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Sample records for gene microdeletion studies

  1. AZF gene microdeletions: case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gallego, A; Rogel, R; Luján, S; Plaza, B; Delgado, F; Boronat, F

    2014-12-01

    Aproximately 10% of patients with non-obstructive azoospermia and 5% with non-obstructive severe oligozoospermia carry AZF region microdeletions (AZoospermic Factor) in the Y chromosome. The aim of this study is to analize the clinical and pathological findings in this group of patients and compare them with the previous evidence. Retrospective study of 11 patients with diagnosis of azoospermia or oligozoospermia and the presence of AZFa, AZFb, AZFc microdeletions or any combination of them. Microdeletions of AZFc region were found in 45% of cases, AZFa in 33% and a 10% showed a deletion of the three regions (a,b and c). 91% of them demonstrated azoospermia with low testicular volume in 62,5% cases. Microdeletions of AZF regions are associated with azoospermia and a low expectation of sperm retrieval in testicular biopsy. On the other hand, they seem not related with significative modifications on the hormone profile. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Microdeletion syndromes, balanced translocations, and gene mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Schinzel, A

    1988-01-01

    High resolution prometaphase chromosome banding has allowed the detection of discrete chromosome aberrations which escaped earlier metaphase examinations. Consistent tiny deletions have been detected in some well established malformation syndromes: an interstitial deletion in 15q11/12 in the majority of patients with the Prader-Willi syndrome and in a minority of patients with the Angelman (happy puppet) syndrome; a terminal deletion of 17p13.3 in most patients examined with the Miller-Dieker syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 8q23.3/24.1 in a large majority of patients with the Giedion-Langer syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 11p13 in virtually all patients with the WAGR (Wilms' tumour-aniridia-gonadoblastoma-retardation) syndrome; and an interstitial deletion in 22q11 in about one third of patients with the DiGeorge sequence. In addition, a combination of chromosome prometaphase banding and DNA marker studies has allowed the localisation of the genes for retinoblastoma and for Wilms' tumour and the clarification of both the autosomal recessive nature of the mutation and the possible somatic mutations by which the normal allele can be lost in retina and kidney cells. After a number of X linked genes had been mapped, discrete deletions in the X chromosome were detected by prometaphase banding with specific attention paid to the sites of the gene(s) in males who had from one to up to four different X linked disorders plus mental retardation. Furthermore, the detection of balanced translocations in probands with disorders caused by autosomal dominant or X linked genes has allowed a better insight into the localisation of these genes. In some females with X linked disorders, balanced X; autosomal translocations have allowed the localisation of X linked genes at the breakpoint on the X chromosome. Balanced autosome; autosome translocations segregating with autosomal dominant conditions have provided some clues to the gene location of these conditions. In two

  3. Burden Analysis of Rare Microdeletions Suggests a Strong Impact of Neurodevelopmental Genes in Genetic Generalised Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C. M.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G.; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E.; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M.; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes. PMID:25950944

  4. Burden analysis of rare microdeletions suggests a strong impact of neurodevelopmental genes in genetic generalised epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Ruppert, Ann-Kathrin; Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C M; Koeleman, Bobby P; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J; Kunz, Wolfram S; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A; Reinthaler, Eva M; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes.

  5. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  6. VEGFA polymorphisms and cardiovascular anomalies in 22q11 microdeletion syndrome: a case-control and family-based study.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan Francisco; Puga, Alonso R; Guzmán, M Luisa; Astete, Carmen Paz; Arriaza, Marta; Aracena, Mariana; Aravena, Teresa; Sanz, Patricia; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2009-01-01

    Microdeletion 22q11 in humans causes velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes. Most patients share a common 3Mb deletion, but the clinical manifestations are very heterogeneous. Congenital heart disease is present in 50-80% of patients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The phenotypic variability suggests the presence of modifiers. Polymorphisms in the VEGFA gene, coding for the vascular endothelial growth factor A, have been associated with non-syndromic congenital heart disease, as well as with the presence of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with microdeletion 22q11. We evaluated the association of VEGFA polymorphisms c.-2578C>A (rs699947), c.-1154G>A (rs1570360) and c.-634C>G (rs2010963) with congenital heart disease in Chilean patients with microdeletion 22q11. The study was performed using case-control and family-based association designs. We evaluated 122 patients with microdeletion 22q11 and known anatomy of the heart and great vessels, and their parents. Half the patients had congenital heart disease. We obtained no evidence of association by either method of analysis. Our results provide further evidence of the incomplete penetrance of the cardiovascular phenotype of microdeletion 22ql 1, but do not support association between VEGFA promoter polymorphisms and the presence of congenital heart disease in Chilean patients with this syndrome.

  7. A case of polimalformed fetus with a microdeletion of CTNNA3 gene.

    PubMed

    Cancemi, Dino; Urciuoli, Maria; Morelli, Franco; Lonardo, Maria Concetta; Lonardo, Valeria; Spampanato, Carmine; Ventruto, Marialuisa; Ventruto, Valerio; Sica, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a male fetus of 20 weeks of gestation with plurimalformed observed by transonic scan and confirmed by MR. The karyotype was 46, XY. Molecular analysis showed a microdeletion of about 100 kb in the CTNNA3 gene.

  8. Exonic microdeletions of the gephyrin gene impair GABAergic synaptic inhibition in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Lal, Dennis; Catarino, Claudia B; Arjune, Sita; Belaidi, Abdel A; Trucks, Holger; Vollmar, Christian; Surges, Rainer; Kunz, Wolfram S; Motameny, Susanne; Altmüller, Janine; Köhler, Anna; Neubauer, Bernd A; Epicure Consortium; Nürnberg, Peter; Noachtar, Soheyl; Schwarz, Günter; Sander, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Gephyrin is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, essential for the clustering of glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) at inhibitory synapses. An impairment of GABAergic synaptic inhibition represents a key pathway of epileptogenesis. Recently, exonic microdeletions in the gephyrin (GPHN) gene have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and epileptic seizures. Here we report the identification of novel exonic GPHN microdeletions in two patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), representing the most common group of genetically determined epilepsies. The identified GPHN microdeletions involve exons 5-9 (Δ5-9) and 2-3 (Δ2-3), both affecting the gephyrin G-domain. Molecular characterization of the GPHN Δ5-9 variant demonstrated that it perturbs the clustering of regular gephyrin at inhibitory synapses in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons in a dominant-negative manner, resulting in a significant loss of γ2-subunit containing GABAARs. GPHN Δ2-3 causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.V22Gfs*7) leading to haplo-insufficiency of the gene. Our results demonstrate that structural exonic microdeletions affecting the GPHN gene constitute a rare genetic risk factor for IGE and other neuropsychiatric disorders by an impairment of the GABAergic inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  9. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  10. KANSL1 gene disruption associated with the full clinical spectrum of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Igoa, María; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Pérez-Juana-del-Casal, Aranzazu; Romero-Ibarra, Carlos; Nieva-Echebarria, Beatriz; Ramos-Arroyo, María Antonia

    2015-08-22

    Chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a multisystem genomic disorder caused by a recurrent 600-kb-long deletion, or haploinsufficiency of the chromatin modifier gene KANSL1, which maps to that region. Patients with KANSL1 intragenic mutations have been reported to display the major clinical features of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. However, they did not exhibit the full clinical spectrum of this disorder, which might indicate that an additional gene or genes, located in the 17q21.31 locus, might also be involved in the syndrome's phenotype. Conventional and molecular karyotypes were performed on a female patient with intellectual disability, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heart defects, hydronephrosis, hypotonia, pigmentary skin anomalies and facial dysmorphic features. FISH analysis was conducted for chromosomal breakpoint localization. qRT-PCR was applied for the comparative gene expression of KANSL1 gene in the patient and a control group. Herein, we present the first report of disruption and haploinsufficiency of the KANSL1 gene, secondary to a t(1;17)(q12;q21)dn chromosomal translocation in a girl that also carried a de novo ~289-kb deletion on 16p11.2. KANSL1 gene expression studies and comparative clinical analysis of patients with 17q21.31 deletions and intragenic KANSL1 gene defects indicate that KANSL1 dysfunction is associated with the full spectrum of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, which includes characteristic facial features, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and structural defects of the brain, heart and genitourinary system, as well as, musculoskeletal and neuroectodermal anomalies. Moreover, we provide further evidence for the overlapping clinical phenotype of this condition with the cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome. KANSL1 gene haploinsufficiency is necessary and sufficient to cause the full spectrum of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. We hypothesize that the KANSL1 gene might have an effect on the Ras

  11. Microdeletions Including FMR1 in Three Female Patients with Intellectual Disability – Further Delineation of the Phenotype and Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zink, A.M.; Wohlleber, E.; Engels, H.; Rødningen, O.K.; Ravn, K.; Heilmann, S.; Rehnitz, J.; Katzorke, N.; Kraus, C.; Blichfeldt, S.; Hoffmann, P.; Reutter, H.; Brockschmidt, F.F.; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, M.; Vogt, P.H.; Prescott, T.E.; Tümer, Z.; Lee, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), especially in males. It is caused most often by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions, and less frequently by point mutations and partial or full deletions of the FMR1 gene. The wide clinical spectrum of affected females partly depends on their X-inactivation status. Only few female ID/DD patients with microdeletions including FMR1 have been reported. We describe 3 female patients with 3.5-, 4.2- and 9.2-Mb de novo microdeletions in Xq27.3-q28 containing FMR1. X-inactivation was random in all patients, yet they presented with ID/DD as well as speech delay, macrocephaly and other features attributable to FXS. No signs of autism were present. Here, we further delineate the clinical spectrum of female patients with microdeletions. FMR1 expression studies gave no evidence for an absolute threshold below which signs of FXS present. Since FMR1 expression is known to be highly variable between unrelated females, and since FMR1 mRNA levels have been suggested to be more similar among family members, we further explored the possibility of an intrafamilial effect. Interestingly, FMR1 mRNA levels in all 3 patients were significantly lower than in their respective mothers, which was shown to be specific for patients with microdeletions containing FMR1. PMID:24715853

  12. First microdeletion involving only the biotinidase gene that can cause biotinidase deficiency: A lesson for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Barry

    2016-01-01

    We report the first microdeletion (26 kb) of the biotinidase gene (BTD) that involves three of the four exons of the gene. This deletion further exemplifies the importance of performing microarray analysis or other methodologies for a deletion of the BTD gene when the enzymatic activity indicates lower activity than can be attributed to the mutations identified by DNA sequencing. PMID:27014582

  13. The Prevalence of Y Chromosome Microdeletions in Iranian Infertile Men with Azoospermia and Severe Oligospermia.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Fahimeh; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Ghaheri, Azadeh; Roodgar Saffari, Javad; Zamanian, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Microdeletions of the Y chromosome long arm are the most common molecular genetic causes of severe infertility in men. They affect three regions including azoospermia factors (AZFa, AZFb and AZFc), which contain various genes involved in spermatogenesis. The aim of the present study was to reveal the patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in Iranian infertile men referred to Royan Institute with azoospermia/ severe oligospermia. Through a cross-sectional study, 1885 infertile men referred to Royan Institute with azoospermia/severe oligospermia were examined for Y chromosome microdeletions from March 2012 to March 2014. We determined microdeletions of the Y chromosome in the AZFa, AZFb and AZFc regions using multiplex Polymerase chain reaction and six different Sequence-Tagged Site (STS) markers. Among the 1885 infertile men, we determined 99 cases of Y chromosome microdeletions (5.2%). Among 99 cases, AZFc microdeletions were found in 70 cases (70.7%); AZFb microdeletions in 5 cases (5%); and AZFa microdeletions in only 3 cases (3%). AZFbc microdeletions were detected in 18 cases (18.1%) and AZFabc microdeletions in 3 cases (3%). Based on these data, our results are in agreement with similar studies from other regions of the world as well as two other recent studies from Iran which have mostly reported a frequency of less than 10% for Y chromosome microdeletions.

  14. The Prevalence of Y Chromosome Microdeletions in Iranian Infertile Men with Azoospermia and Severe Oligospermia

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Fahimeh; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Ghaheri, Azadeh; Roodgar Saffari, Javad; Zamanian, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Objective Microdeletions of the Y chromosome long arm are the most common molecular genetic causes of severe infertility in men. They affect three regions including azoospermia factors (AZFa, AZFb and AZFc), which contain various genes involved in spermatogenesis. The aim of the present study was to reveal the patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in Iranian infertile men referred to Royan Institute with azoospermia/ severe oligospermia. Materials and Methods Through a cross-sectional study, 1885 infertile men referred to Royan Institute with azoospermia/severe oligospermia were examined for Y chromosome microdeletions from March 2012 to March 2014. We determined microdeletions of the Y chromosome in the AZFa, AZFb and AZFc regions using multiplex Polymerase chain reaction and six different Sequence-Tagged Site (STS) markers. Results Among the 1885 infertile men, we determined 99 cases of Y chromosome microdeletions (5.2%). Among 99 cases, AZFc microdeletions were found in 70 cases (70.7%); AZFb microdeletions in 5 cases (5%); and AZFa microdeletions in only 3 cases (3%). AZFbc microdeletions were detected in 18 cases (18.1%) and AZFabc microdeletions in 3 cases (3%). Conclusion Based on these data, our results are in agreement with similar studies from other regions of the world as well as two other recent studies from Iran which have mostly reported a frequency of less than 10% for Y chromosome microdeletions. PMID:28367414

  15. Gene-based copy number variation study reveals a microdeletion at 12q24 that influences height in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Kyoung; Moon, Sanghoon; Hwang, Mi Yeong; Kim, Dong-Joon; Oh, Ji Hee; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Bong-Jo

    2013-02-01

    Height is a classic polygenic trait with high heritability (h(2)=0.8). Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed many independent loci associated with human height. In addition, although many studies have reported an association between copy number variation (CNV) and complex diseases, few have explored the relationship between CNV and height. Recent studies reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly correlated with common CNVs, suggesting that it is warranted to survey CNVs to identify additional genetic factors affecting heritable traits such as height. This study tested the hypothesis that there would be CNV regions (CNVRs) associated with height nearby genes from the GWASs known to affect height. We identified regions containing >1% copy number deletion frequency from 3667 population-based cohort samples using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad BeadChip. Among the identified CNVRs, we selected 15 candidate regions that were located within 1Mb of 283 previously reported genes. To assess the effect of these CNVRs on height, statistical analyses were conducted with samples from a case group of 370 taller (upper 10%) individuals and a control group of 1828 individuals (lower 50%). We found that a newly identified 17.7 kb deletion at chromosomal position 12q24.33, approximately 171.6 kb downstream of GPR133, significantly correlated with height; this finding was validated using quantitative PCR. These results suggest that CNVs are potentially important in determining height and may contribute to height variation in human populations.

  16. Autism and intellectual disability in a patient with two microdeletions in 6q16: a contiguous gene deletion syndrome?

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniela; Weber, Peter; Röthlisberger, Benno; Filges, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations play a significant role in the aetiology of developmental disabilities including non-syndromic intellectual disability and autism. We describe a 19-year old patient with intellectual disability and autism for whom chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis showed the unusual finding of two de novo microdeletions in cis position on chromosome 6q16.1q16.2 and 6q16.3. The two deletions span 10 genes, including FBXL4, POU3F2, PRDM13, CCNC, COQ3 and GRIK2. We compared phenotypes of patients with similar deletions and looked at the involvement of the genes in neuronal networks in order to determine the pathogenicity of our patient's deletions. We suggest that both deletions on 6q are causing his disease phenotype since they harbour several genes which are implicated in pathways of neuronal development and function. Further studies regarding the interaction between PRDM13 and GRIK2 specifically may be interesting.

