndrome patients. PMID:16217032

  15. Identification of Genes Required for the Survival of BRCA 1-/- Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    to double-strand breaks. Science 286, 1162-6 (1999). 36. Smogorzewska, A. et al. Identification of the FANCI protein, a monoubiquitinated FANCD2 paralog required for DNA repair. Cell 129, 289-301 (2007).

  16. Critical role for BRCA1 expression as a marker of chemosensitivity response and prognosis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Paola; De Siervi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is still the leader option for cancer treatment. Nevertheless some patients develop chemotherapy resistance. One major research goal is to identify the critical genes involved in chemotherapy response to predict the best therapy option for patients. Germline mutations in the BReast Cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) are associated to increased risk of developing breast, ovarian and other types of cancers. However, due to harmful BRCA1 gene mutations are relatively rare in the general population, nowadays most researchers focused on BRCA1 expression downregulation and/or epigenetic inactivation in sporadic tumors as a prognosis tool for chemotherapy response in patients. Chemotherapy response can be dramatically different depending on BRCA1 expression status, tumor type and drug. Hence, the chemotherapy response could be dissimilar in breast, ovarian, uterine, prostate, esophageal, gastric and lung cancers. Additionally, differential BRCA1 expression in sporadic tumors shows different response to DNA-damaging agents, mitotic inhibitors or PARP inhibitors. In this review we will examine the response to different chemotherapy agents in several cancer types depending on BRCA1 expression status.

  17. BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 are potential molecular targets for the modulation of a radiation-induced DNA damage response in bystander cells.

    PubMed

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Rothkamm, Kai; McClelland, Keeva; Al Rashid, Shahnaz T; Prise, Kevin M

    2015-01-28

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment option for many human cancers. Current research is investigating the use of molecular targeted drugs in order to improve responses to radiotherapy in various cancers. The cellular response to irradiation is driven by both direct DNA damage in the targeted cell and intercellular signalling leading to a broad range of bystander effects. This study aims to elucidate radiation-induced DNA damage response signalling in bystander cells and to identify potential molecular targets to modulate the radiation induced bystander response in a therapeutic setting. Stalled replication forks in T98G bystander cells were visualised via bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) nuclear foci detection at sites of single stranded DNA. γH2AX co-localised with these BrdU foci. BRCA1 and FANCD2 foci formed in T98G bystander cells. Using ATR mutant F02-98 hTERT and ATM deficient GM05849 fibroblasts it could be shown that ATR but not ATM was required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to sites of replication associated DNA damage in bystander cells whereas BRCA1 bystander foci were ATM-dependent. Phospho-Chk1 foci formation was observed in T98G bystander cells. Clonogenic survival assays showed moderate radiosensitisation of directly irradiated cells by the Chk1 inhibitor UCN-01 but increased radioresistance of bystander cells. This study identifies BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 as potential targets for the modulation of radiation response in bystander cells. It adds to our understanding of the key molecular events propagating out-of-field effects of radiation and provides a rationale for the development of novel molecular targeted drugs for radiotherapy optimisation.

  18. BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 are potential molecular targets for the modulation of a radiation-induced DNA damage response in bystander cells

    PubMed Central

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Rothkamm, Kai; McClelland, Keeva; Al Rashid, Shahnaz T.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment option for many human cancers. Current research is investigating the use of molecular targeted drugs in order to improve responses to radiotherapy in various cancers. The cellular response to irradiation is driven by both direct DNA damage in the targeted cell and intercellular signalling leading to a broad range of bystander effects. This study aims to elucidate radiation-induced DNA damage response signalling in bystander cells and to identify potential molecular targets to modulate the radiation induced bystander response in a therapeutic setting. Stalled replication forks in T98G bystander cells were visualised via bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) nuclear foci detection at sites of single stranded DNA. γH2AX co-localised with these BrdU foci. BRCA1 and FANCD2 foci formed in T98G bystander cells. Using ATR mutant F02-98 hTERT and ATM deficient GM05849 fibroblasts it could be shown that ATR but not ATM was required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to sites of replication associated DNA damage in bystander cells whereas BRCA1 bystander foci were ATM-dependent. Phospho-Chk1 foci formation was observed in T98G bystander cells. Clonogenic survival assays showed moderate radiosensitisation of directly irradiated cells by the Chk1 inhibitor UCN-01 but increased radioresistance of bystander cells. This study identifies BRCA1, FANCD2 and Chk1 as potential targets for the modulation of radiation response in bystander cells. It adds to our understanding of the key molecular events propagating out-of-field effects of radiation and provides a rationale for the development of novel molecular targeted drugs for radiotherapy optimisation. PMID:25304378

  19. The identification of a novel role for BRCA1 in regulating RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Rebecca; D'Costa, Zenobia; Ray, Swagat; Gorski, Julia; Harkin, D. Paul; Mullan, Paul; Panov, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The unrestrained proliferation of cancer cells requires a high level of ribosome biogenesis. The first stage of ribosome biogenesis is the transcription of the large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs); the structural and functional components of the ribosome. Transcription of rRNA is carried out by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) and its associated holoenzyme complex. Here we report that BRCA1, a nuclear phosphoprotein, and a known tumour suppressor involved in variety of cellular processes such as DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and ubiquitylation, is associated with rDNA repeats, in particular with the regulatory regions of the rRNA gene. We demonstrate that BRCA1 interacts directly with the basal Pol-I transcription factors; upstream binding factor (UBF), selectivity factor-1 (SL1) as well as interacting with RNA Pol-I itself. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA1 occupancy at the rDNA repeat is decreased and the observed BRCA1 interactions with the Pol-I transcription machinery are weakened. We propose, therefore, that there is a rDNA associated fraction of BRCA1 involved in DNA damage dependent regulation of Pol-I transcription, regulating the stability and formation of the Pol-I holoenzyme during initiation and/or elongation in response to DNA damage. PMID:27589844

  20. Coordination of BRCA1/BARD1- and MRE11/RAD50/NBS1-dependent DNA Transactions in Breast Tumor Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    In revision) T. Fazio, M. L. Visnapuu, S. Wind, E. C. Greene, Langmuir 24, 10524 (Sep 16, 2008). M. L. Visnapuu, T. Fazio, S. Wind, E. C. Greene... Langmuir 24, 11293 (Oct 7, 2008). CONCLUSION Our experiments in cell-free extracts have allowed us to separate the functions of the BRCA1/BARD1...checkpoint signaling might be critical to prevent breast tumor development. 11 REFERENCES 1. S. V. Hodgson, P. J. Morrison, M. Irving , Am J Med

  1. Targeted sequencing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 across a large unselected breast cancer cohort suggests that one-third of mutations are somatic

    PubMed Central

    Winter, C.; Nilsson, M. P.; Olsson, E.; George, A. M.; Chen, Y.; Kvist, A.; Törngren, T.; Vallon-Christersson, J.; Hegardt, C.; Häkkinen, J.; Jönsson, G.; Grabau, D.; Malmberg, M.; Kristoffersson, U.; Rehn, M.; Gruvberger-Saal, S. K.; Larsson, C.; Borg, Å.; Loman, N.; Saal, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background A mutation found in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene of a breast tumor could be either germline or somatically acquired. The prevalence of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and the ratio between somatic and germline BRCA1/2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients are currently unclear. Patients and methods Paired normal and tumor DNA was analyzed for BRCA1/2 mutations by massively parallel sequencing in an unselected cohort of 273 breast cancer patients from south Sweden. Results Deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 (n = 10) or BRCA2 (n = 10) were detected in 20 patients (7%). Deleterious somatic mutations in BRCA1 (n = 4) or BRCA2 (n = 5) were detected in 9 patients (3%). Accordingly, about 1 in 9 breast carcinomas (11%) in our cohort harbor a BRCA1/2 mutation. For each gene, the tumor phenotypes were very similar regardless of the mutation being germline or somatically acquired, whereas the tumor phenotypes differed significantly between wild-type and mutated cases. For age at diagnosis, the patients with somatic BRCA1/2 mutations resembled the wild-type patients (median age at diagnosis, germline BRCA1: 41.5 years; germline BRCA2: 49.5 years; somatic BRCA1/2: 65 years; wild-type BRCA1/2: 62.5 years). Conclusions In a population without strong germline founder mutations, the likelihood of a BRCA1/2 mutation found in a breast carcinoma being somatic was ∼1/3 and germline 2/3. This may have implications for treatment and genetic counseling. PMID:27194814

  2. A role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility within Sardinian population

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years, numerous studies have assessed the prevalence of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in various cohorts. We here extensively investigated the prevalence and geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations in the entire genetically-homogeneous Sardinian population. The occurrence of phenotypic characteristics which may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations was also evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-eight breast cancer patients presenting a familial recurrence of invasive breast or ovarian carcinoma with at least two affected family members were screened for BRCA1-2 mutations by DHPLC analysis and DNA sequencing. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational status with clinical and pathological parameters was evaluated by Pearson's Chi-Squared test. Results and Conclusion Overall, 8 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2 deleterious mutations were detected in 35/348 (10%) families; majority (23/35;66%) of mutations was found in BRCA2 gene. The geographical distribution of BRCA1-2 mutations was related to three specific large areas of Sardinia, reflecting its ancient history: a) the Northern area, linguistically different from the rest of the island (where a BRCA2 c.8764_8765delAG mutation with founder effect was predominant); b) the Middle area, land of the ancient Sardinian population (where BRCA2 mutations are still more common than BRCA1 mutations); and c) the South-Western area, with many Phoenician and Carthaginian locations (where BRCA1 mutations are prevalent). We also found that phenotypic features such as high tumor grading and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone receptors together with age at diagnosis and presence of ovarian cancer in the family may be predictive for the presence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations. PMID:19619314

  3. BRCA1 tumor suppression occurs via heterochromatin mediated silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quan; Pao, Gerald M.; Huynh, Alexis M.; Suh, Hoonkyo; Tonnu, Nina; Nederlof, Petra; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in tumor suppressor BRCA1 lead to breast and/or ovarian cancer. Here we show that loss of BRCA1 in mice results in transcriptional derepression of the tandemly repeated satellite DNA. BRCA1 deficiency is accompanied by reduction of condensed DNA regions in the genome and loss of ubiquitylation of histone H2A at satellite repeats. BRCA1 binds to satellite DNA regions in vivo and ubiquitylates H2A in vitro. Ectopic expression of an H2A fused to ubiquitin reverses the effects of BRCA1 loss, suggesting that BRCA1 maintains heterochromatin structure via ubiquitylation of histone H2A. Satellite DNA derepression was also observed mouse and human BRCA1 deficient breast cancers. Ectopic expression of satellite DNA can phenocopy BRCA1 loss in centrosome amplification, cell cycle checkpoint defects, DNA damage and genomic instability. We propose that the role of BRCA1 in maintaining global heterochromatin integrity accounts for many of its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:21901007

  4. Identification of BRCA1 and 2 Other Tumor Suppressor Genes on Chromosome 17 Through Positional Cloning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    services of these organizations. In conducting research using animals, the investigator(s) adhered to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals...No. 86-23, Revised 1985). K x For the protection of human subjects, the investigator(s) adhered to policies of applicable Federal Law 45 CFR 46. Ax In...conducting research utilizing recombinant DNA technology, the investigator(s) adhered to current guidelines promulgated by the National Institutes of

  5. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. FOXA1 repression is associated with loss of BRCA1 and increased promoter methylation and chromatin silencing in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, C; Fujino, K; Monteiro, L J; Gomes, A R; Drost, R; Davidson-Smith, H; Takeda, S; Khoo, U S; Jonkers, J; Sproul, D; Lam, E W-F

    2015-09-24

    FOXA1 expression correlates with the breast cancer luminal subtype and patient survival. RNA and protein analysis of a panel of breast cancer cell lines revealed that BRCA1 deficiency is associated with the downregulation of FOXA1 expression. Knockdown of BRCA1 resulted in the downregulation of FOXA1 expression and enhancement of FOXA1 promoter methylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, whereas the reconstitution of BRCA1 in Brca1-deficent mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) promoted Foxa1 expression and methylation. These data suggest that BRCA1 suppresses FOXA1 hypermethylation and silencing. Consistently, the treatment of MMECs with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycitydine induced Foxa1 mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with GSK126, an inhibitor of EZH2 methyltransferase activity, induced FOXA1 expression in BRCA1-deficient but not in BRCA1-reconstituted MMECs. Likewise, the depletion of EZH2 by small interfering RNA enhanced FOXA1 mRNA expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated that BRCA1, EZH2, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT)1/3a/3b and H3K27me3 are recruited to the endogenous FOXA1 promoter, further supporting the hypothesis that these proteins interact to modulate FOXA1 methylation and repression. Further co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP analysis showed that both BRCA1 and DNMT3b form complexes with EZH2 but not with each other, consistent with the notion that BRCA1 binds to EZH2 and negatively regulates its methyltransferase activity. We also found that EZH2 promotes and BRCA1 impairs the deposit of the gene silencing histone mark H3K27me3 on the FOXA1 promoter. These associations were validated in a familial breast cancer patient cohort. Integrated analysis of the global gene methylation and expression profiles of a set of 33 familial breast tumours revealed that FOXA1 promoter methylation is inversely correlated with the transcriptional expression of FOXA1 and that BRCA1 mutation breast cancer is significantly

  7. A Distinct Replication Fork Protection Pathway Connects Fanconi Anemia Tumor Suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:22789542

  8. A distinct replication fork protection pathway connects Fanconi anemia tumor suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2012-07-10

    Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  9. Quality of life after contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in newly diagnosed high-risk breast cancer patients who underwent BRCA1/2 gene testing.

    PubMed

    Tercyak, Kenneth P; Peshkin, Beth N; Brogan, Barbara M; DeMarco, Tiffani; Pennanen, Marie F; Willey, Shawna C; Magnant, Colette M; Rogers, Sarah; Isaacs, Claudine; Schwartz, Marc D

    2007-01-20

    Recent studies indicate that high-risk breast cancer patients (ie, women who carry mutations in BRCA1/2 genes) who opt for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) have a substantially reduced risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. However, the immediate and long-term impact of this decision on women's quality of life and psychosocial functioning is largely unknown. In this study, we compared the impact of BRCA1/2 genetic test result and CPM on these outcomes among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients who opted for CPM at the time of their definitive surgical treatment versus patients who did not. Participants were 149 high-risk women who underwent genetic counseling and testing for alterations in the BRCA1/2 genes. We measured self-reported quality of life, cancer-specific distress, and genetic testing-specific distress using standardized instruments before receipt of genetic test results and again 1 and 12 months later. Compared with patients who chose breast conservation or unilateral mastectomy, those who chose mastectomy of the affected breast and CPM of the unaffected breast did not report diminished quality of life or elevated distress. With respect to quality of life and distress, patients who choose CPM fare as well as those who do not in the first year after surgery.

  10. Germline mutations in MEN1 and BRCA1 genes in a woman with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and inherited breast-ovarian cancer syndromes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Papi, Laura; Palli, Domenico; Masi, Laura; Putignano, Anna Laura; Congregati, Caterina; Zanna, Ines; Marini, Francesca; Giusti, Francesca; Luzi, Ettore; Tonelli, Francesco; Genuardi, Maurizio; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of mutations in two different tumor suppressor genes in the same individual is a very rare event. Here we report the case of a woman in whom germline mutations in both MEN1 and BRCA1 were identified. The severity of MEN1-related biochemical and clinical findings did not significantly differ from that for other affected family members lacking the BRCA1 mutation, except for the development of an extremely large visceral lipoma; the proband has not developed any BRCA1-related malignancies. We explore genetic and molecular rationales for an association between these neoplastic processes.

  11. Conditional inactivation of Brca1 in the mouse ovarian surface epithelium results in an increase in preneoplastic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clark-Knowles, Katherine V. . E-mail: kclar075@uottawa.ca; Garson, Kenneth; Jonkers, Jos; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is thought to arise from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE); however, the molecular events underlying this transformation are poorly understood. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene result in a significantly increased risk of developing EOC and a large proportion of sporadic EOCs display some sort of BRCA1 dysfunction. Using mice with conditional expression of Brca1, we inactivated Brca1 in the murine OSE and demonstrate that this inactivation results in the development of preneoplastic changes, such as hyperplasia, epithelial invaginations, and inclusion cysts, which arise earlier and are more numerous than in control ovaries. These changes resemble the premalignant lesions that have been reported in human prophylactic oophorectomy specimens from women with BRCA1 germline mutation. We also report that inactivation of Brca1 in primary cultures of murine OSE cells leads to a suppression of proliferation due to increased apoptosis that can be rescued by concomitant inactivation of p53. These observations, along with our finding that these cells display an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin, indicate that loss of function of Brca1 in OSE cells impacts both cellular growth control and DNA-damage repair which results in altered cell behavior manifested as morphological changes in vivo that arise earlier and are more numerous than what can be attributed to ageing.

  12. A Novel Pathogenic BRCA1 Splicing Variant Produces Partial Intron Retention in the Mature Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Maria Valeria; Nunziato, Marcella; Starnone, Flavio; Telese, Antonella; Calabrese, Alessandra; D’Aiuto, Giuseppe; Pucci, Pietro; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Baralle, Francisco; D’Argenio, Valeria; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of all breast cancers arise from hereditary mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers; and about 25% of these are associated with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations can enable physicians to better tailor the clinical management of patients; and to initiate preventive measures in healthy carriers. The pathophysiological significance of newly identified variants poses challenges for genetic counseling. We characterized a new BRCA1 variant discovered in a breast cancer patient during BRCA1/2 screening by next-generation sequencing. Bioinformatic predictions; indicating that the variant is probably pathogenetic; were verified using retro-transcription of the patient’s RNA followed by PCR amplifications performed on the resulting cDNA. The variant causes the loss of a canonic donor splice site at position +2 in BRCA1 intron 21; and consequently the partial retention of 156 bp of intron 21 in the patient’s transcript; which demonstrates that this novel BRCA1 mutation plays a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. These findings enabled us to initiate appropriate counseling and to tailor the clinical management of this family. Lastly; these data reinforce the importance of studying the effects of sequence variants at the RNA level to verify their potential role in disease onset. PMID:28009814

  13. [Should knowledge of BRCA1 status impact the choice of chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer: a review].

    PubMed

    Clergue, Océane; Jones, Natalie; Sévenet, Nicolas; Quenel-Tueux, Nathalie; Debled, Marc

    2015-03-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for 40% of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified in the current French diagnostic setting. The proteins encoded by these genes are implicated in DNA repair pathways. As a result, loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 function may modify chemo-sensitivity. This literature review aims to determine whether BRCA1 mutation status should influence the choice of systemic treatment in breast cancer. Fourteen articles and four abstracts from 12 retrospective analyses and 6 prospective studies were identified in the literature review. CMF-type and taxane-based protocols appear to be insufficiently effective, while anthracycline activity does not seem to be affected by BRCA1 status. BRCA1-mutated tumours appear to be highly sensitive to platinum, in both the neoadjuvant and metastatic setting. Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, has only been evaluated in one study in metastatic patients, with promising results. The presence of a BRCA1 mutation can lead to an adaptation of therapies in the metastatic stages in breast cancer. The rapid identification of BRCA1 mutations and the adaptation of treatment according to this status in the (neo)adjuvant setting is likely to become a reality in the coming years.

  14. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency for replication stress suppression in primary cells.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shailja; Bade, Sangeeta; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Burke, Karly; Reed, Rachel; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Su, Ying; Ting, David T; Polyak, Kornelia; Richardson, Andrea L; Feunteun, Jean; Garber, Judy E; Livingston, David M

    2014-11-17

    BRCA1-a breast and ovarian cancer suppressor gene-promotes genome integrity. To study the functionality of BRCA1 in the heterozygous state, we established a collection of primary human BRCA1(+/+) and BRCA1(mut/+) mammary epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Here we report that all BRCA1(mut/+) cells exhibited multiple normal BRCA1 functions, including the support of homologous recombination- type double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR), checkpoint functions, centrosome number control, spindle pole formation, Slug expression and satellite RNA suppression. In contrast, the same cells were defective in stalled replication fork repair and/or suppression of fork collapse, that is, replication stress. These defects were rescued by reconstituting BRCA1(mut/+) cells with wt BRCA1. In addition, we observed 'conditional' haploinsufficiency for HR-DSBR in BRCA1(mut/+) cells in the face of replication stress. Given the importance of replication stress in epithelial cancer development and of an HR defect in breast cancer pathogenesis, both defects are candidate contributors to tumorigenesis in BRCA1-deficient mammary tissue.

  15. Characterization of three alternative transcripts of the BRCA1 gene in patients with breast cancer and a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer who tested negative for pathogenic mutations.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Gaetana; Tancredi, Mariella; Falaschi, Elisabetta; Aretini, Paolo; Caligo, Maria Adelaide

    2015-04-01

    The study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and their alterations has been essential to the understanding of the development of familial breast and ovarian cancers. Many of the variants identified have an unknown pathogenic significance. These include variants which determine alternative mRNA splicing, identified in the intronic regions and those are capable of destroying the splicing ability. The aim of this study was to detect BRCA1/BRCA2 aberrant transcripts resulting from alternative splicing, in women with a known family history and/or early onset of breast and/or ovarian cancer, tested wild-type for BRCA1 and BRCA2. The identification and characterization of aberrant transcripts through the analysis of mRNA levels in blood lymphocytes may help us to recognize families otherwise misclassified as wild-type BRCA1 and BRCA2. Blood samples were collected from 13 women that had a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and tested negative for pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Total RNA was analyzed for the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 naturally occurring and pathological transcripts using RT-PCR. In 2 out of the 13 samples, 2 alternative transcripts of the BRCA1 gene were identified. These were probably pathogenic as they lacked exon 17 and exon 15, respectively, giving rise to a truncated protein. In addition to these, we identified the Δ17-19 transcript in 1 patient, which gives rise to a protein with an in-frame deletion of 69 amino acids. In conclusion, this study on alternative transcripts of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes revealed the presence of isoforms (prevalence of 15%) in blood samples from women with breast and ovarian cancer that were probably pathogenic, that were not detected by conventional methods of mutation screening based on direct sequencing of all coding regions, intron-exons junctions and MLPA analysis.

  16. Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by Alteration of Expression of the BRCA1 and/or P53 Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    later by injection with 5 U of human chorionic gonadotropin (hormones purchased from Sigma, St. Louis, MO). 1.5 days following the last hormone...AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0063 TITLE: Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by Alteration of Expression of the BRCA1 and/or P53 Genes...FUNDING NUMBERS Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by W81XWH-04-1-0063 Alteration of Expression of the BRCAI and/or P53 Genes 6. AUTHOR(S

  17. Exposure to diagnostic radiation and risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations: retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK)

    PubMed Central

    Pijpe, Anouk; Andrieu, Nadine; Easton, Douglas F; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Cardis, Elisabeth; Noguès, Catherine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A; Paterson, Joan; Manders, Peggy; van Asperen, Christi J; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Hauptmann, Michael; Goldgar, David; Rookus, Matti A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with diagnostic radiation in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Design Retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK). Setting Three nationwide studies (GENEPSO, EMBRACE, HEBON) in France, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, Participants 1993 female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations recruited in 2006-09. Main outcome measure Risk of breast cancer estimated with a weighted Cox proportional hazards model with a time dependent individually estimated cumulative breast dose, based on nominal estimates of organ dose and frequency of self reported diagnostic procedures. To correct for potential survival bias, the analysis excluded carriers who were diagnosed more than five years before completion of the study questionnaire. Results In carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations any exposure to diagnostic radiation before the age of 30 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 3.00), with a dose-response pattern. The risks by quarter of estimated cumulative dose <0.0020 Gy, ≥0.0020-0.0065 Gy, ≥0.0066-0.0173 Gy, and ≥0.0174 Gy were 1.63 (0.96 to 2.77), 1.78 (0.88 to 3.58), 1.75 (0.72 to 4.25), and 3.84 (1.67 to 8.79), respectively. Analyses on the different types of diagnostic procedures showed a pattern of increasing risk with increasing number of radiographs before age 20 and before age 30 compared with no exposure. A history of mammography before age 30 was also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 1.43, 0.85 to 2.40). Sensitivity analysis showed that this finding was not caused by confounding by indication of family history. Conclusion In this large European study among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, exposure to diagnostic radiation before age 30 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer at dose levels considerably lower than those at which increases have been found in other cohorts exposed to radiation. The results of this

  18. Exposure to diagnostic radiation and risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations: retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK).

