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Sample records for gene expression markers

  1. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with increased luciferase protein and RNA levels. This change of luciferase expression was abolished by disruption of LacI-LacO binding by treating with IPTG in young seedlings, rosette leaves and inflorescences. This study suggests that association with the nuclear periphery is involved in the regulation of gene expression in plants.

  2. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  3. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Marker for Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfie, Martin; Tu, Yuan; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ward, William W.; Prasher, Douglas C.

    1994-02-01

    A complementary DNA for the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) produces a fluorescent product when expressed in prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) or eukaryotic (Caenorhabditis elegans) cells. Because exogenous substrates and cofactors are not required for this fluorescence, GFP expression can be used to monitor gene expression and protein localization in living organisms.

  4. Identification of novel stem cell markers using gap analysis of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method for detecting marker genes in large heterogeneous collections of gene expression data. Markers are identified and characterized by the existence of demarcations in their expression values across the whole dataset, which suggest the presence of groupings of samples. We apply this method to DNA microarray data generated from 83 mouse stem cell related samples and describe 426 selected markers associated with differentiation to establish principles of stem cell evolution. PMID:17875203

  5. High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Reliable Expression Markers of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Zhenzhi; Peh, Gary S. L.; Herath, Wishva B.; Cheng, Terence Y. D.; Ang, Heng-Pei; Toh, Kah-Peng; Robson, Paul; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Colman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated for the development of suitable corneal endothelial graft alternatives through cell-tissue engineering, which can potentially alleviate the shortage of corneal transplant material. The advent of less invasive suture-less key-hole surgery options such as Descemet’s Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet’s Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK), which involve transplantation of solely the endothelial layer instead of full thickness cornea, provide further impetus for the development of alternative endothelial grafts for clinical applications. A major challenge for this endeavor is the lack of specific markers for this cell type. To identify genes that reliably mark corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in vivo and in vitro, we performed RNA-sequencing on freshly isolated human CECs (from both young and old donors), CEC cultures, and corneal stroma. Gene expression of these corneal cell types was also compared to that of other human tissue types. Based on high throughput comparative gene expression analysis, we identified a panel of markers that are: i) highly expressed in CECs from both young donors and old donors; ii) expressed in CECs in vivo and in vitro; and iii) not expressed in corneal stroma keratocytes and the activated corneal stroma fibroblasts. These were SLC4A11, COL8A2 and CYYR1. The use of this panel of genes in combination reliably ascertains the identity of the CEC cell type. PMID:23844023

  6. MGFM: a novel tool for detection of tissue and cell specific marker genes from microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Khadija; Stachelscheid, Harald; Lekschas, Fritz; Kurtz, Andreas; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2015-08-28

    Identification of marker genes associated with a specific tissue/cell type is a fundamental challenge in genetic and cell research. Marker genes are of great importance for determining cell identity, and for understanding tissue specific gene function and the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases. We have developed a new bioinformatics tool called MGFM (Marker Gene Finder in Microarray data) to predict marker genes from microarray gene expression data. Marker genes are identified through the grouping of samples of the same type with similar marker gene expression levels. We verified our approach using two microarray data sets from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus public repository encompassing samples for similar sets of five human tissues (brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung). Comparison with another tool for tissue-specific gene identification and validation with literature-derived established tissue markers established functionality, accuracy and simplicity of our tool. Furthermore, top ranked marker genes were experimentally validated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The sets of predicted marker genes associated with the five selected tissues comprised well-known genes of particular importance in these tissues. The tool is freely available from the Bioconductor web site, and it is also provided as an online application integrated into the CellFinder platform ( http://cellfinder.org/analysis/marker ). MGFM is a useful tool to predict tissue/cell type marker genes using microarray gene expression data. The implementation of the tool as an R-package as well as an application within CellFinder facilitates its use.

  7. Molecular beacon imaging of tumor marker gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lily; Cao, Zehong; Lin, Yiming; Wood, William C; Staley, Charles A

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a fluorescence imaging-based approach to detect expression of tumor marker genes in pancreatic cancer cells using molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are short hairpin oligonucleotide probes that bind to specific oligonucleotide sequences and produce fluorescent signals. MBs targeting transcripts of two tumor marker genes, mutant K-ras and survivin, were synthesized and their specificity in detection of the expression of those genes in pancreatic cancer cells was examined. We found that K-ras MBs differentially bind to mutant K-ras mRNAs, resulting in strong fluorescent signals in pancreatic cancer cells with specific mutant K-ras genes but not in normal cells or cancer cells expressing either wild type or a different mutation of the K-ras gene. Additionally, MBs targeting survivin mRNA produced a bright fluorescent signal specifically in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that MBs labeled with different fluorophores could detect survivin and mutant K-ras mRNAs simultaneously in single cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that survivin and K-ras MBs have a high specificity in identifying cancer cells on frozen sections of pancreatic cancer tissues. In conclusion, molecular beacon-based imaging of expression of tumor marker genes has potential for the development of novel approaches for the detection of pancreatic cancer cells.

  8. Physiological evaluation of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei in production processes by marker gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Jari J; Bailey, Michael; Kivioja, Teemu; Söderlund, Hans; Penttilä, Merja; Saloheimo, Markku

    2007-01-01

    Background Biologically relevant molecular markers can be used in evaluation of the physiological state of an organism in biotechnical processes. We monitored at high frequency the expression of 34 marker genes in batch, fed-batch and continuous cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei by the transcriptional analysis method TRAC (TRanscript analysis with the aid of Affinity Capture). Expression of specific genes was normalised either with respect to biomass or to overall polyA RNA concentration. Expressional variation of the genes involved in various process relevant cellular functions, such as protein production, growth and stress responses, was related to process parameters such as specific growth and production rates and substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Results Gene expression of secreted cellulases and recombinant Melanocarpus albomyces laccase predicted the trends in the corresponding extracellular enzyme production rates and was highest in a narrow "physiological window" in the specific growth rate (μ) range of 0.03 – 0.05 h-1. Expression of ribosomal protein mRNAs was consistent with the changes in μ. Nine starvation-related genes were found as potential markers for detection of insufficient substrate feed for maintaining optimal protein production. For two genes induced in anaerobic conditions, increasing transcript levels were measured as dissolved oxygen decreased. Conclusion The data obtained by TRAC supported the usefulness of focused and intensive transcriptional analysis in monitoring of biotechnical processes providing thus tools for process optimisation purposes. PMID:17537269

  9. Detection of proneural/mesenchymal marker expression in glioblastoma: temporospatial dynamics and association with chromatin-modifying gene expression.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hideki; Yoshimoto, Koji; Hatae, Ryusuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Hata, Nobuhiro; Kuga, Daisuke; Nakamizo, Akira; Amano, Toshiyuki; Sayama, Tetsuro; Iihara, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Proneural and mesenchymal are two subtypes of glioblastoma identified by gene expression profiling. In this study, the primary aim was to detect markers to develop a clinically applicable method for distinguishing proneural and mesenchymal glioblastoma. The secondary aims were to investigate the temporospatial dynamics of these markers and to explore the association between these markers and the expression of chromatin-modifying genes. One hundred thirty-three glioma samples (grade II: 14 samples, grade III: 18, grade IV: 101) were analyzed. We quantified the expression of 6 signature genes associated with proneural and mesenchymal glioblastoma by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We assigned proneural (PN) and mesenchymal (MES) scores based on the average of the 6 markers and calculated a predominant metagene (P-M) score by subtracting the MES from the PN score. We used these scores to analyze correlations with malignant transformation, tumor recurrence, tumor heterogeneity, chromatin-modifying gene expression, and HDAC7 expression. The MES score positively correlated with tumor grade, whereas the PN score did not. The P-M score was able to distinguish the proneural and mesenchymal subtypes. It was decreased in cases of tumor recurrence and malignant transformation and showed variability within a tumor, suggesting intratumoral heterogeneity. The PN score correlated with the expression of multiple histone-modifying genes, whereas the MES score was associated only with HDAC7 expression. Thus, we demonstrated a simple and straightforward method of quantifying proneural/mesenchymal markers in glioblastoma. Of note, HDAC7 expression might be a novel therapeutic target in glioblastoma treatment.

  10. A PSO-Based Approach for Pathway Marker Identification From Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Monalisa; Mondal, Jyotirmay; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a new and robust pathway activity inference scheme is proposed from gene expression data using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). From microarray gene expression data, the corresponding pathway information of the genes are collected from a public database. For identifying the pathway markers, the expression values of each pathway consisting of genes, termed as pathway activity, are summarized. To measure the goodness of a pathway activity vector, t-score is widely used in the existing literature. The weakness of existing techniques for inferring pathway activity is that they intend to consider all the member genes of a pathway. But in reality, all the member genes may not be significant to the corresponding pathway. Therefore, those genes, which are responsible in the corresponding pathway, should be included only. Motivated by this, in the proposed method, using PSO, important genes with respect to each pathway are identified. The objective is to maximize the average t-score. For the pathway activities inferred from different percentage of significant pathways, the average absolute t -scores are plotted. In addition, the top 50% pathway markers are evaluated using 10-fold cross validation and its performance is compared with that of other existing techniques. Biological relevance of the results is also studied.

  11. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests.

  12. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  13. A standardized microarray assay for the independent gene expression markers in AML: EVI1 and BAALC.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jaap; van Vliet, Martin H; de Best, Leonie; Valk, Peter Jm; Viëtor, Henk E; Löwenberg, Bob; van Beers, Erik H

    2013-03-06

    High levels of BAALC, ERG, EVI1 and MN1 expression have been associated with shorter overall survival in AML but standardized and clinically validated assays are lacking. We have therefore developed and optimized an assay for standardized detection of these prognostic genes for patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk AML. In a training set of 147 intermediate cytogenetic risk cases we performed cross validations at 5 percentile steps of expression level and observed a bimodal significance profile for BAALC expression level and unimodal significance profiles for ERG and MN1 levels with no statistically significant cutoff points near the median expression level of BAALC, ERG or MN1. Of the possible cutoff points for expression levels of BAALC, ERG and MN1, just the 30th and 75th percentile of BAALC expression level and the 30th percentile of MN1 expression level cutoff points showed clinical significance. Of these only the 30th percentile of BAALC expression level reproduced in an independent verification (extended training) data set of 242 cytogenetically normal AML cases and successfully validated in an external cohort of 215 intermediate cytogenetic risk AML cases. Finally, we show independent prognostic value for high EVI1 and low BAALC in multivariate analysis with other clinically relevant molecular AML markers. We have developed a highly standardized molecular assay for the independent gene expression markers EVI1 and BAALC.

  14. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to normal bone tissues, including 1,200 upregulated genes and 681 downregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that obviously activated pathways are Ribosome and ECM-receptor interaction pathways; downregulated pathways are "Hepatitis C" and "cancer" signaling pathways. We further validated the expression of ADAMTS2, one of most differentiated expressed genes, by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 of FD cases. Results showed that ADAMTS2 was significantly overexpressed in FD tissues, but rarely expressed in normal bone tissues, suggesting that ADAMTS2 could be a potential biomarker for FD. Thus, this study uncovered differentially expressed candidate genes in FD, which provides pilot data for understanding FD pathogenesis, and developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and targeting of FD.

  15. Gene expression profiles in prostate cancer: identification of candidate non-invasive diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Mengual, L; Ars, E; Lozano, J J; Burset, M; Izquierdo, L; Ingelmo-Torres, M; Gaya, J M; Algaba, F; Villavicencio, H; Ribal, M J; Alcaraz, A

    2014-04-01

    To analyze gene expression profiles of prostate cancer (PCa) with the aim of determining the relevant differentially expressed genes and subsequently ascertain whether this differential expression is maintained in post-prostatic massage (PPM) urine samples. Forty-six tissue specimens (36 from PCa patients and 10 controls) and 158 urine PPM-urines (113 from PCa patients and 45 controls) were collected between December 2003 and May 2007. DNA microarrays were used to identify genes differentially expressed between tumour and control samples. Ten genes were technically validated in the same tissue samples by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Forty two selected differentially expressed genes were validated in an independent set of PPM-urines by qRT-PCR. Multidimensional scaling plot according to the expression of all the microarray genes showed a clear distinction between control and tumour samples. A total of 1047 differentially expressed genes (FDR≤.1) were indentified between both groups of samples. We found a high correlation in the comparison of microarray and RT-qPCR gene expression levels (r=.928, P<.001). Thirteen genes maintained the same fold change direction when analyzed in PPM-urine samples and in four of them (HOXC6, PCA3, PDK4 and TMPRSS2-ERG), these differences were statistically significant (P<.05). The analysis of PCa by DNA microarrays provides new putative mRNA markers for PCa diagnosis that, with caution, can be extrapolated to PPM-urines. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression pattern of drought stress marker genes in soybean roots under two water deficit systems

    PubMed Central

    Neves-Borges, Anna Cristina; Guimarães-Dias, Fábia; Cruz, Fernanda; Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Romano, Eduardo; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; de Fátima Grossi-de-Sá, Maria; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2012-01-01

    The study of tolerance mechanisms for drought stress in soybean is fundamental to the understanding and development of tolerant varieties. Using in silico analysis, four marker genes involved in the classical ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways of drought response were identified in the Glycine max genome in the present work. The expression profiles of the marker genes ERD1-like, GmaxRD20A-like, GmaxRD22-like and GmaxRD29B-like were investigated by qPCR in root samples of drought sensitive and tolerant soybean cultivars (BR 16 and Embrapa 48, respectively), submitted to water deficit conditions in hydroponic and pot-based systems. Among the four putative soybean homologs to Arabidopsis genes investigated herein, only GmaxRD29B-like was not regulated by water deficit stress. Distinct expression profiles and different induction levels were observed among the genes, as well as between the two drought-inducing systems. Our results showed contrasting gene expression responses for the GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes. GmaxRD20A-like was highly induced by continuous drought acclimating conditions, whereas GmaxRD22-like responses decreased after abrupt water deprivation. GmaxERD1-like showed a different expression profile for the cultivars in each system. Conversely, GmaxRD20A-like and GmaxRD22-like genes exhibited similar expression levels in tolerant plants in both systems. PMID:22802707

  17. Gene expression profiling of pluripotency and differentiation-related markers in cat oocytes and preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Filliers, Muriel; Goossens, Karen; Van Soom, Ann; Merlo, Barbara; Pope, Charles Earle; de Rooster, Hilde; Smits, Katrien; Vandaele, Leen; Peelman, Luc J

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian preimplantation development, two successive differentiation events lead to the establishment of three committed lineages with separate fates: the trophectoderm, the primitive endoderm and the pluripotent epiblast. In the mouse embryo, the molecular mechanisms underlying these two cell fate decisions have been studied extensively, leading to the identification of lineage-specific transcription factors. Species-specific differences in expression patterns of key regulatory genes have been reported, raising questions regarding their role in different species. The aim of the present study was to characterise the gene expression patterns of pluripotency (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG) and differentiation (CDX2, GATA6)-related markers during feline early development using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we assessed the impact of in vitro development on gene expression by comparing transcript levels of the genes investigated between in vitro and in vivo blastocysts. To normalise quantitative data within different preimplantation embryo stages, we first validated a set of stable reference genes. Transcript levels of all genes investigated were present and changed over the course of preimplantation development; a highly significant embryo-stage effect on gene expression was observed. Transcript levels of OCT4 were significantly reduced in in vitro blastocysts compared with their in vivo counterparts. None of the other genes investigated showed altered expression under in vitro conditions. The different gene expression patterns of OCT4, SOX2, CDX2 and GATA6 in cat embryos resembled those described in mouse embryos, indicative of a preserved role for these genes during early segregation. However, because of the absence of any upregulation of NANOG transcription levels after embryonic genome activation, it is unlikely that NANOG is a key regular of lineage segregation. Such results support the hypothesis that the behaviour of

  18. Effect of radiation on the expression of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Zheng; Fan, Fei-Yue; Sun, Yuan-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Cancer radiation therapy can cause skeletal complications, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis. To understand the mechanism responsible for the skeletal complications, the expression profiles of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells were observed. Osteoclast formation was established by RAW264.7 cells that were treated with the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and detected using immunochemistry and morphological observations. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the expression of a panel of osteoclast markers, including the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), integrin β3 and the calcitonin receptor (CTR). RANKL-induced osteoclasts were TRAP-positive and multinucleated, and displayed a distinct morphology. RANKL-induced osteoclast precursor cells had increased TRAP and RANK expression and decreased CTR expression compared to the control cells not treated with RANKL. RAW264.7 cells irradiated with 2-Gy γ-rays had upregulated integrin β3 and RANK expression and downregulated CTR expression compared to the control RAW264.7 cells. The effect of radiation on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation enhanced the expression of CTR and inhibited the expression of RANK and TRAP. Therefore, radiation damage from 2-Gy γ-rays can promote the activities of osteoclast precursor cells, but not those of osteoclasts.

  19. Effect of radiation on the expression of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; LIU, ZHENG; FAN, FEI-YUE; SUN, YUAN-MING

    2012-01-01

    Cancer radiation therapy can cause skeletal complications, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis. To understand the mechanism responsible for the skeletal complications, the expression profiles of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells were observed. Osteoclast formation was established by RAW264.7 cells that were treated with the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and detected using immunochemistry and morphological observations. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the expression of a panel of osteoclast markers, including the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), integrin β3 and the calcitonin receptor (CTR). RANKL-induced osteoclasts were TRAP-positive and multinucleated, and displayed a distinct morphology. RANKL-induced osteoclast precursor cells had increased TRAP and RANK expression and decreased CTR expression compared to the control cells not treated with RANKL. RAW264.7 cells irradiated with 2-Gy γ-rays had upregulated integrin β3 and RANK expression and downregulated CTR expression compared to the control RAW264.7 cells. The effect of radiation on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation enhanced the expression of CTR and inhibited the expression of RANK and TRAP. Therefore, radiation damage from 2-Gy γ-rays can promote the activities of osteoclast precursor cells, but not those of osteoclasts. PMID:22294242

  20. Chronic vortioxetine treatment in rodents modulates gene expression of neurodevelopmental and plasticity markers.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jessica A; Tamm, Joseph A; Abdourahman, Aicha; Pehrson, Alan L; Li, Yan; Cajina, Manuel; Sánchez, Connie

    2017-02-01

    The multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine displays an antidepressant profile distinct from those of conventional selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and possesses cognitive-enhancing properties in preclinical and clinical studies. Recent studies have begun to investigate molecular mechanisms that may differentiate vortioxetine from other antidepressants. Acute studies in adult rats and chronic studies in a middle-aged mouse model reveal upregulation of several markers that play a central role in synaptic plasticity. However, the effect of chronic vortioxetine treatment on expression of neuroplasticity and neurodevelopmental biomarkers in naïve rats has not been evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that vortioxetine at a range of doses regulates expression of genes associated with plasticity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, region encompassing the amygdala, as well as in blood, and displays similar effects relative to the SSRI fluoxetine in adult naïve rats. These genes encode immediate early genes (IEGs), translational regulators, and the neurodevelopmental marker Sema4g. Similar findings detected in brain regions and in blood provide a potential translational impact, and vortioxetine appears to consistently regulate signaling in these networks of neuroplasticity and developmental markers.

  1. All-trans retinoic acid modifies the expression of clock and disease marker genes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Hadas; Gutman, Roee; Chapnik, Nava; Meylan, Jenny; le Coutre, Johannes; Froy, Oren

    2012-03-01

    Restricted feeding (RF), a regimen that restricts the duration of food availability with no calorie restriction, entrains the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Restricted feeding leads to high-amplitude circadian rhythms, which have been shown to promote wellness and reduce disease and inflammatory markers. Retinoids, such as all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), act as anti-inflammatory agents. Thus far, the effect of ATRA combined with RF on the ability to delay the occurrence of age-associated changes, such as cancer and inflammation, is not known. We measured circadian expression of clock genes, disease marker genes and inflammatory markers in the serum, liver and jejunum in mice fed ad libitum (AL) or RF supplemented with 15 or 250 μg/kg body/day ATRA for 16 weeks. Our results show that ATRA supplementation led to phase shifts and reduced amplitudes in clock genes. Under AL, ATRA reduced the average daily messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of some disease markers, such as liver Afp and jejunum Afp, Alt and Gadd45β and aspartate transaminase (AST) protein in the serum, but increased the expression level of liver Crp mRNA. Under RF, ATRA reduced the average daily levels of jejunum Alt and Gadd45β and AST protein in the serum, but increased liver Afp, Alt, Gadd45β and Arginase mRNA. Altogether, our findings suggest that ATRA strongly affects circadian oscillation and disease marker levels. Moreover, its impact is different depending on the feeding regimen (AL or RF). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammation markers predict zinc transporter gene expression in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meika; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2013-09-01

    The pathology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) often is associated with underlying states of conditioned zinc deficiency and chronic inflammation. Zinc and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids each exhibit anti-inflammatory effects and may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. The present randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial was designed to investigate the effects of zinc (40 mg/day) and α-linolenic acid (ALA; 2 g/day flaxseed oil) supplementation on markers of inflammation [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP)] and zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression in 48 postmenopausal women with type 2 DM. No significant effects of zinc or ALA supplementation were observed on inflammatory marker concentrations or fold change in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. Significant increases in plasma zinc concentrations were observed over time in the groups supplemented with zinc alone or combined with ALA (P=.007 and P=.009, respectively). An impact of zinc treatment on zinc transporter gene expression was found; ZnT5 was positively correlated with Zip3 mRNA (P<.001) only in participants receiving zinc, while zinc supplementation abolished the relationship between ZnT5 and Zip10. IL-6 predicted the expression levels and CRP predicted the fold change of the ZnT5, ZnT7, Zip1, Zip7 and Zip10 mRNA cluster (P<.001 and P=.031, respectively). Fold change in the expression of metallothionein mRNA was predicted by TNF-α (P=.022). Associations among inflammatory cytokines and zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression support an interrelationship between zinc homeostasis and inflammation in type 2 DM.

  3. Effect of coculturing on the myogenic and adipogenic marker gene expression.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Pandurangan

    2014-05-01

    The present experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of coculturing on myogenic and adipogenic marker gene expressions with the use of C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 preadipocyte cells under the coculture system. C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 cells were cocultured using transwell inserts with a 0.4-μm porous membrane to separate C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 cells. Each cell type was grown independently on the transwell plates. Following cell differentiation, inserts containing 3 T3-L1 cells were transferred to C2C12 plates, and inserts containing C2C12 cells were transferred to 3 T3-L1 plates. After coculture of the C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 cells for 48 and 72 h, the cells in the lower well were harvested for analysis, and this process was carried out for both cells. Myogenic markers such as myogenin, MyoD, Myf5, PAX3, and PAX7 mRNA expressions were analyzed in the cocultured C2C12 cells. Adipogenic markers such as fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (CEBPA), adiponectin, lipoprotein lipase, and fatty acid synthase mRNA expressions were analyzed in the cocultured 3 T3-L1 cells. Myogenic and adipogenic marker gene mRNA expressions were significantly altered in the cocultured C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 cells when compared with the monocultured C2C12 and 3 T3-L1 cells.

  4. Sexually dimorphic gene expressions in eels: useful markers for early sex assessment in a conservation context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy, Benjamin; Guilbaud, Florian; Amilhat, Elsa; Beaulaton, Laurent; Vignon, Matthias; Huchet, Emmanuel; Rives, Jacques; Bobe, Julien; Fostier, Alexis; Guiguen, Yann; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2016-09-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) has been detected in a range of vertebrate reptile and fish species. Eels are characterized by an ESD that occurs relatively late, since sex cannot be histologically determined before individuals reach 28 cm. Because several eel species are at risk of extinction, assessing sex at the earliest stage is a crucial management issue. Based on preliminary results of RNA sequencing, we targeted genes susceptible to be differentially expressed between ovaries and testis at different stages of development. Using qPCR, we detected testis-specific expressions of dmrt1, amh, gsdf and pre-miR202 and ovary-specific expressions were obtained for zar1, zp3 and foxn5. We showed that gene expressions in the gonad of intersexual eels were quite similar to those of males, supporting the idea that intersexual eels represent a transitional stage towards testicular differentiation. To assess whether these genes would be effective early molecular markers, we sampled juvenile eels in two locations with highly skewed sex ratios. The combined expression of six of these genes allowed the discrimination of groups according to their potential future sex and thus this appears to be a useful tool to estimate sex ratios of undifferentiated juvenile eels.

  5. Sexually dimorphic gene expressions in eels: useful markers for early sex assessment in a conservation context

    PubMed Central

    Geffroy, Benjamin; Guilbaud, Florian; Amilhat, Elsa; Beaulaton, Laurent; Vignon, Matthias; Huchet, Emmanuel; Rives, Jacques; Bobe, Julien; Fostier, Alexis; Guiguen, Yann; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) has been detected in a range of vertebrate reptile and fish species. Eels are characterized by an ESD that occurs relatively late, since sex cannot be histologically determined before individuals reach 28 cm. Because several eel species are at risk of extinction, assessing sex at the earliest stage is a crucial management issue. Based on preliminary results of RNA sequencing, we targeted genes susceptible to be differentially expressed between ovaries and testis at different stages of development. Using qPCR, we detected testis-specific expressions of dmrt1, amh, gsdf and pre-miR202 and ovary-specific expressions were obtained for zar1, zp3 and foxn5. We showed that gene expressions in the gonad of intersexual eels were quite similar to those of males, supporting the idea that intersexual eels represent a transitional stage towards testicular differentiation. To assess whether these genes would be effective early molecular markers, we sampled juvenile eels in two locations with highly skewed sex ratios. The combined expression of six of these genes allowed the discrimination of groups according to their potential future sex and thus this appears to be a useful tool to estimate sex ratios of undifferentiated juvenile eels. PMID:27658729

  6. Obesity Is Associated With Gene Expression and Imaging Markers of Iron Accumulation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Blasco, Gerard; Xifra, Gemma; Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Stefanowicz, Magdalena; Matulewicz, Natalia; Puig, Josep; Ortega, Francisco; Ricart, Wifredo; Straczkowski, Marek; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Different genetic and imaging iron markers are known to be increased in the liver, adipose tissue, and brain of obese subjects. We aimed to investigate these markers in human skeletal muscle. DESIGN, SETTING, PATIENTS, AND OUTCOME MEASURES: Markers of iron accumulation were measured in three different territories: Iron gene markers (TFRC1, TF, SLC11A2, FTL, FTH1, and SLC40A1) were studied in abdominal rectus abdominis (Cohort 1, n = 26) and quadriceps (Cohort 2, n = 13) muscle using real-time PCR, whereas paravertebral muscle R2* signal (as surrogate of iron content) (Cohort 3, n = 43) was evaluated by means of magnetic resonance imaging. In a subgroup of 14 obese participants from Cohort 3, a diet-induced weight loss was performed. Rectus abdominis muscle age-adjusted gene expression of SLC40A1 (ferroportin) (r = 0.47; P = .04), SLC11A2 (r = 0.50; P = .03) and CYBA (r = 0.62; P = .006) increased with body fatness. In obese participants from Cohort 1, muscle CYBA gene expression was positively correlated with serum ferritin. This association was replicated in quadriceps from obese participants (Cohort 2). Paravertebral muscle R2* was positively associated with body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass (measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) in parallel with hepatic iron content, serum ferritin, and hepcidin. In multivariate regression analyses, obesity parameters (P < .0001) and hsCRP concentration (P < .05) contributed independently to the variance of sex-, serum hepcidin- and age-adjusted muscle R2*. Of note, weight loss intervention resulted in decreased muscle R2* (P = .02) in correlation with the change of serum ferritin (r = 0.69; P = .01). These findings emphasize a significant iron accumulation in human skeletal muscle in association with obesity. The mechanisms implicated in these observations should be studied further.

  7. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  8. Identification of single- and multiple-class specific signature genes from gene expression profiles by group marker index.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  9. The expression profile for the tumour suppressor gene PTEN and associated polymorphic markers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J A; Stewart, L M D; Ajayi, L; Gray, I C; Gray, N E; Roberts, K G; Watson, G J; Kaisary, A V; Snary, D

    2000-01-01

    PTEN, a putative tumour suppressor gene associated with prostate and other cancers, is known to be located within the chromosomal region 10q23.3. Transcription of the PTEN gives rise to multiple mRNA species. Analyses by Northern blots, using cell lines which express PTEN together with cell lines which have lost the PTEN or carry a truncated version of the gene, has allowed us to demonstrate that the pseudogene is not transcribed. In addition, 3′ RACE studies confirmed that the multiple mRNA species arising from the gene probably result from the use of alternative polyadenylation sites. No evidence for tissue- or cell-specific patterns of transcription was found. Analysis by 5′ RACE placed the putative site for the start of transcription around 830 bp upstream of the start codon. A map of the location of the PTEN gene with a series of overlapping YAC, BAC and PACs has been constructed and the relative position of eight microsatellite markers sited. Two known and one novel marker have been positioned within the gene, the others are in flanking regions. The more accurate location of these markers should help in future studies of the extent of gene loss. Several polymorphisms were also identified, all were within introns. Four of the common polymorphisms appear to be linked. In blood, DNA from 200 individuals, including normal, BPH and prostate cancer patients, confirmed this link. Only two samples of 200 did not carry the linked haplotype, both were patients with advanced prostate cancer. It is possible that such rearrangements within PTEN could be evidence of predisposition to prostate cancer in this small number of cases. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10817502

  10. Gene Expression markers of Age-Related Inflammation in Two Human Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Joehanes, Roby; Melzer, David; Harries, Lorna W.; Henley, William; Dupuis, Josée; Lin, Honghuang; Mitchell, Marcus; Hernandez, Dena; Ying, Sai-Xia; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Singleton, Andrew; Levy, Daniel; Munson, Peter; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronically elevated circulating inflammatory markers are common in older persons but mechanisms are unclear. Many blood transcripts (>800 genes) are associated with interleukin-6 protein levels (IL6) independent of age. We aimed to identify gene transcripts statistically mediating, as drivers or responders, the increasing levels of IL6 protein in blood at older ages. Methods Blood derived in-vivo RNA from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n=2422, ages 40–92 yrs) and InCHIANTI study (n=694, ages 30–104 yrs), with Affymetrix and Illumina expression arrays respectively (>17,000 genes tested), were tested for statistical mediation of the age-IL6 association using resampling techniques, adjusted for confounders and multiple testing. Results In FHS, IL6 expression was not associated with IL6 protein levels in blood. 102 genes (0.6% of 17,324 expressed) statistically mediated the age-IL6 association of which 25 replicated in InCHIANTI (including 5 of the 10 largest effect genes). The largest effect gene (SLC4A10, coding for NCBE, a sodium bicarbonate transporter) mediated 19% (adjusted CI 8.9 to 34.1%) and replicated by PCR in InCHIANTI (n=194, 35.6% mediated, p=0.01). Other replicated mediators included PRF1 (perforin, a cytolytic protein in cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells) and IL1B (Interleukin 1 beta): few other cytokines were significant mediators. Conclusions This transcriptome-wide study on human blood identified a small distinct set of genes that statistically mediate the age-IL6 association. Findings are robust across two cohorts and different expression technologies. Raised IL6 levels may not derive from circulating white cells in age related inflammation. PMID:26087330

  11. The alteration of zinc transporter gene expression is associated with inflammatory markers in obese women.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hwayoung; Paik, Hee Young; Kim, Jihye; Chung, Jayong

    2014-04-01

    Obesity, a chronic inflammatory state, is associated with altered zinc metabolism. ZnT and Zip transporters are involved in the regulation of zinc metabolism. This study examined the relationships among obesity, zinc transporter gene expression, and inflammatory markers in young Korean women. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of leukocyte zinc transporters between obese (BMI = 28.3 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), n = 35) and nonobese (BMI = 20.7 ± 0.2 kg/m(2), n = 20) women aged 18-28 years were examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-6, were measured in serum by enzyme immunoassay. ZnT1 and Zip1 were the most abundantly expressed zinc transporters in leukocytes. The mRNA levels of many zinc transporters (ZnT4, ZnT5, ZnT9, Zip1, Zip4, and Zip6) were significantly lower in obese women, and expression of these genes was inversely correlated with BMI and body fat percentage. In addition, inflammatory markers (CRP and TNF-α) were significantly higher in obese women. The mRNA levels of ZnT4, Zip1, and Zip6 were inversely correlated with CRP (P < 0.05), and mRNA levels of ZnT4 and ZnT5 were inversely correlated with TNF-α (P < 0.05). In standardized simple regression models, levels of TNF-α and CRP were negatively associated with mRNA levels of zinc transporters such as ZnT4, ZnT5, Zip1, and Zip6 (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of zinc transporters may be altered in obese individuals. Changes in zinc transporters may also be related to the inflammatory state associated with obesity.

  12. Mining and gene ontology based annotation of SSR markers from expressed sequence tags of Humulus lupulus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Gupta, Sanchita; Mani, Ashutosh; Chaturvedi, Anoop

    2012-01-01

    Humulus lupulus is commonly known as hops, a member of the family moraceae. Currently many projects are underway leading to the accumulation of voluminous genomic and expressed sequence tag sequences in public databases. The genetically characterized domains in these databases are limited due to non-availability of reliable molecular markers. The large data of EST sequences are available in hops. The simple sequence repeat markers extracted from EST data are used as molecular markers for genetic characterization, in the present study. 25,495 EST sequences were examined and assembled to get full-length sequences. Maximum frequency distribution was shown by mononucleotide SSR motifs i.e. 60.44% in contig and 62.16% in singleton where as minimum frequency are observed for hexanucleotide SSR in contig (0.09%) and pentanucleotide SSR in singletons (0.12%). Maximum trinucleotide motifs code for Glutamic acid (GAA) while AT/TA were the most frequent repeat of dinucleotide SSRs. Flanking primer pairs were designed in-silico for the SSR containing sequences. Functional categorization of SSRs containing sequences was done through gene ontology terms like biological process, cellular component and molecular function.

  13. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis in identification of endometrial cancer prognosis markers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Ai, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Juan; Xu, Yan-Li; Teng, Yin-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy. Identification of potential biomarkers of EC would be helpful for the detection and monitoring of malignancy, improving clinical outcomes. The Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis method was used to identify prognostic markers for EC in this study. Moreover, underlying molecular mechanisms were characterized by KEGG pathway enrichment and transcriptional regulation analyses. Seven gene co-expression modules were obtained, but only the turquoise module was positively related with EC stage. Among the genes in the turquoise module, COL5A2 (collagen, type V, alpha 2) could be regulated by PBX (pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox 1)1/2 and HOXB1(homeobox B1) transcription factors to be involved in the focal adhesion pathway; CENP-E (centromere protein E, 312kDa) by E2F4 (E2F transcription factor 4, p107/p130-binding); MYCN (v-myc myelocytomatosis viral related oncogene, neuroblastoma derived [avian]) by PAX5 (paired box 5); and BCL-2 (B-cell CLL/ lymphoma 2) and IGFBP-6 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6) by GLI1. They were predicted to be associated with EC progression via Hedgehog signaling and other cancer related-pathways. These data on transcriptional regulation may provide a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and clues to potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of EC.

  14. A method for cell type marker discovery by high-throughput gene expression analysis of mixed cell populations.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Kanji, Femina; Palii, Carmen G; Brand, Marjorie; Atkins, Harold; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol

    2013-10-03

    Gene transcripts specifically expressed in a particular cell type (cell-type specific gene markers) are useful for its detection and isolation from a tissue or other cell mixtures. However, finding informative marker genes can be problematic when working with a poorly characterized cell type, as markers can only be unequivocally determined once the cell type has been isolated. We propose a method that could identify marker genes of an uncharacterized cell type within a mixed cell population, provided that the proportion of the cell type of interest in the mixture can be estimated by some indirect method, such as a functional assay. We show that cell-type specific gene markers can be identified from the global gene expression of several cell mixtures that contain the cell type of interest in a known proportion by their high correlation to the concentration of the corresponding cell type across the mixtures. Genes detected using this high-throughput strategy would be candidate markers that may be useful in detecting or purifying a cell type from a particular biological context. We present an experimental proof-of-concept of this method using cell mixtures of various well-characterized hematopoietic cell types, and we evaluate the performance of the method in a benchmark that explores the requirements and range of validity of the approach.

  15. Adiposity dependent apelin gene expression: relationships with oxidative and inflammation markers.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Diego; Campión, Javier; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, Jose A

    2007-11-01

    It has been reported that apelin functions as an adipokine, which has been associated to obesity and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to analyze the apelin mRNA expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from high-fat (Cafeteria) fed rats, in order to examine potential relationships with obesity markers and other related risk factors. Animals fed on the high-fat diet during 56 days increased their body weight, total body fat and WAT depots weights when compared to controls. Apelin subcutaneous mRNA expression was higher in the Cafeteria than in the Control fed group and this increase was partially reversed by dietary vitamin C supplementation. Statistically significant associations between subcutaneous apelin gene expression and almost all the studied variables were identified, being of special interest the correlations found with serum leptin (r=0.517), liver malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (r=0.477), and leptin, IRS-3 and IL-1ra retroperitoneal mRNA expression (r=0.701; r=0.692 and r=0.561, respectively). These associations evidence a possible role for apelin in the excessive weight gain induced by high-fat feeding and increased adiposity, insulin-resistance, liver oxidative stress and inflammation.

  16. Chlorogenic acid regulates apoptosis and stem cell marker-related gene expression in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Izawa, Yuri; Onodera, Daiki; Tagami, Motoki

    2017-09-05

    Previous studies indicated that chlorogenic acid, a compound present in many fruits and vegetables, has anti-cancer activities. We report that chlorogenic acid regulates the expression of apoptosis-related genes and self-renewal-related stem cell markers in cancer cells. The lung cancer cell line A549 was cultured with or without chlorogenic acid. The presence of chlorogenic acid decreased cell proliferation as measured by MTT activity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that treatment of cells with chlorogenic acid reduced the expression of BCL2 but increased that of both BAX and CASP3. Chlorogenic acid enhanced annexin V expression as measured using fluorescently labeled annexin V. Chlorogenic acid also induced p38 MAPK and JNK gene expression. Meanwhile, several agents, including SB203580 (p38 MAP kinase inhibitor), N-acetylcysteine (antioxidant inhibitor), dipyridamole (phosphodiesterase inhibitor), and apocynin (NADPH-oxidase inhibitor) blocked chlorogenic acid-induced BAX gene expression. Chlorogenic acid reduced gene expression levels of stem cell-associated markers NANOG, POU5F1, and SOX2. Together these results indicate that chlorogenic acid affects the expression of apoptosis-related genes that are part of oxidative stress and p38 MAP-dependent pathways, as well as genes encoding stem cell markers. In conclusion, chlorogenic acid may contribute to the polyphenolic anti-cancer effect associated with consumption of vegetables and fruits.

  17. Molecular markers of early Parkinson's disease based on gene expression in blood.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Clemens R; Eklund, Aron C; Morse, Lee J; Liao, Zhixiang; Locascio, Joseph J; Fefer, Daniel; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Hauser, Michael A; Vance, Jeffery M; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Standaert, David G; Growdon, John H; Jensen, Roderick V; Gullans, Steven R

    2007-01-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) progresses relentlessly and affects five million people worldwide. Laboratory tests for PD are critically needed for developing treatments designed to slow or prevent progression of the disease. We performed a transcriptome-wide scan in 105 individuals to interrogate the molecular processes perturbed in cellular blood of patients with early-stage PD. The molecular multigene marker here identified is associated with risk of PD in 66 samples of the training set comprising healthy and disease controls [third tertile cross-validated odds ratio of 5.7 (P for trend 0.005)]. It is further validated in 39 independent test samples [third tertile odds ratio of 5.1 (P for trend 0.04)]. Insights into disease-linked processes detectable in peripheral blood are offered by 22 unique genes differentially expressed in patients with PD versus healthy individuals. These include the co-chaperone ST13, which stabilizes heat-shock protein 70, a modifier of alpha-synuclein misfolding and toxicity. ST13 messenger RNA copies are lower in patients with PD (mean +/- SE 0.59 +/- 0.05) than in controls (0.96 +/- 0.09) (P = 0.002) in two independent populations. Thus, gene expression signals measured in blood can facilitate the development of biomarkers for PD.

  18. Molecular markers of early Parkinson's disease based on gene expression in blood

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Clemens R.; Eklund, Aron C.; Morse, Lee J.; Liao, Zhixiang; Locascio, Joseph J.; Fefer, Daniel; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Schlossmacher, Michael G.; Hauser, Michael A.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Standaert, David G.; Growdon, John H.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Gullans, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) progresses relentlessly and affects five million people worldwide. Laboratory tests for PD are critically needed for developing treatments designed to slow or prevent progression of the disease. We performed a transcriptome-wide scan in 105 individuals to interrogate the molecular processes perturbed in cellular blood of patients with early-stage PD. The molecular multigene marker here identified is associated with risk of PD in 66 samples of the training set comprising healthy and disease controls [third tertile cross-validated odds ratio of 5.7 (P for trend 0.005)]. It is further validated in 39 independent test samples [third tertile odds ratio of 5.1 (P for trend 0.04)]. Insights into disease-linked processes detectable in peripheral blood are offered by 22 unique genes differentially expressed in patients with PD versus healthy individuals. These include the cochaperone ST13, which stabilizes heat-shock protein 70, a modifier of α-synuclein misfolding and toxicity. ST13 messenger RNA copies are lower in patients with PD (mean ± SE 0.59 ± 0.05) than in controls (0.96 ± 0.09) (P = 0.002) in two independent populations. Thus, gene expression signals measured in blood can facilitate the development of biomarkers for PD. PMID:17215369

  19. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  20. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYING; MOLINA, JULIAN; JIANG, JOHN; FERBER, MATTHEW; PRUTHI, SANDHYA; JATKOE, TIMOTHY; DERECHO, CARLO; RAJPUROHIT, YASHODA; ZHENG, JIAN; WANG, YIXIN

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  1. Gene Expression Changes in Phosphorus Deficient Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Leaves and the Potential for Diagnostic Gene Expression Markers

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, John P.; Broadley, Martin R.; Bowen, Helen C.; Spracklen, William P.; Hayden, Rory M.; White, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background There are compelling economic and environmental reasons to reduce our reliance on inorganic phosphate (Pi) fertilisers. Better management of Pi fertiliser applications is one option to improve the efficiency of Pi fertiliser use, whilst maintaining crop yields. Application rates of Pi fertilisers are traditionally determined from analyses of soil or plant tissues. Alternatively, diagnostic genes with altered expression under Pi limiting conditions that suggest a physiological requirement for Pi fertilisation, could be used to manage Pifertiliser applications, and might be more precise than indirect measurements of soil or tissue samples. Results We grew potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants hydroponically, under glasshouse conditions, to control their nutrient status accurately. Samples of total leaf RNA taken periodically after Pi was removed from the nutrient solution were labelled and hybridised to potato oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 1,659 genes were significantly differentially expressed following Pi withdrawal. These included genes that encode proteins involved in lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism, characteristic of Pi deficient leaves and included potential novel roles for genes encoding patatin like proteins in potatoes. The array data were analysed using a support vector machine algorithm to identify groups of genes that could predict the Pi status of the crop. These groups of diagnostic genes were tested using field grown potatoes that had either been fertilised or unfertilised. A group of 200 genes could correctly predict the Pi status of field grown potatoes. Conclusions This paper provides a proof-of-concept demonstration for using microarrays and class prediction tools to predict the Pi status of a field grown potato crop. There is potential to develop this technology for other biotic and abiotic stresses in field grown crops. Ultimately, a better understanding of crop stresses may improve our management of the crop, improving

  2. A Transgenic Durum Wheat Line that is Free of Marker Genes and Expresses 1dy10

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We used a combination of “clean gene” technology and positive selection to generate transgenic durum wheat lines free of herbicide and antibiotic resistance marker genes. Biolistic transformation experiments were carried out using three “minimal gene cassettes” consisting of linear DNA fragments exc...

  3. A bayesian mixed regression based prediction of quantitative traits from molecular marker and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Madhuchhanda; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2011-01-01

    Both molecular marker and gene expression data were considered alone as well as jointly to serve as additive predictors for two pathogen-activity-phenotypes in real recombinant inbred lines of soybean. For unobserved phenotype prediction, we used a bayesian hierarchical regression modeling, where the number of possible predictors in the model was controlled by different selection strategies tested. Our initial findings were submitted for DREAM5 (the 5th Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods challenge) and were judged to be the best in sub-challenge B3 wherein both functional genomic and genetic data were used to predict the phenotypes. In this work we further improve upon this previous work by considering various predictor selection strategies and cross-validation was used to measure accuracy of in-data and out-data predictions. The results from various model choices indicate that for this data use of both data types (namely functional genomic and genetic) simultaneously improves out-data prediction accuracy. Adequate goodness-of-fit can be easily achieved with more complex models for both phenotypes, since the number of potential predictors is large and the sample size is not small. We also further studied gene-set enrichment (for continuous phenotype) in the biological process in question and chromosomal enrichment of the gene set. The methodological contribution of this paper is in exploration of variable selection techniques to alleviate the problem of over-fitting. Different strategies based on the nature of covariates were explored and all methods were implemented under the bayesian hierarchical modeling framework with indicator-based covariate selection. All the models based in careful variable selection procedure were found to produce significant results based on permutation test.

  4. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  5. [Study on the food safety of the marker gene expressed protein HPT].

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Piao, Jian-Hua

    2005-09-01

    This article studied on the food safety of HPT protein (Hygromycin B Phosphotransferase), a kind of plant selectable marker gene expression product, which mainly included the quantity and quality detection of HPT in the SCK transgenic rice plants, the possible dietary intakes and its stability in the simulative digestive system. HPT cDNA fragment was inserted into the prokaryotic expressing vector pBV222 for the expression of 6His-HPT fusion protein. The inclusion bodies were denatured by 8 mol/L urea and purifiee with metal chelate affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose under denaturing condition. The purified 6His-HPT were used to immunize rabbit and BALB/C mice for the preparation of the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and the double-Ab sandwich ELISA to detect HPT was established then. Concerning the sensitivity assessment of HPT protein, the amino acid sequences of HPT was compared with the other allergens and the simulative digestive experiment in vitro was carried out too. 6His-HPT protein was obtained with the purity up to 95%. The specificity of antisera and ascites was detected by Western blot, which showed specific binding reaction between the antibodies to the purified 6His-HPT proteins and their expressed product. The double-Ab sandwich ELISA system was established successfully with the sensitivity of 30 ng/ml. The HPT expression level in the leaves of transgenic rice was proved in the range of 80 - 150 ng/ml, yet we cannot detect HPT protein in the seeds of the same rice. There showed no comparability in the amino acid sequences between HPT and other allergens, and HPT protein was digested quickly in the simulated stomach and intestines liquids. All the results showed that the expression level of HPT in the SCK transgenic rice plants is very low and they are not stable in the simulative digestive system. So we inferred that under the current detection level, HPT protein might not be able to induce any safety problem. Yet further study on the

  6. Reverse Differentiation as a Gene Filtering Tool in Genome Expression Profiling of Adipogenesis for Fat Marker Gene Selection and Their Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Mujib; Stich, Stefan; Häupl, Thomas; Eucker, Jan; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Background During mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) conversion into adipocytes, the adipogenic cocktail consisting of insulin, dexamethasone, indomethacin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine not only induces adipogenic-specific but also genes for non-adipogenic processes. Therefore, not all significantly expressed genes represent adipogenic-specific marker genes. So, our aim was to filter only adipogenic-specific out of all expressed genes. We hypothesize that exclusively adipogenic-specific genes change their expression during adipogenesis, and reverse during dedifferentiation. Thus, MSC were adipogenic differentiated and dedifferentiated. Results Adipogenesis and reverse adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining and expression of PPARG and FABP4. Based on GeneChips, 991 genes were differentially expressed during adipogenesis and grouped in 4 clusters. According to bioinformatic analysis the relevance of genes with adipogenic-linked biological annotations, expression sites, molecular functions, signaling pathways and transcription factor binding sites was high in cluster 1, including all prominent adipogenic genes like ADIPOQ, C/EBPA, LPL, PPARG and FABP4, moderate in clusters 2–3, and negligible in cluster 4. During reversed adipogenesis, only 782 expressed genes (clusters 1–3) were reverted, including 597 genes not reported for adipogenesis before. We identified APCDD1, CHI3L1, RARRES1 and SEMA3G as potential adipogenic-specific genes. Conclusion The model system of adipogenesis linked to reverse adipogenesis allowed the filtration of 782 adipogenic-specific genes out of total 991 significantly expressed genes. Database analysis of adipogenic-specific biological annotations, transcription factors and signaling pathways further validated and valued our concept, because most of the filtered 782 genes showed affiliation to adipogenesis. Based on this approach, the selected and filtered genes would be potentially important for characterization of adipogenesis and

  7. Expression analysis of human pterygium shows a predominance of conjunctival and limbal markers and genes associated with cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Aryankalayil-John, M.; Campos, M.M.; Fariss, R.N.; Rowsey, J.; Agarwalla, N.; Reid, T.W.; Dushku, N.; Cox, C.A.; Carper, D.; Wistow, G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pterygium is a vision-impairing fibrovascular lesion that grows across the corneal surface and is associated with sunlight exposure. To increase our understanding of the cells types involved in pterygium, we have used expressed sequence tag analysis to examine the transcriptional repertoire of isolated pterygium and to identify marker genes for tissue origin and cell migration. Methods An unnormalized unamplified cDNA library was prepared from 15 pooled specimens of surgically removed pterygia as part of the NEIBank project. Gene expression patterns were compared with existing data for human cornea, limbus, and conjunctiva, and expression of selected genes was verified by immunofluorescence localization in normal eye ocular surface and in pterygium. Results Sequence analysis of 2,976 randomly selected clones produced over 1,800 unique clusters, potentially representing single genes. The most abundant complementary DNAs from pterygium include clusterin, keratins 13 (Krt13) and 4 (Krt4), S100A9/calgranulin B, and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SAT1). Markers for both conjunctiva (such as keratin 13/4 and AQP3) and corneal epithelium (such as keratin 12/3 and AQP5) were present. Immunofluorescence of Krt12 and 13 in the normal ocular surface showed specificity of Krt12 in cornea and Krt13 in conjunctival and limbal epithelia, with a fairly sharp boundary at the limbal–corneal border. In the pterygium there was a patchy distribution of both Krt12 and 13 up to a normal corneal epithelial region specific for Krt12. Immunoglobulins were also among the prominently expressed transcripts. Several of the genes expressed most abundantly in excised pterygium, particularly S100A9 and SAT1, have roles in cell migration. SAT1 exerts its effects through control of polyamine levels. IPENSpm, a polyamine analogue, showed a significant ability to reduce migration in primary cultures of pterygium. A number of genes highly expressed in cornea were not found in

  8. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-22

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  9. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops. PMID:28241413

  10. Homology of the mesopallium in the adult chicken identified by gene expression of the neocortical marker cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Karim, Mohammad Rabiul

    2014-03-06

    Studies of gene expression and fiber connections have suggested that the primary visual (entopallium) and auditory (field L2) centers in the avian telencephalon are homologous to layer 4 of extrastriate and auditory neocortices of mammals, respectively. In addition, it has been proposed that the arcopallium contains neurons homologous to layers 5/6 and that the mesopallium may be homologous to superficial neocortical layers, but gene expression evidence for the latter is lacking in adult birds. In the present study using adult chickens we have examined the gene expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) mRNA, a selective marker for layers 2/3 of mammalian neocortex. CCK mRNA was expressed in neurons of the entire mesopallium, but not in any part of the nidopallium. Together with hodological evidence of connections between the mesopallium and the two primary sensory areas, our results are consistent with the suggestion that the mesopallium is comparable to certain superficial layers of mammalian neocortex.

  11. Defining the expression of marker genes in equine mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Deborah J; Ousey, Jennifer C; Smith, Matthew Rw

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal (MS) cells have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood. To date these cells have been investigated for their differentiation potential and are currently being used to treat damage to horse musculoskeletal tissues. However, no work has been done in horse MS cells to examine the expression profile of proteins and cell surface antigens that are expressed in human MS cells. The identification of such profiles in the horse will allow the comparison of putative MS cells isolated from different laboratories and different tissues. At present it is difficult to ascertain whether equivalent cells are being used in different reports. Here, we report on the expression of a range of markers used to define human MS cells. Using immunocytochemistry we show that horse MS cells homogenously express collagens, alkaline phosphatase activity, CD44, CD90 and CD29. In contrast, CD14, CD79α and the embryonic stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA (stage specific embryonic antigen) -1, -3, -4, TRA (tumor rejection antigen) -1-60 and -1-81 are not expressed. The MS cells also express MHC class I antigens but do not express class II antigens, although they are inducible by treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ).

  12. [Production of marker-free plants expressing the gene of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen].

    PubMed

    Rukavtsova, E B; Gaiazova, A R; Chebotareva, E N; Bur'ianova, Ia I

    2009-08-01

    The pBM plasmid, carrying the gene of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and free of any selection markers of antibiotic or herbicide resistance, was constructed for genetic transformation of plants. A method for screening transformed plant seedlings on nonselective media was developed. Enzyme immunoassay was used for selecting transgenic plants with HBsAg gene among the produced regenerants; this method provides for a high sensitivity detection of HBsAg in plant extracts. Tobacco and tomato transgenic lines synthesizing this antigen at a level of 0.01-0.05% of the total soluble protein were obtained. The achieved level of HBsAg synthesis is sufficient for preclinical trials of the produced plants as a new generation safe edible vaccine. The developed method for selecting transformants can be used for producing safe plants free of selection markers.