  17. Uncovering genomic causes of co-morbidity in epilepsy: gene-driven phenotypic characterization of rare microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Clayton, Lisa M S; Thom, Maria; Martinian, Lillian; Cohen, Hannah; Adalat, Shazia; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Pope, Simon A; Lench, Nicholas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Duncan, John S; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Land, John M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy often suffer from other important conditions. The existence of such co-morbidities is frequently not recognized and their relationship with epilepsy usually remains unexplained. We describe three patients with common, sporadic, non-syndromic epilepsies in whom large genomic microdeletions were found during a study of genetic susceptibility to epilepsy. We performed detailed gene-driven clinical investigations in each patient. Disruption of the function of genes in the deleted regions can explain co-morbidities in these patients. Co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy can be part of a genomic abnormality even in the absence of (known) congenital malformations or intellectual disabilities. Gene-driven phenotype examination can also reveal clinically significant unsuspected condition.

  18. Uncovering Genomic Causes of Co-Morbidity in Epilepsy: Gene-Driven Phenotypic Characterization of Rare Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Clayton, Lisa M. S.; Thom, Maria; Martinian, Lillian; Cohen, Hannah; Adalat, Shazia; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Pope, Simon A.; Lench, Nicholas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Duncan, John S.; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Land, John M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with epilepsy often suffer from other important conditions. The existence of such co-morbidities is frequently not recognized and their relationship with epilepsy usually remains unexplained. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe three patients with common, sporadic, non-syndromic epilepsies in whom large genomic microdeletions were found during a study of genetic susceptibility to epilepsy. We performed detailed gene-driven clinical investigations in each patient. Disruption of the function of genes in the deleted regions can explain co-morbidities in these patients. Conclusions/Significance Co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy can be part of a genomic abnormality even in the absence of (known) congenital malformations or intellectual disabilities. Gene-driven phenotype examination can also reveal clinically significant unsuspected condition. PMID:21858020

  19. Recurrent Microdeletions at Xq27.3-Xq28 and Male Infertility: A Study in the Czech Population

    PubMed Central

    Chylíková, Blanka; Hrdlička, Ivan; Veselá, Kamila; Řežábek, Karel; Liška, František

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic causes of male infertility are hypothesized to involve multiple types of mutations, from single gene defects to complex chromosome rearrangements. Recently, several recurrent X-chromosome microdeletions (located in subtelomeric region of the long arm) were reported to be associated with male infertility in Spanish and Italian males. The aim of our study was to test their prevalence and infertility association in population of men from the Czech Republic. Methods 107 males with pathological sperm evaluation resulting in nonobstructive infertility were compared to 131 males with normal fecundity. X-chromosome microdeletions were assessed by +/- PCR with three primer pairs for each region Xcnv64 (Xq27.3), Xcnv67 (Xq28) and Xcnv69 (Xq28). The latter microdeletion was further characterized by amplification across the deleted region, dividing the deletion into three types; A, B and C. Results We detected presence of isolated Xcnv64 deletion in 3 patients and 14 controls, and Xcnv69 in 3 patients and 6 controls (1 and 1 patient vs.4 and 1 control for types A and B respectively). There was one control with combined Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 type B deletions, and one patient with combination of Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 type C deletions. The frequency of the deletions was thus not higher in patient compared to control group, Xcnv64 was marginally associated with controls (adjusted Fisher´s exact test P = 0.043), Xcnv69 was not associated (P = 0.452). We excluded presence of more extensive rearrangements in two subjects with combined Xcnv64 and Xcnv69 deletions. There was no Xcnv67 deletion in our cohort. Conclusion In conclusion, the two previously reported X-linked microdeletions (Xcnv64 and Xcnv69) do not seem to confer a significant risk to impaired spermatogenesis in the Czech population. The potential clinical role of the previously reported patient-specific Xcnv67 remains to be determined in a larger study population. PMID:27257673

  20. Investigation Into the Role of C17orf79/COPR5 in E2F/DP Target Gene Overexpression in NF1 Microdeletion Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Gene Overexpression in NF1 Microdeletion Syndrome   PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: André Bernards Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION......Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The5-10% of NF1 patients who harbor so-called microdeletions (µΔ

  1. Terminal microdeletions of 13q34 chromosome region in patients with intellectual disability: Delineation of an emerging new microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Liberman, Meytal; Feingold-Zadok, Michal; Tenne, Tamar; Graham, John M

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of chromosomal microarray studies in patients with intellectual disability has led to the description of new microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. We report terminal microdeletions in 13q34 chromosome region in 5 adult patients of two unrelated families. Patients harboring 13q34 microdeletions display common clinical features, including intellectual disability, obesity, and mild facial dysmorphism. These individuals can become fairly self-sufficient, however they do not live independently, and require community and social support. Further systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deleted region will allow the identification of genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations, in particular intellectual disability.

  2. De novo 19p13.2 microdeletion encompassing the insulin receptor and resistin genes in a patient with obesity and learning disability.

    PubMed

    Wangensteen, Teresia; Retterstøl, Lars; Rødningen, Olaug K; Hjelmesaeth, Jøran; Aukrust, Pål; Halvorsen, Bente

    2013-06-01

    Genetic studies have provided novel insights of appetite regulation and pathophysiology of obesity. The adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ secreting several hormones contributing to insulin resistance and the development of the comorbidities of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Herein, we report on a patient with severe obesity and mild learning disability with a 750 kb de novo deletion of chromosome 19. The deletion encompasses several genes, including resistin and the first part of the insulin receptor, genes that are relevant for obesity. This novel deletion may therefore represent a region for obesity research. Plasma analyses and gene expression demonstrated that the deletion resulted in haploinsufficiency for resistin and insulin receptor in the patient compared to controls. We then studied the biochemical and adipocytokine profile in these subjects. We observed no differences in glucose and lipid parameters between the patient and the controls. Thus, haploinsufficiency of insulin receptor and resistin does not appear to influence glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the patient had considerably higher values of adiponectin and TNFα than controls. In conclusion, we identified a 19p13.2 microdeletion encompassing the insulin receptor and resistin genes resulting in haploinsufficiency in an obese, but otherwise healthy patient. No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the potential effect of the microdeletion on adipokine profile. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A de novo microdeletion in a patient with inner ear abnormalities suggests that the 10q26.13 region contains the responsible gene.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Shimojima, Keiko; Ondo, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Masanori; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletions in the 10q26.1 region are related to intellectual disability, growth delay, microcephaly, distinctive craniofacial features, cardiac defects, genital abnormalities and inner ear abnormalities. The genes responsible for inner ear abnormalities have been narrowed to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2), H6 family homeobox 2 gene (HMX2) and H6 family homeobox 3 gene (HMX3). An additional patient with distinctive craniofacial features, congenital deafness and balance dysfunctions showed a de novo microdeletion of 10q26.11q26.13, indicating the existence of a gene responsible for inner ear abnormalities in this region.

  4. Y chromosome azoospermia factor region microdeletions and transmission characteristics in azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Wei, Zhen-Tong; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Song-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential reproductive process that is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are located in a specific region known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF) in the long arm of the human Y chromosome. AZF microdeletions are recognized as the most frequent structural chromosomal abnormalities and are the major cause of male infertility. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) can overcome natural fertilization barriers and help a proportion of infertile couples produce children; however, these techniques increase the transmission risk of genetic defects. AZF microdeletions and their associated phenotypes in infertile males have been extensively studied, and different AZF microdeletion types have been identified by sequence-tagged site polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR), suspension array technology (SAT) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); however, each of these approaches has limitations that need to be overcome. Even though the transmission of AZF microdeletions has been reported worldwide, arguments correlating ART and the incidence of AZF microdeletions and explaining the occurrence of de novo deletions and expansion have not been resolved. Using the newest findings in the field, this review presents a systematic update concerning progress in understanding the functions of AZF regions and their associated genes, AZF microdeletions and their phenotypes and novel approaches for screening AZF microdeletions. Moreover, the transmission characteristics of AZF microdeletions and the future direction of research in the field will be specifically discussed. PMID:26628946

  5. Identifying candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome using clinical, genomic, and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hani; Badduke, Chansonette; Qiao, Ying; Colnaghi, Rita; Abramowicz, Iga; Alcantara, Diana; Dunham, Christopher; Wen, Jiadi; Wildin, Robert S; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Eichmeyer, Jennifer; Lehman, Anna; Maranda, Bruno; Martell, Sally; Shan, Xianghong; Lewis, Suzanne M E; O'Driscoll, Mark; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2016-03-17

    The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome. Here, we describe 8 new patients with the 2p15p16.1 deletion and review all published cases to date. We demonstrate functional deficits for the above 4 candidate genes using patients' lymphoblast cell lines (LCLs) and knockdown of their orthologs in zebrafish. All genes were dosage sensitive on the basis of reduced protein expression in LCLs. In addition, deletion of XPO1, a nuclear exporter, cosegregated with nuclear accumulation of one of its cargo molecules (rpS5) in patients' LCLs. Other pathways associated with these genes (e.g., NF-κB and Wnt signaling as well as the DNA damage response) were not impaired in patients' LCLs. Knockdown of xpo1a, rel, bcl11aa, and bcl11ab resulted in abnormal zebrafish embryonic development including microcephaly, dysmorphic body, hindered growth, and small fins as well as structural brain abnormalities. Our multifaceted analysis strongly implicates XPO1, REL, and BCL11A as candidate genes for 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome.

  6. A microdeletion of chromosome 9q33.3 encompasses the entire LMX1B gene in a Chinese family with nail patella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Zhang, Jiubin; Huang, Dan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yinzhao; He, Rong; Zhao, Yanyan

    2014-11-05

    Nail patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nail malformations, patellar apoplasia, or patellar hypoplasia. Mutations within the LMX1B gene are found in 85% of families with NPS; thus, this gene has been characterized as the causative gene of NPS. In this study, we identified a heterozygous microdeletion of the entire LMX1B gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in a Chinese family with NPS. The determination of the deletion breakpoints by Illumina genome-wide DNA analysis beadchip showed that the deletion was located in chromosome 9q33.3 and spanned about 0.66 Mb in size. This heterozygous deletion provides strong evidence for haploinsufficiency as the pathogenic mechanism of NPS.

  7. Double-blind Y chromosome microdeletion analysis in men with known sperm parameters and reproductive hormone profiles: microdeletions are specific for spermatogenic failure.

    PubMed

    Krausz, C; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Frydelund-Larsen, L; Quintana-Murci, L; McElreavey, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    2001-06-01

    Y chromosome microdeletions have been reported as a possible genetic factor of male infertility. Despite a large number of studies in this subject, there is still considerable debate and confusion surrounding the role of Y chromosome microdeletions in male infertility. This has been further compounded by observations of Y microdeletions in fertile males. The aim of the present study was to evaluate: 1) the incidence of Y microdeletions in control male population and infertile males, where complete semen and hormonal analysis was available to define whether Y microdeletions are specific for spermatogenic failure or if they can be found also in normospermic men; and 2) whether the suboptimal semen quality reported in Denmark is associated with a higher incidence of Y microdeletions in respect to other populations. Double-blind molecular study of deletions was performed in 138 consecutive patients seeking intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment, 100 men of known fertility, and 107 young military conscripts from the general Danish population. Microdeletions or gene-specific deletions were not detected in normospermic subjects or in subfertile men with a sperm count of more than 1 x 10(6)/mL. Deletions of the Azoospermia factor (AZF)c region were detected in 17% of individuals with idiopathic azoo/cryptozoospermia and in 7% of individuals with nonidiopathic azoo/cryptozoospermia. The data indicate that: 1) the composition of the study population is the major factor in determining deletion frequency; 2) Y chromosome microdeletions are specifically associated with severe spermatogenic failure; therefore, the protocol described here is reliable for the routine clinical workup of severe male factor infertility; and 3) the frequency of Yq microdeletions in the Danish population is similar to that from other countries and argues against the involvement of microdeletions in the relatively low sperm count of the Danish population.

  8. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH.

  9. Startle disease in Irish wolfhounds associated with a microdeletion in the glycine transporter GlyT2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Jennifer L.; Capper, Deborah; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Higgins, Robert J.; Rees, Mark I.; Shelton, G. Diane; Harvey, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Defects in glycinergic synaptic transmission in humans, cattle, and rodents result in an exaggerated startle reflex and hypertonia in response to either acoustic or tactile stimuli. Molecular genetic studies have determined that mutations in the genes encoding the postsynaptic glycine receptor (GlyR) α1 and β subunits (GLRA1 and GLRB) and the presynaptic glycine transporter GlyT2 (SLC6A5) are the major cause of these disorders. Here, we report the first genetically confirmed canine cases of startle disease. A litter of seven Irish wolfhounds was identified in which two puppies developed muscle stiffness and tremor in response to handling. Although sequencing of GLRA1 and GLRB did not reveal any pathogenic mutations, analysis of SLC6A5 revealed a homozygous 4.2 kb microdeletion encompassing exons 2 and 3 in both affected animals. This results in the loss of part of the large cytoplasmic N-terminus and all subsequent transmembrane domains due to a frameshift. This genetic lesion was confirmed by defining the deletion breakpoint, Southern blotting, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). This analysis enabled the development of a rapid genotyping test that revealed heterozygosity for the deletion in the dam and sire and three other siblings, confirming recessive inheritance. Wider testing of related animals has identified a total of 13 carriers of the SLC6A5 deletion as well as non-carrier animals. These findings will inform future breeding strategies and enable a rational pharmacotherapy of this new canine disorder. PMID:21420493

  10. A Novel Microdeletion in 1(p34.2p34.3), Involving the "SLC2A1" ("GLUT1") Gene, and Severe Delayed Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Sascha; Koolen, David A; Visser, Gepke; Brackel, Hein J. L.; van der Burgt, Ineke; de Leeuw, Nicole; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Sistermans, Erik A.; Pfundt, Rolph; de Vries, Bert B. A.

    2007-01-01

    A "de novo" 4.1-megabase microdeletion of chromosome 1p34.2p34.3 has been identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in a young male with severely delayed development, microcephaly, pronounced hypotonia, and facial dysmorphism. The deleted region encompasses 48 genes, among them the glucose transporter 1 ("SLC2A1" or "GLUT1")…

  11. A Novel Microdeletion in 1(p34.2p34.3), Involving the "SLC2A1" ("GLUT1") Gene, and Severe Delayed Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Sascha; Koolen, David A; Visser, Gepke; Brackel, Hein J. L.; van der Burgt, Ineke; de Leeuw, Nicole; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Sistermans, Erik A.; Pfundt, Rolph; de Vries, Bert B. A.