    PubMed

    Pijpe, Anouk; Andrieu, Nadine; Easton, Douglas F; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Cardis, Elisabeth; Noguès, Catherine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A; Paterson, Joan; Manders, Peggy; van Asperen, Christi J; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Hauptmann, Michael; Goldgar, David; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2012-09-06

    To estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with diagnostic radiation in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK). Three nationwide studies (GENEPSO, EMBRACE, HEBON) in France, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, 1993 female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations recruited in 2006-09. Risk of breast cancer estimated with a weighted Cox proportional hazards model with a time dependent individually estimated cumulative breast dose, based on nominal estimates of organ dose and frequency of self reported diagnostic procedures. To correct for potential survival bias, the analysis excluded carriers who were diagnosed more than five years before completion of the study questionnaire. In carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations any exposure to diagnostic radiation before the age of 30 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 3.00), with a dose-response pattern. The risks by quarter of estimated cumulative dose <0.0020 Gy, ≥ 0.0020-0.0065 Gy, ≥ 0.0066-0.0173 Gy, and ≥ 0.0174 Gy were 1.63 (0.96 to 2.77), 1.78 (0.88 to 3.58), 1.75 (0.72 to 4.25), and 3.84 (1.67 to 8.79), respectively. Analyses on the different types of diagnostic procedures showed a pattern of increasing risk with increasing number of radiographs before age 20 and before age 30 compared with no exposure. A history of mammography before age 30 was also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio 1.43, 0.85 to 2.40). Sensitivity analysis showed that this finding was not caused by confounding by indication of family history. In this large European study among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, exposure to diagnostic radiation before age 30 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer at dose levels considerably lower than those at which increases have been found in other cohorts exposed to radiation. The results of this study support the use of non-ionising radiation imaging techniques (such as

  19. Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) for large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) detection: A new approach to assess quantitative status of BRCA1 gene in a reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; De Paolis, Elisa; Concolino, Paola; De Bonis, Maria; Rizza, Roberta; Canu, Giulia; Scaglione, Giovanni Luca; Mignone, Flavio; Scambia, Giovanni; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of copy number variation (CNV) in BRCA1/2 genes, due to large genomic rearrangements (LGRs), is a mandatory analysis in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers families, if no pathogenic variants are found by sequencing. LGRs cannot be detected by conventional methods and several alternative methods have been developed. Since these approaches are expensive and time consuming, identification of alternative screening methods for LGRs detection is needed in order to reduce and optimize the diagnostic procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) as molecular tool to detect recurrent BRCA1 LGRs. C-PCR-HRMA was performed on exons 3, 14, 18, 19, 20 and 21 of the BRCA1 gene; exons 4, 6 and 7 of the ALB gene were used as reference fragments. This study showed that it is possible to identify recurrent BRCA1 LGRs, by melting peak height ratio between target (BRCA1) and reference (ALB) fragments. Furthermore, we underline that a peculiar amplicon-melting profile is associated to a specific BRCA1 LGR. All C-PCR-HRMA results were confirmed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. C-PCR-HRMA has proved to be an innovative, efficient and fast method for BRCA1 LGRs detection. Given the sensitivity, specificity and ease of use, c-PCR-HRMA can be considered an attractive and powerful alternative to other methods for BRCA1 CNVs screening, improving molecular strategies for BRCA testing in the context of Massive Parallel Sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    PubMed

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-02

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes.

  1. Dysregulation of the BRCA1/long non-coding RNA NEAT1 signaling axis contributes to breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Zhang, Yongshu; Wolfson, Benjamin; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Yao, Yuan; Duru, Nadire; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of long non-codng RNA (lncRNA) expression has been found to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, the roles of lncRNAs in BRCA1-related breast cancer remain largely unknown. In this study, we delineate the role of the novel BRCA1/lncRNA NEAT1 signaling axis in breast tumorigenesis. BRCA1 inhibits NEAT1 expression potentially through binding to its genomic binding site upstream of the NEAT1 gene. BRCA1 deficiency in human normal/cancerous breast cells and mouse mammary glands leads to NEAT1 overexpression. Our studies show that NEAT1 upregulation resulting from BRCA1 deficiency stimulates in vitro and in vivo breast tumorigenicity. We have further identified molecular mediators downstream of the BRCA1/NEAT1 axis. NEAT1 epigenetically silences miR-129-5p expression by promoting the DNA methylation of the CpG island in the miR-129 gene. Silencing of miR-129-5p expression by NEAT1 results in upregulation of WNT4 expression, a target of miR-129-5p, which leads to activation of oncogenic WNT signaling. Our functional studies indicate that this NEAT1/miR-129-5p/WNT4 axis contributes to the tumorigenic effects of BRCA1 deficiency. Finally our in silico expression correlation analysis suggests the existence of the BRCA1/NEAT1/miR-129-5p axis in breast cancer. Our findings, taken together, suggest that the dysregulation of the BRCA1/NEAT1/miR-129-5p/WNT4 signaling axis is involved in promoting breast tumorigenesis. PMID:27556296

  2. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss havedistinct molecular abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray,Joe; Huntsman, David G.

    2007-07-23

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n = 5), clear cell (n = 4), or low grade serous (n = 2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  3. Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilks, C. Blake; Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray, Joe; Huntsman, David G.

    2008-05-02

    Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n=5), clear cell (n=4), or low grade serous (n=2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

  4. p53 suppresses hyper-recombination by modulating BRCA1 function.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chao; Zhang, Fengmei; Luo, Yue; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Xipeng; Guo, Gongshe; Powell, Simon N; Feng, Zhihui

    2015-09-01

    Both p53 and BRCA1 are tumor suppressors and are involved in a number of cellular processes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, and DNA damage repair. Some studies have suggested that the association of BRCA1 and p53 is required for transcriptional regulation of genes involved in cell replication and DNA repair pathways. However, the relationship between the two proteins in molecular mechanisms of DNA repair is still not clear. Therefore, we sought to determine whether there is a functional link between p53 and BRCA1 in DNA repair. Firstly, using a plasmid recombination substrate, pDR-GFP, integrated into the genome of breast cancer cell line MCF7, we have demonstrated that p53 suppressed Rad51-mediated hyper-recombinational repair by two independent cell models of HPV-E6 induced p53 inactivation and p53 knockdown assay. Our study further indicated that p53 mediated homologous recombination (HR) through inhibiting BRCA1 over-function via mechanism of transcription regulation in response to DNA repair. Since it was found p53 and BRCA1 existed in a protein complex, indicating both proteins may be associated at post-transcriptional level. Moreover, defective p53-induced hyper-recombination was associated with cell radioresistance and chromosomal stability, strongly supporting the involvement of p53 in the inhibition of hyper-recombination, which led to genetic stability and cellular function in response to DNA damage. In addition, it was found that p53 loss rescued BRCA1 deficiency via recovering HR and chromosomal stability, suggesting that p53 is also involved in the HR-inhibition independently of BRCA1. Thus, our data indicated that p53 was involved in inhibiting recombination by both BRCA1-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and there is a functional link between p53-suppression and BRCA1-promotion in regulation of HR activity at transcription level and possible post-transcription level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Futreal, P.A.; Cochran, C.; Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Terry, L.; Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.; Liu, Q.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.

    1994-10-07

    Loss of heterozygosity data from familial tumors suggested that BRCA1, a gene that confers susceptibility to ovarian and early-onset breast cancer, encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 region is also subject to allelic loss in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers, an indication that BRCA1 mutations may occur somatically in these tumors. The BRCA1 coding region was examined for mutations in primary breast and ovarian tumors that show allele loss at the BRCA1 locus. Mutations were detected in 3 of 32 breast and 1 of 12 ovarian carcinomas; all four mutations were germline alterations and occurred in early-onset cancers. These results suggest that mutation of BRCA1 may not be critical in the development of the majority of breast and ovarian cancers that arise in the absence of a mutant germline allele.

  6. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  7. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. Methods. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. Results. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9–12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. Conclusion. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed

  8. No evidence for a role of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish families with hereditary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, E P; Freije, D; Xu, J; Nusskern, D R; Suzuki, H; Isaacs, S D; Wiley, K; Bujnovsky, P; Meyers, D A; Walsh, P C; Isaacs, W B

    1999-06-01

    Two genes responsible for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA1 and BRCA2) have been identified, and predisposing mutations identified. Several studies have provided evidence that germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer an increased risk of prostate cancer. Based on these findings, one might expect to find an increased frequency of mutations in these genes in family clusters of prostate cancer. The Ashkenazi Jewish population is unique in that it has an approximate 2% incidence of specific founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (i.e., 185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1, and 6174delT in BRCA2). To address the question of whether or not mutations in either of these genes were overrepresented in prostate cancer families, we searched for these mutations in germline DNA samples collected from affected and unaffected members of 18 Ashkenazi Jewish families, each having at least 3 first-degree relatives affected with prostate cancer. No mutations were found in the BRCA1 gene in any of the 47 individuals tested. One individual possessed a BRCA2 mutation (6174delT). This individual was unaffected at the time of analysis, but had an affected paternal uncle, and an affected first cousin, neither of whom harbored the mutant gene. In this sample of Ashkenazi prostate cancer families, the frequency of founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was not elevated, suggesting that such mutations will account for only a small, perhaps minimal, fraction of familial prostate cancer.

  9. Common variants in the ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 and TP53 cancer susceptibility genes are unlikely to increase breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Caroline; Healey, Catherine S; Pooley, Karen A; Scollen, Serena; Luben, Robert N; Thompson, Deborah J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M

    2007-01-01

    Certain rare, familial mutations in the ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 or TP53 genes increase susceptibility to breast cancer but it has not, until now, been clear whether common polymorphic variants in the same genes also increase risk. We have attempted a comprehensive, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and haplotype-tagging association study on each of these five genes in up to 4,474 breast cancer cases from the British, East Anglian SEARCH study and 4,560 controls from the EPIC-Norfolk study, using a two-stage study design. Nine tag SNPs were genotyped in ATM, together with five in BRCA1, sixteen in BRCA2, ten in CHEK2 and five in TP53, with the aim of tagging all other known, common variants. SNPs generating the common amino acid substitutions were specifically forced into the tagging set for each gene. No significant breast cancer associations were detected with any individual or combination of tag SNPs. It is unlikely that there are any other common variants in these genes conferring measurably increased risks of breast cancer in our study population.

  10. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Janavičius, Ramūnas; Rudaitis, Vilius; Mickys, Ugnius; Elsakov, Pavel; Griškevičius, Laimonas

    2014-05-01

    There is limited knowledge about the BRCA1/2 mutational profile in Lithuania. We aimed to define the full BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational spectrum and the clinically relevant prevalence of these gene mutations in Lithuania. A data set of 753 unrelated probands, recruited through a clinical setting, was used and consisted of 380 female breast cancer cases, 213 epithelial ovarian cancer cases, 20 breast and ovarian cancer cases, and 140 probands with positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer. A comprehensive mutation analysis of the BRCA1/2 genes by high resolution melting analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was performed. Genetic analysis revealed 32 different pathogenic germline BRCA1/2 mutations: 20 in the BRCA1 gene and 12 in the BRCA2 gene, including four different large genomic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene. In all, 10 novel BRCA1/2 mutations were found. Nine different recurrent BRCA1 mutations and two recurrent BRCA2 mutations were identified, which comprised 90.4% of all BRCA1/2 mutations. BRCA1 exon 1-3 deletion and BRCA2 c.658_659del are reported for the first time as recurrent mutations, pointing to a possible Baltic founder effect. Approximately 7% of breast cancer and 22% of ovarian cancer patients without family history and an estimated 0.5-0.6% of all Lithuanian women were found to be carriers of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of BRCA1 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Judson, Gregory; Penney, Kathryn; Flavin, Richard; Stark, Jennifer; Fiore, Christopher; Fall, Katja; Martin, Neil; Ma, Jing; Sinnott, Jennifer; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Sesso, Howard D.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Finn, Stephen; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 functions as a tumor suppressor; recent work suggests that BRCA1 may also induce cell-cycle arrest to allow for DNA repair. We hypothesized that BRCA1 expression in prostate tumor tissue may be associated with prostate cancer progression through regulation of the cell-cycle. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate BRCA1 protein expression in archival tumors samples from 393 prostate cancer cases in the Physicians' Health Study. The men were followed prospectively from diagnosis to development of metastases and mortality. Fifteen percent of tumors stained positive for BRCA1. BRCA1 positive tumors had substantially increased tumor proliferation index compared to negative tumors (47.0 Ki67 positive nuclei vs. 10.3, p=0.0016), and were more likely to develop lethal cancer compared to BRCA1 negative tumors (Hazard ratio=4.6; 95% Confidence interval: 2.4, 8.7). These findings strengthen the hypothesis that BRCA1 plays a role in cell-cycle control and demonstrate that BRCA1 is a marker of clinical prostate cancer prognosis. PMID:20388772

  12. Methylation of BRCA1 promoter region is associated with unfavorable prognosis in women with early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nicholas C; Huang, Ya-Fang; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Fang-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast cancers are associated with particular features such as early onset, poor histological differentiation, and hormone receptor negativity. Previous studies conducted in Taiwanese population showed that the mutation of BRCA1 gene does not play a significant role in the occurrence of breast cancer. The present study explored methylation of BRCA1 promoter and its relationship to clinical features and outcome in Taiwanese breast cancer patients. Tumor specimens from a cohort of 139 early-stage breast cancer patients were obtained during surgery before adjuvant treatment for DNA extraction. Methylation of BRCA1 promoter region was determined by methylation-specific PCR and the results were related to clinical features and outcome of patients using statistical analysis. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter was detected in 78 (56%) of the 139 tumors. Chi-square analysis indicated that BRCA1 promoter methylation correlated significantly with triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) status of breast cancer patients (p = 0.041). The Kaplan-Meier method showed that BRCA1 promoter methylation was significantly associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.026) and disease-free survival (p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis which incorporated variables of patients' age, tumor size, grade, and lymph node metastasis revealed that BRCA1 promoter methylation was associated with overall survival (p = 0.027; hazard ratio, 16.38) and disease-free survival (p = 0.003; hazard ratio, 12.19) [corrected].Our findings underscore the clinical relevance of the methylation of BRCA1 promoter in Taiwanese patients with early-stage breast cancer.

  13. BRCA1/2 mutations perturb telomere biology: characterization of structural and functional abnormalities in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Orit; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Zuriano, Lital; Naser, Shaden; Beery, Einat; Nordenberg, Jardena; Lubin, Ido; Adel, Yonatan; Shepshelovich, Daniel; Yavin, Hagai; Ben Aharon, Irit; Pery, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamit; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Frumkin, Dan; Lahav, Meir

    2016-01-19

    BRCA1 mutation is associated with carcinogenesis, especially of breast tissue. Telomere maintenance is crucial for malignant transformation. Being a part of the DNA repair machinery, BRCA1 may be implicated in telomere biology. We explored the role of BRCA1 in telomere maintenance in lymphocytes of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and in in vitro system by knocking down its expression in non-malignant breast epithelial cells.The results in both systems were similar. BRCA1/2 mutation caused perturbation of telomere homeostasis, shortening of the single stranded telomere overhang and increased the intercellular telomere length variability as well as the number of telomere free chromosomal ends and telomeric circles. These changes resulted in an increased DNA damage status. Telomerase activity, inducibility and expression remained unchanged. BRCA1 mutation resulted also in changes in the binding of shelterin proteins to telomeres. DNMT-1 levels were markedly reduced both in the carriers and in in vitro system. The methylation pattern of the sub-telomeric regions in carriers suggested hypomethylation in chromosome 10. The expression of a distinct set of genes was also changed, some of which may relate to pre-disposition to malignancy.These results show that BRCA gene products have a role in telomere length homeostasis. It is plausible that these perturbations contribute to malignant transformation in BRCA mutants.

  14. Specific binding of the methyl binding domain protein 2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 locus

    PubMed Central

    Auriol, Emilie; Billard, Lise-Marie; Magdinier, Frédérique; Dante, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins are key molecules in the interpretation of DNA methylation signals leading to gene silencing. We investigated their binding specificity at the constitutively methylated region of a CpG island containing the bidirectional promoter of the Breast cancer predisposition gene 1, BRCA1, and the Near BRCA1 2 (NBR2) gene. In HeLa cells, quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that MBD2 is associated with the methylated region, while MeCP2 and MBD1 were not detected at this locus. MBD2 depletion (∼90%), mediated by a transgene expressing a small interfering RNA (siRNA), did not induce MeCP2 or MBD1 binding at the methylated area. Furthermore, the lack of MBD2 at the BRCA1-NBR2 CpG island is associated with an elevated level of NBR2 transcripts and with a significant reduction of induced-DNA-hypomethylation response. In MBD2 knockdown cells, transient expression of a Mbd2 cDNA, refractory to siRNA-mediated decay, shifted down the NBR2 mRNA level to that observed in unmodified HeLa cells. Variations in MBD2 levels did not affect BRCA1 expression despite its stimulation by DNA hypomethylation. Collectively, our data indicate that MBD2 has specific targets and its presence at these targets is indispensable for gene repression. PMID:16052033

  15. MLN4924 suppresses the BRCA1 complex and synergizes with PARP inhibition in NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zong-Pei; Hu, Ying-Chun; Xie, Yu; Jin, Feng; Song, Zhi-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2017-01-29

    Like ubiquitination, several studies have demonstrated that neddylation is implicated to be involved in the double strand break repair. BRCA1 is one of the key repair factors in the homologous recombination repair and may play a downstream role of the neddylation. BRCA1 is also a frequently mutated gene in cancers, which serve as the targets for PARP inhibitors. Here we further investigated the correlation between neddylation and BRCA1 complex using neddylation inhibitor MLN4924. MLN4924 efficiently inhibited the recruitment of components of BRCA1 complex to DNA damage sites. Thus MLN4924 may collaborate with PARP inhibitor to suppress tumor. Our results showed that combination MLN4924 and PARP inhibitor Olaparib impaired the DNA repair process in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, MLN4924 and Olaparib significantly inhibited the cancer cell growth. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis from lung cancer patients showed that high expression of NEDD8, BRCA1 and PARPs correlate with worse overall survival. Thus the combination of MLN4924 and PARP inhibitor may serve as a new strategy for NSCLC treatment.

  16. BRCA1-directed, enhanced and aberrant homologous recombination: mechanism and potential treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Dever, Seth M; White, E Railey; Hartman, Matthew C T; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2012-02-15

    Despite intense studies, questions still remain regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to the development of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Research focused on elucidating the role of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) in the DNA damage response may be of the most critical importance to understanding these processes. The BRCA1 protein has an N-terminal RING domain possessing E3 ubiquitinligase activity and a C-terminal BRCT domain involved in binding specific phosphoproteins. These domains are involved directly or indirectly in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. As the two terminal domains of BRCA1 represent two separate entities, understanding how these domains communicate and are functionally altered in regards to DSB repair is critical for understanding the development of BRCA1-related breast and ovarian cancers and for developing novel therapeutics. Herein, we review recent findings of how altered functions of these domains might lead to cancer through a mechanism of increased aberrant homologous recombination and possible implications for the development of BRCA1 inhibitors.

  17. Increased cell survival by inhibition of BRCA1 using an antisense approach in an estrogen responsive ovarian carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Annab, Lois A; Hawkins, Rebecca E; Solomon, Greg; Barrett, J Carl; Afshari, Cynthia A

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Germline mutations in the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1, which is located on chromosome 17q21, are associated with a predisposition to the development of cancer in these organs [1,2]. No mutations in the BRCA1 gene have been detected in sporadic breast cancer cases, but mutations have been detected in sporadic cases of ovarian cancer [3,4]. Although there is debate regarding the level of cancer risk associated with mutations in BRCA1 and the significance of the lack of mutations in sporadic tumors, it is possible that alterations in the function of BRCA1 may occur by mechanisms other than mutation, leading to an underestimation of risk when it is calculated solely on the basis of mutational analysis. Such alterations cannot be identified until the function and regulation of BRCA1 are better understood. The BRCA1 gene encodes a 220-kDa nuclear phosphoprotein that is regulated in response to DNA damaging agents [5,6,7] and in response to estrogen-induced growth [8,9,10,11]. Germline mutations that cause breast and ovarian cancer predisposition frequently result in truncated and presumably inactive BRCA1 protein [12]. BG-1 cells were derived from a patient with stage III, poorly differentiated ovarian adenocarcinoma [13]. This cell line, which expresses wild-type BRCA1, is estrogen responsive and withdrawal of estrogen results in eventual cell death. Previous studies suggest that BRCA1 is stimulated as a result of estrogen treatment [8,9,10,11], and also that BRCA1 may be involved in the cell death process [14]. Therefore, we examined the effect of reduction of BRCA1 levels in BG-1 cells on the cellular response to hormone depletion as well as estrogen stimulation. The results suggest that reduced levels of BRCA1 correlates with a survival advantage when BG-1 cells are placed under growth-restrictive and hormone-depleted conditions. In optimum growth conditions, significantly reduced levels of BRCA1 correlates with enhanced growth

  18. The Role of BRCA1/BARD1 Heterodimers in the Mitosis-Interphase Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    53 4 INTRODUCTION Germ line mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to breast and/or ovarian cancer (Miki, et al...Targeted mutations of breast cancer susceptibility gene homologs in mice: lethal phenotypes of Brca1, Brca2, Brca1/Brca2, Brca1/p53, and Brca2/p53...Ludwig, T., Chapman, D.L., Papaioannou, V.E., and Efstratiadis, A. (1997). Targeted mutations of breast cancer susceptibility gene homo- logs in mice

  19. Gestational exposure to the AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces BRCA-1 promoter hypermethylation and reduces BRCA-1 expression in mammary tissue of rat offspring: preventive effects of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, Andreas J; Selmin, Ornella I; Borg, Jamie L; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2015-04-01

    Studies with murine models suggest that maternal exposure to aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists may impair mammary gland differentiation and increase the susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis in offspring. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these perturbations remain largely unknown. Previously, we reported that the AhR agonists 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced CpG methylation of the breast cancer-1 (BRCA-1) gene and reduced BRCA-1 expression in breast cancer cell lines. Based on the information both the human and rat BRCA-1 genes harbor xenobiotic responsive elements (XRE = 5'-GCGTG-3'), which are binding targets for the AhR, we extended our studies to the analysis of offspring of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats treated during gestation with TCDD alone or in combination with the dietary AhR antagonist resveratrol (Res). We report that the in utero exposure to TCDD increased the number of terminal end buds (TEB) and reduced BRCA-1 expression in mammary tissue of offspring. The treatment with TCDD induced occupancy of the BRCA-1 promoter by DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT-1), CpG methylation of the BRCA-1 promoter, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (CDK4). These changes were partially overridden by pre-exposure to Res, which stimulated the expression of the AhR repressor (AhRR) and its recruitment to the BRCA-1 gene. These findings point to maternal exposure to AhR agonists as a risk factor for breast cancer in offspring through epigenetic inhibition of BRCA-1 expression, whereas dietary antagonists of the AhR may exert protective effects.

  20. Role of BRCA1 in heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Xian Ma, Yong; Fan, Saijun; Xiong, Jingbo; Yuan, Ren-Qi; Meng, Qinghui; Gao, Min; Goldberg, Itzhak D; Fuqua, Suzanne A; Pestell, Richard G; Rosen, Eliot M

    2003-01-09

    The heat shock response is an evolutionarily conserved response to heat and other stresses that promotes the maintenance of key metabolic functions and cell survival. We report that exposure of human prostate (DU-145) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells to heat (42 degrees C) caused a rapid disappearance of the breast cancer susceptibility gene-1 (BRCA1) protein, starting at approximately 1 h after the onset of heating and slightly lagging behind the increase in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) levels. The heat-induced loss of BRCA1 occurred at the protein level, since: (1) BRCA1 mRNA expression was unaffected; and (2) the BRCA1 protein loss was also observed in DU-145 cells that expressed exogenous wild-type BRCA1 (wtBRCA1). In addition to heat regulation of BRCA1 protein levels, we also found that BRCA1 could modulate the heat shock response. Thus, wtBRCA1 overexpressing DU-145 cell clones showed significantly decreased sensitivity to heat-induced cytotoxicity; and Brca1 mutant mouse embryo fibroblasts showed increased sensitivity to heat. The DU-145 wtBRCA1 clones also showed increased expression of the small heat shock protein HSP27; and reporter assays revealed that wtBRCA1 stimulated a two to four-fold increase in HSP27 promoter activity, consistent with its ability to upregulate HSP27 mRNA and protein levels. In studies using epitope-tagged truncated BRCA1 proteins, the ability to stimulate the HSP27 promoter and to mediate heat-induced degradation required the amino-terminus but not the carboxyl-terminus of BRCA1. Although the heat-induced loss of BRCA1 appeared to be due to protein degradation, various protein metabolic agents (or combinations) failed to block this event, including: MG132 (a 26S proteasomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (a calpain inhibitor), z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor), and ammonium chloride and chloroquine (which stabilize lysosomes). These findings suggest that in addition to its other functions, BRCA1 may participate

  1. [Clinical-based study of ovarian cancer patients with and without BRCA1/2 genes mutation: clinical features and pedigree analysis].