  13. Identifying diagnostic endocrine markers and changes in endometrial gene expressions during pyometra in cats.

    PubMed

    Jursza-Piotrowska, Ewelina; Siemieniuch, Marta J

    2016-06-01

    Pyometra is a significant reproductive problem in cats. The aims of this study were to evaluate (i) the immunological profile of queens by studying plasma concentrations of metabolites of prostacyclin I2 (6-keto-PGF1α), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4); and (ii) the gene transcription profiles of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 (TLR2/4), PGE2-synthase (PGES), PGF2α-synthase (PGFS) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) in the feline endometrium throughout the estrous cycle, after medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) treatment and during pyometra. The concentration of plasma 6-keto-PGF1α in pyometra was increased in comparison to other groups studied (p<0.01). Endometrial mRNA coding for TLR2 was up-regulated in cats suffering from pyometra compared to other groups (p<0.001). Expression of mRNA for TLR4 was up-regulated in endometria originating from MPA-treated cats, pyometra and late diestrus cats, compared with tissues from cats during estrus and anestrus (p<0.05). As expected, endometrial mRNA for PTGS2 was up-regulated only in pyometra, compared with other groups (p<0.001). Similarly, endometrial mRNA for PGFS was up-regulated in pyometra, compared with endometria from anestrus, late diestrus and from MPA-treated cats (p<0.05), or from cats during estrus (p<0.01). Overall, these results indicate that plasma concentrations of LTB4 and LTC4 are not useful diagnostic markers since they were not increased in queens with pyometra, in contrast to 6-keto-PGF1α. In addition, treatment with MPA evoked neither endocrine nor molecular changes in endometria of cats.

  14. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Wu, Long-Fei; Lu, Xin; Mo, Xing-Bo; Tang, Zai-Xiang; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested. Methods We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Results We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1), each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1). Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation. Conclusion The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:26352601

  15. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP = 299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP = 335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was “immune system process” (P = 3.46 × 10−26). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P = 8.40 × 10−5). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25688367

  16. RNA Sequencing of Sessile Serrated Colon Polyps Identifies Differentially Expressed Genes and Immunohistochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Delker, Don A.; Pop, Stelian; Neklason, Deborah W.; Bronner, Mary P.; Burt, Randall W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. Although large SSA/Ps are generally recognized phenotypically, small (<1 cm) or dysplastic SSA/Ps are difficult to differentiate from hyperplastic or small adenomatous polyps by endoscopy and histopathology. Our aim was to define the comprehensive gene expression phenotype of SSA/Ps to better define this cancer precursor. Results RNA sequencing was performed on 5′ capped RNA from seven SSA/Ps collected from patients with the serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) versus eight controls. Highly expressed genes were analyzed by qPCR in additional SSA/Ps, adenomas and controls. The cellular localization and level of gene products were examined by immunohistochemistry in syndromic and sporadic SSA/Ps, adenomatous and hyperplastic polyps and controls. We identified 1,294 differentially expressed annotated genes, with 106 increased ≥10-fold, in SSA/Ps compared to controls. Comparing these genes with an array dataset for adenomatous polyps identified 30 protein coding genes uniquely expressed ≥10-fold in SSA/Ps. Biological pathways altered in SSA/Ps included mucosal integrity, cell adhesion, and cell development. Marked increased expression of MUC17, the cell junction protein genes VSIG1 and GJB5, and the antiapoptotic gene REG4 were found in SSA/Ps, relative to controls and adenomas, were verified by qPCR analysis of additional SSA/Ps (n = 21) and adenomas (n = 10). Immunohistochemical staining of syndromic (n≥11) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n≥17), adenomatous (n≥13) and hyperplastic (n≥10) polyps plus controls (n≥16) identified unique expression patterns for VSIG1 and MUC17 in SSA/Ps. Conclusion A subset of genes and pathways are uniquely increased in SSA/Ps, compared to adenomatous polyps, thus supporting the concept that cancer develops by different pathways in these phenotypically distinct polyps with markedly different gene expression profiles. Immunostaining

  17. Surface markers and gene expression to characterize the differentiation of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takashi; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ono, Yohei; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a method of cartilage repair. To improve the quality of regenerated tissue by ACI, it is essential to identify surface marker expression correlated with the differentiation status of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes and to define the index for discriminating dedifferentiated cells from monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until passage 4. At each passage, mRNA expression of collagen type I, II, and X and aggrecan was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the surface marker expression of CD14, CD26, CD44, CD49a, CD49c, CD54, and CD151 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The ratios of mRNA levels of collagen type II to I (Col II/Col I) represented the differentiation status of chondrocytes more appropriately during monolayer culture. The surface marker expression of CD44, CD49c, and CD151 was upregulated according to the dedifferentiation status, whereas that of CD14, CD49a, and CD54 was downregulated. The most appropriate combination of the ratio of Col II/Col I was CD54 and CD44. Cell sorting was performed using a magnetic cell sorting system (MACS) according to CD54 and CD44, and real-time quantitative PCR was performed for the cell subpopulations before and after cell sorting. The expression of collagen type II and aggrecan of the chondrocytes after MACS was higher than that before sorting, but not significantly. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio of CD54 to CD44 could be an adequate candidate as the index of the differentiation status.

  18. Gene expression profiles in granuloma tissue reveal novel diagnostic markers in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Christophi, George P; Caza, Tiffany; Curtiss, Christopher; Gumber, Divya; Massa, Paul T; Landas, Steve K

    2014-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an immune-mediated multisystem disease characterized by the formation of non-caseating granulomas. The pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is unclear, with proposed infectious or environmental antigens triggering an aberrant immune response in susceptible hosts. Multiple pro-inflammatory signaling pathways have been implicated in mediating macrophage activation and granuloma formation in sarcoidosis, including IFN-γ/STAT-1, IL-6/STAT-3, and NF-κB. It is difficult to distinguish sarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases or assess disease severity and treatment response with histopathology alone. Therefore, development of improved diagnostic tools is imperative. Herein, we describe an efficient and reliable technique to classify granulomatous disease through selected gene expression and identify novel genes and cytokine pathways contributing to the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. We quantified the expression of twenty selected mRNAs extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue (n = 38) of normal lung, suture granulomas, sarcoid granulomas, and fungal granulomas. Utilizing quantitative real-time RT-PCR we analyzed the expression of several genes, including IL-6, COX-2, MCP-1, IFN-γ, T-bet, IRF-1, Nox2, IL-33, and eotaxin-1 and revealed differential regulation between suture, sarcoidosis, and fungal granulomas. This is the first study demonstrating that quantification of target gene expression in FFPE tissue biopsies is a potentially effective diagnostic and research tool in sarcoidosis.

  19. Integration of zebrafish fin regeneration genes with expression data of human tumors in silico uncovers potential novel melanoma markers

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Katarzyna B.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration requires expression of a large, unknown number of genes to initiate and maintain cellular processes such as proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, differentiation and migration. A unique model to simulate this process in a controlled manner is the re-growth of the caudal fin of zebrafish after amputation. Within this tissue stem cells differentiate into fibroblasts, epithelial and endothelial cells as well as melanocytes. Many genes implicated in the regeneration process are deregulated in cancer. We therefore undertook a systematic gene expression study to identify genes upregulated during the re-growth of caudal fin tissue. By applying a high stringency cut-off value of 4-fold change, we identified 54 annotated genes significantly overexpressed in regenerating blastema. Further bioinformatics data mining studies showed that 22 out of the 54 regeneration genes where overexpressed in melanoma compared to normal skin or other cancers. Whereas the role of TNC (tenascin C) and FN1 (fibronectin 1) in melanoma development is well documented, implication of MARCKS, RCN3, BAMBI, PEA3/ETV4 and the FK506 family members FKBP7, FKBP10 and FKBP11 in melanoma progression is unclear. Corresponding proteins were detected in melanoma tissue but not in normal skin. High expression of FKBP7, DPYSL5 and MDK was significantly associated with poor survival. We discuss a potential role of these novel melanoma genes, which have promising potential as new therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. PMID:27689402

  20. Transcriptional Activity of HTLV-I Tax Influences the Expression of Marker Genes Associated with Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Francene J.; Wycuff, Diane R.; Marriott, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been identified as the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-I encodes a transcriptional regulatory protein, Tax, which also functions as the viral transforming protein. Through interactions with a number of cellular transcription factors Tax can modulate cellular gene expression. Since the majority of Tax-responsive cellular genes are important regulators of cellular proliferation, the transactivating functions of Tax appear to be necessary for cellular transformation by HTLV-I. Gaining a complete understanding of the broad range of genes regulated by Tax, the temporal pattern of their expression, and their effects on cell function may identify early markers of disease progression mediated by this virus. PMID:11790876

  1. Identification of potential general markers of disease resistance in American oysters, Crassostrea virginica through gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Nikapitiya, Chamilani; McDowell, Ian C; Villamil, Luisa; Muñoz, Pilar; Sohn, SaeBom; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2014-11-01

    Several diseases have a significant impact on American oyster populations in the Atlantic coasts of North America. Knowledge about the responses of oysters to pathogenic challenge could help in identifying potential markers of disease resistance and biomarkers of the health status of an oyster population. A previous analysis of the transcriptome of resistant and susceptible American oysters in response to challenge with the bacterial pathogen Roseovarius crassostreae, as well as sequencing of suppression subtractive hybridization libraries from oysters challenged with the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus, provided a list of genes potentially involved in disease resistance or susceptibility. We investigated the patterns of inducible gene expression of several of these genes in response to experimental challenge with the oyster pathogens R. crassostreae, Vibrio tubiashii, and P. marinus. Oysters showing differential susceptibility to R. crassostreae demonstrated differential patterns of expression of genes coding for immune (serine protease inhibitor-1, SPI1) and stress-related (heat shock protein 70, HSP70; arginine kinase) proteins 30 days after challenge with this bacterial pathogen. Differential patterns of expression of immune (spi1, galectin and a matrix metalloproteinase) and stress-related (hsp70, histone H4, and arginine kinase) genes was observed in hemocytes from adult oysters challenged with P. marinus, but not with V. tubiashii. While levels of spi1 expression in hemocytes collected 8 and 21 days after P. marinus challenge were negatively correlated with parasite load in oysters tissues at the end of the challenge (62 days), levels of expression of hsp70 in hemocytes collected 1-day after challenge were positively correlated with oyster parasite load at 62 days. Our results confirm previous research on the role of serine protease inhibitor-1 in immunity and disease resistance in oysters. They also suggest that HSP70 and histone H4 could be used

  2. Integrated analyses for genetic markers of polycystic ovary syndrome with 9 case-control studies of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenqi; Liu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Ning; Yu, Jun; Zhao, Xiaobo; Hu, Hairong; Zheng, Saihua; Li, Xuelian; Wang, Guiying

    2017-01-10

    Due to genetic heterogeneity and variable diagnostic criteria, genetic studies of polycystic ovary syndrome are particularly challenging. Furthermore, lack of sufficiently large cohorts limits the identification of susceptibility genes contributing to polycystic ovary syndrome. Here, we carried out a systematic search of studies deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database through August 31, 2016. The present analyses included studies with: 1) patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal controls, 2) gene expression profiling of messenger RNA, and 3) sufficient data for our analysis. Ultimately, a total of 9 studies with 13 datasets met the inclusion criteria and were performed for the subsequent integrated analyses. Through comprehensive analyses, there were 13 genetic factors overlapped in all datasets and identified as significant specific genes for polycystic ovary syndrome. After quality control assessment, there were six datasets remained. Further gene ontology enrichment and pathway analyses suggested that differentially expressed genes mainly enriched in oocyte pathways. These findings provide potential molecular markers for diagnosis and prognosis of polycystic ovary syndrome, and need in-depth studies on the exact function and mechanism in polycystic ovary syndrome.

  3. Gender-associated expression of tumor markers and a small gene set in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andres, Sarah A; Smolenkova, Irina A; Wittliff, James L

    2014-06-01

    Breast carcinomas in both genders share pathological features, although differences in incidence, prognosis and survival are reported. Expression of 33 genes was investigated in male and female breast carcinomas in association with ER, PR, HER-2/neu and EGF-receptor. Among 98 male breast cancers, 82 were ER+ and 78 were PR+. ER and PR protein levels were greater in males compared to females, although no differences were observed in ESR1 and PGR expression. A difference was observed in binding affinities of PR but not ER between genders. No differences were observed in HER-2/neu, EGFR protein, or patient age. Expression of NAT1, TBC1D9, IL6ST, RABEP1, PLK1 and LRBA was elevated in carcinomas of males compared to those of females, in which ER status appeared to be related to expression. Over-expression of protein products of these genes represents novel molecular targets for development of gender-specific therapeutics and companion diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene Expression Markers of Efficacy and Resistance to Cetuximab Treatment in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Results from CALGB 80203 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Stephanie M.; Jiang, Chen; Hatch, Ace J.; Shterev, Ivo; Sibley, Alexander B.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Venook, Alan P.; Owzar, Kouros; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Nixon, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples from CALGB 80203 were analyzed for expression of EGFR axis–related genes to identify prognostic or predictive biomarkers for cetuximab treatment. Patients and Methods Patients (238 total) with first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) were randomized to FOLFOX or FOLFIRI chemotherapy ± cetuximab. qRT-PCR analyses were conducted on tissues from 103 patients at baseline to measure gene expression levels of HER-related genes, including amphiregulin (AREG), betacellulin (BTC), NT5E (CD73), DUSP4, EGF, EGFR, epigen (EPGN), epiregulin (EREG), HBEGF, ERBB2 (HER2), ERBB3 (HER3), ERBB4 (HER4), PHLDA1, and TGFA. The interactions between expression levels and treatment with respect to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were modeled using multiplicative Cox proportional hazards models. Results High tumor mRNA levels of HER2 [hazard ratio (HR), 0.64; P = 0.002] and EREG (HR, 0.89; P = 0.016) were prognostic markers associated with longer PFS across all patients. HER3 and CD73 expression levels were identified as potential predictive markers of benefit from cetuximab. In KRAS wild-type (WT) tumors, low HER3 expression was associated with longer OS from cetuximab treatment, whereas high HER3 expression was associated with shorter OS from cetuximab treatment (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 1.15; chemo-only: HR, 0.48; Pinteraction = 0.029). High CD73 expression was associated with longer PFS from cetuximab treatment in patients with KRAS-WT (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 0.91; chemo-only: HR, 1.57; Pinteraction = 0.026) and KRAS-mutant (Mut) tumors (chemo + cetuximab: HR, 0.80; chemo-only: HR, 1.29; P = 0.025). Conclusions Gene expression of HER3 and CD73 was identified as a potential predictive marker for cetuximab. These data implicate HER axis signaling and immune modulation as potential mechanisms of cetuximab action and sensitivity. PMID:25520391

  5. Identification of Gene Markers Associated with Aggressive Meningioma by Filtering across Multiple Sets of Gene Expression Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jourdan E.; Lusis, Eriks A.; Scheck, Adrienne C.; Coons, Stephen W.; Lal, Anita; Perry, Arie; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomasare common intracranial tumors but relatively little is known about the genetic events responsible for their clinical diversity. While recent genomic studies have provided clues, the genes identified often differ among publications. We used microarray expression profiling to identify genes that are differentially expressed, with at least a 4-fold change, between grade I and grade III meningiomas. We filtered this initial set of potential biomarkers through a second cohort of meningiomas and then verified the remaining genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction followed by examination using a third microarray expression cohort. Using this approach, we identified 9 overexpressed (TPX2, RRM2, TOP2A, PI3, BIRC5, CDC2, NUSAP1, DLG7, SOX11) and 2 underexpressed (TIMP3, KCNMA1) genes in grade III vs. grade I meningiomas. As a further validation step, we analyzed these genes in a fourth cohort and found that patients with grade II meningiomas with high topoisomerase 2-α protein expression (greater than 5% labeling-index) had shorter times to death than patients with low expression. We believe that this multistep, multi-cohort approach provides a robust method for reducing false positives while generating a list of reproducible candidate genes that are associated with clinically aggressive meningioma and are suitable for analysis for their potential prognostic value. PMID:21157382

  6. LAPTM4B Gene Expression and Polymorphism as Diagnostic Markers of Breast Cancer in Egyptian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Olfat; Taha, Fatma; Salah, Maha; El-Marzouky, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between LAPTM4B gene polymorphism and the risk of breast cancer among Egyptian female patients. Also, measurement was done of its serum level to evaluate its significance as a diagnostic marker for breast cancer. Methods This case control study was done on 88 breast cancer patients, 40 with fibroadenoma and 80 healthy subjects. Genotyping of the LAPTM4B polymorphism was determined by PCR. Serum LAPTM4B level was measured using ELISA. Results There was a significant difference in the (*1/2+ *2/2) genotypes in breast cancer patients (59.1) compared to the control subjects (43.8%) (P=0.047; OR=1.86; 95% CI =1.01–3.43). The frequency of the allele 2* of the LAPTM4B gene was significantly higher in breast cancer patients (36.4%) than in the control (25.6%) (p=0.034; OR=1.66; 95% CI =1.04–2.65). Genotypes (*1/2+*2/2) were significantly associated with the differential classification of TNM. Serum level of LAPTM4B was significantly higher in breast cancer patients than in control and fibroadenoma and in fibroadenoma patients than in control. In breast cancer patients, serum LAPTM4B was significantly higher in stage III and in large tumor size. Serum LAPTM4B was significantly higher in the cancer patients’ genotypes (*1/2+*2/2). Conclusions Genetic polymorphism of LAPTM4B is a potential risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Serum LAPTM4B may be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for breast cancer. PMID:28356847

  7. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES AS MARKERS OF AGGRESSIVE DISEASE—EGFR AS A FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    CHung, Christine H.; Parker, Joel; Levy, Shawn; Slebos, Robbert J.; Dicker, Adam P.; ROdeck, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that 43 (58%) of 75 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors harbor increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene copy numbers as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. In this study, an increased EGFR copy number was associated with decreased progression-free survival and overall survival of HNSCC patients. However, activated EGFR protein levels are difficult to quantify by immunohistochemistry and are subject to dynamic regulation, specifically receptor downregulation on ligand binding. Therefore, we generated an activated EGFR gene expression signature in an in vitro HaCaT keratinocyte model system to further study genes involved in the EGFR signaling pathway in HNSCC. The results from this model system have suggested that the activated EGFR signature might reflect the activated state of the EGFR pathway in human HNSCC tumors and that it is associated with the increased EGFR gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Furthermore, the activated EGFR signature has provided additional leads, because they are related to co-regulated molecular pathways and associated gene products on activation of EGFR. These could be exploited to refine and optimize combination therapies to be used in conjunction with available EGFR inhibitors in individual HNSCC patients. PMID:17848272

  8. Differential gene expression and apoptosis markers in presymptomatic scrapie affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Lyahyai, Jaber; Filali, Hicham; Marín, Belén; Serrano, Carmen; Monleón, Eva; Moreno, Bernardino; Zaragoza, Pilar; Badiola, Juan José; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Bolea, Rosa

    2012-09-14

    Neuronal loss is one of the characteristics of scrapie neuropathology. Previous analysis of brains from sheep naturally infected with scrapie that were in a terminal stage did not detect a clear induction of apoptosis, although molecular changes were evidenced. As neuronal death could be occurring early in scrapie, we developed a neuropathological and gene expression study of sheep infected with scrapie in a presymptomatic stage. The histopathology, immunolabelling of PrP(Sc), Bax and activated caspase-3, and the analysis of the expression of 7 genes involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis were investigated in the following 4 central nervous system areas: medulla oblongata, diencephalon, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Moreover, TUNEL and NeuN immunolabelling was performed in the medulla oblongata. The PrP(Sc) immunolabelling in the four areas, as well as a neuropil spongiform change, were more evident in the terminal stage than in presymptomatic animals. Cytoplasmic Bax immunostaining was observed in the presymptomatic medulla oblongata. In contrast to symptomatic animals, the immunostaining was not extended to the hypothalamus, indicating the progression of Bax induction during the course of the disease. Although neither caspase-3 immunostaining nor the TUNEL technique detected neurons with apoptosis, NeuN-immunolabelled cell counting determined that presymptomatic animals have already suffered neuronal loss in a lower or equal degree than symptomatic animals. Finally, the gene expression profiles indicated that the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was activated with higher intensity in presymptomatic animals than in symptomatic sheep and confirmed the implication of genes such as BAX or AIF in the disease.

  9. Large-scale production and evaluation of marker-free indica rice IR64 expressing phytoferritin genes.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Norman; Chadha-Mohanty, Prabhjit; Poletti, Susanna; Abrigo, Editha; Atienza, Genelou; Torrizo, Lina; Garcia, Ruby; Dueñas, Conrado; Poncio, Mar Aristeo; Balindong, Jeanette; Manzanilla, Marina; Montecillo, Florencia; Zaidem, Maricris; Barry, Gerard; Hervé, Philippe; Shou, Huxia; Slamet-Loedin, Inez H

    2014-01-01

    Biofortification of rice (Oryza sativa L.) using a transgenic approach to increase the amount of iron in the grain is proposed as a low-cost, reliable, and sustainable solution to help developing countries combat anemia. In this study, we generated and evaluated a large number of rice or soybean ferritin over-accumulators in rice mega-variety IR64, including marker-free events, by introducing soybean or rice ferritin genes into the endosperm for product development. Accumulation of the protein was confirmed by ELISA, in situ immunological detection, and Western blotting. As much as a 37- and 19-fold increase in the expression of ferritin gene in single and co-transformed plants, respectively, and a 3.4-fold increase in Fe content in the grain over the IR64 wild type was achieved using this approach. Agronomic characteristics of a total of 1,860 progenies from 58 IR64 single independent transgenic events and 768 progenies from 27 marker-free transgenic events were evaluated and most trait characteristics did not show a penalty. Grain quality evaluation of high-Fe IR64 transgenic events showed quality similar to that of the wild-type IR64. To understand the effect of transgenes on iron homeostasis, transcript analysis was conducted on a subset of genes involved in iron uptake and loading. Gene expression of the exogenous ferritin gene in grain correlates with protein accumulation and iron concentration. The expression of NAS2 and NAS3 metal transporters increased during the grain milky stage.

  10. Phenotypic analysis of cell surface markers and gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes during monolayer expansion.

    PubMed

    Cournil-Henrionnet, Christel; Huselstein, Céline; Wang, Yun; Galois, Laurent; Mainard, Didier; Decot, Véronique; Netter, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Muller, Sylvaine; Gillet, Pierre; Watrin-Pinzano, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Both chondrocytes and mensenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the most used cell sources for cartilage tissue engineering. However, monolayer expansion to obtain sufficient cells leads to a rapid chondrocyte dedifferentiation and a subsequent ancillary reduced ability of MSCs to differentiate into chondrocytes, thus limiting their application in cartilage repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the monolayer expansion on the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of both cell types, and to find the appropriate compromise between monolayer expansion and the remaining chondrogenic characteristics. To this end, human chondrocytes, isolated enzymatically from femoral head slice, and human MSCs, derived from bone marrow, were maintained in monolayer culture up to passage 5. The respective expressions of cell surface markers (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166) and several chondrogenic-related genes for each passage (P0-P5) of those cells were then analyzed using flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Flow cytometry analyses showed that, during the monolayer expansion, some qualitative and quantitative regulations occur for the expression of cell surface markers. A rapid increase in mRNA expression of type 1 collagen occurs whereas a significant decrease of type 2 collagen and Sox 9 was observed in chondrocytes through the successive passages. On the other hand, the expansion did not induced obvious change in MSCs gene expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that passage 1 might be the up-limit for chondrocytes in order to achieve their subsequent redifferentiation in 3D scaffold. Nevertheless, MSCs could be expanded in monolayer until passage 5 without loosing their undifferentiated phenotypes.

  11. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F.; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  12. Long-term stability of marker gene expression in Prunus subhirtella: a model fruit tree species.

    PubMed

    Maghuly, Fatemeh; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Leopold, Stephan; Khan, Mahmood Ali; Katinger, Hermann; Laimer, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic trees currently are being produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistics. Since trees are particularly suited for long-term evaluations of the impact of the technology, Prunus subhirtella autumno rosa (PAR) was chosen as model fruit tree species and transformed with a reporter gene (uidA) under the control of the 35S promoter. Using Southern and GUS fluorometric techniques, we compared transgene copy numbers and observed stability of transgene expression levels in 34 different transgenic plants, grown under in vitro, greenhouse and screenhouse conditions, over a period of 9 years. An influence of grafting on gene expression was not observed. No silenced transgenic plant was detected. Overall, these results suggest that transgene expression in perennial species, such as fruit trees, remains stable in time and space, over extended periods and in different organs, confirming the value of PAR as model species to study season-dependent regulation in mature stone fruit tissues. While the Agrobacterium-derived Prunus transformants contained one to two copies of the transgenes, 91% of the transgenic events also contained various lengths of the bacterial plasmid backbone, indicating that the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is not as precise as previously perceived. The implications for public acceptance and future applications are discussed.

  13. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profile Analyses Identify CTTN as a Potential Prognostic Marker in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Jin; Jia, Yongxu; Sun, Yan; Tang, Senwei; Fu, Li; Qin, Yanru

    2014-01-01

    Aim Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common fatal malignances of the digestive tract. Its prognosis is poor mainly due to the lack of reliable markers for early detection and prognostic prediction. Here we aim to identify the molecules involved in ESCC carcinogenesis and those as potential markers for prognosis and as new molecular therapeutic targets. Methods We performed genome-wide gene expression profile analyses of 10 primary ESCCs and their adjacent normal tissues by cDNA microarrays representing 47,000 transcripts and variants. Candidate genes were then validated by semi quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), tissue microarrays (TMAs) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. Results Using an arbitrary cutoff line of signal log ratio of ≥1.5 or ≤−1.5, we observed 549 up-regulated genes and 766 down-regulated genes in ESCCs compared with normal esophageal tissues. The functions of 302 differentially expressed genes were associated with cell metabolism, cell adhesion and immune response. Several candidate deregulated genes including four overexpressed (CTTN, DMRT2, MCM10 and SCYA26) and two underexpressed (HMGCS2 and SORBS2) were subsequently verified, which can be served as biomarkers for ESCC. Moreover, overexpression of cortactin (CTTN) was observed in 126/198 (63.6%) of ESCC cases and was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.000), pathologic stage (P = 0.000) and poor survival (P<0.001) of ESCC patients. Furthermore, a significant correlation between CTTN overexpression and shorter disease-specific survival rate was found in different subgroups of ESCC patient stratified by the pathologic stage (P<0.05). Conclusion Our data provide valuable information for establishing molecules as candidates for prognostic and/or as therapeutic targets. PMID:24551190

  14. Vigna unguiculata modulates cholesterol induced cardiac markers, genotoxicity and gene expressions profile in an experimental rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Janeesh, P A; Abraham, Annie

    2013-04-25

    Vigna unguiculata (VU) leaves are edible and used as a leafy vegetable in cuisine from traditional times in India. This study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective effect of VU in cholesterol fed rabbits. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6 animals each and the experimental period was 3 months. Group I-ND [normal diet 40 g feed], Group II-ND + FVU [flavanoid fraction of Vigna unguiculata (150 mg kg (-1) per body weight)], Group III-ND + CH [cholesterol (400 mg)] and Group IV-ND + CH (400 mg) +FVU (150 mg kg(-1) per body weight). After the experimental period, animals were sacrificed and the various parameters, such as cardiac markers, toxicity parameters, genotoxicity and gene expression, were investigated. Cholesterol feeding causes a significant increase in the levels of cardiac marker enzymes, namely lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospokinase (CPK), atherogenic index, toxicity parameters like serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) were elevated. Antioxidant enzyme levels were decreased, lipid peroxidation products in heart tissue and inflammatory markers, namely cyclooxygenase (COX2) and lipooxygenase (LOX15) in peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs), were significantly increased. A genotoxicity study using a Comet assay and gene expression by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of transforming growth factor-b1 (TGF-b1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) from heart tissue showed an altered expression in the disease group. The supplementation of the flavonoid fraction of Vigna unguiculata leaves (FVU) in the CH + FVU group caused the reversal of the above parameters and cardiotoxicity to near normal when compared with the CH group and FVU. This study revealed the cardioprotective nature of Vigna unguiculata in preventing cardiovascular diseases and this effect is attributed to the presence of antioxidants and the antihyperlipidemic properties of the

  15. Prognostic and Predictive Markers in Stage II Colon Cancer: Is There a Role for Gene Expression Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Robin K.; Venook, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional clinical and pathologic risk factors in stage II colon cancer provide limited prognostic information and do not predict response to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers are needed to identify patients with highest recurrence risk who will receive the greatest absolute risk reduction from adjuvant chemotherapy. We review below the evidence for conventional risk factors in node-negative colon cancer patients, followed by a discussion of promising new molecular and genetic markers in this malignancy. Gene expression profiling is an emerging tool with both prognostic and predictive potential in oncology. For stage II colon cancer patients, the Oncotype DX Colon Cancer test is now commercially available as a prognostic marker, and the ColoPrint assay is expected to be released later this year. Current evidence for both of these assays is described below, concluding with a discussion of potential future directions for gene expression profiling in colon cancer risk stratification and treatment decision-making. PMID:21859557

  16. Identification of gene expression-based prognostic markers in the hematopoietic stem cells of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Benner, Axel; Mills, Ken I; Cazzola, Mario; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Perry, Janet; Malcovati, Luca; Della Porta, Matteo G; Jädersten, Martin; Verma, Amit; McDonald, Emma-Jane; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Bullinger, Lars; Wainscoat, James S; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is largely dependent on morphologic examination of bone marrow aspirates. Several criteria that form the basis of the classifications and scoring systems most commonly used in clinical practice are affected by operator-dependent variation. To identify standardized molecular markers that would allow prediction of prognosis, we have used gene expression profiling (GEP) data on CD34+ cells from patients with MDS to determine the relationship between gene expression levels and prognosis. GEP data on CD34+ cells from 125 patients with MDS with a minimum 12-month follow-up since date of bone marrow sample collection were included in this study. Supervised principal components and lasso penalized Cox proportional hazards regression (Coxnet) were used for the analysis. We identified several genes, the expression of which was significantly associated with survival of patients with MDS, including LEF1, CDH1, WT1, and MN1. The Coxnet predictor, based on expression data on 20 genes, outperformed other predictors, including one that additionally used clinical information. Our Coxnet gene signature based on CD34+ cells significantly identified a separation of patients with good or bad prognosis in an independent GEP data set based on unsorted bone marrow mononuclear cells, demonstrating that our signature is robust and may be applicable to bone marrow cells without the need to isolate CD34+ cells. We present a new, valuable GEP-based signature for assessing prognosis in MDS. GEP-based signatures correlating with clinical outcome may significantly contribute to a refined risk classification of MDS.

  17. Search for neuro-endocrine markers (chromogranin A, synaptophysin and VGF) in breast cancers. An integrated approach using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Annaratone, Laura; Medico, Enzo; Rangel, Nelson; Castellano, Isabella; Marchiò, Caterina; Sapino, Anna; Bussolati, Gianni

    2014-09-01

    Discordant data are reported in the literature on the definition, incidence and clinical features of neuroendocrine (NE) carcinomas of the breast. This tumour entity is currently assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) detecting "general" NE markers such as chromogranin A (CHGA) and synaptophysin (SYP), but other markers have been considered as well. In the present study, in addition to CHGA and SYP, we investigated the expression of VGF, a neurotrophin-inducible gene, which is emerging as a new specific NE marker. In order to evaluate the differential expression of these neuro-endocrine markers in breast cancers, we conducted parallel immunohistochemical and gene expression analyses, using PCR, gene array and real-time quantitative PCR procedures. Data obtained in 28 cases were further validated with a meta-analysis of published datasets of 103 breast cancer cases. The value of IHC positivity (irrespective of the percentage of positive cells) was confirmed by over-expression of the related gene. However, the genetic approach emerged as more sensitive, showing over-expression of NE markers in a subset of IHC-negative carcinomas. In conclusion, the present study confirms, by a novel approach, the occurrence of NE differentiation in breast cancers. Over-expression of one or more NE marker (CHGA and/or SYP and/or VGF) characterizes a significant fraction (approximately 10 %) of infiltrative breast cancers.

  18. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1β and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1β mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1β levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment. PMID:17596264

  19. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1beta and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1beta mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1beta levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment.

  20. A Novel ‘Gene Insertion/Marker Out’ (GIMO) Method for Transgene Expression and Gene Complementation in Rodent Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Mohammed; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Ramesar, Jai; Klop, Onny; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M. D.; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the biology of malaria parasites has greatly benefited from the application of reverse genetic technologies, in particular through the analysis of gene deletion mutants and studies on transgenic parasites that express heterologous or mutated proteins. However, transfection in Plasmodium is limited by the paucity of drug-selectable markers that hampers subsequent genetic modification of the same mutant. We report the development of a novel ‘gene insertion/marker out’ (GIMO) method for two rodent malaria parasites, which uses negative selection to rapidly generate transgenic mutants ready for subsequent modifications. We have created reference mother lines for both P. berghei ANKA and P. yoelii 17XNL that serve as recipient parasites for GIMO-transfection. Compared to existing protocols GIMO-transfection greatly simplifies and speeds up the generation of mutants expressing heterologous proteins, free of drug-resistance genes, and requires far fewer laboratory animals. In addition we demonstrate that GIMO-transfection is also a simple and fast method for genetic complementation of mutants with a gene deletion or mutation. The implementation of GIMO-transfection procedures should greatly enhance Plasmodium reverse-genetic research. PMID:22216235

  1. Altered expression of oligodendrocyte and neuronal marker genes predicts the clinical onset of autoimmune encephalomyelitis and indicates the effectiveness of multiple sclerosis-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Evangelidou, Maria; Karamita, Maria; Vamvakas, Sotiris-Spyros; Szymkowski, David E; Probert, Lesley

    2014-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a valuable model for studying immunopathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) and for exploring the interface between autoimmune responses and CNS tissue that ultimately leads to lesion development. In this study, we measured gene expression in mouse spinal cord during myelin oligodendrocyte gp35-55 peptide-induced EAE, using quantitative RT-PCR, to identify gene markers that monitor individual hallmark pathological processes. We defined a small panel of genes whose longitudinal expression patterns provided insight into the timing, interrelationships, and mechanisms of individual disease processes and the efficacy of therapeutics for the treatment of MS. Earliest transcriptional changes were upregulation of Il17a and sharp downregulation of neuronal and oligodendrocyte marker genes preceding clinical disease onset, whereas neuroinflammatory markers progressively increased as symptoms and tissue lesions developed. EAE-induced gene-expression changes were not altered in mice deficient in IKKβ in cells of the myeloid lineage compared with controls, but the administration of a selective inhibitor of soluble TNF to mice from the day of immunization delayed changes in the expression of innate inflammation, myelin, and neuron markers from the presymptomatic phase. Proof of principle that the gene panel shows drug screening potential was obtained using a well-established MS therapeutic, glatiramer acetate. Prophylactic treatment of mice with glatiramer acetate normalized gene marker expression, and this correlated with the level of therapeutic success. These results show that neurons and oligodendrocytes are highly sensitive to CNS-directed autoimmunity before the development of clinical symptoms and immunopathology and reveal a role for soluble TNF in mediating the earliest changes in gene expression.

  2. In vivo profiling of hypoxic gene expression in gliomas using the hypoxia marker EF5 and laser-capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Diane; Karar, Jayashree; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Kumanova, Monika; Jenkins, Kevin W.; Tobias, John W.; Baldwin, Donald; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Evans, Sydney M.; Alarcon, Rodolfo; Maity, Amit; Koch, Cameron; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia is a key determinant of tumor aggressiveness, yet little is known regarding hypoxic global gene regulation in vivo. We have employed the hypoxia marker EF5 coupled with laser capture microdissection to isolate RNA from viable hypoxic and normoxic regions of 9L experimental gliomas. Through microarray analysis, we have identified several mRNAs (including the HIF targets Vegf, Glut-1 and Hsp27) with increased levels under hypoxia compared to normoxia both in vitro and in vivo. However, we also found striking differences between the global in vitro and in vivo hypoxic mRNA profiles. Intriguingly, the mRNA levels of a substantial number of immunomodulatory and DNA repair proteins including CXCL9, CD3D and RAD51 were found to be downregulated in hypoxic areas in vivo, consistent with a pro-tumorigenic role of hypoxia in solid tumors. Immunohistochemical staining verified increased HSP27 and decreased RAD51 protein levels in hypoxic vs. normoxic tumor regions. Moreover, CD8+ T cells which are recruited to tumors upon stimulation by CXCL9 and CXCL10, were largely excluded from viable hypoxic areas in vivo. This is the first study to analyze the influence of hypoxia on mRNA levels in vivo and can be readily adapted to obtain a comprehensive picture of hypoxic regulation of gene expression and its influence on biological functions in solid tumors. PMID:21266355

  3. Assessing fitness costs for transgenic Aedes aegypti expressing the GFP marker and transposase genes.

    PubMed

    Irvin, Nic; Hoddle, Mark S; O'Brochta, David A; Carey, Bryan; Atkinson, Peter W

    2004-01-20

    The development of transgenic mosquitoes that are refractory to the transmission of human diseases such as malaria, dengue, and yellow fever has received much interest due to the ability to transform a number of vector mosquito species with transposable elements. Transgenic strains of mosquitoes have been generated with molecular techniques that exhibit a reduced capacity to transmit pathogens. These advancements have led to questions regarding the fitness of transgenic mosquitoes and the ability of transformed mosquitoes to compete and effectively spread beneficial genes through nontransformed field populations, the core requirement of a genetically based control strategy aimed at reducing the spread of mosquito-borne human disease. Here we examine the impact of transgenesis on the fitness of Aedes aegypti, a mosquito that transmits yellow fever. Mosquitoes were altered with two types of transgene, the enhanced GFP gene and two transposase genes from the Hermes and MOS1 transposable elements. We examined the effects of these elements on the survivorship, longevity, fecundity, sex ratio, and sterility of transformed mosquitoes and compared results to the nontransformed laboratory strain. We show that demographic parameters are significantly diminished in transgenic mosquitoes relative to the untransformed laboratory strain. Reduced fitness in transgenic mosquitoes has important implications for the development and utilization of this technology for control programs based on manipulative molecular modification.

  4. Cytoskeletal proteins and stem cell markers gene expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after different periods of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovich, J. G.; Zhambalova, A. P.; Romanov, Yu. A.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are present in a variety of tissues during prenatal and postnatal human development. In adult organism, they are prevalent in bone marrow and supposed to be involved in space-flight induced osteopenia. We studied expression of various genes in human bone marrow MSCs after different terms of simulated microgravity (SMG) provided by Random Positioning Machine. Simulated microgravity induced transient changes in expression level of genes associated with actin cytoskeleton, especially after 48 h of SMG. However, after 120 h exposure in SMG partial restoration of gene expression levels (relative to the control) was found. Similar results were obtained with bmMSCs subjected to 24 h readaptation in static state after 24 h in SMG. Analysis of 84 genes related to identification, growth and differentiation of stem cells revealed that expression of nine genes was changed slightly after 48 h in SMG. More pronounced changes in gene expression of "stem cells markers" were observed after 120 h of simulated microgravity. Among 84 investigated genes, 30 were up-regulated and 24 were down-regulated. Finally, MSCs osteogenesis induced by long-term (10-20 days) simulation of microgravity was accompanied by down-regulation of gene expression of the main osteogenic differentiation markers ( ALPL, OMD) and master transcription osteogenic factor of MSCs ( Runx2). Thus, our study demonstrated that changes in expression level of some genes associated with actin cytoskeleton and stem cell markers are supposed to be one of the mechanisms, which contribute to precursor's cellular adaptation to the microgravity conditions. These results can clarify genomic mechanisms through which SMG reduces osteogenic differentiation of bmMSCs.

  5. Cytosine deaminase as a negative selectable marker for the microalgal chloroplast: a strategy for the isolation of nuclear mutations that affect chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2014-12-01

    Negative selectable markers are useful tools for forward-genetic screens aimed at identifying trans-acting factors that are required for expression of specific genes. Transgenic lines harbouring the marker fused to a gene element, such as a promoter, may be mutagenized to isolate loss-of-function mutants able to survive under selection. Such a strategy allows the molecular dissection of factors that are essential for expression of the gene. Expression of individual chloroplast genes in plants and algae typically requires one or more nuclear-encoded factors that act at the post-transcriptional level, often through interaction with the 5' UTR of the mRNA. To study such nuclear control further, we have developed the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase gene codA as a conditional negative selectable marker for use in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that a codon-optimized variant of codA with three amino acid substitutions confers sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) when expressed in the chloroplast under the control of endogenous promoter/5' UTR elements from the photosynthetic genes psaA or petA. UV mutagenesis of the psaA transgenic line allowed recovery of 5-FC-resistant, photosynthetically deficient lines harbouring mutations in the nuclear gene for the factor TAA1 that is required for psaA translation. Similarly, the petA line was used to isolate mutants of the petA mRNA stability factor MCA1 and the translation factor TCA1. The codA marker may be used to identify critical residues in known nuclear factors and to aid the discovery of additional factors required for expression of chloroplast genes.

  6. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    PubMed

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  7. Expression profiling of marker genes responsive to the defence-associated phytohormones salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Kouzai, Yusuke; Kimura, Mamiko; Yamanaka, Yurie; Watanabe, Megumi; Matsui, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Ichinose, Yuki; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Onda, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Keiichi; Noutoshi, Yoshiteru

    2016-03-02

    Brachypodium distachyon is a promising model plants for grasses. Infections of Brachypodium by various pathogens that severely impair crop production have been reported, and the species accordingly provides an alternative platform for investigating molecular mechanisms of pathogen virulence and plant disease resistance. To date, we have a broad picture of plant immunity only in Arabidopsis and rice; therefore, Brachypodium may constitute a counterpart that displays the commonality and uniqueness of defence systems among plant species. Phytohormones play key roles in plant biotic stress responses, and hormone-responsive genes are used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate disease resistance responses during pathogen infection. For these purposes, defence-related phytohormone marker genes expressed at time points suitable for defence-response monitoring are needed. Information about their expression profiles over time as well as their response specificity is also helpful. However, useful marker genes are still rare in Brachypodium. We selected 34 candidates for Brachypodium marker genes on the basis of protein-sequence similarity to known marker genes used in Arabidopsis and rice. Brachypodium plants were treated with the defence-related phytohormones salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, and their transcription levels were measured 24 and 48 h after treatment. Two genes for salicylic acid, 7 for jasmonic acid and 2 for ethylene were significantly induced at either or both time points. We then focused on 11 genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) 1 protein and compared their expression patterns with those of Arabidopsis and rice. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Brachypodium contains several PR1-family genes similar to rice genes. Our expression profiling revealed that regulation patterns of some PR1 genes as well as of markers identified for defence-related phytohormones are closely related to those in rice. We propose that the Brachypodium immune

  8. Novel potential ALL low-risk markers revealed by gene expression profiling with new high-throughput SSH-CCS-PCR.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Gunaratne, P; Peterson, L E; Khurana, D; Walsham, N; Loulseged, H; Karni, R J; Roussel, E; Gibbs, R A; Margolin, J F; Gingras, M C

    2003-09-01

    The current systems of risk grouping in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) fail to predict therapeutic success in 10-35% of patients. To identify better predictive markers of clinical behavior in ALL, we have developed an integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, concatenated cDNA sequencing, and reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative PCR. Using this approach, a total of 600 differentially expressed genes were identified between t(4;11) ALL and pre-B ALL with no determinant chromosomal translocation. The expression of 67 genes was analyzed in different cytogenetic ALL subgroups and B lymphocytes isolated from healthy donors. Three genes, BACH1, TP53BPL, and H2B/S, were consistently expressed as a significant cluster associated with the low-risk ALL subgroups. A total of 42 genes were differentially expressed in ALL vs normal B lymphocytes, with no specific association with any particular ALL subgroups. The remaining 22 genes were part of a specific expression profile associated with the hyperdiploid, t(12;21), or t(4;11) subgroups. Using an unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis, the discriminating power of these specific expression profiles allowed the clustering of patients according to their subgroups. These genes could help to understand the difference in treatment response and become therapeutical targets to improve ALL clinical outcomes.

  9. Coordinated gene expression of neuroinflammatory and cell signaling markers in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during human brain development and aging.

    PubMed

    Primiani, Christopher T; Ryan, Veronica H; Rao, Jagadeesh S; Cam, Margaret C; Ahn, Kwangmi; Modi, Hiren R; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2014-01-01

    Age changes in expression of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes are not well characterized during human brain development and senescence. Knowing these changes may elucidate structural, metabolic, and functional brain processes over the lifespan, as well vulnerability to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative diseases. Expression levels of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes in the human brain are coordinated over the lifespan and underlie changes in phenotypic networks or cascades. We used a large-scale microarray dataset from human prefrontal cortex, BrainCloud, to quantify age changes over the lifespan, divided into Development (0 to 21 years, 87 brains) and Aging (22 to 78 years, 144 brains) intervals, in transcription levels of 39 genes. Gene expression levels followed different trajectories over the lifespan. Many changes were intercorrelated within three similar groups or clusters of genes during both Development and Aging, despite different roles of the gene products in the two intervals. During Development, changes were related to reported neuronal loss, dendritic growth and pruning, and microglial events; TLR4, IL1R1, NFKB1, MOBP, PLA2G4A, and PTGS2 expression increased in the first years of life, while expression of synaptic genes GAP43 and DBN1 decreased, before reaching plateaus. During Aging, expression was upregulated for potentially pro-inflammatory genes such as NFKB1, TRAF6, TLR4, IL1R1, TSPO, and GFAP, but downregulated for neurotrophic and synaptic integrity genes such as BDNF, NGF, PDGFA, SYN, and DBN1. Coordinated changes in gene transcription cascades underlie changes in synaptic, neurotrophic, and inflammatory phenotypic networks during brain Development and Aging. Early postnatal expression changes relate to neuronal, glial, and myelin growth and synaptic pruning events, while late Aging is associated with pro-inflammatory and synaptic loss changes. Thus, comparable transcriptional regulatory networks that operate

  10. Coordinated Gene Expression of Neuroinflammatory and Cell Signaling Markers in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex during Human Brain Development and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Primiani, Christopher T.; Ryan, Veronica H.; Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Cam, Margaret C.; Ahn, Kwangmi; Modi, Hiren R.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Age changes in expression of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes are not well characterized during human brain development and senescence. Knowing these changes may elucidate structural, metabolic, and functional brain processes over the lifespan, as well vulnerability to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative diseases. Hypothesis Expression levels of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes in the human brain are coordinated over the lifespan and underlie changes in phenotypic networks or cascades. Methods We used a large-scale microarray dataset from human prefrontal cortex, BrainCloud, to quantify age changes over the lifespan, divided into Development (0 to 21 years, 87 brains) and Aging (22 to 78 years, 144 brains) intervals, in transcription levels of 39 genes. Results Gene expression levels followed different trajectories over the lifespan. Many changes were intercorrelated within three similar groups or clusters of genes during both Development and Aging, despite different roles of the gene products in the two intervals. During Development, changes were related to reported neuronal loss, dendritic growth and pruning, and microglial events; TLR4, IL1R1, NFKB1, MOBP, PLA2G4A, and PTGS2 expression increased in the first years of life, while expression of synaptic genes GAP43 and DBN1 decreased, before reaching plateaus. During Aging, expression was upregulated for potentially pro-inflammatory genes such as NFKB1, TRAF6, TLR4, IL1R1, TSPO, and GFAP, but downregulated for neurotrophic and synaptic integrity genes such as BDNF, NGF, PDGFA, SYN, and DBN1. Conclusions Coordinated changes in gene transcription cascades underlie changes in synaptic, neurotrophic, and inflammatory phenotypic networks during brain Development and Aging. Early postnatal expression changes relate to neuronal, glial, and myelin growth and synaptic pruning events, while late Aging is associated with pro-inflammatory and synaptic loss changes. Thus, comparable

  11. Transcriptomics of the late gestation ovine fetal brain: modeling the co-expression of immune marker genes.

    PubMed

    Rabaglino, Maria B; Keller-Wood, Maureen; Wood, Charles E

    2014-11-19

    Major changes in gene expression occur in the fetal brain to modulate the function of this organ postnatally. Thus, factors can alter the genomics of the fetal brain, predisposing to neurological disorders later in life. We hypothesized that the physiological dynamics of the immune system transcriptome of the fetal brain during the last stage of gestation will reveal patterns of immune function and development in the developing brain. In this study we applied weighted gene co-expression analysis of microarrays performed on ovine fetal brain samples, to model the changes in gene expression throughout the second half of gestation. Clusters of co-expressed genes that strongly increase in expression toward the first day of extra-uterine life are related to the hematopoietic lineage, while activation of immune pathways is induced after birth. Moreover, the pattern of gene expression suggests induction of tolerance mechanisms, probably necessary to protect highly produced proteins--such as myelin basic protein--from an autoimmune attack. This study provides insight into the dramatic changes in gene expression that take place in the brain during the fetal life, especially during the last stage of gestation, and suggests that the immune system may have an important role in maturation of the fetal brain, which if disrupted or altered, could have negative consequences in postnatal life.

  12. Over-expression of dopamine D2 receptor and inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes in drug-naive schizophrenic peripheral blood lymphocytes as potential diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Zvara, Agnes; Szekeres, György; Janka, Zoltán; Kelemen, János Z; Cimmer, Csongor; Sántha, Miklós; Puskás, László G

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3) were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

  13. Gene expression profiling of single circulating tumor cells in ovarian cancer - Establishment of a multi-marker gene panel.

    PubMed

    Blassl, Christina; Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Webers, Alessandra; Wimberger, Pauline; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2016-08-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of ovarian cancer patients was shown to correlate with decreased overall survival, whereby CTCs with epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) or stem-like traits are supposed to be involved in metastatic progression and recurrence. Thus, investigating the transcriptional profiles of CTCs might help to identify therapy resistant tumor cells and to overcome treatment failure. For this purpose, we established a multi-marker panel for the molecular characterization of single CTCs, detecting epithelial (EpCAM, Muc-1, CK5/7), EMT (N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snai1/2, CD117, CD146, CD49f) and stem cell (CD44, ALDH1A1, Nanog, SOX2, Notch1/4, Oct4, Lin28) associated transcripts. First primer specificity and PCR-performance of the multiplex-RT-PCRs were successfully validated on genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from OvCar3 cells. The assay sensitivity of the epithelial panel was evaluated by adding defined numbers of tumor cells into the blood of healthy donors and performing a subsequent immunomagnetic tumor cell enrichment (AdnaTest OvarianCancerSelect), resulting in a 100% concordance for the epithelial markers EpCAM and Muc-1 to the AdnaTest OvarianCancerDetect. Additionally, by processing blood from ovarian cancer patients, high assay sensitivity could be verified. In blood of healthy donors no signals for epithelial markers were detected, for EMT and stem cell markers, however, signals were obtained mainly originating from leukocytes which calls for single cell analysis. To that aim by using the ovarian cancer cell line OvCar3, we successfully established a workflow enabling the characterization of single CTCs. It consists of a density gradient-dependent enrichment for nucleated cells, a depletion of CD45-positive cells of hematopoietic origin followed by immunofluorescent labeling of CTCs by EpCAM and Muc-1. Single CTCs are then isolated by micromanipulation and processed for panel gene expression profiling. Finally

  14. 18F-FDG imaging of human atherosclerotic carotid plaques reflects gene expression of the key hypoxia marker HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette F; Højgaard, Liselotte; Sillesen, Henrik; Kjær, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the association between gene expression of key molecular markers of hypoxia and inflammation in atherosclerotic carotid lesions with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) uptake as determined clinically by positron emission tomography (PET). Studies using PET have demonstrated 18F-FDG-uptake in patients with confirmed plaques of the carotid artery. Inflammatory active or “vulnerable” plaques progressively increase in bulk, develop necrotic cores, poor vessel-wall vascularization and become prone to hypoxia. We used quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (qPCR) to determine gene expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) on plaques recovered by carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in 18 patients. Gene expression was compared with 18F-FDG-uptake quantified as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on co-registered PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed the day before CEA. Immunohistochemistry was used to validate target-gene protein expression. In univariate linear regression analysis HIF-1α was significantly correlated with 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax) as was CD68. A two-tailed Pearson regression model demonstrated that HIF-1α and CD68 gene expression co-variated and accordingly when entering the variables into multivariate linear regression models with SUV-values as dependent variables, HIF-1α was eliminated in the final models. 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax) is correlated with HIF-1α gene expression indicating an association between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in vivo. The marker of inflammation CD68 is also associated with 18F-FDG-uptake (SUVmax). As CD68 and HIF-1α gene expression co-variate their information is overlapping. PMID:24116346

  15. Altered gene expression and repressed markers of autophagy in skeletal muscle of insulin resistant patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Kampmann, Ulla; Hedegaard, Jakob; Thorsen, Kasper; Nordentoft, Iver; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the gene expression profile in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to determine associated signaling pathways. Gene expression profiles were examined by whole transcriptome, strand-specific RNA-sequencing and associated signaling was determined by western blot. We identified 117 differentially expressed gene transcripts. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis related these differences to abnormal muscle morphology and mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite a ~5-fold difference in plasma insulin, we did not observe any difference in phosphorylation of AKT or AS160, although other insulin-sensitive cascades, as mTOR/4EBP1, had retained their sensitivity. Autophagy-related gene (ATG14, RB1CC1/FIP200, GABARAPL1, SQSTM1/p62, and WIPI1) and protein (LC3BII, SQSTM1/p62 and ATG5) expression were decreased in skeletal muscle from the patients, and this was associated with a trend to increased phosphorylation of the insulin-sensitive regulatory transcription factor FOXO3a. These data show that gene expression is highly altered and related to mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal morphology in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with T2D, and that this is associated with decreased expression of autophagy-related genes and proteins. We speculate that prolonged treatment with high doses of insulin may suppress autophagy thereby generating a vicious cycle maintaining insulin resistance. PMID:28252104

  16. Study of lactoferrin gene expression in human and mouse adipose tissue, human preadipocytes and mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. Association with adipogenic and inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Serrano, Marta; Sabater, Mònica; Ortega, Francisco; Serino, Matteo; Pueyo, Neus; Luche, Elodie; Waget, Aurelie; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José Ignacio; Ricart, Wifredo; Burcelin, Remy; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Lactoferrin is considered an epithelial protein present in different gland secretions. Administration of exogenous lactoferrin is also known to modulate adipogenesis and insulin action in human adipocytes. Here, we aimed to investigate lactoferrin gene expression (real-time polymerase chain reaction) and protein (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) levels in human (n=143) and mice adipose tissue samples, in adipose tissue fractions and during human preadipocyte and 3T3-L1 cell line differentiation, evaluating the effects of inducers (rosiglitazone) and disruptors (inflammatory factors) of adipocyte differentiation. Lactoferrin (LTF) gene and protein were detectable at relatively high levels in whole adipose tissue and isolated adipocytes in direct association with low-density lipoprotein-related protein 1 (LRP1, its putative receptor). Obese subjects with type 2 diabetes and increased triglycerides had the lowest levels of LTF gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Specifically, LTF gene expression was significantly increased in adipocytes, mainly from lean subjects, increasing during differentiation in parallel to adipogenic genes and gene markers of lipid droplets. The induction or disruption of adipogenesis led to concomitant changes (increase and decrease, respectively) of lactoferrin levels during adipocyte differentiation also in parallel to gene markers of adipogenesis and lipid droplet development. The administration of lactoferrin led to autopotentiated increased expression of the LTF gene. The decreased lactoferrin mRNA levels in association with obesity and diabetes were replicated in mice adipose tissue. In conclusion, this is the first observation, to our knowledge, of lactoferrin gene expression in whole adipose tissue and isolated adipocytes, increasing during adipogenesis and suggesting a possible contribution in adipose tissue physiology through LRP1.