    2007-01-01

    A "de novo" 4.1-megabase microdeletion of chromosome 1p34.2p34.3 has been identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in a young male with severely delayed development, microcephaly, pronounced hypotonia, and facial dysmorphism. The deleted region encompasses 48 genes, among them the glucose transporter 1 ("SLC2A1" or "GLUT1")…

  12. Microdeletions detected using chromosome microarray in children with suspected genetic movement disorders: a single-centre study.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Nicholson, Michelle; Peters, Greg B

    2012-07-01

    Chromosome microarray (CMA) can determine copy number variants such as microdeletions or microduplications. Microdeletions of movement disorder genes including epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TITF1) have been described in patients with myoclonus dystonia and benign hereditary chorea respectively. We examined whether CMA is a valuable tool in the investigation of children with suspected genetic movement disorders. A genetic movement disorder was suspected if there was a positive first-degree family history, or two or more of the following factors: normal or near-normal magnetic resonance imaging, negative history of brain injury, and negative investigations for metabolic disorders. Tic disorders were excluded. Twenty-five patients (18 males, seven females) with a mean age at movement disorder onset of 4 years 5 month (range 1 mo-14 y) were prospectively recruited with the following primary movement disorders: dystonia (n=10), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (n=5), tremor (n=4), chorea (n=3), myoclonus (n=2), and paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (n=1). Comorbid associated features were common, particularly developmental delay or intellectual disability (19 out of 25) and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (six out of 25). CMA was performed using Agilent aCGH 60K array. Seven out of twenty-five patients had a microdeletion determined by CMA. None of the microdeletions were considered benign variants. Four patients had a deletion of a known movement disorder gene including paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PRRT2; n=2), SGCE (myoclonus dystonia, n=1), and TITF1 (benign hereditary chorea, n=1). Three patients had novel microdeletions of unknown but potential significance including 14q13.3 (chorea, n=1), 19p13.12 (tremor, n=1), and 19q13.12 (progressive dystonia). All seven patients had associated neurodevelopmental or behavioural problems. Assays that determine copy number variants may be a valuable first-tier investigation in

  13. Incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in children whose fathers underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with epididymal sperm aspiration: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ghirelli-Filho, Milton; de Marchi, Patricia Leme; Mafra, Fernanda Abani; Cavalcanti, Viviane; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Barbosa, Caio Parente; Bianco, Bianca; Glina, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by epididymal aspiration (percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration). Methods A case-control study comprising male children of couples in which the man had been previously vasectomized and chose vasectomy reversal (n=31) or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (n=30) to conceive new children, and a Control Group of male children of fertile men who had programmed vasectomies (n=60). Y-chromosome microdeletions research was performed by polymerase chain reaction on fathers and children, evaluating 20 regions of the chromosome. Results The results showed no Y-chromosome microdeletions in any of the studied subjects. The incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with spermatozoa recovered by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration did not differ between the groups, and there was no difference between control subjects born from natural pregnancies or population incidence in fertile men. Conclusion We found no association considering microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome and assisted reproduction. We also found no correlation between these Y-chromosome microdeletions and vasectomies, which suggests that the assisted reproduction techniques do not increase the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions. PMID:28076602

  14. Identification of ANKRD11 and ZNF778 as candidate genes for autism and variable cognitive impairment in the novel 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bacino, Carlos A; Gerkes, Erica; de Brouwer, Arjan PM; Pfundt, Rolph; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Scherer, Stephen W; Marshall, Christian R; Potocki, Lorraine; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of array comparative genomic hybridization in the evaluation of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or mental retardation has recently led to the discovery of a number of novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. We present four male patients with overlapping molecularly defined de novo microdeletions of 16q24.3. The clinical features observed in these patients include facial dysmorphisms comprising prominent forehead, large ears, smooth philtrum, pointed chin and wide mouth, variable cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, structural anomalies of the brain, seizures and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Although deletions vary in size, the common region of overlap is only 90 kb and comprises two known genes, Ankyrin Repeat Domain 11 (ANKRD11) (MIM 611192) and Zinc Finger 778 (ZNF778), and is located approximately 10 kb distally to Cadherin 15 (CDH15) (MIM 114019). This region is not found as a copy number variation in controls. We propose that these patients represent a novel and distinctive microdeletion syndrome, characterized by autism spectrum disorder, variable cognitive impairment, facial dysmorphisms and brain abnormalities. We suggest that haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 and/or ZNF778 contribute to this phenotype and speculate that further investigation of non-deletion patients who have features suggestive of this 16q24.3 microdeletion syndrome might uncover other mutations in one or both of these genes. PMID:19920853

  15. A novel 2q37 microdeletion containing human neural progenitors genes including STK25 results in severe developmental delay, epilepsy, and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Imitola, Jaime; Khurana, Divya S; Teplyuk, Nadiya M; Zucker, Mark; Jethva, Reena; Legido, Agustin; Krichevsky, Ana M; Frangieh, Michael; Walsh, Christopher A; Carvalho, Karen S

    2015-11-01

    2q37 microdeletion syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by neurodevelopmental delay, bone, cardiovascular, and neurological alterations. This syndrome is typically associated with loss of genetic material of approximately 100 genes in the 2q37 band. However, the genes associated with neurodevelopmental phenotype in this syndrome are still unknown. We identified a deleted region of 496 kb by whole genome array CGH in a patient who fulfilled criteria for 2q37 microdeletion syndrome with developmental delay, microcephaly, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, hand wringing, toe walking, and seizures. The deleted segment contains genes that are highly expressed in the developing human cortical plate and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in vivo and human neural progenitors in vitro, including SEPT2, THAP4, ATG4B, PPP1R7, and STK25. Network analysis revealed that STK25 was the most interacting gene associated with neural development in this deletion. Our report narrows the likely causative genomic region for microcephaly and neurodevelopmental delay in 2q37 microdeletion syndrome to a small genomic region enriched with neural progenitor genes that may represent an important locus for the development of the human cortex and corpus callosum. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Delineation of the clinically recognizable 17q22 contiguous gene deletion syndrome in a patient carrying the smallest microdeletion known to date.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Fernández-Toral, Joaquin; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; MacDonald, Alexandra; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with a 1.34 Mb microdeletion at chromosome band 17q22, which is also present in his affected mother. To better delineate this microdeletion syndrome, we compare the clinical and molecular characteristics of 10 previously reported cases and our patient. Of these, the present patient has the smallest deletion which includes five genes: MMD, TMEM100, PCTP, ANKFN1, and NOG. We compare the clinical manifestations described in relation to NOG, since this is the only gene whose loss is shared by our patient and the other eight patients. Previously, the clinical patterns associated with NOG mutations have been included under the general term "NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD)." Based on our analyses, and considering that there is a clinical correlation observed in cases with a "17q22 microdeletion including NOG" of which the main characteristics can be contributed to loss of this gene, we propose that the clinical patterns observed in these patients should be named as NOG-spectrum disorder-contiguous gene syndrome (NOGSD-CGS). This designation is important for clinicians because when a patient has defects concordant with alterations of NOG but also presents other anomalies not related to this gene, they would be able to suspect the existence of a microdeletion affecting 17q22, therefore, allowing an early diagnosis. This will also enable the clinician to provide the family with adequate information about the prognosis and the risk of reoccurrence in future potential offspring. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Analysis of microdeletions in 22q11 in Colombian patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Marleny; Villalba, Guiovanny; Mateus, Heidi; Villegas, Victoria; Fonseca, Dora; Núñez, Federico; Caicedo, Víctor; Pachón, Sonia; Bernal, Jaime E

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac defects are the most frequent congenital malformations, with an incidence estimated between 4 and 12 per 1000 newborns. Their etiology is multifactorial and might be attributed to genetic predispositions and environmental factors. Since 1990 these types of pathologies have been associated with 22q11 microdeletion. In this study, the frequency of microdeletion 22q11 was determined in 61 patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and TUPLE1 and STR D10S2198 genes were amplified by multiplex PCR and visualized in agarose gels. Gene content was quantified by densitometry. Three patients were found with microdeletion 22q11, representing a 4.9% frequency. This microdeletion was associated with two cases of Tetralogy of Fallot and a third case with atrial septal defect (ASD). In conclusion, the frequency for microdeletion 22q11 in the population analyzed was 4.9%. The cases that presented Teratology of Fallot had a frequency for this microdeletion of 7.4% and for ASD of 11.1%.

  18. Seizure Disorder in a Patient with a 5.09 Mb 7q11.23-q21.11 Microdeletion Including the MAGI2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jess F; Thakur, Pankaj; Peffer, Abigail; Kolthoff, Marta; Kochmar, Sally J; Surti, Urvashi

    2014-01-01

    Infantile spasms (IS) are a severe form of epilepsy characterized by hysparrhythmia on EEG, spasms, and intellectual disability. Typically occurring before one year of age, 40-60% of patients diagnosed with IS eventually develop other seizure disorders later in life. The etiology of IS is broad, and only recently have IS-associated genes been identified. MAGI2, an implicated IS-associated gene located within the 7q11.23-q21.11 chromosome region, encodes for a synaptic scaffolding protein involved in synaptic development and function. To date, several case reports of patients with 7q11.23-q21.11 microdeletions involving MAGI2 have been described, with the majority presenting with IS or other seizure disorders that are attributed to loss of heterozygosity of the MAGI2 gene. In addition, several other patients with 7q11.23 microdeletions not including MAGI2 have been described with clinical features that include IS, epilepsy, intellectual disabilities, and neurobehavioral problems, suggesting additional IS-associated candidate genes within the 7q11.23 region. Adding to the literature, we report on a 21-year-old female with a de novo 5.09 Mb 7q11.23-q21.11 microdeletion (aCGH analysis) involving the MAGI2 gene with a history of seizure disorder, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features. Although we agree that MAGI2 is the most likely candidate gene for seizure disorder in our patient, other candidate genes must be considered in 7q11.23 deletion cases not spanning the MAGI2 gene.

  19. Fifty microdeletions among 112 cases of sotos syndrome: Low copy repeats possibly mediate the common deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kurotaki, Naohiro; Harada, Naoki; Shimokawa, Osamu; Miyake, Noriko; Kawame, Hiroshi; Uetake, Kimiaki; Makita, Yoshio; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Nagai, Toshiro; Ozaki, Takao; Touyama, Mayumi; Shenhav, Ruthie; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Medne, Livija; Shiihara, Takashi; Ohtsu, Shigeyuki; Kato, Zen-ichiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nishimoto, Junji; Lev, Dorit; Miyoshi, Yoko; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Sonoda, Tohru; Sakazume, Satoru; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Ohta, Tohru; Kishino, Tatsuya; Niikawa, Norio; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2003-04-15

    Sotos syndrome (SoS) is an autosomal dominant overgrowth syndrome with characteristic craniofacial dysmorphic features and various degrees of mental retardation. We previously showed that haploin sufficiency of the NSD1 gene is the major cause of SoS, and submicroscopic deletions at 5q35, including NSD1, were found in about a half (20/42) of our patients examined. Since the first report, an additional 70 SoS cases consisting of 53 Japanese and 17 non-Japanese have been analyzed. We found 50 microdeletions (45 percent) and 16 point mutations (14 percent) among all the 112 cases. A large difference in the frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese patients was noted: 49 (52 percent) of the 95 Japanese patients and only one (6 percent) of the 17 non-Japanese had microdeletions. A sequence-based physical map was constructed to characterize the microdeletions. Most of the microdeletions were confirmed to be identical by FISH analysis. We identified highly homologous sequences, i.e., possible low copy repeats (LCRs), in regions flanking proximal and distal breakpoints of the common deletion. This suggests that LCRs may mediate the deletion. Such LCRs seem to be present in different populations. Thus the different frequency of microdeletions between Japanese and non-Japanese cases in our study may have been caused by patient-selection bias.

  20. Identification of Microdeletions in Candidate Genes for Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Mostowska, Adrianna; Jugessur, Astanand; Johnson, Marla K.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies are now used routinely to identify genes implicated in complex traits. The panels used for such analyses can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants, both of which may help to identify small deleted regions of the genome that may contribute to a particular disease METHODS We performed a candidate gene analysis involving 1221 SNPs in 333 candidate genes for orofacial clefting using 2823 samples from 725 two- and three-generation families with a proband with clefts of the lip and/or palate. We used SNP genotyping, DNA sequencing, high-resolution DNA microarray analysis and long-range PCR to confirm and characterize the deletion events RESULTS This dataset had a high duplicate reproducibility rate (99.98%), high Mendelian consistency rate (99.93%), and low missing data rate (0.55%), which provided a powerful opportunity for deletion detection. Apparent Mendelian inconsistencies between parents and child suggested deletion events in 15 individuals in 11 genomic regions. We confirmed deletions involving CYP1B1, FGF10, SP8, SUMO1, TBX1, TFAP2A, and UGT7A1, including both de novo and familial cases. Deletions of SUMO1, TBX1, and TFAP2A are likely to be etiologic CONCLUSIONS These deletions suggest the potential roles of genes or regulatory elements contained within deleted regions in the etiology of clefting. Our analysis took advantage of genotypes from a candidate-gene-based SNP survey and proved to be an efficient analytical approach to interrogate genes potentially involved in clefting. This can serve as a model to find genes playing a role in complex traits in general. PMID:19137569

  1. Detection of Y chromosome microdeletions and mitochondrial DNA mutations in male infertility patients.

    PubMed

    Güney, A I; Javadova, D; Kırac, D; Ulucan, K; Koc, G; Ergec, D; Tavukcu, H; Tarcan, T

    2012-04-27

    Infertility affects about 10-15% of all couples attempting pregnancy with infertility attributed to the male partner in approximately half of the cases. Proposed causes of male infertility include sperm motility disturbances, Y chromosome microdeletions, chromosomal abnormalities, single gene mutations, and sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements. To investigate the etiology of decreased sperm fertility and motility of sperm and to develop an appropriate therapeutic strategy, the molecular basis of these defects must be elucidated. In this study, we aimed to reveal the relationships between the genetic factors including sperm mtDNA mutations, Y chromosome microdeletions, and sperm parameters that can be regarded as candidate factors for male infertility. Thirty men with a history of infertility and 30 fertile men were recruited to the study. Y chromosome microdeletions were analyzed by multiplex PCR. Mitochondrial genes ATPase6, Cytb, and ND1, were amplified by PCR and then analyzed by direct sequencing. No Y chromosome microdeletions were detected in either group. However, a total of 38 different nucleotide substitutions were identified in the examined mitochondrial genes in both groups, all of which are statistically non-significant. Fifteen substitutions caused an amino acid change and 12 were considered novel mutations. As a conclusion, mtDNA mutations and Y chromosome microdeletions in male infertility should be examined in larger numbers in order to clarify the effect of genetic factors.

  2. 9q33.3q34.11 microdeletion: new contiguous gene syndrome encompassing STXBP1, LMX1B and ENG genes assessed using reverse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Nambot, Sophie; Masurel, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Marle, Nathalie; Thevenon, Julien; Perez-Martin, Stéphanie; Dulieu, Véronique; Huet, Frédéric; Plessis, Ghislaine; Andrieux, Joris; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Billy-Lopez, Gipsy; Coutton, Charles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Heron, Delphine; Rooryck, Caroline; Goldenberg, Alice; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Joly-Hélas, Géraldine; Calenda, Patricia; Kuentz, Paul; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Callier, Patrick; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    The increasing use of array-CGH in malformation syndromes with intellectual disability could lead to the description of new contiguous gene syndrome by the analysis of the gene content of the microdeletion and reverse phenotyping. Thanks to a national and international call for collaboration by Achropuce and Decipher, we recruited four patients carrying de novo overlapping deletions of chromosome 9q33.3q34.11, including the STXBP1, the LMX1B and the ENG genes. We restrained the selection to these three genes because the effects of their haploinsufficency are well described in the literature and easily recognizable clinically. All deletions were detected by array-CGH and confirmed by FISH. The patients display common clinical features, including intellectual disability with epilepsy, owing to the presence of STXBP1 within the deletion, nail dysplasia and bone malformations, in particular patellar abnormalities attributed to LMX1B deletion, epistaxis and cutaneous-mucous telangiectasias explained by ENG haploinsufficiency and common facial dysmorphism. This systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deletion allowed us to identify genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations and complications that require personalized follow-up, in particular for renal, eye, ear, vascular and neurological manifestations.

  3. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome associated with Chiari type I malformation caused by a large 16p13.3 microdeletion: a contiguous gene syndrome?