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Yang, J X; Shen, K; Cao, D Y

    2017-01-25

    Objective: To compare the clinical and histological features and prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer from different genetic background, and to make further understanding of the genetic model of BRCA genes used pedigree analysis. Methods: There were 71 patients from 67 independent families enrolled in our study from Apr. 2000 to Jun. 2009 in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. All exons of BRCA1/2 genes were analyzed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography(DHPLC) followed by direct sequencing, and clinical features of patients were compared by statistical analysis. Pedigree analysis of two families with BRCA genes mutation were performed. Results: The mutation rate of BRCA genes was 28% (20/71). The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation was 23% (16/71) and 6% (4/71), respectively (P=0.004). Histology types of patients with and without BRCA genes mutation were different. The onset age between patients with and without BRCA genes mutation was similar (52.6 versus 54.6 years old, P=0.393), and tend to be early-onset breast or ovarian cancer in high-risk group. There was no significant difference of platinum-resistant rate, disease free survival and overall survival rate between patients with and without BRCA genes mutation (all P>0.05). According to the pedigree analysis, up to 100% of female offspring inherited pathogenic mutations, and male offspring could be a mutation carrier. Conclusions: The genetic screening and clinical intervention should be performed as early as possible for the members from families at risk of hereditary ovarian cancer. Genetic consulting is important for patients with high-grade papillary serous adenocarcinoma of ovary. It is still unknown that whether the patients with BRCA gene mutations have better prognosis than sporadic ones, and further perspective, randomized controlled trial is still needed.

  2. Modification of BRCA1 Breast Cancer Risk by Coffee Consumption: Potential Mechanisms for Biologic Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    including caffeine although the full length wildtype BRCA1 protein is affected. We also show that the BRCA1 mutant proteins 1853 and Cys61Gly show a loss of...proteins 1853 and Cys61Gly show a loss of nuclear localization and are defective in DNA repair and radiation response. BRCA1 is a large, nuclear

  3. BRCA1 regulates microRNA biogenesis via the DROSHA microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinji; Amano, Atsuo

    2012-04-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that function as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNA maturation is controlled by the DROSHA microprocessor complex. However, the detailed mechanism of miRNA biogenesis remains unclear. We show that the tumor suppressor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) accelerates the processing of miRNA primary transcripts. BRCA1 increased the expressions of both precursor and mature forms of let-7a-1, miR-16-1, miR-145, and miR-34a. In addition, this tumor suppressor was shown to be directly associated with DROSHA and DDX5 of the DROSHA microprocessor complex, and it interacted with Smad3, p53, and DHX9 RNA helicase. We also found that BRCA1 recognizes the RNA secondary structure and directly binds with primary transcripts of miRNAs via a DNA-binding domain. Together, these results suggest that BRCA1 regulates miRNA biogenesis via the DROSHA microprocessor complex and Smad3/p53/DHX9. Our findings also indicate novel functions of BRCA1 in miRNA biogenesis, which may be linked to its tumor suppressor mechanism and maintenance of genomic stability.

  4. ACCA phosphopeptide recognition by the BRCT repeats of BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Ray, Hind; Moreau, Karen; Dizin, Eva; Callebaut, Isabelle; Venezia, Nicole Dalla

    2006-06-16

    The tumour suppressor gene BRCA1 encodes a 220 kDa protein that participates in multiple cellular processes. The BRCA1 protein contains a tandem of two BRCT repeats at its carboxy-terminal region. The majority of disease-associated BRCA1 mutations affect this region and provide to the BRCT repeats a central role in the BRCA1 tumour suppressor function. The BRCT repeats have been shown to mediate phospho-dependant protein-protein interactions. They recognize phosphorylated peptides using a recognition groove that spans both BRCT repeats. We previously identified an interaction between the tandem of BRCA1 BRCT repeats and ACCA, which was disrupted by germ line BRCA1 mutations that affect the BRCT repeats. We recently showed that BRCA1 modulates ACCA activity through its phospho-dependent binding to ACCA. To delineate the region of ACCA that is crucial for the regulation of its activity by BRCA1, we searched for potential phosphorylation sites in the ACCA sequence that might be recognized by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using sequence analysis and structure modelling, we proposed the Ser1263 residue as the most favourable candidate among six residues, for recognition by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using experimental approaches, such as GST pull-down assay with Bosc cells, we clearly showed that phosphorylation of only Ser1263 was essential for the interaction of ACCA with the BRCT repeats. We finally demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of ACCA in cells, that the whole BRCA1 protein interacts with ACCA when phosphorylated on Ser1263.

  5. BRCA-1 promoter hypermethylation and silencing induced by the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor-ligand TCDD are prevented by resveratrol in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, Andreas J; Borg, Jamie L; Selmin, Ornella I; Romagnolo, Donato F

    2012-10-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to reduced expression of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 in sporadic breast cancers. Through environmental exposure and diet, humans are exposed to xenobiotics and food compounds that bind the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). AhR-ligands include the dioxin-like and tumor promoter 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The activated AhR regulates transcription through binding to xenobiotic response elements (XREs=GCGTG) and interactions with transcription cofactors. Previously, we reported on the presence of several XREs in the proximal BRCA-1 promoter and that the expression of endogenous AhR was required for silencing of BRCA-1 expression by TCDD. Here, we document that in estrogen receptor-α-positive and BRCA-1 wild-type MCF-7 breast cancer cells, the treatment with TCDD attenuated 17β-estradiol-dependent stimulation of BRCA-1 protein and induced hypermethylation of a CpG island spanning the BRCA-1 transcriptional start site of exon-1a. Additionally, we found that TCDD enhanced the association of the AhR; DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b; methyl binding protein (MBD)2; and trimethylated H3K9 (H3K9me3) with the BRCA-1 promoter. Conversely, the phytoalexin resveratrol, selected as a prototype dietary AhR antagonist, antagonized at physiologically relevant doses (1 μmol/L) the TCDD-induced repression of BRCA-1 protein, BRCA-1 promoter methylation and the recruitment of the AhR, MBD2, H3K9me3 and DNMTs (1, 3a and 3b). Taken together, these observations provide mechanistic evidence for AhR agonists in the establishment of BRCA-1 promoter hypermethylation and the basis for the development of prevention strategies based on AhR antagonists.

  6. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions.

    PubMed

    Zámborszky, J; Szikriszt, B; Gervai, J Z; Pipek, O; Póti, Á; Krzystanek, M; Ribli, D; Szalai-Gindl, J M; Csabai, I; Szallasi, Z; Swanton, C; Richardson, A L; Szüts, D

    2017-02-09

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong and specific correlation with a mutation signature associated with BRCA1/2 mutant tumours. To model endogenous alkylating damage, we determined the mutation spectrum caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed that MMS also induces more base substitution mutations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells. Spontaneously arising and MMS-induced insertion/deletion mutations and large rearrangements were also more common in BRCA1/2 mutant cells compared with the wild-type control. A difference in the short deletion phenotypes of BRCA1 and BRCA2 suggested distinct roles for the two proteins in the processing of DNA lesions, as BRCA2 mutants contained more short deletions, with a wider size distribution, which frequently showed microhomology near the breakpoints resembling repair by non-homologous end joining. An increased and prolonged gamma-H2AX signal in MMS-treated BRCA1/2 cells suggested an aberrant processing of stalled replication forks as the cause of increased mutagenesis. The high rate of base substitution mutagenesis demonstrated by our experiments is likely to significantly contribute to the oncogenic effect of the inactivation of BRCA1 or BRCA2.

  7. BRCA1 and BRCA2: different roles in a common pathway of genome protection

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rohini; Chun, Jarin; Powell, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, work in a common pathway of genome protection. However, the two proteins work at different stages in the DNA damage response (DDR) and in DNA repair. BRCA1 is a pleiotropic DDR protein that functions in both checkpoint activation and DNA repair, whereas BRCA2 is a mediator of the core mechanism of homologous recombination. The links between the two proteins are not well understood, but they must exist to explain the marked similarity of human cancer susceptibility that arises with germline mutations in these genes. As discussed here, the proteins work in concert to protect the genome from double-strand DNA damage during DNA replication. PMID:22193408

  8. BRCA1 promoter methylation of normal breast epithelial cells as a possible precursor for BRCA1-methylated breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Yoko; Miyake, Tomohiro; Kagara, Naofumi; Shimoda, Masafumi; Naoi, Yasuto; Maruyama, Naomi; Shimomura, Atsuhi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) promoters are reportedly often methylated in breast cancer tissues. Their methylation status in surrounding normal breast tissues has not been examined thoroughly although this may well be important for a better understanding of breast carcinogenesis. In this study, BRCA1 and GSTP1 promoter methylation was examined by methylation-specific PCR assay. Patients with BRCA1-methylated (n = 15) or BRCA1-unmethylated (n = 15) tumors and those with GSTP1-methylated (n = 9) or GSTP1-unmethylated (n = 11) tumors were included in the present study. Methylation status of manually micro-dissected normal epithelial cells from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of normal breast tissues adjacent to and distant from the tumors was examined at multiple sites (n = 1–5). Of the 15 patients with BRCA1-methylated tumors, 9 harbored BRCA1 promoter methylation in at least one site of the normal breast tissues. However, no BRCA1 promoter methylation was observed at any site of the normal tissues of the 15 patients with BRCA1-unmethylated tumors. No GSTP1 promoter methylation was observed in the normal tissues regardless of the methylation status of the tumors. The presence of BRCA1 promoter methylation in the normal tissues was confirmed in the epithelial cells enriched with the magnetic-activated cell sorting method. Our findings suggest that a small proportion of normal breast epithelial cells with BRCA1 promoter methylation can be precursor cells from which BRCA1-methylated breast tumors may originate. This does not apply to GSTP1 promoter methylation. PMID:25155055

  9. Common Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Do Not Contribute to Early Prostate Cancer in Jewish Men

    PubMed Central

    Nastiuk, Kent L.; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Terry, Mary Beth; Kularatne, Piyumika; Rubin, Mark A.; Melamed, Jonathan; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ittmann, Michael; Krolewski, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Families with a high incidence of hereditary breast cancer, and subsequently shown to have terminating mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 appear to have a higher incidence of prostate cancer among the male relatives. We aimed to determine whether the common germline mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 in Ashkenazi Jewish men predisposed them to prostate cancer. Methods We examined genomic DNA from 83 (for BRCA1 185delAG) or 82 (for BRCA2 6174delT) Ashkenazi Jewish prostate cancer patients, most of whom were treated at a relatively young age, for the most common germline mutation in each gene seen in the Ashkenazi population. Results Our study should be able to detect a four to five fold increase in the risk of prostate cancer due to mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2. However, only one (1.15%, 95% CI 0-3.6%) of the patients was heterozygous for the BRCA1 mutant allele, and only two were heterozygous for the BRCA2 mutation (2.4%, 95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions The incidence of each of the germline mutations in these prostate cancer patients closely matched their incidence (about 1%) in the general Ashkenazi Jewish population. This suggests that unlike the cases of breast and ovarian cancers, mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 do not significantly predispose men to prostate cancer. PMID:10398279

  10. Immunohistochemical loss of BRCA1 protein in uterine serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Jonathan L; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Awtrey, Christopher S; Soslow, Robert A

    2014-05-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma is a uncommon aggressive variant of endometrial cancer whose biologic origin is unclear. Mutations in p53 and BRCA1 genes play a key role in ovarian serous carcinogenesis. We investigated whether the loss of BRCA1 expression plays a similar role in uterine serous carcinoma. Loss of BRCA1 expression and Wilms tumor 1 (WT-1) overexpression were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Depth of myometrial invasion, the presence of precursor lesions or polyps, and clinical parameters (age, history of breast cancer, and germline BRCA1 mutation status) were recorded. A total of 27 cases were available for evaluation. Three tumors (11.1%, 95% confidence interval, 2%-29%) showed the loss of BRCA1 expression. Two of these had known germline mutation in BRCA1, and the third had not been analyzed. Two of these cases expressed WT-1 or showed some morphologic features suggestive of drop metastasis from the adnexa, but no case showed detectable serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or features of an ovarian primary tumor. Overall, 5 women in the group had a personal history of breast cancer, and the finding was significantly associated with BRCA1 staining (P=0.049). A subset of uterine serous carcinomas shows the loss of BRCA1 protein and is associated with germline mutation.

  11. Pathogenicity of the BRCA1 Missense Variant M1775K is Determined by the Disruption of the BRCT Phosphopeptide-Binding Pocket: a Multi-Modal Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tischkowitz,M.; Hamel, N.; Carvalho, M.; Birrane, G.; Soni, A.; van Beers, E.; Joosse, S.; Wong, N.; Novak, D.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A number of germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, it remains difficult to determine whether many single amino-acid (missense) changes in the BRCA1 protein that are frequently detected in the clinical setting are pathologic or not. Here, we used a combination of functional, crystallographic, biophysical, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis to demonstrate that the BRCA1 missense variant M1775K is pathogenic. Functional assays in yeast and mammalian cells showed that the BRCA1 BRCT domains carrying the amino-acid change M1775K displayed markedly reduced transcriptional activity, indicating that this variant represents a deleterious mutation. Importantly, the M1775K mutation disrupted the phosphopeptide-binding pocket of the BRCA1 BRCT domains, thereby inhibiting the BRCA1 interaction with the proteins BRIP1 and CtIP, which are involved in DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. These results indicate that the integrity of the BRCT phosphopeptide-binding pocket is critical for the tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Moreover, this study demonstrates that multiple lines of evidence obtained from a combination of functional, structural, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis are required to confirm the pathogenicity of rare variants of disease-susceptibility genes and obtain important insights into the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  12. Missense Variants of Uncertain Significance (VUS) Altering the Phosphorylation Patterns of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Tram, Eric; Savas, Sevtap; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for a large proportion of breast-ovarian cancer families. Protein-truncating mutations have been effectively used in the clinical management of familial breast cancer due to their deleterious impact on protein function. However, the majority of missense variants identified throughout the genes continue to pose an obstacle for predictive informative testing due to low frequency and lack of information on how they affect BRCA1/2 function. Phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 play an important role in their function as regulators of DNA repair, transcription and cell cycle in response to DNA damage but whether missense variants of uncertain significance (VUS) are able to disrupt this important process is not known. Here we employed a novel approach using NetworKIN which predicts in vivo kinase-substrate relationship, and evolutionary conservation algorithms SIFT, PolyPhen and Align-GVGD. We evaluated whether 191 BRCA1 and 43 BRCA2 VUS from the Breast Cancer Information Core (BIC) database can functionally alter the consensus phosphorylation motifs and abolish kinase recognition and binding to sites known to be phosphorylated in vivo. Our results show that 13.09% (25/191) BRCA1 and 13.95% (6/43) BRCA2 VUS altered the phosphorylation of BRCA1 and BRCA2. We highlight six BRCA1 (K309T, S632N, S1143F, Q1144H, Q1281P, S1542C) and three BRCA2 (S196I, T207A, P3292L) VUS as potentially clinically significant. These occurred rarely (n<2 in BIC), mutated evolutionarily conserved residues and abolished kinase binding to motifs established in the literature involved in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, transcription or response to DNA damage. Additionally in vivo phosphorylation sites identified via through-put methods are also affected by VUS and are attractive targets for studying their biological and functional significance. We propose that rare VUS affecting phosphorylation may be a novel and important mechanism for which BRCA1 and

  13. BRCA1185delAG tumors may acquire therapy resistance through expression of RING-less BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Drost, Rinske; Dhillon, Kiranjit K.; van der Gulden, Hanneke; van der Heijden, Ingrid; Brandsma, Inger; Cruz, Cristina; Chondronasiou, Dafni; Castroviejo-Bermejo, Marta; van der Burg, Eline; Wientjens, Ellen; Pieterse, Mark; Klijn, Christiaan; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Elkon, Ran; van Deemter, Liesbeth; Rottenberg, Sven; van de Ven, Marieke; Dekkers, Dick H.W.; Demmers, Jeroen A.A.; Agami, Reuven; Balmaña, Judith; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu; Bouwman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) strongly predispose women to breast cancer. BRCA1 plays an important role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination (HR), which is important for tumor suppression. Although BRCA1-deficient cells are highly sensitive to treatment with DSB-inducing agents through their HR deficiency (HRD), BRCA1-associated tumors display heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in clinical trials. It is unclear whether all pathogenic BRCA1 mutations have similar effects on the response to therapy. Here, we have investigated mammary tumorigenesis and therapy sensitivity in mice carrying the Brca1185stop and Brca15382stop alleles, which respectively mimic the 2 most common BRCA1 founder mutations, BRCA1185delAG and BRCA15382insC. Both the Brca1185stop and Brca15382stop mutations predisposed animals to mammary tumors, but Brca1185stop tumors responded markedly worse to HRD-targeted therapy than did Brca15382stop tumors. Mice expressing Brca1185stop mutations also developed therapy resistance more rapidly than did mice expressing Brca15382stop. We determined that both murine Brca1185stop tumors and human BRCA1185delAG breast cancer cells expressed a really interesting new gene domain–less (RING-less) BRCA1 protein that mediated resistance to HRD-targeted therapies. Together, these results suggest that expression of RING-less BRCA1 may serve as a marker to predict poor response to DSB-inducing therapy in human cancer patients. PMID:27454287

  14. Soya phytonutrients act on a panel of genes implicated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 oncosuppressors in human breast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Caëtano, Bertrand; Le Corre, Ludovic; Chalabi, Nassera; Delort, Laetitia; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique J

    2006-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a significant cause of death. Mutations of the oncosuppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with a hereditary risk of breast cancer, and dysregulation of their expression has been observed in sporadic cases. Soya isoflavones have been shown to inhibit breast cancer in studies in vitro, but associations between the consumption of isoflavone-containing foods and breast cancer risk have varied in epidemiological studies. Soya is a unique source of the phytoestrogens daidzein (4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone) and genistein (4',5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), two molecules that are able to inhibit the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of genistein (5 microg/ml) and daidzein (20 microg/ml) on transcription in three human breast cell lines (one dystrophic, MCF10a, and two malignant, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) after 72 h treatment. The different genes involved in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathways (GADD45A, BARD1, JUN, BAX, RB1, ERalpha, ERbeta, BAP1, TNFalpha, p53, p21Waf1/Cip1, p300, RAD51, pS2, Ki-67) were quantified by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, using the TaqMan method and an ABI Prism 7700 Sequence Detector (Applied Biosystems). We observed that, in response to treatment, many of these genes were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) but not in the dystrophic cell line (MCF10a).

  15. Ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: analysis of prognostic factors and survival

    PubMed Central

    Biglia, Nicoletta; Sgandurra, Paola; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Maggiorotto, Furio; Piva, Eleonora; Pivetta, Emanuele; Ponzone, Riccardo; Pasini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare clinical–pathological characteristics and outcome between sporadic ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer in patents with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Methods Twenty-four patients with ovarian cancer treated between 2000 and 2009 who tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutation (BRCA+) and a control group of 64 age-matched patients with no family history of breast/ovarian cancer (controls) were enrolled. Clinical–pathological characteristics, surgical outcome, overall (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between the two groups. Results The high-grade serous histotype was more represented in BRCA+ than in controls (70.8% versus 53.1%) (p > 0.05). BRCA+ cancers were more frequently diagnosed at stage II than controls (20.83% versus 4.69%) (p = 0.024). Radical primary surgery was performed in 70% of women in both groups, with no difference in debulking results. In patients undergoing surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, in all BRCA+ patients, optimal cytoreduction was achieved (versus 70% of the controls). PFS was significantly longer for BRCA+ patients compared to controls (60 months versus 22 months; p = 0.039). No significant difference was observed in OS between BRCA+ patients and controls. Conclusions At a median follow-up time of 46 months, BRCA+ patients have a better prognosis than controls in terms of PFS. Higher chemosensitivity of BRCA+ tumours was observed. PMID:27350785

  16. BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT) in North African

    PubMed Central

    Laraqui, Abdelilah; Uhrhammer, Nancy; EL Rhaffouli, Hicham; Sekhsokh, Yassine; Lahlou-Amine, Idriss; Bajjou, Tahar; Hilali, Farida; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Al Bouzidi, Abderrahmane; Bakri, Youssef; Amzazi, Said; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to both hereditary and sporadic breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has not yet been thoroughly investigated in MENA. Methods. To establish the knowledge about BRCA1 mutations and their correlation with the clinical aspect in diagnosed cases of HBOC in MENA populations. A systematic review of studies examining BRCA1 in BC women in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia was conducted. Results. Thirteen relevant references were identified, including ten studies which performed DNA sequencing of all BRCA1 exons. For the latter, 31 mutations were detected in 57 of the 547 patients ascertained. Familial history of BC was present in 388 (71%) patients, of whom 50 were mutation carriers. c.798_799delTT was identified in 11 North African families, accounting for 22% of total identified BRCA1 mutations, suggesting a founder allele. A broad spectrum of other mutations including c.68_69delAG, c.181T>G, c.5095C>T, and c.5266dupC, as well as sequence of unclassified variants and polymorphisms, was also detected. Conclusion. The knowledge of genetic structure of BRCA1 in MENA should contribute to the assessment of the necessity of preventive programs for mutation carriers and clinical management. The high prevalence of BC and the presence of frequent mutations of the BRCA1 gene emphasize the need for improving screening programs and individual testing/counseling. PMID:25814778

  17. Germline mutations of BRCA1 gene exon 11 are not associated with platinum response neither with survival advantage in patients with primary ovarian cancer: understanding the clinical importance of one of the biggest human exons. A study of the Tumor Bank Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Consortium.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Desislava; Ruscito, Ilary; Olek, Sven; Richter, Rolf; Hellwag, Alexander; Türbachova, Ivana; Woopen, Hannah; Baron, Udo; Braicu, Elena Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2016-09-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 gene have been reported in up to 20 % of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. Distinct clinical characteristics have been attributed to this special EOC population. We hypothesized that mutations in different BRCA1 gene exons may differently affect the clinical course of the disease. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a large cohort of primary EOCs, the clinical impact of mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11, the largest exon of the gene sequence encoding the 60 % of BRCA1 protein. Two hundred sixty-three primary EOC patients, treated between 2000 and 2008 at Charité University Hospital of Berlin, were included. Patients' blood samples were obtained from the Tumor Ovarian Cancer (TOC) Network ( www.toc-network.de ). Direct sequencing of BRCA1 gene exon 11 was performed for each patient to detect mutations. Based on their BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status, patients were compared regarding clinico-pathological variables and survival. Mutations in BRCA1 exon 11 were found in 18 out of 263 patients (6.8 %). Further 10/263 (3.8 %) cases showed variants of uncertain significance (VUS). All exon 11 BRCA1-positive tumors (100 %) were Type 2 ovarian carcinomas (p = 0.05). Age at diagnosis was significantly younger in Type 2 exon 11 mutated patients (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, BRCA1 exon 11 mutational status was not found to be an independent predictive factor for optimal cytoreduction, platinum response, or survival. Mutations in BRCA1 gene exon 11 seem to predispose women to exclusively develop a Type 2 ovarian cancer at younger age. Exon 11 BRCA1-mutated EOC patients showed distinct clinico-pathological features but similar clinical outcome with respect to sporadic EOC patients.

  18. Targeting the Akt/mTOR pathway in Brca1-deficient cancers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, T; Jia, Y; Sherris, D; Li, S; Wang, H; Lu, D; Yang, Q

    2011-05-26

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (Brca1) has a key role in both hereditary and sporadic mammary tumorigenesis. However, the reasons why Brca1-deficiency leads to the development of cancer are not clearly understood. Activation of Akt kinase is one of the most common molecular alterations associated with human malignancy. Increased Akt kinase activity has been reported in most breast cancers. We previously found that downregulation of Brca1 expression or mutations of the Brca1 gene activate the Akt oncogenic pathway. To further investigate the role of Brca1/Akt in tumorigenesis, we analyzed Brca1/Akt expression in human breast cancer samples and found that reduced expression of Brca1 was highly correlated with increased phosphorylation of Akt. Consistent with the clinical data, knockdown of Akt1 by short-hairpin RNA inhibited cellular proliferation of Brca1 mutant cells. Importantly, depletion of Akt1 significantly reduced tumor formation induced by Brca1-deficiency in mice. The third generation inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Palomid 529, significantly suppressed Brca1-deficient tumor growth in mice through inhibition of both Akt and mTOR signaling. Our results indicate that activation of Akt is involved in Brca1-deficiency mediated tumorigenesis and that the mTOR pathway can be used as a novel target for treatment of Brca1-deficient cancers.