  17. Molecular marker genes for ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Treesearch

    Shiv Hiremath; Carolyn McQuattie; Gopi Podila; Jenise. Bauman

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a mutually beneficial association very commonly found among most vascular plants. Formation of mycorrhiza happens only between compatible partners and predicting this is often accomplished through a trial and error process. We investigated the possibility of using expression of symbiosis specific genes as markers to predict the formation of...

  18. Establishing Zebrafish as a Novel Exercise Model: Swimming Economy, Swimming-Enhanced Growth and Muscle Growth Marker Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Mireia; Brittijn, Sebastiaan A.; Burgerhout, Erik; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Spaink, Herman P.; Planas, Josep V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Zebrafish has been largely accepted as a vertebrate multidisciplinary model but its usefulness as a model for exercise physiology has been hampered by the scarce knowledge on its swimming economy, optimal swimming speeds and cost of transport. Therefore, we have performed individual and group-wise swimming experiments to quantify swimming economy and to demonstrate the exercise effects on growth in adult zebrafish. Methodology/Principal Findings Individual zebrafish (n = 10) were able to swim at a critical swimming speed (Ucrit) of 0.548±0.007 m s−1 or 18.0 standard body lengths (BL) s−1. The optimal swimming speed (Uopt) at which energetic efficiency is highest was 0.396±0.019 m s−1 (13.0 BL s−1) corresponding to 72.26±0.29% of Ucrit. The cost of transport at optimal swimming speed (COTopt) was 25.23±4.03 µmol g−1 m−1. A group-wise experiment was conducted with zebrafish (n = 83) swimming at Uopt for 6 h day−1 for 5 days week−1 for 4 weeks vs. zebrafish (n = 84) that rested during this period. Swimming zebrafish increased their total body length by 5.6% and body weight by 41.1% as compared to resting fish. For the first time, a highly significant exercise-induced growth is demonstrated in adult zebrafish. Expression analysis of a set of muscle growth marker genes revealed clear regulatory roles in relation to swimming-enhanced growth for genes such as growth hormone receptor b (ghrb), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor a (igf1ra), troponin C (stnnc), slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1), troponin I2 (tnni2), myosin heavy polypeptide 2 (myhz2) and myostatin (mstnb). Conclusions/Significance From the results of our study we can conclude that zebrafish can be used as an exercise model for enhanced growth, with implications in basic, biomedical and applied sciences, such as aquaculture. PMID:21217817

  19. A Multiplex High-Throughput Gene Expression Assay to Simultaneously Detect Disease and Functional Markers in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Marc; Corneo, Barbara; Davis, Janine; Wan, Qin; Miyagishima, Kiyoharu Joshua; King, Rebecca; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Marugan, Juan; Sharma, Ruchi; Shure, Michael; Temple, Sally; Miller, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing interest in the development of lineage-specific cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for use in cell therapies and drug discovery. Although in most cases differentiated cells show features of the desired lineage, they retain fetal gene expression and do not fully mature into “adult-like” cells. Such cells may not serve as an effective therapy because, once implanted, immature cells pose the risk of uncontrolled growth. Therefore, there is a need to optimize lineage-specific stem cell differentiation protocols to produce cells that no longer express fetal genes and have attained “adult-like” phenotypes. Toward that goal, it is critical to develop assays that simultaneously measure cell function and disease markers in high-throughput format. Here, we use a multiplex high-throughput gene expression assay that simultaneously detects endogenous expression of multiple developmental, functional, and disease markers in iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We optimized protocols to differentiate iPS cell-derived RPE that was then grown in 96- and 384-well plates. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate differential expression of eight genes in iPS cells, iPS cell-derived RPE at two different differentiation stages, and primary human RPE using this multiplex assay. The data obtained from the multiplex gene expression assay are significantly correlated with standard quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based measurements, confirming the ability of this high-throughput assay to measure relevant gene expression changes. This assay provides the basis to screen for compounds that improve RPE function and maturation and target disease pathways, thus providing the basis for effective treatments of several retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:24873859

  20. Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Leaf Tissues of Cultivated Peanuts and Development of EST-SSR Markers and Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baozhu; Chen, Xiaoping; Hong, Yanbin; Liang, Xuanqiang; Dang, Phat; Brenneman, Tim; Holbrook, Corley; Culbreath, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Peanut is vulnerable to a range of foliar diseases such as spotted wilt caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), early (Cercospora arachidicola) and late (Cercosporidium personatum) leaf spots, southern stem rot (Sclerotium rolfsii), and sclerotinia blight (Sclerotinia minor). In this study, we report the generation of 17,376 peanut expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from leaf tissues of a peanut cultivar (Tifrunner, resistant to TSWV and leaf spots) and a breeding line (GT-C20, susceptible to TSWV and leaf spots). After trimming vector and discarding low quality sequences, a total of 14,432 high-quality ESTs were selected for further analysis and deposition to GenBank. Sequence clustering resulted in 6,888 unique ESTs composed of 1,703 tentative consensus (TCs) sequences and 5185 singletons. A large number of ESTs (5717) representing genes of unknown functions were also identified. Among the unique sequences, there were 856 EST-SSRs identified. A total of 290 new EST-based SSR markers were developed and examined for amplification and polymorphism in cultivated peanut and wild species. Resequencing information of selected amplified alleles revealed that allelic diversity could be attributed mainly to differences in repeat type and length in the SSR regions. In addition, a few additional INDEL mutations and substitutions were observed in the regions flanking the microsatellite regions. In addition, some defense-related transcripts were also identified, such as putative oxalate oxidase (EU024476) and NBS-LRR domains. EST data in this study have provided a new source of information for gene discovery and development of SSR markers in cultivated peanut. A total of 16931 ESTs have been deposited to the NCBI GenBank database with accession numbers ES751523 to ES768453. PMID:19584933

  1. Brain Region–Specific Alterations in the Gene Expression of Cytokines, Immune Cell Markers and Cholinergic System Components during Peripheral Endotoxin–Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Harold A; Dancho, Meghan; Regnier-Golanov, Angelique; Nasim, Mansoor; Ochani, Mahendar; Olofsson, Peder S; Ahmed, Mohamed; Miller, Edmund J; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Golanov, Eugene; Metz, Christine N; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by excessive peripheral immune responses are associated with diverse alterations in brain function, and brain-derived neural pathways regulate peripheral inflammation. Important aspects of this bidirectional peripheral immune–brain communication, including the impact of peripheral inflammation on brain region–specific cytokine responses, and brain cholinergic signaling (which plays a role in controlling peripheral cytokine levels), remain unclear. To provide insight, we studied gene expression of cytokines, immune cell markers and brain cholinergic system components in the cortex, cerebellum, brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum and thalamus in mice after an intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide injection. Endotoxemia was accompanied by elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and other cytokines and brain region–specific increases in Il1b (the highest increase, relative to basal level, was in cortex; the lowest increase was in cerebellum) and Il6 (highest increase in cerebellum; lowest increase in striatum) mRNA expression. Gene expression of brain Gfap (astrocyte marker) was also differentially increased. However, Iba1 (microglia marker) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions in parallel with morphological changes, indicating microglia activation. Brain choline acetyltransferase (Chat ) mRNA expression was decreased in the striatum, acetylcholinesterase (Ache) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and increased in the hippocampus, and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (Chrm1) mRNA expression was decreased in the cortex and the brainstem. These results reveal a previously unrecognized regional specificity in brain immunoregulatory and cholinergic system gene expression in the context of peripheral inflammation and are of interest for designing future antiinflammatory approaches. PMID:25299421

  2. Gene expression profiling to identify markers associated with deregulated hTERT in HPV-transformed keratinocytes and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Jillian; Wilting, Saskia M; Meijer, Chris J L M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Ylstra, Bauke; Snijders, Peter J F; Steenbergen, Renske D M

    2008-02-15

    Although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection plays a major role in the development of cervical cancer, additive oncogenic events are involved as well. One key event involves increased activity of telomerase resulting from a deregulated expression of its catalytic subunit hTERT. Our previous microcell-mediated chromosome transfer studies revealed that introduction of human chromosome 6 in the HPV16-immortalized keratinocyte cell line FK16A and in the HPV16-containing cervical cancer cell line SiHa induced growth arrest, resulting from a repression of hTERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity. Here, this model was used to analyze expression profiles associated with hTERT deregulation in HPV-transformed cells. Microarray expression analysis of 12 FK16A/chromosome 6 hybrids, 4 of which were negative for endogenous hTERT and 8 of which were positive for endogenous hTERT, resulted in the identification of 164 differentially expressed genes. Differential expression of a selection of 5 genes was verified by real-time RT-PCR. Of these 164 genes, 32 were also differentially expressed in other HPV transformed cells with deregulated hTERT. For 2 of these genes, encoding AQP3 and MGP, altered expression in hTERT positive cervical carcinomas was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Moreover, increased MGP protein expression was significantly more frequent in high-grade cervical premalignant lesions with elevated hTERT mRNA expression compared to those without. In summary, we identified 32 candidate biomarkers for deregulated hTERT mRNA expression, which may enable the identification of cervical premalignant lesions that are at highest risk to progress to invasive cancer.

  3. Expression of stemness genes in primary breast cancer tissues: the role of SOX2 as a prognostic marker for detection of early recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Pistilli, Barbara; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mariani, Paola; Santinelli, Alfredo; Latini, Luciano; Galderisi, Umberto; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The events leading to breast cancer (BC) progression or recurrence are not completely understood and new prognostic markers aiming at identifying high risk-patients and to develop suitable therapy are highly demanded. Experimental evidences found in cancer cells a deregulated expression of some genes involved in governance of stem cell properties and demonstrated a relationship between stemness genes overexpression and poorly differentiated BC subtypes. In the present study 140 primary invasive BC specimens were collected. The expression profiles of 13 genes belonging to the OCT3/SOX2/NANOG/KLF4 core circuitry by RT-PCR were analyzed and any correlation between their expression and the BC clinic-pathological features (CPfs) and prognosis was investigated. In our cohort (117 samples), NANOG, GDF3 and SOX2 significantly correlated with grade 2, Nodes negative status and higher KI67 proliferation index, respectively (p=0.019, p=0.029, p= 0.035). According to multivariate analysis, SOX2 expression resulted independently associated with increased risk of recurrence (HR= 2,99; p= p=0,004) as well as Nodes status (HR=2,44; p=0,009) and T-size >1 (HR=1,77; p=0,035). Our study provides further proof of the suitable use of stemness genes in BC management. Interestingly, a prognostic role of SOX2, which seems to be a suitable marker of early recurrence irrespective of other clinicopathological features. PMID:25127259

  4. Expression of stemness genes in primary breast cancer tissues: the role of SOX2 as a prognostic marker for detection of early recurrence.

    PubMed

    Finicelli, Mauro; Benedetti, Giovanni; Squillaro, Tiziana; Pistilli, Barbara; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mariani, Paola; Santinelli, Alfredo; Latini, Luciano; Galderisi, Umberto; Giordano, Antonio

    2014-10-30

    The events leading to breast cancer (BC) progression or recurrence are not completely understood and new prognostic markers aiming at identifying high risk-patients and to develop suitable therapy are highly demanded. Experimental evidences found in cancer cells a deregulated expression of some genes involved in governance of stem cell properties and demonstrated a relationship between stemness genes overexpression and poorly differentiated BC subtypes. In the present study 140 primary invasive BC specimens were collected. The expression profiles of 13 genes belonging to the OCT3/SOX2/NANOG/KLF4 core circuitry by RT-PCR were analyzed and any correlation between their expression and the BC clinic-pathological features (CPfs) and prognosis was investigated. In our cohort (117 samples), NANOG, GDF3 and SOX2 significantly correlated with grade 2, Nodes negative status and higher KI67 proliferation index, respectively (p=0.019, p=0.029, p= 0.035). According to multivariate analysis, SOX2 expression resulted independently associated with increased risk of recurrence (HR= 2,99; p= p=0,004) as well as Nodes status (HR=2,44; p=0,009) and T-size >1 (HR=1,77; p=0,035). Our study provides further proof of the suitable use of stemness genes in BC management. Interestingly, a prognostic role of SOX2, which seems to be a suitable marker of early recurrence irrespective of other clinicopathological features.

  5. Expressed sequence tag analysis and development of gene associated markers in a near-isogenic plant system of Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Díaz, Marina; Selva, Juan P; Zappacosta, Diego; Zanazzi, Darío; Landerreche, Iñaki; Martelotto, Luciano; Felitti, Silvina; Pessino, Silvina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees is a forage grass native to the semiarid regions of Southern Africa, which reproduces mainly by pseudogamous diplosporous apomixis. A collection of ESTs was generated from four cDNA libraries, three of them obtained from panicles of near-isogenic lines with different ploidy levels and reproductive modes, and one obtained from 12 days-old plant leaves. A total of 12,295 high-quality ESTs were clustered and assembled, rendering 8,864 unigenes, including 1,490 contigs and 7,394 singletons, with a genome coverage of 22%. A total of 7,029 (79.11%) unigenes were functionally categorized by BLASTX analysis against sequences deposited in public databases, but only 37.80% could be classified according to Gene Ontology. Sequence comparison against the cereals genes indexes (GI) revealed 50% significant hits. A total of 254 EST-SSRs were detected from 219 singletons and 35 from contigs. Di- and tri- motifs were similarly represented with percentages of 38.95 and 40.16%, respectively. In addition, 190 SNPs and Indels were detected in 18 contigs generated from 3 to 4 libraries. The ESTs and the molecular markers obtained in this study will provide valuable resources for a wide range of applications including gene identification, genetic mapping, cultivar identification, analysis of genetic diversity, phenotype mapping and marker assisted selection.

  6. High BAALC expression associates with other molecular prognostic markers, poor outcome, and a distinct gene-expression signature in cytogenetically normal patients younger than 60 years with acute myeloid leukemia: a Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study.

    PubMed

    Langer, Christian; Radmacher, Michael D; Ruppert, Amy S; Whitman, Susan P; Paschka, Peter; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Baldus, Claudia D; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Liu, Chang-Gong; Ross, Mary E; Powell, Bayard L; de la Chapelle, Albert; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Larson, Richard A; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2008-06-01

    BAALC expression is considered an independent prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), but has yet to be investigated together with multiple other established prognostic molecular markers in CN-AML. We analyzed BAALC expression in 172 primary CN-AML patients younger than 60 years of age, treated similarly on CALGB protocols. High BAALC expression was associated with FLT3-ITD (P = .04), wild-type NPM1 (P < .001), mutated CEBPA (P = .003), MLL-PTD (P = .009), absent FLT3-TKD (P = .005), and high ERG expression (P = .05). In multivariable analysis, high BAALC expression independently predicted lower complete remission rates (P = .04) when adjusting for ERG expression and age, and shorter survival (P = .04) when adjusting for FLT3-ITD, NPM1, CEBPA, and white blood cell count. A gene-expression signature of 312 probe sets differentiating high from low BAALC expressers was identified. High BAALC expression was associated with overexpression of genes involved in drug resistance (MDR1) and stem cell markers (CD133, CD34, KIT). Global microRNA-expression analysis did not reveal significant differences between BAALC expression groups. However, an analysis of microRNAs that putatively target BAALC revealed a potentially interesting inverse association between expression of miR-148a and BAALC. We conclude that high BAALC expression is an independent adverse prognostic factor and is associated with a specific gene-expression profile.

  7. Identification of new markers of recurrence in patients with unprovoked deep vein thrombosis by gene expression profiling: the retro study.

    PubMed

    Montes, Ramón; Guruceaga, Elisabet; González-Porras, José R; Reverter, Joan C; Marco, Pascual; Pina, Elena; Páramo, José A; Hermida, José; Lecumberri, Ramón

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess differences in the gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells between patients with early recurrent thrombosis vs. patients without recurrent events after withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy for a first episode of unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (uDVT), to identify novel predictors of recurrence. In the discovery population (N = 32), a microarray RNA assay followed by RT-PCR confirmation were performed. In the validation population (N = 44) a multiple RT-PCR-based strategy was applied to assess genes differentially expressed in the discovery population. The sex-adjusted Linear Model for Microarray Data analysis showed 102 genes differentially expressed (P < 0.01) in the discovery population. Nineteen of them underwent further confirmation in the validation population. The gene encoding for Acyl-CoA Synthetase Family Member 2 (ACSF2) was underexpressed in recurrent DVT patients in both, the discovery (P = 0.007) and validation populations (P = 0.004). In the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, the areas under the curve of ACSF2 expression were 0.77 and 0.80, respectively. For the first time an association between ACSF2 expression and the risk of recurrent DVT is suggested. Should this association be confirmed in larger prospective studies, ACSF2 could become useful for the selection of patients requiring extended anticoagulant therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development of Gene Expression Markers of Acute Heat-Light Stress in Reef-Building Corals of the Genus Porites

    PubMed Central

    Kenkel, Carly D.; Aglyamova, Galina; Alamaru, Ada; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Capper, Roxana; Cunning, Ross; deVillers, Amanda; Haslun, Joshua A.; Hédouin, Laetitia; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Kuehl, Kristin A.; Mahmoud, Huda; McGinty, Elizabeth S.; Montoya-Maya, Phanor H.; Palmer, Caroline V.; Pantile, Raffaella; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schils, Tom; Silverstein, Rachel N.; Squiers, Logan B.; Tang, Pei-Ciao; Goulet, Tamar L.; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are declining worldwide due to increased incidence of climate-induced coral bleaching, which will have widespread biodiversity and economic impacts. A simple method to measure the sub-bleaching level of heat-light stress experienced by corals would greatly inform reef management practices by making it possible to assess the distribution of bleaching risks among individual reef sites. Gene expression analysis based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used as a diagnostic tool to determine coral condition in situ. We evaluated the expression of 13 candidate genes during heat-light stress in a common Caribbean coral Porites astreoides, and observed strong and consistent changes in gene expression in two independent experiments. Furthermore, we found that the apparent return to baseline expression levels during a recovery phase was rapid, despite visible signs of colony bleaching. We show that the response to acute heat-light stress in P. astreoides can be monitored by measuring the difference in expression of only two genes: Hsp16 and actin. We demonstrate that this assay discriminates between corals sampled from two field sites experiencing different temperatures. We also show that the assay is applicable to an Indo-Pacific congener, P. lobata, and therefore could potentially be used to diagnose acute heat-light stress on coral reefs worldwide. PMID:22046408

  9. Gene expression profiles of progressive pancreatic endocrine tumours and their liver metastases reveal potential novel markers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Capurso, G; Lattimore, S; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T; Panzuto, F; Milione, M; Bhakta, V; Campanini, N; Swift, S M; Bordi, C; Delle Fave, G; Lemoine, N R

    2006-06-01

    The intrinsic nature of tumour behaviour (stable vs progressive) and the presence of liver metastases are key factors in determining the outcome of patients with a pancreatic endocrine tumour (PET). Previous expression profile analyses of PETs were limited to non-homogeneous groups or to primary lesions only. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression profiles of a more uniform series of sporadic, non-functioning (NF) PETs with progressive disease and, for the first time, their liver metastases, on the Affymetrix human genome U133A and B GeneChip set. Thirteen NF PET samples (eight primaries and five liver metastases) from ten patients with progressive, metastatic disease, three cell lines (BON, QGP and CM) and four purified islet samples were analysed. The same samples were employed for confirmation of candidate gene expression by means of quantitative RT-PCR, while a further 37 PET and 15 carcinoid samples were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of genes differentially expressed between islets and primaries and metastases revealed 667 up- and 223 down-regulated genes, most of which have not previously been observed in PETs, and whose gene ontology molecular function has been detailed. Overexpression of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) and protein Z dependent protease inhibitor (SERPINA10) which may represent useful biomarkers, and of lymphocyte specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen (BST2) which could be used as therapeutic targets, has been validated. When primary tumours were compared with metastatic lesions, no significantly differentially expressed genes were found, in accord with cluster analysis which revealed a striking similarity between primary and metastatic lesions, with the cell lines clustering separately. We have provided a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes in a uniform set of aggressive NF PETs. A number of dysregulated genes deserve further in-depth study as potentially

  10. The dynamic expression of extraembryonic marker genes in the beetle Tribolium castaneum reveals the complexity of serosa and amnion formation in a short germ insect.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Beermann, Anke; Schröder, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    Most insect embryos develop with two distinct extraembryonic membranes, the serosa and the amnion. In the insect beetle Tribolium the early origin of the serosa within the anterior blastoderm is well established but the origin of the amnion is still debated. It is not known whether this tissue develops from a blastodermal precursor or originates de novo later from embryonic tissue during embryogenesis. We undertook an in-depth analysis of the spatio-temporal expression pattern profile of important extraembryonic membrane marker genes with emphasis on early blastoderm development in Tribolium. The amnion marker iroquois (Tc-iro) was found co-expressed with the serosa marker zerknüllt1 (Tc-zen1) during early blastoderm formation in an anterior cap domain. This domain later resolved into two adjacent domains that likely represent the precursors of the serosa and the amnion. In addition, we found the hindsight ortholog in Tribolium (Tc-hnt) to be a serosa-specific marker. Surprisingly, decapentaplegic (Tc-dpp) expression was not seen as a symmetric cap domain but detected asymmetrically first along the DV- and later also along the AP-axis. Moreover, we found a previously undescribed domain of phosphorylated MAD (pMAD) protein in anterior ventral serosal cells. This is the first study showing that the anterior-lateral part of the amnion originates from the anterior blastoderm while the precursor of the dorsal amnion develops later de novo from a dorsal-posterior region within the differentiated blastoderm.

  11. The expression of a candidate cucumber fruit sugar starvation marker gene CsSEF1 is enhanced in malformed fruit induced by salinity.

    PubMed

    Tazuke, Akio; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Asayama, Munehiko

    2017-07-01

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) gene Cucumis sativus Somatic Embryogenesis Zinc Finger 1 (CsSEF1) was suggested to be a good marker gene for sugar starvation in fruit. The expression of this gene in fruits is dramatically upregulated in plants that have suffered either complete defoliation or prolonged darkness. CsSEF1 was initially discovered as a gene that was upregulated during somatic embryogenesis. We examined the difference in fruit parts and the effect of pollination on the upregulation of CsSEF1 induced by defoliation treatment. The results indicated that the upregulation of CsSEF1 in fruit by defoliation is not dependent on the presence of developing embryos. The expression of CsSEF1 was upregulated in malformed fruit induced by salinity in which the development of placenta was arrested. Partial cutting of the distal part of the fruit showed that if placenta tissue remained there was no upregulation of CsSEF1, whereas when placenta tissue did not remain there was a marked upregulation of CsSEF1. These results could be consistently interpreted as showing that placenta tissue induced the transport of photoassimilates to the fruit and that without developing placenta tissue, pericarp tissue suffers from severe sugar starvation. This interpretation, in turn, enforces the view that CsSEF1 is a good marker gene of fruit sugar starvation.

  12. Optical imaging of green fluorescent protein markers for tracking vascular gene expression: a feasibility study in human tissue-like phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ananda; Chen, Hunter H.; Long, Erin; Wang, Danming; Yang, Xiaoming

    2002-06-01

    Vascular gene therapy is an exciting approach to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, to date, there are no imaging modalities available for non-invasive detection of vascular gene expression. We have developed an optical imaging method to track vascular gene expression by detecting fluorescent signals emitted from arterial walls following gene transfer. To investigate the feasibility of this new technique, we performed experiments on a set of human tissue-like phantoms using a common biological marker in gene therapy, the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The phantoms were constructed to mimic the arterial geometry beneath a tissue layer. Human smooth muscle cells transfected with GFP were embedded in a capillary tube in the phantom. Monte Carlo modeling of the phantom experiment was performed to optimize the performance of the optical imaging system. We compared the fluence rates among three types of light beams, including ring beam, Gaussian beam, and flat beam. The results showed that our optical imaging system was able to detect fluorescent signals up to 5-mm depth in the phantom, and that flat beam geometry would produce the optimum fluorescence remittance. This study provides valuable insights for improvements to the optical imaging system and refinement of the new technique to non-invasively detect/track vascular gene expression.

  13. Expression of cancer stem markers could be influenced by silencing of p16 gene in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Zhang, J; Shi, H

    2016-01-01

    Effect of the tumor suppression gene p16 on the biological characteristics of HeLa cervical carcinoma cells was explored. The expression of p16 protein was increased in HeLa tumor sphere cells, and no significant difference in tumor spheres from the first to the fourth passages. Compared with those of parental HeLa cells, the proportion of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ cells increased significantly in tumor spheres. However after the cells were silenced by the p16-sh289 vector, expression of P16 protein and the cell number of CD44+/CD24- and ABCG2+ decreased. Moreover, HeLa cells with p16 gene silencing showed decreased abilities of sphere formation and matrigel invasion. More HeLa cells with p16 gene silence were needed for tumor formation in nude mice. Tumor size and weight in mouse model established with p16 gene silenced HeLa cells were less than those with HeLa parental cell model. The present results indicate that silencing of the p16 gene inhibits expression of cancer stem cell markers and tumorigenic ability of HeLa cells.

  14. Gene Expression Profile and Angiogenic Marker Correlates of Response to Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab (BV) Followed by BV plus Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sherry X.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Nguyen, Dat; Wu, Thomas D.; Modrusan, Zora; Swain, Sandra M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Identify biomarkers and gene expression profile signatures to distinguish patients with partial response (PR) from those with stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD). Experimental Design Twenty patients with inflammatory breast cancer and one with locally advanced breast cancer received one cycle of bevacizumab (BV) followed by six cycles of BV plus docetaxel-doxorubicin before surgery. Baseline angiogenic/tumor markers were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and gene expression profiles were measured by Agilent Whole Human Genome arrays. All were assessed for clinical response. Results Fourteen patients (67%, 95% CI 43% – 85.4%) had PR, 5 had SD, and 2 had PD. Expression of CD31 and PDGFR-beta in the tumor vasculature by IHC was significantly associated with response (PR vs. SD/PD; CD31 median: 33.5 vs. 13.2, P = 0.0004; PDGFR-beta median: 5.9 vs. 0.6, P = 0.01). Tumor VEGF-A demonstrated a trend towards association with response (2.65 vs. 0.25, P = 0.04). pVEGFR2(Y996), pVEGFR2(Y951), MVD, Ki67, apoptosis, grade, ER, HER-2/neu, and p53 were not associated with response. Twenty-six of 1339 Gene Ontology (GO) classes at gene transcriptional level were differentially expressed between patients with PR and SD/PD (P < 0.005). Representative significant GO classes include spindle (11 genes; P = 0.001), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor activity including PDGFR–beta (5 genes; P = 0.002), and cell motility including CD31 (80 gene; P = 0.005). Conclusions Baseline CD31, PDGFR-beta and GO classes for VEGFR activity and mitosis were significantly associated with response to BV followed by BV plus chemotherapy. PMID:18794102

  15. Highlighting of quorum sensing lux genes and their expression in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata ectosymbiontic community. Possible use as biogeographic markers.

    PubMed

    Le Bloa, Simon; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Le Bars, Josiane; Taupin, Laure; Marteau, Charlotte; Bazire, Alexis; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Rimicaris exoculata is a caridean shrimp that dominates the fauna at several hydrothermal vent sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It has two distinct and stable microbial communities. One of these epibiontic bacterial communities is located in the shrimp gut and has a distribution and role that are poorly understood. The second colonizes its enlarged gill chamber and is involved in host nutrition. It is eliminated after each molt, and has colonization processes reminiscent of those of a biofilm. The presence and expression of genes usually involved in quorum sensing (QS) were then studied. At four sites, Rainbow, TAG, Snake Pit and Logatchev, two lux genes were identified in the R. exoculata epibiontic community at different shrimp molt stages and life stages. RT-PCR experiments highlighted lux gene expression activity at TAG, Snake Pit and Rainbow vent sites. Their potential QS activity and their possible roles in epibiont colonization processes are discussed. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis has shown the presence of three clades for luxS (Epsilonproteobacteria) and four clades for luxR (Gammaproteobacteria) genes, each clade being restricted to a single site. These genes are more divergent than the 16S rRNA one. They could therefore be used as biogeographical genetic markers.

  16. Highlighting of quorum sensing lux genes and their expression in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata ectosymbiontic community. Possible use as biogeographic markers

    PubMed Central

    Le Bloa, Simon; Durand, Lucile; Cueff- Gauchard, Valérie; Le Bars, Josiane; Taupin, Laure; Marteau, Charlotte; Bazire, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Rimicaris exoculata is a caridean shrimp that dominates the fauna at several hydrothermal vent sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It has two distinct and stable microbial communities. One of these epibiontic bacterial communities is located in the shrimp gut and has a distribution and role that are poorly understood. The second colonizes its enlarged gill chamber and is involved in host nutrition. It is eliminated after each molt, and has colonization processes reminiscent of those of a biofilm. The presence and expression of genes usually involved in quorum sensing (QS) were then studied. At four sites, Rainbow, TAG, Snake Pit and Logatchev, two lux genes were identified in the R. exoculata epibiontic community at different shrimp molt stages and life stages. RT-PCR experiments highlighted lux gene expression activity at TAG, Snake Pit and Rainbow vent sites. Their potential QS activity and their possible roles in epibiont colonization processes are discussed. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis has shown the presence of three clades for luxS (Epsilonproteobacteria) and four clades for luxR (Gammaproteobacteria) genes, each clade being restricted to a single site. These genes are more divergent than the 16S rRNA one. They could therefore be used as biogeographical genetic markers. PMID:28328982

  17. Gene amplification and immunohistochemical expression of ERBB2 and EGFR in cervical carcinogenesis. Correlation with cell-cycle markers and HPV presence.

    PubMed

    Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Torres-Moreno, Daniel; Isaac, María A; Pérez-Guillermo, Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Although the members of the epidermal growth factor receptor family ERBB2 and EGFR are important therapeutic targets in the treatment of malignant neoplasias, little is known about their role in cervical carcinogenesis. Our objective was to evaluate the dysfunction of ERBB2 and EGFR at the gene copy number and protein expression level in neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix with the aim of obtaining information about its role in cervical carcinogenesis and their possible use as therapeutic targets in these diseases. We studied gene amplification and protein expression of ERBB2 and EGFR and their relationship with Ki67, p16 and p53 and HPV presence in 22 normal/benign (N/B) cervices, 20 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 70 high-grade SILs (HSILs) and 32 invasive squamous cervical carcinomas (ISCCs). No cases showed selective amplification of ERBB2 or EGFR but corresponding chromosome-specific probes displayed chromosome 17 and 7 polyploidy associated with the grade of the lesion (p<0.0001 and p=0.004, respectively) and with the positive expression of Ki67 and p16 (p<0.01). Concurrent polyploidy for both chromosomes was statistically related (p<0.0001). ERBB2 immunohistochemical expression was not observed in any of the study cases except for one ISCC but EGFR was associated with higher-grade lesions (N/B plus LSIL 21.4% vs. HSIL plus ISCC 45.5%; p=0.007). No association was observed between EGFR expression and that of cell-cycle markers or HPV presence. Increased copy number of EGFR and ERBB2 is due to polyploidy of 7 and 17 chromosomes, this being a phenomenon associated with lesion severity and with an increase in the expression of cell-cycle markers. EGFR, but not ERBB2, is expressed in precursor lesions of squamous cervical neoplasia and is related to the neoplastic progression but not to proliferation marker expression and therefore ERBB2 and this calls into question the usefulness of ERBB2 as a therapeutic target.

  18. Transcriptional expression levels of cell stress marker genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas exposed to acute thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Farcy, Émilie; Voiseux, Claire; Lebel, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    During the annual cycle, oysters are exposed to seasonal slow changes in temperature, but during emersion at low tide on sunny summer days, their internal temperature may rise rapidly, resulting in acute heat stress. We experimentally exposed oysters to a 1-h acute thermal stress and investigated the transcriptional expression level of some genes involved in cell stress defence mechanisms, including chaperone proteins (heat shock proteins Hsp70, Hsp72 and Hsp90 (HSP)), regulation of oxidative stress (Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, metallothionein (MT)), cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase sigma, cytochrome P450 and multidrug resistance (MDR1)) and regulation of the cell cycle (p53). Gene mRNA levels were quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and expressed as their ratio to actin mRNA, used as a reference. Of the nine genes studied, HSP, MT and MDR1 mRNA levels increased in response to thermal stress. We compared the responses of oysters exposed to acute heat shock in summer and winter and observed differences in terms of magnitude and kinetics. A larger increase was observed in September, with recovery within 48 h, whereas in March, the increase was smaller and lasted more than 2 days. The results were also compared with data obtained from the natural environment. Though the functional molecule is the protein and information at the mRNA level only has limitations, the potential use of mRNAs coding for cell stress defence proteins as early sensitive biomarkers is discussed. PMID:19002605

  19. QTL analysis of photoperiod sensitivity in common buckwheat by using markers for expressed sequence tags and photoperiod-sensitivity candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Takashi; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Okuno, Kazutoshi; Matsui, Katsuhiro; Ohsawa, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    Photoperiod sensitivity is an important trait related to crop adaptation and ecological breeding in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). Although photoperiod sensitivity in this species is thought to be controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), no genes or regions related to photoperiod sensitivity had been identified until now. Here, we identified QTLs controlling photoperiod sensitivity by QTL analysis in a segregating F4 population (n = 100) derived from a cross of two autogamous lines, 02AL113(Kyukei SC2)LH.self and C0408-0 RP. The F4 progenies were genotyped with three markers for photoperiod-sensitivity candidate genes, which were identified based on homology to photoperiod-sensitivity genes in Arabidopsis and 76 expressed sequence tag markers. Among the three photoperiod-sensitivity candidate genes (FeCCA1, FeELF3 and FeCOL3) identified in common buckwheat, FeELF3 was associated with photoperiod sensitivity. Two EST regions, Fest_L0606_4 and Fest_L0337_6, were associated with photoperiod sensitivity and explained 20.0% and 14.2% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. For both EST regions, the allele from 02AL113(Kyukei SC2)LH.self led to early flowering. An epistatic interaction was also confirmed between Fest_L0606_4 and Fest_L0337_6. These results demonstrate that photoperiod sensitivity in common buckwheat is controlled by a pathway consisting of photoperiod-sensitivity candidate genes as well as multiple gene action. PMID:23136477

  20. Adenoviral Gene Therapy for Diabetic Keratopathy: Effects on Wound Healing and Stem Cell Marker Expression in Human Organ-cultured Corneas and Limbal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kramerov, Andrei A; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh; Ljubimov, Alexander V

    2016-04-07

    The goal of this protocol is to describe molecular alterations in human diabetic corneas and demonstrate how they can be alleviated by adenoviral gene therapy in organ-cultured corneas. The diabetic corneal disease is a complication of diabetes with frequent abnormalities of corneal nerves and epithelial wound healing. We have also documented significantly altered expression of several putative epithelial stem cell markers in human diabetic corneas. To alleviate these changes, adenoviral gene therapy was successfully implemented using the upregulation of c-met proto-oncogene expression and/or the downregulation of proteinases matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) and cathepsin F. This therapy accelerated wound healing in diabetic corneas even when only the limbal stem cell compartment was transduced. The best results were obtained with combined treatment. For possible patient transplantation of normalized stem cells, an example is also presented of the optimization of gene transduction in stem cell-enriched cultures using polycationic enhancers. This approach may be useful not only for the selected genes but also for the other mediators of corneal epithelial wound healing and stem cell function.

  1. Valproic Acid Induces the Hyperacetylation of P53, Expression of P53 Target Genes, and Markers of the Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway in Midorganogenesis Murine Limbs.

    PubMed

    Paradis, France-Hélène; Hales, Barbara F

    2015-10-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant and histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), increases the risk of congenital malformations. Although the mechanisms leading to the teratogenicity of VPA remain unsolved, several HDAC inhibitors increase cell death in cancer cell lines and embryonic tissues. Moreover, P53, the master regulator of apoptosis, is an established HDAC target. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of VPA on P53 signaling and markers of apoptosis during midorganogenesis in vitro limb development. Timed-pregnant CD1 mice (gestation day 12) were euthanized; embryonic forelimbs were excised and cultured in vitro for 3, 6, 12, or 24 hr in the presence or absence of VPA or valpromide (VPD), a non-HDACi analog of VPA. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blots were used to assess the expression of candidate genes and proteins involved in P53 signaling and apoptosis. P53 hyperacetylation and a decrease (Survivin/Birc5 and Bcl2) or an increase (p21/Cdkn1a) in the expression of p53 target genes was observed only in VPA-exposed limbs. VPA exposure also triggered an increase in markers of apoptosis and DNA damage; the concentrations of cleaved caspase 9 and caspase 3, cleaved-poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and γ-H2AX were increased in VPA-exposed limbs. VPD treatment caused a small but significant increase in cleaved caspase 3. Thus, in vitro exposure to an HDACi such as VPA leads to P53 hyperacetylation, enhances the expression of P53 target genes, and triggers an increase in apoptosis that may contribute to teratogenicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium: The Role of Pigmentation as Maturation Marker and Gene Expression Profile Comparison with Human Endogenous Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bennis, A; Jacobs, J G; Catsburg, L A E; Ten Brink, J B; Koster, C; Schlingemann, R O; van Meurs, J; Gorgels, T G M F; Moerland, P D; Heine, V M; Bergen, A A

    2017-07-21

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deteriorates, leading to photoreceptor decay and severe vision loss. New therapeutic strategies aim at RPE replacement by transplantation of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived RPE. Several protocols to generate RPE have been developed where appearance of pigmentation is commonly used as indicator of RPE differentiation and maturation. It is, however, unclear how different pigmentation stages reflect developmental stages and functionality of PSC-derived RPE cells. We generated human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) cells and investigated their gene expression profiles at early pigmentation (EP) and late pigmentation (LP) stages. In addition, we compared the hESC-RPE samples with human endogenous RPE. We used a common reference design microarray (44 K). Our analysis showed that maturing hESC-RPE, upon acquiring pigmentation, expresses markers specific for human RPE. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that EP and LP hESC-RPE do not differ much in gene expression. Our data further showed that pigmented hESC-RPE has a significant lower expression than human endogenous RPE in the visual cycle and oxidative stress pathways. In contrast, we observed a significantly higher expression of pathways related to the process adhesion-to-polarity model that is typical of developing epithelial cells. We conclude that, in vitro, the first appearance of pigmentation hallmarks differentiated RPE. However, further increase in pigmentation does not result in much significant gene expression changes and does not add important RPE functionalities. Consequently, our results suggest that the time span for obtaining differentiated hESC-RPE cells, that are suitable for transplantation, may be greatly reduced.

  3. The effects of wild blueberry consumption on plasma markers and gene expression related to glucose metabolism in the obese Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Vendrame, Stefano; Zhao, Alice; Merrow, Thomas; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy

    2015-06-01

    Impaired fasting blood glucose is one of the landmark signs of metabolic syndrome, together with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and a chronic proinflammatory, pro-oxidative, and prothrombotic environment. This study investigates the effect of wild blueberry (WB) consumption on blood glucose levels and other parameters involved in glucose metabolism in the obese Zucker rat (OZR), an experimental model of metabolic syndrome. Sixteen OZRs and 16 lean littermate controls (lean Zucker rat [LZR]) were fed an 8% enriched WB diet or a control (C) diet for 8 weeks. Plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin GHbA1c, resistin, and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) were measured. Expression of the resistin, RBP4, and glucose transporter GLUT4 genes was also determined both in the liver and the abdominal adipose tissue (AAT). Plasma glycated hemoglobin HbA1c, RBP4, and resistin concentrations were significantly lower in OZRs following the WB diet (-20%, -22%, and -27%, respectively, compared to C diet, P<.05). Following WB consumption, resistin expression was significantly downregulated in the liver of both OZRs and LZRs (-28% and -61%, respectively, P<.05), while RBP4 expression was significantly downregulated in the AAT of both OZRs and LZRs (-87% and -43%, respectively, P<.05). All other markers were not significantly affected following WB consumption. In conclusion, WB consumption normalizes some markers related to glucose metabolism in the OZR model of metabolic syndrome, but has no effect on fasting blood glucose or insulin concentrations.

  4. Elimination of Marker Genes from Transformed Filamentous Fungi by Unselected Transient Transfection with a Cre-expressing Plasmid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A convenient method to remove selectable markers from fungal transformants permits the markers to be used for sequential transformations, and should also reduce public concerns and regulatory impediments to applications involving environmental release of genetically modified fungi. We report a metho...

  5. Gene expression analysis of Arc mRNA as a neuronal cell activity marker in the hippocampus and amygdala in two-way active avoidance test in rats.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Kyohei; Takahashi, Erika; Igarashi, Isao; Iguchi, Takuma; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi; Kai, Kiyonori; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Immediate early genes are widely used as neuronal cell activity markers in neuroscience. The present study investigated the relationship between their expression and abnormality in context fear conditioning. The learning test (two-way active avoidance test) was conducted in male rats administered with nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine or selective dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at a dose level of 2.0 or 0.1mg/kg, respectively, for 4days. Expression levels of Arc and Fos mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala were also evaluated on the second day of dosing by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Scopolamine had no effect on avoidance rate, but decreased freezing in the two-way active avoidance test. SCH 23390 decreased avoidance rate and increased freezing. In FISH and RT-qPCR assays, scopolamine decreased Arc mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala, whereas SCH 23390 increased Arc mRNA in the hippocampus. By contrast, scopolamine and SCH 23390 did not change Fos mRNA expression compared to Arc mRNA expression. The results of the learning test indicated that scopolamine or SCH 23390 respectively inhibited fear or context conditioning in rats. Furthermore, alteration of the expression of Arc mRNA but not of Fos mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala of the brain was suggested to be a sensitive neuronal cell activity marker to detect behavioral abnormality in the two-way active avoidance test. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Molecular Analysis by Gene Expression of Mitochondrial ATPase Subunits in Papillary Thyroid Cancer: Is ATP5E Transcript a Possible Early Tumor Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-López, Luis Mauricio; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Ruiz, José Damián Carrillo; González, Norma Estela Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer development involves an “injury” to the respiratory machinery (Warburg effect) due to decreased or impaired mitochondrial function. This circumstance results in a down regulation of some of the ATPase subunits of the malignant tissue. The objective of this work was to assess and compare the relative expression of mRNA of mitochondrial ATPase subunits between samples of thyroid cancer and benign nodules. Material/Methods Samples from 31 patients who had an operation for PTC at the General Hospital of Mexico were snap-frozen and stored at −70°C. Thirty-five patients who had an operation for benign tumors were also included in the study. mRNA expression levels of alpha, beta, gamma, and epsilon subunits of F1 and “c12” of subunit Fo were determined by real-time RT-PCR (by duplicate), in order to determine if abnormal expression of these genes could partially explain the Warburg effect in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Results ATP5E transcript alteration (down-expression) was highly associated to PTC diagnosis OR=11.76 (95% confidence interval, 1.245–237.98; p=0.04). Conclusions Relative down-expression of ATP5E transcript was highly associated with PTC diagnosis. This transcript alteration may be used as a tumoral marker in papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:26079849

  7. Consensus paper of the WFSBP Task Force on Genetics: Genetics, epigenetics and gene expression markers of major depressive disorder and antidepressant response.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Chiara; Hosak, Ladislav; Mössner, Rainald; Giegling, Ina; Mandelli, Laura; Bellivier, Frank; Claes, Stephan; Collier, David A; Corrales, Alejo; Delisi, Lynn E; Gallo, Carla; Gill, Michael; Kennedy, James L; Leboyer, Marion; Lisoway, Amanda; Maier, Wolfgang; Marquez, Miguel; Massat, Isabelle; Mors, Ole; Muglia, Pierandrea; Nöthen, Markus M; O'Donovan, Michael C; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Propping, Peter; Shi, Yongyong; St Clair, David; Thibaut, Florence; Cichon, Sven; Mendlewicz, Julien; Rujescu, Dan; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heritable disease with a heavy personal and socio-economic burden. Antidepressants of different classes are prescribed to treat MDD, but reliable and reproducible markers of efficacy are not available for clinical use. Further complicating treatment, the diagnosis of MDD is not guided by objective criteria, resulting in the risk of under- or overtreatment. A number of markers of MDD and antidepressant response have been investigated at the genetic, epigenetic, gene expression and protein levels. Polymorphisms in genes involved in antidepressant metabolism (cytochrome P450 isoenzymes), antidepressant transport (ABCB1), glucocorticoid signalling (FKBP5) and serotonin neurotransmission (SLC6A4 and HTR2A) were among those included in the first pharmacogenetic assays that have been tested for clinical applicability. The results of these investigations were encouraging when examining patient-outcome improvement. Furthermore, a nine-serum biomarker panel (including BDNF, cortisol and soluble TNF-α receptor type II) showed good sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between MDD and healthy controls. These first diagnostic and response-predictive tests for MDD provided a source of optimism for future clinical applications. However, such findings should be considered very carefully because their benefit/cost ratio and clinical indications were not clearly demonstrated. Future tests may include combinations of different types of biomarkers and be specific for MDD subtypes or pathological dimensions.

  8. IKBKAP mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes: a molecular marker of gene expression and splicing in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Leyne, Maire; Mull, James; Rolnitzky, Linda M; Goldberg, Judith D; Berlin, Dena; Axelrod, Felicia B; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2008-02-01

    The common familial dysautonomia (FD) mutation results in tissue specific mis-splicing with reduced amount of wild-type (WT) IkappaB kinase associated protein gene (IKBKAP) mRNA and ELP1. ELP1 is a subunit of Elongator, formerly called the IkappaB kinase associated protein (IKAP) protein. We measured IKBKAP mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes to determine whether FD subjects and carriers have characteristic levels. Estimated mean IKBKAP mRNA levels, measured by quantitative PCR and expressed as amount relative to the noncarrier average, were significantly different for the two groups when not adjusted for age and sex (p < 0.001): FD subjects 0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.19, 0.28); carriers 0.58, 95% CI (0.50, 0.68); or adjusted for age and sex (p < 0.001): FD subjects 0.21, 95% CI (0.16, 0.26); carriers 0.66, 95% CI (0.55, 0.79). Comparison of IKBKAP mRNA levels of the 22 FD subjects and their related carriers showed a strong correlation, providing evidence for genetic control of splicing efficiency. IKBKAP mRNA levels were not higher in those subjects using tocotrienols or epigallocatechin gallate. Levels of IKBKAP mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes can be used to assess molecular response to therapies aimed at enhancing exon 20 inclusion and increasing cellular levels of ELP1/IKAP.

  9. Large-scale analysis of differential gene expression in coffee genotypes resistant and susceptible to leaf miner-toward the identification of candidate genes for marker assisted-selection.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Danielle C; Martinati, Juliana C; Giachetto, Poliana F; Vidal, Ramon O; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Padilha, Lilian; Guerreiro-Filho, Oliveiro; Maluf, Mirian P

    2014-01-24

    A successful development of herbivorous insects into plant tissues depends on coordination of metabolic processes. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to recognize such attacks, and to trigger a defense response. To understand the transcriptional basis of this response, we compare gene expression profiles of two coffee genotypes, susceptible and resistant to leaf miner (Leucoptera coffella). A total of 22000 EST sequences from the Coffee Genome Database were selected for a microarray analysis. Fluorescence probes were synthesized using mRNA from the infested and non-infested coffee plants. Array hybridization, scanning and data normalization were performed using Nimble Scan® e ArrayStar® platforms. Genes with foldchange values +/-2 were considered differentially expressed. A validation of 18 differentially expressed genes was performed in infected plants using qRT-PCR approach. The microarray analysis indicated that resistant plants differ in gene expression profile. We identified relevant transcriptional changes in defense strategies before insect attack. Expression changes (>2.00-fold) were found in resistant plants for 2137 genes (1266 up-regulated and 873 down-regulated). Up-regulated genes include those responsible for defense mechanisms, hypersensitive response and genes involved with cellular function and maintenance. Also, our analyses indicated that differential expression profiles between resistant and susceptible genotypes are observed in the absence of leaf-miner, indicating that defense is already build up in resistant plants, as a priming mechanism. Validation of selected genes pointed to four selected genes as suitable candidates for markers in assisted-selection of novel cultivars. Our results show evidences that coffee defense responses against leaf-miner attack are balanced with other cellular functions. Also analyses suggest a major metabolic reconfiguration that highlights the complexity of this response.

  10. Large-scale analysis of differential gene expression in coffee genotypes resistant and susceptible to leaf miner–toward the identification of candidate genes for marker assisted-selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A successful development of herbivorous insects into plant tissues depends on coordination of metabolic processes. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to recognize such attacks, and to trigger a defense response. To understand the transcriptional basis of this response, we compare gene expression profiles of two coffee genotypes, susceptible and resistant to leaf miner (Leucoptera coffella). A total of 22000 EST sequences from the Coffee Genome Database were selected for a microarray analysis. Fluorescence probes were synthesized using mRNA from the infested and non-infested coffee plants. Array hybridization, scanning and data normalization were performed using Nimble Scan® e ArrayStar® platforms. Genes with foldchange values +/-2 were considered differentially expressed. A validation of 18 differentially expressed genes was performed in infected plants using qRT-PCR approach. Results The microarray analysis indicated that resistant plants differ in gene expression profile. We identified relevant transcriptional changes in defense strategies before insect attack. Expression changes (>2.00-fold) were found in resistant plants for 2137 genes (1266 up-regulated and 873 down-regulated). Up-regulated genes include those responsible for defense mechanisms, hypersensitive response and genes involved with cellular function and maintenance. Also, our analyses indicated that differential expression profiles between resistant and susceptible genotypes are observed in the absence of leaf-miner, indicating that defense is already build up in resistant plants, as a priming mechanism. Validation of selected genes pointed to four selected genes as suitable candidates for markers in assisted-selection of novel cultivars. Conclusions Our results show evidences that coffee defense responses against leaf-miner attack are balanced with other cellular functions. Also analyses suggest a major metabolic reconfiguration that highlights the complexity of this response. PMID

  11. Keratin 15, transcobalamin I and homeobox gene Hox-B13 expression in breast phyllodes tumors: novel markers in biological classification.