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Cezary; Volz, Kim; Ranola, Maria; Kitch, Karla; Karim, Tariza; O'Neil, Joseph; Smith, Jodi; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo

    2010-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS, OMIM 180849) is a rare condition, which in 65% of cases is caused by haploinsufficiency of CREBBP (cAMP response element binding protein binding protein) localized to 16p13.3. A small subset of RSTS cases caused by 16p13.3 microdeletions involving neighboring genes have been recently suggested to be a true contiguous gene syndrome called severe RSTS or 16p13.3 deletion syndrome (OMIM 610543). In the present report, we describe a case of a 2-year-old female with RSTS who, besides most of the typical features of RSTS has corpus callosum dysgenesis and a Chiari type I malformation which required neurosurgical decompression. CGH microarray showed a approximately 520.7 kb microdeletion on 16p13.3 involving CREBBP, ADCY9, and SRL genes. We hypothesize that the manifestations in this patient might be influenced by the haploinsufficiency for ADCY9 and SRL. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. [Microdeletion 12p12 involving SOX5 gene: a new syndrome with developmental delay].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Carrera, Ignacio; de Zaldívar-Tristancho, M Solo; Martín-Fernández, Rebeca; Hernández-Martín, Raquel; López-Lafuente, Amparo; Rodríguez-Revenga, Laia

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. El gen SOX5 codifica un factor de transcripcion implicado en la regulacion de la condrogenia y el desarrollo del sistema nervioso. Caso clinico. Niña de 10 anos con discapacidad intelectual, alteracion conductual y malformaciones menores de este nuevo sindrome con alteracion en el neurodesarrollo, con una delecion 12p12 que incluye el gen SOX5. Conclusiones. Se revisan los casos publicados tanto de deleciones intragenicas de SOX5 como de deleciones mas grandes que incluyen este gen, y se analizan las correlaciones genotipo-fenotipo y los genes implicados en esta paciente.

  5. A de novo Microdeletion of ANKRD11 Gene in a Korean Patient with KBG Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hun; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jin-Ok; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2014-01-01

    KBG syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by macrodontia of upper central incisors, global developmental delay, distinctive craniofacial features, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Ankyrin repeat domain 11 gene (ANKRD11) has recently been identified as a causal factor of this syndrome. We describe a 6-yr-old Korean boy with features of KBG syndrome. The patient had a short stature, macrodontia, dysmorphic facial features, speech and motor delay with intellectual disability, and partial seizures as indicated by the electroencephalogram, but he was neither autistic nor had autism spectrum disorders. Using high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, we identified a heterozygous 240-kb deletion at 16q24.3 corresponding to ANKRD11. This patient provided additional evidence on the influence of ANKRD11 in KBG syndrome and suggested that deletion limited to ANKRD11 is unlikely to cause autism. PMID:25187894

  6. A de novo microdeletion of ANKRD11 gene in a Korean patient with KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hun; Seo, Eul-Ju; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jin-Ok; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2014-09-01

    KBG syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by macrodontia of upper central incisors, global developmental delay, distinctive craniofacial features, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Ankyrin repeat domain 11 gene (ANKRD11) has recently been identified as a causal factor of this syndrome. We describe a 6-yr-old Korean boy with features of KBG syndrome. The patient had a short stature, macrodontia, dysmorphic facial features, speech and motor delay with intellectual disability, and partial seizures as indicated by the electroencephalogram, but he was neither autistic nor had autism spectrum disorders. Using high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, we identified a heterozygous 240-kb deletion at 16q24.3 corresponding to ANKRD11. This patient provided additional evidence on the influence of ANKRD11 in KBG syndrome and suggested that deletion limited to ANKRD11 is unlikely to cause autism.

  7. Homozygous microdeletion of the POU1F1, CHMP2B, and VGLL3 genes in chromosome 3--a novel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Frumkin-Ben David, Rachel; Bar, Meytal; Potievsky, Olga; Phillip, Moshe; Lazar, Liora

    2011-09-01

    Microdeletion syndromes include numerous syndromic phenotypes associated with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features. We report on a patient with a novel microdeletion of chromosomal region 3p11.2-p12.1 containing POU1F1, chromatin-modifying protein 2B (CHMP2B), and vestigial-like 3 (VGLL3) genes. Our patient was diagnosed as having a neonatal multiple pituitary hormone [growth hormone (GH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin] deficiency. In addition to the typical findings associated with these hormonal deficiencies, she exhibited clinical features resembling those of Laron syndrome (frontal bossing, saddle nose, small chin, blue sclera, and acromicria), with moderate intellectual disability. She also displayed an unusual growth pattern characterized by unresponsiveness to high doses of GH replacement therapy during infancy and early childhood and an accelerated growth rate beginning at the age of 4.5 years. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels were consistently extremely low or undetectable. Extensive medical and genetic analysis ruled out primary and secondary GH insensitivity. The distinct phenotype and the peculiar growth pattern observed in this affected patient, not reported to have been observed in other cases with POU1F1 gene inactivity, suggest that the other two deleted genes play a possible role in the development of this syndrome. This hypothesis may be supported by the fact that both the CHMP2B and VGLL3 genes are expressed in the liver and the growth plate, the two main target organs of the GH/IGF-1 axis. The homozygous deletion of the CHMP2B gene, previously associated with frontotemporal dementia, may contribute to the intellectual disability observed in this patient. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Substantial prevalence of microdeletions of the Y-chromosome in infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia and oligozoospermia detected using a sequence-tagged site-based mapping strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Najmabadi, H.; Huang, V.; Bhasin, D.

    1996-04-01

    Genes on the long arm of Y (Yq), particularly within interval 6, are believed to play a critical role in human spermatogenesis. Cytogenetically detectable deletions of this region are associated with azoospermia in men, but are relatively uncommon. The objective of this study was to validate a sequence-tagged site (STS)-mapping strategy for the detection of Yq microdeletions and to use this method to determine the proportion of men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia who carry microdeletions in Yq. STS mapping of a sufficiently large sample of infertile men should also help further localize the putative gene(s) involved in the pathogenesis of male infertility. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 16 normal fertile men, 7 normal fertile women, 60 infertile men, and 15 patients with the X-linked disorder, ichthyosis. PCR primers were synthesized for 26 STSs that span Yq interval 6. None of the 16 normal men of known fertility had microdeletions. Seven normal fertile women failed to amplify any of the 26 STSs, providing evidence of their Y specificity. No microdeletions were detected in any of the 15 patients with ichthyosis. Of the 60 infertile men typed with 26 STSs, 11 (18%; 10 azoospermic and 1 oligozoospermic) failed to amplify 1 or more STS. Interestingly, 4 of the 11 patients had microdeletions in a region that is outside the Yq region from which the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia gene region) gene was cloned. In an additional 3 patients, microdeletions were present both inside and outside the DAZ region. The physical locations of these microdeletions provide further support for the concept that a gene(s) on Yq deletion interval 6 plays an important role in spermatogenesis. The presence of deletions that do not overlap with the DAZ region suggests that genes other than the DAZ gene may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of some subsets of male infertility. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Differences in speech and language abilities between children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and children with phenotypic features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome but without microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Rakonjac, Marijana; Cuturilo, Goran; Stevanovic, Milena; Jelicic, Ljiljana; Subotic, Misko; Jovanovic, Ida; Drakulic, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    22q11.2DS is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, usually associated with speech and language delay (SLD). Approximately 75% of children with 22q11.2 microdeletion have congenital heart malformations (CHM) which after infant open-heart surgery might lead to SLD. The purpose of this study was to determine whether factors associated with microdeletion contribute to SLD in children with 22q11.2DS. We compared speech and language abilities of two groups of school-aged children: those with 22q11.2 microdeletion (E1) and those with the phenotype resembling 22q11.2DS but without the microdeletion (E2). An age-matched group of typically developing children was also tested. The obtained results revealed that children from group E1 have lower level of speech and language abilities compared to children from group E2 and control group. Additionally, mild to moderate SLD was detected in children from group E2 compared to children from the control group. The obtained results imply that both CHM after infant open-heart surgery and other factors associated with 22q11.2 microdeletion, contribute to SLD in patients with 22q11.2 microdeletion. Based on this, we could postulate that there is/are some potential candidate gene(s), located in the 22q11.2 region, whose function could be important for speech and language development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromosome 22q12.1 microdeletions: confirmation of the MN1 gene as a candidate gene for cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Breckpot, Jeroen; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Alanay, Yasemin; Blyth, Moira; Brahimi, Afane; Duban-Bedu, Bénédicte; Gozé, Odile; Firth, Helen; Yakicier, Mustafa Cengiz; Hens, Greet; Rayyan, Maissa; Legius, Eric; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-01-01

    We report on seven novel patients with a submicroscopic 22q12 deletion. The common phenotype constitutes a contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 22q12.1q12.2, featuring NF2-related schwannoma of the vestibular nerve, corpus callosum agenesis and palatal defects. Combining our results with the literature, eight patients are recorded with palatal defects in association with haploinsufficiency of 22q12.1, including the MN1 gene. These observations, together with the mouse expression data and the finding of craniofacial malformations including cleft palate in a Mn1-knockout mouse model, suggest that this gene is a candidate gene for cleft palate in humans. PMID:25944382

  11. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis.

    PubMed

    Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3-100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35-3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease.

  12. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3–100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35–3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease. PMID:26925314

  13. Incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in children whose fathers underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with epididymal sperm aspiration: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli-Filho, Milton; Marchi, Patricia Leme de; Mafra, Fernanda Abani; Cavalcanti, Viviane; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Barbosa, Caio Parente; Bianco, Bianca; Glina, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by epididymal aspiration (percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration). A case-control study comprising male children of couples in which the man had been previously vasectomized and chose vasectomy reversal (n=31) or in vitro fertilization with sperm retrieval by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (n=30) to conceive new children, and a Control Group of male children of fertile men who had programmed vasectomies (n=60). Y-chromosome microdeletions research was performed by polymerase chain reaction on fathers and children, evaluating 20 regions of the chromosome. The results showed no Y-chromosome microdeletions in any of the studied subjects. The incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in individuals born from vasectomized fathers who underwent vasectomy reversal or in vitro fertilization with spermatozoa recovered by percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration did not differ between the groups, and there was no difference between control subjects born from natural pregnancies or population incidence in fertile men. We found no association considering microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome and assisted reproduction. We also found no correlation between these Y-chromosome microdeletions and vasectomies, which suggests that the assisted reproduction techniques do not increase the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions. Avaliar a incidência de microdeleções do cromossomo Y em indivíduos nascidos de pais vasectomizados submetidos à reversão de vasectomia ou fertilização in vitro com recuperação de espermatozoides por aspiração do epidídimo (aspiração percutânea de espermatozoides do epidídimo). Estudo caso-controle que compreende crianças do sexo masculino de casais em que o homem havia sido previamente vasectomizado e escolheu revers

  14. Prevalence and patterns of Y chromosome microdeletion in infertile men with azoospermia and oligzoospermia in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Elfateh, Fadlalla; Rulin, Dai; Xin, Yun; Linlin, Li; Haibo, Zhu; Liu, Rui-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In some cases infertile men showed small deletions of specific genes in the Y chromosome. It had been confirmed, these deleted genes are greatly associated with spermatogenic failure. However, the frequency and the patterns of such microdeletions among infertile men are not clearly clarified. Objective: We sought to determine the frequency and the patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic and oligozoospermic infertile men in Northeast China, and try to optimize the selection of sequence tagged sites (STSs) of AZF microdeletions in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: 720 azoospermic and 330 oligozoospermic infertile men, from Northeast China were included in this retrospective study during May 2008 to November 2012. Semen analysis was performed according to the World Health Organization guidelines. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by polymerase chain reaction assays. G-banding method was used for chromosome Karyotype analysis. Chi-square tests were used to compare patterns of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic and oligozoospermic patients. Results: Of 1050 infertile men, 12.95% cases had shown Y chromosome microdeletions, and 19.43% of cases showed abnormal chromosomal karyotype. Deletions in AZFc region was the most frequent 75.00%, followed by deletions in AZFb region 13.33%, AZFbc region 09.62%, and AZFa region 2.22%. All oligozoospermic patients showed presence of sY84, sY86, sY127, and sY134. Deletion of sY127 (p=0.0101) and sY157 (p=0.0043) showed significant difference between azoospermic group and oligozoospermic group. Conclusion: Deletions of sY127 may relate to azoospermia while sY84, sY86, sY127 can be ignored in AZF screening for oligozoospermic patients. PMID:25071845

  15. Pleiotropy in microdeletion syndromes: neurologic and spermatogenic abnormalities in mice homozygous for the p6H deletion are likely due to dysfunction of a single gene.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M; Carpenter, D A; Handel, M A

    1995-07-03

    Variability and complexity of phenotypes observed in microdeletion syndromes can be due to deletion of a single gene whose product participates in several aspects of development or can be due to the deletion of a number of tightly linked genes, each adding its own effect to the syndrome. The p6H deletion in mouse chromosome 7 presents a good model with which to address this question of multigene vs. single-gene pleiotropy. Mice homozygous for the p6H deletion are diluted in pigmentation, are smaller than their littermates, and manifest a nervous jerky-gait phenotype. Male homozygotes are sterile and exhibit profound abnormalities in spermiogenesis. By using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNU) mutagenesis and a breeding protocol designed to recover recessive mutations expressed hemizygously opposite a large p-locus deletion, we have generated three noncomplementing mutations that map to the p6H deletion. Each of these EtNU-induced mutations has adverse effects on the size, nervous behavior, and progression of spermiogenesis that characterize p6H deletion homozygotes. Because EtNU is thought to induce primarily intragenic (point) mutations in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia, we propose that the trio of phenotypes (runtiness, nervous jerky gait, and male sterility) expressed in p6H deletion homozygotes is the result of deletion of a single highly pleiotropic gene. We also predict that a homologous single locus, quite possibly tightly linked and distal to the D15S12 (P) locus in human chromosome 15q11-q13, may be associated with similar developmental abnormalities in humans.

  16. Microdeletions in 9q33.3-q34.11 in five patients with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and seizures of incomplete penetrance: is STXBP1 not the only causative gene?

    PubMed

    Ehret, Julia K; Engels, Hartmut; Cremer, Kirsten; Becker, Jessica; Zimmermann, Johannes P; Wohlleber, Eva; Grasshoff, Ute; Rossier, Eva; Bonin, Michael; Mangold, Elisabeth; Bevot, Andrea; Schön, Stefanie; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Dennert, Nicola; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Lacaze, Elodie; Plessis, Ghislaine; de Broca, Alain; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Röthlisberger, Benno; Miny, Peter; Filges, Isabel; Dufke, Andreas; Andrieux, Joris; Lee, Jennifer A; Zink, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Most microdeletions involving chromosome sub-bands 9q33.3-9q34.11 to this point have been detected by analyses focused on STXBP1, a gene known to cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 4 and other seizure phenotypes. Loss-of-function mutations of STXBP1 have also been identified in some patients with intellectual disability without epilepsy. Consequently, STXBP1 is widely assumed to be the gene causing both seizures and intellectual disability in patients with 9q33.3-q34.11 microdeletions. We report five patients with overlapping microdeletions of chromosome 9q33.3-q34.11, four of them previously unreported. Their common clinical features include intellectual disability, psychomotor developmental delay with delayed or absent speech, muscular hypotonia, and strabismus. Microcephaly and short stature are each present in four of the patients. Two of the patients had seizures. De novo deletions range from 1.23 to 4.13 Mb, whereas the smallest deletion of 432 kb in patient 3 was inherited from her mother who is reported to have mild intellectual disability. The smallest region of overlap (SRO) of these deletions in 9q33.3 does not encompass STXBP1, but includes two genes that have not been previously associated with disease, RALGPS1 and GARNL3. Sequencing of the two SRO genes RALGPS1 and GARNL3 in at least 156 unrelated patients with mild to severe idiopathic intellectual disability detected no causative mutations. Gene expression analyses in our patients demonstrated significantly reduced expression levels of GARNL3, RALGPS1 and STXBP1 only in patients with deletions of the corresponding genes. Thus, reduced expression of STXBP1 was ruled out as a cause for seizures in our patient whose deletion did not encompass STXBP1. We suggest that microdeletions of this region on chromosome 9q cause a clinical spectrum including intellectual disability, developmental delay especially concerning speech, microcephaly, short stature, mild dysmorphisms, strabismus, and