  19. Targeting the Akt/mTOR pathway in Brca1-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, T; Jia, Y; Sherris, D; Li, S; Wang, H; Lu, D; Yang, Q

    2011-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (Brca1) has a key role in both hereditary and sporadic mammary tumorigenesis. However, the reasons why Brca1-deficiency leads to the development of cancer are not clearly understood. Activation of Akt kinase is one of the most common molecular alterations associated with human malignancy. Increased Akt kinase activity has been reported in most breast cancers. We previously found that downregulation of Brca1 expression or mutations of the Brca1 gene activate the Akt oncogenic pathway. To further investigate the role of Brca1/Akt in tumorigenesis, we analyzed Brca1/Akt expression in human breast cancer samples and found that reduced expression of Brca1 was highly correlated with increased phosphorylation of Akt. Consistent with the clinical data, knockdown of Akt1 by short-hairpin RNA inhibited cellular proliferation of Brca1 mutant cells. Importantly, depletion of Akt1 significantly reduced tumor formation induced by Brca1-deficiency in mice. The third generation inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Palomid 529, significantly suppressed Brca1-deficient tumor growth in mice through inhibition of both Akt and mTOR signaling. Our results indicate that activation of Akt is involved in Brca1-deficiency mediated tumorigenesis and that the mTOR pathway can be used as a novel target for treatment of Brca1-deficient cancers. PMID:21242970

  20. Individual and Combined Expression of DNA Damage Response Molecules PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 Predict Shorter Survival of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, See-Hyoung; Park, Hye Jeong; Wang, Sung Il; Park, Ho Sung; Lee, Ho; Kwon, Keun Sang; Moon, Woo Sung; Lee, Dong Geun; Kim, Jung Ryul; Jang, Kyu Yun

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) molecules are protective against genotoxic stresses. DDR molecules are also involved in the survival of cancer cells in patients undergoing anti-cancer therapies. Therefore, DDR molecules are potential markers of cancer progression in addition to being potential therapeutic targets. In this study, we evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 and their prognostic significance in 112 cases of soft tissue sarcoma (STS). The expression of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 were significantly associated with each other and were associated with higher tumor stage and presence of distant metastasis. The expression of PARP1, γH2AX, and BRCA2 were significantly associated with shorter disease-specific survival (DSS) and event-free survival (EFS) by univariate analysis. BRCA1 expression was associated with shorter DSS. Multivariate analysis revealed the expression of PARP1 and γH2AX to be independent indicators of poor prognosis of DSS and EFS. BRCA2 expression was an independent indicator of poor prognosis of DSS. In addition, the combined expressional patterns of PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 (CSddrm) were independent prognostic predictors of DSS (P < 0.001) and EFS (P = 0.016). The ten-year DSS rate of the CSddrm-low, CSddrm-intermediate, and CSddrm-high subgroups were 81%, 26%, and 0%, respectively. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the individual and combined expression patterns of the DDR molecules PARP1, γH2AX, BRCA1, and BRCA2 could be predictive of the prognosis of STS patients and suggests that controlling the activity of these DDR molecules could be employed in new therapeutic stratagems for the treatment of STS. PMID:27643881

  1. Compromised BRCA1-PALB2 interaction is associated with breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Foo, T K; Tischkowitz, M; Simhadri, S; Boshari, T; Zayed, N; Burke, K A; Berman, S H; Blecua, P; Riaz, N; Huo, Y; Ding, Y C; Neuhausen, S L; Weigelt, B; Reis-Filho, J S; Foulkes, W D; Xia, B

    2017-03-20

    The major breast cancer suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 play essential roles in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair, which is thought to be critical for tumor suppression. The two BRCA proteins are linked by a third tumor suppressor, PALB2, in the HR pathway. While truncating mutations in these genes are generally pathogenic, interpretation of missense variants remains a challenge. To date, patient-derived missense variants that disrupt PALB2 binding have been identified in BRCA1 and BRCA2; however, there has not been sufficient evidence to prove their pathogenicity in humans, and no variants in PALB2 that disrupt either its BRCA1 or BRCA2 binding have been reported. Here we report on the identification of a novel PALB2 variant, c.104T>C (p.L35P), that segregates in a family with a strong history of breast cancer. Functional analyses showed that L35P abrogates the PALB2-BRCA1 interaction and completely disables its abilities to promote HR and confer resistance to platinum salts and PARP inhibitors. Whole-exome sequencing of a breast cancer from a c.104T>C carrier revealed a second, somatic, truncating mutation affecting PALB2, and the tumor displays hallmark genomic features of tumors with BRCA mutations and HR defects, cementing the pathogenicity of L35P. Parallel analyses of other germline variants in the PALB2 N-terminal BRCA1-binding domain identified multiple variants that affect HR function to varying degrees, suggesting their possible contribution to cancer development. Our findings establish L35P as the first pathogenic missense mutation in PALB2 and directly demonstrate the requirement of the PALB2-BRCA1 interaction for breast cancer suppression.Oncogene advance online publication, 20 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.46.

  2. p16INK4a suppresses BRCA1-deficient mammary tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alexandria; Bai, Feng; Chan, Ho Lam; Liu, Shiqin; Ma, Jinshan; Slingerland, Joyce M; Robbins, David J.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Pei, Xin-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Senescence prevents the proliferation of genomically damaged, but otherwise replication competent cells at risk of neoplastic transformation. p16INK4A (p16), an inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, plays a critical role in controlling cellular senescence in multiple organs. Functional inactivation of p16 by gene mutation and promoter methylation is frequently detected in human breast cancers. However, deleting p16 in mice or targeting DNA methylation within the murine p16 promoter does not result in mammary tumorigenesis. How loss of p16 contributes to mammary tumorigenesis in vivo is not fully understood. In this article, we reported that disruption of Brca1 in the mammary epithelium resulted in premature senescence that was rescued by p16 loss. We found that p16 loss transformed Brca1-deficient mammary epithelial cells and induced mammary tumors, though p16 loss alone was not sufficient to induce mammary tumorigenesis. We demonstrated that loss of both p16 and Brca1 led to metastatic, basal-like, mammary tumors with the induction of EMT and an enrichment of tumor initiating cells. We discovered that promoter methylation silenced p16 expression in most of the tumors developed in mice heterozygous for p16 and lacking Brca1. These data not only identified the function of p16 in suppressing BRCA1-deficient mammary tumorigenesis, but also revealed a collaborative effect of genetic mutation of p16 and epigenetic silencing of its transcription in promoting tumorigenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic evidence directly showing that p16 which is frequently deleted and inactivated in human breast cancers, collaborates with Brca1 controlling mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:27811360

  3. Comprehensive analysis of BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 germline mutation and tumor characterization: a portrait of early-onset breast cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Dirce Maria; Koike Folgueira, Maria Aparecida Azevedo; Garcia Lisboa, Bianca Cristina; Ribeiro Olivieri, Eloisa Helena; Vitorino Krepischi, Ana Cristina; de Carvalho, Alex Fiorini; de Carvalho Mota, Louise Danielle; Puga, Renato David; do Socorro Maciel, Maria; Michelli, Rodrigo Augusto Depieri; de Lyra, Eduardo Carneiro; Grosso, Stana Helena Giorgi; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Achatz, Maria Isabel Alves de Souza Waddington; Brentani, Helena; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Brentani, Maria Mitzi

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53 genes have been identified as one of the most important disease-causing issues in young breast cancer patients worldwide. The specific defective biological processes that trigger germline mutation-associated and -negative tumors remain unclear. To delineate an initial portrait of Brazilian early-onset breast cancer, we performed an investigation combining both germline and tumor analysis. Germline screening of the BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (c.1100delC) and TP53 genes was performed in 54 unrelated patients <35 y; their tumors were investigated with respect to transcriptional and genomic profiles as well as hormonal receptors and HER2 expression/amplification. Germline mutations were detected in 12 out of 54 patients (22%) [7 in BRCA1 (13%), 4 in BRCA2 (7%) and one in TP53 (2%) gene]. A cancer familial history was present in 31.4% of the unrelated patients, from them 43.7% were carriers for germline mutation (37.5% in BRCA1 and in 6.2% in the BRCA2 genes). Fifty percent of the unrelated patients with hormone receptor-negative tumors carried BRCA1 mutations, percentage increasing to 83% in cases with familial history of cancer. Over-representation of DNA damage-, cellular and cell cycle-related processes was detected in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-associated tumors, whereas cell and embryo development-related processes were over-represented in the up-regulated genes of BRCA1/2-negative tumors, suggesting distinct mechanisms driving the tumorigenesis. An initial portrait of the early-onset breast cancer patients in Brazil was generated pointing out that hormone receptor-negative tumors and positive familial history are two major risk factors for detection of a BRCA1 germline mutation. Additionally, the data revealed molecular factors that potentially trigger the tumor development in young patients.

  4. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Coordination of BRCA1/BARD1- and MRE11/RAD50/NBS1-Dependent DNA Transactions in Breast Tumor Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Langmuir 2008, 24, (19), 11293 - 9. Gorman, J.; Fazio, T.; Wang, F.; Wind, S.; Greene, E. Langmuir 2010, 26, (2), 1372 - 9. CONCLUSION Our...development. 
 10
 REFERENCES 
 1. Hodgson, S. V., Morrison, P. J., and Irving , M. (2004) Breast cancer genetics: unsolved questions and open...Greene, E. (2008) Parallel arrays of geometric nanowells for assembling curtains of DNA with controlled lateral dispersion, Langmuir 24, 11293 - 11299

  6. Coordination of BRCA1/BARD1- and MRE11/RAD50/NBS1-Dependent DNA Transactions in Breast Tumor Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Cycle Regulation of DNA Double-strand Break Resection. (In revision) T. Fazio, M. L. Visnapuu, S. Wind, E. C. Greene, Langmuir 24, 10524 (Sep 16...2008). M. L. Visnapuu, T. Fazio, S. Wind, E. C. Greene, Langmuir 24, 11293 (Oct 7, 2008). CONCLUSION Our experiments in cell-free extracts have...S. V. Hodgson, P. J. Morrison, M. Irving , Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 129, 56 (Aug 15, 2004). 2. M. C. King, J. H. Marks, J. B. Mandell

  7. BRCA1 Mediated Ubiquitination: Identification of Targets for Destruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Breast cancer can be a genetic disease passed from mother...to daughter. BRCA1 is the gene that when mutated is responsible for half of inherited breast cancer cases and about 80% of the combined breast and...ovarian cancer kindreds. Therefore, the function of the protein product of BRCA 1, which is still unknown, must be extremely important in mammary and

  8. A New Cell-Free System to Study BRCA1 Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This proposal is based on our finding that in a cell-free system based on Xenopus egg extracts, the...addition, we found that in BRCA1-depleted egg extracts, the CMG helicase that unwinds DNA ahead of DNA polymerases, fails to be unloaded from the...tumor suppression. We have also developed new ways of inhibiting BRCA1 function in egg extracts and examined the role of potential BRCA1 effectors

  9. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 Tumor Test as Basis for Treatment Decisions and Referral for Genetic Counselling of Patients with Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Weren, Robbert D.A.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Simons, Michiel; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Sie, Aisha S.; Ouchene, Hicham; van Asseldonk, Monique; Gomez‐Garcia, Encarna B.; Blok, Marinus J.; de Hullu, Joanne A.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bulten, Johan; Tops, Bastiaan B.J.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the recent introduction of Poly(ADP‐ribose) polymerase inhibitors, a promising novel therapy has become available for ovarian carcinoma (OC) patients with inactivating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in their tumor. To select patients who may benefit from these treatments, assessment of the mutation status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in the tumor is required. For reliable evaluation of germline and somatic mutations in these genes in DNA derived from formalin‐fixed, paraffin‐embedded (FFPE) tissue, we have developed a single‐molecule molecular inversion probe (smMIP)‐based targeted next‐generation sequencing (NGS) approach. Our smMIP‐based NGS approach provides analysis of both strands of the open reading frame of BRCA1 and BRCA2, enabling the discrimination between real variants and formalin‐induced artefacts. The single molecule tag enables compilation of unique reads leading to a high analytical sensitivity and enabling assessment of the reliability of mutation‐negative results. Multiplex ligation‐dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Methylation‐specific multiplex ligation‐dependent probe amplification (MS‐MLPA) were used to detect exon deletions of BRCA1 and methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, respectively. Here, we show that this combined approach allows the rapid and reliable detection of both germline and somatic aberrations affecting BRCA1 and BRCA2 in DNA derived from FFPE OCs, enabling improved hereditary cancer risk assessment and clinical treatment of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27767231

  10. BRCA1 and its toolbox for the maintenance of genome integrity

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Michael S.Y.; Sy, Shirley M.H.; Chen, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    The breast and ovarian cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) has pivotal roles in the maintenance of genome stability. Studies support that BRCA1 exerts its tumour suppression function primarily through its involvement in cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA damage repair. In addition, recent proteomic and genetic studies have revealed the presence of distinct BRCA1 complexes in vivo, each of which governs a specific cellular response to DNA damage. Thus, BRCA1 is emerging as the master regulator of the genome through its ability to execute and coordinate various aspects of the DNA damage response. PMID:20029420

  11. Combined genetic and splicing analysis of BRCA1 c.[594-2A>C; 641A>G] highlights the relevance of naturally occurring in-frame transcripts for developing disease gene variant classification algorithms.

    PubMed

    de la Hoya, Miguel; Soukarieh, Omar; López-Perolio, Irene; Vega, Ana; Walker, Logan C; van Ierland, Yvette; Baralle, Diana; Santamariña, Marta; Lattimore, Vanessa; Wijnen, Juul; Whiley, Philip; Blanco, Ana; Raponi, Michela; Hauke, Jan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Hansen, Thomas V O; Behar, Raquel; Investigators, KConFaB; Niederacher, Diether; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Steinemann, Doris; Faust, Ulrike; Rubinstein, Wendy; Hulick, Peter J; Houdayer, Claude; Caputo, Sandrine M; Castera, Laurent; Pesaran, Tina; Chao, Elizabeth; Brewer, Carole; Southey, Melissa C; van Asperen, Christi J; Singer, Christian F; Sullivan, Jan; Poplawski, Nicola; Mai, Phuong; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Galastri, Laura; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Blows, Fiona; Shah, Mitul; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; McGuffog, Lesley; Bolla, Manjeet K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Tavtigian, Sean; Vreeswijk, Maaike P; Parsons, Michael; Meeks, Huong D; Martins, Alexandra; Goldgar, David E; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    A recent analysis using family history weighting and co-observation classification modeling indicated that BRCA1 c.594-2A > C (IVS9-2A > C), previously described to cause exon 10 skipping (a truncating alteration), displays characteristics inconsistent with those of a high risk pathogenic BRCA1 variant. We used large-scale genetic and clinical resources from the ENIGMA, CIMBA and BCAC consortia to assess pathogenicity of c.594-2A > C. The combined odds for causality considering case-control, segregation and breast tumor pathology information was 3.23 × 10(-8) Our data indicate that c.594-2A > C is always in cis with c.641A > G. The spliceogenic effect of c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] was characterized using RNA analysis of human samples and splicing minigenes. As expected, c.[594-2A > C; 641A > G] caused exon 10 skipping, albeit not due to c.594-2A > C impairing the acceptor site but rather by c.641A > G modifying exon 10 splicing regulatory element(s). Multiple blood-based RNA assays indicated that the variant allele did not produce detectable levels of full-length transcripts, with a per allele BRCA1 expression profile composed of ≈70-80% truncating transcripts, and ≈20-30% of in-frame Δ9,10 transcripts predicted to encode a BRCA1 protein with tumor suppression function.We confirm that BRCA1c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] should not be considered a high-risk pathogenic variant. Importantly, results from our detailed mRNA analysis suggest that BRCA-associated cancer risk is likely not markedly increased for individuals who carry a truncating variant in BRCA1 exons 9 or 10, or any other BRCA1 allele that permits 20-30% of tumor suppressor function. More generally, our findings highlight the importance of assessing naturally occurring alternative splicing for clinical evaluation of variants in disease-causing genes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Combined genetic and splicing analysis of BRCA1 c.[594-2A>C; 641A>G] highlights the relevance of naturally occurring in-frame transcripts for developing disease gene variant classification algorithms

    PubMed Central

    de la Hoya, Miguel; Soukarieh, Omar; López-Perolio, Irene; Vega, Ana; Walker, Logan C.; van Ierland, Yvette; Baralle, Diana; Santamariña, Marta; Lattimore, Vanessa; Wijnen, Juul; Whiley, Philip; Blanco, Ana; Raponi, Michela; Hauke, Jan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Becker, Alexandra; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Behar, Raquel; Investigators, KConFaB; Niederacher, Diether; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Steinemann, Doris; Faust, Ulrike; Rubinstein, Wendy; Hulick, Peter J.; Houdayer, Claude; Caputo, Sandrine M.; Castera, Laurent; Pesaran, Tina; Chao, Elizabeth; Brewer, Carole; Southey, Melissa C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Singer, Christian F.; Sullivan, Jan; Poplawski, Nicola; Mai, Phuong; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Galastri, Laura; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Blows, Fiona; Shah, Mitul; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; McGuffog, Lesley; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Tavtigian, Sean; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Parsons, Michael; Meeks, Huong D.; Martins, Alexandra; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    A recent analysis using family history weighting and co-observation classification modeling indicated that BRCA1 c.594-2A > C (IVS9-2A > C), previously described to cause exon 10 skipping (a truncating alteration), displays characteristics inconsistent with those of a high risk pathogenic BRCA1 variant. We used large-scale genetic and clinical resources from the ENIGMA, CIMBA and BCAC consortia to assess pathogenicity of c.594-2A > C. The combined odds for causality considering case-control, segregation and breast tumor pathology information was 3.23 × 10−8. Our data indicate that c.594-2A > C is always in cis with c.641A > G. The spliceogenic effect of c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] was characterized using RNA analysis of human samples and splicing minigenes. As expected, c.[594-2A > C; 641A > G] caused exon 10 skipping, albeit not due to c.594-2A > C impairing the acceptor site but rather by c.641A > G modifying exon 10 splicing regulatory element(s). Multiple blood-based RNA assays indicated that the variant allele did not produce detectable levels of full-length transcripts, with a per allele BRCA1 expression profile composed of ≈70–80% truncating transcripts, and ≈20–30% of in-frame Δ9,10 transcripts predicted to encode a BRCA1 protein with tumor suppression function. We confirm that BRCA1c.[594-2A > C;641A > G] should not be considered a high-risk pathogenic variant. Importantly, results from our detailed mRNA analysis suggest that BRCA-associated cancer risk is likely not markedly increased for individuals who carry a truncating variant in BRCA1 exons 9 or 10, or any other BRCA1 allele that permits 20–30% of tumor suppressor function. More generally, our findings highlight the importance of assessing naturally occurring alternative splicing for clinical evaluation of variants in disease-causing genes. PMID:27008870

  13. A mechanism for transcriptional repression dependent on the BRCA1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Andrew A; Affar, El Bachir; Heine, George F; Shi, Yang; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2007-04-17

    Loss of function of the tumor suppressor protein BRCA1 is responsible for a high percentage of familial and also sporadic breast cancers. Early work identified a stimulatory transcriptional coactivator function for the BRCA1 protein, and more recently, BRCA1 has been implicated in transcriptional repression, although few examples of repressed genes have been characterized. We recently used an in vitro transcription assay to identify a biochemical mechanism that explained the BRCA1 stimulatory activity. In this study, we identified an ubiquitin-dependent mechanism by which BRCA1 inhibits transcription. BRCA1 ubiquitinates the transcriptional preinitiation complex, preventing stable association of TFIIE and TFIIH, and thus blocks the initiation of mRNA synthesis. What is striking about this mechanism of regulation by BRCA1 is that the ubiquitination of the preinitiation complex is not targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome, nor are ubiquitin receptors modifying the activity, but rather the ubiquitin moiety itself interferes with the assembly of basal transcription factors at the promoter. Using RNAi to knockdown expression of the endogenous BRCA1 protein, we assessed the level of repression dependent on BRCA1 in the cell, and we found that BRCA1 is at least as significant a transcriptional repressor as it is an activator. These results define a biochemical mechanism by which the BRCA1 enzymatic activity regulates a key cellular process.

  14. Next-generation sequencing meets genetic diagnostics: development of a comprehensive workflow for the analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Feliubadaló, Lídia; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Castellsagué, Ester; del Valle, Jesús; Menéndez, Mireia; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Gómez, Carolina; Campos, Olga; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Serra, Eduard; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2013-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is changing genetic diagnosis due to its huge sequencing capacity and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an NGS-based workflow for routine diagnostics for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS), to improve genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2. A NGS-based workflow was designed using BRCA MASTR kit amplicon libraries followed by GS Junior pyrosequencing. Data analysis combined Variant Identification Pipeline freely available software and ad hoc R scripts, including a cascade of filters to generate coverage and variant calling reports. A BRCA homopolymer assay was performed in parallel. A research scheme was designed in two parts. A Training Set of 28 DNA samples containing 23 unique pathogenic mutations and 213 other variants (33 unique) was used. The workflow was validated in a set of 14 samples from HBOCS families in parallel with the current diagnostic workflow (Validation Set). The NGS-based workflow developed permitted the identification of all pathogenic mutations and genetic variants, including those located in or close to homopolymers. The use of NGS for detecting copy-number alterations was also investigated. The workflow meets the sensitivity and specificity requirements for the genetic diagnosis of HBOCS and improves on the cost-effectiveness of current approaches.

  15. The BRCA1ness signature is associated significantly with response to PARP inhibitor treatment versus control in the I-SPY 2 randomized neoadjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Severson, Tesa M; Wolf, Denise M; Yau, Christina; Peeters, Justine; Wehkam, Diederik; Schouten, Philip C; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian J; Michaut, Magali; Bosma, Astrid; Pereira, Bernard; Bismeijer, Tycho; Wessels, Lodewyk; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, René; Simon, Iris M; Glas, Annuska M; Linn, Sabine; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-08-25

    Patients with BRCA1-like tumors correlate with improved response to DNA double-strand break-inducing therapy. A gene expression-based classifier was developed to distinguish between BRCA1-like and non-BRCA1-like tumors. We hypothesized that these tumors may also be more sensitive to PARP inhibitors than standard treatments. A diagnostic gene expression signature (BRCA1ness) was developed using a centroid model with 128 triple-negative breast cancer samples from the EU FP7 RATHER project. This BRCA1ness signature was then tested in HER2-negative patients (n = 116) from the I-SPY 2 TRIAL who received an oral PARP inhibitor veliparib in combination with carboplatin (V-C), or standard chemotherapy alone. We assessed the association between BRCA1ness and pathologic complete response in the V-C and control arms alone using Fisher's exact test, and the relative performance between arms (biomarker × treatment interaction, likelihood ratio p < 0.05) using a logistic model and adjusting for hormone receptor status (HR). We developed a gene expression signature to identify BRCA1-like status. In the I-SPY 2 neoadjuvant setting the BRCA1ness signature associated significantly with response to V-C (p = 0.03), but not in the control arm (p = 0.45). We identified a significant interaction between BRCA1ness and V-C (p = 0.023) after correcting for HR. A genomic-based BRCA1-like signature was successfully translated to an expression-based signature (BRC1Aness). In the I-SPY 2 neoadjuvant setting, we determined that the BRCA1ness signature is capable of predicting benefit of V-C added to standard chemotherapy compared to standard chemotherapy alone. I-SPY 2 TRIAL beginning December 31, 2009: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer (I-SPY 2), NCT01042379 .

  16. New perspective on maintenance therapies for platinum- sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer in women with germline and somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Vergote, I; Bours, V; Blaumeiser, B; Baurain, J-F

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the seventh most common cancer in women. Although women diagnosed with OC are usually treated frontline with platinum-based chemotherapy, most of them relapse once treatment is halted. Therefore, maintenance therapies have been developed to secure the response and delay further chemotherapy. There are two established maintenance therapies for women affected by platinum-sensitive recurrent OC: bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, and olaparib, an inhibitor of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARPi). Loss-of-function mutations in genes in the homologous recombination pathway, especially BRCA1 and BRCA2, predict higher rates of platinum sensitivity, better overall survival (OS), and better response to PARPi in women with OC. Among patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC, a BRCA mutation is the first genetically defined predictive marker for targeted therapy, since these patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with a PARPi, such as olaparib. In patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC without a BRCA mutation, bevacizumab currently seems to be the best maintenance option. Women with OC are progressively more routinely screened for germline BRCA mutations, and the implication of somatic BRCA mutations is increasingly being recognized in OC. Therefore, the recommendations should be updated to reflect the importance of both types of mutations. Together, these data highlight the fact that treatment of recurrent OC can be optimized using genomic contributions to individualize therapy and to improve treatment response.