    PubMed

    Chong, Luke Yong-Zheng; Cheok, Poh Yian; Tan, Wai-Jin; Thike, Aye Aye; Allen, George; Ang, Mei Kim; Ooi, Aik Seng; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Breast phyllodes tumors are rare neoplasms which present challenges for histological classification. Microscopic features are not always predictive of clinical behavior, and scarce data exist on the prognostic role of biological markers. Our study evaluated a series of 145 phyllodes tumors diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital between 2006 and 2009, incorporating 91 (62.8%) benign, 40 (27.6%) borderline, and 14 (9.7%) malignant phyllodes tumors. Antibodies to keratin 15 (KRT15), transcobalamin I (TCN1), and homeobox gene Hox-B13 (HOXB13) were applied to sections cut from tissue microarray blocks. KRT15 and TCN1 positivity was defined when there was reactivity of 1% or more stromal cells, while HOXB13 positivity was defined using a H-score of 100 and above. Positive immunohistochemical expression for KRT15, TCN1, and HOXB13 was seen in 21 (14.5%), 96 (66.2%), and 66 (45.5%) of tumors, respectively. Stromal expression of KRT15, TCN1, and HOXB13 was significantly correlated with tumor grade (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.012), stromal hypercellularity (P = 0.005, P < 0.001, P = 0.023), mitotic activity (P < 0.001), and microscopic borders (P = 0.006, P < 0.001, P = 0.011). Co-expression of TCN1 and HOXB13 was seen in 21 of 91 (23.1%) benign, 18 of 40 (45.0%) borderline, and 11 of 14 (78.6%) malignant tumors, suggesting that the dual-marker panels of TCN1 and HOXB13 might be helpful in classifying borderline and malignant tumors. Although expression of TCN1 alone was present in all malignant and 34 of 40 (85.0%) borderline tumors, a combined panel with HOXB13 excluded some benign cases and was a better discriminant for a significant proportion of borderline and malignant tumors.

  12. Wilms tumor gene 1 expression as a predictive marker for relapse and survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Jeon, Young-Woo; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Han, Kyungja; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yoo-Jin

    2015-03-01

    Relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a major concern in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but the role of Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) as a predictive marker for post-HSCT relapse remains to be validated. We measured WT1 transcript levels by real-time quantitative PCR from marrow samples of 82 MDS patients who underwent transplantation between 2009 and 2013. Pre-HSCT WT1 expression weakly correlated with marrow blast counts or International Prognostic Scoring System scores and failed to predict post-transplantation relapse. Regarding post-HSCT WT1, transcript levels of relapsed patients were significantly higher in comparison to those in remission. Further analysis using receiver operating characteristics curves showed that higher (>154 copies/10(4)ABL) 1-month post-HSCT WT1 resulted in a higher 3-year relapse rate (47.2% versus 6.9%, P < .001) with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival at 3 years (41.7% versus 79.0% and 54.3% versus 82.1%, P = .003 and P = .033, respectively). Multivariate analysis after adjusting for pre-HSCT karyotype and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also revealed that higher 1-month post-HSCT WT1 was an independent predictive marker for subsequent relapse (P = .002) and poorer DFS (P = .010). In the higher 1-month post-HSCT WT1 subgroup, patients with chronic GVHD showed lower relapse rate and favorable survival outcome. One month post-HSCT WT1 expression was a useful marker for minimal residual disease and relapse prediction in association with chronic GVHD in the context of HSCT for MDS. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pituitary tumor transforming gene and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor expression and immunohistochemical measurement of Ki-67 as potential prognostic markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tejada, Laura; Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Moreno-Pérez, Oscar; Montañana, Carmen Fajardo; Niveiro, Maria; Tritos, Nicholas A; Alfonso, Antonio M Picó

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict recurrence of pituitary adenoma (PA) after surgery may be helpful to determine follow-up frequency and the need for adjuvant treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic capacity of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), and Ki-67. In this retrospective study, the normalized copy number (NCN) of PTIG and IGF1R mRNA was measured using RT-PCR, and the Ki-67 index was measured by immunohistochemistry in 46 PA samples. Clinical data, histological subtype, and radiographic characteristics were collected to assess associations between variables and tumor behavior. Progression of tumor remnants and its association to markers was also studied in 14 patients with no adjuvant treatment after surgery followed up for 46±36 months. Extrasellar tumors had a lower PTTG expression as compared to sellar tumors (0.065 [1st-3rd quartile: 0.000-0.089] NCN vs. 0.135 [0.105-0.159] NCN, p=0.04). IGF1R expression changed depending on histological subtype (p=0.014), and was greater in tumor with remnant growth greater than 20% during follow-up (10.69±3.84 NCN vs. 5.44±3.55 NCN, p=0.014). Our results suggest that the IGF1R is a more helpful molecular marker than PTTG in PA management. Ki-67 showed no association to tumor behavior. However, the potential of these markers should be established in future studies with standardized methods and on larger samples. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression Level of the DREB2-Type Gene, Identified with Amplifluor SNP Markers, Correlates with Performance, and Tolerance to Dehydration in Bread Wheat Cultivars from Northern Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Shavrukov, Yuri; Zhumalin, Aibek; Serikbay, Dauren; Botayeva, Makpal; Otemisova, Ainur; Absattarova, Aiman; Sereda, Grigoriy; Sereda, Sergey; Shvidchenko, Vladimir; Turbekova, Arysgul; Jatayev, Satyvaldy; Lopato, Sergiy; Soole, Kathleen; Langridge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A panel of 89 local commercial cultivars of bread wheat was tested in field trials in the dry conditions of Northern Kazakhstan. Two distinct groups of cultivars (six cultivars in each group), which had the highest and the lowest grain yield under drought were selected for further experiments. A dehydration test conducted on detached leaves indicated a strong association between rates of water loss in plants from the first group with highest grain yield production in the dry environment relative to the second group. Modern high-throughput Amplifluor Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) technology was applied to study allelic variations in a series of drought-responsive genes using 19 SNP markers. Genotyping of an SNP in the TaDREB5 (DREB2-type) gene using the Amplifluor SNP marker KATU48 revealed clear allele distribution across the entire panel of wheat accessions, and distinguished between the two groups of cultivars with high and low yield under drought. Significant differences in expression levels of TaDREB5 were revealed by qRT-PCR. Most wheat plants from the first group of cultivars with high grain yield showed slight up-regulation in the TaDREB5 transcript in dehydrated leaves. In contrast, expression of TaDREB5 in plants from the second group of cultivars with low grain yield was significantly down-regulated. It was found that SNPs did not alter the amino acid sequence of TaDREB5 protein. Thus, a possible explanation is that alternative splicing and up-stream regulation of TaDREB5 may be affected by SNP, but these hypotheses require additional analysis (and will be the focus of future studies). PMID:27917186

  15. Selectable marker genes and unintended changes to the plant transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Miki, Brian; Abdeen, Ashraf; Manabe, Yuzuki; MacDonald, Phil

    2009-04-01

    The intended effect of a selectable marker gene is to confer a novel trait that allows for the selection and recovery of transgenic plants. Unintended effects may also occur as a result of interactions between the selectable marker gene or its regulatory elements and genetic elements at the site of insertion. These are called position effects. Other unintended effects may occur if the selectable marker gene has a range of pleiotropic effects related to the functional and regulatory domains within the coding region or the regulatory elements used to drive expression. Both pleiotropic and position effects may generate unpredictable events depending on the process used for transgenesis and the state of knowledge associated with the selectable marker gene. Although some selectable marker genes, such as the neomycin phosphotransferase type II gene (nptII), have no pleiotropic effects on the transcriptomes of transgenic plants, others, such as the bialaphos resistance gene (bar), have pleiotropic effects. These must be clearly understood and accounted for when evaluating the expression patterns conferred by other co-transforming transgenes under study. The number and kinds of selectable marker genes are large. A detailed understanding of their unintended effects is needed to develop transgenic strategies that will minimize or eliminate unintended and unpredictable changes to plants with newly inserted genes.

  16. Induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic human keratinocytes by transfection with thymosin beta 4.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Ookuma, Yukiko F; Shiotsuka, Maho; Kihara, Makiko; Hasegawa, Kana; Someya, Hirotaka; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the recombination of cells liberated from developing tooth germs develop into teeth. However, it is difficult to use human developing tooth germ as a source of cells because of ethical issues. Previous studies have reported that thymosin beta 4 (Tmsb4x) is closely related to the initiation and development of the tooth germ. We herein attempted to establish odontogenic epithelial cells from non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by transfection with TMSB4X. TMSB4X-transfected cells formed nodules that were positive for Alizarin-red S (ALZ) and von Kossa staining (calcium phosphate deposits) when cultured in calcification-inducing medium. Three selected clones showing larger amounts of calcium deposits than the other clones, expressed PITX2, Cytokeratin 14, and Sonic Hedgehog. The upregulation of odontogenesis-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), Amelogenin (AMELX), Ameloblastin (AMBN) and Enamelin (ENAM) was also detected. These proteins were immunohistochemically observed in nodules positive for the ALZ and von Kossa staining. RUNX2-positive selected TMSB4X-transfected cells implanted into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice formed matrix deposits. Immunohistochemically, AMELX, AMBN and ENAM were observed in the matrix deposits. This study demonstrated the possibility of induction of dental epithelial cell differentiation marker gene expression in non-odontogenic HaCaT cells by TMSB4X. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  18. RELATIVE EXPRESSION AND STABILITY OF A CHROMOSOMALLY INTEGRATED AND PLASMID-BORNE MARKER GENE FUSION IN ENVIRONMENTALLY COMPETENT BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A xyIE-iceC transcriptional fusion was created by ligating a DNA fragment harboring the cloned xyIE structural gene from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 into the cloned iceC gene of Pseudomonas syringae Cit7. This fusion construct was integrated into chromosome of Pseu...

  19. Effects of Silica and Titanium Oxide Particles on a Human Neural Stem Cell Line: Morphology, Mitochondrial Activity, and Gene Expression of Differentiation Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U.; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 μm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 μm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations ≥62.5 μg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure. PMID:24992594

  20. Effects of silica and titanium oxide particles on a human neural stem cell line: morphology, mitochondrial activity, and gene expression of differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-07-02

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 µm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 µm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations = 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations =62.5 µg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling Supports the Neural Crest Origin of Adult Rodent Carotid Body Stem Cells and Identifies CD10 as a Marker for Mesectoderm-Committed Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Guerrero, Elena; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Linares-Clemente, Pedro; Cases, Ildefonso; López-Barneo, José; Pardal, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are promising tools for understanding nervous system plasticity and repair, but their use is hampered by the lack of markers suitable for their prospective isolation and characterization. The carotid body (CB) contains a population of peripheral NSCs, which support organ growth during acclimatization to hypoxia. We have set up CB neurosphere (NS) cultures enriched in differentiated neuronal (glomus) cells versus undifferentiated progenitors to investigate molecular hallmarks of cell classes within the CB stem cell (CBSC) niche. Microarray gene expression analysis in NS is compatible with CBSCs being neural crest derived-multipotent progenitor cells able to sustain CB growth upon exposure to hypoxia. Moreover, we have identified CD10 as a marker suitable for isolation of a population of CB mesectoderm-committed progenitor cells. CD10 + cells are resting in normoxia, and during hypoxia they are activated to proliferate and to eventually complete maturation into mesectodermal cells, thus participating in the angiogenesis necessary for CB growth. Our results shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in CBSC fate choice, favoring a potential use of these cells for cell therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:1637-1650. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Liver-enriched transcription factors are critical for the expression of hepatocyte marker genes in mES-derived hepatocyte-lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Dickson, Alan J

    2009-04-23

    Induction of stem cell differentiation toward functional hepatocytes is hampered by lack of knowledge of the hepatocyte differentiation processes. The overall objective of this project is to characterize key stages in the hepatocyte differentiation process. We established a mouse embryonic stem (mES) cell culture system which exhibited changes in gene expression profiles similar to those observed in the development of endodermal and hepatocyte-lineage cells previously described in the normal mouse embryo. Transgenic mES cells were established that permitted isolation of enriched hepatocyte-lineage populations. This approach has isolated mES-derived hepatocyte-lineage cells that express several markers of mature hepatocytes including albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, tyrosine aminotransferase, cytochrome P450-3a, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. In addition, our results show that the up-regulation of the expression levels of hepatocyte nuclear factor-3alpha, -4alpha, -6, and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-beta might be critical for passage into late-stage differentiation towards functional hepatocytes. These data present important steps for definition of regulatory phenomena that direct specific cell fate determination. The mES cell culture system generated in this study provides a model for studying transition between stages of the hepatocyte development and has significant potential value for studying the molecular basis of hepatocyte differentiation in vitro.

  3. Development of an expressed gene catalogue and molecular markers from the de novo assembly of short sequence reads of the lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Shah, Niraj; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2013-09-01

    Genomic resources such as ESTs, molecular markers and linkage maps are essential for crop improvement. However, these resources are still limited in important legumes such as lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.), which is valued world wide as a rich source of dietary protein. In this study, the de novo transcriptome assembly of 119,855,798 short reads, generated by Illumina paired-end sequencing, was performed using various assembly programs. This resulted in 42,196 nonredundant high-quality transcripts of average length 810 bases, N50 value of 1,432 and an average expression per transcript of 26.21 rpkm reads per kilobase per million(RPKM). Similarity search with the unigenes and protein sequences of other plants resulted in maximum similarity with soybean. A total of 20,009 nonredundant transcripts showed similarity with the UniProtKB database and of these, 18,064 transcripts were grouped into three main GO categories, that is, biological process (15,126), molecular function (15,505) and cellular component (9,434). Annotated transcripts were mapped to 289 predicted Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways and 8,893 transcripts were classified into 24 functional categories based on Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) of proteins. Mining the data set for the presence of SSRs resulted in 8,722 SSRs with a frequency occurrence of one SSR per 3.92 kb. From these, 5,673 SSR primer pairs were designed, and a subset of these were utilized for diversity analysis. This study, which provides a large data set of annotated transcripts and gene-based SSR markers, would serve as a foundation for various applications in lentil breeding and genetics.

  4. Lodgepole pine: the first evidence of seed-based somatic embryogenesis and the expression of embryogenesis marker genes in shoot bud cultures of adult trees.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Young; Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-11-01

    Of the various alternatives for cloning elite conifers, somatic embryogenesis (SE) appears to be the best option. In recent years, significant areas of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forest have been devastated by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) in Western Canada. In an attempt to establish an SE propagation system for MPB-resistant lodgepole pine, several families displaying varying levels of resistance were selected for experimentation involving shoot bud and immature seed explants. In bud cultures, eight embryogenic lines were induced from 2 of 15 genotypes following various treatments. Genotype had an important influence on embryogenic culture initiation, and this effect was consistent over time. These lines were identified by microscopic observation and genetic markers. Despite the abundance of early somatic embryos, the cultures have yet to develop into mature embryos. In contrast, immature zygotic embryos (ZEs) cultured from megagametophytes initiated SE at an early dominance stage via nodule-type callus in 1 of 10 genotypes. As part of the study, putative embryogenesis-specific genes, WOX2 (WUSCHELL homeobox 2) and HAP3A, were analyzed in cultures of both shoot bud explants and ZEs. On the basis of these analyses, we postulate that PcHAP3A was expressed mainly in callus and may be involved in cell division, whereas WOX2 was expressed mainly in embryonal mass (EM)-like tissues. The findings from this study, based on molecular assessment, suggest that the cell lines derived from bud cultures were truly EM. Moreover, these experimental observations suggest that PcWOX2 could be used as an early genetic marker to discriminate embryogenic cultures from callus.

  5. Experimental coccidiosis influences the expression of the ABCB1 gene, a physiological important functional marker of intestinal integrity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Haritova, Aneliya; Koinarski, Vencislav; Stanilova, Spaska

    2013-01-01

    Efflux transporters belonging to the family of ABC transporters have an important functional role in the maintenance of the intestinal barrier. As efflux transporters they prevent the absorption of toxic substances from feed, while at the same time facilitating the excretion of metabolic waste products as well as drugs from the circulation into the intestinal lumen. As Eimeria tenella infection significantly affects the integrity of caecum, the effects of experimental E. tenella infection on the levels of expression of ABCB1 mRNAs in the intestines and livers of broilers were evaluated. ABCB1 mRNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Its expression levels were significantly down-regulated in the caecum of infected animals. The levels of ABCB1 mRNA were not changed in the duodenum and the liver. After treatment of the animals with sulfapyrazine for three days, not only a significant improvement of the clinical appearance but also a normalization of the P-gp expression was noticed. Although the current study cannot distinguish between the direct effect of the drug on the host and the drug action on the parasite, these results suggest that the treatment of coccidiosis with sulfachlorpyrazine also restored the expression of the investigated efflux transporter in the caecum. This is of clinical significance as P-glycoproteins contribute to the integrity of intestines and their function as important biological barriers, protecting poultry from pathogens and toxic compounds in animal feeds.

  6. Fidelity of a simple Liberty leaf-painting assay to validate transgenic maize plants expressing the selectable marker gene, bar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Screening of gene manipulation events (transgenic, mutation/genome editing etc.) is a cost/labor intensive and time-consuming process in plant science research. While PCR is the most definitive way for screening desired events, the process still requires efficient DNA extraction and subsequent steps...

  7. A novel selectable marker based on Aspergillus niger arginase expression.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kashyap; Ahuja, Manmeet; Jayashri, T N; Sirola, Rekha Bisht; Punekar, Narayan S

    2012-06-10

    Selectable markers are valuable tools in transforming asexual fungi like Aspergillus niger. An arginase (agaA) expression vector and a suitable arginase-disrupted host would define a novel nutritional marker/selection for transformation. The development of such a marker was successfully achieved in two steps. The single genomic copy of A. niger arginase gene was disrupted by homologous integration of the bar marker. The agaA disruptant was subsequently complemented by transforming it with agaA expression vectors. Both citA and trpC promoters were able to drive the expression of arginase cDNA. Such agaA+ transformants displayed arginase expression pattern distinct from that of the parent strain. The results are also consistent with a single catabolic route for arginine in this fungus. A simple yet novel arginine-based selection for filamentous fungal transformation is thus described.

  8. Vaccine Properties of a Novel Marker Gene-Free Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara Expressing Immunodominant CMV Antigens pp65 and IE1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongde; La Rosa, Corinna; Li, Zhongqi; Ly, Heang; Krishnan, Aparna; Martinez, Joy; Britt, William J.; Diamond, Don

    2007-01-01

    CMV tegument protein pp65 and CMV immediate early gene product IE1 are both considered immunodominant targets of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and potentially capable of controlling CMV infection. To better assess their role in host defense, we have constructed a novel MVA transfer vector named pZWIIA and generated a recombinant MVA (rMVA) expressing both full-length pp65 and exon4 of IE1 (pp65-IE1-MVA) at high levels, followed by the genetic removal of the bacterial marker gene used to distinguish recombinant forms. Immunogenicity evaluation indicates that pp65-IE1-MVA not only can induce robust primary CMI to both antigens in HLA A2.1 Tg mice, but also can stimulate vigorous expansion of memory T lymphocyte responses to pp65 and IE1 in PBMC of CMV-positive donors. These properties make the MVA-based vaccine ideal for the dual role of priming and boosting CMV-specific T cell immunity as a means to control CMV disease in recipients of hematopoietic cell or solid organ transplantation (HCT or SOT). pZWIIA alone or in combination with other MVA transfer vectors can be used to generate MVA based multiple-antigen vaccine which have application in vaccine development for a wide spectrum of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:17049414

  9. The expression of pluripotency genes and neuronal markers after neurodifferentiation in fibroblasts co-cultured with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Marinowic, D R; Domingues, M F; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J C

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an attractive source of stem cells; however, it has a heterogeneous cell population with few mesenchymal stem cells. Cell reprogramming induced by different methodologies can confer pluripotency to differentiated adult cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reprogramming of fibroblasts and their subsequent neural differentiation after co-culture with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Cells were obtained from four human umbilical cords. The mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 d and subsequently co-cultured with mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells for 6 d. The pluripotency of the cells was evaluated by RT-PCR using primers specific for pluripotency marker genes. The pluripotency was also confirmed by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Neural differentiation of the reprogrammed cells was evaluated by immunofluorescence. All co-cultured cells showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. After co-cultivation, cells expressed the pluripotency gene KLF4. Statistically significant differences in cell area, diameter, optical density, and fractal dimension were observed by confocal microscopy in the neurally differentiated cells. Contact in the form of co-cultivation of fibroblasts with umbilical cord blood mononuclear fraction for 6 d promoted the reprogramming of these cells, allowing the later induction of neural differentiation.

  10. Effect of insoluble fibre on intestinal morphology and mRNA expression pattern of inflammatory, cell cycle and growth marker genes in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Schedle, Karl; Pfaffl, Michael W; Plitzner, Christian; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Windisch, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    The effects of insoluble dietary fibre differing in lignin content on intestinal morphology and mRNA expression was tested in an animal model of 48 weaned piglets. Engaged fibre sources were wheat bran (rich in cellulose and hemicellulose) and pollen from Chinese Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) (rich in lignin), respectively. The fibre sources were added to a basal diet as follows: no addition (control), 3.0% wheat bran, 1.27% pine pollen, and 2.55% pine pollen. The 12 animals of each feeding group were fed four experimental diets ad libitum for 37 days and were then slaughtered for retrieving tissue samples from stomach, jejunum, ileum, colon and mesenterial lymph nodes. Both fibre sources increased villus height of mucosa in jejunum (+10% on average) and ileum (+16% on average). Results of mRNA expression rates of inflammatory, cell cycle and growth marker genes (NFkappaB, TNFalpha, TGFbeta, Caspase3, CDK4, IGF1) were specific to fibre source and tissue: wheat bran induced an up-regulation of NFkappaB in stomach and jejunum, as well as TNFalpha and TGFbeta, and Caspase3 in jejunum. Pine pollen induced down regulation of NFkappaB, TNFalpha, TGFbeta, Caspase3, CDK4 and IGF1 in the colon as well as up-regulation of NFkappaB and TGFbeta in mesenterial lymph nodes. Finally, an overall data comparison based on a hierarchical cluster analysis showed a close relation between gene regulation in different gut sections and organs, as well as between small intestine morphology and zootechnical performance.

  11. Diet-dependent retinoid effects on liver gene expression include stellate and inflammation markers and parallel effects of the nuclear repressor Shp.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Meghan; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Foong, Yee Hoon; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A; Jefcoate, Colin R

    2017-09-01

    For mice, a maternal vitamin A (VA)-deficient diet initiated from midgestation (GVAD) produces serum retinol deficiency in mature offspring. We hypothesize that the effects of GVAD arise from preweaning developmental changes. We compare the effect of this GVAD protocol in combination with a postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) or high-carbohydrate diet (LF12). Each is compared to an equivalent VA-sufficient combination. GVAD extensively decreased serum retinol and liver retinol, retinyl esters, and retinoid homeostasis genes (Lrat, Cyp26b1 and Cyp26a1). These suppressions were each more effective with LF12 than with HFD. Postweaning initiation of VA deficiency with LF12 depleted liver retinoids, but serum retinol was unaffected. Liver retinoid depletion, therefore, precedes serum attenuation. Maternal LF12 decreased the obesity response to the HFD, which was further decreased by GVAD. LF12 fed to the mother and offspring extensively stimulated genes marking stellate activation (Col1a1, Timp2 and Cyp1b1) and novel inflammation markers (Ly6d, Trem2 and Nupr1). The GVAD with LF12 diet combination suppressed these responses. GVAD in combination with the HFD increased these same clusters. A further set of expression differences on the HFD when compared to a high-carbohydrate diet was prevented when GVAD was combined with HFD. Most of these GVAD gene changes match published effects from deletion of Nr0b2/Shp, a retinoid-responsive, nuclear co-repressor that modulates metabolic homeostasis. The stellate and inflammatory increases seen with the high-carbohydrate LF12 diet may represent postprandial responses. They depend on retinol and Shp, but the regulation reverses with an HFD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Gene expression changes in the hypothalamus provide evidence for regionally-selective changes in IL-1 and microglial markers after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Blandino, Peter; Barnum, Christopher J; Solomon, Lyvia G; Larish, Yaniv; Lankow, Benjamin S; Deak, Terrence

    2009-10-01

    Recent work from our laboratory and others has shown that certain stressors increase expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1) in the hypothalamus. The first goal of the following studies was to assess the impact of acute stress on other key inflammatory factors, including both cytokines and cell surface markers for immune-derived cells resident to the CNS in adult male Sprague Dawley rats exposed to intermittent footshock (80 shocks, 90 s variable ITI, 5 s each). While scattered changes in IL-6 and GFAP were observed in the hippocampus and cortex, we found the hypothalamus to be exquisitely sensitive to the effects of footshock. At the level of the hypothalamus, mRNA for IL-1 and CD14 were significantly increased, while at the same time CD200R mRNA was significantly decreased. A subsequent experiment demonstrated that propranolol (20mg/kg i.p.) blocked the increase in IL-1 and CD14 mRNA observed in the hypothalamus, while the decrease in CD200R was unaffected by propranolol. Interestingly, inhibition of glucocorticoid synthesis via injection of metyrapone (50mg/kg s.c.) plus aminoglutethimide (100mg/kg s.c.) increased basal IL-1 mRNA and augmented IL-1 and CD14 expression provoked by footshock. Injection of minocycline, a putative microglial inhibitor, blocked the IL-1 response to footshock, while CD14 and CD200R were unaffected. Together, these gene expression changes (i) provide compelling evidence that stress may provoke neuroinflammatory changes that extend well beyond isolated changes in a single cytokine; (ii) suggest opposing roles for classic stress-responsive factors (norepinephrine and corticosterone) in the modulation of stress-related neuroinflammation; (iii) indicate microglia within the hypothalamus may be key players in stress-related neuroinflammation; and (iv) provide a potential mechanism (increased CD14) by which acute stress primes reactivity to later immune challenge.

  13. Moesin expression is a marker of basal breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Monville, Florence; Bertucci, François; Esterni, Benjamin; Ginestier, Christophe; Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Geneix, Jeannine; Hassanein, Mohamed; Rabayrol, Laetitia; Sobol, Hagay; Taranger-Charpin, Colette; Xerri, Luc; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Jacquemier, Jocelyne

    2007-10-15

    Basal breast cancers (BBCs) have a high risk of metastasis, recurrence and death. Formal subtype definition relies on gene expression but can be approximated by protein expression. New markers are needed to help in the management of the basal subtype of breast cancer. In a previous transcriptional analysis of breast cell lines we found that Moesin expression was a potential basal marker. We show here that Moesin protein expression is a basal marker in breast tumors. In a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 547 sporadic breast cancers, of which 108 were profiled for gene expression, Moesin was expressed in 31% of all tumors and in 82% of the basal tumors. To confirm that Moesin expression remained associated with the basal phenotype in specific types of BBCs, we analyzed Moesin expression in 2 other TMAs containing 40 medullary breast cancers (MBCs) and 27 BRCA1-associated breast cancers (BRCA1-BCs), respectively. Moesin was strongly expressed in MBCs (87%; p = 2.4 x 10(-5)) and in BRCA1-BCs (58%; p = 1.3 x 10(-5)) as compared with non-MBCs and sporadic cases. Moesin-expressing tumors display features of BBCs, such as high proliferation rate, hormone receptors negativity, expression of putative basal/myoepithelial markers (CAV1, CD10, CK5/6, CK14, EGFR, P53, P-cadherin and SMA). Survival analysis showed a reduced specific survival and metastasis-free survival in Moesin-expressing tumors by log-rank test (p(SS) = 0.014 and p(MFS) = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, Moesin expression was nearly an independent prognostic marker of poor outcome as shown by Cox proportional hazard model in patients without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.052, HR = 2.38, CI 95[0.99-5.69]).

  14. Identifying new human oocyte marker genes: a microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Gasca, Stéphan; Pellestor, Franck; Assou, Saïd; Loup, Vanessa; Anahory, Tal; Dechaud, Hervé; De Vos, John; Hamamah, Samir

    2007-02-01

    The efficacy of classical IVF techniques is still impaired by poor implantation and pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. This is mainly due to a lack of reliable criteria for the selection of embryos with sufficient development potential. Several studies have provided evidence that some gene expression levels could be used as objective markers of oocyte and embryo competence and capacity to sustain a successful pregnancy. These analyses usually use reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to look at small sets of pre-selected genes. However, microarray approaches allow the identification of a wider range of cellular marker genes which could include additional and perhaps more suitable genes that could serve as embryo selection markers. Microarray screenings of around 30,000 genes on U133P Affymetrix gene chips made it possible to establish the expression profile of these genes as well as other related genes in human oocytes and cumulus cells. This study identifies new potential regulators and marker genes such as BARD1, RBL2, RBBP7, BUB3 or BUB1B, which are involved in oocyte maturation.

  15. Intermediate filament genes as differentiation markers in the leech Helobdella.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dian-Han; Weisblat, David A

    2011-10-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) cytoskeleton is a general feature of differentiated cells. Its molecular components, IF proteins, constitute a large family including the evolutionarily conserved nuclear lamins and the more diverse collection of cytoplasmic intermediate filament (CIF) proteins. In vertebrates, genes encoding CIFs exhibit cell/tissue type-specific expression profiles and are thus useful as differentiation markers. The expression of invertebrate CIFs, however, is not well documented. Here, we report a whole-genome survey of IF genes and their developmental expression patterns in the leech Helobdella, a lophotrochozoan model for developmental biology research. We found that, as in vertebrates, each of the leech CIF genes is expressed in a specific set of cell/tissue types. This allows us to detect earliest points of differentiation for multiple cell types in leech development and to use CIFs as molecular markers for studying cell fate specification in leech embryos. In addition, to determine the feasibility of using CIFs as universal metazoan differentiation markers, we examined phylogenetic relationships of IF genes from various species. Our results suggest that CIFs, and thus their cell/tissue-specific expression patterns, have expanded several times independently during metazoan evolution. Moreover, comparing the expression patterns of CIF orthologs between two leech species suggests that rapid evolutionary changes in the cell or tissue specificity of CIFs have occurred among leeches. Hence, CIFs are not suitable for identifying cell or tissue homology except among very closely related species, but they are nevertheless useful species-specific differentiation markers.

  16. Overweight and obesity are associated with neuronal injury in the human cerebellum and hippocampus in young adults: a combined MRI, serum marker and gene expression study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, K; Sacher, J; Arelin, K; Holiga, Š; Kratzsch, J; Villringer, A; Schroeter, M L

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity represents a risk for enhanced gray matter (GM) density changes comparable to those demonstrated for mild cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, it is not clear what mechanisms underlie this apparent alteration in brain structure of overweight subjects and to what extent these changes can already occur in the adolescent human brain. In the present volumetric magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated GM changes and serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a marker for neuronal injury, in a set of overweight/obese subjects and controls. We report a negative correlation for overweight and obese subjects between serum NSE and GM density in hippocampal and cerebellar regions. To validate our neuroimaging findings, we complement these data with NSE gene expression information obtained from the Allen Brain atlas. GM density changes were localized in brain areas that mediate cognitive function—the hippocampus associated with memory performance, and the cognitive cerebellum (lateral posterior lobes) associated with executive, spatial and linguistic processing. The data of our present study highlight the importance of extending current research on cognitive function and brain plasticity in the elderly in the context of obesity to young adult subjects and include serum biomarkers to validate imaging findings generally. PMID:23212584

  17. Exploiting expressed sequence tag databases for the development and characterization of gene-derived simple sequence repeat markers in the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) for forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Jin, Gang Nam; Lee, Kyung Lyong; Han, Myun Soo; Lee, Yang Han; Yang, Moon Sik

    2011-09-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) were identified from an expressed sequence tag (EST) database comprised of 20,340 sequences. In total, 2780 SSR-containing sequences were identified. The most frequent microsatellite had an AT/TA motif (37%). Twenty-two opium poppy EST-SSR markers were presently developed and polymorphisms of six markers (psom 2, 4, 12, 13, 17, and 22) were utilized in 135 individuals under narcotic control investigation. An average of three alleles per locus (range: 2-5 alleles) with a mean heterozygosity of 0.167 was detected. Six loci identified 29 unique profiles in 135 individuals. The EST-SSR markers exhibited small degrees of genetic differentiation (fixation index = 0.727, p < 0.001). Other variable markers will be needed to facilitate the forensic identification of the opium poppy for future cases. To determine the potential for cross-species amplification, six markers were tested in five Papaver genera species and two Eschscholzia genera. The psom 4 and psom 17 primer pair was transferable. This is the first study to report SSR markers of the opium poppy.

  18. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women

    PubMed Central

    Maningat, Patricia D.; Sen, Partha; Rijnkels, Monique; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Bray, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained from five normal lactating women. Following 24 h of baseline milk and blood sampling, rhGH (0.1 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 3 days. Gene expression changes were determined by microarray studies utilizing milk fat globule RNA isolated from each milk sample. Following rhGH administration, DNA synthesis and cell cycle genes were induced, while no significant changes were observed in the expression of milk synthesis genes. Expression of glycolysis and citric acid cycle genes were increased by day 4 compared with day 1, while lipid synthesis genes displayed a circadian-like pattern. Cell cycle gene upregulation occurred after a lag of ∼2 days, likely explaining the failure to increase milk production after only 3 days of rhGH treatment. We conclude that rhGH induces expression of cellular proliferation and metabolism genes but does not induce milk protein gene expression, as potential mechanisms for increasing milk production and could account for the known effect of rhGH to increase milk production following 7–10 days. PMID:21205870

  19. Identifying new human oocyte marker genes: a microarray approach

    PubMed Central

    Gasca, Stephan; Pellestor, Franck; Assou, Said; Loup, Vanessa; Anahory, Tal; Dechaud, Hervé; De Vos, John; Hamamah, Samir

    2007-01-01

    Efficiency in classical IVF (cIVF) techniques is still impaired by poor implantation and pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. This is mostly due to a lack of reliable criteria for the selection of embryos with sufficient development potential. Several studies have provided evidence that some genes’ expression levels could be used as objective markers of oocytes and embryos competence and of their capacity to sustain a successful pregnancy. These analyses usually used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to look at small sets of pre-selected genes. However, microarray approaches permit to identify a wider range of cellular marker genes. Thus they allow the identification of additional and perhaps more suited genes that could serve as embryo selection markers. Microarray screenings of circa 30 000 genes on U133P Affymetrix™ gene chips made it possible to establish the expression profile of these genes as well as other related genes in human oocytes and cumulus cells. In this study, we identified new potential regulators and marker genes such as BARD1, RBL2, RBBP7, BUB3 or BUB1B, which are involved in oocyte maturation. PMID:17298719

  20. Expression of an engineered synthetic cry2Aa (D42/K63F/K64P) gene of Bacillus thuringiensis in marker free transgenic tobacco facilitated full-protection from cotton leaf worm (S. littoralis) at very low concentration.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Srimonta; Mandal, Chandi Charan; Samanta, Milan Kumar; Dey, Avishek; Sen, Soumitra Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of resistant insects limits the sustainability of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic crop plants for insect management. Beside this, the presence of unwanted marker gene(s) in the transgenic crops is also a major environmental and health concern. Thus, development of marker free transgenic crop plants expressing a new class of toxin having a different mortality mechanism is necessary for resistance management. In a previous study, we generated an engineered Cry2Aa (D42/K63F/K64P) toxin which has a different mortality mechanism as compared to first generation Bt toxin Cry1A, and this engineered toxin was found to enhance 4.1-6.6-fold toxicity against major lepidopteran insect pests of crop plants. In the present study, we have tested the potency of this engineered synthetic Cry2Aa (D42/K63F/K64P) toxin as a candidate in the development of insect resistant transgenic tobacco plants. Simultaneously, we have eliminated the selectable marker gene from the Cry2Aa (D42/K63F/K64P) expressing tobacco plants by exploiting the Cre/lox mediated recombination methodology, and successfully developed marker free T2 transgenic tobacco plants expressing the engineered Cry2Aa toxin. Realtime and western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of engineered toxin gene in transgenic plants. Insect feeding assays revealed that the marker free T2 progeny of transgenic plants expressing Cry2Aa (D42/K63F/K64P) toxin showed 82-92 and 52-61 % mortality to cotton leaf worm (CLW) and cotton bollworm (CBW) respectively. Thus, this engineered Cry2Aa toxin could be useful for the generation of insect resistant transgenic Bt lines which will protect the crop damages caused by different insect pests such as CLW and CBW.

  1. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG).

    PubMed

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen; Nowak, Alexander; Gudziol, Volker; Valentini, Chiara; von Neubeck, Cläre; Jütz, Martin; Tinhofer, Inge; Budach, Volker; Sak, Ali; Stuschke, Martin; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Rödel, Claus; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Abdollahi, Amir; Debus, Jürgen; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Pigorsch, Steffi; Combs, Stephanie E; Mönnich, David; Zips, Daniel; Buchholz, Frank; Aust, Daniela E; Baretton, Gustavo B; Thames, Howard D; Dubrovska, Anna; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the impact of the tumour volume, HPV status, cancer stem cell (CSC) marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures, as potential markers of radiobiological mechanisms of radioresistance, in a contemporary cohort of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), who received primary radiochemotherapy (RCTx). For 158 patients with locally advanced HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx who were treated at six DKTK partner sites, the impact of tumour volume, HPV DNA, p16 overexpression, p53 expression, CSC marker expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein expression on LRC. The tumour hypoxia classification showed a significant impact only for small tumours. In multivariate analyses an independent correlation of tumour volume, SLC3A2 expression, and the 15-gene hypoxia signature with LRC was identified (CD44 protein n/a because of no event in the CD44-negative group). Logistic modelling showed that inclusion of CD44 protein expression and p16 overexpression significantly improved the performance to predict LRC at 2years compared to the model with tumour volume alone. Tumour volume, HPV status, CSC marker expression and hypoxia gene signatures are potential prognostic biomarkers for patients with locally advanced HNSCC, who were treated by primary RCTx. The study also supports that the individual tumour volumes should generally be included in biomarker studies and that panels of biomarkers are superior to individual parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  3. Variable but consistent pattern of Meningioma 1 gene (MN1) expression in different genetic subsets of acute myelogenous leukaemia and its potential use as a marker for minimal residual disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Valentina; Calabrese, Chiara; Signorino, Elisabetta; Bot-Sartor, Giada; Nicoli, Paolo; Gallo, Daniela; Bracco, Enrico; Morotti, Alessandro; Panuzzo, Cristina; Gottardi, Enrico; Cilloni, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma 1 (MN1) gene overexpression has been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients and identified as a negative prognostic factor. In order to characterize patients presenting gene overexpression and to verify if MN1 transcript could be a useful marker for minimal residual disease detection, MN1 was quantified in 136 AML patients with different cytogenetic risk and in 50 normal controls. In 20 patients bearing a fusion gene transcript suitable for minimal residual disease quantitative assessment and in 8 patients with NPM1 mutation, we performed a simultaneous analysis of MN1 and the fusion-gene transcript or NPM1 mutation during follow-up. Sequential MN1 and WT1 analysis was also performed in 13 AML patients lacking other molecular markers. The data obtained show that normal cells consistently express low levels of MN1 transcript. In contrast, high levels of MN1 expression are present in 47% of patients with normal karyotype and in all cases with inv(16). MN1 levels during follow-up were found to follow the pattern of other molecular markers (fusion gene transcripts, NPM1 and WT1). Increased MN1 expression in the BM during follow up was always found to be predictive of an impending hematological relapse. PMID:27765915

  4. Detection and treatment of molecular relapse in acute myeloid leukemia with RUNX1 (AML1), CBFB, or MLL gene translocations: frequent quantitative monitoring of molecular markers in different compartments and correlation with WT1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Doubek, Michael; Palasek, Ivo; Pospisil, Zdenek; Borsky, Marek; Klabusay, Martin; Brychtova, Yvona; Jurcek, Tomas; Jeziskova, Ivana; Krejci, Marta; Dvorakova, Dana; Mayer, Jiri

    2009-06-01

    Our objective was to determine the value of frequent minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a robust marker of impending relapse, and whether treatment benefits patients during the MRD-positive phase of their disease. Frequent MRD monitoring was performed in all AML treatment phases using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for fusion transcripts (CBFB/MYH11; RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion transcripts of MLL gene) and for the Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene. A total of 2,664 samples, taken from 79 AML patients and 6 healthy volunteers, were examined. Presence of fusion gene was detected in 25 of 79 examined patients. Vast correlation was discovered for fusion transcripts as well as for the WT1 gene between levels in bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood, CD34(+) BM cells, and CD34(-) BM cells. WT1 expression, however, was usually positive for cases showing fusion transcripts negativity and in healthy volunteers. Moreover, no universal value of the WT1 expression could unequivocally discriminate between remission and relapse. Therefore, detection of molecular relapses relied on fusion transcripts only and was characterized by strong expression in CD34(+) cells. Considering relapsed patients, duration from molecular to hematological relapse was 8 to 79 days (median: 25.5 days). Twelve patients were treated (chemotherapy, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, or immunomodulation after allogeneic transplantation) for 21 molecular relapses and 14 responses to treatment were observed. Frequent quantitative monitoring of fusion transcripts is useful for reliably predicting hematological relapse in AML patients. Treatment for molecular relapse of AML can be successful.

  5. Investigation of the human H3.3B (H3F3B) gene expression as a novel marker in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayoubi, Habib Allah; Mirzaei, Rezvan

    2017-01-01

    Background H3.3 histone is a replacement histone subtype that is express in entire cell cycle phases and overexpress in transcriptionally active regions, promoter regions, and intergenic or intragenic regulatory elements. This histone encoded by two genes termed H3.3A (H3F3A) and H3.3B (H3F3B). Mutations of these two genes lead to some human cancers such as chondroblastoma, osteosarcoma, and epithelial ovarian cancer. The aims of this study were to quantitatively examine the expression of H3.3B gene in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to correlate their expression level with demographics and clinicopathological characteristics. Methods We investigated H3.3B gene expression in CRC by relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) technique for the first time. For this purpose, total RNA extracted, then cDNA synthesized and H3.3B gene expression was evaluated with specific primers by real-time PCR in tumoral tissues and adjacent normal tissues of 36 patients with CRC, then statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results The results of this study indicated that H3.3B gene significantly overexpressed in tumoral tissue than adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, statistical analysis represented the significant correlation between the H3.3B gene expression and some of the clinicopathological characteristics. Conclusions Our study showed that H3.3B gene expression changes can be useful as a probable prognosis biomarker in the early stages of CRC before it metastasized. PMID:28280610

  6. MGDB: crossing the marker genes of a user microarray with a database of public-microarrays marker genes.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Mario; Munyi, Marc; Expósito, David; Querol, Enric; Cedano, Juan

    2014-06-15

    The microarrays performed by scientific teams grow exponentially. These microarray data could be useful for researchers around the world, but unfortunately they are underused. To fully exploit these data, it is necessary (i) to extract these data from a repository of the high-throughput gene expression data like Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and (ii) to make the data from different microarrays comparable with tools easy to use for scientists. We have developed these two solutions in our server, implementing a database of microarray marker genes (Marker Genes Data Base). This database contains the marker genes of all GEO microarray datasets and it is updated monthly with the new microarrays from GEO. Thus, researchers can see whether the marker genes of their microarray are marker genes in other microarrays in the database, expanding the analysis of their microarray to the rest of the public microarrays. This solution helps not only to corroborate the conclusions regarding a researcher's microarray but also to identify the phenotype of different subsets of individuals under investigation, to frame the results with microarray experiments from other species, pathologies or tissues, to search for drugs that promote the transition between the studied phenotypes, to detect undesirable side effects of the treatment applied, etc. Thus, the researcher can quickly add relevant information to his/her studies from all of the previous analyses performed in other studies as long as they have been deposited in public repositories. Marker-gene database tool: http://ibb.uab.es/mgdb © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma Gene Markers

    PubMed Central

    Dalgin, Gul S.; Holloway, Dustin T.; Liou, Louis S.; DeLisi, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling has been used to distinguish histological subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and consequently to identify specific tumor markers. The analytical procedures currently in use find sets of genes whose average differential expression across the two categories differ significantly. In general each of the markers thus identified does not distinguish tumor from normal with 100% accuracy, although the group as a whole might be able to do so. For the purpose of developing a widely used economically viable diagnostic signature, however, large groups of genes are not likely to be useful. Here we use two different methods, one a support vector machine variant, and the other an exhaustive search, to reanalyze data previously generated in our Lab (Lenburg et al. 2003). We identify 158 genes, each having an expression level that is higher (lower) in every tumor sample than in any normal sample, and each having a minimum differential expression across the two categories at a significance of 0.01. The set is highly enriched in cancer related genes (p = 1.6 × 10−12), containing 43 genes previously associated with either RCC or other types of cancer. Many of the biomarkers appear to be associated with the central alterations known to be required for cancer transformation. These include the oncogenes JAZF1, AXL, ABL2; tumor suppressors RASD1, PTPRO, TFAP2A, CDKN1C; and genes involved in proteolysis or cell-adhesion such as WASF2, and PAPPA. PMID:19455236

  8. Alteration of Multiple Leukocyte Gene Expression Networks is Linked with Magnetic Resonance Markers of Prognosis After Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Teren, A.; Kirsten, H.; Beutner, F.; Scholz, M.; Holdt, L. M.; Teupser, D.; Gutberlet, M.; Thiery, J.; Schuler, G.; Eitel, I.

    2017-01-01

    Prognostic relevant pathways of leukocyte involvement in human myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury are largely unknown. We enrolled 136 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) after primary angioplasty within 12 h after onset of symptoms. Following reperfusion, whole blood was collected within a median time interval of 20 h (interquartile range: 15–25 h) for genome-wide gene expression analysis. Subsequent CMR scans were performed using a standard protocol to determine infarct size (IS), area at risk (AAR), myocardial salvage index (MSI) and the extent of late microvascular obstruction (lateMO). We found 398 genes associated with lateMO and two genes with IS. Neither AAR, nor MSI showed significant correlations with gene expression. Genes correlating with lateMO were strongly related to several canonical pathways, including positive regulation of T-cell activation (p = 3.44 × 10−5), and regulation of inflammatory response (p = 1.86 × 10−3). Network analysis of multiple gene expression alterations associated with larger lateMO identified the following functional consequences: facilitated utilisation and decreased concentration of free fatty acid, repressed cell differentiation, enhanced phagocyte movement, increased cell death, vascular disease and compensatory vasculogenesis. In conclusion, the extent of lateMO after acute, reperfused STEMI correlated with altered activation of multiple genes related to fatty acid utilisation, lymphocyte differentiation, phagocyte mobilisation, cell survival, and vascular dysfunction. PMID:28155873

  9. Widespread and efficient marker gene expression in the airway epithelia of fetal sheep after minimally invasive tracheal application of recombinant adenovirus in utero.

    PubMed

    Peebles, D; Gregory, L G; David, A; Themis, M; Waddington, S N; Knapton, H J; Miah, M; Cook, T; Lawrence, L; Nivsarkar, M; Rodeck, C; Coutelle, C

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a common lethal genetic disease caused by functional absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Although a candidate disease for in utero gene therapy, demonstration of potentially therapeutic levels of transgene expression in the fetal airways after minimally invasive gene delivery is a mandatory prerequisite before application of this approach in humans can be considered. We report here on the delivery of a beta-galactosidase expressing adenovirus directly to the airways of fetal sheep in utero using ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of the trachea in the fetal chest. Injection of adenoviral particles to the fetal airways was not associated with mortality and resulted in low-level expression in the peripheral airways. However, complexation of the virus with DEAE dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus, and pretreatment of the airways with Na-caprate, which opens tight junctions, increased transgene expression, and a combination of these two enhancers resulted in widespread and efficient gene transfer of the fetal trachea and bronchial tree. Using a percutaneous ultrasound-guided injection technique, we have clearly demonstrated proof of principle for substantial transgene delivery to the fetal airways providing levels of gene expression that could be relevant for a therapeutic application of CFTR expressing vectors.

  10. Perils of gene mapping with microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.A.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Vieland, V.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The discovery of microsatellite polymorphisms has revitalized the genetic mapping of the human genome and promises to have a dramatic effect on human disease gene mapping. The high polymorphicity, relative abundance, and amenability of these markers to assay by PCR amplification gives them a significant advantage over previous markers, which explains their general acceptance and widespread use (Litt and Luty 1989; Weber and May 1989). Preliminary chromosome maps have been constructed using microsatellites exclusively (Weber et al. 1991; Hazen et al. 1992; Kwiatkowski et al. 1992), and disease loci have been mapped by linkage to these markers (Wijmenga et al. 1991). The markers provide new optimism for the mapping of disease genes, particularly for the mapping of complex genetic disorders. The authors present evidence that the very qualities that render these markers so efficient for chromosome mapping in large reference pedigrees can lead to dramatic lod score bias when applied to the typical pedigrees used to study genetic disorders, particularly when the disorder under study is complex. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Comparison of the gene expression profiles of human fetal cortical astrocytes with pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells identifies human astrocyte markers and signaling pathways and transcription factors active in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nasir; Wang, Xiantao; Shah, Sonia; Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Yan, Bin; Heman-Ackah, Sabrina; Zhan, Ming; Rao, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease.

  12. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  13. Expression screening of cancer/testis genes in prostate cancer identifies NR6A1 as a novel marker of disease progression and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Romain; Evrard, Bertrand; Fromont, Gaëlle; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Godet, Julie; Cathelineau, Xavier; Guillé, François; Primig, Michael; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Cancer/Testis (CT) genes are expressed in male gonads, repressed in most healthy somatic tissues and de-repressed in various somatic malignancies including prostate cancers (PCa). Because of their specific expression signature and their associations with tumor aggressiveness and poor outcomes, CT genes are considered to be useful biomarkers and they are also targets for the development of new anti-cancer immunotherapies. The aim of this study was to identify novel CT genes associated with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (HSPC), and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). To identify novel CT genes we screened genes for which transcripts were detected by RNA profiling specifically in normal testis and in either HSPC or CRPC as compared to normal prostate and 44 other healthy tissues using GeneChips. The expression and clinicopathological significance of a promising candidate--NR6A1--was examined in HSPC, CRPC, and metastatic site samples using tissue microarrays. We report the identification of 98 genes detected in CRPC, HSPC and testicular samples but not in the normal controls. Among them, cellular levels of NR6A1 were found to be higher in HSPC compared to normal prostate and further increased in metastatic lesions and CRPC. Furthermore, increased NR6A1 immunoreactivity was significantly associated with a high Gleason score, advanced pT stage and cancer cell proliferation. Our results show that cellular levels of NR6A1 are correlated with disease progression in PCa. We suggest that this essential orphan nuclear receptor is a potential therapeutic target as well as a biomarker of PCa aggressiveness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cellular Distribution and Gene Expression Pattern of Metastasin (S100A4), Calgranulin A (S100A8), and Calgranulin B (S100A9) in Oral Lesions as Markers for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Reckenbeil, Jan; Kraus, Dominik; Probstmeier, Rainer; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frentzen, Matthias; Martini, Markus; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Winter, Jochen

    2016-07-02

    The objective of this study was to analyze cellular localization and expression levels of oncologic relevant members of the S100 family in common oral lesions.Biopsies of various oral lesions were analyzed. S100A4 showed a higher expression rate in leukoplakias and oral squamous cell carcinomas. Transcript levels of S100A8 and S100A9 were significantly decreased in malignant OSCCs. A correlation could be drawn between the expression levels of these genes and the pathological characteristics of the investigated lesions. S100A4, A8, and A9 proteins represent promising marker genes to evaluate the risk potential of suspicious oral lesions in molecular pathology.

  15. Candidate Markers That Associate with Chemotherapy Resistance in Breast Cancer through the Study on Taxotere-Induced Damage to Tumor Microenvironment and Gene Expression Profiling of Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs)

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guohua; Kang, Hua; Wang, Yajun; Hai, Tao; Sun, Haichen

    2013-01-01

    Recently, emerging evidence has suggested that carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) could contribute to chemotherapy resistances in breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study is to compare the gene expression profiling of CAFs before and after chemotherapy and pick up candidate genes that might associate with chemotherapy resistance and could be used as predictors of treatment response. CAFs were cultured from surgically resected primary breast cancers and identified with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Flow cytometry (FCM). MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured as the breast cancer cell line. Cell adhesion assay, invasion assay, and proliferation assay (MTT) were performed to compare the function of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured with CAFs and MDA-MB-231 cells without co-culture, after chemotherapy. Totally 6 pairs of CAFs were prepared for microarray analysis. Each pair of CAFs were obtained from the same patient and classified into two groups. One group was treated with Taxotere (regarded as after chemotherapy) while the other group was not processed with Taxotere (regarded as before chemotherapy). According to our study, the primary-cultured CAFs exhibited characteristic phenotype. After chemotherapy, MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured with CAFs displayed increasing adhesion, invasiveness and proliferation abilities, compared with MDA-MB-231 cells without CAFs. Moreover, 35 differentially expressed genes (absolute fold change >2) were identified between CAFs after chemotherapy and before chemotherapy, including 17 up-regulated genes and 18 down-regulated genes. CXCL2, MMP1, IL8, RARRES1, FGF1, and CXCR7 were picked up as the candidate markers, of which the differential expression in CAFs before and after chemotherapy was confirmed. The results indicate the changes of gene expression in CAFs induced by Taxotere treatment and propose the candidate markers that possibly associate with chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. PMID:23951052

  16. [Construction of plant expression vectors with PMI gene as selection marker and their utilization in transformation of Salvia miltiorrhiza f. alba].