  17. Case fatality rate and associated factors in patients with 22q11 microdeletion syndrome: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Gabriela M; Guzmán, M Luisa; Delgado, Iris; Loyola, Hugo; Palomares, Mirta; Lay-Son, Guillermo; Vial, Cecilia; Benavides, Felipe; Espinoza, Karena; Alvarez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion is the most commonly occurring known microdeletion syndrome. Deaths related to the syndrome have been reported, but the magnitude of death has not been quantified. This study evaluated the deletion's impact on survival and its clinical manifestations in a large cohort of Chilean patients. Design Demographic and clinical data of individuals with 22q11 deletions diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were collected from medical records and death certificates. Case fatality rate was calculated and compared with national vital statistics. OR with 95% CI analysis was used to assess the association between clinical manifestations and death. Setting Genetic services in tertiary care centres in Chile, following patients with 22q11.2 deletion. Outcomes Fatality rate and associated factors. Results 59 of 419 patients (14.1%) died during the study period at a median of 3.4 months (range 0 to 32 years of age). Factors associated with death included congenital heart disease (OR 5.27; 95% CI 2.06 to 13.99; p<0.0001), hypocalcaemia (OR 4.27; 95% CI 1.67 to 11.15; p<0.002) and airway malacia (OR 13.37; 95% CI 1.19 to 110.51; p<0.002). Patients with deletions and defects such as tetralogy of Fallot with or without pulmonary atraesia, truncus arteriosus or ventricular septal defect, had a 2.6-fold to 4.6-fold higher death rate compared with nationwide reports for the same types of defects. Conclusions In this cohort, we observed a death rate of 14.1%, implying that one in seven patients with 22q11 deletion died during the study period. Significant associations with cardiac defects, hypocalcaemia and airway malacia were observed. Furthermore, the death risk in patients with 22q11 deletion and cardiac defects exceeded the global figures observed in Chile for infants with structurally similar but apparently isolated anomalies. These observations indicate a need to identify patients who may require specific perioperative management to improve survival

  18. Homozygous microdeletion of exon 5 in ZNF277 in a girl with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Fabiola; Simpson, Nuala H; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Clark, Ann; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Donnelly, Peter; Bentley, David R; Martin, Hilary; Parr, Jeremy; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2014-10-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI), an unexpected failure to develop appropriate language skills despite adequate non-verbal intelligence, is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder with a complex genetic basis. We identified a homozygous microdeletion of 21,379 bp in the ZNF277 gene (NM_021994.2), encompassing exon 5, in an individual with severe receptive and expressive language impairment. The microdeletion was not found in the proband's affected sister or her brother who had mild language impairment. However, it was inherited from both parents, each of whom carries a heterozygous microdeletion and has a history of language problems. The microdeletion falls within the AUTS1 locus, a region linked to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Moreover, ZNF277 is adjacent to the DOCK4 and IMMP2L genes, which have been implicated in ASD. We screened for the presence of ZNF277 microdeletions in cohorts of children with SLI or ASD and panels of control subjects. ZNF277 microdeletions were at an increased allelic frequency in SLI probands (1.1%) compared with both ASD family members (0.3%) and independent controls (0.4%). We performed quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the expression of IMMP2L, DOCK4 and ZNF277 in individuals carrying either an IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletion or a ZNF277 microdeletion. Although ZNF277 microdeletions reduce the expression of ZNF277, they do not alter the levels of DOCK4 or IMMP2L transcripts. Conversely, IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletions do not affect the expression levels of ZNF277. We postulate that ZNF277 microdeletions may contribute to the risk of language impairments in a manner that is independent of the autism risk loci previously described in this region.

  19. Homozygous microdeletion of exon 5 in ZNF277 in a girl with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Fabiola; Simpson, Nuala H; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Clark, Ann; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Donnelly, Peter; Bentley, David R; Martin, Hilary; Parr, Jeremy; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2014-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI), an unexpected failure to develop appropriate language skills despite adequate non-verbal intelligence, is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder with a complex genetic basis. We identified a homozygous microdeletion of 21,379 bp in the ZNF277 gene (NM_021994.2), encompassing exon 5, in an individual with severe receptive and expressive language impairment. The microdeletion was not found in the proband's affected sister or her brother who had mild language impairment. However, it was inherited from both parents, each of whom carries a heterozygous microdeletion and has a history of language problems. The microdeletion falls within the AUTS1 locus, a region linked to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Moreover, ZNF277 is adjacent to the DOCK4 and IMMP2L genes, which have been implicated in ASD. We screened for the presence of ZNF277 microdeletions in cohorts of children with SLI or ASD and panels of control subjects. ZNF277 microdeletions were at an increased allelic frequency in SLI probands (1.1%) compared with both ASD family members (0.3%) and independent controls (0.4%). We performed quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the expression of IMMP2L, DOCK4 and ZNF277 in individuals carrying either an IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletion or a ZNF277 microdeletion. Although ZNF277 microdeletions reduce the expression of ZNF277, they do not alter the levels of DOCK4 or IMMP2L transcripts. Conversely, IMMP2L_DOCK4 microdeletions do not affect the expression levels of ZNF277. We postulate that ZNF277 microdeletions may contribute to the risk of language impairments in a manner that is independent of the autism risk loci previously described in this region. PMID:24518835

  20. Fused teeth, macrodontia and increased caries are characteristic features of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients with NF1 gene microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Matsune, Kensuke; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2012-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the most common genetic condition caused by NF1 gene alteration. A 1.5 Mb submicroscopic deletion encompassing the entire NF1 gene, is known to be responsible for approximately 5% of NF1 cases. Patients with NF1 deletion, compared to those with NF1 mutation tend to exhibit more severe phenotypes. To know the possible differences in oral/dental features between NF1 deletion and NF1 mutation patients, we examined four patients with NF1 deletion and three with NF1 mutation to compare their oral manifestations. Fused teeth in the mandibular anterior region were found only in the patients with deletion (2/4). Macrodontia was noted in all four patients with an NF1 deletion. Although macrodontia was also found in one patient with a mutation, it was relatively mild compared to the deletion patients. Dental caries were observed in both NF1 deletion (4/4) and mutation (2/3) patients. However, patients with NF1 deletions showed more apparently severe caries (average number of dental caries 12.8) than those with NF1 mutation (average number 5.5). Other features also noted in patients with both deletions and mutations were high-arched palate, hypodontia and malocclusion. Our study might suggest that fused teeth, macrodontia and increased dental caries are distinctive manifestations of NF1 deletion. Providing comprehensive dental care from early infancy would be very important to prevent dental caries especially in patients with NF1 deletion.

  1. 7p22.1 microdeletions involving ACTB associated with developmental delay, short stature, and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Narai, Satoshi; Togawa, Masami; Doumoto, Tomotsune; Sangu, Noriko; Vanakker, Olivier M; de Paepe, Anne; Edwards, Matthew; Whitehall, John; Brescianini, Sally; Petit, Florence; Andrieux, Joris; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    There are no published reports of patients harboring microdeletions involving the 7p22.1 region. Although 7p22.1 microdeletions are rare, some reports have shown microduplications encompassing this region. In this study, we report five patients with overlapping deletions of the 7p22.1 region. The patients exhibited clinical similarities including non-specific developmental delay, short stature, microcephaly, and other distinctive features. The shortest region of overlap within the 7p22.1 region includes five genes, FBXL18, ACTB, FSCN1, RNF216, and ZNF815P. Of these genes, only ACTB is known to be associated with an autosomal dominant trait. Dominant negative mutations in ACTB are responsible for Baraitser-Winter syndrome 1. We analyzed ACTB expression in immortalized lymphocytes derived from one of the patients and found that it was reduced to approximately half that observed in controls. This indicates that ACTB expression is linearly correlated with the gene copy number. We suggest that haploinsufficiency of ACTB may be responsible for the clinical features of patients with 7p22.1 microdeletions.

  2. Heterogeneous contribution of microdeletions in the development of common generalised and focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Palma, Eduardo; Helbig, Ingo; Klein, Karl Martin; Anttila, Verneri; Horn, Heiko; Reinthaler, Eva Maria; Gormley, Padhraig; Ganna, Andrea; Byrnes, Andrea; Pernhorst, Katharina; Toliat, Mohammad R; Saarentaus, Elmo; Howrigan, Daniel P; Hoffman, Per; Miquel, Juan Francisco; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Nürnberg, Peter; Lerche, Holger; Zimprich, Fritz; Neubauer, Bern A; Becker, Albert J; Rosenow, Felix; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Weber, Yvonne G; Lal, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Background Microdeletions are known to confer risk to epilepsy, particularly at genomic rearrangement ‘hotspot’ loci. However, microdeletion burden not overlapping these regions or within different epilepsy subtypes has not been ascertained. Objective To decipher the role of microdeletions outside hotspots loci and risk assessment by epilepsy subtype. Methods We assessed the burden, frequency and genomic content of rare, large microdeletions found in a previously published cohort of 1366 patients with genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) in addition to two sets of additional unpublished genome-wide microdeletions found in 281 patients with rolandic epilepsy (RE) and 807 patients with adult focal epilepsy (AFE), totalling 2454 cases. Microdeletions were assessed in a combined and subtype-specific approaches against 6746 controls. Results When hotspots are considered, we detected an enrichment of microdeletions in the combined epilepsy analysis (adjusted p=1.06×10−6,OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.35). Epilepsy subtype-specific analyses showed that hotspot microdeletions in the GGE subgroup contribute most of the overall signal (adjusted p=9.79×10−12, OR 7.45, 95% CI 4.20–13.5). Outside hotspots , microdeletions were enriched in the GGE cohort for neurodevelopmental genes (adjusted p=9.13×10−3,OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.62–4.94). No additional signal was observed for RE and AFE. Still, gene-content analysis identified known (NRXN1, RBFOX1 and PCDH7) and novel (LOC102723362) candidate genes across epilepsy subtypes that were not deleted in controls. Conclusions Our results show a heterogeneous effect of recurrent and non-recurrent microdeletions as part of the genetic architecture of GGE and a minor contribution in the aetiology of RE and AFE. PMID:28756411

  3. Heterogeneous contribution of microdeletions in the development of common generalised and focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Palma, Eduardo; Helbig, Ingo; Klein, Karl Martin; Anttila, Verneri; Horn, Heiko; Reinthaler, Eva Maria; Gormley, Padhraig; Ganna, Andrea; Byrnes, Andrea; Pernhorst, Katharina; Toliat, Mohammad R; Saarentaus, Elmo; Howrigan, Daniel P; Hoffman, Per; Miquel, Juan Francisco; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Nürnberg, Peter; Lerche, Holger; Zimprich, Fritz; Neubauer, Bern A; Becker, Albert J; Rosenow, Felix; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Weber, Yvonne G; Lal, Dennis

    2017-09-01

    Microdeletions are known to confer risk to epilepsy, particularly at genomic rearrangement 'hotspot' loci. However, microdeletion burden not overlapping these regions or within different epilepsy subtypes has not been ascertained. To decipher the role of microdeletions outside hotspots loci and risk assessment by epilepsy subtype. We assessed the burden, frequency and genomic content of rare, large microdeletions found in a previously published cohort of 1366 patients with genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) in addition to two sets of additional unpublished genome-wide microdeletions found in 281 patients with rolandic epilepsy (RE) and 807 patients with adult focal epilepsy (AFE), totalling 2454 cases. Microdeletions were assessed in a combined and subtype-specific approaches against 6746 controls. When hotspots are considered, we detected an enrichment of microdeletions in the combined epilepsy analysis (adjusted p=1.06×10(-6),OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.35). Epilepsy subtype-specific analyses showed that hotspot microdeletions in the GGE subgroup contribute most of the overall signal (adjusted p=9.79×10(-12), OR 7.45, 95% CI 4.20-13.5). Outside hotspots , microdeletions were enriched in the GGE cohort for neurodevelopmental genes (adjusted p=9.13×10(-3),OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.62-4.94). No additional signal was observed for RE and AFE. Still, gene-content analysis identified known (NRXN1, RBFOX1 and PCDH7) and novel (LOC102723362) candidate genes across epilepsy subtypes that were not deleted in controls. Our results show a heterogeneous effect of recurrent and non-recurrent microdeletions as part of the genetic architecture of GGE and a minor contribution in the aetiology of RE and AFE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. PTEN microdeletions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are caused by illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rui D; Sarmento, Leonor M; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Zuurbier, Linda; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G C A M; Póvoa, Vanda; Smits, Willem K; Abecasis, Miguel; Yunes, J Andres; Sonneveld, Edwin; Horstmann, Martin A; Pieters, Rob; Barata, João T; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2014-07-24

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-inactivating mutations and/or deletions are an independent risk factor for relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients treated on Dutch Childhood Oncology Group or German Cooperative Study Group for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia protocols. Some monoallelic mutated or PTEN wild-type patients lack PTEN protein, implying that additional PTEN inactivation mechanisms exist. We show that PTEN is inactivated by small deletions affecting a few exons in 8% of pediatric T-ALL patients. These microdeletions were clonal in 3% and subclonal in 5% of patients. Conserved deletion breakpoints are flanked by cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently have non-template-derived nucleotides inserted in between breakpoints, pointing to an illegitimate RAG recombination-driven activity. Identified cRSSs drive RAG-dependent recombination in a reporter system as efficiently as bona fide RSSs that flank gene segments of the T-cell receptor locus. Remarkably, equivalent microdeletions were detected in thymocytes of healthy individuals. Microdeletions strongly associate with the TALLMO subtype characterized by TAL1 or LMO2 rearrangements. Primary and secondary xenotransplantation of TAL1-rearranged leukemia allowed development of leukemic subclones with newly acquired PTEN microdeletions. Ongoing RAG activity may therefore actively contribute to the acquisition of preleukemic hits, clonal diversification, and disease progression. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Genetic and phenotypic dissection of 1q43q44 microdeletion syndrome and neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with mutations in ZBTB18 and HNRNPU.

    PubMed

    Depienne, Christel; Nava, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Heide, Solveig; Rastetter, Agnès; Passemard, Sandrine; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Agrawal, Pankaj B; VanNoy, Grace; Stoler, Joan M; Amor, David J; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Doummar, Diane; Alby, Caroline; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Garel, Catherine; Marzin, Pauline; Scheidecker, Sophie; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Hirsch, Edouard; Korff, Christian; Bottani, Armand; Faivre, Laurence; Verloes, Alain; Orzechowski, Christine; Burglen, Lydie; Leheup, Bruno; Roume, Joelle; Andrieux, Joris; Sheth, Frenny; Datar, Chaitanya; Parker, Michael J; Pasquier, Laurent; Odent, Sylvie; Naudion, Sophie; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Le Caignec, Cédric; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Renaldo, Florence; Stewart, Fiona; Toutain, Annick; Koehler, Udo; Häckl, Birgit; von Stülpnagel, Celina; Kluger, Gerhard; Møller, Rikke S; Pal, Deb; Jonson, Tord; Soller, Maria; Verbeek, Nienke E; van Haelst, Mieke M; de Kovel, Carolien; Koeleman, Bobby; Monroe, Glen; van Haaften, Gijs; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Boutaud, Lucile; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril

    2017-04-01

    Subtelomeric 1q43q44 microdeletions cause a syndrome associating intellectual disability, microcephaly, seizures and anomalies of the corpus callosum. Despite several previous studies assessing genotype-phenotype correlations, the contribution of genes located in this region to the specific features of this syndrome remains uncertain. Among those, three genes, AKT3, HNRNPU and ZBTB18 are highly expressed in the brain and point mutations in these genes have been recently identified in children with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. In this study, we report the clinical and molecular data from 17 patients with 1q43q44 microdeletions, four with ZBTB18 mutations and seven with HNRNPU mutations, and review additional data from 37 previously published patients with 1q43q44 microdeletions. We compare clinical data of patients with 1q43q44 microdeletions with those of patients with point mutations in HNRNPU and ZBTB18 to assess the contribution of each gene as well as the possibility of epistasis between genes. Our study demonstrates that AKT3 haploinsufficiency is the main driver for microcephaly, whereas HNRNPU alteration mostly drives epilepsy and determines the degree of intellectual disability. ZBTB18 deletions or mutations are associated with variable corpus callosum anomalies with an incomplete penetrance. ZBTB18 may also contribute to microcephaly and HNRNPU to thin corpus callosum, but with a lower penetrance. Co-deletion of contiguous genes has additive effects. Our results confirm and refine the complex genotype-phenotype correlations existing in the 1qter microdeletion syndrome and define more precisely the neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with genetic alterations of AKT3, ZBTB18 and HNRNPU in humans.