  17. New perspective on maintenance therapies for platinum- sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer in women with germline and somatic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    PubMed Central

    Vergote, I; Bours, V; Blaumeiser, B; Baurain, J-F

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the seventh most common cancer in women. Although women diagnosed with OC are usually treated frontline with platinum-based chemotherapy, most of them relapse once treatment is halted. Therefore, maintenance therapies have been developed to secure the response and delay further chemotherapy. There are two established maintenance therapies for women affected by platinum-sensitive recurrent OC: bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, and olaparib, an inhibitor of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARPi). Loss-of-function mutations in genes in the homologous recombination pathway, especially BRCA1 and BRCA2, predict higher rates of platinum sensitivity, better overall survival (OS), and better response to PARPi in women with OC. Among patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC, a BRCA mutation is the first genetically defined predictive marker for targeted therapy, since these patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with a PARPi, such as olaparib. In patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent OC without a BRCA mutation, bevacizumab currently seems to be the best maintenance option. Women with OC are progressively more routinely screened for germline BRCA mutations, and the implication of somatic BRCA mutations is increasingly being recognized in OC. Therefore, the recommendations should be updated to reflect the importance of both types of mutations. Together, these data highlight the fact that treatment of recurrent OC can be optimized using genomic contributions to individualize therapy and to improve treatment response. PMID:28003870

  18. Molecular Analysis of BRCA1 in Human Breast Cancer Cells Under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Brian L.; Liang, Yanping; Winton, Carly E.; Patel, Kaya; Karageorge, Vasilea; Varano, A. Cameron; Dearnaley, William; Sheng, Zhi; Kelly, Deborah F.

    2017-01-01

    The precise manner in which physical changes to the breast cancer susceptibility protein (BRCA1) affect its role in DNA repair events remain unclear. Indeed, cancer cells harboring mutations in BRCA1 suffer from genomic instability and increased DNA lesions. Here, we used a combination of molecular imaging and biochemical tools to study the properties of the BRCA1 in human cancer cells. Our results reveal new information for the manner in which full-length BRCA1 engages its binding partner, the BRCA1-associated Ring Domain protein (BARD1) under oxidative stress conditions. We also show how physical differences between wild type and mutated BRCA15382insC impact the cell’s response to oxidative damage. Overall, we demonstrate how clinically relevant changes to BRCA1 affect its structure-function relationship in hereditary breast cancer. PMID:28262780

  19. Construction and Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Lines Containing Mutations in the p53 or BRCA1 Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    development of breast cancers. To study the effects of inactivating mutations in these tumor suppressor genes early in the breast-cancer pathway, we have...the effects of inactivating mutations in these tumor suppressor genes early in the breast-cancer pathway. The consequences of transduction of these...proposed three approaches for constructing p53-deficient cells; i.e., by mutating the p53 gene directly, by abrogating the protein’s normal cellular

  20. A systematic genetic assessment of 1,433 sequence variants of unknown clinical significance in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer-predisposition genes.

    PubMed

    Easton, Douglas F; Deffenbaugh, Amie M; Pruss, Dmitry; Frye, Cynthia; Wenstrup, Richard J; Allen-Brady, Kristina; Tavtigian, Sean V; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Iversen, Edwin S; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E

    2007-11-01

    Mutation screening of the breast and ovarian cancer-predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 is becoming an increasingly important part of clinical practice. Classification of rare nontruncating sequence variants in these genes is problematic, because it is not known whether these subtle changes alter function sufficiently to predispose cells to cancer development. Using data from the Myriad Genetic Laboratories database of nearly 70,000 full-sequence tests, we assessed the clinical significance of 1,433 sequence variants of unknown significance (VUSs) in the BRCA genes. Three independent measures were employed in the assessment: co-occurrence in trans of a VUS with known deleterious mutations; detailed analysis, by logistic regression, of personal and family history of cancer in VUS-carrying probands; and, in a subset of probands, an analysis of cosegregation with disease in pedigrees. For each of these factors, a likelihood ratio was computed under the hypothesis that the VUSs were equivalent to an "average" deleterious mutation, compared with neutral, with respect to risk. The likelihood ratios derived from each component were combined to provide an overall assessment for each VUS. A total of 133 VUSs had odds of at least 100 : 1 in favor of neutrality with respect to risk, whereas 43 had odds of at least 20 : 1 in favor of being deleterious. VUSs with evidence in favor of causality were those that were predicted to affect splicing, fell at positions that are highly conserved among BRCA orthologs, and were more likely to be located in specific domains of the proteins. In addition to their utility for improved genetics counseling of patients and their families, the global assessment reported here will be invaluable for validation of functional assays, structural models, and in silico analyses.

  1. Large genomic rearrangements in the familial breast and ovarian cancer gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased frequency of high risk features.

    PubMed

    James, Paul A; Sawyer, Sarah; Boyle, Samantha; Young, Mary-Anne; Kovalenko, Serguei; Doherty, Rebecca; McKinley, Joanne; Alsop, Kathryn; Beshay, Victoria; Harris, Marion; Fox, Stephen; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Mitchell, Gillian

    2015-06-01

    Large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) account for at least 10% of the mutations in BRCA1 and 5% of BRCA2 mutations in outbred hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) families. Data from some series suggest LGRs represent particularly penetrant mutations. 1,034 index cases from HBOC families underwent comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing, including screening for LGRs. The personal and family history of 254 identified mutation carriers were compared based on mutation type. Thirty-six LGRs were detected; 32/122 (26%) BRCA1 and 4/132 (3%) BRCA2 mutations. High risk features (bilateral breast cancer, diagnosis <40 years, ovarian cancer, male breast cancer) were more commonly associated with an LGR than a non-LGR mutation (p = 0.008), In families with a BRCA1 LGR the mean age of breast cancer diagnosis was younger than in families with a non-LGR BRCA1 mutation (42.5 vs. 46.1 years, p = 0.007). Across the entire group of mutation positive families the number of relatives affected by breast or ovarian cancer was increased [LGR 3.7 vs. non- LGR 2.8 per family, p value (adjusted for genotype) = 0.047]. Excluding index cases, the odds ratio for breast cancer in BRCA1 families with an LGR was 1.42 (95% CI 1.24-1.63) and for ovarian cancer 1.66 (95% CI 1.10-2.49). The increased cancer risk was reflected in significantly higher risk assessments by mutation prediction tools. LGRs are associated with higher cancer risks. If validated, LGRs could be included in cancer risk prediction tools to improve personalised cancer risk prediction estimates and may guide cost-minimising mutation screening strategies in some healthcare settings.

  2. Rendering DNA Repair Defective by Targeting Wild-Type BRCA1 Nuclear Shuttling in Sporadic Breast Cancer as a Therapeutic Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    in MCF7, but only 47% to 43% in PC3). The cytotoxicity from Olaparib alone, IR alone, or IR + Olaparib was assessed using a colony formation...assay. As shown in Fig. 4, all three cell lines are resistant to Olaparib alone. Interestingly, IR pretreatment resulted in a dramatic increase in cell...induced BRCA1 nuclear export is associated with IR-induced sensitization of sporadic cancer cells to PARPi. Cells were exposed to Olaparib alone, or

  3. Breast cancer risk in Chinese women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lu; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Juan; He, Yingjian; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2016-04-01

    BRCA1/2 mutations represent approximately 5 % of unselected Chinese women with breast cancer. However, the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the age-specific cumulative risk of breast cancer in Chinese women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Our study included 1816 unselected Chinese women with breast cancer and 5549 female first-degree relatives of these probands. All probands were screened for BRCA1/2 mutation. The age-specific cumulative risks of BRCA1/2 carriers were estimated using the kin-cohort study by comparing the history of breast cancer in first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 carriers and non-carriers. Among the 1816 probands, 125 BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations were identified (70 in the BRCA1 gene and 55 in the BRCA2 gene). The incidence of breast cancer in the first-degree female relatives of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was significantly higher (3.7-fold and 4.4-fold for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively) than in non-carriers. The estimated cumulative risks of breast cancer by age 70 years were 37.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.1-54.4 %] for BRCA1 mutation carriers and 36.5 % (95 % CI 26.7-51.8 %) for BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. Our study suggests that the breast cancer risk of Chinese women with BRCA1/2 mutations appears to be relatively high by the age of 70. Therefore, genetic counseling, enhanced surveillance, and individual preventive strategies should be provided for Chinese women who carry a BRCA1/2 mutation.

  4. Alterations in p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 genes and their effect in modifying clinicopathological characteristics and overall survival of Bulgarian patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozhanov, Stefan S; Angelova, Svetla G; Krasteva, Maria E; Markov, Tsanko L; Christova, Svetlana L; Gavrilov, Ivan G; Georgieva, Elena I

    2010-11-01

    Though p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 genes are shown to be involved in various aspects of breast carcinogenesis, their functional relationship and clinical value are still disputable. We investigated the genetic status or expression profile of these genes to further elucidate their clinical significance. PCR-SSCP-Sequencing of p53, BRCA1, ATM, and PIK3CA was performed in 145 Bulgarian patients with sporadic breast cancer. Expression profiles of HER2 were determined by ICH and CISH. Relationship between mutations and clinicopathological characteristics was evaluated by Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard test and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to evaluate differences in overall survival between groups. The frequency of p53 (22.07%), BRCA1 (0.69%), ATM (7.59%), and PIK3CA (31.25%) alterations and HER2 (21.21%) overexpression was estimated. Mutated p53 was associated with tumor size (P = 0.033) and grade of malignancy (P = 0.001), ATM--with grade of malignancy (P = 0.032), and PIK3CA--with PR-positive tumors (P = 0.047). HER2 overexpression correlated with age of diagnosis (P = 0.009), tumor size (P = 0.0004), and ER expression (P = 0.011). Univariate survival analysis showed that mutated p53 is an indicator for worse outcome (P = 0.041). Combination of two genetic abnormalities did not correlate with more aggressive carcinogenesis and worse overall survival. Our data indicated that p53, BRCA1, ATM, PIK3CA, and HER2 alterations specifically correlate with clinicopathological characteristics of Bulgarian patients with breast cancer. Of these genes, only mutated p53 showed significant, though not independent, negative effect on overall survival.

  5. Loss of BRCA1 impairs centromeric cohesion and triggers chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Aurélie; Racca, Carine; Calsou, Patrick; Larminat, Florence

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to its well-known role in the DNA damage response during interphase, the function of BRCA1 in the maintenance of chromosomal stability during mitosis remains to be defined. In this study, we uncover a novel role of BRCA1 in preserving centromere integrity in mitotic human cells. Using immunofluorescence and chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches, we report BRCA1 association with centromeric chromatin during mitosis. BRCA1 depletion impairs centromeric cohesion, leading to an increase in interkinetochore distance and in unpaired sister-chromatids frequency during prometaphase. Moreover, BRCA1 loss partially decreased accumulation of the Aurora B kinase at the centromere. We found that proper recruitment of the DNMT3b DNA methyltransferase to satellite sequences is BRCA1-dependent during mitosis, suggesting that DNA hypomethylation contributes to Aurora B mislocalization. BRCA1-deficient cells exhibited decreased ability to correct improper Aurora B-dependent chromosome-spindle attachments and to align chromosomes at metaphase. Finally, we show that BRCA1 disruption promotes merotelic kinetochore attachments that represent a major mechanism of aneuploidy in human cells. In summary, we report here a novel function of BRCA1 in maintaining chromosomal stability through its contribution to the mitotic centromere integrity necessary for faithful segregation of sister-chromatids during cell division.

  6. Transgenic expression of BRCA1 disturbs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells quiescence and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lin; Shi, Guiying; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-10-15

    The balance between quiescence and proliferation of HSCs is an important regulator of hematopoiesis. Loss of quiescence frequently results in HSCs exhaustion, which underscores the importance of tight regulation of proliferation in these cells. Studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinases are involved in the regulation of quiescence in HSCs. BRCA1 plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks, cell cycle, apoptosis and transcription. BRCA1 is expressed in the bone marrow. However, the function of BRCA1 in HSCs is unknown. In our study, we generated BRCA1 transgenic mice to investigate the effects of BRCA1 on the mechanisms of quiescence and differentiation in HSCs. The results demonstrate that over-expression of BRCA1 in the bone marrow impairs the development of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, BRCA1 induced an increase in the number of LSKs, LT-HSCs, ST-HSCs and MPPs. A competitive transplantation assay found that BRCA1 transgenic mice failed to reconstitute hematopoiesis. Moreover, BRCA1 regulates the expression of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}, which results in a loss of quiescence in LSKs. Together, over-expression of BRCA1 in bone marrow disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs, and disrupted differentiation of the HSCs, which acts through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}. - Highlights: • Over-expression of BRCA1 results in impaired B lymphocyte development. • BRCA1 transgenic mice disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs. • BRCA1 impairs the function of HSCs through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1/cip1} and p57{sup kip2}.

  7. Rare alleles of the HRAS polymorphism do not modify the risk of breast or ovarian cancer in BRCA1 carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, C.; Tonin, P.; Lynch, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of one of the rare alleles of a minisatellite polymorphism at the HRAS locus on chromosome 11p15 has been associated with a roughly two-fold increase in the risk of breast cancer. The BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q12-21 is responsible for the majority of the families with the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. It is estimated that 87% of BRCA1 carriers will be affected with breast cancer by age 70. The relative risk for premenopausal breast cancer in carriers, compared to non-carriers, is roughly 100. Because of the wide range in ages of onset of cancer among BRCA1 carriers, it is likely that additional factors modify the risk of cancer. The role of other modifying genetic loci has not been studied. Through haplotype analysis we have identified 199 female BRCA1 carriers above the age of 20 years in 25 linked families. 127 of these women have been diagnosed with cancer and 72 are currently healthy. DNA was available on 59 carriers. Each sample was typed for the HRAS polymorphism by PCR, using primers flanking the minisatellite. Rare alleles were identified in 18 carriers. The penetrance of the BRCA1 gene was not higher among those women who carried a rare HRAS allele (mean age of onset 49 years) than among those who carried two common alleles (mean age of onset 43 years) (p= 0.59; log rank test). Similar results were obtained for ovarian cancer. These data do not support the hypothesis that the HRAS locus modified the risk of cancer among carriers of mutations in BRCA1.

  8. The role of germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 and mismatch repair genes in men ascertained for early-onset and/or familial prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maia, Sofia; Cardoso, Marta; Paulo, Paula; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Catarina; Pinto, Carla; Peixoto, Ana; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common cancers diagnosed worldwide and 5-10 % of all cases are estimated to be associated with inherited predisposition. Even though there is strong evidence that the genetic component is significant in PrCa, the genetic etiology of familial and early-onset disease is largely unknown. Although it has been suggested that men from families with hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) and, more recently, with Lynch syndrome may have an increased risk for PrCa, the contribution of these syndromes to PrCa predisposition in families ascertained for early-onset and/or familial PrCa, independently of the presence of other cancers in the family, is uncertain. To quantify the contribution of genes associated with HBOC and Lynch syndromes to PrCa predisposition, we have tested for germline mutations 460 early-onset and/or familial PrCa patients. All patients were screened for the six mutations that are particularly common in Portugal and 38 of them were selected for complete sequencing of BRCA1/2 and/or MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Two patients were found to harbor the same MSH2 mutation and a third patient carried a Portuguese BRCA2 founder mutation. None of the alterations were identified in 288 control subjects. Furthermore, we reviewed the 62 PrCa diagnoses in all HBOC (n = 161) and Lynch syndrome (n = 124) families previously diagnosed at our department, and found five other BRCA2 mutation carriers and two additional MSH2 mutation carriers. The clinicopathological characteristics of mutation carriers are in concordance with earlier data suggesting an aggressive PrCa phenotype and support the hypothesis that mutation carriers might benefit from targeted screening according to the gene mutated in the germline.

  9. BRCA1 involved in regulation of Bcl-2 expression and apoptosis susceptibility to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, YanLing; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Ning; Tanaka, Kaoru; Zhou, Xin; Chen, RuPing; Zhang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    BRCA1 has been proposed to be tightly linked to the resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation. The pathway leading to this phenomenon is not yet clear. In this work, we investigated the role of BRCA1 in the apoptosis regulation in response to carbon ion irradiation. We utilized three different cancer cell lines with various states for BRCA1 and p53 to identify the relationship between endogenous BRCA1 and the apoptosis-related genes, and determine whether p53 function would affect the role of BRCA1 in apoptosis regulation. By Western blot analysis, we found that Bax expressions were not significantly changed after irradiation in all of three cell lines. However, Bcl-2 expression showed an up-regulation by endogenous BRCA1 regardless of p53 status. Moreover, the changes in Bcl-2 protein were due to the increase in the transcriptional levels of Bcl-2 mRNA, based on real-time PCR assay. At the same time, BRCA1-deficient cells showed a greater apoptosis susceptibility to irradiation when compared with BRCA1-proficient cells. The results suggest that BRCA1 might exert p53-independent regulative activities for Bcl-2, which seems account for the low apoptosis susceptibility in BRCA1-proficient carcinomas.

  10. BRCA1-hapoinsufficiency: Unraveling the molecular and cellular basis for tissue-specific cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sedic, Maja; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    abstract Over the past 20 years tremendous progress has been made in understanding the function of BRCA1 gene products. Yet one question still remains: why is mutation of BRCA1 typically associated with preferential development of breast and ovarian cancers and not tumors in other tissues? Here we discuss recent evidence documenting the effect of BRCA1-haploinsufficiency in different cells and tissues and synthesize a model for how mutations in a single BRCA1 allele in human cells might preferentially confer increased cancer risk in breast epithelial cells. PMID:26822887

  11. BRCA1-hapoinsufficiency: Unraveling the molecular and cellular basis for tissue-specific cancer.

    PubMed

    Sedic, Maja; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years tremendous progress has been made in understanding the function of BRCA1 gene products. Yet one question still remains: why is mutation of BRCA1 typically associated with preferential development of breast and ovarian cancers and not tumors in other tissues? Here we discuss recent evidence documenting the effect of BRCA1-haploinsufficiency in different cells and tissues and synthesize a model for how mutations in a single BRCA1 allele in human cells might preferentially confer increased cancer risk in breast epithelial cells.

  12. BRCA1-Associated Protein BRCC36: A Novel Target for Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Arciero CA, Wang C, Broccoli D, Godwin AK. 2006. BRCC36 is essential for ionizing radiation-induced BRCA1 phosphorylation and nuclear foci formation...1999). BRCA1, BRCA2, and Rad51 operate in a common DNA damage response pathway. Cancer Res 59: 1752s- 1756s. Chen X, Arciero CA, Wang C, Broccoli D

  13. BRCA1 inhibits AR-mediated proliferation of breast cancer cells through the activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Yin, Yongmei; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan Åke; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-02-23

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor protein that functions to maintain genomic stability through critical roles in DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, and transcriptional control. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in more than 70% of breast cancers and has been implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis. However, little is known about the role of BRCA1 in AR-mediated cell proliferation in human breast cancer. Here, we report that a high expression of AR in breast cancer patients was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) using a tissue microarray with 149 non-metastatic breast cancer patient samples. We reveal that overexpression of BRCA1 significantly inhibited expression of AR through activation of SIRT1 in breast cancer cells. Meanwhile, SIRT1 induction or treatment with a SIRT1 agonist, resveratrol, inhibits AR-stimulated proliferation. Importantly, this mechanism is manifested in breast cancer patient samples and TCGA database, which showed that low SIRT1 gene expression in tumor tissues compared with normal adjacent tissues predicts poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. Taken together, our findings suggest that BRCA1 attenuates AR-stimulated proliferation of breast cancer cells via SIRT1 mediated pathway.

  14. Characterization of direct selected cDNAs from the BRCA1 region of 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Welcsh, P.L.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L.; Spillman, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene involved in the development of early-onset familial breast and ovarian cancer, BRCA1, has been mapped to human chromosome 17q21. Polymorphisms closely linked to BRCA1 has been sublocalized to a region of 17q21 which is defined by the markers D17S856 and D17S78. A physical map of this region, that consists of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) and cosmid contigs, has been constructed and used to isolate potential coding sequences via direct selection. We have identified at least 23 unique transcripts in a 600 kb interval corresponding to approximately one gene every 30 kb. We have determined the expression profile of these cDNAs by generating cDNA-specific primers which have been used in a screen of cDNAs derived from wide variety of tissues and cell types. Full length cDNA clones are being obtained from cDNA libraries in which the genes have been shown to be expressed by a variety of techniques which include direct screening, 5{prime} and 3{prime} RACE, anchor PCR as well as modified selection procedures. We are currently screening for mutations in these candidate cDNAs in affected family members known to harbor a germ-line BRCA1 mutation and in sporadic breast and ovarian tumors. Mutation screening is being performed by Southern and Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, and SSCP analysis of germline DNA and cDNA. Finally, we are analyzing these candidate cDNAs in a number of breast and ovarian cancer cell lines for induction by known mitogenic factors such as estrogen and progesterone by Northern blotting and RT-PCR.

  15. Modeling Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Mice by Alteration of Expression of the BRCA1 and/or p53 Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    including high level chromosome damage, variable chromosome counts, rearrangements and multiclonal populations ( dicentrics , translocations...sarcoma arising in the p53LoxP/LoxP group, while not normal, generally had patterns of whole chromosome gains and losses consistent with aneuploidy and...many fewer regions of interstitial chromosomal gains/losses detected by aCGH as compared to tumors isolated from Brca1LoxP/LoxP;p53LoxP/LoxP mice

  16. BRCA1 Interaction of Centrosomal Protein Nlp Is Required for Successful Mitotic Progression*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shunqian; Gao, Hua; Mazzacurati, Lucia; Wang, Yang; Fan, Wenhong; Chen, Qiang; Yu, Wei; Wang, Mingrong; Zhu, Xueliang; Zhang, Chuanmao; Zhan, Qimin

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is implicated in the control of mitotic progression, although the underlying mechanism(s) remains to be further defined. Deficiency of BRCA1 function leads to disrupted mitotic machinery and genomic instability. Here, we show that BRCA1 physically interacts and colocalizes with Nlp, an important molecule involved in centrosome maturation and spindle formation. Interestingly, Nlp centrosomal localization and its protein stability are regulated by normal cellular BRCA1 function because cells containing BRCA1 mutations or silenced for endogenous BRCA1 exhibit disrupted Nlp colocalization to centrosomes and enhanced Nlp degradation. Its is likely that the BRCA1 regulation of Nlp stability involves Plk1 suppression. Inhibition of endogenous Nlp via the small interfering RNA approach results in aberrant spindle formation, aborted chromosomal segregation, and aneuploidy, which mimic the phenotypes of disrupted BRCA1. Thus, BRCA1 interaction of Nlp might be required for the successful mitotic progression, and abnormalities of Nlp lead to genomic instability. PMID:19509300

  17. The RING heterodimer BRCA1-BARD1 is a ubiquitin ligase inactivated by the platinum-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Atipairin, Apichart; Canyuk, Bhutorn; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2011-02-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein 1 (BRCA1) participates in the maintenance of cells genomic integrity through DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint, protein ubiquitination, and transcriptional regulation. The N-terminus of BRCA1 contains a RING domain that preferentially forms a heterodimeric complex with BARD1. The BRCA1-BARD1 RING complex has an E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that plays an essential role in response to DNA damage. Preclinical and clinical studies have recently revealed that structural changes to the heterodimer result in alterations to the BRCA1-mediated DNA repair pathways in cancer cells, and lead to hypersensitivity to several chemotherapeutic agents. It is of interest to approach the BRCA1 RING domain as a potentially molecular target for platinum-based drugs for cancer therapy. A previous study has shown that the anticancer drug cisplatin formed intramolecular and intermolecular BRCA1 adducts in which His117 was the primary platinum-binding site, and conferred conformational changes and induced thermostability. Here, we have studied the functional consequence of the in vitro platination of the BRCA1 RING domain by a number of platinum complexes. The BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity was inhibited by transplatin > cisplatin > oxaliplatin > carboplatin in that order. The consequences of the binding of the platinum complexes on the reactivity of the BRCA1 were also discussed. The data raised the possibility of selectively targeting the BRCA1 DNA repair for cancer therapy.

  18. Multimodal Assessment of Protein Functional Deficiency Supports Pathogenicity of BRCA1 p.V1688del

    PubMed Central

    De Nicolo, Arcangela; Parisini, Emilio; Zhong, Quan; Palma, Maurizia Dalla; Stoeckert, Kathryn A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Caligo, Maria A.; Vidal, Marc; Cusick, Michael E.; Garber, Judy E.