    PubMed

    Tao, Ru; Zhang, You-Can; Fang, Qian; Shi, Ren-Jiu; Li, Yan-Ling; Huang, Lu-Qi; Hao, Gang-Ping

    2014-04-01

    To construct plant expression pCAMBIA1301-PMI by substituting PMI for hygromycin resistance gene in pCAMBIA1301 and obtain transgenic Salvia miltiorrhiza f. alba using PMI-mannose selection system. The 6-phosphomannose isomerase gene (PMI) of Escherichia coli was amplified by PCR. Sequence analysis showed that it shared 100% amino acids identities with the sequences of PMI genes isolates reported in the NCBI. Based on pCAMBIA1305, the plant expression pCAMBIA1305-PMI was constructed successfully by substituting PMI for hygromycin resistance gene in pCAMBIA1305. pCAMBIA1305-PMI was transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, and then the leaves of S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were inoculated in LBA4404 with pCAMBIA1305-PMI. Plant expression pCAMBIA1301-PMI was successfully constructed and the leaves of S. miltiorrhiza f. alba inoculated in LBA4404 with pCAMBIA1305-PMI were selected on medium supplemented with a combination of 20 g x L(-1) mannose and 10 g x L(-1) sucrose as a carbon source. The transformation efficiency rate was 23.7%. Genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR, indicating that a new method for obtaining transgenic S. miltiorrhiza f. alba plants was developed using PMI-mannose selection system.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of Burkholderia cenocepacia at the Time of Cepacia Syndrome: Loss of Motility as a Marker of Poor Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Kalferstova, Lucie; Kolar, Michal; Fila, Libor; Vavrova, Jolana

    2015-01-01

    Cepacia syndrome (CS) is a fatal septic condition that develops in approximately 20% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). The most common causative agent is Burkholderia cenocepacia, a clinically dominant Bcc species that contains the globally distributed epidemic strain sequence type 32 (ST32). Using microarrays, we compared the transcriptomes of ST32 isolates from the bloodstream at the time of CS with their sputum counterparts recovered 1 to 2 months prior to the development of CS. Global gene expression profiles of blood isolates revealed greater activities of the virulence genes involved in the type III secretion system, the bacterial exopolysaccharide cepacian, and quorum sensing, while reduced expression was demonstrated for flagellar genes. Furthermore, a nonmotile phenotype (as evaluated by a swimming motility assay) was identified in blood isolates from 6 out of 8 patients with CS; this phenotype was traceable to 24 months prior to the onset of CS. Loss of motility was not observed in any of the 89 ST32 isolates recovered over the course of chronic infection from 17 patients without CS. In conclusion, the gene expression of Bcc bacteria disseminated during CS has been elucidated for the first time. This study demonstrated marked differences at the transcriptome level between isogenic ST32 isolates that are attributable to the stage and site of infection. The finding of a nonmotile B. cenocepacia isolate may serve as a warning sign for the development of CS in the near future. PMID:25694518

  18. Gene expression profiling of Burkholderia cenocepacia at the time of cepacia syndrome: loss of motility as a marker of poor prognosis?

    PubMed

    Kalferstova, Lucie; Kolar, Michal; Fila, Libor; Vavrova, Jolana; Drevinek, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Cepacia syndrome (CS) is a fatal septic condition that develops in approximately 20% of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). The most common causative agent is Burkholderia cenocepacia, a clinically dominant Bcc species that contains the globally distributed epidemic strain sequence type 32 (ST32). Using microarrays, we compared the transcriptomes of ST32 isolates from the bloodstream at the time of CS with their sputum counterparts recovered 1 to 2 months prior to the development of CS. Global gene expression profiles of blood isolates revealed greater activities of the virulence genes involved in the type III secretion system, the bacterial exopolysaccharide cepacian, and quorum sensing, while reduced expression was demonstrated for flagellar genes. Furthermore, a nonmotile phenotype (as evaluated by a swimming motility assay) was identified in blood isolates from 6 out of 8 patients with CS; this phenotype was traceable to 24 months prior to the onset of CS. Loss of motility was not observed in any of the 89 ST32 isolates recovered over the course of chronic infection from 17 patients without CS. In conclusion, the gene expression of Bcc bacteria disseminated during CS has been elucidated for the first time. This study demonstrated marked differences at the transcriptome level between isogenic ST32 isolates that are attributable to the stage and site of infection. The finding of a nonmotile B. cenocepacia isolate may serve as a warning sign for the development of CS in the near future.

  19. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases.

  20. SNP Marker Discovery in Koala TLR Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J.; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O’Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  1. Tissue-based Alzheimer gene expression markers-comparison of multiple machine learning approaches and investigation of redundancy in small biomarker sets.

    PubMed

    Scheubert, Lena; Luštrek, Mitja; Schmidt, Rainer; Repsilber, Dirk; Fuellen, Georg

    2012-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease has been known for more than 100 years and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood. The identification of genes involved in the processes in Alzheimer affected brain is an important step towards such an understanding. Genes differentially expressed in diseased and healthy brains are promising candidates. Based on microarray data we identify potential biomarkers as well as biomarker combinations using three feature selection methods: information gain, mean decrease accuracy of random forest and a wrapper of genetic algorithm and support vector machine (GA/SVM). Information gain and random forest are two commonly used methods. We compare their output to the results obtained from GA/SVM. GA/SVM is rarely used for the analysis of microarray data, but it is able to identify genes capable of classifying tissues into different classes at least as well as the two reference methods. Compared to the other methods, GA/SVM has the advantage of finding small, less redundant sets of genes that, in combination, show superior classification characteristics. The biological significance of the genes and gene pairs is discussed.

  2. The roles of BTG3 expression in gastric cancer: a potential marker for carcinogenesis and a target molecule for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gou, Wen-feng; Yang, Xue-feng; Shen, Dao-fu; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Yun-peng; Sun, Hong-zhi; Takano, Yasuo; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Zheng, Hua-chuan

    2015-08-14

    BTG (B-cell translocation gene) can inhibit cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, and induce differentiation in various cells. Here, we found that BTG3 overexpression inhibited proliferation, induced S/G2 arrest, differentiation, autophagy, apoptosis, suppressed migration and invasion in MKN28 and MGC803 cells (p < 0.05). BTG3 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of p27, Bax, 14-3-3, Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Beclin 1, NF-κB, IL-1, -2, -4, -10 and -17, but a lower mRNA expression of p21, MMP-9 and VEGF than the control and mock (p < 0.05). At protein level, BTG3 overexpression increased the expression of CDK4, AIF, LC-3B, Beclin 1 and p38 (p < 0.05), but decreased the expression of p21 and β-catenin in both transfectants (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG3 transfectants showed lower viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05). BTG3 expression was restored after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine or MG132 treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG3 expression was decreased in gastric cancer in comparison to the adjacent mucosa (p < 0.05), and positively correlated with venous invasion and dedifferentiation of cancer (p < 0.05). It was suggested that BTG3 expression might contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. BTG3 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer.

  3. CGMD: An integrated database of cancer genes and markers

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kramthi Kumar, Konidala; Balasubramanyam, Lokanada; Vidya Prabhakar, Kodali; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Integrating cancer genes and markers with experimental evidence might provide valuable information for the further investigation of crosstalk between tumor genes and markers in cancer biology. To achieve this objective, we developed a database known as the Cancer Gene Marker Database (CGMD), which integrates data on tumor genes and markers based on experimental evidence. The major goal of CGMD is to provide the following: 1) current systematic treatment approaches and recent advances in different cancer treatments; 2) the aggregation of different genes and markers by their molecular characteristics and pathway associations; and 3) free access to the data compiled by CGMD at http://cgmd.in/. The database consists of 309 genes and 206 markers, as well as a list of 40 different human cancers, with detailed descriptions of all characterized markers. CGMD provides complete cancer annotations and molecular descriptions of cancer genes and markers such as CpG islands, promoters, exons, PDB structures, active sites and domains. PMID:26160459

  4. CGMD: An integrated database of cancer genes and markers.

    PubMed

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kramthi; Balasubramanyam, Lokanada; Prabhakar, Kodali Vidya; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-07-10

    Integrating cancer genes and markers with experimental evidence might provide valuable information for the further investigation of crosstalk between tumor genes and markers in cancer biology. To achieve this objective, we developed a database known as the Cancer Gene Marker Database (CGMD), which integrates data on tumor genes and markers based on experimental evidence. The major goal of CGMD is to provide the following: 1) current systematic treatment approaches and recent advances in different cancer treatments; 2) the aggregation of different genes and markers by their molecular characteristics and pathway associations; and 3) free access to the data compiled by CGMD at http://cgmd.in/. The database consists of 309 genes and 206 markers, as well as a list of 40 different human cancers, with detailed descriptions of all characterized markers. CGMD provides complete cancer annotations and molecular descriptions of cancer genes and markers such as CpG islands, promoters, exons, PDB structures, active sites and domains.

  5. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  6. The effects of elevated subcutaneous fat stores on fatty acid composition and gene expression of proinflammatory markers in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Scholte, Cynthia M; Rezamand, Pedram; Tsai, Chia-Yu; Amiri, Zahra M; Ramsey, Kirk C; McGuire, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    During the periparturient period, elevated circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from excessive lipid mobilization affect not only the circulating fatty acid (FA) composition, but also that of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). However, the changes to specific lipid fractions remain unknown. We hypothesized that elevated lipid mobilization will alter FA profiles and gene expression of selected proinflammatory mediators in PBMC and PMNL. Starting -28 d relative to expected calving (d 0), treatment cows (n = 18) received a dry cow ration plus an additional 10 kg of corn/head per day, while the control cows (n = 16) received the dry cow ration (no additional corn) supplemented with 400 mg of monensin/head per day to minimize lipid mobilization. Postpartum, treatment cows were feed deprived for 8 h on d +3. For FA analysis, serum was collected on d -28 and -7 relative to expected parturition and d +1, +3, +6, +15, and +21 postpartum, in addition to milk samples. Immune cells, PBMC and PMNL, were isolated on d -28, +3, +12, and +21 for FA analysis and gene expression analysis by reverse-transcription PCR. Serum, PBMC, and PMNL lipids were fractionated into NEFA and phospholipids (PL). The FA composition of milk, serum, PBMC, and PMNL was analyzed by gas chromatography. Data were analyzed as repeated measures ANOVA using mixed model procedures in SAS (9.3) with significance declared at P ≤ 0.05. Several FA varied by treatment and across time and parity. Within the serum PL fraction, FA associated with altered immune function, C18:3n-6, C20:4, C20:5, total n-3, and the ratio of n-6 to n-3 varied significantly by a treatment × parity × time interaction. Overall, FA composition of NEFA and PL fractions from PBMC and PMNL did not significantly reflect FA of serum. Gene expression for IL-1β in PBMC was greater for control, whereas ICAM, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were greater in primiparous than multiparous cows

  7. Validation of hsp70 stress gene expression as a marker of metal effects in Deroceras reticulatum (Pulmonata): Correlation with demographic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, H.R.; Eckwert, H.; Rahman, B.; Belitz, B.; Adam, R.; Trontelj, P. |

    1998-11-01

    The presence of a stress gene comprising a motif homologous to the hsp70 consensus sequence was proven for the grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Mueller). The induction of stress gene transcription (including mRNA stability) and the accumulation of the corresponding stress protein, Hsp70, was quantified in slugs exposed to cadmium- or zinc-enriched food for 2 to 3 weeks. To validate the suitability of these two aspects of the cellular stress response to act as early-warning markers for metal effects on life-history parameters, fecundity, offspring number, longevity, and mortality of slugs were recorded in life-cycle experiments. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and a standardized immunoblotting technique revealed higher sensitivity of changes in hsp70 transcription than stress protein accumulation in response to both metals. The elevation of the hsp70-mRNA level caused by short-term (14 d) metal exposure coincided with both diminished fecundity and reduced offspring production due to chronic metal exposure in terms of threshold concentrations for cadmium effects. As well, accumulation of Hsp70 after 3 weeks of exposure can be considered an early-warning signal for increased mortality when cadmium or zinc exposure is throughout the entire lifetime of the slugs.

  8. [Circadian markers and genes in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Yeim, S; Boudebesse, C; Etain, B; Belliviera, F

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and complex multifactorial disease, characterized by alternance of acute episodes of depression and mania/hypomania, interspaced by euthymic periods. The etiological determinants of bipolar disorder yet, are still poorly understood. For the last 30 years, chronobiology is an important field of investigation to better understand the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. We conducted a review using Medline, ISI Database, EMBase, PsyInfo up to January 2015, using the following keywords combinations: "mood disorder", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "unipolar disorder", "major depressive disorder", "affective disorder", for psychiatric conditions; and "circadian rhythms", "circadian markers", "circadian gene", "clock gene", "melatonin" for circadian rhythms. The search critera was presence of word in any field of the article. Quantitative and qualitative circadian abnormalities are associated with bipolar disorders both during acute episodes and euthymic periods, suggesting that these altered circadian rhythms may represent biological trait markers of the disorder. These circadian dysfunctions were assessed by various validated tools including polysomnography, actigraphy, sleep diaries, chronotype assessments and blood melatonin/cortisol measures. Other altered endogenous circadian activities have also been reported in bipolar patients, such as hormones secretion, core body temperature or fibroblasts activity. Moreover, these markers were also altered in healthy relatives of bipolar patients, suggesting a degree of heritability. Several genetic association studies have also showed associations between multiple circadian genes and bipolar disorder, such as CLOCK, ARTNL1, GSK3β, PER3, NPAS2, NR1D1, TIMELESS, RORA, RORB, and CSNK1ε. Thus, these circadian gene variants may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the disease. Furthermore, the study of the clock system may help to better understand some phenotypic aspects like the

  9. Runx2 expression: A mesenchymal stem marker for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Maria Teresa; Serafini, Paola; Innamorati, Giulio; Gili, Anna; Cheri, Samuele; Bassi, Claudio; Dalle Carbonare, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is a master gene implicated in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, and thus serves a determinant function in bone remodelling and skeletal integrity. Various signalling pathways regulate Runx2 abundance, which requires a number of molecules to finely modulate its expression. Furthermore, this gene may be ectopically-expressed in cancer cells. Recent studies have reported the involvement of Runx2 in cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, apoptosis and metastatic processes, suggesting it may represent a useful therapeutic target in cancer treatment. However, studies evaluating this gene as a cancer marker are lacking. In the present study, Runx2 expression was analysed in 11 different cancer cell lines not derived from bone tumour. In addition, the presence of Runx2-related cell-free RNA was examined in the peripheral blood of 41 patients affected by different forms of tumours. The results demonstrated high expression levels of Runx2 in the cancer cell lines and identified the presence of Runx2-related cell-free RNA in the peripheral blood of patients with cancer. As compared with normal individuals, the expression level was increased by 14.2-fold in patients with bone metastases and by 4.01-fold in patients without metastases. The results of the present study therefore opens up the possibility to exploit Runx2 expression as a cancer biomarker allowing the use of minimally invasive approaches for diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:27895787

  10. Alterations in apoptotic markers and egg-specific protein gene expression in the chicken oviduct during pause in laying induced by tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Socha, Joanna K; Hrabia, Anna

    2017-09-21

    The aim of this study was to examine the cell apoptosis, gene expression and activity of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9, and the mRNA expression of selected egg-specific proteins in the chicken oviduct during pause in egg laying induced by tamoxifen (TMX) treatment. The experiment was carried out on Hy-Line Brown laying hens. The control birds were treated subcutaneously with vehicle (ethanol) and the experimental ones with TMX at a dose of 6 mg/kg of body weight. Hens were treated daily until a pause in egg laying occurred and sacrificed on Day 7 of the experiment. Within the oviductal wall, the highest number of apoptotic cells (TUNEL-positive) was found in the luminal epithelium and the lowest in the stroma. The administration of TMX increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in the magnum, isthmus, and shell gland as well as immunoreactivity for caspases 3 and 9. Real-time PCR analysis revealed the segment-dependent mRNA expression of caspases 2, 3, 8 and 9. Treatment of hens with TMX elevated the level of caspase-2 transcript in the infundibulum, caspases 2, 3 and 8 in the isthmus, and caspase-9 in the shell gland (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001). As shown by fluorometric method TMX caused an increase in the activity of caspases 3 and 8 in the magnum, isthmus and shell gland, and the activity of caspases 2 and 9 in the isthmus and shell gland (P < 0.05 - P < 0.01). The expression of ovalbumin, avidin and ovocleidin-116 mRNAs was decreased (P < 0.05 - P < 0.001), ovocalyxin-36 mRNA level tended to increase, and ovocalyxin-32 expression was not affected by TMX. The results obtained indicate that caspases are involved in the chicken oviduct regression during a pause in laying induced by TMX, and estrogen is involved in the regulation of examined caspase expression and activity. The changes in mRNA transcript levels of some examined egg-specific proteins after TMX treatment suggest that there is a relationship between estrogen action and the expression of these genes

  11. Leaf-, panel- and latex-expressed sequenced tags from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) under cold-stressed and suboptimal growing conditions: the development of gene-targeted functional markers for stress response.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carla C; Mantello, Camila C; Campos, Tatiana; Souza, Livia M; Gonçalves, Paulo S; Souza, Anete P

    2014-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis is a native species of the Amazon Basin of South America and the primary source of natural rubber worldwide. Due to the occurrence of South American Leaf Blight disease in this area, rubber plantations have been extended to suboptimal regions. Rubber tree breeding is time-consuming and expensive, but molecular markers can serve as a tool for early evaluation, thus reducing time and costs. In this work, we constructed six different cDNA libraries with the aim of developing gene-targeted molecular markers for the rubber tree. A total of 8,263 reads were assembled, generating 5,025 unigenes that were analyzed; 912 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) represented new transcripts, and two sequences were highly up-regulated by cold stress. These unigenes were scanned for microsatellite (SSR) regions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, 169 novel EST-SSR markers were developed; 138 loci were polymorphic in the rubber tree, and 98 % presented transferability to six other Hevea species. Locus duplication was observed in H. brasiliensis and other species. Additionally, 43 SNP markers in 13 sequences that showed similarity to proteins involved in stress response, latex biosynthesis and developmental processes were characterized. cDNA libraries are a rich source of SSR and SNP markers and enable the identification of new transcripts. The new markers developed here will be a valuable resource for linkage mapping, QTL identification and other studies in the rubber tree and can also be used to evaluate the genetic variability of other Hevea species, which are valuable assets in rubber tree breeding.

  12. Production of marker-free disease-resistant potato using isopentenyl transferase gene as a positive selection marker.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raham Sher; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Chin, Dong Poh; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of antibiotic or herbicide resistant genes as selection markers for production of transgenic plants and their continuous presence in the final transgenics has been a serious problem for their public acceptance and commercialization. MAT (multi-auto-transformation) vector system has been one of the different strategies to excise the selection marker gene and produce marker-free transgenic plants. In the present study, ipt (isopentenyl transferase) gene was used as a selection marker gene. A chitinase gene, ChiC (isolated from Streptomyces griseus strain HUT 6037) was used as a gene of interest. ChiC gene was cloned from the binary vector, pEKH1 to an ipt-type MAT vector, pMAT21 by gateway cloning and transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. The infected tuber discs of potato were cultured on hormone- and antibiotic-free MS medium. Seven of the 35 explants infected with the pMAT21/ChiC produced shoots. The same antibiotic- and hormones-free MS medium was used in subcultures of the shoots (ipt like and normal shoots). Molecular analyses of genomic DNA from transgenic plants confirmed the integration of gene of interest and excision of the selection marker in 3 of the 7 clones. Expression of ChiC gene was confirmed by Northern blot and western blot analyses. Disease-resistant assay of the marker-free transgenic, in vitro and greenhouse-grown plants exhibited enhanced resistance against Alternaria solani (early blight), Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) and Fusarium oxysporum (Fusarium wilt). From these results it could be concluded that ipt gene can be used as a selection marker to produce marker-free disease-resistant transgenic potato plants on PGR- and antibiotic-free MS medium.

  13. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  14. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  15. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C.; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection. PMID:28187136

  16. HINTW, a W-chromosome HINT gene in chick, is expressed ubiquitously and is a robust female cell marker applicable in intraspecific chimera studies.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiroki; Sezaki, Maiko; Bertocchini, Federica; Fukuda, Kimiko; Sheng, Guojun

    2014-05-01

    Grafting and transplantation experiments in embryology require proper distinction between host and donor tissues. For the avian model this has traditionally been achieved by using two closely related species (e.g., chick and quail) followed by species-specific antibody staining. Here, we show that an in situ hybridization probe against the HINTW gene is a robust and reliable marker for female-derived chicken cells. At all pre-circulation stages tested, all cells in female embryos, independently confirmed by PCR analysis, were strongly positive for HINTW, whereas all male embryos were negative. This probe is broadly applicable in intra-specific chick/chick chimera studies, and as a proof of principle, we utilized this probe to detect female cells in three experimental settings: (1) to mark female donor cells in a node transplantation assay; (2) to distinguish female cells in male/female twins generated by the Cornish pasty culture; and (3) to detect female half of the embryo in artificially generated bilateral gynandromorphs. A rapid, PCR based pre-screening step increases the efficiency of obtaining desired donor/host sex combination from 25% to 100%. For most avian chimera studies, this female-specific in situ probe is a low cost alternative to the commonly used QCPN antibody and to ubiquitous-GFP chicken strains which are not widely available to the research community. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neuroendocrine marker expression in thyroid epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Satoh, F; Umemura, S; Yasuda, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue sections from 50 cases with thyroid tumors, composed of 11 follicular adenomas, 10 follicular carcinomas, 14 papillary carcinomas, 10 anaplastic carcinomas, and 5 medullary carcinomas, were immunohistochemically analyzed for representative neuroendocrine markers. Immunoexpression ratios of these neuroendocrine markers were as follows: Follicular adenomas, neuron-specific enolase (NSE)63.6%, synaptophysin (SynP) 45.5%, Leu7 27.3%, NCAM 45.5%, chromogranin A (CgA) 0%, SNAP25 0%; follicular carcinomas, NSE 90.0%, SynP 80.0%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; papillary carcinomas, NSE 85.7%, SynP 78.6%, Leu7 100%, NCAM 7.0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25.0%; anaplastic carcinomas, NSE 10.0%, SynP 0%, Leu7 0%, NCAM 0%, CgA 0%, SNAP25 0%; medullary carcinomas, NSE 100%, SynP100%, Leu7 80.0%, NCAM 40.0%, CgA 100%, SNAP25 100%. The two follicular carcinomas, which were morphologically characterized by "insular" (or "alveolar") arrangements, showed distinct immunoexpression of NSE and SynP at the same time. By in situ hybridization (ISH), expression of mRNA for NSE was confirmed in cases with marked immunoexpression of NSE. Although no endocrine granules were found, our results suggested that a specific type of follicular carcinoma, i.e., insular variant, may be immaturely neuroendocrine-differentiated.

  18. Acute Effects of Dietary Fat on Inflammatory Markers and Gene Expression in First-Degree Relatives of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pietraszek, Anna; Gregersen, Søren; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their relatives (REL) carry an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Low-grade inflammation, an independent risk factor for CVD, is modifiable by diet. Subjects with T2D show elevated postprandial inflammatory responses to fat-rich meals, while information on postprandial inflammation in REL is sparse. AIM: To clarify whether medium-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) have differential acute effects on low-grade inflammation in REL compared to controls (CON). METHODS: In randomized order, 17 REL and 17 CON ingested two fat-rich meals, with 72 energy percent from MUFA and 79 energy percent from mainly medium-chain SFA, respectively. Plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adiponectin, and leptin were measured at baseline, 15 min, 60 min, and 240 min postprandially. Muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were taken at baseline and 210 min after the test meal, and expression of selected genes was analyzed. RESULTS: Plasma IL-6 increased (p < 0.001) without difference between REL and CON and between the meals, whereas plasma adiponectin and plasma hs-CRP were unchanged during the 240 min observation period. Plasma leptin decreased slightly in response to medium-chain SFA in both groups, and to MUFA in REL. Several genes were differentially regulated in muscle and adipose tissue of REL and CON. CONCLUSIONS: MUFA and medium-chain SFA elicit similar postprandial circulating inflammatory responses in REL and CON. Medium-chain SFA seems more proinflammatory than MUFA, judged by the gene expression in muscle and adipose tissue of REL and CON. PMID:22580729

  19. Functional Analysis of Plant Promoter rpL34 Using the GUS Marker Gene in New Tr,tnsgene Expression Vector pZD428

    SciTech Connect

    Mauzey-Amato, Jacqueline M.; Dai, Ziyu )

    2000-11-01

    Optimization of the transgene expression system is one of the critical steps for the high level production of heterologous proteins in plants, where the promoter is a key component regulating transgene expression. In this study, the activity of the rpL34 promoter was analyzed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) NTI calli. A DNA fragment containing the rpL34 promoter and the reporter gene B-D-glucuronidase (GUS) were cloned into binary vector pZD427 to generate the transgene expression vector pZD428. The insertion was verified by enzyme restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses. The DNA fragment containing the rpL34 promoter and GUS reporter gene was then integrated into the tobacco genomes via Agrobacterium funiefaciens-mediated NT suspension cell transformation. The transformed CaNi were induced on Murashige and Skoog (MS) plates containing proper amounts of 2,4-D, cefotoxime, and kanamycin. Two hundred and sixty transformed calli were harvested for GUS activity and protein concentration measurements. GUS activity analyses revealed the specific activity up to 278,358 units per milligram total soluble protein. The GUS activity under the control of the rpL34 promoter is much higher than that under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, a commonly used promoter in plant biology. These results suggest that the rpL34 promoter is one of the most active promoters that can be used for heterologous protein production in calli and suspension cells.

  20. Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol and Organic Acids Affect Gene Expression of Selected Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Markers in IPEC-J2 Cells Exposed to Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Adolfse, Simone J M; Ahad, Dina S A; Tersteeg-Zijderveld, Monique H G; Jongerius-Gortemaker, Betty G M; Post, Jan A; Brüggemann, Holger; Santos, Regiane R

    2016-12-01

    Essential oils and organic acids are used as feed additives to improve health status and reduce colonization with pathogens. Although bactericidal in vitro, concentrations achieved in the animal gut are probably not lethal to pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and cinnamic, lactic and propionic acids on the ability of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 (ST) to invade intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and on the expression levels of immune related genes in the cells. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and non-inhibitory concentration (NIC) were determined and influence on the invasion capacity of ST was investigated. The structure of fimbriae and flagella was analysed by electron microscopy, and expression levels of HSP70, IkBa, IL-8 and IL-10 in the IPEC-J2 cells were carried out by q-PCR. Cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and cinnamic and propionic acids inhibited ST invasion but not cell viability, bacterial viability and motility or the development of flagella. Propionic acid and cinnamaldehyde in combination with cinnamic acid caused structural impairment of fimbriae. Cinnamaldehyde up-regulated expression of HSP70 irrespective of the presence of organic acids or ST; exposure to carvacrol induced HSP70 only in the presence of propionic acid and ST. © 2016 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Expression of the pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG1) in pheochromocytoma as a potential marker for distinguishing benign versus malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Haji Amousha, Mohamad Reza; Sabetkish, Nastaran; Sabet Kish, Nastaran; Heshmat, Ramin; Rajabiani, Afsaneh; Saffar, Hiva; Haghpanah, Vahid; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Distinction between malignant and benign pheochromocytoma has always been a diagnostic challenge over the last decades. To date, the only reliable criterion is metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible expression of pituitary-tumor transforming gene (PTTG1) and retinoblastoma (Rb) in benign and malignant pheochromocytoma. Paraffin blocks of 44 and 11 patients diagnosed with benign and malignant pheochromocytoma were collected. Parameters such as sex, age, tumor size, necrosis, and histological features were compared between the benign and malignant groups as well as immunohistochemical labeling using specific antibodies. PTTG1 showed negative expression in all (44) benign and 9 out of 11 (81.8%) malignant tumors with only 2 out of 11 (18.2%) malignant tumors showed positive reactivity for PTTG1 (P: 0.037) with spindle cell histological pattern in both of them (P: 0.013). Although Rb expression in malignant tumors (81.8%) was slightly more than the benign ones (52.3%), no statistically significant correlation was observed (P: 0.087). These results suggest that PTTG1 immunostaining may play a key role in distinguishing between benign and malignant phaeochromocytoma. However, larger studies are necessary to confirm the outcomes of the present study.

  2. Characterization of Hsp70 gene in Chironomus riparius: expression in response to endocrine disrupting pollutants as a marker of ecotoxicological stress.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Planelló, Rosario; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Herrero, Oscar; Cortés, Estrella; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the Hsp70 cDNA in Chironomus riparius and evaluated its expression profile under different environmental stressors. It is highly conserved, at both DNA and protein levels, displaying many of the hallmarks of Hsps and sharing 80-96% of overall amino acid identities with homologous sequences from other diptera. The changes are mainly concentrated in the C-terminal domain of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the known classification of insects. The Hsp70 gene was located by in situ hybridization in region III-3A at the third polytene chromosome, a locus activated upon heat shock as shown by RNA pol II binding. As C. riparius is widely used in aquatic ecotoxicology testing, we studied Hsp70 gene induction in fourth instar aquatic larvae submitted to heat shock and selected environmental pollutants classified as potential endocrine disruptors. RT-PCR analysis showed that Hsp70 mRNA levels increased significantly (p<0.05) after short-term acute exposures to a temperature shift (HS), cadmium chloride (Cd), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP) and ethinylestradiol (EE). However, neither pentachlorophenol (PCP) nor tributyltin (TBTO) treatments were able to activate the Hsp70 gene. The cognate form, Hsc70, was also analysed and, unlike Hsp70, was not altered by any of the different treatments assayed. Moreover, at the times tested, there was no significant mortality of the larvae. The rapid upregulation of the Hsp70 gene suggests that it is sensitive and selective for different environmental pollutants, and could be used as an early molecular endpoint in ecotoxicological studies.

  3. Age-Specific Gene Expression Signatures for Breast Tumors and Cross-Species Conserved Potential Cancer Progression Markers in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; AlBakheet, AlBandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; AL-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H.; Bin Amer, Suad M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross

  4. Age-specific gene expression signatures for breast tumors and cross-species conserved potential cancer progression markers in young women.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Nofal, Asmaa; Albakheet, Albandary; Nirmal, Maimoona; Jeprel, Hatim; Eldali, Abdelmoneim; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Tulbah, Asma; Ajarim, Dahish; Malik, Osama Al; Inan, Mehmet S; Kaya, Namik; Park, Ben H; Bin Amer, Suad M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer in young women is more aggressive with a poorer prognosis and overall survival compared to older women diagnosed with the disease. Despite recent research, the underlying biology and molecular alterations that drive the aggressive nature of breast tumors associated with breast cancer in young women have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we performed transcriptomic profile and network analyses of breast tumors arising in Middle Eastern women to identify age-specific gene signatures. Moreover, we studied molecular alterations associated with cancer progression in young women using cross-species comparative genomics approach coupled with copy number alterations (CNA) associated with breast cancers from independent studies. We identified 63 genes specific to tumors in young women that showed alterations distinct from two age cohorts of older women. The network analyses revealed potential critical regulatory roles for Myc, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and IL-1 in disease characteristics of breast tumors arising in young women. Cross-species comparative genomics analysis of progression from pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) revealed 16 genes with concomitant genomic alterations, CCNB2, UBE2C, TOP2A, CEP55, TPX2, BIRC5, KIAA0101, SHCBP1, UBE2T, PTTG1, NUSAP1, DEPDC1, HELLS, CCNB1, KIF4A, and RRM2, that may be involved in tumorigenesis and in the processes of invasion and progression of disease. Array findings were validated using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and extensive in silico analyses of independently performed microarray datasets. To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive genomic analysis of breast cancer in Middle Eastern women in age-specific cohorts and potential markers for cancer progression in young women. Our data demonstrate that cancer appearing in young women contain distinct biological characteristics and deregulated signaling pathways. Moreover, our integrative genomic and cross

  5. Microsatellite markers derived from Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae) expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Setsuko, Suzuki; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Sugai, Kyoko; Hanaoka, So; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Robust markers are required (inter alia) for assessing origins of Calophyllum inophyllum populations on the Bonin Islands, Japan. Therefore, informative expressed sequence tag (EST)-based microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSRs) markers in the species were sought. Using 135378 ESTs derived from de novo pyrosequencing, primers for 475 EST-SSRs were developed, 48 of which were tested for PCR amplification. Thirty-six of the 48 primers showed clear amplification, with 23 displaying polymorphism in sampled populations. Expected heterozygosity in the samples from the Bonin Islands and Ryukyu Islands populations ranged from 0.041 to 0.697 and from 0.041 to 0.773, respectively. As EST-SSRs are potentially tightly linked with functional genes, and reportedly more transferable to related species than anonymous genomic SSRs, the developed primers have utility for future studies of the origins, genetic structure, and conservation of C. inophyllum and related species.

  6. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in the Human Fetal Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Metsuyanim, Sally; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Buzhor, Ella; Omer, Dorit; Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Ben-Hur, Herzl; Halperin, Reuvit; Schneider, David; Dekel, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    In the human fetal kidney (HFK) self-renewing stem cells residing in the metanephric mesenchyme (MM)/blastema are induced to form all cell types of the nephron till 34th week of gestation. Definition of useful markers is crucial for the identification of HFK stem cells. Because wilms' tumor, a pediatric renal cancer, initiates from retention of renal stem cells, we hypothesized that surface antigens previously up-regulated in microarrays of both HFK and blastema-enriched stem-like wilms' tumor xenografts (NCAM, ACVRIIB, DLK1/PREF, GPR39, FZD7, FZD2, NTRK2) are likely to be relevant markers. Comprehensive profiling of these putative and of additional stem cell markers (CD34, CD133, c-Kit, CD90, CD105, CD24) in mid-gestation HFK was performed using immunostaining and FACS in conjunction with EpCAM, an epithelial surface marker that is absent from the MM and increases along nephron differentiation and hence can be separated into negative, dim or bright fractions. No marker was specifically localized to the MM. Nevertheless, FZD7 and NTRK2 were preferentially localized to the MM and emerging tubules (<10% of HFK cells) and were mostly present within the EpCAMneg and EpCAMdim fractions, indicating putative stem/progenitor markers. In contrast, single markers such as CD24 and CD133 as well as double-positive CD24+CD133+ cells comprise >50% of HFK cells and predominantly co-express EpCAMbright, indicating they are mostly markers of differentiation. Furthermore, localization of NCAM exclusively in the MM and in its nephron progenitor derivatives but also in stroma and the expression pattern of significantly elevated renal stem/progenitor genes Six2, Wt1, Cited1, and Sall1 in NCAM+EpCAM- and to a lesser extent in NCAM+EpCAM+ fractions confirmed regional identity of cells and assisted us in pinpointing the presence of subpopulations that are putative MM-derived progenitor cells (NCAM+EpCAM+FZD7+), MM stem cells (NCAM+EpCAM-FZD7+) or both (NCAM+FZD7+). These results and

  7. Assembly of 500,000 inter-specific catfish expressed sequence tags and large scale gene-associated marker development for whole genome association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Catfish Genome Consortium; Wang, Shaolin; Peatman, Eric; Abernathy, Jason; Waldbieser, Geoff; Lindquist, Erika; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan; Wang, Mei; Li, Ping; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Liu, Lei; Vullaganti, Deepika; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Murdock, Christopher; Small, Brian C; Wilson, Melanie; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Yanliang; Lee, Yoona; Chen, Fei; Lu, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqi; Xu, Peng; Somridhivej, Benjaporn; Baoprasertkul, Puttharat; Quilang, Jonas; Sha, Zhenxia; Bao, Baolong; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Qun; Takano, Tomokazu; Nandi, Samiran; Liu, Shikai; Wong, Lilian; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Quiniou, Sylvie; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman; Trant, John; Rokhsar, Daniel; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-03-23

    Background-Through the Community Sequencing Program, a catfish EST sequencing project was carried out through a collaboration between the catfish research community and the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute. Prior to this project, only a limited EST resource from catfish was available for the purpose of SNP identification. Results-A total of 438,321 quality ESTs were generated from 8 channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and 4 blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) libraries, bringing the number of catfish ESTs to nearly 500,000. Assembly of all catfish ESTs resulted in 45,306 contigs and 66,272 singletons. Over 35percent of the unique sequences had significant similarities to known genes, allowing the identification of 14,776 unique genes in catfish. Over 300,000 putative SNPs have been identified, of which approximately 48,000 are high-quality SNPs identified from contigs with at least four sequences and the minor allele presence of at least two sequences in the contig. The EST resource should be valuable for identification of microsatellites, genome annotation, large-scale expression analysis, and comparative genome analysis. Conclusions-This project generated a large EST resource for catfish that captured the majority of the catfish transcriptome. The parallel analysis of ESTs from two closely related Ictalurid catfishes should also provide powerful means for the evaluation of ancient and recent gene duplications, and for the development of high-density microarrays in catfish. The inter- and intra-specific SNPs identified from all catfish EST dataset assembly will greatly benefit the catfish introgression breeding program and whole genome association studies.

  8. Effects of Valproic Acid and Dexamethasone Administration on Early Bio-Markers and Gene Expression Profile in Acute Kidney Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Ryan W.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Andrews, Jared M.; Gelnett, Mary S.; Brand, Timothy C.; Salgar, Shashikumar K.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) causes acute kidney injury (AKI) with high mortality and morbidity. The objective of this investigation was to ameliorate kidney IR injury and identify novel biomarkers for kidney injury and repair. Under general anesthesia, left renal ischemia was induced in Wister rats by occluding renal artery for 45 minutes, followed by reperfusion and right nephrectomy. Thirty minutes prior to ischemia, rats (n = 8/group) received Valproic Acid (150 mg/kg; VPA), Dexamethasone (3 mg/kg; Dex) or Vehicle (saline) intraperitoneally. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 24 or 120 h post-IR. Plasma creatinine (mg/dL) at 24 h was reduced (P<0.05) in VPA (2.7±1.8) and Dex (2.3±1.2) compared to Vehicle (3.8±0.5) group. At 3 h, urine albumin (mg/mL) was higher in Vehicle (1.47±0.10), VPA (0.84±0.62) and Dex (1.04±0.73) compared to naïve (uninjured/untreated control) (0.14±0.26) group. At 24 h post-IR urine lipocalin-2 (μg/mL) was higher (P<0.05) in VPA, Dex and Vehicle groups (9.61–11.36) compared to naïve group (0.67±0.29); also, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1; ng/mL) was higher (P<0.05) in VPA, Dex and Vehicle groups (13.7–18.7) compared to naïve group (1.7±1.9). Histopathology demonstrated reduced (P<0.05) ischemic injury in the renal cortex in VPA (Grade 1.6±1.5) compared to Vehicle (Grade 2.9±1.1). Inflammatory cytokines IL1β and IL6 were downregulated and anti-apoptotic molecule BCL2 was upregulated in VPA group. Furthermore, kidney DNA microarray demonstrated reduced injury, stress, and apoptosis related gene expression in the VPA administered rats. VPA appears to ameliorate kidney IR injury via reduced inflammatory cytokine, apoptosis/stress related gene expression, and improved regeneration. KIM-1, lipocalin-2 and albumin appear to be promising early urine biomarkers for the diagnosis of AKI. PMID:25970334

  9. Recent arguments against germ cell renewal in the adult human ovary: is an absence of marker gene expression really acceptable evidence of an absence of oogenesis?

    PubMed

    Tilly, Jonathan L; Johnson, Joshua

    2007-04-15

    In 2004, a study from our lab published in the journal Nature reignited a worldwide debate over the validity of the dogma that mammalian females are incapable of oocyte and follicle production during postnatal life. Amidst widespread skepticism, we forged ahead and published a second study in 2005 in the journal Cell, which not only reaffirmed with different experimental approaches that this dogma is invalid but also identified cells in bone marrow (BM) and blood of adult female mice that could generate oocytes contained within immature follicles in the ovaries of recipient females following transplantation. Although this work has been the subject of extensive critical commentary as well, two recent reports from others have confirmed the germline potential of adult BM-derived cells in mice. Further, independent corroboration of the results and conclusions presented in our earlier Nature paper is also now available. However, three papers have been published that purportedly question our work and conclusions. The first is a paper by Eggan et al. published in the journal Nature, which attempts to draw conclusions about the germline potential of BM-derived cells after focusing solely on ovulated eggs while ignoring what may be occurring at the level of oogenesis in the ovaries. The second, from Veitia and colleagues, attempts to draw the same conclusions as Eggan et al. from a single clinical case report of a female Fanconi anemia patient who conceived a genetically-related daughter after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The third is a report from Liu et al. just released in the journal Developmental Biology that claims to provide evidence refuting the possibility that adult female mammals produce new oocytes. However, all of the data presented in this latter report are derived from gene expression studies that the authors say fail to show the occurrence of meiosis or germ cell mitosis in adult human ovaries. Given that more than three years have passed since

  10. Developement of gene and EST-based markers and their chromosomal localization in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular markers are being used extensively in genetic studies and breeding programs of cotton. To screen the limited genetic diversity in cotton germplasm, we focused our efforts to develop candidate gene and expressed sequence tag (EST) based markers and in finding polymorphisms between genotype...

  11. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  12. Molecular analysis of the seasonal expression of genes coding for different functional markers of the digestive gland of the bivalve mollusk Pecten maximus (L.).

    PubMed

    Le Pennec, Gaël; Le Pennec, Marcel

    2002-11-01

    Digestive gland cells of Pecten maximus accumulate and release lipid storage according to a seasonal cycle. For the first time in molluscs, molecular probes were developed and applied to monitor the lipid accumulation and consumption cycle related to phytoplankton blooms and phenomena of cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The molecular probes consisted of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), which is involved in the acetylation of fatty acids; aldolase, which favours the formation of pyruvate and dihydroxyacetone; actin, an essential element of the cytoskeleton that disappears during adipocyte cell transformation; and cycline B, an ubiquitous cell cycle protein. Alpha-amylase, provided by IFREMER-Brest (France), was used to relate these different events to the animal's food supply. A positive relation between GPD and aldolase gene expressions was inversely correlated with that of actin, confirming results in mammals. In P. maximus, mRNA transcripts of GPD and aldolase decrease rapidly before gamete emissions whereas those of actin increase rapidly. After gamete emission, the mRNA levels of aldolase, GPD and alpha-amylase increase, while those of actin decrease. Cycline B mRNA transcripts indicate that the period of digestive cell proliferation is initiated during winter, prior to the release of lipids into the digestive tract and apoptosis. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  13. Targeted insertion of foreign genes into the tobacco plastid genome without physical linkage to the selectable marker gene

    SciTech Connect

    Carrer, H.; Maliga, P.

    1995-08-01

    To determine whether targeted DNA insertion into the tobacco plastid genome can be obtained without physical linkage to a selectable marker gene, we carried out biolistic transformation of chloroplasts in tobacco leaf segments with a 1:1 mix of two independently targeted antibiotic resistance genes. Plastid transformants were selected by spectinomycin resistance due to expression of an integrated aadA gene. Integration of the unselected kanamycin resistance (kan) gene into the same plastid genome was established by Southern probing in {approx}20% of the spectinomycin-selected clones. Efficient cotransformation will facilitate targeted plastid genome modification without physical linkage to a marker gene. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine.

  15. Knock-down of the MEP pathway isogene 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 2 inhibits formation of arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced apocarotenoids, and abolishes normal expression of mycorrhiza-specific plant marker genes.

    PubMed

    Floss, Daniela S; Hause, Bettina; Lange, Peter R; Küster, Helge; Strack, Dieter; Walter, Michael H

    2008-10-01

    The first step of the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is catalyzed by two isoforms of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS1 and DXS2). In Medicago truncatula, MtDXS1 and MtDXS2 genes exhibit completely different expression patterns. Most prominently, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi induces the accumulation of certain apocarotenoids (cyclohexenone and mycorradicin derivatives) correlated with the expression of MtDXS2 but not of MtDXS1. To prove a distinct function of DXS2, a selective RNAi approach on MtDXS2 expression was performed in transgenic hairy roots of M. truncatula. Repression of MtDXS2 consistently led to reduced transcript levels in mycorrhizal roots, and to a concomitant reduction of AM-induced apocarotenoid accumulation. The transcript levels of MtDXS1 remained unaltered in RNAi plants, and no phenotypical changes in non-AM plants were observed. Late stages of the AM symbiosis were adversely affected, but only upon strong repression with residual MtDXS2-1 transcript levels remaining below approximately 10%. This condition resulted in a strong decrease in the transcript levels of MtPT4, an AM-specific plant phosphate transporter gene, and in a multitude of other AM-induced plant marker genes, as shown by transcriptome analysis. This was accompanied by an increased proportion of degenerating and dead arbuscules at the expense of mature ones. The data reveal a requirement for DXS2-dependent MEP pathway-based isoprenoid products to sustain mycorrhizal functionality at later stages of the symbiosis. They further validate the concept of a distinct role for DXS2 in secondary metabolism, and offer a novel tool to selectively manipulate the levels of secondary isoprenoids by targeting their precursor supply.

  16. Chemically regulated gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Padidam, Malla

    2003-04-01

    Chemically inducible systems that activate or inactivate gene expression have many potential applications in the determination of gene function and in plant biotechnology. The precise timing and control of gene expression are important aspects of chemically inducible systems. Several systems have been developed and used to analyze gene function, marker-free plant transformation, site-specific DNA excision, activation tagging, conditional genetic complementation, and restoration of male fertility. Chemicals that are used to regulate transgene expression include the antibiotic tetracycline, the steroids dexamethasone and estradiol, copper, ethanol, the inducer of pathogen-related proteins benzothiadiazol, herbicide safeners, and the insecticide methoxyfenozide. Systems that are suitable for field application are particularly useful for experimental systems and have potential applications in biotechnology.

  17. Common Marker Genes Identified from Various Sample Types for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bing, Peng-Fei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex auto-immune disease. Gene expression studies have been conducted to identify SLE-related genes in various types of samples. It is unknown whether there are common marker genes significant for SLE but independent of sample types, which may have potentials for follow-up translational research. The aim of this study is to identify common marker genes across various sample types for SLE. Based on four public microarray gene expression datasets for SLE covering three representative types of blood-born samples (monocyte; peripheral blood mononuclear cell, PBMC; whole blood), we utilized three statistics (fold-change, FC; t-test p value; false discovery rate adjusted p value) to scrutinize genes simultaneously regulated with SLE across various sample types. For common marker genes, we conducted the Gene Ontology enrichment analysis and Protein-Protein Interaction analysis to gain insights into their functions. We identified 10 common marker genes associated with SLE (IFI6, IFI27, IFI44L, OAS1, OAS2, EIF2AK2, PLSCR1, STAT1, RNASE2, and GSTO1). Significant up-regulation of IFI6, IFI27, and IFI44L with SLE was observed in all the studied sample types, though the FC was most striking in monocyte, compared with PBMC and whole blood (8.82-251.66 vs. 3.73-74.05 vs. 1.19-1.87). Eight of the above 10 genes, except RNASE2 and GSTO1, interact with each other and with known SLE susceptibility genes, participate in immune response, RNA and protein catabolism, and cell death. Our data suggest that there exist common marker genes across various sample types for SLE. The 10 common marker genes, identified herein, deserve follow-up studies to dissert their potentials as diagnostic or therapeutic markers to predict SLE or treatment response.

  18. Nonadditive gene expression in polyploids.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Liu, Xiaoxian; Pires, J Chris; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidy involves hybridization and duplication of divergent parental genomes and provides new avenues for gene expression. The expression levels of duplicated genes in polyploids can show deviation from parental additivity (the arithmetic average of the parental expression levels). Nonadditive expression has been widely observed in diverse polyploids and comprises at least three possible scenarios: (a) The total gene expression level in a polyploid is similar to that of one of its parents (expression-level dominance); (b) total gene expression is lower or higher than in both parents (transgressive expression); and (c) the relative contribution of the parental copies (homeologs) to the total gene expression is unequal (homeolog expression bias). Several factors may result in expression nonadditivity in polyploids, including maternal-paternal influence, gene dosage balance, cis- and/or trans-regulatory networks, and epigenetic regulation. As our understanding of nonadditive gene expression in polyploids remains limited, a new generation of investigators should explore additional phenomena (i.e., alternative splicing) and use other high-throughput "omics" technologies to measure the impact of nonadditive expression on phenotype, proteome, and metabolome.

  19. Novel recombinant papillomavirus genomes expressing selectable genes

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Porter, Samuel; McKinney, Caleb; Stepp, Wesley H.; McBride, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses infect and replicate in keratinocytes, but viral proteins are initially expressed at low levels and there is no effective and quantitative method to determine the efficiency of infection on a cell-to-cell basis. Here we describe human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes that express marker proteins (antibiotic resistance genes and Green Fluorescent Protein), and can be used to elucidate early stages in HPV infection of primary keratinocytes. To generate these recombinant genomes, the late region of the oncogenic HPV18 genome was replaced by CpG free marker genes. Insertion of these exogenous genes did not affect early replication, and had only minimal effects on early viral transcription. When introduced into primary keratinocytes, the recombinant marker genomes gave rise to drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies and cell lines, which maintained the extrachromosomal recombinant genome long-term. Furthermore, the HPV18 “marker” genomes could be packaged into viral particles (quasivirions) and used to infect primary human keratinocytes in culture. This resulted in the outgrowth of drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies containing replicating HPV18 genomes. In summary, we describe HPV18 marker genomes that can be used to quantitatively investigate many aspects of the viral life cycle. PMID:27892937

  20. Gene expression studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tajouri, Lotti; Fernandez, Francesca; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2007-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious neurological disorder affecting young Caucasian individuals, usually with an age of onset at 18 to 40 years old. Females account for approximately 60x of MS cases and the manifestation and course of the disease is highly variable from patient to patient. The disorder is characterised by the development of plaques within the central nervous system (CNS). Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in MS. Human tissues and experimental mice were used in these gene-profiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from these various expression studies. In general, genes showing variable expression include mainly immunological and inflammatory genes, stress and antioxidant genes, as well as metabolic and central nervous system markers. Of particular interest are a number of genes localised to susceptible loci previously shown to be in linkage with MS. However due to the clinical complexity of the disease, the heterogeneity of the tissues used in expression studies, as well as the variable DNA chips/membranes used for the gene profiling, it is difficult to interpret the available information. Although this information is essential for the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS, it is difficult to decipher and define the gene pathways involved in the disorder. Experiments in gene expression profiling in MS have been numerous and lists of candidates are now available for analysis. Researchers have investigated gene expression in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells (PBMCs), in MS animal models Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE) and post mortem MS brain tissues. This review will focus on the results of these studies.

  1. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  2. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  3. CIRCADIAN CLOCK AND CELL CYCLE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Richard P.; Qu, Xiaoyu; Laffin, Brian; Earnest, David; Porter, Weston W.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC-11) and mammary tissues were analyzed for developmental changes in circadian clock, cellular proliferation and differentiation marker genes. Expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1, were elevated in differentiated HC-11 cells whereas Per2 mRNA levels were higher in undifferentiated cells. This differentiation-dependent profile of clock gene expression was consistent with that observed in mouse mammary glands as Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA levels were elevated in late pregnant and lactating mammary tissues, while Per2 expression was higher in proliferating virgin and early pregnant glands. In both HC-11 cells and mammary glands, elevated Per2 expression was positively correlated with c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels while Per1 and Bmal1 expression changed in conjunction with ß-casein mRNA levels. Interestingly, developmental stage had differential effects on rhythms of clock gene expression in the mammary gland. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may play a role in mouse mammary gland development and differentiation. PMID:16261617

  4. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  5. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  6. The flow of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  7. Discovering modulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Özgün; Demir, Emek; Gönen, Mithat; Sander, Chris; Dogrusoz, Ugur

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that modulate the activity of transcription factors, often called modulators, play a critical role in creating tissue- and context-specific gene expression responses to the signals cells receive. GEM (Gene Expression Modulation) is a probabilistic framework that predicts modulators, their affected targets and mode of action by combining gene expression profiles, protein–protein interactions and transcription factor–target relationships. Using GEM, we correctly predicted a significant number of androgen receptor modulators and observed that most modulators can both act as co-activators and co-repressors for different target genes. PMID:20466809

  8. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Primo Vessel of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Seok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Won Jin; Heo, Jinbeom; Shin, Dong Myung; Leem, Chae Hun

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating line of evidence support that adult tissues contain a rare population of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which differentiate into all types of cells in our body. Bonghan microcell (primo microcells (PMCs)) discovered in 1960s was reported to have a pluripotency like a stem cell in vivo as well as in vitro condition. Here, we describe the detailed morphology and molecular features of PMCs. PMCs reside in Bonghan duct (primo vessel (PV)) reported as a corresponding structure of acupuncture points and meridian system. We found that PMCs were frequently observed in the liver surface of the rat between 300 g and 400 g from April to June, suggesting that the their detection frequency depends on the weight, the season, and the organ of rat. As reported, PMCs freshly isolated from PVs were spherical ~1-2 μm microsized cells. In contrast, a unique bithread or budding-shaped PMCs emerged during tissue culture around 8 days. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that PVs-derived cells express the Oct4, the most important PSCs gene, in addition to several PSCs markers (Sox2, Stella, Rex1, and Klf4). Thus, we for the first time provide the evidence about Oct4-expressing stem-like characteristics for cells resident in PVs, a possible novel stem cell enriched niche. PMID:23983780

  9. Expression of stem cell markers in primo vessel of rat.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Seok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Won Jin; Heo, Jinbeom; Shin, Dong Myung; Leem, Chae Hun

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating line of evidence support that adult tissues contain a rare population of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which differentiate into all types of cells in our body. Bonghan microcell (primo microcells (PMCs)) discovered in 1960s was reported to have a pluripotency like a stem cell in vivo as well as in vitro condition. Here, we describe the detailed morphology and molecular features of PMCs. PMCs reside in Bonghan duct (primo vessel (PV)) reported as a corresponding structure of acupuncture points and meridian system. We found that PMCs were frequently observed in the liver surface of the rat between 300 g and 400 g from April to June, suggesting that the their detection frequency depends on the weight, the season, and the organ of rat. As reported, PMCs freshly isolated from PVs were spherical ~1-2  μ m microsized cells. In contrast, a unique bithread or budding-shaped PMCs emerged during tissue culture around 8 days. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that PVs-derived cells express the Oct4, the most important PSCs gene, in addition to several PSCs markers (Sox2, Stella, Rex1, and Klf4). Thus, we for the first time provide the evidence about Oct4-expressing stem-like characteristics for cells resident in PVs, a possible novel stem cell enriched niche.