  6. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P.

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  7. Characteristics of 2p15-p16.1 microdeletion syndrome: Review and description of two additional patients.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-08-01

    Many new microdeletion syndromes have been characterized in the past decade, including 2p15-p16.1 microdeletion syndrome. More than 10 patients with this syndrome have been described. Recently, we encountered two additional patients with 2p15-p16.1 microdeletion syndrome. All patients showed variable degrees of intellectual disability, with the autistic features characteristic of this syndrome. Seven out of 16 patients (44%) showed structural abnormalities in the brain, which is also an important feature of this syndrome. The shortest region of microdeletion overlap among the patients includes two genes, USP34 and XPO1. Although these genes have some functional relevance to cancer, they have not been associated with neurological functions. Diagnosis of additional patients with 2p15-p16.1 microdeletion syndrome and identification of pathogenic mutations in this region will help identify the genes responsible for the neurological features of the syndrome. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  8. A novel microdeletion syndrome involving 5q14.3-q15: clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of three patients

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Hartmut; Wohlleber, Eva; Zink, Alexander; Hoyer, Juliane; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moog, Ute; Hellmann-Mersch, Birgit; Weber, Ruthild G; Willatt, Lionel; Kreiß-Nachtsheim, Martina; Firth, Helen V; Rauch, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping is being increasingly applied to delineate novel disease causing microaberrations and related syndromes in patients with mental retardation of unknown aetiology. We report on three unrelated patients with overlapping de novo interstitial microdeletions involving 5q14.3-q15. All three patients presented with severe psychomotor retardation, epilepsy or febrile seizures, muscular hypotonia and variable brain and minor anomalies. Molecular karyotyping revealed three overlapping microdeletions measuring 5.7, 3.9 and 3.6 Mb, respectively. The microdeletions were identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays (Affymetrix 100K and Illumina 550K) and array comparative genomic hybridization (1 Mb Sanger array-CGH). Confirmation and segregation studies were performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR. All three aberrations were confirmed and proven to have occurred de novo. The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the three patients were different, but an overlapping region of around 1.6 Mb in 5q14.3 was defined. It included five genes: CETN3, AC093510.2, POLR3G, LYSMD3 and the proximal part of GPR98/MASS1, a known epilepsy gene. Haploinsufficiency of GPR98/MASS1 is probably responsible for the seizure phenotype in our patients. At least one other gene contained in the commonly deleted region, LYSMD3, shows a high level of central nervous expression during embryogenesis and is also, therefore, a good candidate gene for other central nervous system (CNS) symptoms, such as psychomotor retardation, brain anomalies and muscular hypotonia of the 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19471318

  9. Proximal microdeletions and microduplications of 1q21.1 contribute to variable abnormal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Schaefer, G Bradley; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Ballif, Blake C; Klopocki, Eva; Mundlos, Stefan; Shaffer, Lisa G; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal band 1q21.1 can be divided into two distinct regions, proximal and distal, based on segmental duplications that mediate recurrent rearrangements. Microdeletions and microduplications of the distal region within 1q21.1, which are susceptibility factors for a variety of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, have been more extensively studied than proximal microdeletions and microduplications. Proximal microdeletions are known as a susceptibility factor for thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome, but it is unclear if these proximal microdeletions have other phenotypic consequences. Therefore, to elucidate the clinical significance of rearrangements of the proximal 1q21.1 region, we evaluated the phenotypes in patients identified with 1q21.1 rearrangements after referral for clinical microarray testing. We report clinical information for 55 probands with copy number variations (CNVs) involving proximal 1q21.1: 22 microdeletions and 20 reciprocal microduplications limited to proximal 1q21.1 and 13 microdeletions that include both the proximal and distal regions. Six individuals with proximal microdeletions have TAR syndrome. Three individuals with proximal microdeletions and two individuals with larger microdeletions of proximal and distal 1q21.1 have a ‘partial' TAR phenotype. Furthermore, one subject with TAR syndrome has a smaller, atypical deletion, narrowing the critical deletion region for the syndrome. Otherwise, phenotypic features varied among individuals with these microdeletions and microduplications. The recurrent, proximal 1q21.1 microduplications are enriched in our population undergoing genetic testing compared with control populations. Therefore, CNVs in proximal 1q21.1 can be a contributing factor for the development of abnormal phenotypes in some carriers. PMID:22317977

  10. Meiotic studies of infertile men in case of non-obstructive azoospermia with normal karyotype and no microdeleted Y-chromosome precise the clinical couple management.

    PubMed

    North, Marie-Odile; Lellei, Ilona; Erdei, Edit; Barbet, Jacques Patrick; Tritto, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    To identify meiotic criteria for infertility management in non-obstructive azoospermic men, a prospective and multicentric study was organized in Andrological Departments of Paris (France), Roma (Italy) and Budapest (Hungary). In 117 non-obstructive azoospermic men with normal karyotype and no Y-chromosome microdeletion, histology and meiotic studies on bilateral bipolar testicular biopsies were done. Histologically, 40 patients (34%) presented spermatocyte or spermatid arrest, 39 (33%) hypospermatogenesis whereas no meiotic cell could be observed in the remaining patients (33%). Cytogenetically, meiotic figures could only be obtained from the two first histological groups. Meiotic abnormalities were observed in a total of 44 patients (37.6%) including nine patients (7.7%) with severe class I and class IIB anomalies and 19 patients (16.2%) with class IIC environmentally linked meiotic abnormalities. These results provided essential clues for an accurate clinical management. For patients with no meiotic figures and patients with class I and class IIB anomalies, an hormonal stimulation is illusory and a sperm gift should be directly proposed. An hormonal stimulation should be proposed to all the other patients, either directly or following the treatment of the testicular microenvironment for the patients presenting class IIC anomalies. The genetic risk and possibility of prenatal chromosomal analysis in case of pregnancy should be clearly exposed to all the couples in all the cases where type IIA, III or IV anomalies are present. This therapeutical strategy has been applied to all the patients in our series.

  11. Screening of ‘Y’ chromosome microdeletions in Iranian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Malekasgar, Ali Mohammad; Mombaini, Hayat

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that microdeletions of Yq may account for a significant proportion of men with infertility. Three nonoverlapping regions, referred to as “azoospermia factors” (AZFa, b, c from proximal to distal Yq) have been defined as spermatogenesis loci and deletions in these regions have been shown to be pathogenically involved in male infertility associated with azoospermia or severe oligospermia. AIMS: Evaluation the frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions in Iranian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty infertile men were selected. Semen analysis was done and on the basis of the mean sperm count, all patients were categorized into azoospermia and oligozoospermia, groups. Blood samples were obtained for DNA extraction and chromosomal analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood lymphocytes and amplified by sequence tagged sites-polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR) method to determine the presence of microdeletions in AZF locus. A total of 34 STS primers including two controls were selected to identify microdeletions of Y chromosome on each subject. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: 26/50 cases (52%) showed deletion of at least one of the STS Marker. Totally 41 microdeletions was observed. A total of 17 cases (34%) had deletion in one STS. Four oligospermia cases (8%) had deletion in 2 STS site. Three azoospermia cases (6%) had again deletion in 2 STS site, but in different STSs. One case had three deletions in three STS site and finally one individual had seven deletions in AZF locus. The overall frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions observed in the present study was found to be 26/50 (52%). Comparison of our data with the result of other investigators world wide shows that the incidence of Yq microdeletions in Iranian population is much higher than international frequency. Our data agree with other studies regarding microdeletions of AZFc, but for microdeletions of AZFa (14.6%) our results is much higher and differ significantly with

  12. Cryptic microdeletion of the CREBBP gene from t(1;16) (p36.2;p13.3) as a novel genetic defect causing Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Ran; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Yae-Jean; Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and toes, and mental retardation. RTS is known to be caused by the disruption, either by point mutations or microdeletions, of the human CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) gene on 16p13.3. Gross rearrangements involving 16p13.3, such as translocations or inversions, have rarely been reported in RTS. A 3-month-old boy with a phenotype typical of RTS was referred for genetic diagnosis. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel reciprocal translocation: t(1;16)(p36.2;p13.3). Gene dosage analysis for the CREBBP gene was performed using multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and revealed heterozygous deletion of the whole CREBBP gene. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-array confirmed the deletion and also indicated large genomic deletions in both 1p36.2 and 16p13.3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of characterization of the genomic dosage imbalances in RTS by SNP-array.

  13. Clinical and Molecular Consequences of NF1 Microdeletion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    sequences from the shotgun ( Celera ) cloning of the human genome , which we expect to provide evidence to help us decide if a duplication is possible. In...Database. "* Analyze data for phenotype/genotype correlations and prognostic utility. "• Analyze the complete sequence of the NF1 microdeletion region for...new genes and paralogs. "• Perform comparative mapping of final human sequence with that of the mouse. "* Write manuscripts Progress on new and

  14. Genetic mapping of the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) locus on chromosome band 6p21 to include a microdeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, B.D.; Desnick, R.J.; Shevell, M.

    1995-08-28

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a generalized skeletal dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance. Recently, the CCD disease locus was localized to 23 and 17 cM regions of chromosome band 6p21 by linkage studies of seven affected families. Of note, the 23 cM region contained a microdeletion detected in one family at D6S459, an interval that was excluded in the 17 cM overlapping region. Here, linkage of CCD to 6p21 was independently confirmed with a maximal two-point LOD score of Z=5.12 with marker D6S452 at {theta}=0.00. Recombinant events in two affected individuals defined a CCD region of 7 cM from D6S465 to D6S282, which overlapped with the CCD region containing the microdeletion but did not overlap with the 17 cM critical region from D6S282 to D6S291. These results suggest the refined localization of the CCD region to 6 cM spanning markers D6S438 to D6S282, thereby reviving the possibility that the CCD gene lies within the microdeletion at D6S459. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities and y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men with varicocele and idiopathic infertility of South Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lakshmi; Babu, Arvind; Kanakavalli, Murthy; Padmalatha, Venkata; Singh, Amarpal; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Deenadayal, Mamata; Singh, Lalji

    2004-01-01

    Various factors cause spermatogenesis arrest in men and, in a large number of cases, the underlying reason still remains unknown. Little attention is paid to determining the genetic defects of varicocele-related infertility. The objective of our present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men of South Indian origin with varicocele and idiopathic infertility. Metaphase chromosomes of 251 infertile men with varicocele and unexplained infertility were analyzed using Giemsa-Trypsin-Giemsa (GTG) banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The microdeletions in 6 genes and 18 sequence-tagged-sites (STS) in the Yq region were screened using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Out of 251 infertile men, 57 (22.7%) men were with varicocele, of which 8.77% were azoospermic, 26.31% were severely oligozoospermic, 21.05% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 43.85% were oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT), and 194 (77.29%), with idiopathic infertility, of which 51% were azoospermic, 13.40% were severely oligozoospermic, 19.07% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 16.4% were with OAT. Genetic defects were observed in 38 (15.13%) infertile individuals, including 14 (24.56%) men with varicocele and 24 (12.37%) men with idiopathic infertility. The frequencies of chromosomal defects in varicocele and idiopathic infertility were 19.3% and 8.76%, respectively, whereas Y chromosome microdeletions were 5.26% and 3.60%, respectively. Overall rate of incidence of chromosomal anomalies and microdeletions in 251 infertile men were 11.5% and 3.98%, respectively, indicating a very significant higher association of genetic defects with varicocele than idiopathic male infertility. Our data also demonstrate that, among infertile men with varicocele, severely oligozoospermic and OAT men with varicocele have higher incidences of genetic defects than mildly oligozoospermic and azoospermic men.

  16. A 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 leads to NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiuhong; Luo, Huajie; Chai, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaowen; Sun, Lianhua; He, Longxia; Chen, Penghui; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions in chromosome 17q22, where the NOG gene resides, have been reported leading to the NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD), intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities. In this study we reported a dominant Chinese Han family segregating with typical NOG-SSD symptoms including proximal symphalangism, conductive hearing loss, amblyopia and strabismus, but not intellectual disability. Sanger sequencing identified no pathogenic mutation in the coding regions of candidate genes NOG, GDF5 and FGF9. SNP genotyping in the genomic region surrounding NOG identified loss of heterozygosity in the affected family members. By array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we identified and mapped the breakpoints of a novel 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 that included NOG and twelve other genes. It is the first microdeletion reported in chromosome 17q22 that is associated with NOG-SSD only but not with intellectual disability. Our results may help identifying the dosage sensitive genes for intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities in chromosome 17q22. Our study also suggested that genomic deletions in chromosome 17q22 should be screened in the NOG-SSD patients in which no pathogenic mutation is identified by conventional sequencing methods.

  17. Genetic effects of a 13q31.1 microdeletion detected by noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT).

    PubMed

    Jia, Yifang; Zhao, Heyong; Shi, Donghong; Peng, Wen; Xie, Luwen; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Fuman; Zhang, Hongyun; Wang, Xietong

    2014-01-01

    Microdeletions of chromosome 13q31.1 are relatively rare. These types of deletions may cause different genetic effects on genotypes and/or phenotypes. There are several ways to detect microdeletions; noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is the newest detection method. In this study, we aimed to investigate the genetic effects of a 13q31.1 microdeletion detected by NIPT and to reconfirm the feasibility of this procedure in predicting sub-chromosomal copy number variations (CNVs). The 13q31.1 microdeletion, which has previously been described as a disease-associated fragment, was detected by NIPT in a pregnant woman. To validate the finding and to explain the origin of this sub-chromosomal CNV, we collected fetal amniotic fluid and parental blood samples and tested the samples using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Karyotype analysis was performed on all of the samples to rule out balanced or mosaic anomalies. The aCGH results confirmed the NIPT findings. We detected the same type of microdeletion in the fetus and the mother via aCGH. The mother had a normal phenotype; therefore, in a post-test genetic counseling session, we predicted a normal phenotype for the fetus. After delivery, the normal phenotype of the newborn confirmed our prediction. Based on the present study, this 13q31.1 microdeletion may be considered as a chromosomal polymorphism. This study also reconfirmed the feasibility of obtaining a molecular karyotype of a fetus via NIPT.

  18. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  19. 3p22.1p21.31 microdeletion identifies CCK as Asperger syndrome candidate gene and shows the way for therapeutic strategies in chromosome imbalances.

    PubMed

    Iourov, Ivan Y; Vorsanova, Svetlana G; Voinova, Victoria Y; Yurov, Yuri B

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other autism spectrum disorders, chromosome abnormalities are rare in Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism. Consequently, AS was occasionally subjected to classical positional cloning. Here, we report on a case of AS associated with a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3. Further in silico analysis has identified a candidate gene for AS and has suggested a therapeutic strategy for manifestations of the chromosome rearrangement. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, an interstitial deletion of 3p22.1p21.31 (~2.5 Mb in size) in a child with Asperger's syndrome, seborrheic dermatitis and chronic pancreatitis was detected. Original bioinformatic approach to the prioritization of candidate genes/processes identified CCK (cholecystokinin) as a candidate gene for AS. In addition to processes associated with deleted genes, bioinformatic analysis of CCK gene interactome indicated that zinc deficiency might be a pathogenic mechanism in this case. This suggestion was supported by plasma zinc concentration measurements. The increase of zinc intake produced a rise in zinc plasma concentration and the improvement in the patient's condition. Our study supported previous linkage findings and had suggested a new candidate gene in AS. Moreover, bioinformatic analysis identified the pathogenic mechanism, which was used to propose a therapeutic strategy for manifestations of the deletion. The relative success of this strategy allows speculating that therapeutic or dietary normalization of metabolic processes altered by a chromosome imbalance or genomic copy number variations may be a way for treating at least a small proportion of cases of these presumably incurable genetic conditions.