    2009-01-01

    Unequivocal discrimination between neutral variants and deleterious mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling of individuals with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 sequence change. An increasing number of variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) are being identified, whose unclassified biological effect poses clinical concerns. A multifactorial likelihood-based approach recently suggested disease causality for BRCA1 p.V1688del, a VUS recurrent in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. Whether and how this single amino acid deletion in the BRCA1 BRCT domain affects the function of the mutant protein (ΔValBRCA1) has not been elucidated. We undertook comprehensive functional characterization of ΔValBRCA1, comprising comparative structural modeling, analysis of protein stability and associations, and analysis of DNA repair function. Our model predicted BRCT domain destabilization and folding disruption caused by BRCA1 p.V1688del. Consistently, the recombinant ΔValBRCA1 was less stable than wtBRCA1 and, unlike the latter, failed to associate with BRIP1, CtIP, and Rap80, and to re-localize to sites of DNA damage. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a compromised interaction with FHL2 and with KPNA2, which is likely responsible for improper subcellular localization of ΔValBRCA1. In addition, we found four new breast/ovarian cancer families of Italian ancestry who carried this sequence alteration. These results provide the first evidence of the effect of BRCA1 p.V1688del on protein stability and function, supporting the view that it is a deleterious mutation. Multimodal analyses like ours could advance understanding of tumor suppression by BRCA1, and ultimately contribute to developing efficient strategies for screening and characterization of VUSs. PMID:19706752

  19. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  20. Two BRCA1/2 founder mutations in Jews of Sephardic origin.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Michal; Eilat, Avital; Ben Avi, Liat; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Hamburger, Tamar; Peretz, Tamar; Lerer, Israela

    2011-03-01

    Founder mutations in BRCA1/2 genes have been detected in several Jewish communities in Israel, including in Ashkenazi Jews and Jews who immigrated to Israel from Iraq, Yemen, Iran and Afghanistan. We analyzed DNA samples of patients of Sephardic origin (descendents of Jews from the Iberian Peninsula) with breast cancer (BC) and/or ovarian cancer (OC) and additional family history of these cancers. In this study we identified 2 mutations: p.A1708E in BRCA1 and c.67 + 1G > A (IVS2 + 1G > A) in BRCA2, each in 3 unrelated patients. The frequency of the two mutations was 26-31% among Sephardic high risk families and about 3% among the full cohort of 177 patients of this origin who were tested in our center. Based on haplotype analysis we concluded that these mutations are most probably founder mutations in Sephardic Jews. We recommend testing the two mutations in women of Sephardic origin who apply for BRCA testing because of personal and/or family history of BC and/or OC. Furthermore, we suggest adding them to the 5 mutations included in "The Jewish panel" of BRCA1/2 mutations that are being tested in Israel.

  1. Breast and ovarian cancer predisposition due to de novo BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Golmard, L; Delnatte, C; Laugé, A; Moncoutier, V; Lefol, C; Abidallah, K; Tenreiro, H; Copigny, F; Giraudeau, M; Guy, C; Barbaroux, C; Amorim, G; Briaux, A; Guibert, V; Tarabeux, J; Caputo, S; Collet, A; Gesta, P; Ingster, O; Stern, M-H; Rouleau, E; de Pauw, A; Gauthier-Villars, M; Buecher, B; Bézieau, S; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Houdayer, C

    2016-03-10

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two major genes predisposing to breast and ovarian cancer. Whereas high de novo mutation rates have been demonstrated for several genes, only 11 cases of de novo BRCA1/2 mutations have been reported to date and the BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate remains unknown. The present study was designed to fill this gap based on a series of 12 805 consecutive unrelated patients diagnosed with breast and/or ovarian cancer who met the inclusion criteria for BRCA1/2 gene analysis according to French guidelines. BRCA1/2 mutations were detected in 1527 (12%) patients, and three BRCA1 mutations and one BRCA2 mutation were de novo. The BRCA1/2 de novo mutation rate was estimated to be 0.3% (0.1%; 0.7%). Although rare, it may be useful to take the possibility of de novo BRCA1/2 mutation into account in genetic counseling of relatives and to improve the understanding of complex family histories of breast and ovarian cancers.

  2. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J.

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. "Ring-fencing" BRCA1 tumor suppressor activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan J; Crossan, Gerry P; Hodskinson, Michael R G

    2011-12-13

    BRCA1 is a crucial human breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor gene. The article by Drost et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell together with a recent paper in Science now provide a clearer picture of how this large and complex protein suppresses tumorigenesis.

  4. The occurrence of germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 sequence alterations in Slovenian population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation spectrum and mutation detection rates according to different family histories were investigated in 521 subjects from 322 unrelated Slovenian cancer families with breast and/or ovarian cancer. Methods The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were screened using DGGE, PTT, HRM, MLPA and direct sequencing. Results Eighteen different mutations were found in BRCA1 and 13 in BRCA2 gene. Mutations in one or other gene were found in 96 unrelated families. The mutation detection rates were the highest in the families with at least one breast and at least one ovarian cancer - 42% for BRCA1 and 8% for BRCA2. The mutation detection rate observed in the families with at least two breast cancers with disease onset before the age of 50 years and no ovarian cancer was 23% for BRCA1 and 13% for BRCA2. The mutation detection rate in the families with at least two breast cancers and only one with the disease onset before the age of 50 years was 11% for BRCA1 and 8% for BRCA2. In the families with at least two breast cancers, all of them with disease onset over the age of 50 years, the detection rate was 5% for BRCA2 and 0% for BRCA1. Conclusion Among the mutations detected in Slovenian population, 5 mutations in BRCA1 and 4 mutations in BRCA2 have not been described in other populations until now. The most frequent mutations in our population were c.181T > G, c.1687C > T, c.5266dupC and c.844_850dupTCATTAC in BRCA1 gene and c.7806-2A > G, c.5291C > G and c.3978insTGCT in BRCA2 gene (detected in 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 positive families). PMID:21232165

  5. Proliferation and ovarian hormone signaling are impaired in normal breast tissues from women with BRCA1 mutations: benefit of a progesterone receptor modulator treatment as a breast cancer preventive strategy in women with inherited BRCA1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Communal, Laudine; Courtin, Aurélie; Mourra, Najat; Lahlou, Najiba; Le Guillou, Morwenna; de Jotemps, Muriel Perrault; Chauvet, Marie-Pierre; Chaouat, Marc; Pujol, Pascal; Feunteun, Jean; Delaloge, Suzette; Forgez, Patricia; Gompel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Women with inherited BRCA1 mutations have an elevated risk (40-80%) for developing breast and ovarian cancers. Reproductive history has been reported to alter this risk, suggesting a relationship between ovarian hormone signaling and BRCA1-related tumor development. BRCA1 interactions with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) signaling were previously described in human breast cancer cell lines and mouse models. However, few studies have examined the effect of ovarian hormone regulation in normal human breast tissues bearing a heterozygous BRCA1 mutation. This study compares the proliferation level (Ki67) and the expression of ER, PR, and of the PR target gene, fatty acid synthase (FASN), in histologically normal breast tissues from women with BRCA1 mutations (BRCA1+/mut, n=23) or without BRCA1 mutations (BRCA1+/+, n=28). BRCA1+/mut tissues showed an increased proliferation and impaired hormone receptor expression with a marked loss of the PR isoform, PR-B. Responses to estradiol and progesterone treatments in BRCA1+/mut and BRCA1+/+ breast tissues were studied in a mouse xenograft model, and showed that PR and FASN expression were deregulated in BRCA1+/mut breast tissues. Progesterone added to estradiol treatment increased the proliferation in a subset of BRCA1+/mut breast tissues. The PR inhibitor, ulipristal acetate (UPA), was able to reverse this aberrant progesterone-induced proliferation. This study suggests that a subset of women with BRCA1 mutations could be candidates for a UPA treatment as a preventive breast cancer strategy. PMID:27246982

  6. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of BRCA1 Discovered Using Small Molecule Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Na, Zhenkun; Pan, Sijun; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Yao, Shao Q

    2017-01-01

    Microarray screening technology has transformed the life sciences arena over the last decade. The platform is widely used in the area of mapping interaction networks, to molecular fingerprinting and small molecular inhibitor discovery. The technique has significantly impacted both basic and applied research. The microarray platform can likewise enable high-throughput screening and discovery of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors. Herein we demonstrate the application of microarray-guided PPI inhibitor discovery, using human BRCA1 as an example. Mutations in BRCA1 have been implicated in ~50 % of hereditary breast cancers. By targeting the (BRCT)2 domain, we showed compound 15a and its prodrug 15b inhibited BRCA1 activities in tumor cells. Unlike previously reported peptide-based PPI inhibitors of BRCA1, the compounds identified could be directly administered to tumor cells, thus making them useful in targeting BRCA1/PARP-related pathways involved in DNA damage and repair response, for cancer therapy.

  7. RING domain–deficient BRCA1 promotes PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Krais, John J.; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Cai, Kathy Q.; Harrell, Maria I.; Kim, Hyoung H.; George, Erin; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Simpkins, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancers that harbor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) mutations initially respond well to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy; however, resistance invariably arises in these patients and is a major clinical problem. The BRCA1185delAG allele is a common inherited mutation located close to the protein translation start site that is thought to produce a shortened, nonfunctional peptide. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that lead to PARPi and platinum resistance in the SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cell line, which harbors a hemizygous BRCA1185delAG mutation. SUM1315MO2 cells were initially sensitive to PARPi and cisplatin but readily acquired resistance. PARPi- and cisplatin-resistant clones did not harbor secondary reversion mutations; rather, PARPi and platinum resistance required increased expression of a really interesting gene (RING) domain–deficient BRCA1 protein (Rdd-BRCA1). Initiation of translation occurred downstream of the frameshift mutation, probably at the BRCA1-Met-297 codon. In contrast to full-length BRCA1, Rdd-BRCA1 did not require BRCA1-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1) interaction for stability. Functionally, Rdd-BRCA1 formed irradiation-induced foci and supported RAD51 foci formation. Ectopic overexpression of Rdd-BRCA1 promoted partial PARPi and cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, Rdd-BRCA1 protein expression was detected in recurrent carcinomas from patients who carried germline BRCA1185delAG mutations. Taken together, these results indicate that RING-deficient BRCA1 proteins are hypomorphic and capable of contributing to PARPi and platinum resistance when expressed at high levels. PMID:27454289

  8. ENIGMA--evidence-based network for the interpretation of germline mutant alleles: an international initiative to evaluate risk and clinical significance associated with sequence variation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Healey, Sue; Devereau, Andrew; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Radice, Paolo; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Tavtigian, Sean; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E

    2012-01-01

    As genetic testing for predisposition to human diseases has become an increasingly common practice in medicine, the need for clear interpretation of the test results is apparent. However, for many disease genes, including the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, a significant fraction of tests results in the detection of a genetic variant for which disease association is not known. The finding of an "unclassified" variant (UV)/variant of uncertain significance (VUS) complicates genetic test reporting and counseling. As these variants are individually rare, a large collaboration of researchers and clinicians will facilitate studies to assess their association with cancer predisposition. It was with this in mind that the ENIGMA consortium (www.enigmaconsortium.org) was initiated in 2009. The membership is both international and interdisciplinary, and currently includes more than 100 research scientists and clinicians from 19 countries. Within ENIGMA, there are presently six working groups focused on the following topics: analysis, clinical, database, functional, tumor histopathology, and mRNA splicing. ENIGMA provides a mechanism to pool resources, exchange methods and data, and coordinately develop and apply algorithms for classification of variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2. It is envisaged that the research and clinical application of models developed by ENIGMA will be relevant to the interpretation of sequence variants in other disease genes.

  9. Disentangling the Babylonian speech confusion in genetic counseling: an analysis of the reliability and validity of the nomenclature for BRCA1/2 DNA-test results other than pathogenic.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joël; van Asperen, Christi J; Wijnen, Juul T; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Tibben, Aad

    2009-10-01

    Effective communication of DNA-test results requires a sound terminology. However, the variety of terms in literature for DNA-test results other than pathogenic, may create inconsistencies between professionals, and misunderstanding in patients. Therefore, we conducted a theoretical and empirical analysis of the terms most frequently used in articles between 2002 and 2007 for BRCA 1/2-test results other than pathogenic. We analyzed the content validity of the no-pathogenic DNA-test result-terms by comparing the literal and intended meaning of the terms and by examining their clarity and the inclusion of all relevant information. We analyzed the reliability of the terms by measuring the strength of association between terms and their meanings and the consistency among different authors over time. Two hundred twenty-seven articles with 361 no-pathogenic DNA-test result-terms were found. Only two terms seemed to have acceptable validity: variant of uncertain clinical significance and no-pathogenic-DNA-test-result. Only variant of uncertain clinical significance and true negative were found to be used reliably in the literature. Current DNA nomenclature lacks validity and reliability. Transparent DNA-test result terminology should be developed covering both laboratory findings and clinical meaning.

  10. Frequent microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in the region including BRCA1 (17q21) in young patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Semba, S; Yokozaki, H; Yasui, W; Tahara, E

    1998-06-01

    It is known that nearly 5% of gastric carcinomas arise under the age of 40. To elucidate genetic alterations in these patients, we performed studies using microsatellite assay in 27 gastric cancers under 35 years of age, composed of 5 well and 22 poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. We detected replication errors (RERs) in 18 (67%) of 27 tumors, but no germline mutation in DNA mismatch repair genes (hMLH1 and hMSH2), except fory 3 somatic mutations in the hMLH1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at D17S855, located on chromosome 17q21 (BRCA1), was detected in 8 (40%) of 20 informative cases. In 12 (44%) of 27 cases, LOH on chromosome 17q12-21 including the BRCA1 was found in several neighboring markers in this region, while no mutation was found in the BRCA1 gene. Four (40%) of 10 scirrhous type gastric cancers exhibited wide allelic deletions on chromosome 17q12-21. These results overall suggest that young gastric cancer patients display highly frequent micro-satellite instability that might be due to defect of DNA repair system rather than hMLH1 and hMSH2. In addition, chromosome 17q12-21 including BRCA1 locus may contain a candidate for tumor suppressor gene, particularly in scirrhous type gastric cancers arising in young patients.

  11. CHK2-BRCA1 tumor-suppressor axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A kinase to ensure proper mitotic microtubule assembly.

    PubMed

    Ertych, Norman; Stolz, Ailine; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H; Bastians, Holger

    2016-02-16

    BRCA1 (breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein) is a multifunctional tumor suppressor involved in DNA damage response, DNA repair, chromatin regulation, and mitotic chromosome segregation. Although the nuclear functions of BRCA1 have been investigated in detail, its role during mitosis is little understood. It is clear, however, that loss of BRCA1 in human cancer cells leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), which is defined as a perpetual gain or loss of whole chromosomes during mitosis. Moreover, our recent work has revealed that the mitotic function of BRCA1 depends on its phosphorylation by the tumor-suppressor kinase Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) and that this regulation is required to ensure normal microtubule plus end assembly rates within mitotic spindles. Intriguingly, loss of the positive regulation of BRCA1 leads to increased oncogenic Aurora-A activity, which acts as a mediator for abnormal mitotic microtubule assembly resulting in chromosome missegregation and CIN. However, how the CHK2-BRCA1 tumor suppressor axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A during mitosis to ensure karyotype stability remained an open question. Here we uncover a dual molecular mechanism by which the CHK2-BRCA1 axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A activity during mitosis and identify BRCA1 itself as a target for Aurora-A relevant for CIN. In fact, Chk2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required to recruit the PP6C-SAPS3 phosphatase, which acts as a T-loop phosphatase inhibiting Aurora-A bound to BRCA1. Consequently, loss of CHK2 or PP6C-SAPS3 promotes Aurora-A activity associated with BRCA1 in mitosis. Aurora-A, in turn, then phosphorylates BRCA1 itself, thereby inhibiting the mitotic function of BRCA1 and promoting mitotic microtubule assembly, chromosome missegregation, and CIN.

  12. DHPLC/SURVEYOR nuclease: a sensitive, rapid and affordable method to analyze BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Pilato, Brunella; De Summa, Simona; Danza, Katia; Papadimitriou, Stavros; Zaccagna, Paolo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for about 10% of all breast cancers and BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified as validated susceptibility genes for this pathology. Testing for BRCA gene mutations is usually based on a pre-screening approach, such as the partial denaturation DHPLC method, and capillary direct sequencing. However, this approach is time consuming due to the large size of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Recently, a new low cost and time saving DHPLC protocol has been developed to analyze gene mutations by using SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease digestion and DHPLC analysis. A subset of 90 patients, enrolled in the Genetic Counseling Program of the National Cancer Centre of Bari (Italy), was performed to validate this approach. Previous retrospective analysis showed that 9/90 patients (10%) were mutated in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and these data were confirmed by the present approach. DNA samples underwent touchdown PCR and, subsequently, SURVEYOR(®) nuclease digestion. BRCA1 and BRCA2 amplicons were divided into groups depending on amplicon size to allow multiamplicon digestion. The product of this reaction were analyzed on Transgenomic WAVE Nucleic Acid High Sensitivity Fragment Analysis System. The operator who performed the DHPLC surveyor approach did not know the sequencing results at that time. The SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease DHPLC approach was able to detect all alterations with a sensitivity of 95%. Furthermore, in order to save time and reagents, a multiamplicon setting preparation was validated.

  13. Identification of a founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Quiles, F; Teulé, À; Martinussen Tandstad, N; Feliubadaló, L; Tornero, E; Del Valle, J; Menéndez, M; Salinas, M; Wethe Rognlien, V; Velasco, A; Izquierdo, A; Capellá, G; Brunet, J; Lázaro, C

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer among women in Morocco. However, the role of the most prevalent BC-predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, has been largely unexplored. To help define the role of BRCA1 in BC in Morocco, we characterized the first potential BRCA1 founder mutation in this population. Genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in BC high-risk families identified mutation BRCA1 c.5309G>T, p.(Gly1770Val) or G1770V in five independent families from Morocco, suggesting a founder effect. To confirm this hypothesis, haplotype construction was performed using seven intragenic and flanking BRCA1 microsatellite markers. Clinical data were also compiled. Clinical data from carriers of mutation G1770V correspond to data from carriers of BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Microsatellite analysis showed a common haplotype for the five families in a region comprising 1.54 Mb, confirming G1770V as the first specific founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of BC genetics in the Moroccan population. Nevertheless, comprehensive studies of mutation G1770V in large series of BC patients from Morocco are needed to assess the real prevalence of this mutation and to improve genetic testing and risk assessment in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determination of Cancer Risk Associated with Germ Line BRCA1 Missense Variants by Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Marsillac, Sylvia M.; Karchin, Rachel; Manoukian, Siranoush; Grist, Scott; Swaby, Ramona F.; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Rondinelli, Edson; Silva, Rosane; Gayol, Luis; Baumbach, Lisa; Sutphen, Rebecca; Pickard-Brzosowicz, Jennifer L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Sali, Andrej; Goldgar, David; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Germ line inactivating mutations in BRCA1 confer susceptibility for breast and ovarian cancer. However, the relevance of the many missense changes in the gene for which the effect on protein function is unknown remains unclear. Determination of which variants are causally associated with cancer is important for assessment of individual risk. We used a functional assay that measures the transactivation activity of BRCA1 in combination with analysis of protein modeling based on the structure of BRCA1 BRCT domains. In addition, the information generated was interpreted in light of genetic data. We determined the predicted cancer association of 22 BRCA1 variants and verified that the common polymorphism S1613G has no effect on BRCA1 function, even when combined with other rare variants. We estimated the specificity and sensitivity of the assay, and by meta-analysis of 47 variants, we show that variants with <45% of wild-type activity can be classified as deleterious whereas variants with >50% can be classified as neutral. In conclusion, we did functional and structure-based analyses on a large series of BRCA1 missense variants and defined a tentative threshold activity for the classification missense variants. By interpreting the validated functional data in light of additional clinical and structural evidence, we conclude that it is possible to classify all missense variants in the BRCA1 COOH-terminal region. These results bring functional assays for BRCA1 closer to clinical applicability. PMID:17308087

  15. BRCA1/2 germline mutations and their clinical importance in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Erturk, Elif; Ak, Secil; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Tasdelen, Ismet; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Bayram, Nuran; Avci, Nilufer; Evrensel, Turkkan

    2014-10-01

    BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were screened in 117 patients with breast cancer by sequencing. Fourteen percent of patients tested positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Four frame shift mutations, four pathogenic missense mutations, and 25 different sequence variations were detected. BRCA mutation positivity was significantly associated with Ki67 (p = .001). BRCA protein expressions were decreased in the patients harboring important mutations and polymorphisms (BRCA1;P508 stop, V1740G, Q1182R, Q1756P and BRCA2;V2466A) related with disease. Our findings contribute significantly to the types of germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and their biological effects in Turkish women. These data could help guide the management of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-carrying patients when considering breast-conserving therapy.

  16. Germline BRCA1 mutations in patients from 84 families with breast and/or ovarian cancers in northern France.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, J P; Vennin, P; Hornez, L; Fournier, J; Adenis, C; Bonneterre, J

    1998-02-01

    The BRCA1 gene modification is responsible for an autosomal dominant syndrome of inherited early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer. This gene is estimated to account for almost half of inherited breast cancers and three quarters of inherited breast/ovarian cancers. This suggests that about 1 in every 500 women may carry the BRCA1 mutation. The BRCA1 was isolated by positional cloning in 1994. More than 100 different mutations have been found in the germline of affected individuals. Using systematic sequencing, we looked at BRCA1 germline mutations in 84 patients treated at the Centre Oscar Lambret for breast and/or ovarian cancer who belonged to high-risk families. We found 39 mutations: 22 true mutations inducing modifications of the BRCA1 protein (BRCA1+), six mutations with unknown consequences on the BRCA1 protein, and eleven mutations corresponding to polymorphisms that had been described previously. All the BRCA1+ cases had a HPG3 tumour. The median age of discovery and the receptor positivity percentage are lower in hereditary breast cancer than in the standard population of the breast cancers treated in our centre. Conversely, most of the BRCA1+ patients are without node involvement. This shows that BRCA1 mutations are not always related to parameters thought to indicate a bad prognosis.

  17. Prevalence of BRCA1 Mutations in Familial and Sporadic Greek Ovarian Cancer Cases

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Fostira, Florentia; Pertesi, Maroulio; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Triantafyllidou, Olga; Bamias, Aristotelis; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Timotheadou, Eleni; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Christos; Klouvas, George; Papadimitriou, Christos; Makatsoris, Thomas; Pentheroudakis, George; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Karydakis, Vassilis; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contribute to approximately 18% of hereditary ovarian cancers conferring an estimated lifetime risk from 15% to 50%. A variable incidence of mutations has been reported for these genes in ovarian cancer cases from different populations. In Greece, six mutations in BRCA1 account for 63% of all mutations detected in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BRCA1 mutations in a Greek cohort of 106 familial ovarian cancer patients that had strong family history or metachronous breast cancer and 592 sporadic ovarian cancer cases. All 698 patients were screened for the six recurrent Greek mutations (including founder mutations c.5266dupC, p.G1738R and the three large deletions of exon 20, exons 23–24 and exon 24). In familial cases, the BRCA1 gene was consequently screened for exons 5, 11, 12, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. A deleterious BRCA1 mutation was found in 43/106 (40.6%) of familial cancer cases and in 27/592 (4.6%) of sporadic cases. The variant of unknown clinical significance p.V1833M was identified in 9/698 patients (1.3%). The majority of BRCA1 carriers (71.2%) presented a high-grade serous phenotype. Identifying a mutation in the BRCA1 gene among breast and/or ovarian cancer families is important, as it enables carriers to take preventive measures. All ovarian cancer patients with a serous phenotype should be considered for genetic testing. Further studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of mutations in the rest of the BRCA1 gene, in the BRCA2 gene, and other novel predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:23536787

  18. BRCA1 deficiency in skin epidermis leads to selective loss of hair follicle stem cells and their progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A.; Karambelas, Andrea E.; Debaugnies, Maud; Candi, Aurelie; Bouwman, Peter; Moers, Virginie; Revenco, Tatiana; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Jonkers, Jos; Blanpain, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    The accurate maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of this process leads to cancer and aging. BRCA1 is a critical mediator of this process. Here, we performed conditional deletion of Brca1 during epidermal development and found that BRCA1 is specifically required for hair follicle (HF) formation and for development of adult HF stem cells (SCs). Mice deficient for Brca1 in the epidermis are hairless and display a reduced number of HFs that degenerate progressively. Surprisingly, the interfollicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands remain unaffected by Brca1 deletion. Interestingly, HF matrix transient amplifying progenitors present increased DNA damage, p53 stabilization, and caspase-dependent apoptosis compared with the interfollicular and sebaceous progenitors, leading to hyperproliferation, apoptosis, and subsequent depletion of the prospective adult HF SCs. Concomitant deletion of p53 and Brca1 rescues the defect of HF morphogenesis and loss of HF SCs. During adult homeostasis, BRCA1 is dispensable for quiescent bulge SCs, but upon their activation during HF regeneration, Brca1 deletion causes apoptosis and depletion of Brca1-deficient bulge SCs. Our data reveal a major difference in the requirement of BRCA1 between different types of epidermal SCs and progenitors and during the different activation stages of adult HF SCs. PMID:23271346

  19. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  20. Pyrosequencing analysis of BRCA1 methylation level in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fengfeng; Ge, Isabell; Wang, Minghong; Biskup, Ewelina; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Xiaoyan

    2014-04-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are crucial for double-strand break repair by homologous recombination, and mutations in these genes are responsible for most familial breast carcinomas. Cells with inactivating mutations of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes are sensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) inhibitors. Already in 2010, it has been predicted, that BRCA1 hypermethylation might be sensitive to PARP1 inhibitor. However, till today, a statistically significant proof has been missing, and the effectiveness of PARP1 inhibitors for breast cancer caused by BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation remained elusive. Pyrosequencing has been proposed as an optimal method to investigate the methylation status of the BRCA1 genes. Here, we show for the first time that BRCA1 CpG island hypermethylation is sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors. In clinical settings, this might improve treatment response and provide a more personalized therapy for breast cancer patients. Furthermore, the determination of methylation status of BRCA1 and other genes of the BRCA/homologous recombination (HR) pathway may be an important predictive classifier of response to PARP inhibitor therapy.