  10. Heterogeneous lineage marker expression in naive embryonic stem cells is mostly due to spontaneous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Abranches, Elsa; Guedes, Ana M. V.; Henrique, Domingos; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Populations of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) exhibit a subfraction of cells expressing uncharacteristically low levels of pluripotency markers such as Nanog. Yet, the extent to which individual Nanog-negative cells are differentiated, both from ESCs and from each other, remains unclear. Here, we show the transcriptome of Nanog-negative cells exhibits expression of classes of genes associated with differentiation that are not yet active in cells exposed to differentiation conditions for one day. Long non-coding RNAs, however, exhibit more changes in expression in the one-day-differentiated cells than in Nanog-negative cells. These results are consistent with the concept that Nanog-negative cells may contain subpopulations of both lineage-primed and differentiated cells. Single cell analysis showed that Nanog-negative cells display substantial and coherent heterogeneity in lineage marker expression in progressively nested subsets of cells exhibiting low levels of Nanog, then low levels of Oct4, and then a set of lineage markers, which express intensely in a small subset of these more differentiated cells. Our results suggest that the observed enrichment of lineage-specific marker gene expression in Nanog-negative cells is associated with spontaneous differentiation of a subset of these cells rather than the more random expression that may be associated with reversible lineage priming. PMID:26292941

  11. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  12. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  13. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  14. Predictive gene signatures: molecular markers distinguishing colon adenomatous polyp and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Mayer, Claus Dieter; Vase, Hollie F; Coates, Philip J; Steele, Robert J; Carey, Francis A

    2014-01-01

    Cancers exhibit abnormal molecular signatures associated with disease initiation and progression. Molecular signatures could improve cancer screening, detection, drug development and selection of appropriate drug therapies for individual patients. Typically only very small amounts of tissue are available from patients for analysis and biopsy samples exhibit broad heterogeneity that cannot be captured using a single marker. This report details application of an in-house custom designed GenomeLab System multiplex gene expression assay, the hCellMarkerPlex, to assess predictive gene signatures of normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma colon tissue using archived tissue bank material. The hCellMarkerPlex incorporates twenty-one gene markers: epithelial (EZR, KRT18, NOX1, SLC9A2), proliferation (PCNA, CCND1, MS4A12), differentiation (B4GANLT2, CDX1, CDX2), apoptotic (CASP3, NOX1, NTN1), fibroblast (FSP1, COL1A1), structural (ACTG2, CNN1, DES), gene transcription (HDAC1), stem cell (LGR5), endothelial (VWF) and mucin production (MUC2). Gene signatures distinguished normal, adenomatous polyp and carcinoma. Individual gene targets significantly contributing to molecular tissue types, classifier genes, were further characterised using real-time PCR, in-situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry revealing aberrant epithelial expression of MS4A12, LGR5 CDX2, NOX1 and SLC9A2 prior to development of carcinoma. Identified gene signatures identify aberrant epithelial expression of genes prior to cancer development using in-house custom designed gene expression multiplex assays. This approach may be used to assist in objective classification of disease initiation, staging, progression and therapeutic responses using biopsy material.

  15. PL1 fusion gene: a novel visual selectable marker gene that confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic tomato.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Li, Shu; Dang, Lijie; Chai, Wenting; Li, Pengli; Wang, Ning Ning

    2012-10-01

    Visual selectable markers, including the purple color caused by the accumulation of anthocyanins, have been proposed for use as antibiotic-free alternatives. However, the excessive accumulation of anthocyanins seriously inhibits the growth and development of transgenic plants. In our study, the AtDWF4 promoter from Arabidopsis and the tomato LeANT1 gene, encoding a MYB transcription factor, were used to construct the PL1 fusion gene to test whether it could be used as a visual selectable marker gene for tomato transformation. All the PL1 transgenic shoots exhibited intense purple color on shoot induction medium. In the transgenic tomato plants, PL1 was highly expressed in the cotyledons, but expressed only slightly in the true leaves and other organs. The expression of PL1 had no significantly adverse effects on the growth or development of the transgenic tomato plants, and conferred tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in them. With the “cut off green shoots” method, multiple independent 35S::GFP transgenic tomato lines were successfully obtained using PL1 as the selectable marker gene. These results suggest that PL1 has potential application of visual selectable marker gene for tomato transformation.

  16. Piwi-interacting RNAs and PIWI genes as novel prognostic markers for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Preethi; Ghosh, Sunita; Graham, Kathryn; Mackey, John R.; Kovalchuk, Olga; Damaraju, Sambasivarao

    2016-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), whose role in germline maintenance has been established, are now also being classified as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in somatic cells. PIWI proteins, central to piRNA biogenesis, have been identified as genetic and epigenetic regulators of gene expression. piRNAs/PIWIs have emerged as potential biomarkers for cancer but their relevance to breast cancer has not been comprehensively studied. piRNAs and mRNAs were profiled from normal and breast tumor tissues using next generation sequencing and Agilent platforms, respectively. Gene targets for differentially expressed piRNAs were identified from mRNA expression dataset. piRNAs and PIWI genes were independently assessed for their prognostic significance (outcomes: Overall Survival, OS and Recurrence Free Survival, RFS). We discovered eight piRNAs as novel independent prognostic markers and their association with OS was confirmed in an external dataset (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Further, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4 genes showed prognostic relevance. 306 gene targets exhibited reciprocal relationship with piRNA expression. Cancer cell pathways such as apoptosis and cell signaling were the key Gene Ontology terms associated with the regulated gene targets. Overall, we have captured the entire cascade of events in a dysregulated piRNA pathway and have identified novel markers for breast cancer prognostication. PMID:27177224

  17. Gene expression profiling of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Miller, Daniel; Ramalingam, Suresh; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2008-06-01

    Functional genomics has emerged over the past 10 years as a novel technology to study genetic alterations. Gene expression arrays are one genomic technique employed to discover changes in the DNA expression that occur in neoplastic transformation. Microarrays have been applied to investigating lung cancer. Specific applications include discovering novel genetic changes that occur in lung tumors. Microarrays can also be applied to improve diagnosis, staging and discover prognostic markers. The eventual goal of this technology is to discover new markers for therapy and to customize therapy based on an individual tumor genetic composition. In this review, we present the current state of gene expression array technology in its application to lung cancer.

  18. Increased expression of senescence markers in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jessica K.; Degan, Simone; Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Zheng, Shuo; Haridass, Prashamsha; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a chronic lung disease characterized by chronic neutrophilic airway inflammation and increased levels of neutrophil elastase (NE) in the airways. We have previously reported that NE treatment triggers cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle arrest can lead to senescence, a complete loss of replicative capacity. Importantly, senescent cells can be proinflammatory and would perpetuate CF chronic inflammation. By immunohistochemistry, we evaluated whether airway sections from CF and control subjects expressed markers of senescence, including p16INK4a (p16), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, phospho-Histone H2A.X (γH2A.X), and phospho-checkpoint 2 kinase (phospho-Chk2), which are also DNA damage response markers. Compared with airway epithelium from control subjects, CF airway epithelium had increased levels of expression of all three senescence markers. We hypothesized that the high load of NE in the CF airway triggers epithelial senescence by upregulating expression of p16, which inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, cultured in air-liquid interface were treated with NE (0, 200, and 500 nM) to induce visible injury. Total cell lysates were collected and evaluated by Western analysis for p16 protein expression and CDK4 kinase activity. NE significantly increased p16 expression and decreased CDK4 kinase activity in NHBE cells. These results support the concept that NE triggers expression of senescence markers in CF airway epithelial cells. PMID:23316069

  19. Tuning noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sanjay

    2015-05-05

    The relative contribution of promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment in regulating gene expression noise has remained elusive. In their recent work, Arkin, Schaffer and colleagues (Dey et al, 2015) show that mean expression and noise for a given promoter at different genomic loci are uncorrelated and influenced by the local chromatin environment.

  20. Monoallelic Gene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chess, Andrew

    2016-11-23

    Monoallelic expression not due to cis-regulatory sequence polymorphism poses an intriguing problem in epigenetics because it requires the unequal treatment of two segments of DNA that are present in the same nucleus and that can indeed have absolutely identical sequences. Here, I focus on a few recent developments in the field of monoallelic expression that are of particular interest and raise interesting questions for future work. One development is regarding analyses of imprinted genes, in which recent work suggests the possibility that intriguing networks of imprinted genes exist and are important for genetic and physiological studies. Another issue that has been raised in recent years by a number of publications is the question of how skewed allelic expression should be for it to be designated as monoallelic expression and, further, what methods are appropriate or inappropriate for analyzing genomic data to examine allele-specific expression. Perhaps the most exciting recent development in mammalian monoallelic expression is a clever and carefully executed analysis of genetic diversity of autosomal genes subject to random monoallelic expression (RMAE), which provides compelling evidence for distinct evolutionary forces acting on random monoallelically expressed genes.

  1. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; LiVolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-01-01

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT–PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers. PMID:16969345

  2. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; Livolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-10-23

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT-PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers.

  3. Generation of marker-free plastid transformants using a transiently cointegrated selection gene.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Sebastian M J; Huang, Fong-Chin; Golds, Timothy J; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Genetic engineering of higher plant plastids typically involves stable introduction of antibiotic resistance genes as selection markers. Even though chloroplast genes are maternally inherited in most crops, the possibility of marker transfer to wild relatives or microorganisms cannot be completely excluded. Furthermore, marker expression can be a substantial metabolic drain. Therefore, efficient methods for complete marker removal from plastid transformants are necessary. One method to remove the selection gene from higher plant plastids is based on loop-out recombination, a process difficult to control because selection of homoplastomic transformants is unpredictable. Another method uses the CRE/lox system, but requires additional retransformation and sexual crossing for introduction and subsequent removal of the CRE recombinase. Here we describe the generation of marker-free chloroplast transformants in tobacco using the reconstitution of wild-type pigmentation in combination with plastid transformation vectors, which prevent stable integration of the kanamycin selection marker. One benefit of a procedure using mutants is that marker-free plastid transformants can be produced directly in the first generation (T0) without retransformation or crossing.

  4. Database of cattle candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogorevc, J; Kunej, T; Razpet, A; Dovc, P

    2009-01-01

    A cattle database of candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis has been developed to provide an integrated research tool incorporating different types of information supporting a genomic approach to study lactation, udder development and health. The database contains 943 genes and genetic markers involved in mammary gland development and function, representing candidates for further functional studies. The candidate loci were drawn on a genetic map to reveal positional overlaps. For identification of candidate loci, data from seven different research approaches were exploited: (i) gene knockouts or transgenes in mice that result in specific phenotypes associated with mammary gland (143 loci); (ii) cattle QTL for milk production (344) and mastitis related traits (71); (iii) loci with sequence variations that show specific allele-phenotype interactions associated with milk production (24) or mastitis (10) in cattle; (iv) genes with expression profiles associated with milk production (207) or mastitis (107) in cattle or mouse; (v) cattle milk protein genes that exist in different genetic variants (9); (vi) miRNAs expressed in bovine mammary gland (32) and (vii) epigenetically regulated cattle genes associated with mammary gland function (1). Fourty-four genes found by multiple independent analyses were suggested as the most promising candidates and were further in silico analysed for expression levels in lactating mammary gland, genetic variability and top biological functions in functional networks. A miRNA target search for mammary gland expressed miRNAs identified 359 putative binding sites in 3′UTRs of candidate genes. PMID:19508288

  5. Vcsa1 Acts as a Marker of Erectile Function Recovery After Gene Therapeutic and Pharmacological Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Calenda, Giulia; Tong, Yuehong; Tar, Moses; Lowe, Daniel; Siragusa, Joseph; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We identified molecular markers of erectile function, particularly those responding to erectile dysfunction treatment. Materials and Methods Sprague-Dawley retired breeder rats were intracorporeally injected with pVAX-hSlo, pSMAA-hSlo or the control plasmid pVAX. One week later the intracorporeal pressure-to-blood pressure ratio and gene expression were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Rat corporeal cells were transfected in vitro with pVAX-hSlo, pSMAA-hSlo or pVAX and the change in gene expression was determined. We also determined whether Vcsa1 expression was changed after pharmacotherapy using tadalafil. Results Animals treated with vectors expressing hSlo had significantly improved erectile function compared to that in controls, accompanied by changed expression of a subset of genes. Vcsa1 was one of the genes that was most changed in expression (the third of approximately 31,000 with greater than 10-fold up-regulation). Changes in gene expression were different than those observed in corporeal cells transfected in vitro, distinguishing gene expression changes that were a direct effect of hSlo over expression. When tadalafil was administered in retired breeder rats, the Vcsa1 transcript increased 4-fold in corporeal tissue compared to that in untreated controls. Conclusions Our study identifies a set of genes that are changed in response to improved erectile function, rather than as a direct effect of treatment. We noted Vcsa1 may act as marker of the restoration of erectile function after gene transfer and pharmacotherapy. PMID:19375734

  6. Effect of outlier removal on gene marker selection using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Richard; Phan, John; Hemby, Scott; Wang, May

    2005-01-01

    Biological markers are useful tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Many different methods are currently used to extract markers from multiple data sources, including gene expression microarrays. This paper investigates the effect of outlier removal on the performance of one such biomarker selection method, Support Vector Machines (SVM). A simple method of outlier removal is employed as a preprocessing step before the data is used for SVM analysis. Both linear and radial basis kernels are used as well as four different normalization techniques. Results show that outlier removal increases the number of highly predictive genes as well as the number of poorly predicting genes. This result thus supports the use of outlier removal prior to biological marker identification via SVM analysis.

  7. Differential gene expression in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2014-07-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell-matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system.

  8. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF TRANSGENIC PLANT MARKER GENE PERSISTENCE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods were developed to monitor persistence of genomic DNA in decaying plants in the field. As a model, we used recombinant neomycin phosphotransferase II (rNPT-II) marker genes present in genetically engineered plants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed, com...

  10. QUANTIFICATION OF TRANSGENIC PLANT MARKER GENE PERSISTENCE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods were developed to monitor persistence of genomic DNA in decaying plants in the field. As a model, we used recombinant neomycin phosphotransferase II (rNPT-II) marker genes present in genetically engineered plants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed, com...

  11. Expression of pluripotency markers in the bovine uterus with adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Łupicka, Martyna; Socha, Barbara; Szczepańska, Agata; Korzekwa, Anna

    2015-09-29

    Adenomyosis is a proliferative uterine dysfunction with unknown aetiology. One possible mechanism of its development involves disturbances in stem cell differentiation in uterine tissue. Previously, we identified pluripotent/multipotent cells in the bovine uterus, therefore our present study focused on determining expression of pluripotency markers, NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2, in bovine adenomyotic tissues and cells. Immunolocalisation revealed protein expression of NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in both normal and adenomyotic uteri. mRNA expression for NANOG and OCT4 was increased in tissues obtained from uteri with adenomyosis compared to controls, but at the protein level there were no significant differences. mRNA expression for all three pluripotency markers was higher in myometrial cells isolated from uteri with adenomyotic lesions than in those isolated from normal uteri. The protein level of NANOG and SOX2 was decreased in stromal cells from adenomyotic tissues, whereas the level of OCT4 and SOX2 was increased in myometrial cells obtained from dysfunctional uteri. The results indicate significant changes in expression of pluripotency markers in adenomyotic compared to normal uteri, which suggest the involvement of uterine stem cells in adenomyosis.

  12. Expression of pluripotent stem cell markers in mouse uterine tissue during estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Kolsum; Zavareh, Saeed; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ghorbanian, Mohamad Taghi; paylakhi, Seyed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    It was assumed that uterine stem cells are responsible for the unique regenerative capacity of uterine. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of the pluripotent stem cell markers in the mice uterine tissue during different stages of estrous cycles. Twelve virgin female NMRI mice (6 to 8 weeks old) were considered at proestrus, estrus, metestrus and diestrus according to the cell types observed in the vaginal smear and underwent hysterectomy operation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemical staining for pluripotent stem cell markers (SOX2, OCT4, KLF4, and NANOG) were performed. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that expression and localization of the pluripotency markers SOX2, OCT4, KLF4, and NANOG at the protein level were not different throughout estrous cycle. Also, mRNA of pluripotency markers was detected in all tested samples. However, there were no significant differences in their genes expression at each stage and during the estrous cycle. Different hormonal profile during the estrous cycle could not affect expression of pluripotent stem cell markers in uterine tissue. PMID:27872713

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. However, the impact of cell passaging on gene expression and function of the cells has not been determined. Methods Commercially available human MSCs derived from bone marrow from six different donors, grown under identical culture conditions and harvested at cell passages 3, 5, and 7, were analyzed with gene-expression profiling by using microarray technology. Results The phenotype of these cells did not change as reported previously; however, a statistical analysis revealed a set of 78 significant genes that were distinguishable in expression between passages 3 and 7. None of these significant genes corresponded to the markers established by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) for MSC identification. When the significant gene lists were analyzed through pathway analysis, these genes were involved in the top-scoring networks of cellular growth and proliferation and cellular development. A meta-analysis of the literature for significant genes revealed that the MSCs seem to be undergoing differentiation into a senescent cell type when cultured extensively. Consistent with the differences in gene expression at passage 3 and 7, MSCs exhibited a significantly greater potential for cell division at passage 3 in comparison to passage 7. Conclusions Our results identified specific gene markers that distinguish aging MSCs grown in cell culture. Confirmatory studies are needed to correlate these molecular markers with biologic attributes that may facilitate the development

  15. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Bellayr, Ian H; Catalano, Jennifer G; Lababidi, Samir; Yang, Amy X; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2014-04-28

    Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. However, the impact of cell passaging on gene expression and function of the cells has not been determined. Commercially available human MSCs derived from bone marrow from six different donors, grown under identical culture conditions and harvested at cell passages 3, 5, and 7, were analyzed with gene-expression profiling by using microarray technology. The phenotype of these cells did not change as reported previously; however, a statistical analysis revealed a set of 78 significant genes that were distinguishable in expression between passages 3 and 7. None of these significant genes corresponded to the markers established by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) for MSC identification. When the significant gene lists were analyzed through pathway analysis, these genes were involved in the top-scoring networks of cellular growth and proliferation and cellular development. A meta-analysis of the literature for significant genes revealed that the MSCs seem to be undergoing differentiation into a senescent cell type when cultured extensively. Consistent with the differences in gene expression at passage 3 and 7, MSCs exhibited a significantly greater potential for cell division at passage 3 in comparison to passage 7. Our results identified specific gene markers that distinguish aging MSCs grown in cell culture. Confirmatory studies are needed to correlate these molecular markers with biologic attributes that may facilitate the development of assays to test the quality of MSCs

  16. Stochastic Mechanisms in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Harley H.; Arkin, Adam

    1997-02-01

    In cellular regulatory networks, genetic activity is controlled by molecular signals that determine when and how often a given gene is transcribed. In genetically controlled pathways, the protein product encoded by one gene often regulates expression of other genes. The time delay, after activation of the first promoter, to reach an effective level to control the next promoter depends on the rate of protein accumulation. We have analyzed the chemical reactions controlling transcript initiation and translation termination in a single such ``genetically coupled'' link as a precursor to modeling networks constructed from many such links. Simulation of the processes of gene expression shows that proteins are produced from an activated promoter in short bursts of variable numbers of proteins that occur at random time intervals. As a result, there can be large differences in the time between successive events in regulatory cascades across a cell population. In addition, the random pattern of expression of competitive effectors can produce probabilistic outcomes in switching mechanisms that select between alternative regulatory paths. The result can be a partitioning of the cell population into different phenotypes as the cells follow different paths. There are numerous unexplained examples of phenotypic variations in isogenic populations of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that may be the result of these stochastic gene expression mechanisms.

  17. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  18. Expression of unusual immunohistochemical markers in mucinous breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Natal, Rodrigo; Derchain, Sophie F; Pavanello, Marina; Paiva, Geisilene R; Sarian, Luis O; Vassallo, José

    2017-04-01

    Mucinous breast carcinoma is characterized by the production of variable amounts of mucin. Some studies have addressed immunohistochemical characterization of mucinous breast carcinoma using a limited set of antibodies. However, the purpose of the present study was to investigate a larger panel of markers not widely used in daily practice and to determine their pathological implications. Forty patients diagnosed with mucinous breast carcinoma were enrolled. An immunohistochemical study was performed on whole sections of paraffin embedded tissue, using antibodies for the following markers: estrogen receptor alpha and beta, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, HER2, EGFR, Ki-67, E-cadherin, β-catenin, p53, chromogranin, synaptophysin, GCDFP15, mammaglobin, and CDX2. The pure mucinous type was more prevalent in older patients and more frequently expressed GCDFP15. Capella type B presented more frequently with a high Ki-67 index and neuroendocrine differentiation. Although there was a lower frequency of vascular invasion and lymph node metastases in the pure type, the difference was not statistically significant. No case expressed CDX2 (a marker for gastrointestinal tumors), while 85% of the cases expressed at least one of the two typical breast markers (GCDFP15 and mammaglobin), suggesting that these markers may be reliably used for differential diagnosis. Expression of estrogen receptor beta was related to the presence of mucin cell producing lymph node metastasis, with potential prognostic and predictive value. our findings support the immunohistochemical homogeneity of mucinous breast carcinomas because only minor differences were found when subgrouping them into Capella types A and B or into types pure and mixed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. From genes to markers: exploiting gene sequence information to develop tools for plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa; Mather, Diane E

    2014-01-01

    Once the sequence is known for a gene of interest, it is usually possible to design markers to detect polymorphisms within the gene. Such markers can be particularly useful in plant breeding, especially if they detect the causal polymorphism within the gene and are diagnostic of the phenotype. In this chapter, we (1) discuss how gene sequences are obtained and aligned and how polymorphic sites can be identified or predicted; (2) explain the principles of PCR primer design and PCR amplification and provide guidelines for their application in the design and testing of markers; (3) discuss detection methods for presence/absence (dominant) polymorphisms, length polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); and (4) outline some of the factors that affect the utility of markers in plant breeding and explain how markers can be evaluated (validated) for use in plant breeding.

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster cinnabar gene is a cell autonomous genetic marker in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Nagaraja; O'Brochta, David A

    2005-07-01

    The cinnabar gene of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) encodes for kynurenine hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in ommochrome biosynthesis. This gene is commonly included as a visible genetic marker in gene vectors used to create transgenic Aedes aegypti (L.) that are homozygous for the khw allele, the mosquito homolog of cinnabar. Unexpectedly, the phenotype of cells expressing kynurenine hydroxylase in transgenic Ae. aegypti is cell autonomous as demonstrated by the recovery of insects heterozygous for the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene with mosaic eye color patterns. In addition, a transgenic gynandromorph was recovered in which one-half of the insect was expressing the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene, including one eye with red pigmentation, whereas the other half of the insect was homozygous khw and included a white eye. The cell autonomous behavior of cinnabar in transgenic Ae. aegypti is unexpected and increases the utility of this genetic marker.

  1. Monitoring aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by functional marker genes.

    PubMed

    Nyyssönen, Mari; Piskonen, Reetta; Itävaara, Merja

    2008-07-01

    The development of biological treatment technologies for contaminated environments requires tools for obtaining direct information about the biodegradation of specific contaminants. The potential of functional gene array analysis to monitor changes in the amount of functional marker genes as indicators of contaminant biodegradation was investigated. A prototype functional gene array was developed for targeting key functions in the biodegradation of naphthalene, toluene and xylenes. Internal standard probe based normalization was introduced to facilitate comparison across multiple samples. Coupled with one-colour hybridization, the signal normalization improved the consistency among replicate hybridizations resulting in better discrimination for the differences in the amount of target DNA. During the naphthalene biodegradation in a PAH-contaminated soil slurry microcosm, the normalized hybridization signals in naphthalene catabolic gene probes were in good agreement with the amount of naphthalene-degradation genes and the production of 14CO2. Gene arrays provide efficient means for monitoring of contaminant biodegradation in the environment.

  2. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  3. Caffeine alters circadian rhythms and expression of disease and metabolic markers.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Hadas; Gutman, Roee; Chapnik, Nava; Meylan, Jenny; le Coutre, Johannes; Froy, Oren

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock regulates many aspects of physiology, energy metabolism, and sleep. Restricted feeding (RF), a regimen that restricts the duration of food availability entrains the circadian clock. Caffeine has been shown to affect both metabolism and sleep. However, its effect on clock gene and clock-controlled gene expression has not been studied. Here, we tested the effect of caffeine on circadian rhythms and the expression of disease and metabolic markers in the serum, liver, and jejunum of mice supplemented with caffeine under ad libitum (AL) feeding or RF for 16 weeks. Caffeine significantly affected circadian oscillation and the daily levels of disease and metabolic markers. Under AL, caffeine reduced the average daily mRNA levels of certain disease and inflammatory markers, such as liver alpha fetoprotein (Afp), C-reactive protein (Crp), jejunum alanine aminotransferase (Alt), growth arrest and DNA damage 45β (Gadd45β), Interleukin 1α (Il-1α), Il-1β mRNA and serum plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Under RF, caffeine reduced the average daily levels of Alt, Gadd45β, Il-1α and Il-1β mRNA in the jejunum, but not in the liver. In addition, caffeine supplementation led to decreased expression of catabolic factors under RF. In conclusion, caffeine affects circadian gene expression and metabolism possibly leading to beneficial effects mainly under AL feeding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Meta-analysis of gene expression data identifies causal genes for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Hao, Jian-Wei; Zhou, Rui-Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Yan, Tian-Zhong; Ding, De-Gang; Shan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of death in male populations across the globe. With the advent of gene expression arrays, many microarray studies have been conducted in prostate cancer, but the results have varied across different studies. To better understand the genetic and biologic mechanisms of prostate cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of two studies on prostate cancer. Eight key genes were identified to be differentially expressed with progression. After gene co-expression analysis based on data from the GEO database, we obtained a co- expressed gene list which included 725 genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these genes are involved in actin filament-based processes, locomotion and cell morphogenesis. Further analysis of the gene list should provide important clues for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  5. Human amniotic epithelial cells differentiate into cells expressing germ cell specific markers when cultured in medium containing serum substitute supplement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) maintain the plasticity of pregastrulation embryonic cells, having the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. The potential of these cells to differentiate into cells expressing germ cell specific markers has never been described before. Methods In the present study, hAECs were cultured in medium containing serum substitute supplement (SSS). Gene and protein expression of germ cell and oocyte specific markers was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence staining and flow activated cell sorter analysis (FACS) in hAECs at different time points during the differentiation into cells expressing germ cell specific markers. Results When cultured with SSS, already at passage 1, hAECs start to express the germ cell specific genes C-KIT, DAZL, VASA and ZP3 and at passage 5 large round cells, resembling oocytes, appeared. The cells express the germ cell specific marker DAZL, the oocyte specific markers GDF9 and ZP3 and the meiosis specific markers DMC1 and SCP3 at the protein level. Conclusions From our preliminary results we can conclude that hAECs have the potential to differentiate into cells expressing germ cell specific markers. PMID:23241213

  6. Expression of Cre recombinase during transient phage infection permits efficient marker removal in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Khodakaramian, Gholam; Lissenden, Sarah; Gust, Bertolt; Moir, Laura; Hoskisson, Paul A.; Chater, Keith F.; Smith, Margaret C. M.

    2006-01-01

    We report a system for the efficient removal of a marker flanked by two loxP sites in Streptomyces coelicolor, using a derivative of the temperate phage φC31 that expresses Cre recombinase during a transient infection. As the test case for this recombinant phage (called Cre-phage), we present the construction of an in-frame deletion of a gene, pglW, required for phage growth limitation or Pgl in S.coelicolor. Cre-phage was also used for marker deletion in other strains of S.coelicolor. PMID:16473843

  7. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-06-20

    The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST) library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR), and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry.

  8. HOX Genes as Potential Markers of Circulating Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R; El-Tanani, M

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have significant diagnostic potential as they can reflect both the presence and recurrence of a wide range of cancers. However, this potential continues to be limited by the lack of robust and accessible isolation technologies. An alternative to isolation might be their direct detection amongst other peripheral blood cells, although this would require markers that allow them to be distinguished from an exceptionally high background signal. This review assesses the potential role of HOX genes, a family of homeodomain containing transcription factors with key roles in both embryonic development and oncogenesis, as unique and possibly disease specific markers of CTCs.

  9. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  10. Effects of space flight on surface marker expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to affect expression of several cell surface markers. These markers play important roles in regulation of immune responses, including CD4 and CD8. The studies have involved flight of experimental animals and humans followed by analysis of tissue samples (blood in humans, rats and monkeys, spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and bone marrow in rodents). The degree and direction of the changes induced by space flight have been determined by the conditions of the flight. Also, there may be compartmentalization of the response of surface markers to space flight, with differences in the response of cells isolated from blood and local immune tissue. The same type of compartmentalization was also observed with cell adhesion molecules (integrins). In this case, the expression of integrins from lymph node cells differed from that of splenocytes isolated from rats immediately after space flight. Cell culture studies have indicated that there may be an inhibition in conversion of a precursor cell line to cells exhibiting mature macrophage characteristics after space flight, however, these experiments were limited as a result of technical difficulties. In general, it is clear that space flight results in alterations of cell surface markers. The biological significance of these changes remains to be established.

  11. Regulation of ABO gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Hata, Yukiko; Matsui, Kazuhiro; Takizawa, Hisao

    2005-07-01

    The ABO blood group system is important in blood transfusions and in identifying individuals during criminal investigations. Two carbohydrate antigens, the A and B antigens, and their antibodies constitute this system. Although biochemical and molecular genetic studies have demonstrated the molecular basis of the histo-blood group ABO system, some aspects remain to be elucidated. To explain the molecular basis of how the ABO genes are controlled in cell type-specific expression, during normal cell differentiation, and in cancer cells with invasive and metastatic potential that lack A/B antigens, it is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of ABO gene transcription. We review the transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene, including positive and negative elements in the upstream region of the gene, and draw some inferences that help to explain the phenomena described above.

  12. Ras protein expression as a marker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    CALAF, GLORIA M.; ABARCA-QUINONES, JORGE

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common neoplasm in women of all ages, is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide. Markers to help to predict the risk of progression and ultimately provide non-surgical treatment options would be of great benefit. At present, there are no available molecular markers to predict the risk of carcinoma in situ progression to invasive cancer; therefore, all women diagnosed with this type of malignancy must undergo surgery. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous complex disease, and different patients respond differently to different treatments. In breast cancer, analysis using immunohistochemical markers remains an essential component of routine pathological examinations, and plays an import role in the management of the disease by providing diagnostic and prognostic strategies. The aim of the present study was to identify a marker that can be used as a prognostic tool for breast cancer. For this purpose, we firstly used an established breast cancer model. MCF-10F, a spontaneously immortalized breast epithelial cell line was transformed by exposure to estrogen and radiation. MCF-10F cells were exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) α particles (150 keV/μm) of radiation, and subsequently cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol. Three cell lines were used: i) MCF-10F cells as a control; ii) Alpha5 cells, a malignant and tumorigenic cell line; and iii) Tumor2 cells derived from Alpha5 cells injected into nude mice. Secondly, we also used normal, benign and malignant breast specimens obtained from biopsies. The results revealed that the MCF-10F cells were negative for c-Ha-Ras protein expression; however, the Alpha5 and Tumor2 cell lines were positive for c-Ha-Ras protein expression. The malignant breast samples were also strongly positive for c-Ha-Ras expression. The findings of our study indicate that c-Ha-Ras protein expression may be used as a marker to predict the progression of breast cancer; this

  13. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  15. Haplotype structure enables prioritization of common markers and candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vardarajan, B N; Eran, A; Jung, J-Y; Kunkel, L M; Wall, D P

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that results in behavioral, social and communication impairments. ASD has a substantial genetic component, with 88–95% trait concordance among monozygotic twins. Efforts to elucidate the causes of ASD have uncovered hundreds of susceptibility loci and candidate genes. However, owing to its polygenic nature and clinical heterogeneity, only a few of these markers represent clear targets for further analyses. In the present study, we used the linkage structure associated with published genetic markers of ASD to simultaneously improve candidate gene detection while providing a means of prioritizing markers of common genetic variation in ASD. We first mined the literature for linkage and association studies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, copy-number variations and multi-allelic markers in Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) families. From markers that reached genome-wide significance, we calculated male-specific genetic distances, in light of the observed strong male bias in ASD. Four of 67 autism-implicated regions, 3p26.1, 3p26.3, 3q25-27 and 5p15, were enriched with differentially expressed genes in blood and brain from individuals with ASD. Of 30 genes differentially expressed across multiple expression data sets, 21 were within 10 cM of an autism-implicated locus. Among them, CNTN4, CADPS2, SUMF1, SLC9A9, NTRK3 have been previously implicated in autism, whereas others have been implicated in neurological disorders comorbid with ASD. This work leverages the rich multimodal genomic information collected on AGRE families to present an efficient integrative strategy for prioritizing autism candidates and improving our understanding of the relationships among the vast collection of past genetic studies. PMID:23715297

  16. Prognostic value of changes in the expression of stem cell markers in the peripheral blood of patients with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Padín-Iruegas, Maria-Elena; Herranz-Carnero, Michel; Aguin-Losada, Santiago; Brozos-Vazquez, Elena; Anido-Herranz, U; Antunez-Lopez, Jose-Ramon; Ruibal-Morell, Alvaro; López-López, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    Cancer stem cells play an important role in carcinogenesis and resistance to treatment and may lead to metastasis. The isolation of circulating stem cells involves cell sorting based on the presence of cell surface markers. Many surface markers such as CD133, c-Kit, SOX, OCT4 and TWIST have been reported. In the present study, we determined the expression of different stem cell markers and their variation in expression at different stages of the treatment process. Samples of EDTA blood were collected from metastatic colorectal cancer patients, and circulating cancer stem cells were isolated for the analysis of the expression of stem cell markers using RT-PCR. These findings were correlated with the response to therapy. All statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad Prism 5.03 software. Significant differences were found in the expression levels of the markers CD133, SOX2, OCT4 and TWIST1. No differences were found in c-Kit expression. Correlation in the expression levels of most of the markers was observed. Expression of CD133, OCT4, SOX2 and TWIST1 had a predictive value for colon cancer behavior. Evaluation of this stem cell gene expression panel may be useful for predicting the response during the process of treatment, and the relative easy access to samples facilitates this method. Moreover the correlation between CD133 and TWIST1 expression may be associated with tumor regrowth and metastatic relapse.

  17. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  18. Microdissection of the gene expression codes driving nephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W; Patterson, Larry T

    2010-01-01

    The kidney represents an excellent model system for learning the principles of organogenesis. It is intermediate in complexity, and employs many commonly used developmental processes. As such, kidney development has been the subject of intensive study, using a variety of techniques, including in situ hybridization, organ culture and gene targeting, revealing many critical genes and pathways. Nevertheless, proper organogenesis requires precise patterns of cell type specific differential gene expression, involving very large numbers of genes. This review is focused on the use of global profiling technologies to create an atlas of gene expression codes driving development of different mammalian kidney compartments. Such an atlas allows one to select a gene of interest, and to determine its expression level in each element of the developing kidney, or to select a structure of interest, such as the renal vesicle, and to examine its complete gene expression state. Novel component specific molecular markers are identified, and the changing waves of gene expression that drive nephrogenesis are defined. As the tools continue to improve for the purification of specific cell types and expression profiling of even individual cells it is possible to predict an atlas of gene expression during kidney development that extends to single cell resolution. PMID:21220959

  19. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for marker development in yam (Dioscorea alata L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) is a major limiting factor in the production of yam (Dioscorea spp.) worldwide. Availability of high quality sequence information is necessary for designing molecular markers associated with resistance. However, very limited sequence information pertaining to yam is available at public genome databases. Therefore, this collaborative project was developed for genetic improvement and germplasm characterization of yams using molecular markers. The current investigation is focused on studying gene expression, by large scale generation of ESTs, from one susceptible (TDa 95-0310) and two resistant yam genotypes (TDa 87-01091, TDa 95-0328) challenged with the fungus. Total RNA was isolated from young leaves of resistant and susceptible genotypes and cDNA libraries were sequenced using Roche 454 technology. Results A total of 44,757 EST sequences were generated from the cDNA libraries of the resistant and susceptible genotypes. Greater than 56% of ESTs were annotated using MapMan Mercator tool and Blast2GO search tools. Gene annotations were used to characterize the transcriptome in yam and also perform a differential gene expression analysis between the resistant and susceptible EST datasets. Mining for SSRs in the ESTs revealed 1702 unique sequences containing SSRs and 1705 SSR markers were designed using those sequences. Conclusion We have developed a comprehensive annotated transcriptome data set in yam to enrich the EST information in public databases. cDNA libraries were constructed from anthracnose fungus challenged leaf tissues for transcriptome characterization, and differential gene expression analysis. Thus, it helped in identifying unique transcripts in each library for disease resistance. These EST resources provide the basis for future microarray development, marker validation, genetic linkage mapping and QTL analysis in Dioscorea species. PMID:21303556

  20. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for marker development in yam (Dioscorea alata L.).

    PubMed

    Narina, Satya S; Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Sartie, Alieu M; Ali, Mohamed I; Robert, Asiedu; Hodeba, Mignouna J D; Sayre, Brian L; Scheffler, Brian E

    2011-02-09

    Anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) is a major limiting factor in the production of yam (Dioscorea spp.) worldwide. Availability of high quality sequence information is necessary for designing molecular markers associated with resistance. However, very limited sequence information pertaining to yam is available at public genome databases. Therefore, this collaborative project was developed for genetic improvement and germplasm characterization of yams using molecular markers. The current investigation is focused on studying gene expression, by large scale generation of ESTs, from one susceptible (TDa 95-0310) and two resistant yam genotypes (TDa 87-01091, TDa 95-0328) challenged with the fungus. Total RNA was isolated from young leaves of resistant and susceptible genotypes and cDNA libraries were sequenced using Roche 454 technology. A total of 44,757 EST sequences were generated from the cDNA libraries of the resistant and susceptible genotypes. Greater than 56% of ESTs were annotated using MapMan Mercator tool and Blast2GO search tools. Gene annotations were used to characterize the transcriptome in yam and also perform a differential gene expression analysis between the resistant and susceptible EST datasets. Mining for SSRs in the ESTs revealed 1702 unique sequences containing SSRs and 1705 SSR markers were designed using those sequences. We have developed a comprehensive annotated transcriptome data set in yam to enrich the EST information in public databases. cDNA libraries were constructed from anthracnose fungus challenged leaf tissues for transcriptome characterization, and differential gene expression analysis. Thus, it helped in identifying unique transcripts in each library for disease resistance. These EST resources provide the basis for future microarray development, marker validation, genetic linkage mapping and QTL analysis in Dioscorea species.

  1. Advances in plant gene-targeted and functional markers: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Public genomic databases have provided new directions for molecular marker development and initiated a shift in the types of PCR-based techniques commonly used in plant science. Alongside commonly used arbitrarily amplified DNA markers, other methods have been developed. Targeted fingerprinting marker techniques are based on the well-established practices of arbitrarily amplified DNA methods, but employ novel methodological innovations such as the incorporation of gene or promoter elements in the primers. These markers provide good reproducibility and increased resolution by the concurrent incidence of dominant and co-dominant bands. Despite their promising features, these semi-random markers suffer from possible problems of collision and non-homology analogous to those found with randomly generated fingerprints. Transposable elements, present in abundance in plant genomes, may also be used to generate fingerprints. These markers provide increased genomic coverage by utilizing specific targeted sites and produce bands that mostly seem to be homologous. The biggest drawback with most of these techniques is that prior genomic information about retrotransposons is needed for primer design, prohibiting universal applications. Another class of recently developed methods exploits length polymorphism present in arrays of multi-copy gene families such as cytochrome P450 and β-tubulin genes to provide cross-species amplification and transferability. A specific class of marker makes use of common features of plant resistance genes to generate bands linked to a given phenotype, or to reveal genetic diversity. Conserved DNA-based strategies have limited genome coverage and may fail to reveal genetic diversity, while resistance genes may be under specific evolutionary selection. Markers may also be generated from functional and/or transcribed regions of the genome using different gene-targeting approaches coupled with the use of RNA information. Such techniques have the

  2. Gene Marker Loss Induced by the Transposable Element, En, in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Cormack, J.; Peterson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The En/Spm transposable element system in maize includes the functional element, En/Spm and the receptor element I/dSpm. An En receptor has been found that shows En-induced breakage. This En-responsive receptor (designated 1836518) is located on the short arm of chromosome 9, proximal to Wx. In the presence of En, markers distal to the receptor show a loss of gene expression. Kernels heterozygous for aleurone and endosperm marker genes have a variegated appearance. The hypothesis is advanced that this variegation represents a physical loss of the chromosome segments carrying the genes distal to the receptor position. It is the first case of an En-controlled breakage event. PMID:8005421

  3. Expression of lymphatic markers during avian and mouse cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Yang, Ke; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Wikenheiser, Jamie; Bader, David; Barnett, Joey; Austin, Anita; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Watanabe, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    The adult heart has been reported to have an extensive lymphatic system, yet the development of this important system during cardiogenesis is still largely unexplored. The nuclear-localized transcription factor Prox-1 identified a sheet of Prox-1-positive cells on the developing aorta and pulmonary trunk in avian and murine embryos just prior to septation of the four heart chambers. The cells coalesced into a branching lymphatic network that spread within the epicardium to cover the heart. These vessels eventually expressed the lymphatic markers LYVE-1, VEGFR-3, and podoplanin. Before the Prox-1-positive cells were detected in the mouse epicardium, LYVE-1, a homologue of the CD44 glycoprotein, was primarily expressed in individual epicardial cells. Similar staining patterns were observed for CD44 in avian embryos. The proximity of these LYVE-1/CD44-positive mesenchymal cells to Prox-1-positive vessels suggests that they may become incorporated into the lymphatics. Unexpectedly, we detected LYVE-1/PECAM/VEGFR-3-positive vessels within the embryonic and adult myocardium which remained Prox-1/podoplanin-negative. Lymphatic markers were surprisingly found in adult rat and embryonic mouse epicardial cell lines, with Prox-1 also exhibiting nuclear-localized expression in primary cultures of embryonic avian epicardial cells. Our data identified three types of cells in the embryonic heart expressing lymphatic markers: (1) Prox-1-positive cells from an extracardiac source that migrate within the serosa of the outflow tract into the epicardium of the developing heart, (2) individual LYVE-1-positive cells in the epicardium that may be incorporated into the Prox-1-positive lymphatic vasculature, and (3) LYVE-1-positive cells/vessels in the myocardium that do not become Prox-1-positive even in the adult heart. PMID:19938109

  4. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  5. Does FACS perturb gene expression?

    PubMed

    Richardson, Graham M; Lannigan, Joanne; Macara, Ian G

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence activated cell sorting is the technique most commonly used to separate primary mammary epithelial sub-populations. Many studies incorporate this technique before analyzing gene expression within specific cellular lineages. However, to our knowledge, no one has examined the effects of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) separation on short-term transcriptional profiles. In this study, we isolated a heterogeneous mixture of cells from the mouse mammary gland. To determine the effects of the isolation and separation process on gene expression, we harvested RNA from the cells before enzymatic digestion, following enzymatic digestion, and following a mock FACS sort where the entire cohort of cells was retained. A strict protocol was followed to minimize disruption to the cells, and to ensure that no subpopulations were enriched or lost. Microarray analysis demonstrated that FACS causes minimal disruptions to gene expression patterns, but prior steps in the mammary cell isolation process are followed by upregulation of 18 miRNA's and rapid decreases in their predicted target transcripts. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  6. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  7. The bacterial paromomycin resistance gene, aphH, as a dominant selectable marker in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Jakobiak, Thomas; Mages, Wolfgang; Scharf, Birgit; Babinger, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schmitt, Rüdiger

    2004-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin that is highly toxic to the green alga Volvox carteri is efficiently inactivated by aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase from Streptomyces rimosus. Therefore, we made constructs in which the bacterial aphH gene encoding this enzyme was combined with Volvox cis-regulatory elements in an attempt to develop a new dominant selectable marker--paromomycin resistance (PmR)--for use in Volvox nuclear transformation. The construct that provided the most efficient transformation was one in which aphH was placed between a chimeric promoter that was generated by fusing the Volvox hsp70 and rbcS3 promoters and the 3' UTR of the Volvox rbcS3 gene. When this plasmid was used in combination with a high-impact biolistic device, the frequency of stable PmR transformants ranged about 15 per 106 target cells. Due to rapid and sharp selection, PmR transformants were readily isolated after six days, which is half the time required for previously used markers. Co-transformation of an unselected marker ranged about 30%. The chimeric aphH gene was stably integrated into the Volvox genome, frequently as tandem multiple copies, and was expressed at a level that made selection of PmR transformants simple and unambiguous. This makes the engineered bacterial aphH gene an efficient dominant selection marker for the transformation and co-transformation of a broad range of V. carteri strains without the recurring need for using auxotrophic recipient strains.

  8. Discovering monotonic stemness marker genes from time-series stem cell microarray data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsei-Wei; Sun, Hsing-Jen; Chang, Ting-Yu; Lo, Hung-Hao; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Tseng, George C; Lin, Chin-Teng; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Pal, Nikhil; Chung, I-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genes with ascending or descending monotonic expression patterns over time or stages of stem cells is an important issue in time-series microarray data analysis. We propose a method named Monotonic Feature Selector (MFSelector) based on a concept of total discriminating error (DEtotal) to identify monotonic genes. MFSelector considers various time stages in stage order (i.e., Stage One vs. other stages, Stages One and Two vs. remaining stages and so on) and computes DEtotal of each gene. MFSelector can successfully identify genes with monotonic characteristics. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of MFSelector on two synthetic data sets and two stem cell differentiation data sets: embryonic stem cell neurogenesis (ESCN) and embryonic stem cell vasculogenesis (ESCV) data sets. We have also performed extensive quantitative comparisons of the three monotonic gene selection approaches. Some of the monotonic marker genes such as OCT4, NANOG, BLBP, discovered from the ESCN dataset exhibit consistent behavior with that reported in other studies. The role of monotonic genes found by MFSelector in either stemness or differentiation is validated using information obtained from Gene Ontology analysis and other literature. We justify and demonstrate that descending genes are involved in the proliferation or self-renewal activity of stem cells, while ascending genes are involved in differentiation of stem cells into variant cell lineages. We have developed a novel system, easy to use even with no pre-existing knowledge, to identify gene sets with monotonic expression patterns in multi-stage as well as in time-series genomics matrices. The case studies on ESCN and ESCV have helped to get a better understanding of stemness and differentiation. The novel monotonic marker genes discovered from a data set are found to exhibit consistent behavior in another independent data set, demonstrating the utility of the proposed method. The MFSelector R function and data

  9. Effect of HPV on tumor expression levels of the most commonly used markers in HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Polanska, Hana; Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Raudenska, Martina; Svobodova, Marketa; Balvan, Jan; Fojtu, Michaela; Binkova, Hana; Horakova, Zuzana; Kostrica, Rom; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene; Masarik, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 90 % of head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and the overall 5-year survival rate is not higher than 50 %. There is much evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may influence the expression of commonly studied HNSCC markers. Our study was focused on the possible HPV-specificity of molecular markers that could be key players in important steps of cancerogenesis (MKI67, EGF, EGFR, BCL-2, BAX, FOS, JUN, TP53, MT1A, MT2A, VEGFA, FLT1, MMP2, MMP9, and POU5F). qRT-PCR analysis of these selected genes was performed on 74 biopsy samples of tumors from patients with histologically verified HNSCC (22 HPV-, 52 HPV+). Kaplan-Meier analysis was done to determine the relevance of these selected markers for HNSCC prognosis. In conclusion, our study confirms the impact of HPV infection on commonly studied HNSCC markers MT2A, MMP9, FLT1, VEGFA, and POU5F that were more highly expressed in HPV-negative HNSCC patients and also shows the relevance of studied markers in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC patients.

  10. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  11. Expression Marker-Based Strategy to Improve Beef Quality

    PubMed Central

    Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Picard, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    For beef cattle research, a main objective is to control concomitantly the development of muscles and the qualities of beef cuts. Beef quality is a complex phenotype that is only detectable after slaughter and is highly variable. The beef industry is in need of tools to estimate beef quality of live cattle or online in abattoirs, with specific attention towards sensory attributes (tenderness, juiciness, flavour, and colour). Identification of relevant genetic and genomic markers is ongoing, especially for tenderness—a top priority quality attribute. In this paper, we describe the steps of an expression marker-based strategy to improve beef sensory quality, from the discovery of biomarkers that identify consistent beef and the biological functions governing beef tenderness to the integration of the knowledge into detection tests for desirable animals. These tools should soon be available for the management of sensory quality in the beef production chain for meeting market's demands and assuring good quality standards. PMID:27066527

  12. Inheritance and expression of the mouse metallothionein gene in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Wagner, G.J.; Yeargan, R.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Genetically engineered seedlings obtained from self-fertilized transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) contained and expressed the mouse metallothionein and kanamycin resistance marker genes and were more tolerant to cadmium stress than untransformed controls. Cadmium accumulation in leaves of transgenic seedlings exposed to a low, field-like Cd concentration (0.02 micromolar) was about 20% lower than that in untransformed controls. Genetic analysis of R1 and R2 progeny showed inheritance of the marker gene to be as a dominant Mendelian trait. These results suggest the possibility of developing transgenic plants with modified tolerance to heavy metal stress and food crops having lower Cd content.

  13. Functionally Relevant Microsatellite Markers From Chickpea Transcription Factor Genes for Efficient Genotyping Applications and Trait Association Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C.L.L.; Singh, Sube; Jain, Mukesh; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2013-01-01

    We developed 1108 transcription factor gene-derived microsatellite (TFGMS) and 161 transcription factor functional domain-associated microsatellite (TFFDMS) markers from 707 TFs of chickpea. The robust amplification efficiency (96.5%) and high intra-specific polymorphic potential (34%) detected by markers suggest their immense utilities in efficient large-scale genotyping applications, including construction of both physical and functional transcript maps and understanding population structure. Candidate gene-based association analysis revealed strong genetic association of TFFDMS markers with three major seed and pod traits. Further, TFGMS markers in the 5′ untranslated regions of TF genes showing differential expression during seed development had higher trait association potential. The significance of TFFDMS markers was demonstrated by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence expansion/contraction in the functional domain and alteration of secondary protein structure encoded by genes. The seed weight-associated markers were validated through traditional bi-parental genetic mapping. The determination of gene-specific linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in desi and kabuli based on single nucleotide polymorphism-microsatellite marker haplotypes revealed extended LD decay, enhanced LD resolution and trait association potential of genes. The evolutionary history of a strong seed-size/weight-associated TF based on natural variation and haplotype sharing among desi, kabuli and wild unravelled useful information having implication for seed-size trait evolution during chickpea domestication. PMID:23633531

  14. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  15. Analysis of bHLH coding genes using gene co-expression network approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Sanchita; Singh, Garima; Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Network analysis provides a powerful framework for the interpretation of data. It uses novel reference network-based metrices for module evolution. These could be used to identify module of highly connected genes showing variation in co-expression network. In this study, a co-expression network-based approach was used for analyzing the genes from microarray data. Our approach consists of a simple but robust rank-based network construction. The publicly available gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum under cold and heat stresses were considered to create and analyze a gene co-expression network. The analysis provide highly co-expressed module of bHLH coding genes based on correlation values. Our approach was to analyze the variation of genes expression, according to the time period of stress through co-expression network approach. As the result, the seed genes were identified showing multiple connections with other genes in the same cluster. Seed genes were found to be vary in different time periods of stress. These analyzed seed genes may be utilized further as marker genes for developing the stress tolerant plant species.

  16. Producing a Mammalian GFP Expression Vector Containing Neomycin Resistance Gene.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Manizheh; Abiri, Maryam; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) was originally isolated from the Jellyfish Aequorea Victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light. GFP protein is composed of 238 amino acids with the molecular mass of 26.9 kD. The GFP gene is frequently used in cellular and molecular biology as a reporter gene. To date, many bacterial, yeast, fungal, plants, fly and mammalian cells, including human, have been created which express GFP. Martin Chalfie, Osamu Shimomura, and Roger Tsien were awarded the 2008 noble prize in chemistry for their discovery and development of GFP. In many studies on mammalian cells, GFP gene is introduced into cells using vector-based systems or a recombinant virus to track the location of a target protein or to study the expression level of the gene of interest, but in these studies there is no selection marker to normalize transfection. According to the importance of neomycin gene as a selection marker in mammalian cells, we aimed to produce a GFP expression vector that contains neomycin gene. GFP gene was separated from pEGFP-N1 vector and was inserted in the back-bone of pCDNA3.1/His/LacZ vector that contained the neomycin gene. The resulted vector contained GFP beside neomycin gene.