  20. Recurrent 8q13.2-13.3 microdeletions associated with branchio-oto-renal syndrome are mediated by human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequence blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Jun; Mitchell, Elyse; Guo, Jin; Wang, Liwen; Zhang, Yu; Hodge, Jennelle C; Shen, Yiping

    2014-08-19

    Human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences are the remnants of ancient retroviral infection and comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The high abundance and interspersed nature of homologous HERV sequences make them ideal substrates for genomic rearrangements. A role for HERV sequences in mediating human disease-associated rearrangement has been reported but is likely currently underappreciated. In the present study, two independent de novo 8q13.2-13.3 microdeletion events were identified in patients with clinical features of Branchio-Oto-Renal (BOR) syndrome. Nucleotide-level mapping demonstrated the identical breakpoints, suggesting a recurrent microdeletion including multiple genes such as EYA1, SULF1, and SLCO5A1, which is mediated by HERV1 homologous sequences. These findings raise the potential that HERV sequences may more commonly underlie recombination of dosage sensitive regions associated with recurrent syndromes.

  1. Split Hand/Foot Malformation Associated with 7q21.3 Microdeletion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Srikanth, Ambika; Kulshreshtha, Pooja S.; Anuradha, Deenadayalu; Kadandale, Jayarama S.; Samuel, Chandra R.

    2016-01-01

    Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) or ectrodactyly is a rare genetic condition affecting limb development. SHFM shows clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It can present as an isolated form or in combination with additional anomalies affecting the long bones (nonsyndromic form) or other organ systems including the craniofacial, genitourinary and ectodermal structures (syndromic ectrodactyly). This study reports a girl with SHFM who also exhibited developmental delay, mild dysmorphic facial features and sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution banding analysis indicated an interstitial deletion within the 7q21 band. FISH using locus-specific BAC probes confirmed the microdeletion of 7q21.3. Chromosomal microarray analysis also revealed a microdeletion of 1.856 Mb in 7q21.3. However, a larger 8.44-Mb deletion involving bands 7q21.11q21.2 was observed, and the breakpoints were refined. The phenotype and the candidate genes underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder are discussed. PMID:27022330

  2. Xp22.3 microdeletion in a 19-year-old girl with clinical features of MLS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enright, F; Campbell, P; Stallings, R L; Hall, K; Green, A J; Sweeney, E; Barnes, L; Watson, R

    2003-01-01

    We describe a 19-year-old girl who has clinical features of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome caused by a microdeletion of Xp22.3. In addition to the classical ocular abnormalities and linear skin defects she has other features not previously described. She was previously reported in this journal in 1990 as poikiloderma congenitale, but her true diagnosis of an Xp22.3 microdeletion was clarified when fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that one of her X chromosomes had a microdeletion including the KAL gene. We describe this patient with an Xp22.3 microdeletion to heighten awareness among dermatologists of this syndrome and to underscore the difficulties in diagnosing MLS syndrome.

  3. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions for building the molecules that ... proteins. Parents pass their genes to their offspring. DNA is shaped like a corkscrew-twisted ladder, called ...

  4. Submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in idiopathic Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS): the SRS phenotype overlaps with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spengler, S; Schönherr, N; Binder, G; Wollmann, H A; Fricke-Otto, S; Mühlenberg, R; Denecke, B; Baudis, M; Eggermann, T

    2010-05-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction, body asymmetry, a relative macrocephaly, a characteristic triangular face and further dysmorphisms. In about 50% of patients, genetic/epigenetic alterations can be detected: >38% of patients show a hypomethylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting region in 11p15, whereas the additional 10% carry a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7. In single cases, cytogenetic aberrations can be detected. Nevertheless, there still remain 50% of SRS patients without known genetic/epigenetic alterations. To find out whether submicroscopic imbalances contribute to the aetiology of SRS, 20 idiopathic SRS patients were screened with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500 K array set. Apart from known apathogenic copy number variations, we identified one patient with a 12q14 microdeletion. The 12q14 microdeletion syndrome is characterised by dwarfism but it additionally includes mental retardation and osteopoikilosis. The deletion in our patient is smaller than those in the 12q14 microdeletion carriers but it also affects the LEMD3 and the HMGA2 genes. LEMD3 haploinsufficiency and point mutations have been previously associated with osteopoikilosis but radiographs of our patient at the age of 16 years did not reveal any hint for osteopoikilosis lesions. Haploinsufficiency of HMGA2 is probably responsible for aberrant growth in 12q14 microdeletion syndrome. However, in this study, a general role of HMGA2 mutations for SRS was excluded by sequencing of 20 idiopathic patients. In conclusion, our results exclude a common cryptic chromosomal imbalance in idiopathic SRS patients but show that chromosomal aberrations are relevant in this disease. Thus, molecular karyotyping is indicated in SRS and should be included in the diagnostic algorithm.

  5. Behavioral characteristics associated with 19p13.2 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Welham, Alice; Barth, Bursharan; Moss, Joanna; Penhallow, Jessica; Sheth, Krupa; Wilde, Lucy; Wynn, Sarah; Oliver, Chris

    2015-10-01

    A small number of recent papers have described individuals with intellectual disabilities and microdeletions in chromosome band 19p13.2. However, little is known about the behavioral characteristics of individuals with microdeletions in this area. The current study examines behavioral characteristics of a series of 10 participants ranging in age from 2 to 20 years with 19p13.2 microdeletions. Parents/caregivers completed a series of established behavioral measures which have aided the elucidation of the behavioral phenotypes of a number of genetic neurodevelopmental syndromes. All but the youngest two participants (aged 2 and 3 years) were verbal, ambulant, and classified as "partly able" or "able" with regard to self-help skills. Six of eight participants for whom a screening measure for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) could be deployed met criteria for an ASD. Six of the 10 participants had displayed self-injurious behavior in the month prior to assessment, eight had displayed destruction/disruption of property, and eight had shown physically aggressive behaviors. Repetitive behaviors were prevalent in the sample (with all participants displaying at least one repetitive behavior to a clinically relevant level), as were problems with sleep. Low mood was not prevalent in this group, and nor were overactivity or impulsivity. Full determination of a behavioral phenotype for this group would require a larger sample size, distinguishing between genetic subtypes. However, the current data suggest that ASD characteristics, repetitive, and challenging behaviors (such as aggression and self-injury) might be associated with 19p13.2 microdeletions, providing a basis for future investigation.

  6. A clinical case report and literature review of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Devin M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 15-year-old male with the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and summarize the medical literature. He had intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, obsessive compulsive tendencies, speech delay, delayed walking, a hypernasal voice, gait abnormalities, chronic constipation, gastroesophageal reflux disorder, urinary voiding dysfunction, abnormal skin pigmentation, and dysmorphic features. We present a review of the literature for the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome by comparing both the phenotype and the genetic defects in reported cases. Of the 38 previously reported cases with deletion size information, the most common chromosome deletion was 1.6 Mb in size including ~30 genes. This emerging microdeletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, speech delay, behavioral problems, craniofacial dysmorphism, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. PMID:25714563

  7. Genetic screening for chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in Chinese infertile men.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Xiong, Da-Ke; Ding, Xian-Ping; Li, Chuang; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Ding, Min; Nie, Shuang-Shuang; Quan, Qiang

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions and analyze their association with defective spermatogenesis in Chinese infertile men. This is a single center study. Karyotyping using G-banding and screening for Y chromosome microdeletion by multiplex polymerase chain reaction(PCR)were performed in 200 controls and 1,333 infertile men, including 945 patients with non-obstructive azoospermia and 388 patients with severe oligozoospermia. Out of 1,333 infertile patients, 154(11.55%) presented chromosomal abnormalities. Of these, 139 of 945 (14.71%) were from the azoospermic and 15 of 388 (3.87%) from the severe oligozoospermic patient groups. The incidence of sex chromosomal abnormalities in men with azoospermia was 11.53% compared with 1.03% in men with severe oligozoospermia (P < 0.01). Also 144 of 1,333(10.80%) patients presented Y chromosome microdeletions. The incidence of azoospermia factor(AZF) microdeletion was 11.75% and 8.51% in patients with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia respectively. Deletion of AZFc was the most common and deletions in AZFa or AZFab or AZFabc were found in azoospermic men. In addition, 34 patients had chromosomal abnormalities among the 144 patients with Y chromosome microdeletions. No chromosomal abnormality and microdeletion in AZF region were detected in controls. There was a high incidence (19.80%) of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. These findings strongly suggest that genetic screening should be advised to infertile men before starting assisted reproductive treatments.

  8. Y Choromosomal Microdeletion Screening in The Workup of Male Infertility and Its Current Status in India

    PubMed Central

    Suganthi, Ramaswamy; Vijesh, Vijayabhavanath Vijayakumaran; Vandana, Nambiar; Fathima Ali Benazir, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential stage in human male gamete development, which is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are centred in a specific region located on the long arm of the human Y chromosome known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF). Deletion events are common in Y chromosome because of its peculiar structural organization. Astonishingly, among the several known genetic causes of male infertility, Y chromosomal microdeletions emerged as the most frequent structural chromosome anomaly associated with the quantitative reduction of sperm. The development of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) like intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) helps to bypass the natural barriers of fertilization, but it increases the concern about the transmission of genetic defects. Experimental evidence suggested that the men with Y chromosomal microdeletions vertically transmitted their deletion as well as related fertility disorders to their offspring via these ART techniques. In India, infertility is on alarming rise. ART centres have opened up in virtually every state but still most of the infertility centres in India do not choose to perform Y chromosomal microdeletion diagnosis because of some advanced theoretical reasons. Moreover, there is no consensus among the clinicians about the diagnosis and management of Y chromosomal microdeletion defects. The current review discusses thoroughly the role of Y chromosome microdeletion screening in the workup of male infertility, its significance as a diagnostic test, novel approaches for screening Y deletions and finally a systematic review on the current status of Y chromosome microdeletion deletion screening in India. PMID:24520494

  9. De novo microdeletion of Xp11.3 exclusively encompassing the monoamine oxidase A and B genes in a male infant with episodic hypotonia: A genomics approach to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Ryan E.; Shih, Jean C.; Hyland, Keith; Kramer, Nancy; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A and B (MAOA and MAOB) play key roles in deaminating neurotransmitters and various other biogenic amines. Patients deficient in one or both enzymes have distinct metabolic and neurologic profiles. MAOB deficient patients exhibit normal clinical characteristics and behavior, while MAOA deficient patients have borderline intellectual deficiency and impaired impulse control. Patients who lack both MAOA and MAOB have the most extreme laboratory values (urine, blood, and CSF serotonin 4–6 times normal, with elevated O-methylated amine metabolites and reduced deaminated metabolites) in addition to severe intellectual deficiency and behavioral problems. Mice lacking maoa and moab exhibit decreased proliferation of neural stem cells beginning in late gestation and persisting into adulthood These mice show significantly increased monoamine levels, particularly serotonin, as well as anxiety-like behaviors as adults, suggesting that brain maturation in late embryonic development is adversely affected by elevated serotonin levels. We report the case of a male infant with a de novo Xp11.3 microdeletion exclusively encompassing the MAOA and MAOB genes. This newly recognized X-linked disorder is characterized by severe intellectual disability and unusual episodes of hypotonia, which resemble atonic seizures, but have no EEG correlate. A customized low dietary amine diet was implemented in an attempt to prevent the cardiovascular complications that can result from the excessive intake of these compounds. This is the second report of this deletion and the first attempt to maintain the patient’s cardiovascular health through dietary manipulation. Even though a diet low in tyramine, phenylethylamine, and dopa/dopamine is necessary for long-term management, it will not rescue the abnormal monoamine profile seen in combined MAOA and MAOB deficiency. Our patient displays markedly elevated levels of serotonin in blood, serum, urine, and CSF while on this diet

  10. 15q11.2 microdeletion (BP1-BP2) and developmental delay, behaviour issues, epilepsy and congenital heart disease: a series of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Clémence; Petit, Florence; Malan, Valérie; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Bouquillon, Sonia; Boute, Odile; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Delobel, Bruno; Duban, Bénédicte; Vallee, Louis; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Lemaitre, Marie-Pierre; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Pigeyre, Marie; Lanco-Dosen, Sandrine; Plessis, Ghislaine; Gerard, Marion; Decamp, Matthieu; Mathieu, Michèle; Morin, Gilles; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Bilan, Frédéric; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Fauvert, Delphine; Roume, Joëlle; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Caumes, Roseline; Puechberty, Jacques; Genevieve, David; Sarda, Pierre; Pinson, Lucie; Blanchet, Patricia; Lemeur, Nathalie; Sheth, Frenny; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Andrieux, Joris

    2015-03-01

    Proximal region of chromosome 15 long arm is rich in duplicons that, define five breakpoints (BP) for 15q rearrangements. 15q11.2 microdeletion between BP1 and BP2 has been previously associated with developmental delay and atypical psychological patterns. This region contains four highly-conserved and non-imprinted genes: NIPA1, NIPA2, CYFIP1, TUBGCP5. Our goal was to investigate the phenotypes associated with this microdeletion in a cohort of 52 patients. This copy number variation (CNV) was prevalent in 0.8% patients presenting with developmental delay, psychological pattern issues and/or multiple congenital malformations. This was studied by array-CGH at six different French Genetic laboratories. We collected data from 52 unrelated patients (including 3 foetuses) after excluding patients with an associated genetic alteration (known CNV, aneuploidy or known monogenic disease). Out of 52 patients, mild or moderate developmental delay was observed in 68.3%, 85.4% had speech impairment and 63.4% had psychological issues such as Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, Autistic Spectrum Disorder or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Seizures were noted in 18.7% patients and associated congenital heart disease in 17.3%. Parents were analysed for abnormalities in the region in 65.4% families. Amongst these families, 'de novo' microdeletions were observed in 18.8% and 81.2% were inherited from one of the parents. Incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity were observed amongst the patients. Our results support the hypothesis that 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) microdeletion is associated with developmental delay, abnormal behaviour, generalized epilepsy and congenital heart disease. The later feature has been rarely described. Incomplete penetrance and variability of expression demands further assessment and studies.

  11. Microdeletions are a general feature of adult and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Unexpected similarities with pediatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; MacDougall, Finlay; Stevens, Jane; Stasevich, Irina; Vrcelj, Nikoletta; Chaplin, Tracy; Lillington, Debra M.; Lister, T. Andrew; Young, Bryan D.

    2008-01-01

    We present here a genome-wide map of abnormalities found in diagnostic samples from 45 adults and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A 500K SNP array analysis uncovered frequent genetic abnormalities, with cryptic deletions constituting half of the detected changes, implying that microdeletions are a characteristic feature of this malignancy. Importantly, the pattern of deletions resembled that recently reported in pediatric ALL, suggesting that adult, adolescent, and childhood cases may be more similar on the genetic level than previously thought. Thus, 70% of the cases displayed deletion of one or more of the CDKN2A, PAX5, IKZF1, ETV6, RB1, and EBF1 genes. Furthermore, several genes not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of ALL were identified as possible recurrent targets of deletion. In total, the SNP array analysis identified 367 genetic abnormalities not corresponding to known copy number polymorphisms, with all but two cases (96%) displaying at least one cryptic change. The resolution level of this SNP array study is the highest used to date to investigate a malignant hematologic disorder. Our findings provide insights into the leukemogenic process and may be clinically important in adult and adolescent ALL. Most importantly, we report that microdeletions of key genes appear to be a common, characteristic feature of ALL that is shared among different clinical, morphological, and cytogenetic subgroups. PMID:18458336

  12. Clinical and prognostic importance of chromosomal abnormalities, Y chromosome microdeletions, and CFTR gene mutations in individuals with azoospermia or severe oligospermia.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Zeynep; Üyetüork, Uğur; Dinçer, Muhammet Murat

    2014-01-01

    To illustrate the importance of genetic screening in the assessment of fertility and the correct diagnosis in patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermia. This study examined 500 patients with reproductive failure, having fewer than 5 million sperm/mL detected in at least 2 consecutive spermiograms, who presented at a medical genetics polyclinic between 2008 and 2012. Metaphase preparations obtained from cell cultures were stained by trypsin-Giemsa banding. After DNA isolation, Y chromosome loci, including AZFa (SY84, SY86), AZFb (SY127, SY134), AZFc (SY254 SY255), and AZFd, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers. Thirty-five patients with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens or congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) and a positive cystic fibrosis family history were evaluated for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations. No chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 440 (88%) of the 500 patients, whereas structural or numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 60 patients (12%). Individuals with Y deletions made up 5.6% (n = 28) of the study sample. Three patients with no AZF deletion or chromosomal abnormality, but with CBAVD, were heterozygous for I148T, G1130A, or IVS3 406- 3T>C mutations. This study shows that genetic testing can make an important contribution to the treatment of patients planning in vitro fertilization due to azoospermia or severe oligospermia.