  1. Contralateral breast cancer after radiotherapy among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a WECARE study report.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Thomas, Duncan C; Shore, Roy E; Robson, Mark; Boice, John D; Stovall, Marilyn; Andersson, Michael; Bernstein, Leslie; Malone, Kathleen E; Reiner, Anne S; Lynch, Charles F; Capanu, Marinela; Smith, Susan A; Tellhed, Lina; Teraoka, Sharon N; Begg, Colin B; Olsen, Jorgen H; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Liang, Xiaolin; Diep, Anh T; Borg, Ake; Concannon, Patrick; Haile, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    Women with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/BRCA2) mutations are at very high risk of developing breast cancer, including asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC). BRCA1/BRCA2 genes help maintain genome stability and assist in DNA repair. We examined whether the risk of CBC associated with radiation treatment was higher among women with germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations than among non-carriers. A population-based, nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of 52,536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer (UBC). Cases were 603 women with CBC and controls were 1199 women with UBC individually matched on age at diagnosis, race, year of first diagnosis and cancer registry. All women were tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Radiation absorbed dose from the initial radiotherapy (RT) to the CBC location within the contralateral breast was reconstructed from measurements in a tissue-equivalent phantom and details available in the therapy records. Among women treated with radiation, the mean radiation dose was 1.1 Gy (range = 0.02-6.2 Gy). Risk of developing CBC was elevated among women who carried a deleterious BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation (rate ratio, RR = 4.5, confidence interval, CI = 3.0-6.8), and also among those treated with RT (RR = 1.2, CI = 1.0-1.6). However, among mutation carriers, an incremental increase in risk associated with radiation dose was not statistically significant. Multiplicative interaction of RT with mutation status would be reflected by a larger association of RT with CBC among carriers than among non-carriers, but this was not apparent. Accordingly, there was no clear indication that carriers of deleterious BRCA/BRCA2 mutations were more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation than non-carriers. These findings are reassuring and have important clinical implications for treatment decisions and the clinical management of patients harbouring deleterious BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. All work associated with this study was supported by

  2. Genetic analysis of the BRCA1 region in a large breast/ovarian family: refinement of the minimal region containing BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Kelsell, D P; Black, D M; Bishop, D T; Spurr, N K

    1993-11-01

    We have analyzed a single multi-affected breast/ovarian cancer pedigree (BOV3) and have shown consistent inheritance of markers on chromosome 17q with the disease confirming that this family is due to the BRCA1 gene. Analysis of 17q haplotypes shows a recombination event in a bilateral breast cancer case which suggests that the BRCA1 gene lies distal to D17S857; D17S857 is thus the new proximal boundary for the region containing BRCA1. Combining this information with previously published mapping information suggests that BRCA1 is contained in a region estimated at 1-1.5 Mb in length. All seven breast tumour/blood pairs examined from this family show loss of heterozygosity in the tumours. The allel retained in each tumour was from the disease-bearing chromosome implicating BRCA1 as a tumour suppressor gene. We have sequenced the 17 beta-oestradiol dehydrogenase genes (EDH17B1 and EDH17B2) which have been suggested as candidate genes for BRCA1 in four members of this family. No germline mutations were detected.

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients from China: ethnic-related mutations in BRCA1 associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tingyan; Wang, Pan; Xie, Caixia; Yin, Sheng; Shi, Di; Wei, Congchong; Tang, Wenbin; Jiang, Rong; Cheng, Xi; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Qing; Zang, Rongyu

    2017-05-01

    BRCA1/2 are cancer predisposition genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Mutation carriers display an increased sensitivity to inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Despite a number of small-size hospital-based studies being previously reported, there is not yet, to our knowledge, precise data of BRCA1/2 mutations among Chinese ovarian cancer patients. We performed a multicenter cohort study including 916 unselected consecutive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients from eastern China to screen for BRCA1/2 mutations using the next-generation sequencing approach. A total of 153 EOC patients were found to carry pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1/2, accounting for an overall mutation incidence of 16.7% with the predominance in BRCA1 (13.1%) compared with BRCA2 (3.9%). We identified 53 novel pathogenic mutations, among which the c.283_286delCTTG and the c.4573C > T of BRCA1 were both found in two unrelated patients. More importantly, the most common mutation found in this study, c.5470_5477del8 was most likely to be Chinese population-related without an apparent founder origin. This hot-spot mutation was presumably associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Taken together, germline BRCA1/2 mutations were common in Chinese EOC patients with distinct mutational spectrum compared to Western populations. Our study contributes to the current understanding of BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence worldwide. We recommend BRCA1/2 genetic testing to all Chinese women diagnosed with EOC to identify HBOC families, to provide genetic counseling and clinical management for at-risk relatives. Mutation carriers may also benefit from PARP-targeted therapies. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Performance of multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx kit on the detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in fresh frozen ovarian and breast tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Badoer, Cindy; Garrec, Céline; Goossens, Dirk; Ellison, Gillian; Mills, John; Dzial, Mélina; Housni, Hakim El; Berwouts, Sarah; Concolino, Paola; Guevellou, Virginie Guibert-Le; Delnatte, Capucine; Favero, Jurgen Del

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled new approaches for detection of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). The search for germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes is of importance with respect to oncogenetic and surgical (bilateral mastectomy, ovariectomy) counselling. Testing tumor material for BRCA mutations is of increasing importance for therapeutic decision making as the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, olaparib, is now available to treat patients with specific forms of ovarian cancer and BRCA mutations. Molecular genetics laboratories should develop reliable and sensitive techniques for the complete analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. This is a challenge due to the size of the coding sequence of the BRCA1/2 genes, the absence of hot spot mutations, and particularly by the lower DNA quality obtained from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) tissue. As a result, a number of analyses are uninterpretable and do not always provide a result to the clinician, limiting the optimal therapeutic management of patients. The availability of Fresh Frozen Tissue (FFT) for some laboratories and the excellent quality of the DNA extracted from it offers an alternative. For this reason, we evaluated Multiplicom's BRCA MASTR Dx assay on a set of 97 FFT derived DNA samples, in combination with the MID for Illumina MiSeq for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation detection. We obtained interpretable NGS results for all tested samples and showed > 99,7% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. PMID:27793035

  5. Molecular profiles of BRCA1-mutated and matched sporadic breast tumours: relation with clinico-pathological features

    PubMed Central

    Berns, E M J J; Staveren, I L van; Verhoog, L; Ouweland, A M W van de; Gelder, M Meijer-van; Meijers-Heijboer, H; Portengen, H; Foekens, J A; Dorssers, L C J; Klijn, J G M

    2001-01-01

    About 5–10% of breast cancers are hereditary; a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease in which several susceptibility genes, including BRCA1, have been identified. While distinct tumour features can be used to estimate the likelihood that a breast tumour is caused by a BRCA1 germline mutation it is not yet possible to categorize a BRCA1 mutated tumour. The aim of the present study is to molecularly classify BRCA1 mutated breast cancers by resolving gene expression patterns of BRCA1 and matched sporadic surgical breast tumour specimens. The expression profiles of 6 frozen breast tumour tissues with a proven BRCA1 gene mutation were weighed against those from 12 patients without a known family history but who had similar clinico-pathological characteristics. In addition two fibroblast cultures, the breast cancer cell-line HCC1937 and its corresponding B-lymphoblastoid cell line (heterozygous for mutation BRCA1 5382insC) and an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (A2780) were studied. Using a high density membrane based array for screening of RNA isolated from these samples and standard algorithms and software, we were able to distinguish subgroups of sporadic cases and a group consisting mainly of BRCA1-mutated breast tumours. Furthermore this pilot analysis revealed a gene cluster that differentially expressed genes related to cell substrate formation, adhesion, migration and cell organization in BRCA1-mutated tumours compared to sporadic breast tumours. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506493

  6. Clinical impact of detection of loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 and BRCA2 markers in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Picard, F.; An, H. X.; van Roeyen, C. R.; Dominik, S. I.; Mosny, D. S.; Schnürch, H. G.; Bender, H. G.; Niederacher, D.

    1996-01-01

    The development of familial and sporadic breast cancer is based on genetic alterations of tumour-suppressor genes, for which loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is one mechanism of gene inactivation. To investigate LOH of BRCA1 (17q21) and BRCA2 (13-q12-13) in sporadic breast cancer, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based fluorescent DNA technology for detection of microsatellite polymorphisms was applied. A total of 137 breast cancer and 15 benign breast specimens with matched normal tissue were examined. Fluorescent-labelled PCR products were analysed in an automated DNA sequencer (ALFTM Pharmacia). Losses at both loci were correlated with different histological types, age, tumour size, lymph node status, grading and steroid hormone receptor expression, [SHR: oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR)]. For BRCA1 (D17S855, THRA1, D17S579) losses could be detected in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; n = 108) in 32-38%, invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC; n = 19) in 21-42% depending on the marker applied, but not in benign breast tumours (n = 15). Losses of BRCA1 markers correlated with larger tumour size, higher grade, and PgR expression. For BRCA2 (D13S260, D13S267, D13S171) losses could be detected in 108 IDCs in 30-38%, in 19 ILCs in 17-39% depending on the marker applied, but not in benign breast tumours. Losses of BRCA2 markers correlated only with higher grade. Microsatellite analyses combined with detection of fluorescent-labelled PCR products by an automated laser DNA sequencer can be used for routine determination of LOH. In sporadic breast cancer, LOH of BRCA1 of BRCA2 does not add decisive prognostic value as stated for familial breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8630282

  7. BRCA1 Regulates Follistatin Function in Ovarian Cancer and Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sneed, Rosie; Salamanca, Clara; Li, Xin; Xu, Jingwen; Kumar, Deepak; Rosen, Eliot M.; Saha, Tapas

    2012-01-01

    Follistatin (FST), a folliculogenesis regulating protein, is found in relatively high concentrations in female ovarian tissues. FST acts as an antagonist to Activin, which is often elevated in human ovarian carcinoma, and thus may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention against ovarian cancer. The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) is a known tumor suppressor gene in human breast cancer; however its role in ovarian cancer is not well understood. We performed microarray analysis on human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3 that stably overexpress wild-type BRCA1 and compared with the corresponding empty vector-transfected clones. We found that stable expression of BRCA1 not only stimulates FST secretion but also simultaneously inhibits Activin expression. To determine the physiological importance of this phenomenon, we further investigated the effect of cellular BRCA1 on the FST secretion in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cells derived from either normal human ovaries or ovaries of an ovarian cancer patient carrying a mutation in BRCA1 gene. Knock-down of BRCA1 in normal IOSE cells demonstrates down-regulation of FST secretion along with the simultaneous up-regulation of Activin expression. Furthermore, knock-down of FST in IOSE cell lines as well as SKOV3 cell line showed significantly reduced cell proliferation and decreased cell migration when compared with the respective controls. Thus, these findings suggest a novel function for BRCA1 as a regulator of FST expression and function in human ovarian cells. PMID:22685544

  8. Association of BRCA1 promoter methylation with sporadic breast cancers: Evidence from 40 studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Long, Xinghua

    2015-12-08

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) located at chromosome 17q12-21 is a classic tumor suppressor gene, and has been considered as a significant role in hereditary breast cancers. Moreover, numerous studies demonstrated the methylation status of CpG islands in the promoter regions of BRCA1 gene was aberrant in patients with sporadic breast tumors compared with healthy females or patients with benign diseases. However, these conclusions were not always consistent. Hence, a meta-analysis was performed to get a more precise estimate for these associations. Crude odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the association of BRCA1 promoter methylation and the risk or clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancers under fixed or random effect model. A total of 40 studies were eligible for this present study. We observed the frequency of BRCA1 promoter methylation was statistically significant higher in breast cancers than non-cancer controls. Furthermore, BRCA1 methylation was statistically associated with lymph node metastasis, histological grade 3, ER(-), PR(-), triple-negative phenotype, and decreased or lack levels of BRCA1 protein expression. In conclusion, this study indicated that BRCA1 promoter methylation appeared to be a useful predictive or prognostic biomarker for breast cancers in clinical assessment.

  9. TNRC9 downregulates BRCA1 expression and promotes breast cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jingxuan; Dsouza, Shoba P; Bakhru, Sasha; Al-Azwani, Eman K; Ascierto, Maria L; Sastry, Konduru S; Bedri, Shahinaz; Kizhakayil, Dhanya; Aigha, Idil I; Malek, Joel; Al-Bozom, Issam; Gehani, Salah; Furtado, Stacia; Mathiowitz, Edith; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2013-05-01

    Although the linkage between germline mutations of BRCA1 and hereditary breast/ovarian cancers is well established, recent evidence suggests that altered expression of wild-type BRCA1 might contribute to the sporadic forms of breast cancer. The breast cancer gene trinucleotide-repeat-containing 9 (TNRC9; TOX3) has been associated with disease susceptibility but its function is undetermined. Here, we report that TNRC9 is often amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer, particularly in advanced breast cancer. Gene amplification was associated with reduced disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Ectopic expression of TNRC9 increased breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and survival after exposure to apoptotic stimuli. These phenotypes were associated with tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer. Gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and in silico assays of large datasets of breast and ovarian cancer samples suggested that TNRC9 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated. Notably, we found that TNRC9 bound to both the BRCA1 promoter and the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) complex, a regulator of BRCA1 transcription. In support of this connection, expression of TNRC9 downregulated expression of BRCA1 by altering the methylation status of its promoter. Our studies unveil a function for TNRC9 in breast cancer that highlights a new paradigm in BRCA1 regulation.

  10. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M.; Wang, Charles X.; An, W. Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  11. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Eastern Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, J M; Kataja, V; Pirskanen, M; Arffman, A; Ristonmaa, U; Vahteristo, P; Ryynänen, M; Heinonen, S; Kosma, V-M; Mannermaa, A

    2007-10-01

    Familial aggregation is thought to account for 5-10% of all breast cancer cases, and high penetrance breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 explain < or =20% of these. Hundreds of mutations among breast/ovarian cancer families have been found in these two genes. The mutation spectrum and prevalence, however, varies widely among populations. Thirty-six breast/ovarian cancer families were identified from a population sample of breast and ovarian cancer cases among a relatively isolated population in Eastern Finland, and the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations were screened using heteroduplex analysis, protein truncation test and sequencing. Five different mutations were detected in seven families (19.4%). Two mutations were found in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2. One of the mutations (BRCA2 4088insA) has not been detected elsewhere in Finland while the other four, 4216-2nt A-->G and 5370 C-->T in BRCA1 and 999del5 and 6503delTT in BRCA2, are recurrent Finnish founder mutations. These results add to the evidence of the geographical differences in distribution of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. This screen also provides further evidence for the presumption that the majority of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations have been found and that the proportion of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families is around 20%.

  12. Novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations in Slovene hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families

    PubMed Central

    NOVAKOVIĆ, SRDJAN; MILATOVIĆ, MAŠA; CERKOVNIK, PETRA; STEGEL, VIDA; KRAJC, MATEJA; HOČEVAR, MARKO; ŽGAJNAR, JANEZ; VAKSELJ, ALEŠ

    2012-01-01

    The estimated proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers among all breast and ovarian cancer cases is 5–10%. According to the literature, inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumour-suppressor genes, account for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. The aim of this report is to present novel mutations that have not yet been described in the literature and pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations which have been detected in HBOC families for the first time in the last three years. In the period between January 2009 and December 2011, 559 individuals from 379 families affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Three novel mutations were detected: one in BRCA1 - c.1193C>A (p.Ser398*) and two in BRCA2 - c.5101C>T (p.Gln1701*) and c.5433_5436delGGAA (p.Glu1811Aspfs*3). These novel mutations are located in the exons 11 of BRCA1 or BRCA2 and encode truncated proteins. Two of them are nonsense while one is a frameshift mutation. Also, 11 previously known pathogenic mutations were detected for the first time in the HBOC families studied here (three in BRCA1 and eight in BRCA2). All, except one cause premature formation of stop codons leading to truncation of the respective BRCA1 or BRCA2 proteins. PMID:22923021

  13. BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Jiayan; Chen, Fengxia; Yang, Fang; Song, Wei; Zhu, Aiyu; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2015-04-10

    BRCA1 plays a key role in the regulation of p53-dependent target gene transcription activation. Meanwhile, the p53 inducible gene 3 (PIG3) is a downstream target of p53 and is involved in p53-initiated apoptosis. However, little is known about whether BRCA1 can regulate PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Using a tissue microarray containing 149 breast cancer patient samples, we found that BRCA1 and PIG3 expression status were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.678, P < 0.001) and identified a significant positive correlation between high expression of BRCA1 and/or PIG3 and overall survival (OS). Moreover, we reveal that overexpression of BRCA1 significantly increased expression of PIG3 in cells with intact p53, whereas no increase in PIG3 was observed in p53-null MDA-MB-157 cells and p53-depleted HCT116p53-/- cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of BRCA1 could not lead to an increase expression level of prohibitin (PHB), which we have previously identified to induce PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Finally, ChIP analysis revealed that PHB can bind to the PIG3 promoter and activate PIG3 transcription independent of p53, although p53 presence did enhance this process. Taken together, our findings suggest that BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner, and that PIG3 expression is associated with a better OS in breast cancer patients.

  14. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  15. BRCA1-regulated RRM2 expression protects glioblastoma cells from endogenous replication stress and promotes tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Rikke D.; Gajjar, Madhavsai K.; Tuckova, Lucie; Jensen, Kamilla E.; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgaard, Kjeld; Rasmussen, Jane S.; Brennum, Jannick; Bartek, Jiri; Syrucek, Martin; Sedlakova, Eva; Andersen, Klaus K.; Frederiksen, Marie H.; Bartek, Jiri; Hamerlik, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-evoked replication stress (RS) fuels genomic instability in diverse cancer types. Here we report that BRCA1, traditionally regarded a tumour suppressor, plays an unexpected tumour-promoting role in glioblastoma (GBM), safeguarding a protective response to supraphysiological RS levels. Higher BRCA1 positivity is associated with shorter survival of glioma patients and the abrogation of BRCA1 function in GBM enhances RS, DNA damage (DD) accumulation and impairs tumour growth. Mechanistically, we identify a novel role of BRCA1 as a transcriptional co-activator of RRM2 (catalytic subunit of ribonucleotide reductase), whereby BRCA1-mediated RRM2 expression protects GBM cells from endogenous RS, DD and apoptosis. Notably, we show that treatment with a RRM2 inhibitor triapine reproduces the BRCA1-depletion GBM-repressive phenotypes and sensitizes GBM cells to PARP inhibition. We propose that GBM cells are addicted to the RS-protective role of the BRCA1-RRM2 axis, targeting of which may represent a novel paradigm for therapeutic intervention in GBM. PMID:27845331

  16. Surgically treated ovarian endometriosis association with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Soriano, David; Shmuel, Elyasaf; Schonman, Ron; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Zadok, Oranit; Vituri, Aya; Seidman, Daniel; Barshack, Iris; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-04-01

    Endometriosis is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. Few studies have also shown increased risk of breast cancer. BRCA1/2 mutations are linked to an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers but their relation to endometriosis is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the mutation rate of BRCA1/2 among women with surgically treated ovarian endometriosis. We collected 126 specimens from Jewish Ashkenazi women with endometriotic (76) and control non-endometriotic (50) ovarian cysts, reviewed the pathological diagnoses and extracted DNA from all samples. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), samples were examined for the founder germline mutations of BRCA1/2, most common among Ashkenazi Jews. The rate of mutations in each group was calculated and compared. BRCA1/2 mutation rate was 1/76 (1.3%) in the endometriotic cyst study group and 1/50 (2%) in the control non-endometriotic cysts, showing no statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.84). BRCA1/2 mutation rate was similar to the previously reported rate among Jewish Ashkenazi women. BRCA1/2 mutation rates in patients with endometriotic ovarian cysts and with non-endometriotic ovarian cysts are similar. A larger cohort is required to completely exclude the possibility of an association between BRCA1/2 mutations and surgically treated endometriosis.

  17. BRCA1 promoter methylation is a marker of better response to anthracycline-based therapy in sporadic TNBC.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, T; Poehlmann, A; Ignatov, A; Schinlauer, A; Costa, S D; Roessner, A; Kalinski, T; Bischoff, J

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of BRCA1 gene aberrations in sporadic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and its impact on anthracycline-based therapy. BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed in 70 TNBC and compared with the clinical and pathologic characteristics. As a control group, we used 70 patients with non-TNBC. BRCA1 promoter methylation was observed in 65.2 % of patients and was similar in both groups. BRCA1 promoter methylation was associated with decreased intensity of BRCA1 protein expression (P = 0.002) and significant increase of median disease-free survival (DFS) of TNBC patients receiving adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that BRCA1 promoter methylation remains a favorable factor in regard to DFS (HR 0.224; 95 % CI 0.092-0.546, P = 0.001) in TNBC after adjustment for other prognostic factors. In contrast, in non-TNBC, BRCA1 promoter methylation was not associated with any clinical and pathologic parameters. BRCA1 promoter methylation is a common mechanism of BRCA1 gene aberration in sporadic breast cancer and is predictive for better response to anthracycline-based therapies.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic test in high risk patients and families: counselling and management.

    PubMed

    Marchina, Eleonora; Fontana, Maria Grazia; Speziani, Michela; Salvi, Alessandro; Ricca, Giuseppe; Di Lorenzo, Diego; Gervasi, Maria; Caimi, Luigi; Barlati, Sergio

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for 5-10% of all cases of breast cancer and 10-15% of ovarian cancer and is characterised by dominant inheritance, early onset, the severity of the disease and bilaterality. About 30% of cases with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with a mutation in the BRCA1 gene have a 80-90% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 40-65% chance of developing ovarian cancer. Most studies carried out throughout the world indicate that the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation is lower than originally suggested by early studies on large families with several affected members. Studies performed in Italy have reported different prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, probably due to different selection criteria and to the variability of the techniques used. In this study, we performed a screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in families from northern Italy with familial recurrence of breast cancer or ovarian cancer in which the individual risk of patients of being carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation was evaluated using BRCAPRO (CAGene) software. We enrolled 27 patients of 101 unrelated families selected when they fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Specific risk evaluation, genetic test administration if needed, and discussion of the results were offered during multi-disciplinary genetic, surgical and psychological counselling. Seven probands (35%) found BRCA1/2 sequence variation carriers; no BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were detected in the remaining 13 probands. Two (15%) patients had BRCA1 mutations and 5 (25%) patients had BRCA2 mutations. In the latter case, BRCA2 delA 9158fs+29stop mutation in exon 22, never previously described and a new sequence variation (T703N) in exon 11 were identified.

  19. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  20. Differential Cytotoxicity, Cellular Uptake, Apoptosis and Inhibition of BRCA1 Expression of BRCA1-Defective and Sporadic Breast Cancer Cells Induced by an Anticancer Ruthenium(II)-Arene Compound, RAPTA-EA1.

    PubMed

    Ratanaphan, Adisorn; Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Hongthong, Khwanjira; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTA-EA1 complex [ruthenium(II)-arene 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (pta) complex with an arene-tethered ethacrynic acid ligand] has been reported to overcome drug resistance that developed due to the current use of platinum-based treatments. However, the exact mechanism of action of RAPTA-EA1 remains largely unexplored and unknown. Here we have further studied the effect of RAPTA-EA1 on BRCA1-defective HCC1937 breast cancer cells and compared its effects on BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HCC1937 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with the RAPTA-EA1 complex. The cytotoxicity of ruthenium-induced cells was evaluated by a MTT assay. Cellular uptake of ruthenium was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed using a flow cytometer. Expression of BRCA1 mRNA and its encoded protein was quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Differences in cytotoxicity were correlated with the differential accumulations of ruthenium and the induction of apoptosis. The ruthenium complex caused dramatically more damage to the BRCA1 gene in the BRCA1-defective HCC1937 cells than to the BRCA1-competent MCF-7 cells. It decreased the expression of BRCA1 mRNA in the BRCA1-competent cells, while in contrast, its expression increased in the BRCA1-defective cells. However, the expression of the BRCA1 protein was significantly reduced in both types of breast cancer cells. The results presented here have demonstrated a differential cellular response for the BRCA1-defective and BRCA1-competent breast cancer cells to RAPTA-EA1. These findings have provided more insight into the actions and development of the ruthenium-based compounds for use for the treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Sensitivity of BRCA1/2 testing in high-risk breast/ovarian/male breast cancer families: little contribution of comprehensive RNA/NGS panel testing.