  17. Expression of c‐kit in human osteosarcoma and its relevance as a prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Sulzbacher, Irene; Birner, Peter; Toma, Cyril; Wick, Nikolaus; Mazal, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    Aims To examine the prognostic relevance of c‐kit expression in human osteosarcomas and to evaluate the mutation status in exon 9 and exon 11 of the c‐kit gene. Methods c‐kit expression was examined in 100 human osteosarcomas by immunohistochemistry using paraffin embedded tumour tissues, and capillary sequencing of genomic DNA was performed to search for mutations in exons 9 and 11 of the c‐kit gene. Results 20 osteosarcomas showed c‐kit expression ranging from 5% to 90% (mean 5.9%; SD 16.74%). Furthermore, DNA sequences of exon 9 and exon 11 of the c‐kit gene were not altered in these tumours. Overall and disease free survival analysis did not reveal any differences between patients with osteosarcoma with c‐kit expression and those with c‐kit negative tumours. Conclusions C‐kit expression is not a prognostic marker in patients with osteosarcoma. The protein expression is not linked to mutations in exon 9 or exon 11 of the c‐kit gene. Therefore, these exons may not function as targets for treatment modalities based on the suppression of c‐kit tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:17018686

  18. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T.; Minas, Tsion Z.; Conn, Erin J.; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T.; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes. PMID:27137931

  19. Ezrin Inhibition Up-regulates Stress Response Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Haydar; Bulut, Gülay; Han, Jenny; Graham, Garrett T; Minas, Tsion Z; Conn, Erin J; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Pauly, Gary T; Hayran, Mutlu; Li, Xin; Özdemirli, Metin; Ayhan, Ayşe; Rudek, Michelle A; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Üren, Aykut

    2016-06-17

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of proteins that links cortical cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. High expression of ezrin correlates with poor prognosis and metastasis in osteosarcoma. In this study, to uncover specific cellular responses evoked by ezrin inhibition that can be used as a specific pharmacodynamic marker(s), we profiled global gene expression in osteosarcoma cells after treatment with small molecule ezrin inhibitors, NSC305787 and NSC668394. We identified and validated several up-regulated integrated stress response genes including PTGS2, ATF3, DDIT3, DDIT4, TRIB3, and ATF4 as novel ezrin-regulated transcripts. Analysis of transcriptional response in skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSC305787-treated mice compared with a control group revealed that, among those genes, the stress gene DDIT4/REDD1 may be used as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of ezrin inhibitor compound activity. In addition, we validated the anti-metastatic effects of NSC305787 in reducing the incidence of lung metastasis in a genetically engineered mouse model of osteosarcoma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of NSC305787 and NSC668394 in mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cytoplasmic ezrin, previously considered a dormant and inactive protein, has important functions in regulating gene expression that may result in down-regulation of stress response genes.

  20. Gene expression profiling of the developing mouse kidney and embryo.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Lisa; Johnson, Penny A; Kimber, Susan J

    2010-02-01

    The metanephros is formed from the reciprocal inductive interaction of two precursor tissues, the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and the ureteric bud (UB). The UB induces MM to condense and differentiate forming the glomerulus and renal tubules, whilst the MM induces the UB to differentiate into the collecting tubules of the mature nephron. Uninduced MM is considered the progenitor cell population of the developing metanephros because of its potential to differentiate into more renal cell types than the UB. Previous studies have identified the phenotype of renal precursor cells; however, expression of candidate marker genes have not been analysed in other tissues of the murine embryo. We have assayed up to 19 candidate genes in eight embryonic tissues at five gestation stages of the mouse embryo to identify markers definitively expressed by renal cells during metanephric induction and markers developmentally regulated during kidney maturation. We then analysed their expression in other developing tissues. Results show Dcn, Hoxc9, Mest, Wt1 and Ywhaq were expressed at moderate to high levels during the window of metanephric specification and early differentiation (E10.5-E12.5 dpc), and Hoxc9, Ren1 and Wt1 expression was characteristic of mature renal cells. We demonstrated Cd24a, Cdh11, Mest, Scd2 and Sim2 were regulated during brain development, and Scd2, Cd24a and Sip1 expression was enriched in developing liver. These markers may be useful negative markers of kidney development. Use of a combination of highly expressed and negative markers may aid in the identification and removal of non-renal cells from heterogeneous populations of differentiating stem cells.

  1. Increased expression of astrocyte markers in schizophrenia: Association with neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Catts, Vibeke Sørensen; Wong, Jenny; Fillman, Stu Gregory; Fung, Samantha Jane; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2014-08-01

    While schizophrenia may have a progressive component, the evidence for neurodegenerative processes as indicated by reactive astrocytes is inconclusive. We recently identified a subgroup of individuals with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex, and hypothesized that this subgroup would also have reactive astrocytes. We measured glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein levels by immunoblotting in grey matter homogenate from 37 individuals with schizophrenia and 37 unaffected controls. We examined the morphology of GFAP-positive astrocytes in immunostained sections of middle frontal gyrus. We tested if GFAP expression or astrocyte morphology were altered in people with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers. We used RNA-Seq data on a subset of patients and controls (n=20/group) to ascertain whether mRNA transcripts associated with astrogliosis were elevated in the individuals with active neuroinflammation. GFAP (mRNA and protein) levels and astrocyte morphology were not significantly different between people with schizophrenia and controls overall. However, individuals with schizophrenia with neuroinflammation had increased expression of GFAP mRNA (t(33)=2.978, p=0.005), hypertrophic astrocyte morphology (χ(2)(2)=6.281, p=0.043), and statistically significant elevated expression of three mRNA transcripts previously associated with astrogliosis. We found clear evidence of astrogliosis in a subset of people with schizophrenia. We suggest that the lack of astrogliosis reported in previous studies may be due to cohort differences in aetiopathology, illness stage, treatment exposure, or a failure to examine subsets of people with schizophrenia. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  2. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  3. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  4. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  5. Development of expressed sequence tag and expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat marker resources for Musa acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Marco A. N.; de Oliveira Cruz, Viviane; Emediato, Flavia L.; de Camargo Teixeira, Cristiane; Souza, Manoel T.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C.; Ferreira, Claudia F.; Amorim, Edson P.; de Alencar Figueiredo, Lucio Flavio; Martins, Natalia F.; de Jesus Barbosa Cavalcante, Maria; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Pappas, Georgios J.; Pignolet, Luc; Abadie, Catherine; Ciampi, Ana Y.; Piffanelli, Pietro; Miller, Robert N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Banana (Musa acuminata) is a crop contributing to global food security. Many varieties lack resistance to biotic stresses, due to sterility and narrow genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of transcripts expressed during compatible and incompatible banana–Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Mf) interactions. Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by Mf, is a destructive disease of banana. Microsatellite markers were developed as a resource for crop improvement. Methodology cDNA libraries were constructed from in vitro-infected leaves from BLSD-resistant M. acuminata ssp. burmaniccoides Calcutta 4 (MAC4) and susceptible M. acuminata cv. Cavendish Grande Naine (MACV). Clones were 5′-end Sanger sequenced, ESTs assembled with TGICL and unigenes annotated using BLAST, Blast2GO and InterProScan. Mreps was used to screen for simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with markers evaluated for polymorphism using 20 diploid (AA) M. acuminata accessions contrasting in resistance to Mycosphaerella leaf spot diseases. Principal results A total of 9333 high-quality ESTs were obtained for MAC4 and 3964 for MACV, which assembled into 3995 unigenes. Of these, 2592 displayed homology to genes encoding proteins with known or putative function, and 266 to genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Gene ontology (GO) classification identified 543 GO terms, 2300 unigenes were assigned to EuKaryotic orthologous group categories and 312 mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 624 SSR loci were identified, with trinucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant in MAC4 (54.1 %) and MACV (57.6 %). Polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions was observed with 75 markers. Alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 8, totalling 289. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.81. Conclusions This EST collection offers a resource for studying functional genes, including

  6. Autophagic Marker MAP1LC3B Expression Levels Are Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Goikuria, Haize; Vega, Reyes; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; López Medina, Antonio; Freijo, María del Mar; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Alloza, Iraide

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism by which atheroma plaque becomes unstable is not completely understood to date but analysis of differentially expressed genes in stable versus unstable plaques may provide clues. This will be crucial toward disclosing the mechanistic basis of plaque instability, and may help to identify prognostic biomarkers for ischaemic events. The objective of our study was to identify differences in expression levels of 59 selected genes between symptomatic patients (unstable plaques) and asymptomatic patients (stable plaques). Methods 80 carotid plaques obtained by carotid endarterectomy and classified as symptomatic (>70% stenosis) or asymptomatic (>80% stenosis) were used in this study. The expression levels of 59 genes were quantified by qPCR on RNA extracted from the carotid plaques obtained by endarterectomy and analyzed by means of various bioinformatic tools. Results Several genes associated with autophagy pathways displayed differential expression levels between asymptomatic and symptomatic (i.e. MAP1LC3B, RAB24, EVA1A). In particular, mRNA levels of MAP1LC3B, an autophagic marker, showed a 5−fold decrease in symptomatic samples, which was confirmed in protein blots. Immune system−related factors and endoplasmic reticulum-associated markers (i.e. ERP27, ITPR1, ERO1LB, TIMP1, IL12B) emerged as differently expressed genes between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Conclusions Carotid atherosclerotic plaques in which MAP1LC3B is underexpressed would not be able to benefit from MAP1LC3B−associated autophagy. This may lead to accumulation of dead cells at lesion site with subsequent plaque destabilization leading to cerebrovascular events. Identified biomarkers and network interactions may represent novel targets for development of treatments against plaque destabilization and thus for the prevention of cerebrovascular events. PMID:25503069

  7. Identification of expressed resistance gene analogs from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanji; Feng, Suping; Pandey, Manish K; Chen, Xiaoping; Culbreath, Albert K; Varshney, Rajeev K; Guo, Baozhu

    2013-05-01

    Low genetic diversity makes peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) very vulnerable to plant pathogens, causing severe yield loss and reduced seed quality. Several hundred partial genomic DNA sequences as nucleotide-binding-site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance genes (R) have been identified, but a small portion with expressed transcripts has been found. We aimed to identify resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from peanut expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and to develop polymorphic markers. The protein sequences of 54 known R genes were used to identify homologs from peanut ESTs from public databases. A total of 1,053 ESTs corresponding to six different classes of known R genes were recovered, and assembled 156 contigs and 229 singletons as peanut-expressed RGAs. There were 69 that encoded for NBS-LRR proteins, 191 that encoded for protein kinases, 82 that encoded for LRR-PK/transmembrane proteins, 28 that encoded for Toxin reductases, 11 that encoded for LRR-domain containing proteins and four that encoded for TM-domain containing proteins. Twenty-eight simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from 25 peanut expressed RGAs. One SSR polymorphic marker (RGA121) was identified. Two polymerase chain reaction-based markers (Ahsw-1 and Ahsw-2) developed from RGA013 were homologous to the Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) resistance gene. All three markers were mapped on the same linkage group AhIV. These expressed RGAs are the source for RGA-tagged marker development and identification of peanut resistance genes. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. NDRG4, an early detection marker for colorectal cancer, is specifically expressed in enteric neurons.

    PubMed

    Vaes, N; Lentjes, M H F M; Gijbels, M J; Rademakers, G; Daenen, K L; Boesmans, W; Wouters, K A D; Geuzens, A; Qu, X; Steinbusch, H P J; Rutten, B P F; Baldwin, S H; Sharkey, K A; Hofstra, R M W; van Engeland, M; Vanden Berghe, P; Melotte, V

    2017-09-01

    Promoter methylation of N-myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 4 (NDRG4) in fecal DNA is an established early detection marker for colorectal cancer (CRC). Despite its connection to CRC, NDRG4 is predominantly studied in brain and heart, with little to no knowledge about its expression or role in other organs. In this study, we aimed to determine the whole-body expression of NDRG4, with a focus on the intestinal tract. We investigated NDRG4 expression throughout the body by immunohistochemistry, Western Blotting and in situ mRNA hybridization using tissues from NDRG4 wild-type, heterozygous and knockout mice and humans. In addition, we explored cell-specific expression of NDRG4 in murine whole-mount gut preparations using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. NDRG4 is specifically expressed within nervous system structures throughout the body. In the intestinal tract of both mouse and man, NDRG4 immunoreactivity was restricted to the enteric nervous system (ENS), where it labeled cell bodies of the myenteric and submucosal plexuses and interconnecting nerve fibers. More precisely, NDRG4 expression was limited to neurons, as NDRG4 always co-localized with HuC/D (pan-neuronal marker) but never with GFAP (an enteric glial cell marker). Furthermore, NDRG4 was expressed in various neuropeptide Y positive neurons, but was only found in a minority (~10%) of neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase. NDRG4 is exclusively expressed by central, peripheral and enteric neurons/nerves, suggesting a neuronal-specific role of this protein. Our findings raise the question whether NDRG4, via the ENS, an understudied component of the tumor microenvironment, supports CRC development and/or progression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Gene Expression Signature in Peripheral Blood Detects Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Dov; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Iakoubova, Olga; Tranquilli, Maryann; Albornoz, Gonzalo; Blake, Julie; Mehmet, Necip N.; Ngadimo, Dewi; Poulter, Karen; Chan, Frances; Samaha, Raymond R.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is usually asymptomatic and associated with high mortality. Adverse clinical outcome of TAA is preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. We hypothesized that gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells may correlate with TAA disease status. Our goal was to identify a distinct gene expression signature in peripheral blood that may identify individuals at risk for TAA. Methods and Findings Whole genome gene expression profiles from 94 peripheral blood samples (collected from 58 individuals with TAA and 36 controls) were analyzed. Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) identified potential signature genes characterizing TAA vs. normal, ascending vs. descending TAA, and sporadic vs. familial TAA. Using a training set containing 36 TAA patients and 25 controls, a 41-gene classification model was constructed for detecting TAA status and an overall accuracy of 78±6% was achieved. Testing this classifier on an independent validation set containing 22 TAA samples and 11 controls yielded an overall classification accuracy of 78%. These 41 classifier genes were further validated by TaqMan® real-time PCR assays. Classification based on the TaqMan® data replicated the microarray results and achieved 80% classification accuracy on the testing set. Conclusions This study identified informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood cells that can characterize TAA status and subtypes of TAA. Moreover, a 41-gene classifier based on expression signature can identify TAA patients with high accuracy. The transcriptional programs in peripheral blood leading to the identification of these markers also provide insights into the mechanism of development of aortic aneurysms and highlight potential targets for therapeutic intervention. The classifier genes identified in this study, and validated by TaqMan® real-time PCR, define a set of promising potential diagnostic markers

  10. Gut microbiota, host gene expression, and aging.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Paola; Tacconelli, Stefania; Bruno, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Novel concepts of disease susceptibility and development suggest an important role of gastrointestinal microbiota and microbial pathogens. They can contribute to physiological systems and disease processes, even outside of the gastrointestinal tract. There is increasing evidence that genetics of the host influence and interact with gut microbiota. Moreover, aging-associated oxidative stress may cause morphologic alterations of bacterial cells, thus influencing the aggressive potential and virulence markers of an anaerobic bacterium and finally the type of interaction with the host. At the same time, microbiota may influence host gene expression and it is becoming apparent that it may occur through the regulation of microRNAs. They are short single-stranded noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and/or translational repression of their target mRNAs. The introduction of -omics approaches (such as metagenomics, metaproteomics, and metatranscriptomics) in microbiota research will certainly advance our knowledge of this area. This will lead to greatly deepen our understanding of the molecular targets in the homeostatic interaction between the gut microbiota and the host and, thereby, promises to reveal new ways to treat diseases and maintain health.

  11. Transcriptome profiling in response to different types of ionizing radiation and identification of multiple radio marker genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Lee, Kyung Jun; Jang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kim, Sang Hoon; Ha, Bo-Keun; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Kang, Si-Yong; Kim, Dong Sub

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) affects gene expression from plant genomes. To monitor the genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by three types of IR, we used the rice Affymetrix GeneChip microarray to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated by gamma rays (GAs), cosmic rays (CRs) and ion beams (IBs). The overall expression patterns in rice seedlings generated from seeds exposed to GAs and IBs were similar but differed for CRs exposure. Expression profiles of genes involved in metabolic pathways and cellular response were identified using MapMan analysis. This result revealed that IRs induced gene expression related to sucrose-starch metabolisms; sugar and starch accumulation was significantly increased in response to three types of IR in rice. In addition, we compared the genes commonly up- or down-regulated by exposure to three types of IR and identified 53 candidate radio marker genes (RMGs) that were differentially regulated by radiation exposure but not by other stresses. Among these genes, we selected six RMGs commonly applicable to different types of IR by specific coexpression networks using the algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (aracne) and confirmed the expression of these genes by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Our results provided insight into the mechanisms of the responses to different types of IR and identified multiple marker genes to predict sensitivity to three types of IR. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. [Neuronal plasticity and gene expression].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O O; Shtark, M B; Lisachev, P D

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity--a fundamental feature of brain--provides adequate interactions with dynamic environment. One of the most deeply investigated forms of the neuronal plasticity is a long-term potentiation (LTP)--a phenomenon underlying learning and memory. Signal paths activated during LTP converge into the nuclear of the neuron, giving rise to launch of the molecular-genetic programs, which mediate structural and functional remodeling of synapses. In the review data concerning involvement of multilevel gene expression into plastic change under neuronal activation are summarized.

  13. Minimal breast cancer: evaluation of histology and biological marker expression

    PubMed Central

    Dublin, E A; Millis, R R; Smith, P; Bobrow, L G

    1999-01-01

    Ninety-eight minimal breast cancers (MBCs) diagnosed between 1975 and 1990, and all originally considered to be invasive were found, on review, to form three groups: (a) 28 predominantly invasive carcinomas ≤10 mm (‘predominant invasive’); (b) 48 predominantly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions with definite foci of invasion each ≤10 mm (‘predominant DCIS’); and (c) 22 DCIS without evidence of invasion (‘pure DCIS’). Tumour histology and immunohistochemical expression of Ki-67, c-erbB2, p53, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Bcl-2 were compared. The major finding was the contrasting features in the two invasive groups, with significant differences in their extent of invasion (P < 0.0001), tumour grade (P = 0.03), DCIS type (P = 0.008) and in marker expression. In the predominant invasive group, the infiltrative component was usually greater than 5 mm, low-grade and associated with well-differentiated DCIS. Expression of Ki-67, c-erbB2 and p53 was generally low, and that of ER, PR and Bcl-2 high. The predominant DCIS group in contrast had a much smaller, commonly high-grade, invasive component, usually with poorly differentiated DCIS and the reverse pattern of marker expression. Although not significant, survival of patients in the predominant invasive group was slightly better. These findings suggest that invasive MBCs should perhaps be treated as separate entities, in order to aid more appropriate selection of treatment. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408407

  14. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular.

  15. A longitudinal study of gene expression in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Karlovich, Chris; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Johnson, Andrea; McLoughlin, Patricia; Navarro, Mercidita; Fleurbaey, Carole; Steiner, Lori; Tessier, Michel; Nguyen, Tracy; Wilhelm-Seiler, Monika; Caulfield, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of gene expression in venous blood either as a pharmacodynamic marker in clinical trials of drugs or as a diagnostic test requires knowledge of the variability in expression over time in healthy volunteers. Here we defined a normal range of gene expression over 6 months in the blood of four cohorts of healthy men and women who were stratified by age (22–55 years and > 55 years) and gender. Methods Eleven immunomodulatory genes likely to play important roles in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and infection in addition to four genes typically used as reference genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), as well as the full genome as represented by Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Results Gene expression levels as assessed by qRT-PCR and microarray were relatively stable over time with ~2% of genes as measured by microarray showing intra-subject differences over time periods longer than one month. Fifteen genes varied by gender. The eleven genes examined by qRT-PCR remained within a limited dynamic range for all individuals. Specifically, for the seven most stably expressed genes (CXCL1, HMOX1, IL1RN, IL1B, IL6R, PTGS2, and TNF), 95% of all samples profiled fell within 1.5–2.5 Ct, the equivalent of a 4- to 6-fold dynamic range. Two subjects who experienced severe adverse events of cancer and anemia, had microarray gene expression profiles that were distinct from normal while subjects who experienced an infection had only slightly elevated levels of inflammatory markers. Conclusion This study defines the range and variability of gene expression in healthy men and women over a six-month period. These parameters can be used to estimate the number of subjects needed to observe significant differences from normal gene expression in clinical studies. A set of genes that varied by gender was also identified as were a set of genes with elevated expression in a subject with

  16. A longitudinal study of gene expression in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Karlovich, Chris; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Johnson, Andrea; McLoughlin, Patricia; Navarro, Mercidita; Fleurbaey, Carole; Steiner, Lori; Tessier, Michel; Nguyen, Tracy; Wilhelm-Seiler, Monika; Caulfield, John P

    2009-06-07

    The use of gene expression in venous blood either as a pharmacodynamic marker in clinical trials of drugs or as a diagnostic test requires knowledge of the variability in expression over time in healthy volunteers. Here we defined a normal range of gene expression over 6 months in the blood of four cohorts of healthy men and women who were stratified by age (22-55 years and > 55 years) and gender. Eleven immunomodulatory genes likely to play important roles in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and infection in addition to four genes typically used as reference genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), as well as the full genome as represented by Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Gene expression levels as assessed by qRT-PCR and microarray were relatively stable over time with approximately 2% of genes as measured by microarray showing intra-subject differences over time periods longer than one month. Fifteen genes varied by gender. The eleven genes examined by qRT-PCR remained within a limited dynamic range for all individuals. Specifically, for the seven most stably expressed genes (CXCL1, HMOX1, IL1RN, IL1B, IL6R, PTGS2, and TNF), 95% of all samples profiled fell within 1.5-2.5 Ct, the equivalent of a 4- to 6-fold dynamic range. Two subjects who experienced severe adverse events of cancer and anemia, had microarray gene expression profiles that were distinct from normal while subjects who experienced an infection had only slightly elevated levels of inflammatory markers. This study defines the range and variability of gene expression in healthy men and women over a six-month period. These parameters can be used to estimate the number of subjects needed to observe significant differences from normal gene expression in clinical studies. A set of genes that varied by gender was also identified as were a set of genes with elevated expression in a subject with iron deficiency anemia and

  17. Gene Expression Profiling of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel; Ramalingam, Suresh; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2008-01-01

    Functional genomics has emerged over the past ten years as a novel technology to study genetic alterations. Gene expression arrays are one genomic technique employed to discover changes in the DNA expression that occur in neoplastic transformation. Microarrays have been applied to investigating lung cancer. Specific applications include discovering novel genetic changes that occur in lung tumors. Microarrays can also be applied to improve diagnosis, staging, and discover prognostic markers. The eventual goal of this technology is to discover new markers for therapy and to customize therapy based on an individual tumor genetic composition. In this review, we present the current state of gene expression array technology in its application to lung cancer. PMID:18440087

  18. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  19. Tradict enables accurate prediction of eukaryotic transcriptional states from 100 marker genes

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Surojit; Kerner, Konstantin; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Jojic, Vladimir; Wigge, Philip A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcript levels are a critical determinant of the proteome and hence cellular function. Because the transcriptome is an outcome of the interactions between genes and their products, it may be accurately represented by a subset of transcript abundances. We develop a method, Tradict (transcriptome predict), capable of learning and using the expression measurements of a small subset of 100 marker genes to predict transcriptome-wide gene abundances and the expression of a comprehensive, but interpretable list of transcriptional programs that represent the major biological processes and pathways of the cell. By analyzing over 23,000 publicly available RNA-Seq data sets, we show that Tradict is robust to noise and accurate. Coupled with targeted RNA sequencing, Tradict may therefore enable simultaneous transcriptome-wide screening and mechanistic investigation at large scales. PMID:28474674

  20. User-friendly markers linked to Fusarium wilt race 1 resistance Fw gene for marker-assisted selection in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium wilt is one of the most widespread diseases of pea. Resistance to Fusarium wilt race 1 was reported as a single gene, Fw, located on linkage group III. The previously reported AFLP and RAPD markers linked to Fw have limited usage in marker-assisted selection due to their map distance and l...

  1. EST, COSII, and arbitrary gene markers give similar estimates of nucleotide diversity in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Labate, Joanne A; Robertson, Larry D; Wu, Feinan; Tanksley, Steven D; Baldo, Angela M

    2009-03-01

    Because cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is low in genetic diversity, public, verified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers within the species are in demand. To promote marker development we resequenced approximately 23 kb in a diverse set of 31 tomato lines including TA496. Three classes of markers were sampled: (1) 26 expressed-sequence tag (EST), all of which were predicted to be polymorphic based on TA496, (2) 14 conserved ortholog set II (COSII) or unigene, and (3) ten published sequences, composed of nine fruit quality genes and one anonymous RFLP marker. The latter two types contained mostly noncoding DNA. In total, 154 SNPs and 34 indels were observed. The distributions of nucleotide diversity estimates among marker types were not significantly different from each other. Ascertainment bias of SNPs was evaluated for the EST markers. Despite the fact that the EST markers were developed using SNP prediction within a sample consisting of only one TA496 allele and one additional allele, the majority of polymorphisms in the 26 EST markers were represented among the other 30 tomato lines. Fifteen EST markers with published SNPs were more closely examined for bias. Mean SNP diversity observations were not significantly different between the original discovery sample of two lines (53 SNPs) and the 31 line diversity panel (56 SNPs). Furthermore, TA496 shared its haplotype with at least one other line at 11 of the 15 markers. These data demonstrate that public EST databases and noncoding regions are a valuable source of unbiased SNP markers in tomato.

  2. Glyphosate-tolerant CP4 and GOX genes as a selectable marker in wheat transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Arrowsmith, J W; Fromm, M E; Hironaka, C M; Taylor, M L; Rodriguez, D; Pajeau, M E; Brown, S M; Santino, C G; Fry, J E

    1995-12-01

    The lack of alternative selectable markers in crop transformation has been a substantial barrier for commercial application of agricultural biotechnology. We have developed an efficient selection system for wheat transformation using glyphosate-tolerant CP4 and GOX genes as a selectable marker. Immature embryos of the wheat cultivar Bobwhite were bombarded with two separate plasmids harboring the CP4/GOX and GUS genes. After a 1 week delay, the bombarded embryos were transferred to a selection medium containing 2 mM glyphosate. Embryo-derived calli were subcultured onto the same selection medium every 3 weeks consecutively for 9-12 weeks, and were then regenerated and rooted on selection media with lower glyphosate concentrations. Transgenic plants tolerant to glyphosate were recovered. ELISA assay confirmed expression of the CP4 and GOX genes in R0 plants. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the transgenes were integrated into the wheat genomes and transmitted to the following generation. The use of CP4 and GOX genes as a selectable marker provides an efficient, effective, and alternative transformation selection system for wheat.

  3. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    PubMed Central

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST) library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR), and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. Results A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. Conclusion This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry. PMID:18570660

  4. Sarcoplasmic MxA expression: A valuable marker of dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Uruha, Akinori; Nishikawa, Atsuko; Tsuburaya, Rie S; Hamanaka, Kohei; Kuwana, Masataka; Watanabe, Yurika; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of myxovirus resistance A (MxA) expression in the cytoplasm of myofibers in the diagnosis of dermatomyositis (DM). We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the sarcoplasmic expression of MxA in muscles with DM by immunohistochemistry in consecutive cases of DM (n = 34) and other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (n = 120: 8 with polymyositis, 16 with anti-tRNA-synthetase antibody-associated myositis, 46 with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, and 50 with inclusion body myositis) and compared them with conventional pathologic hallmarks of DM, including perifascicular atrophy (PFA) and membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on endomysial capillaries. The sensitivity and specificity of sarcoplasmic MxA expression were 71% and 98%, respectively. While the specificity was almost comparable to that of PFA and capillary MAC deposition, the sensitivity was higher, with PFA showing 47% sensitivity and 98% specificity and capillary MAC deposition showing 35% sensitivity and 93% specificity. Of note, in patients with DM with typical skin rash but no PFA, 44% of the samples showed sarcoplasmic MxA expression, which was higher than the 17% sensitivity of capillary MAC deposition in the population. Sarcoplasmic MxA expression detected by immunohistochemistry is a more sensitive marker of DM than the conventional hallmarks, indicating its practical utility in the diagnosis of DM. It may well be included in the routine immunohistochemistry panel for myositis. This study provides Class II evidence that immunohistochemistry-detected sarcoplasmic MxA expression accurately identifies patients with dermatomyositis. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Gene markers in brain tumors: what the epileptologist should know.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn; Cohen, Mark L; Ondracek, Annie; Sloan, Andrew; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

    2013-12-01

    Gene markers or biomarkers can be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes for all different types of complex disease, including brain tumors. Prognostic markers can be useful to explain differences not only in overall survival but also in response to treatment and for development of targeted therapies. Multiple genes with specific types of alterations have now been identified that are associated with improved response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, such as O(6)-methylguanine methyltranferase (MGMT) or loss of chromosomes 1p and/or 19q. Other alterations have been identified that are associated with improved overall survival, such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and/or isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) or having the glioma CpG island DNA methylator phenotype (G-CIMP). There are many biomarkers that may have relevance in brain tumor-associated epilepsy that do not respond to treatment. Given the rapidly changing landscape of high throughput "omics" technologies, there is significant potential for gaining further knowledge via integration of multiple different types of high genome-wide data. This knowledge can be translated into improved therapies and clinical outcomes for patients with brain tumors.

  6. Evaluation of p53 protein expression as a marker for long-term prognosis in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, J. W.; Baas, I. O.; Polak, M. M.; Goodman, S. N.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of the p53 gene is reported to be of prognostic importance in colorectal carcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining of the accumulated p53 gene product may be a simple alternative for p53 mutation analysis. Previous studies addressing the prognostic importance of p53 expression, however, yielded contradictory results. Therefore, we evaluated the importance of p53 expression as a marker for long-term prognosis in a well-characterised study population of 109 colorectal carcinomas. After antigen retrieval with target unmasking fluid (TUF), immunostaining of p53 was performed with both monoclonal antibody DO7 and polyclonal antibody CM1. Objective quantification of the p53 signal was assessed by a computerised image analyser. p53 expression was higher in non-mucinous tumours than in mucinous tumours (p53 labelling index = 30% and 17% respectively, P = 0.05), and in metastatic tumours compared with non-metastatic tumours (p53 labelling index = 37% and 22% respectively, P = 0.05). Other histopathological features were not related to p53 expression. In multivariate analysis, Dukes' stage (P = 0.02) and histological grade (P = 0.05) stood out as independent markers for prognosis. p53 expression was not an independent marker for prognosis. At present, p53 expression is not a useful marker for long-term prognosis. Further insight into the relationship between p53 mutations and p53 expression is needed to elucidate more precisely the clinical relevance of p53 alterations. PMID:7779721

  7. Pre- and early-postnatal nutrition modify gene and protein expressions of muscle energy metabolism markers and phospholipid Fatty Acid composition in a muscle type specific manner in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Kongsted, Anna H; Ghoreishi, Seyed M; Takhtsabzy, Tasnim K; Friedrichsen, Martin; Hellgren, Lars I; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Vaag, Allan; Nielsen, Mette O

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that undernutrition in late fetal life reduced whole-body insulin sensitivity in adult sheep, irrespective of dietary exposure in early postnatal life. Skeletal muscle may play an important role in control of insulin action. We therefore studied a range of putative key muscle determinants of insulin signalling in two types of skeletal muscles (longissimus dorsi (LD) and biceps femoris (BF)) and in the cardiac muscle (ventriculus sinister cordis (VSC)) of sheep from the same experiment. Twin-bearing ewes were fed either 100% (NORM) or 50% (LOW) of their energy and protein requirements during the last trimester of gestation. From day-3 postpartum to 6-months of age (around puberty), twin offspring received a high-carbohydrate-high-fat (HCHF) or a moderate-conventional (CONV) diet, whereafter all males were slaughtered. Females were subsequently raised on a moderate diet and slaughtered at 2-years of age (young adults). The only long-term consequences of fetal undernutrition observed in adult offspring were lower expressions of the insulin responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1α (PGC1α) mRNA in BF, but increased PGC1α expression in VSC. Interestingly, the HCHF diet in early postnatal life was associated with somewhat paradoxically increased expressions in LD of a range of genes (but not proteins) related to glucose uptake, insulin signalling and fatty acid oxidation. Except for fatty acid oxidation genes, these changes persisted into adulthood. No persistent expression changes were observed in BF and VSC. The HCHF diet increased phospholipid ratios of n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in all muscles, even in adults fed identical diets for 1½ years. In conclusion, early postnatal, but not late gestation, nutrition had long-term consequences for a number of determinants of insulin action and metabolism in LD. Tissues other than muscle may account for reduced whole

  8. Noncytopathic Sindbis virus RNA vectors for heterologous gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Agapov, Eugene V.; Frolov, Ilya; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Prágai, Béla M.; Schlesinger, Sondra; Rice, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Infection of vertebrate cells with alphaviruses normally leads to prodigious expression of virus-encoded genes and a dramatic inhibition of host protein synthesis. Recombinant Sindbis viruses and replicons have been useful as vectors for high level foreign gene expression, but the cytopathic effects of viral replication have limited their use to transient studies. We recently selected Sindbis replicons capable of persistent, noncytopathic growth in BHK cells and describe here a new generation of Sindbis vectors useful for long-term foreign gene expression based on such replicons. Foreign genes of interest as well as the dominant selectable marker puromycin N-acteyltransferase, which confers resistance to the drug puromycin, were expressed as subgenomic transcripts of noncytopathic replicons or defective-interfering genomes complemented in trans by a replicon. Based on these strategies, we developed vectors that can be initiated via either RNA or DNA transfection and analyzed them for their level and stability of foreign gene expression. Noncytopathic Sindbis vectors express reasonably high levels of protein in nearly every cell. These vectors should prove to be flexible tools for the rapid expression of heterologous genes under conditions in which cellular metabolism is not perturbed, and we illustrate their utility with a number of foreign proteins. PMID:9789028

  9. Association mapping and marker-assisted selection of the lettuce dieback resistance gene Tvr1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lettuce (Lactuca saliva L.) is susceptible to dieback, a soilborne disease caused by two viruses from the family Tombusviridae. Susceptibility to dieback is widespread in romaine and leaf-type lettuce, while modern iceberg cultivars are resistant to this disease. Resistance in iceberg cultivars is conferred by Tvr1 - a single, dominant gene that provides durable resistance. This study describes fine mapping of the resistance gene, analysis of nucleotide polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium in the Tvr1 region, and development of molecular markers for marker-assisted selection. Results A combination of classical linkage mapping and association mapping allowed us to pinpoint the location of the Tvr1 resistance gene on chromosomal linkage group 2. Nine molecular markers, based on expressed sequence tags (EST), were closely linked to Tvr1 in the mapping population, developed from crosses between resistant (Salinas and Salinas 88) and susceptible (Valmaine) cultivars. Sequencing of these markers from a set of 68 cultivars revealed a relatively high level of nucleotide polymorphism (θ = 6.7 × 10-3) and extensive linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.124 at 8 cM) in this region. However, the extent of linkage disequilibrium was affected by population structure and the values were substantially larger when the analysis was performed only for romaine (r2 = 0.247) and crisphead (r2 = 0.345) accessions. The association mapping approach revealed that one of the nine markers (Cntg10192) in the Tvr1 region matched exactly with resistant and susceptible phenotypes when tested on a set of 200 L. sativa accessions from all horticultural types of lettuce. The marker-trait association was also confirmed on two accessions of Lactuca serriola - a wild relative of cultivated lettuce. The combination of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the Cntg10192 marker identified four haplotypes. Three of the haplotypes were associated with resistance and one of them was always

  10. Hypoxia markers are expressed in interneurons exposed to recurrent seizures.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Fabio; Marinelli, Carla; Longo, Daniela; Pugnaghi, Matteo; Nichelli, Paolo F; Meletti, Stefano; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    An early but transient decrease in oxygen availability occurs during experimentally induced seizures. Using pimonidazole, which probes hypoxic insults, we found that by increasing the duration of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) from 30 to 120 min, counts of pimonidazole-immunoreactive neurons also increased (P < 0.01, 120 vs 60 and 30 min). All the animals exposed to SE were immunopositive to pimonidazole, but a different scenario emerged during epileptogenesis when a decrease in pimonidazole-immunostained cells occurred from 7 to 14 days, so that only 1 out of 4 rats presented with pimonidazole-immunopositive cells. Pimonidazole-immunoreactive cells robustly reappeared at 21 days post-SE induction when all animals (7 out of 7) had developed spontaneous recurrent seizures. Specific neuronal markers revealed that immunopositivity to pimonidazole was present in cells identified by neuropeptide Y (NPY) or somatostatin antibodies. At variance, neurons immunopositive to parvalbumin or cholecystokinin were not immunopositive to pimonidazole. Pimonidazole-immunopositive neurons expressed remarkable immunoreactivity to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). Interestingly, surgical samples obtained from pharmacoresistant patients showed neurons co-labeled by HIF-1α and NPY antibodies. These interneurons, along with parvalbumin-positive interneurons that were negative to HIF-1α, showed immunopositivity to markers of cell damage, such as high-mobility group box 1 in the cytoplasm and cleaved caspase-3 in the nucleus. These findings suggest that interneurons are continuously endangered in rodent and human epileptogenic tissue. The presence of hypoxia and cell damage markers in NPY interneurons of rats and patients presenting with recurrent seizures indicates a mechanism of selective vulnerability in a specific neuronal subpopulation.

  11. Mechanoregulation of gene expression in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, James H.-C.; Thampatty, Bhavani P.; Lin, Jeen-Shang; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loads placed on connective tissues alter gene expression in fibroblasts through mechanotransduction mechanisms by which cells convert mechanical signals into cellular biological events, such as gene expression of extracellular matrix components (e.g., collagen). This mechanical regulation of ECM gene expression affords maintenance of connective tissue homeostasis. However, mechanical loads can also interfere with homeostatic cellular gene expression and consequently cause the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases such as tendinopathy and osteoarthritis. Therefore, the regulation of gene expression by mechanical loads is closely related to connective tissue physiology and pathology. This article reviews the effects of various mechanical loading conditions on gene regulation in fibroblasts and discusses several mechanotransduction mechanisms. Future research directions in mechanoregulation of gene expression are also suggested. PMID:17331678

  12. Objective analysis of cancer stem cell marker expression using immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Miller, T J; McCoy, M J; Hemmings, C; Bulsara, M K; Iacopetta, B; Platell, C F

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of immunohistochemical expression is often a subjective and semiquantitative process that can lead to the inconsistent reporting of results. To assess the effect that region selection and quantification method have on results, five different cancer stem cell markers were used in this study to compare tissue scoring with digital analysis methods that used three different tissue annotation methods. Samples of tumour and normal mucosa were used from 10 consecutive stage II colon cancer patients and stained for the putative cancer stem cell markers ALDH1, CD44v6, CD133, Lgr5 and SOX2. Tissue scoring was found to have considerably different results to digital analysis with the three different digital methods harbouring concordant results overall. However, SOX2 on normal tissue and CD133 on tumour and normal tissue produced discordant results which could be attributed to the different regions of tissue that were analysed. It is important that quantification method and selection of analysis areas are considered as part of study design to ensure that reproducible and consistent results are reported in the literature.

  13. The 3'-UTR (CA)n microsatellite on CD40LG gene as a possible genetic marker for rheumatoid arthritis in Mexican population: impact on CD40LG mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Román-Fernández, I V; Sánchez-Zuno, G A; Padilla-Gutiérrez, J R; Cerpa-Cruz, S; Hernández-Bello, J; Valle, Y; Ramírez-Dueñas, M G; Carrillo, C; Muñoz-Valle, J F

    2017-09-30

    The objective of this study was to determine the association of the CD40LG 3'-UTR (CA)n microsatellite with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and CD40LG mRNA levels in females from western Mexico. A case-control study with 219 RA patients and 175 control subjects (CS) was conducted. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), X (2) test was used to compare genotype and allele frequencies, and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the association between RA and the microsatellite. CD40LG mRNA expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. For comparisons between groups, Kruskal-Wallis or Mann-Whitney U tests for non-parametric data and ANOVA test for parametric data were performed. Among the 13 different alleles identified, CA25 was the most represented (45.4% RA and 46.3% CS). Stratification according to CA repeats as CA25 showed a tendency towards a higher frequency of >CA25 alleles in RA patients (29%) compared to CS (23.4%). There was no association between any genotype and the clinical parameters of RA patients. According to the 2(-∆∆Cq) method, CD40LG mRNA expression in RA patients was 4.5-fold higher compared to CS; this difference was significant when assessed by the 2(-∆Cq) method (p = 0.028). Compared to carriers of the CA25/CA25 genotype, CS carrying the expression (9.97-fold), unlike RA patients, where expression was 2.55-fold higher for >CA25/>CA25 carriers. The 3'-UTR CD40LG (CA)n microsatellite is not a genetic marker for RA in western Mexican population; however, results suggest that it plays a role in the CD40LG mRNA expression.

  14. Hypertension genes are genetic markers for insulin sensitivity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiuqing; Cheng, Suzanne; Taylor, Kent D; Cui, Jinrui; Hughes, Randall; Quiñones, Manuel J; Bulnes-Enriquez, Isabel; De la Rosa, Roxana; Aurea, George; Yang, Huiying; Hsueh, Willa; Rotter, Jerome I

    2005-04-01

    Insulin resistance is a determinant of blood pressure variation and risk factor for hypertension. Because insulin resistance and blood pressure cosegregate in Mexican American families, we thus investigated the association between variations in 9 previously reported hypertension genes (ACE, AGT, AGTRI, ADDI, NPPA, ADDRB2, SCNN1A, GNB3, and NOS3) and insulin resistance. Families were ascertained via a coronary artery disease proband in the Mexican American Coronary Artery Disease Project. Individuals from 100 Mexican American families (n=656) were genotyped for 14 polymorphisms in the 9 genes and all adult offspring and offspring spouses were phenotyped for insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (n=449). AGT M235T and NOS3 A(-922)G and E298D polymorphisms were significantly associated with insulin sensitivity (P=0.018, 0.036, 0.039) but were not significant after adjusting for body mass index. ADD1 G460W was associated with insulin sensitivity only after adjusting for body mass index. The NPPA T2238C and SCNN1A A663T were associated with decreased fasting insulin levels after adjusting for body mass index (P=0.015 and 0.028). In conclusion, AGT, NOS3, NPPA, ADRB2, ADD1, and SCNN1A may well be genetic markers for insulin resistance, and adiposity was a potential modifier for only some gene/trait combinations. Our data support the hypothesis that genes in the blood pressure pathway may play a role in insulin resistance in Mexican Americans.

  15. Differential expression of distinct surface markers in early endothelial progenitor cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Meng; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Shing; Lin, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in postnatal angiogenesis. Currently, EPCs are defined as early and late EPCs based on their biological properties and their time of appearance during in vitro culture. Reports have shown that early EPCs share common properties and surface markers with adherent blood cells, especially CD14+ monocytes. Distinguishing early EPCs from circulating monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) is therefore crucial to obtaining pure endothelial populations before they can be applied as part of clinical therapies. We compared the gene expression profiles of early EPCs, blood cells (including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes, and MDMs), and various endothelial lineage cells (including mature endothelial cells, late EPCs, and CD133+ stem cells). We found that early EPCs expressed an mRNA profile that showed the greatest similarity to MDMs than any other cell type tested. The functional significance of this molecular profiling data was explored by Gene Ontology database search. Novel plasma membrane genes that might potentially be novel isolation biomarkers were also pinpointed. Specifically, expression of CLEC5A was high in MDMs, whereas early EPCs expressed abundant SIGLEC8 and KCNE1. These detailed mRNA expression profiles and the identified functional modules will help to develop novel cell isolation approaches that will allow EPCs to be purified; these can then be used to target cardiovascular disease, tumor angiogenesis, and various ischemia-related diseases.

  16. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  17. Norovirus gene expression and replication.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Lucy G; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-02-01

    Noroviruses are small, positive-sense RNA viruses within the family Caliciviridae, and are now accepted widely as a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in both developed and developing countries. Despite their impact, our understanding of the life cycle of noroviruses has lagged behind that of other RNA viruses due to the inability to culture human noroviruses (HuNVs). Our knowledge of norovirus biology has improved significantly over the past decade as a result of numerous technological advances. The use of a HuNV replicon, improved biochemical and cell-based assays, combined with the discovery of a murine norovirus capable of replication in cell culture, has improved greatly our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of norovirus genome translation and replication, as well as the interaction with host cell processes. In this review, the current state of knowledge of the intracellular life of noroviruses is discussed with particular emphasis on the mechanisms of viral gene expression and viral genome replication.

  18. Plasmid selection in Escherichia coli using an endogenous essential gene marker

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Shan; Good, Liam

    2008-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance genes are widely used for selection of recombinant bacteria, but their use risks contributing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. In particular, the practice is inappropriate for some intrinsically resistant bacteria and in vaccine production, and costly for industrial scale production. Non-antibiotic systems are available, but require mutant host strains, defined media or expensive reagents. An unexplored concept is over-expression of a host essential gene to enable selection in the presence of a chemical inhibitor of the gene product. To test this idea in E. coli, we used the growth essential target gene fabI as the plasmid-borne marker and the biocide triclosan as the selective agent. Results The new cloning vector, pFab, enabled selection by triclosan at 1 μM. Interestingly, pFab out-performed the parent pUC19-ampicillin system in cell growth, plasmid stability and plasmid yield. Also, pFab was toxic to host cells in a way that was reversed by triclosan. Therefore, pFab and triclosan are toxic when used alone but in combination they enhance growth and plasmid production through a gene-inhibitor interaction. Conclusion The fabI-triclosan model system provides an alternative plasmid selection method based on essential gene over-expression, without the use of antibiotic-resistance genes and conventional antibiotics. PMID:18694482

  19. In vivo expression of the HBZ gene of HTLV-1 correlates with proviral load, inflammatory markers and disease severity in HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    PubMed

    Saito, Mineki; Matsuzaki, Toshio; Satou, Yorifumi; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Saito, Kousuke; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2009-02-19

    Recently, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ), encoded from a minus strand mRNA was discovered and was suggested to play an important role in adult T cell leukemia (ATL) development. However, there have been no reports on the role of HBZ in patients with HTLV-1 associated inflammatory diseases. We quantified the HBZ and tax mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood from 56 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients, 10 ATL patients, 38 healthy asymptomatic carriers (HCs) and 20 normal uninfected controls, as well as human leukemic T-cell lines and HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, and the data were correlated with clinical parameters. The spliced HBZ gene was transcribed in all HTLV-1-infected individuals examined, whereas tax mRNA was not transcribed in significant numbers of subjects in the same groups. Although the amount of HBZ mRNA expression was highest in ATL, medium in HAM/TSP, and lowest in HCs, with statistical significance, neither tax nor the HBZ mRNA expression per HTLV-1-infected cell differed significantly between each clinical group. The HTLV-1 HBZ, but not tax mRNA load, positively correlated with disease severity and with neopterin concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients. Furthermore, HBZ mRNA expression per HTLV-1-infected cell was decreased after successful immunomodulatory treatment for HAM/TSP. These findings suggest that in vivo expression of HBZ plays a role in HAM/TSP pathogenesis.

  20. Mel-18, a mammalian Polycomb gene, regulates angiogenic gene expression of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Choi, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Minhyung; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong-Won; Kim, Young-Myeong; Hwang, Daehee; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2010-10-01

    Mel-18 is a mammalian homolog of Polycomb group (PcG) genes. Microarray analysis revealed that Mel-18 expression was induced during endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) differentiation and correlates with the expression of EC-specific protein markers. Overexpression of Mel-18 promoted EPC differentiation and angiogenic activity of ECs. Accordingly, silencing Mel-18 inhibited EC migration and tube formation in vitro. Gene expression profiling showed that Mel-18 regulates angiogenic genes including kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), claudin 5, and angiopoietin-like 2. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that Mel-18 plays a significant role in the angiogenic function of ECs by regulating endothelial gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification and characterization of gene-based SSR markers in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is an important tree in the Middle East and North Africa due to the nutritional value of its fruit. Molecular Breeding would accelerate genetic improvement of fruit tree through marker assisted selection. However, the lack of molecular markers in date palm restricts the application of molecular breeding. Results In this study, we analyzed 28,889 EST sequences from the date palm genome database to identify simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) and to develop gene-based markers, i.e. expressed sequence tag-SSRs (EST-SSRs). We identified 4,609 ESTs as containing SSRs, among which, trinucleotide motifs (69.7%) were the most common, followed by tetranucleotide (10.4%) and dinucleotide motifs (9.6%). The motif AG (85.7%) was most abundant in dinucleotides, while motifs AGG (26.8%), AAG (19.3%), and AGC (16.1%) were most common among trinucleotides. A total of 4,967 primer pairs were designed for EST-SSR markers from the computational data. In a follow up laboratory study, we tested a sample of 20 random selected primer pairs for amplification and polymorphism detection using genomic DNA from date palm cultivars. Nearly one-third of these primer pairs detected DNA polymorphism to differentiate the twelve date palm cultivars used. Functional categorization of EST sequences containing SSRs revealed that 3,108 (67.4%) of such ESTs had homology with known proteins. Conclusion Date palm EST sequences exhibits a good resource for developing gene-based markers. These genic markers identified in our study may provide a valuable genetic and genomic tool for further genetic research and varietal development in date palm, such as diversity study, QTL mapping, and molecular breeding. PMID:23241238

  2. Tolerance Associated Gene Expression following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Bloom, Gregory C.; Eschrich, Steven; Sarwal, Minnie; Enkemann, Steve; Betts, Brian C.; Beato, Francisca; Yoder, Sean; Anasetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT) and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT) HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10) for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL) group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL). These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted. PMID:25774806

  3. [Construction and Function Verification of a Novel Shuttle Vector Containing a Marker Gene Self-deletion System].

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Wang, Zhan; Zhou, Yubai; Zhang, Fang; Shen, Sisi; Li, Zelin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-09-01

    For rapid and accurate screening of recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA) that satisfied the quality standards of clinical trials, a novel shuttle vector that can delete the marker gene automatically during virus propagation was construted: pZL-EGFP. To construct the pZL-EGFP, the original shuttle vector pSC11 was modified by replacing the LacZ marker gene with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and then inserting homologous sequences of TKL into the flank regions of EGFP. Baby hamster kidney (BHK)-21 cells were cotransfected with pZL-EGFP and MVA, and underwent ten passages and one plaque screening to obtain the EGFP-free rMVA carrying the exogenous gene. Resulting rMVA was tested by polymerase chain reaction and western blotting to verify pZL-EGFP function. A novel shuttle vector pZL-EGFP containing an EGFP marker gene which could be deleted automatically was constructed. This gene deletion had no effect on the activities of rMVA, and the exogenous gene could be expressed stably. These results suggest that rMVA can be packaged efficiently by homologous recombination between pZL-EGFP and MVA in BHK-21 cells, and that the carried EGFP gene can be removed automatically by intramolecular homologous recombination during virus passage. Meanwhile, the gene deletion had no influence on the activities of rMVA and the expression of exogenous target gene. This study lays a solid foundation for the future research.

  4. Ameliorative Effects of Curcumin on Fibrinogen-Like Protein-2 Gene Expression, Some Oxido-Inflammatory and Apoptotic Markers in a Rat Model of l-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shafik, Noha M; Abou-Fard, Ghada M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the ameliorative effects of curcumin on fibrinogen like protein-2 (fgl-2), some oxido-inflammatory and apoptotic markers in rat-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). Seventy-five albino rats were divided into control group, l-arginine (l-Arg)-induced AP group, curcumin pre-treated group before AP induction, curcumin post-treated group after AP induction, and curcumin injected group only. AP group showed severe necrotizing pancreatitis confirmed by histopathological changes and elevations in serum amylase and lipase activities, levels of epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, tissue content of protein carbonyls, levels of tumor necrosis factor α, and caspase-3 as well as myeloperoxidase activity. Significant elevation in pancreatic fgl-2 mRNA expression was detected in AP group. Improvement of all parameters was detected with increase of caspase-3 in both curcumin-treated groups that confirmed curcumin ameliorative effects against AP through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of micro-thrombosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

  5. Differential gene detection incorporating common expression patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Shigeyuki; Ishii, Shin

    2009-12-01

    In detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes between different groups of samples based on a high-throughput expression measurement system, we often use a classical statistical testing based on a simple assumption that the expression of a certain DE gene in one group is higher or lower in average than that in the other group. Based on this simple assumption, the theory of optimal discovery procedure (ODP) (Storey, 2005) provided an optimal thresholding function for DE gene detection. However, expression patterns of DE genes over samples may have such a structure that is not exactly consistent with group labels assigned to the samples. Appropriate treatment of such a structure can increase the detection ability. Namely, genes showing similar expression patterns to other biologically meaningful genes can be regarded as statistically more significant than those showing expression patterns independent of other genes, even if differences in mean expression levels are comparable. In this study, we propose a new statistical thresholding function based on a latent variable model incorporating expression patterns together with the ODP theory. The latent variable model assumes hidden common signals behind expression patterns over samples and the ODP theory is extended to involve the latent variables. When applied to several gene expression data matrices which include cluster structures or 'cancer outlier' structures, the newly-proposed thresholding functions showed prominently better detection performance of DE genes than the original ODP thresholding function did. We also demonstrate how the proposed methods behave through analyses of real breast cancer and lymphoma datasets.