    PubMed

    Byers, Helen; Wallis, Yvonne; van Veen, Elke M; Lalloo, Fiona; Reay, Kim; Smith, Philip; Wallace, Andrew J; Bowers, Naomi; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of testing BRCA1 and BRCA2 remains unresolved as the frequency of deep intronic splicing variants has not been defined in high-risk familial breast/ovarian cancer families. This variant category is reported at significant frequency in other tumour predisposition genes, including NF1 and MSH2. We carried out comprehensive whole gene RNA analysis on 45 high-risk breast/ovary and male breast cancer families with no identified pathogenic variant on exonic sequencing and copy number analysis of BRCA1/2. In addition, we undertook variant screening of a 10-gene high/moderate risk breast/ovarian cancer panel by next-generation sequencing. DNA testing identified the causative variant in 50/56 (89%) breast/ovarian/male breast cancer families with Manchester scores of ≥50 with two variants being confirmed to affect splicing on RNA analysis. RNA sequencing of BRCA1/BRCA2 on 45 individuals from high-risk families identified no deep intronic variants and did not suggest loss of RNA expression as a cause of lost sensitivity. Panel testing in 42 samples identified a known RAD51D variant, a high-risk ATM variant in another breast ovary family and a truncating CHEK2 mutation. Current exonic sequencing and copy number analysis variant detection methods of BRCA1/2 have high sensitivity in high-risk breast/ovarian cancer families. Sequence analysis of RNA does not identify any variants undetected by current analysis of BRCA1/2. However, RNA analysis clarified the pathogenicity of variants of unknown significance detected by current methods. The low diagnostic uplift achieved through sequence analysis of the other known breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes indicates that further high-risk genes remain to be identified.

  2. BRCA1 is a negative modulator of the PRC2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Zeng, Xianzhuo; Chen, Shuai; Ding, Liya; Zhong, Jian; Zhao, Jonathan C; Wang, Liguo; Sarver, Aaron; Koller, Antonius; Zhi, Jizu; Ma, Yupo; Yu, Jindan; Chen, Junjie; Huang, Haojie

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is important for maintenance of stem cell pluripotency and suppression of cell differentiation by promoting histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and transcriptional repression of differentiation genes. Here we show that the tumour-suppressor protein BRCA1 interacts with the Polycomb protein EZH2 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) and human breast cancer cells. The BRCA1-binding region in EZH2 overlaps with the noncoding RNA (ncRNA)-binding domain, and BRCA1 expression inhibits the binding of EZH2 to the HOTAIR ncRNA. Decreased expression of BRCA1 causes genome-wide EZH2 re-targeting and elevates H3K27me3 levels at PRC2 target loci in both mouse ES and human breast cancer cells. BRCA1 deficiency blocks ES cell differentiation and enhances breast cancer migration and invasion in an EZH2-dependent manner. These results reveal that BRCA1 is a key negative modulator of PRC2 and that loss of BRCA1 inhibits ES cell differentiation and enhances an aggressive breast cancer phenotype by affecting PRC2 function. PMID:23624935

  3. RANKL/RANK control Brca1 mutation-driven mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sigl, Verena; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo; Joshi, Purna A; Kavirayani, Anoop; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Novatchkova, Maria; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Schramek, Daniel; Edokobi, Nnamdi; Hersl, Jerome; Sampson, Aishia; Odai-Afotey, Ashley; Lazaro, Conxi; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Pujana, Miguel A; CIMBA, for; Heyn, Holger; Vidal, Enrique; Cruickshank, Jennifer; Berman, Hal; Sarao, Renu; Ticevic, Melita; Uribesalgo, Iris; Tortola, Luigi; Rao, Shuan; Tan, Yen; Pfeiler, Georg; Lee, Eva YHP; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Kenner, Lukas; Popper, Helmuth; Singer, Christian; Khokha, Rama; Jones, Laundette P; Penninger, Josef M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, affecting approximately one in eight women during their life-time. Besides environmental triggers and hormones, inherited mutations in the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) or BRCA2 genes markedly increase the risk for the development of breast cancer. Here, using two different mouse models, we show that genetic inactivation of the key osteoclast differentiation factor RANK in the mammary epithelium markedly delayed onset, reduced incidence, and attenuated progression of Brca1;p53 mutation-driven mammary cancer. Long-term pharmacological inhibition of the RANK ligand RANKL in mice abolished the occurrence of Brca1 mutation-driven pre-neoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, genetic inactivation of Rank or RANKL/RANK blockade impaired proliferation and expansion of both murine Brca1;p53 mutant mammary stem cells and mammary progenitors from human BRCA1 mutation carriers. In addition, genome variations within the RANK locus were significantly associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 mutations. Thus, RANKL/RANK control progenitor cell expansion and tumorigenesis in inherited breast cancer. These results present a viable strategy for the possible prevention of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutant patients. PMID:27241552

  4. Association of BRCA1 Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Doan, Phi C.; Wei, Qingyi; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Guojun

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a vital DNA repair gene, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of this gene have been studied in diverse cancer types. In this study, we investigated the association between eight common BRCA1 functional SNPs and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Methods This cancer center-based case–control study included 303 DTC cases and 511 controls. A polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was performed for genotyping. Unconditional logistical regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in single-SNP analysis and haplotype analysis. Results A decreased risk of DTC was found for the A1988G heterozygous AG genotype (adjusted OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.45–0.87, Bonferroni-adjusted p-value=0.036). AATAATA and ATAA haplotypes that carry C33420T variant allele were associated with reduced papillary thyroid cancer risk (adjusted OR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.33–0.84; adjusted OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.40–0.95, respectively). Also, having a combination of ≥3 favorable genotypes was associated with a DTC risk reduction (adjusted OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.50–0.95). The A31875G AG/GG genotype was associated with a 69% reduced risk of multifocal primary tumor in DTC patients (adjusted OR=0.31, 95% CI: 0.12–0.81). Conclusion BRCA1 genetic polymorphisms may play a role in DTC risk, while the possible associations warrant confirmation in independent studies. PMID:22136207

  5. Breast cancer 1 (BrCa1) may be behind decreased lipogenesis in adipose tissue from obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Mayas, Dolores; García-Santos, Eva; Gómez-Serrano, María; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Frühbeck, Gema; Peral, Belen; Fernández-Real, José M

    2012-01-01

    Expression and activity of the main lipogenic enzymes is paradoxically decreased in obesity, but the mechanisms behind these findings are poorly known. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) interacts with acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) reducing the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate BrCa1 in human adipose tissue according to obesity and insulin resistance, and in vitro cultured adipocytes. BrCa1 gene expression, total and phosphorylated (P-) BrCa1, and ACC were analyzed in adipose tissue samples obtained from a total sample of 133 subjects. BrCa1 expression was also evaluated during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells. BrCa1 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in both omental (OM; 1.36-fold, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous (SC; 1.49-fold, p = 0.001) adipose tissue from obese subjects. In parallel with increased BrCa1 mRNA, P-ACC was also up-regulated in SC (p = 0.007) as well as in OM (p = 0.010) fat from obese subjects. Consistent with its role limiting fatty acid biosynthesis, both BrCa1 mRNA (3.5-fold, p<0.0001) and protein (1.2-fold, p = 0.001) were increased in pre-adipocytes, and decreased during in vitro adipogenesis, while P-ACC decreased during differentiation of human adipocytes (p = 0.005) allowing lipid biosynthesis. Interestingly, BrCa1 gene expression in mature adipocytes was restored by inflammatory stimuli (macrophage conditioned medium), whereas lipogenic genes significantly decreased. The specular findings of BrCa1 and lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue and adipocytes reported here suggest that BrCa1 might help to control fatty acid biosynthesis in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  6. BRCA1/2 testing: uptake, phenocopies, and strategies to improve detection rates in initially negative families.

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Engel, C; Sutter, C; Zachariae, S; Schmutzler, R; Meindl, A; Heidemann, S; Grimm, T; Goecke, T O; Debatin, I; Horn, D; Wieacker, P; Gadzicki, D; Becker, K; Schäfer, D; Stock, F; Voigtländer, T

    2012-11-01

    In families with clustering of breast and ovarian cancer, molecular testing of the major susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 helps to identify patients with disease mutations and healthy persons at high risk who can participate in targeted intervention programs. We investigated 5559 families from the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer included between 1997 and 2008 and treated under clinical routine conditions. In each family an index patient/person had been screened for deleterious mutations in BRCA1/2. Healthy relatives agreed to predictive testing in 888 of 1520 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families (58%). Of 2646 eligible unaffected first-degree relatives 1143 decided to be tested (43%). In 325 families with BRCA1/2-positive index patients one related BC/OC patient was tested and 39 (12.0%; 95% confidence interval: 8.7-16.0%) discrepant cases found. A second related individual was screened in 163 of 3388 (4.9%) families with BRCA1/2-negative index patient and in eight families a BRCA1/2 mutation was found. In BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families, BC/OC patients lacking the familial mutation have to be expected at a rather high rate. In families with BRCA1/2-negative index patient we recommend a second screening if another patient with a high probability of carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation is available.

  7. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks: impact in the western Danish population.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne; Ladelund, Steen; Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Hansen, Thomas V O; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Borg, Åke; Therkildsen, Christina

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G>A and c.8474delC] were found to account for 23 % of the BRCA1 mutations and for 32 % of the BRCA2 mutations. The BRCA1 mutation c.3319G>T was, compared to other BRCA1 mutations, associated with a higher risk for ovarian cancer. In conclusion, founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to up to one-third of the families in western Denmark and among these the BRCA1 c.3319G>T mutation is potentially linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

  8. Spectrum and characterisation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in high-risk Czech patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Lukesova, Mirka; Vasickova, Petra; Navratilova, Marie; Coene, Ilse; Pavlu, Hana; Kosinova, Veronika; Kuklova, Jitka; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of breast cancer has doubled over the past 20 years in the Czech Republic. Hereditary factors may be a cause of young onset, bilateral breast or ovarian cancer, and familial accumulation of the disease. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for an important fraction of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. One thousand and ten unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer were analysed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (Czech Republic) during 1999–2006. Methods The complete coding sequences and splice sites of both genes were screened, and the presence of large intragenic rearrangements in BRCA1 was verified. Putative splice-site variants were analysed at the cDNA level for their potential to alter mRNA splicing. Results In 294 unrelated families (29.1% of the 1,010 probands) pathogenic mutations were identified, with 44 different BRCA1 mutations and 41 different BRCA2 mutations being detected in 204 and 90 unrelated families, respectively. In total, three BRCA1 founder mutations (c.5266dupC; c.3700_3704del5; p.Cys61Gly) and two BRCA2 founder mutations (c.7913_7917del5; c.8537_8538del2) represent 52% of all detected mutations in Czech high-risk probands. Nine putative splice-site variants were evaluated at the cDNA level. Three splice-site variants in BRCA1 (c.302-3C>G; c.4185G>A and c.4675+1G>A) and six splice-site variants in BRCA2 (c.475G>A; c.476-2>G; c.7007G>A; c.8755-1G>A; c.9117+2T>A and c.9118-2A>G) were demonstrated to result in aberrant transcripts and are considered as deleterious mutations. Conclusion This study represents an evaluation of deleterious genetic variants in the BRCA1 and 2 genes in the Czech population. The classification of several splice-site variants as true pathogenic mutations may prove useful for genetic counselling of families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:18489799

  9. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  10. Rapid detection of regionally clustered germ-line BRCA1 mutations by multiplex heteroduplex analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gayther, S.A.; Harrington, P.; Russell, P.

    1996-03-01

    Germ-line mutations of the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a substantial proportion of families with multiple cases of early-onset breast and/or ovarian cancer. Since the isolation of BRCA1 last year, >65 distinct mutations scattered throughout the coding region have been detected, making analysis of the gene time consuming and technically challenging. We have developed a multiplex heteroduplex analysis that is designed to analyze one-quarter of the coding sequence in a single-step screening procedure and that will detect {approximately}50% of all BRCA1 mutations so far reported in breast/ovarian cancer families. We have used this technique to analyze BRCA1 in 162 families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and identified 12 distinct mutations in 35 families. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5%-10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer.

  12. Genomic rearrangement screening of the BRCA1 from seventy Iranian high-risk breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    Sedghi, Maryam; Esfandiari, Elham; Fazel-Najafabadi, Esmat; Salehi, Mansoor; Salavaty, Abbas; Fattahpour, Shirin; Dehghani, Leila; Nouri, Nayerossadat; Mokarian, Fariborz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The second leading cause of cancer deaths in women is breast cancer. Germline mutations in susceptibility breast cancer gene BRCA1 increase the lifetime risk of breast cancer. Eighty-one large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) have been reported up to date in BRCA1 gene, and evaluation of these rearrangements helps with precise risk assessment in high-risk individuals. In this study, we have investigated LGRs in BRCA1 among Iranian high-risk breast cancer families. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients with breast cancer who were identified negative for point mutations or small deletions/insertions of BRCA1 gene were selected. Deletions and duplications of BRCA1 gene were evaluated using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Results: Two deletions, deletion of exons 1A/1B-2 and exon 24, were detected in two patients with breast cancer. The former alteration was found in a woman with a strong family history of breast cancer while the latter one was detected in a woman with early onset of breast cancer. Conclusion: Although our data confirm that LGRs in BRCA1 comprise a relatively small proportion of mutations in hereditary breast cancer in the Iranian population, MLPA analysis might be considered for screening of LGRs in high-risk individuals. It is worth to note that our results are consistent with previous studies in various Asian and European countries. PMID:28163741

  13. A BRCA1-interacting lncRNA regulates homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Khurana, Simran; Kubben, Nard; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Gorospe, Myriam; Misteli, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in diverse biological processes. Upon DNA damage, cells activate a complex signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). Using a microarray screen, we identify here a novel lncRNA, DDSR1 (DNA damage-sensitive RNA1), which is induced upon DNA damage. DDSR1 induction is triggered in an ATM-NF-κB pathway-dependent manner by several DNA double-strand break (DSB) agents. Loss of DDSR1 impairs cell proliferation and DDR signaling and reduces DNA repair capacity by homologous recombination (HR). The HR defect in the absence of DDSR1 is marked by aberrant accumulation of BRCA1 and RAP80 at DSB sites. In line with a role in regulating HR, DDSR1 interacts with BRCA1 and hnRNPUL1, an RNA-binding protein involved in DNA end resection. Our results suggest a role for the lncRNA DDSR1 in modulating DNA repair by HR.

  14. A BRCA1-interacting lncRNA regulates homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Khurana, Simran; Kubben, Nard; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Oberdoerffer, Philipp; Gorospe, Myriam; Misteli, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in diverse biological processes. Upon DNA damage, cells activate a complex signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR). Using a microarray screen, we identify here a novel lncRNA, DDSR1 (DNA damage-sensitive RNA1), which is induced upon DNA damage. DDSR1 induction is triggered in an ATM-NF-κB pathway-dependent manner by several DNA double-strand break (DSB) agents. Loss of DDSR1 impairs cell proliferation and DDR signaling and reduces DNA repair capacity by homologous recombination (HR). The HR defect in the absence of DDSR1 is marked by aberrant accumulation of BRCA1 and RAP80 at DSB sites. In line with a role in regulating HR, DDSR1 interacts with BRCA1 and hnRNPUL1, an RNA-binding protein involved in DNA end resection. Our results suggest a role for the lncRNA DDSR1 in modulating DNA repair by HR. PMID:26412854

  15. Modeling Impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are estimated to...account for over 10% of the breast cancer burden in the US. The current standard of care for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers is based on limited...understanding of the effects of specific mutations, and thus treats all carriers as if they have the same relative risk for development of breast cancer

  16. Novel mechanisms of PARP inhibitor resistance in BRCA1 deficient cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0027 TITLE: Novel Mechanisms of PARP inhibitor resistance in BRCA1-deficient Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL...gene are associated with a heightened lifetime risk for breast cancer (King, Marks, & Mandell, 2003). PARP inhibitors (PARPi) have been tested with... breast cancers become resistance to PARPi and how resistant tumors can be identified and treated. Key Words: Breast Cancer , BRCA1, PARP inhibitor

  17. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 epigenetically controls oncogenic microRNA-155

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suhwan; Wang, Rui-Hong; Akagi, Keiko; Kim, Kyung-Ae; Martin, Betty K; Cavallone, Luca; Haines, Diana C; Basik, Mark; Mai, Phuong; Poggi, Elizabeth; Isaacs, Claudine; Looi, Lai M; Mun, Kein S; Greene, Mark H; Byers, Stephen W; Teo, Soo H; Deng, Chu-Xia; Sharan, Shyam K

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1, a well-known tumor suppressor with multiple interacting partners, is predicted to have diverse biological functions. However, so far its only well-established role is in the repair of damaged DNA and cell cycle regulation. In this regard, the etiopathological study of low-penetrant variants of BRCA1 provides an opportunity to uncover its other physiologically important functions. Using this rationale, we studied the R1699Q variant of BRCA1, a potentially moderate-risk variant, and found that it does not impair DNA damage repair but abrogates the repression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), a bona fide oncomir. Mechanistically, we found that BRCA1 epigenetically represses miR-155 expression via its association with HDAC2, which deacetylates histones H2A and H3 on the miR-155 promoter. We show that overexpression of miR-155 accelerates whereas the knockdown of miR-155 attenuates the growth of tumor cell lines in vivo. Our findings demonstrate a new mode of tumor suppression by BRCA1 and suggest that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target for BRCA1-deficient tumors. PMID:21946536

  18. RADIOSENSITIVITY TO HIGH ENERGY IRON IONS IS INFLUENCED BY HETEROZYGOSITY for ATM, RAD9 and BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1GeV/n 56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy Iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation. PMID:24431481

  19. Radiosensitivity to high energy iron ions is influenced by heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1 GeV/ n56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation.

  20. The carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for subnuclear assembly of RAD51 after treatment with cisplatin but not ionizing radiation in human breast and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chenyi; Huang Peng; Liu Jinsong . E-mail: jliu@mdanderson.org

    2005-10-28

    BRCA1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability through its involvement in DNA repair. Although it is known that BRCA1 and RAD51 form distinct DNA repair subnuclear complexes, or foci, following environmental insults to the DNA, the role of BRCA1 in this process remains to be characterized. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the role of BRCA1 in the formation of RAD51 foci following treatment with cisplatin and ionizing radiation. We found that although a functional BRCA1 is required for the subnuclear assembly of BRCA1 foci following treatment with either ionizing radiation or cisplatin, a functional BRCA1 is required for RAD51 foci to form following treatment with cisplatin but not with ionizing radiation. Similar results were obtained in SKOV-3 cells when the level of BRCA1 expression was knocked down by stable expression of a retrovirus-mediated small-interfering RNA against BRCA1. We also found that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 contains uncharacterized phosphorylation sites that are responsive to cisplatin. The functional BRCA1 is also required for breast and ovarian cancer cells to mount resistance to cisplatin. These results suggest that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for the cisplatin-induced recruitment of RAD51 to the DNA-damage site, which may contribute to cisplatin resistance.

  1. The predictive value of 53BP1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Laura; Costa, Carlota; Majem, Margarita; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Gimenez-Capitan, Ana; Rodriguez, Ignacio; Vergenegre, Alain; Massuti, Bartomeu; Favaretto, Adolfo; Rugge, Massimo; Pallares, Cinta; Taron, Miquel; Rosell, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for non-oncogene-addicted non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and the analysis of multiple DNA repair genes could improve current models for predicting chemosensitivity. We investigated the potential predictive role of components of the 53BP1 pathway in conjunction with BRCA1. The mRNA expression of BRCA1, MDC1, CASPASE3, UBC13, RNF8, 53BP1, PIAS4, UBC9 and MMSET was analyzed by real-time PCR in 115 advanced NSCLC patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients expressing low levels of both BRCA1 and 53BP1 obtained a median progression-free survival of 10.3 months and overall survival of 19.3 months, while among those with low BRCA1 and high 53BP1 progression-free survival was 5.9 months (P <0.0001) and overall survival was 8.2 months (P=0.001). The expression of 53BP1 refines BRCA1-based predictive modeling to identify patients most likely to benefit from platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:24197907

  2. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444, isse 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1 binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  3. HUWE1 interacts with BRCA1 and promotes its degradation in the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway (Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, v. 444 issue 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Lu, Guang; Li, Li; Yi, Juan; Yan, Kaowen; Wang, Yaqing; Zhu, Baili; Kuang, Jingyu; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; Shao, Genze

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The 2000–2634 aa region of HUWE1 mediates the interaction with BRCA1 degron. • HUWE1 promotes the degradation of BRCA1 through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. • HUWE1 expression is inversely correlated with BRCA1 in breast cancer cells. • RNAi inhibition of HUWE1 confers increased resistance of MCF-10F cells to IR and MMC. - Abstract: The cellular BRCA1 protein level is essential for its tumor suppression activity and is tightly regulated through multiple mechanisms including ubiquitn–proteasome system. E3 ligases are involved to promote BRCA1 for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we identified HUWE1/Mule/ARF-BP1 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein involved in the control of BRCA1 protein level. HUWE1binds BRCA1 through its N-terminus degron domain. Depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA-mediated interference significantly increases BRCA1 protein levels and prolongs the half-life of BRCA1. Moreover, exogenous expression of HUWE1 promotes BRCA1 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, which could explain an inverse correlation between HUWE1 and BRCA1 levels in MCF10F, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Consistent with a functional role for HUWE1 in regulating BRCA1-mediated cellular response to DNA damage, depletion of HUWE1 by siRNA confers increased resistance to ionizing radiation and mitomycin. These data indicate that HUWE1 is a critical negative regulator of BRCA1 and suggest a new molecular mechanism for breast cancer pathogenesis.

  4. Morphology of breast cancer as a means of triage of patients for BRCA1 genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Farshid, Gelareh; Balleine, Rosemary L; Cummings, Margaret; Waring, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Women who have germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene are at substantially increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer but are otherwise normal. Currently, early age of onset of cancer and a strong family history are relied upon as the chief clues as to who should be offered genetic testing. Certain morphologic and immunohistochemical features are overrepresented in BRCA1-associated breast cancers but these differences have not been incorporated into the current selection criteria for genetic testing. Each of the 4 pathologists studied 30 known cases of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer from kConFab families. After reviewing the literature, we agreed on a semiquantitative scoring system for estimating the chances of presence of an underlying BRCA1 mutation, based on the number of the reported prototypic features present. After a time lag of 12 months, we each examined a series of 62 deidentified cases of breast cancer, inclusive of cases of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and controls. The controls included cases of BRCA2-associated breast cancer and sporadic cases. Our predictions had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value of 61%, and negative predictive value of 98%. For comparison the sensitivity of currently used selection criteria are in the range of 25% to 30%. The inclusion of morphologic and immunohistochemical features of breast cancers in algorithms to predict the likelihood of presence of germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene improves the accuracy of the selection process.

  5. Two PALB2 germline mutations found in both BRCA1+ and BRCAx familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Downs, Bradley; Kim, Yeong C; Xiao, Fengxia; Snyder, Carrie; Chen, Peixian; Fleissner, Elizabeth A; Becirovic, Dina; Wen, Hongxiu; Sherman, Simon; Cowan, Kenneth H; Lynch, Henry T; Wang, San Ming

    2015-05-01

    Partner and localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2), plays an important functional role in DNA damage repair. Recent studies indicate that germline mutations in PALB2 predispose individuals to a high risk of developing familial breast cancer. Therefore, comprehensive identification of PALB2 germline mutations is potentially important for understanding their roles in tumorigenesis and for testing their potential utility as clinical targets. Most of the previous studies of PALB2 have focused on familial breast cancer cases with normal/wild-type BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCAx). We hypothesize that PALB2 genetic mutations also exist in individuals with BRCA mutations (BRCA+). To test this hypothesis, PALB2 germline mutations were screened in 107 exome data sets collected from familial breast cancer families who were either BRCA1+ or BRCAx. Two novel heterozygous mutations predicted to alter the function of PALB2 were identified (c.2014G>C, p.E672Q and c.2993G>A, p.G998E). Notably, both of these mutations co-existed in BRCA1+ and BRCA1x families. These studies show that mutations in PALB2 can occur independent of the status of BRCA1 mutations, and they highlight the importance to include BRCA1+ families in PALB2 mutation screens.

  6. BRCA1 deficiency in ovarian cancer is associated with alteration in expression of several key regulators of cell motility – A proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Gau, David M; Lesnock, Jamie L; Hood, Brian L; Bhargava, Rohit; Sun, Mai; Darcy, Kathleen; Luthra, Soumya; Chandran, Uma; Conrads, Thomas P; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Krivak, Thomas C; Roy, Partha

    2015-01-01