  6. Familial aggregation analysis of gene expressions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shao-Qi; Xu, Liang-De; Zhang, Guang-Mei; Li, Xia; Li, Lin; Shen, Gong-Qing; Jiang, Yang; Yang, Yue-Ying; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Wang, Qing K

    2007-01-01

    Traditional studies of familial aggregation are aimed at defining the genetic (and non-genetic) causes of a disease from physiological or clinical traits. However, there has been little attempt to use genome-wide gene expressions, the direct phenotypic measures of genes, as the traits to investigate several extended issues regarding the distributions of familially aggregated genes on chromosomes or in functions. In this study we conducted a genome-wide familial aggregation analysis by using the in vitro cell gene expressions of 3300 human autosome genes (Problem 1 data provided to Genetic Analysis Workshop 15) in order to answer three basic genetics questions. First, we investigated how gene expressions aggregate among different types (degrees) of relative pairs. Second, we conducted a bioinformatics analysis of highly familially aggregated genes to see how they are distributed on chromosomes. Third, we performed a gene ontology enrichment test of familially aggregated genes to find evidence to support their functional consensus. The results indicated that 1) gene expressions did aggregate in families, especially between sibs. Of 3300 human genes analyzed, there were a total of 1105 genes with one or more significant (empirical p < 0.05) familial correlation; 2) there were several genomic hot spots where highly familially aggregated genes (e.g., the chromosome 6 HLA genes cluster) were clustered; 3) as we expected, gene ontology enrichment tests revealed that the 1105 genes were aggregating not only in families but also in functional categories. PMID:18466548

  7. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance gene markers in Mycoplasma genitalium: application to studies of the minimal gene complement.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Burgos, Raul; Planell, Raquel; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2006-02-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been proposed as a suitable model for an in-depth understanding of the biology of a free-living organism. This paper reports that the expression of the aminoglycoside resistance gene aac(6')-aph(2''), the only selectable marker hitherto available for M. genitalium genetic studies, correlates with a growth impairment of the resistant strains. In light of this finding, a tetM438 construction based on the tetracycline resistance gene tetM was developed; it can be used efficiently in M. genitalium and confers multiple advantages when compared to aac(6')-aph(2''). The use of tetM438 significantly improves transformation efficiency and generates visible colonies faster. Finally, the improvements in the pMTnTetM438 construction made it possible to obtain insertions in genes which have not been previously considered to be dispensable under laboratory growth conditions.

  8. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  9. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  10. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  11. Trichloroethylene effects on gene expression during cardiac development

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, John Michael; Selmin, Ornella; Johnson, Paula D.; Runyan, Raymond B.

    2003-05-09

    Background: Halogenated hydrocarbon exposure is associated with changes in gene expression in adult and embryonic tissue. The present study was undertaken to identify differentially expressed mRNA transcripts in embryonic hearts from Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) or potential bio-transformation products of TCE, Dichloroethylene (DCE) and Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA). Methods: cDNA subtractive hybridization was used to selectively amplify expressed mRNA in either control or day 11 embryonic rat hearts exposed to one of these halogenated hydrocarbons from day 0 to 11. The doses used were 1100 and 110 ppm (8300 and 830 mu M) TCE, 110 and 11 ppm (1100 and 110 mu M) DCE, 27.3 and 2.75 mg/ml (100 and 10 mM) TCAA. Control animals were given distilled drinking water throughout the period of experiments. Results: Sequencing of over 100 clones derived from halogenated hydrocarbon exposed groups=resulted in identification of numerous differentially regulate gene sequences. Up-regulated transcripts identified include genes associated with stress response (Hsp 70) and homeostasis (several ribosomal proteins). Down-regulated transcripts include extracellular matrix components (GPI-p137 and vimentin) and Ca2 + responsive proteins (Serca-2 Ca2+-ATPase and beta-catenin). Two possible markers for fetal TCE exposure were identified: Serca-2 and GPI-p137, a GPI-linked protein of unknown function. Both markers show a dose-related decrease in mRNA transcript levels associated with fetal exposure to TCE. Differential regulation of expression of both markers by TCE was confirmed by dot blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Levels of exposure between 100 and 250 ppb (0.76 and 1.9 mu M) TCE are sufficient to decrease expression of both the Ca2+-AT Pase and GPI-p137. Conclusion: Sequences down-regulated with TCE exposure appear to be those associated with cellular=housekeeping, cell adhesion and developmental processes, while TCE=exposure up-regulates expression

  12. Amplification of kinetic oscillations in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2008-10-01

    Because of the feedbacks between the DNA transcription and mRNA translation, the gene expression in cells may exhibit bistability and oscillations. The deterministic and stochastic calculations presented illustrate how the bistable kinetics of expression of one gene in a cell can be influenced by the kinetic oscillations in the expression of another gene. Due to stability of the states of the bistable kinetics of gene 1 and the relatively small difference between the maximum and minimum protein amounts during the oscillations of gene 2, the induced oscillations of gene 1 are found to typically be related either to the low-or high-reactive state of this gene. The quality of the induced oscillations may be appreciably better than that of the inducing oscillations. This means that gene 1 can serve as an amplifier of the kinetic oscillations of gene 2.

  13. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    BROUWERS, FREDERIEKE M.; ELKAHLOUN, ABDEL G.; MUNSON, PETER J.; EISENHOFER, GRAEME; BARB, JENNIFER; LINEHAN, W. MARSTON; LENDERS, JACQUES W.M.; DE KRIJGER, RONALD; MANNELLI, MASSIMO; UDELSMAN, ROBERT; OCAL, IDRIS T.; SHULKIN, BARRY L.; BORNSTEIN, STEFAN R.; BREZA, JAN; KSINANTOVA, LUCIA; PACAK, KAREL

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers or effective treatments for malignant pheochromocytoma. This study used oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in pheochromocytomas from 90 patients, including 20 with malignant tumors, the latter including metastases and primary tumors from which metastases developed. Other subgroups of tumors included those defined by tissue norepinephrine compared to epinephrine contents (i.e., noradrenergic versus adrenergic phenotypes), adrenal versus extra-adrenal locations, and presence of germline mutations of genes pre-disposing to the tumor. Correcting for the confounding influence of nora-drenergic versus adrenergic catecholamine phenotype by the analysis of variance revealed a larger and more accurate number of genes that discriminated benign from malignant pheochromocytomas than when the confounding influence of catecholamine phenotype was not considered. Seventy percent of these genes were underexpressed in malignant compared to benign tumors. Similarly, 89% of genes were underexpressed in malignant primary tumors compared to benign tumors, suggesting that malignant potential is largely characterized by a less-differentiated pattern of gene expression. The present database of differentially expressed genes provides a unique resource for mapping the pathways leading to malignancy and for establishing new targets for treatment and diagnostic and prognostic markers of malignant disease. The database may also be useful for examining mechanisms of tumorigenesis and genotype–phenotype relationships. Further progress on the basis of this database can be made from follow-up confirmatory studies, application of bioinformatics approaches for data mining and pathway analyses, testing in pheochromocytoma cell culture and animal model systems, and retrospective and prospective studies of diagnostic markers. PMID:17102123

  15. Hypermethylation of the COX-2 gene is a potential prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hoenil; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae W; Kang, Gyeong H; Park, Noh H; Song, Yong S; Park, Sang Y; Kang, Soon B; Lee, Hyo P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the DNA hypermethylation profiles of 14 genes known to be associated with tumor behavior and their clinical significance in cervical cancer. The clinical features of 82 patients with stage IB cervical cancer were analyzed in terms of DNA hypermethylation of 14 genes (hMLH1, p16, COX-2, CDH1, APC, DAPK, MGMT, p14, RASSF1A, RUNX3, TIMP3, FHIT, THBS1, and HLTF). Of 14 genes investigated, only hypermethylation of COX-2 showed significant association with poor disease-free survival (P = 0.001). To further investigate an alteration in COX-2 expression by DNA hypermethylation, immunohistochemistry for COX-2 protein was performed in the cervical cancer tissues. We found no significant association between hypermethylation and expression patterns of the COX-2 gene. The present results suggest that DNA hypermethylation of the COX-2 gene may be a potential prognostic marker in early stage cervical cancer, the underlying mechanism of which is independent of gene silencing.

  16. Gene expression inference with deep learning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX CONTACT: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Generation of ESTs for Flowering Gene Discovery and SSR Marker Development in Upland Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Junjie; Wu, Dong; Gong, Wenfang; Yu, Shuxun

    2011-01-01

    Background Upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is one of the world's most important economic crops. In the absence of the entire genomic sequence, a large number of expressed sequence tag (EST) resources of upland cotton have been generated and used in several studies. However, information about the flower development of this species is rare. Methodology/Principal Findings To clarify the molecular mechanism of flower development in upland cotton, 22,915 high-quality ESTs were generated and assembled into 14,373 unique sequences consisting of 4,563 contigs and 9,810 singletons from a normalized and full-length cDNA library constructed from pooled RNA isolated from shoot apexes, squares, and flowers. Comparative analysis indicated that 5,352 unique sequences had no high-degree matches to the cotton public database. Functional annotation showed that several upland cotton homologs with flowering-related genes were identified in our library. The majority of these genes were specifically expressed in flowering-related tissues. Three GhSEP (G. hirsutum L. SEPALLATA) genes determining floral organ development were cloned, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes were expressed preferentially in squares or flowers. Furthermore, 670 new putative microsatellites with flanking sequences sufficient for primer design were identified from the 645 unigenes. Twenty-five EST–simple sequence repeats were randomly selected for validation and transferability testing in 17 Gossypium species. Of these, 23 were identified as true-to-type simple sequence repeat loci and were highly transferable among Gossypium species. Conclusions/Significance A high-quality, normalized, full-length cDNA library with a total of 14,373 unique ESTs was generated to provide sequence information for gene discovery and marker development related to upland cotton flower development. These EST resources form a valuable foundation for gene expression profiling analysis, functional

  18. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:25435758

  19. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tieming; Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-09-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online.

  20. AGEMAP: A Gene Expression Database for Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Art B; Ingram, Donald K; Lustig, Ana; Carter, Arnell; Weeraratna, Ashani T; Taub, Dennis D; Gorospe, Myriam; Mazan-Mamczarz, Krystyna; Lakatta, Edward G; Boheler, Kenneth R; Xu, Xiangru; Mattson, Mark P; Falco, Geppino; Ko, Minoru S. H; Schlessinger, David; Firman, Jeffrey; Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Wood, William H; Zonderman, Alan B; Kim, Stuart K; Becker, Kevin G

    2007-01-01

    We present the AGEMAP (Atlas of Gene Expression in Mouse Aging Project) gene expression database, which is a resource that catalogs changes in gene expression as a function of age in mice. The AGEMAP database includes expression changes for 8,932 genes in 16 tissues as a function of age. We found great heterogeneity in the amount of transcriptional changes with age in different tissues. Some tissues displayed large transcriptional differences in old mice, suggesting that these tissues may contribute strongly to organismal decline. Other tissues showed few or no changes in expression with age, indicating strong levels of homeostasis throughout life. Based on the pattern of age-related transcriptional changes, we found that tissues could be classified into one of three aging processes: (1) a pattern common to neural tissues, (2) a pattern for vascular tissues, and (3) a pattern for steroid-responsive tissues. We observed that different tissues age in a coordinated fashion in individual mice, such that certain mice exhibit rapid aging, whereas others exhibit slow aging for multiple tissues. Finally, we compared the transcriptional profiles for aging in mice to those from humans, flies, and worms. We found that genes involved in the electron transport chain show common age regulation in all four species, indicating that these genes may be exceptionally good markers of aging. However, we saw no overall correlation of age regulation between mice and humans, suggesting that aging processes in mice and humans may be fundamentally different. PMID:18081424

  1. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE): application in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2004-06-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful tool that allows digital analysis of overall gene expression patterns. SAGE provides quantitative and comprehensive expression profiling in a given cell population. Because SAGE does not require a preexisting clone, it can be used to identify and quantitate new as well as known genes. It works by isolating short fragments of genetic information from the genes expressed in the cell being studied. These short sequences, called SAGE tags, are linked together for efficient sequencing. SAGE is particularly well suited for organisms whose genome is not completely sequenced, because it does not require a hybridization probe for each transcript and allows new genes to be discovered. New modifications of SAGE now permit the analysis of gene expression in cell sub-populations or micro-anatomic structures, providing access to unexplored transcriptomes of normal and disease biology. Data derived using the SAGE technology have been used to identify tumor markers for a variety of cancers, including gastrointestinal cancer, lung and thyroid cancer, breast and ovarian cancer, neuroblastoma and glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. In this review we present an outline of the method and updated information on the applications of SAGE technology to various cancers.

  2. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  3. Identification of genes related to salt stress tolerance using intron-length polymorphic markers, association mapping and virus-induced gene silencing in cotton.

    PubMed

    Cai, Caiping; Wu, Shuang; Niu, Erli; Cheng, Chaoze; Guo, Wangzhen

    2017-04-03

    Intron length polymorphisms (ILPs), a type of gene-based functional marker, could themselves be related to the particular traits. Here, we developed a genome-wide cotton ILPs based on orthologs annotation from two sequenced diploid species, A-genome Gossypium arboreum and D-genome G. raimondii. We identified 10,180 putative ILP markers from 5,021 orthologous genes. Among these, 535 ILP markers from 9 gene families related to stress were selected for experimental verification. Polymorphic rates were 72.71% between G. arboreum and G. raimondii and 36.45% between G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124. Furthermore, 14 polymorphic ILP markers were detected in 264 G. hirsutum accessions. Coupled with previous simple sequence repeats (SSRs) evaluations and salt tolerance assays from the same individuals, we found a total of 25 marker-trait associations involved in nine ILPs. The nine genes, temporally named as C1 to C9, showed the various expressions in different organs and tissues, and five genes (C3, C4, C5, C7 and C9) were significantly upregulated after salt treatment. We verified that the five genes play important roles in salt tolerance. Particularly, silencing of C4 (encodes WRKY DNA-binding protein) and C9 (encodes Mitogen-activated protein kinase) can significantly enhance cotton susceptibility to salt stress.

  4. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes Between Osteoblasts and Osteocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paic, Frane; Igwe, John C.; Ravi, Nori; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Franceschetti, Tiziana; Harrington, Patrick; Kuo, Lynn; Shin, Don-Guk; Rowe, David W.; Harris, Stephen E.; Kalajzic, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Osteocytes represent the most abundant cellular component of mammalian bones with important functions in bone mass maintenance and remodeling. To elucidate the differential gene expression between osteoblasts and osteocytes we completed a comprehensive analysis of their gene profiles. Selective identification of these two mature populations was achieved by utilization of visual markers of bone lineage cells. We have utilized dual GFP reporter mice in which osteocytes are expressing GFP (topaz) directed by the DMP1 promoter, while osteoblasts are identified by expression of GFP (cyan) driven by 2.3kb of the Col1a1 promoter. Histological analysis of 7-day-old neonatal calvaria confirmed the expression pattern of DMP1GFP in osteocytes and Col2.3 in osteoblasts and osteocytes. To isolate distinct populations of cells we utilized fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS). Cells suspensions were subjected to RNA extraction, in vitro transcription and labeling of cDNA and gene expression was analyzed using the Illumina WG-6v1 BeadChip. Following normalization of raw data from four biological replicates, 3444 genes were called present in all three sorted cell populations: GFP negative, Col2.3cyan+ (osteoblasts), and DMP1topaz+(preosteocytes and osteocytes). We present the genes that showed in excess of a 2-fold change for gene expression between DMP1topaz+ and Col2.3cyan+ cells. The selected genes were classified and grouped according to their associated gene ontology terms. Genes clustered to osteogenesis and skeletal development such as Bmp4, Bmp8a, Dmp1, Enpp1, Phex and Ank were highly expressed in DMP1topaz+cells. Most of the genes encoding extracellular matrix components and secreted proteins had lower expression in DMP1topaz+ cells, while most of the genes encoding plasma membrane proteins were increased. Interestingly a large number of genes associated with muscle development and function and with neuronal phenotype were increased in DMP1topaz+ cells, indicating

  5. Chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers derived from human synovial membranes.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes, I; de Toro, F J; Blanco, F J

    2010-11-01

    In this study we analyzed the chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human synovial membranes enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers. Subpopulations of human synovial membrane MSCs enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers were isolated using a cytometry sorter and characterized by flow cytometry for MSC markers. The expression of Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 genes by these cells was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The chondrogenesis of each subpopulation was assessed by culturing the cells in a defined medium to produce spontaneous spheroid formation and differentiation towards chondrocyte-like cells. The examination of the spheroids by histological and immunohistochemical analyses for collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, collagen type I (COL1), metalloprotease 13 (MMP13), and collagen type X (COLX) levels were performed to assess their chondrogenesis capacity. The adipogenesis and osteogenesis potential of each subpopulation was determined using commercial media; the resulting cells were stained with oil red O or red alizarin to test the degree of differentiation. The subpopulations had different profiles of cells positive for the MSC markers CD44, CD69, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and showed different expression levels of the genes Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 involved in chondrogenesis, undifferentiation, and osteoblastogenesis, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that COL1, COL2, COLX, MMP13, and aggrecan were expressed in the spheroids as soon as 14 days of culture. The CD271(+) subpopulation expressed the highest levels of COL2 staining compared to the other subpopulations. CD105 and Runx2 were shown by immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis to have significantly higher expression CD271(+) subpopulation than the other subpopulations. Spheroids formed from CD271-enriched and CD73-enriched MSCs from normal human synovial membranes mimic the native cartilage extracellular

  6. Improved integrative framework combining association data with gene expression features to prioritize Crohn's disease genes.

    PubMed

    Ning, Kaida; Gettler, Kyle; Zhang, Wei; Ng, Sok Meng; Bowen, B Monica; Hyams, Jeffrey; Stephens, Michael C; Kugathasan, Subra; Denson, Lee A; Schadt, Eric E; Hoffman, Gabriel E; Cho, Judy H

    2015-07-15

    Genome-wide association studies in Crohn's disease (CD) have identified 140 genome-wide significant loci. However, identification of genes driving association signals remains challenging. Furthermore, genome-wide significant thresholds limit false positives at the expense of decreased sensitivity. In this study, we explored gene features contributing to CD pathogenicity, including gene-based association data from CD and autoimmune (AI) diseases, as well as gene expression features (eQTLs, epigenetic markers of expression and intestinal gene expression data). We developed an integrative model based on a CD reference gene set. This integrative approach outperformed gene-based association signals alone in identifying CD-related genes based on statistical validation, gene ontology enrichment, differential expression between M1 and M2 macrophages and a validation using genes causing monogenic forms of inflammatory bowel disease as a reference. Besides gene-level CD association P-values, association with AI diseases was the strongest predictor, highlighting generalized mechanisms of inflammation, and the interferon-γ pathway particularly. Within the 140 high-confidence CD regions, 598 of 1328 genes had low prioritization scores, highlighting genes unlikely to contribute to CD pathogenesis. For select regions, comparably high integrative model scores were observed for multiple genes. This is particularly evident for regions having extensive linkage disequilibrium such as the IBD5 locus. Our analyses provide a standardized reference for prioritizing potential CD-related genes, in regions with both highly significant and nominally significant gene-level association P-values. Our integrative model may be particularly valuable in prioritizing rare, potentially private, missense variants for which genome-wide evidence for association may be unattainable.

  7. Improved integrative framework combining association data with gene expression features to prioritize Crohn's disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Kaida; Gettler, Kyle; Zhang, Wei; Ng, Sok Meng; Bowen, B. Monica; Hyams, Jeffrey; Stephens, Michael C.; Kugathasan, Subra; Denson, Lee A.; Schadt, Eric E.; Hoffman, Gabriel E.; Cho, Judy H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies in Crohn's disease (CD) have identified 140 genome-wide significant loci. However, identification of genes driving association signals remains challenging. Furthermore, genome-wide significant thresholds limit false positives at the expense of decreased sensitivity. In this study, we explored gene features contributing to CD pathogenicity, including gene-based association data from CD and autoimmune (AI) diseases, as well as gene expression features (eQTLs, epigenetic markers of expression and intestinal gene expression data). We developed an integrative model based on a CD reference gene set. This integrative approach outperformed gene-based association signals alone in identifying CD-related genes based on statistical validation, gene ontology enrichment, differential expression between M1 and M2 macrophages and a validation using genes causing monogenic forms of inflammatory bowel disease as a reference. Besides gene-level CD association P-values, association with AI diseases was the strongest predictor, highlighting generalized mechanisms of inflammation, and the interferon-γ pathway particularly. Within the 140 high-confidence CD regions, 598 of 1328 genes had low prioritization scores, highlighting genes unlikely to contribute to CD pathogenesis. For select regions, comparably high integrative model scores were observed for multiple genes. This is particularly evident for regions having extensive linkage disequilibrium such as the IBD5 locus. Our analyses provide a standardized reference for prioritizing potential CD-related genes, in regions with both highly significant and nominally significant gene-level association P-values. Our integrative model may be particularly valuable in prioritizing rare, potentially private, missense variants for which genome-wide evidence for association may be unattainable. PMID:25935003

  8. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  9. Dietary wheat germ oil influences gene expression in larvae and eggs of the oriental fruit fly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changes in animal nutrition, particularly essential dietary components, alter global gene expression patterns. Our goal is to identify molecular markers that serve as early indicators of the quality of insect culture media. Markers of deficient culture media will increase the efficiency of develop...

  10. Considerations For Optimizing Microbiome Analysis Using a Marker Gene.

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Zuluaga, Jacobo; Escobar, Juan S

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have found a widespread use in the study of host-microbe interactions due to the increase in their throughput and their ever-decreasing costs. The analysis of human-associated microbial communities using a marker gene, particularly the 16S rRNA, has been greatly benefited from these technologies - the human gut microbiome research being a remarkable example of such analysis that has greatly expanded our understanding of microbe-mediated human health and disease, metabolism, and food absorption. 16S studies go through a series of in vitro and in silico steps that can greatly influence their outcomes. However, the lack of a standardized workflow has led to uncertainties regarding the transparency and reproducibility of gut microbiome studies. We, here, discuss the most common challenges in the archetypical 16S rRNA workflow, including the extraction of total DNA, its use as template in PCR with primers that amplify specific hypervariable regions of the gene, amplicon sequencing, the denoising and removal of low-quality reads, the detection and removal of chimeric sequences, the clustering of high-quality sequences into operational taxonomic units, and their taxonomic classification. We recommend the essential technical information that should be conveyed in publications for reproducibility of results and encourage non-experts to include procedures and available tools that mitigate most of the problems encountered in microbiome analysis.

  11. Considerations For Optimizing Microbiome Analysis Using a Marker Gene

    PubMed Central

    de la Cuesta-Zuluaga, Jacobo; Escobar, Juan S.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have found a widespread use in the study of host–microbe interactions due to the increase in their throughput and their ever-decreasing costs. The analysis of human-associated microbial communities using a marker gene, particularly the 16S rRNA, has been greatly benefited from these technologies – the human gut microbiome research being a remarkable example of such analysis that has greatly expanded our understanding of microbe-mediated human health and disease, metabolism, and food absorption. 16S studies go through a series of in vitro and in silico steps that can greatly influence their outcomes. However, the lack of a standardized workflow has led to uncertainties regarding the transparency and reproducibility of gut microbiome studies. We, here, discuss the most common challenges in the archetypical 16S rRNA workflow, including the extraction of total DNA, its use as template in PCR with primers that amplify specific hypervariable regions of the gene, amplicon sequencing, the denoising and removal of low-quality reads, the detection and removal of chimeric sequences, the clustering of high-quality sequences into operational taxonomic units, and their taxonomic classification. We recommend the essential technical information that should be conveyed in publications for reproducibility of results and encourage non-experts to include procedures and available tools that mitigate most of the problems encountered in microbiome analysis. PMID:27551678

  12. ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION AND DEVELOPMENT OF POTENTIAL BIOMARKERS IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) BRAIN, LIVER AND TESTIS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO FIBRATE PHARMACEUTICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the consequences of increasing levels of environmental contaminants and to identify potentially novel markers of toxicity, we examined gene expression profiles from medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to a prototypical fibrate pharmaceutical. Changes in gene express...

  13. ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION AND DEVELOPMENT OF POTENTIAL BIOMARKERS IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) BRAIN, LIVER AND TESTIS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO FIBRATE PHARMACEUTICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the consequences of increasing levels of environmental contaminants and to identify potentially novel markers of toxicity, we examined gene expression profiles from medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to a prototypical fibrate pharmaceutical. Changes in gene express...

  14. Integrating phenotype and gene expression data for predicting gene function.

    PubMed

    Malone, Brandon M; Perkins, Andy D; Bridges, Susan M

    2009-10-08

    This paper presents a framework for integrating disparate data sets to predict gene function. The algorithm constructs a graph, called an integrated similarity graph, by computing similarities based upon both gene expression and textual phenotype data. This integrated graph is then used to make predictions about whether individual genes should be assigned a particular annotation from the Gene Ontology. A combined graph was generated from publicly-available gene expression data and phenotypic information from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This graph was used to assign annotations to genes, as were graphs constructed from gene expression data and textual phenotype information alone. While the F-measure appeared similar for all three methods, annotations based upon the integrated similarity graph exhibited a better overall precision than gene expression or phenotype information alone can generate. The integrated approach was also able to assign almost as many annotations as the gene expression method alone, and generated significantly more total and correct assignments than the phenotype information could provide. These results suggest that augmenting standard gene expression data sets with publicly-available textual phenotype data can help generate more precise functional annotation predictions while mitigating the weaknesses of a standard textual phenotype approach.

  15. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  16. The expression of retinal cell markers in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their augmentation by the synthetic retinoid fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Vugler, Anthony A.; Yu, Lu; Semo, Maayan; Coffey, Pete; Moss, Stephen E.; Greenwood, John

    2011-01-01

    factors paired box 6 gene (PAX6), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), cone-rod homeobox (CRX), and neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), further implies that in culture these cells are predisposed toward a retinal progenitor-like state. The fenretinide-induced increase in photoreceptor cell markers, accompanied by a decrease in RPE cell markers, suggests that retinoids may play a role in the transdifferentiation of RPE cells. Importantly, our data show for the first time the expression of a vertebrate ciliary opsin (OPN1lw) and rhabdomeric-like opsin, opsin 4 (OPN4 also known as melanopsin) in a clonal cell line. Together these data suggest that ARPE-19 cells are primed for and possess the capacity to differentiate toward a retinal cell-like lineage. PMID:21738400

  17. The expression of retinal cell markers in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their augmentation by the synthetic retinoid fenretinide.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amanda-Jayne; Vugler, Anthony A; Yu, Lu; Semo, Maayan; Coffey, Pete; Moss, Stephen E; Greenwood, John

    2011-01-01

    In several species the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has the potential to transdifferentiate into retinal cells to regenerate functional retinal tissue after injury. However, this capacity for regeneration is lost in mammals. The synthetic retinoic acid derivative, fenretinide [N(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide], induces a neuronal-like phenotype in the human adult retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). These changes are characterized by the appearance of neural-like processes and the expression of neuronal markers not normally associated with RPE cells. Here we assess whether fenretinide can induce a neuroretinal cell phenotype in ARPE-19 cells, by examining retinal cell marker expression. ARPE-19 cells were treated daily with culture medium containing either 3 μM fenretinide or dimethyl sulfoxide as a control for 7 days. Cells were processed for immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and for analysis by PCR to examine the expression of a panel of RPE, neural, and retinal-associated cellular markers, including classical and non-canonical opsins. Treatment with fenretinide for 7 days induced the formation of neuronal-like processes in ARPE-19 cells. Fenretinide induced the expression of the cone long wavelength sensitive opsin (OPN1lw) but not rhodopsin (RHO), while decreasing the expression of RPE cell markers. Many of the neuronal and retinal specific markers examined were expressed in both control and fenretinide treated cells, including those involved in photoreceptor cell development and the multipotency of neural retinal progenitor cells. Interestingly, ARPE-19 cells also expressed both photoreceptor specific and non-specific canonical opsins. The expression of retinal-associated markers and loss of RPE cell markers in control ARPE-19 cells suggests that these cells might have dedifferentiated from an RPE cell phenotype under standard culture conditions. The expression of molecules, such as the transcription factors paired box 6 gene (PAX6), sex

  18. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  19. Marker-free transgenic rice expressing the vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip) of Bacillus thuringiensis shows broad insecticidal properties.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Subrata; Chakraborty, Anirban; Sikdar, Narattam; Chakraborty, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Jagannath; Mitra, Joy; Manna, Anulina; Dutta Gupta, Snehasish; Sen, Soumitra Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Genetically engineered rice lines with broad insecticidal properties against major lepidopteran pests were generated using a synthetic, truncated form of vegetative insecticidal protein (Syn vip3BR) from Bacillus thuringiensis. The selectable marker gene and the redundant transgene(s) were eliminated through Cre/ lox mediated recombination and genetic segregation to make consumer friendly Bt -rice. For sustainable resistance against lepidopteran insect pests, chloroplast targeted synthetic version of bioactive core component of a vegetative insecticidal protein (Syn vip3BR) of Bacillus thuringiensis was expressed in rice under the control of green-tissue specific ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit gene promoter. The transgenic plants (in Oryza sativa indica Swarna cultivar) showed high insect mortality rate in vitro against major rice pests, yellow stem borer (Scirpophaga incertulas), rice leaf folder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) and rice horn caterpillar (Melanitis leda ismene) in T1 generation, indicating insecticidal potency of Syn vip3BR. Under field conditions, the T1 plants showed considerable resistance against leaf folders and stem borers. The expression cassette (vip-lox-hpt-lox) as well as another vector with chimeric cre recombinase gene under constitutive rice ubiquitin1 gene promoter was designed for the elimination of selectable marker hygromycin phosphotransferase (hptII) gene. Crossing experiments were performed between T1 plants with single insertion site of vip-lox-hpt-lox T-DNA and one T1 plant with moderate expression of cre recombinase with linked bialaphos resistance (syn bar) gene. Marker gene excision was achieved in hybrids with up to 41.18 % recombination efficiency. Insect resistant transgenic lines, devoid of selectable marker and redundant transgene(s) (hptII + cre-syn bar), were established in subsequent generation through genetic segregation.

  20. Gene expression patterns during somatic embryo development and germination in maize Hi II callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Che, Ping; Love, Tanzy M; Frame, Bronwyn R; Wang, Kan; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Howell, Stephen H

    2006-09-01

    Gene expression patterns were profiled during somatic embryogenesis in a regeneration-proficient maize hybrid line, Hi II, in an effort to identify genes that might be used as developmental markers or targets to optimize regeneration steps for recovering maize plants from tissue culture. Gene expression profiles were generated from embryogenic calli induced to undergo embryo maturation and germination. Over 1,000 genes in the 12,060 element arrays showed significant time variation during somatic embryo development. A substantial number of genes were downregulated during embryo maturation, largely histone and ribosomal protein genes, which may result from a slowdown in cell proliferation and growth during embryo maturation. The expression of these genes dramatically recovered at germination. Other genes up-regulated during embryo maturation included genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes (nucleases, glucosidases and proteases) and a few storage genes (an alpha-zein and caleosin), which are good candidates for developmental marker genes. Germination is accompanied by the up-regulation of a number of stress response and membrane transporter genes, and, as expected, greening is associated with the up-regulation of many genes encoding photosynthetic and chloroplast components. Thus, some, but not all genes typically associated with zygotic embryogenesis are significantly up or down-regulated during somatic embryogenesis in Hi II maize line regeneration. Although many genes varied in expression throughout somatic embryo development in this study, no statistically significant gene expression changes were detected between total embryogenic callus and callus enriched for transition stage somatic embryos.

  1. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  2. Cell cycle regulated gene expression in yeasts.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression through the mitotic cell cycle, so that genes are transcribed at particular cell cycle times, is widespread among eukaryotes. In some cases, it appears to be important for control mechanisms, as deregulated expression results in uncontrolled cell divisions, which can cause cell death, disease, and malignancy. In this review, I describe the current understanding of such regulated gene expression in two established simple eukaryotic model organisms, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In these two yeasts, the global pattern of cell cycle gene expression has been well described, and most of the transcription factors that control the various waves of gene expression, and how they are in turn themselves regulated, have been characterized. As related mechanisms occur in all other eukaryotes, including humans, yeasts offer an excellent paradigm to understand this important molecular process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development

    PubMed Central

    KAWASAKI, KATSUSHIGE; KAWASAKI, MAIKO; WATANABE, MOMOKO; IDRUS, ERIK; NAGAI, TAKAHIRO; OOMMEN, SHELLY; MAEDA, TAKEYASU; HAGIWARA, NOBUKO; QUE, JIANWEN; SHARPE, PAUL T.; OHAZAMA, ATSUSHI

    2017-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development. PMID:26864488

  4. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene set analysis (GSA) has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information) with accession number GSE6085. PMID

  5. Gene-Ontology-based clustering of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Adryan, Boris; Schuh, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    The expected correlation between genetic co-regulation and affiliation to a common biological process is not necessarily the case when numerical cluster algorithms are applied to gene expression data. GO-Cluster uses the tree structure of the Gene Ontology database as a framework for numerical clustering, and thus allowing a simple visualization of gene expression data at various levels of the ontology tree. The 32-bit Windows application is freely available at http://www.mpibpc.mpg.de/go-cluster/

  6. Marker genes identify three somatic cell types in the fetal mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Rastetter, Raphael H; Bernard, Pascal; Palmer, James S; Chassot, Anne-Amandine; Chen, Huijun; Western, Patrick S; Ramsay, Robert G; Chaboissier, Marie-Christine; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2014-10-15

    The two main functions of the ovary are the production of oocytes, which allows the continuation of the species, and secretion of female sex hormones, which control many aspects of female development and physiology. Normal development of the ovaries during embryogenesis is critical for their function and the health of the individual in later life. Although the adult ovary has been investigated in great detail, we are only starting to understand the cellular and molecular biology of early ovarian development. Here we show that the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 is expressed in the cortical region of the fetal ovary and this expression is mutually exclusive to FOXL2. Strikingly, a third somatic cell population can be identified, marked by the expression of NR2F2, which is expressed in LGR5- and FOXL2 double-negative ovarian somatic cells. Together, these three marker genes label distinct ovarian somatic cell types. Using lineage tracing in mice, we show that Lgr5-positive cells give rise to adult cortical granulosa cells, which form the follicles of the definitive reserve. Moreover, LGR5 is required for correct timing of germ cell differentiation as evidenced by a delay of entry into meiosis in Lgr5 loss-of-function mutants, demonstrating a key role for LGR5 in the differentiation of pre-granulosa cells, which ensure the differentiation of oogonia, the formation of the definitive follicle reserve, and long-term female fertility.

  7. FOS Expression in Blood as a LDL-Independent Marker of Statin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Jawed, Sarah I.; Brenneman, Cynthia L.; Rao, Yesoda N.; Sher, Salman; Facio, Flavia M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Sachdev, Vandana; Hwang, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The expression of FOS, a gene critical for monocyte and macrophage function, can be inhibited by statins through the disruption of a cholesterol independent signaling pathway. In this pilot study, we hypothesized that blood FOS mRNA levels will be sensitive to statin treatment independent of LDL cholesterol levels. Methods Three cohorts at increased risk of or with cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied. Blood FOS mRNA levels were measured before and after statin treatment or in patients under stable treatment. Results Statin treatment for three months significantly reduced blood FOS mRNA and LDL cholesterol levels. However, in subjects with similar LDL levels achieved by different doses of long term statin treatment, there was an inverse relationship between statin dose and FOS expression. Conclusions FOS mRNA levels appear to be a sensitive marker of statin treatment that is dissociated from cholesterol levels. PMID:20619839

  8. VSG gene expression site control in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, G; Blundell, P A; Taylor, M C; Kieft, R; Borst, P

    1994-11-15

    When the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is taken up from mammals by a tse-tse fly, it replaces its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat by a procyclin coat. Transcription of VSG genes stops in the fly, but transcription of sequences derived from the promoter area of the VSG expression site(s) remains high. Whether this is due to continuing high activity of one promoter or to low activity of many promoters was unclear. We have used the small differences between the sequences of different expression sites to show that multiple expression site promoters are active in insect form trypanosomes. This is confirmed by the low expression of single copy marker genes introduced into the transcribed area. However, if the expression site promoter is removed from the genomic location of the expression site and inserted in the non-transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), it is derepressed. Derepression of transcription can also be accomplished by replacing the promoter of an expression site by an rDNA promoter. We conclude that the down-regulation of VSG gene expression site promoters in insect form trypanosomes is affected by both the DNA sequence of the promoter and the genomic context in which it resides.

  9. Directed genomic integration, gene replacement, and integrative gene expression in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, B; Knol, J; Poolman, B; Marciset, O; Delley, M

    1993-01-01

    Several pGEM5- and pUC19-derived plasmids containing a selectable erythromycin resistance marker were integrated into the chromosome of Streptococcus thermophilus at the loci of the lactose-metabolizing genes. Integration occurred via homologous recombination and resulted in cointegrates between plasmid and genome, flanked by the homologous DNA used for integration. Selective pressure on the plasmid-located erythromycin resistance gene resulted in multiple amplifications of the integrated plasmid. Release of this selective pressure, however, gave way to homologous resolution of the cointegrate structures. By integration and subsequent resolution, we were able to replace the chromosomal lacZ gene with a modified copy carrying an in vitro-generated deletion. In the same way, we integrated a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene between the chromosomal lacS and lacZ genes of the lactose operon. The inserted cat gene became a functional part of the operon and was expressed and regulated accordingly. Selective pressure on the essential lacS and lacZ genes under normal growth conditions in milk ensures the maintenance and expression of the integrated gene. As there are only minimal repeated DNA sequences (an NdeI site) flanking the inserted cat gene, it was stably maintained even in the absence of lactose, i.e., when grown on sucrose or glucose. The methodology represents a stable system in which to express and regulate foreign genes in S. thermophilus, which could qualify in the future for an application with food. Images PMID:8331064

  10. Gene Expression Profiling during Murine Tooth Development.

    PubMed

    Landin, Maria A Dos Santos Silva; Shabestari, Maziar; Babaie, Eshrat; Reseland, Janne E; Osmundsen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn), amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx), and enamelin (Enam) during early (pre-secretory) tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24 h intervals, starting at the 11th embryonic day (E11.5), and up to the 7th day after birth (P7). The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx, and Enam). Microarray results where validated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), and translated proteins identified by Western-blotting. In situ localization of the Ambn, Amelx, and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially expressed (DE; p ≤ 0.05) genes. Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx, and Enam to be significant DE throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0) increasing after birth (P1-P7). Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. These mRNAs were expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx, and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western-blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around 35 genes were associated with 15 transcription factors.

  11. Gene Expression Profiling during Murine Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Maria A. dos Santos Silva; Shabestari, Maziar; Babaie, Eshrat; Reseland, Janne E.; Osmundsen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn), amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx), and enamelin (Enam) during early (pre-secretory) tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24 h intervals, starting at the 11th embryonic day (E11.5), and up to the 7th day after birth (P7). The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx, and Enam). Microarray results where validated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), and translated proteins identified by Western-blotting. In situ localization of the Ambn, Amelx, and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially expressed (DE; p ≤ 0.05) genes. Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx, and Enam to be significant DE throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5–P0) increasing after birth (P1–P7). Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. These mRNAs were expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx, and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western-blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around 35 genes were associated with 15 transcription factors. PMID:22866057

  12. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juansheng; Yu, Yuchao; Gao, Fangyuan; Zeng, Lihua; Lu, Xianjun; Wu, Xianting; Yan, Wengui; Ren, Guangjun

    2013-07-01

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known RGAs and used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for genetic analyses of structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. Of the 472 RGA markers, 138 were polymorphic and these were applied to 178 entries selected from the USDA rice core collection. Results from the RGA markers were similar between two methods, UPGMA and STRUCTURE. Additionally, the results from RGA markers in our study were agreeable with those previously reported from SSR markers, including cluster of ancestral classification, genetic diversity estimates, genetic relatedness, and cluster of geographic origins. These results suggest that RGA markers are applicable for analyses of genetic structure and diversity in rice. However, unlike SSR markers, the RGA markers failed to differentiate temperate japonica, tropical japonica, and aromatic subgroups. The restricted way for developing RGA markers from the cDNA sequence might limit the polymorphism of RGA markers in the genome, thus limiting the discriminatory power in comparison with SSR markers. Genetic differentiation obtained using RGA markers may be useful for defining genetic diversity of a suite of random R genes in plants, as many studies show a differentiation of resistance to a wide array of pathogens. They could also help to characterize the genetic structure and geographic distribution in crops, including rice, wheat, barley, and banana.

  13. Global gene expression profiling reveals genes expressed differentially in cattle with high and low residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Gondro, C; Quinn, K; Herd, R M; Parnell, P F; Vanselow, B

    2011-10-01

    Feed efficiency is an economically important trait in beef production. It can be measured as residual feed intake. This is the difference between actual feed intake recorded over a test period and the expected feed intake of an animal based on its size and growth rate. DNA-based marker-assisted selection would help beef breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for feed efficiency by reducing the generation interval and would obviate the high cost of measuring residual feed intake. Although numbers of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes have been identified with the advance of molecular genetics, our understanding of the physiological mechanisms and the nature of genes underlying residual feed intake is limited. The aim of the study was to use global gene expression profiling by microarray to identify genes that are differentially expressed in cattle, using lines genetically selected for low and high residual feed intake, and to uncover candidate genes for residual feed intake. A long-oligo microarray with 24 000 probes was used to profile the liver transcriptome of 44 cattle selected for high or low residual feed intake. One hundred and sixty-one unique genes were identified as being differentially expressed between animals with high and low residual feed intake. These genes were involved in seven gene networks affecting cellular growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell signalling, drug metabolism, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism. Analysis of functional data using a transcriptional approach allows a better understanding of the underlying biological processes involved in residual feed intake and also allows the identification of candidate genes for marker-assisted selection. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Dominant selectable markers for Penicillium spp. transformation and gene function studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Penicillium spp. has been genetically manipulated and gene function studies have utilized single gene deletion strains for phenotypic analysis. Fungal transformation experiments have relied on hygromycin and hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) as the main dominant selectable marker (DSM) system in P...

  15. Stratified gene expression analysis identifies major amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ashley R; Troakes, Claire; King, Andrew; Sahni, Vibhu; De Jong, Simone; Bossers, Koen; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Pamela J; Kirby, Janine; Veldink, Jan H; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons resulting in progressive paralysis. Gene expression studies of ALS only rarely identify the same gene pathways as gene association studies. We hypothesized that analyzing tissues by matching on degree of disease severity would identify different patterns of gene expression from a traditional case-control comparison. We analyzed gene expression changes in 4 postmortem central nervous system regions, stratified by severity of motor neuron loss. An overall comparison of cases (n = 6) and controls (n = 3) identified known ALS gene, SOX5, as showing differential expression (log2 fold change = 0.09, p = 5.5 × 10(-5)). Analyses stratified by disease severity identified expression changes in C9orf72 (p = 2.77 × 10(-3)), MATR3 (p = 3.46 × 10(-3)), and VEGFA (p = 8.21 × 10(-4)), all implicated in ALS through genetic studies, and changes in other genes in pathways involving RNA processing and immune response. These findings suggest that analysis of gene expression stratified by disease severity can identify major ALS genes and may be more efficient than traditional case-control comparison. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  17. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  18. Influence of the Expression of Inflammatory Markers on Kidney after Fetal Programming in an Experimental Model of Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Pereira Júnior, Carlos Donizete; Guimarães, Camila Souza de Oliveira; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis Aquiles; da Glória, Maria Aparecida; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Rocha, Lenaldo Branco; Dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Machado, Juliana Reis; Rocha, Laura Penna; Helmo, Fernanda Rodrigues; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the expression of inflammatory markers in experimental renal failure after fetal programming. Methods. The offspring aged two and five months were divided into four groups: CC (control dams, control offspring); DC (diabetic dams, control offspring); CFA (control dams, folic acid offspring, 250 mg/Kg); and DFA (diabetic dams, folic acid offspring). Gene expression of inflammatory markers MCP-1, IL-1, NOS3, TGF-β, TNF-α, and VEGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results. MCP-1 was increased in the CFA and DFA groups at two and five months of age, as well as in DC5 when compared to CC5. There was a higher expression of IL-1 in the CFA2, DFA2, and DC2 groups. There was a decrease in NOS3 and an increase in TNF-α in DFA5 in relation to CFA5. The gene expression of TGF-β increased in cases that had received folic acid at two and five months, and VEGF decreased in the CFA5 and DFA5 groups. DC5 showed increased VEGF expression in comparison with CC5. Conclusions. Gestational diabetes mellitus and folic acid both change the expression of inflammatory markers, thus demonstrating that the exposure to harmful agents in adulthood has a more severe impact in cases which underwent fetal reprogramming.

  19. Influence of the Expression of Inflammatory Markers on Kidney after Fetal Programming in an Experimental Model of Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Júnior, Carlos Donizete; Guimarães, Camila Souza de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis Aquiles; da Glória, Maria Aparecida; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Rocha, Laura Penna; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the expression of inflammatory markers in experimental renal failure after fetal programming. Methods. The offspring aged two and five months were divided into four groups: CC (control dams, control offspring); DC (diabetic dams, control offspring); CFA (control dams, folic acid offspring, 250 mg/Kg); and DFA (diabetic dams, folic acid offspring). Gene expression of inflammatory markers MCP-1, IL-1, NOS3, TGF-β, TNF-α, and VEGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. Results. MCP-1 was increased in the CFA and DFA groups at two and five months of age, as well as in DC5 when compared to CC5. There was a higher expression of IL-1 in the CFA2, DFA2, and DC2 groups. There was a decrease in NOS3 and an increase in TNF-α in DFA5 in relation to CFA5. The gene expression of TGF-β increased in cases that had received folic acid at two and five months, and VEGF decreased in the CFA5 and DFA5 groups. DC5 showed increased VEGF expression in comparison with CC5. Conclusions. Gestational diabetes mellitus and folic acid both change the expression of inflammatory markers, thus demonstrating that the exposure to harmful agents in adulthood has a more severe impact in cases which underwent fetal reprogramming. PMID:28018922

  20. Development of gene-based markers and construction of an integrated linkage map in eggplant by using Solanum orthologous (SOL) gene sets.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Miyatake, Koji; Nunome, Tsukasa; Negoro, Satomi; Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Asamizu, Erika; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Ohyama, Akio

    2012-06-01

    We constructed an integrated DNA marker linkage map of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) using DNA marker segregation data sets obtained from two independent intraspecific F(2) populations. The linkage map consisted of 12 linkage groups and encompassed 1,285.5 cM in total. We mapped 952 DNA markers, including 313 genomic SSR markers developed by random sequencing of simple sequence repeat (SSR)-enriched genomic libraries, and 623 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels) found in eggplant-expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and related genomic sequences [introns and untranslated regions (UTRs)]. Because of their co-dominant inheritance and their highly polymorphic and multi-allelic nature, the SSR markers may be more versatile than the SNP and InDel markers for map-based genetic analysis of any traits of interest using segregating populations derived from any intraspecific crosses of practical breeding materials. However, we found that the distribution of microsatellites in the genome was biased to some extent, and therefore a considerable part of the eggplant genome was first detected when gene-derived SNP and InDel markers were mapped. Of the 623 SNP and InDel markers mapped onto the eggplant integrated map, 469 were derived from eggplant unigenes contained within Solanum orthologous (SOL) gene sets (i.e., sets of orthologous unigenes from eggplant, tomato, and potato). Out of the 469 markers, 326 could also be mapped onto the tomato map. These common markers will be informative landmarks for the transfer of tomato's more saturated genomic information to eggplant and will also provide comparative information on the genome organization of the two solanaceous species. The data are available from the DNA marker database of vegetables, VegMarks (http://vegmarks.nivot.affrc.go.jp).

  1. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  2. Expression of Stem Cell Markers in Preinvasive Tubal Lesions of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chene, G.; Ouellet, V.; Rahimi, K.; Barres, V.; Meunier, L.; De Ladurantaye, M.; Provencher, D.; Mes-Masson, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better understand the ovarian serous carcinogenic process with tubal origin, we investigated the expression of stem cell markers in premalignant tubal lesions (serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma or STIC). We found an increased stem cell marker density in the normal fallopian tube followed by a high CD117 and a low ALDH and CD44 expression in STICs raising the question of the role of the stem cell markers in the serous carcinogenic process. PMID:26504831

  3. Aromatase gene expression in the stallion.

    PubMed

    Lemazurier, E; Sourdaine, P; Nativelle, C; Plainfossé, B; Séralini, G

    2001-06-10

    Adult stallion secretes very high estrogen levels in its testicular vein and semen, and the responsible enzyme cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450 arom) is known to be present mainly in Leydig cells. We studied in further details the distribution of equine aromatase in various adult tissues including the brain (hypothalamic area), liver, kidney, small intestine, muscle, bulbourethral gland and testes. The aromatase mRNA was essentially detected by RT-PCR in testis (169+/-14 amol of aromatase mRNA per microg of total RNA) and was barely detectable in brain, or below 0.1 amol/microg RNA in other tissues. This range of expression was confirmed by ELISA (50+/-7 pg/microg total protein) in the testis, and by immunoblot, evidencing a 53 kDA specific protein band in testis and brain only. The corresponding aromatase activity was well detected, by 3H(2)O release from 1beta, 2beta(3)H-androstenedione, in testis and brain (200+/-23 and 25+/-6 pmol/min per mg, respectively) and below 3 pmol product formed/min per mg in other tissues. This study indicates that the testis, among the tissues analyzed, is the major source of aromatase in the adult stallion, and that the aromatase gene expression is specifically enhanced at this level, and is responsible for the high estrogen synthesis observed. Moreover, the study of aromatase in one colt testis has shown lower levels of transcripts, protein and enzyme activity, evidencing that aromatase is regulated during the development and may serve as a useful marker of testicular function. As the second organ where aromatase mRNA and activity are both well detected is brain, this study also underlines the possible role of neurosteroids in stallion on behaviour, brain function or central endocrine control.

  4. Effect of lifelong football training on the expression of muscle molecular markers involved in healthy longevity.

    PubMed

    Mancini, A; Vitucci, D; Labruna, G; Imperlini, E; Randers, M B; Schmidt, J F; Hagman, M; Andersen, T R; Russo, R; Orrù, S; Krustrup, P; Salvatore, F; Buono, P

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether lifelong football training affects the expression of healthy longevity-related muscle molecular markers. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of 10 lifelong football-trained men (68.2 ± 3.0 years) and of 10 active untrained healthy men (66.7 ± 1.3 years). Gene and protein expression was measured by RTqPCR on RNA and by western blotting on protein extracts from muscle biopsies, respectively. The expression of AMPKα1/α2, NAMPT, TFAM and PGC1α, which are markers of oxidative metabolism, and MyHC β isoform expression was higher in the muscle of football-trained men vs untrained men. Also citrate synthase activity was higher in trained than in untrained men (109.3 ± 9.2 vs 75.1 ± 9.2 mU/mg). These findings were associated with a healthier body composition in trained than in untrained men [body weight: 78.2 ± 6.5 vs 91.2 ± 11.2 kg; body mass index BMI: 24.4 ± 1.6 vs 28.8 ± 4.0 kg m(-2); fat%: 22.6 ± 8.0 vs 31.4 ± 5.0%)] and with a higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max: 34.7 ± 3.8 vs 27.3 ± 4.0 ml/min/kg). Also the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair and in senescence suppression (Erk1/2, Akt and FoxM1) was higher in trained than in untrained men. At BMI- and age-adjusted multiple linear regression analysis, fat percentage was independently associated with Akt protein expression, and VO2max was independently associated with TFAM mRNA and with Erk1/2 protein expression. Lifelong football training increases the expression of key markers involved in muscle oxidative metabolism, and in the DNA repair and senescence suppression pathways, thus providing the molecular basis for healthy longevity.

  5. Recent patents on biosafety strategies of selectable marker genes in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Hu, Xiaoning; Huang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified crops (GMCs) have been planted world wide since 1990s, but the potential insecurity of selectable marker genes raises the questions about GMC safety. Therefore, several researches have been conducted on marker gene safety issues and recently several patents have been issued on this subject. There are two main approaches to achieve this goal: seeking the biosafety selectable marker and eliminating these insecure marker genes after transformation. Results show that these two systems are quite effective. Recent patents on the two ways are discussed in this review.

  6. Effect of cell culture using chitosan membranes on stemness marker genes in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Tian, Xiaojun; Yuan, Yan; Song, Zhixiu; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Xia; Li,