  13. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Persistent gating deficit and increased sensitivity to NMDA receptor antagonism after puberty in a new mouse model of the human 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: a study in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Didriksen, Michael; Fejgin, Kim; Nilsson, Simon R.O.; Birknow, Michelle R.; Grayton, Hannah M.; Larsen, Peter H.; Lauridsen, Jes B.; Nielsen, Vibeke; Celada, Pau; Santana, Noemi; Kallunki, Pekka; Christensen, Kenneth V.; Werge, Thomas M.; Stensbøl, Tine B.; Egebjerg, Jan; Gastambide, Francois; Artigas, Francesc; Bastlund, Jesper F.; Nielsen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Background The hemizygous 22q11.2 microdeletion is a common copy number variant in humans. The deletion confers high risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. Up to 41% of deletion carriers experience psychotic symptoms. Methods We present a new mouse model (Df(h22q11)/+) of the deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and report on, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive study undertaken to date in 22q11.2DS models. The study was conducted in male mice. Results We found elevated postpubertal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist–induced hyperlocomotion, age-independent prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits and increased acoustic startle response (ASR). The PPI deficit and increased ASR were resistant to antipsychotic treatment. The PPI deficit was not a consequence of impaired hearing measured by auditory brain stem responses. The Df(h22q11)/+ mice also displayed increased amplitude of loudness-dependent auditory evoked potentials. Prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatal elevations of the dopamine metabolite DOPAC and increased dorsal striatal expression of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 was found. The Df(h22q11)/+ mice did not deviate from wild-type mice in a wide range of other behavioural and biochemical assays. Limitations The 22q11.2 microdeletion has incomplete penetrance in humans, and the severity of disease depends on the complete genetic makeup in concert with environmental factors. In order to obtain more marked phenotypes reflecting the severe conditions related to 22q11.2DS it is suggested to expose the Df(h22q11)/+ mice to environmental stressors that may unmask latent psychopathology. Conclusion The Df(h22q11)/+ model will be a valuable tool for increasing our understanding of the etiology of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders associated with the 22q11DS. PMID:27391101

  15. Genetic aspects of human male infertility: the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in severe male factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Vicdan, Arzu; Vicdan, Kubilay; Günalp, Serdar; Kence, Aykut; Akarsu, Cem; Işik, Ahmet Zeki; Sözen, Eran

    2004-11-10

    The main purpose of this study is to detect the frequency and type of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in patients with severe male factor infertility and fertile control subjects. The association between the genetic abnormality and clinical parameters was also evaluated. This study was carried out in 208 infertile and 20 fertile men. Results of 208 patients, 119 had non-obstructive azoospermia and 89 had severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT). Seventeen out of 119 (14.3%) azoospermic patients and two out of 89 (2.2%) patients with OAT had Y chromosome microdeletions. In total, 19 cases with deletions were detected in 208 infertile men, with a frequency of 9.1%. The AZFc locus, mainly DAZ gene cluster was the most frequently deleted region. Five other cases with azoospermia (4.2%) and two cases with OAT (2.2%) had a chromosomal abnormality, with a total number of seven (3.4%). Including Y chromosome deletions and structural chromosome abnormalities, the rate of genetic abnormalities was 12.5% (26/208) in our patients. On the other hand, 20 men with proven fertility and fathers of five cases with microdeletions were genetically normal. Y chromosome deletions and chromosomal abnormalities were associated with various histological alterations in testis. Sertoli cell-only (SCO) syndrome and maturation arrest predominated in these cases, whereas hypospermatogenesis occurred more frequently in genetically normal patients. Various chromosomal abnormalities and deletions of Y chromosome can cause spermatogenic breakdown resulting in chromosomally derived infertility. All these findings strongly support the recommendation of genetic screening of infertile patients.

  16. The Identification of Microdeletion and Reciprocal Microduplication in 22q11.2 Using High-Resolution CMA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Ana Julia Cunha; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Cunha, Damiana Mirian da Cruz e; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome 22q11.2 region has long been implicated in genomic diseases. Some genomic regions exhibit numerous low copy repeats with high identity in which they provide increased genomic instability and mediate deletions and duplications in many disorders. DiGeorge Syndrome is the most common deletion syndrome and reciprocal duplications could be occurring in half of the frequency of microdeletions. We described five patients with phenotypic variability that carries deletions or reciprocal duplications at 22q11.2 detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had clinical indication to global developmental delay and a normal karyotype. We observed in our study three microdeletions and two microduplications in 22q11.2 region with variable intervals containing known genes and unstudied transcripts as well as the LCRs that are often flanking and within this genomic rearrangement. The identification of these variants is of particular interest because it may provide insight into genes or genomic regions that are crucial for specific phenotypic manifestations and are useful to assist in the quest for understanding the mechanisms subjacent to genomic deletions and duplications. PMID:27123452

  17. The Identification of Microdeletion and Reciprocal Microduplication in 22q11.2 Using High-Resolution CMA Technology.

    PubMed

    Leite, Ana Julia Cunha; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Cunha, Damiana Mirian da Cruz E; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome 22q11.2 region has long been implicated in genomic diseases. Some genomic regions exhibit numerous low copy repeats with high identity in which they provide increased genomic instability and mediate deletions and duplications in many disorders. DiGeorge Syndrome is the most common deletion syndrome and reciprocal duplications could be occurring in half of the frequency of microdeletions. We described five patients with phenotypic variability that carries deletions or reciprocal duplications at 22q11.2 detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had clinical indication to global developmental delay and a normal karyotype. We observed in our study three microdeletions and two microduplications in 22q11.2 region with variable intervals containing known genes and unstudied transcripts as well as the LCRs that are often flanking and within this genomic rearrangement. The identification of these variants is of particular interest because it may provide insight into genes or genomic regions that are crucial for specific phenotypic manifestations and are useful to assist in the quest for understanding the mechanisms subjacent to genomic deletions and duplications.

  18. 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome: further expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, F H; Morrison, N; Murray, R; Iremonger, J; Stephen, J; Maher, E; Tolmie, J; Jackson, A P

    2009-01-01

    Microdeletions of the 17q21.31 region are associated with hypotonia, oromotor dyspraxia, an apparently characteristic face, moderate learning disability and have an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 16,000. Here we report 3 individuals who extend further the phenotypic spectrum observed with microdeletions of the 17q21.31 region. They all have learning disability, hypotonia, and craniofacial dysmorphism in keeping with previous reported cases. One case has iris-choroid coloboma and partial situs inversus, 2 features that are newly recorded phenotype abnormalities. These deletions were detected from a cohort of 600 individuals with learning disability and congenital anomalies, reflecting that 17q21.31 microdeletions are a common finding in such cases. FISH analysis demonstrated that each of the deletions occurred as de novo events. The deleted region in our cases encompasses the previously defined critical region for 17q21.31, and includes CRHR1 and MAPT, putative candidate genes for the 17q21.31 phenotype. The 17q21.31 microdeletion phenotype is perhaps more variable than previously described despite haploinsufficiency for the same genes in many cases.

  19. 2q11.2 microdeletions: linking DNA structural variation to brain dysfunction and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Karayiorgou, Maria; Simon, Tony J.; Gogos, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies are beginning to paint a clear and consistent picture of the impairments in psychological and cognitive competencies that are associated with microdeletions in chromosome 22q11.2. These studies have highlighted a strong link between this genetic lesion and schizophrenia. Parallel studies in humans and animal models are starting to uncover the complex genetic and neural substrates altered by the microdeletion. In addition to offering a deeper understanding of the effects of this genetic lesion, these findings may guide analysis of other copy-number variants associated with cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. PMID:20485365

  20. Interstitial microdeletions including the chromosome band 4q13.2 and the UBA6 gene as possible causes of intellectual disability and behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Gomez-Lado, Carmen; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-12-01

    The few proximal 4q chromosomal aberrations identified in patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes that have been published to date are variable in type, size and breakpoints and, therefore, encompass different chromosome bands and genes, making the establishment of genotype-phenotype correlations a challenging task. Here, microarray-based copy number analysis allowed us the detection of two novel and partially overlapping deletions in two unrelated families. In Family 1, a 4q13.1-q13.2 deletion of 3.84 Mb was identified in a mother with mild intellectual disability and in her two children, both with mild intellectual disability and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In Family 2, a de novo 4q13.2-q13.3 deletion of 6.81 Mb was detected in a female patient, born to unaffected parents, with a diagnosis of mild intellectual disability, behavioral disorder and facial dysmorphism. The shortest region of overlap between these two aberrations is located at chromosome 4q13.2 and includes 17 genes amongst of which we suggest UBA6 (ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 6) as a strong candidate gene for these phenotypes.

  1. A twin sibling with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by type 2 microdeletion following assisted reproductive technology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HAN, JI YOON; PARK, JOONHONG; JANG, WOORI; CHAE, HYOJIN; KIM, MYUNGSHIN; KIM, YONGGOO

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral imprinting disorder, which arises due to an absence of paternally expressed genes within the 15q11.2-q13 region. This occurs via one of the three main genetic mechanisms, as follows: Deletion of the paternally inherited 15q11.2-q13 region, maternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defect. Recent studies have reported an association between imprinting disorders and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). The current study presents a 6-year-old female patient who is a dizygotic twin, in which one was born with de novo microdeletion at 15q11.2-q13.1 following in vitro fertilization. The patient had characteristic facial features including narrow bifrontal diameter, strabismus, downturned mouth, feeding problems and generalized hypotonia during infancy, developmental delay, mental retardation and rapid weight gain. Based upon phenotypic resemblance and the medical records, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridization analyses demonstrate type 2 microdeletion between breaking point 2 (BP2) and BP3, which occur from MKRN3 through HERC2 at 15q11.2-q13.1. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report a PWS case born following ART reported in South Korea. In addition to previous studies, the present study contributes to the consensus regarding genotype-phenotype comparisons in this respect. PMID:27330749

  2. Genetic Risk of Azoospermia Factor (AZF) Microdeletions in Idiopathic Cases of Azoospermia and Oligozoospermia in Central Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Ambulkar, Prafulla S.; Sigh, Ramji; Reddy, MVR; Varma, Poonam S.; Gupta, Dilip O.; Shende, Moreshwar R; Pal, Asoke K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genetic factors cause about 15% of male infertility. Azoospermia factors (AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc) present on Yq are most important for spermatogenesis. We have made an attempt to evaluate the frequencies of microdeletions of AZFa, AZFb, AZFc in idiopathic cases of azoospermia and oligozoospermia from central Indian population. Materials and Methods: We have analyzed a total of 156 subjects (95 oligozoospermia and 61 azoospermia) & 50 control subjects. DNA samples were analyzed for microdeletions of Y chromosome by PCR-screening of 18 sequences-tagged-site (STS) markers from different region of the AZF on Yq and SRY on Yp. Results: Out of 156 cases analyzed, 13 (8.33%) subjects (8 azoospermia and 5 oligozoospermia) showed partial deletion of AZF regions, of which deletion in AZFc region was the most common (84.6%) followed by AZFb (15.4%) and AZFa (15.4%). The sites and sizes of deletions varied among patients. Histological study of the testicular tissue of the available subjects, who showed microdeletions of Y chromosome, showed spermatogenic arrest at different stages. The frequency of Y chromosome microdeletion in our subjects was 8.33%. Conclusion: Some Indian studies reported low frequencies of microdeletions than that of our result. We suggest that the frequency of deletions may be affected by the involvement of different genetic factors, ethnic population and different geographical regions. PCR based Y chromosome screening for microdeletions will be useful and great help to infertility clinics for genetic counselling and assisted reproduction. PMID:24783090

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 15q24 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... 15q24 microdeletion have occurred in people with no history of the condition in their family. The chromosomal change likely occurs as a random event during the formation of reproductive cells (eggs or sperm) or in early fetal development. Related Information What does it mean ...

  4. Male infertility in China: laboratory finding for AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Xue; Fu, Chao; Yang, Ya-Ping; Han, Rong-Rong; Dong, Yuan; Dai, Ru-Lin; Liu, Rui-Zhi

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the frequencies of AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China. Moreover, to compare the prevalence of these abnormalities with other countries and regions in the world. 305 infertile men were enrolled. A complete semen analysis and reproductive hormones were measured according to standard methods. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using nine specific sequence-tagged sites (STS) were used to detect AZF microdeletions. Karyotype analyses were performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes with standard G-banding. Of the 305 infertile men, 28 (9.2%) had AZF microdeletions and 26 (8.5%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent microdeletions were in the AZFc+d, followed by AZFc, AZFb+c+d and AZFa. A total of 19 patients (82.6%) had Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY) in the azoospermic group. The freqencies of AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China were comparable with infertile men from other countries and regions. However, there was a slightly higher prevalence rate of AZF microdeletions in oligozoospermic patients than reported in previous studies.

  5. Triplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Optimization for AZF Y-chromosome Microdeletion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Tatiana Puga; Rojas, Xavier Blum; Narváez, Medardo Blum; Montanero, Edith López; Sarasti, Alexandra Narváez

    2015-05-01

    Y chromosome microdeletions at the "Azoospermia Factor" regions (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc) are the second genetic cause of spermatogenic failure in infertile men. Despite its importance for the treatment of infertile patients, no prior investigations have been previously published in Ecuador. . The purpose of this study is to optimize a molecular technique that allows detection of microdeletions in the AZF region. Using a genomic DNA of healthy male with natural conceived offsprings, a multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was standarized with eigth sequence-tagged site (STS) sY85, G34990, sY133, sY127, sY254, sY255, and using as internal control sex-determine region Y (SRY) and Ameologenin Y (AMELY). With this technique, 35 DNA samples taken from peripheral blood of patients with severe oligozoospermia were analyzed. A triplex qPCR was standardized using EvaGreen DNA-binding dye to obtain melting temperature (Tm) of the STS previously mentioned. Three of the patients evaluated were detected to have partial microdeletion in the AZFa region, with a frequency of 8.8%; being losses in the G34990 section (one patient) and sY85 section (two patients). No cases of microdeletions in other AZF regions were found. The triplex qPCR optimizated allows the identification of microdeletions in AZFa, AZFb and AZFc region in infertile men and a better clinical management of the patient's treatment decision. This first report for Ecuador reveled a higher prevalence of microdeletions in the AZFa region in comparison with those previously described in other populations.

  6. Haploinsufficiency of the 22q11.2 microdeletion gene Mrpl40 disrupts short-term synaptic plasticity and working memory through dysregulation of mitochondrial calcium

    PubMed Central

    Devaraju, P; Yu, J; Eddins, D; Mellado-Lagarde, M M; Earls, L R; Westmoreland, J J; Quarato, G; Green, D R; Zakharenko, S S

    2017-01-01

    Hemizygous deletion of a 1.5- to 3-megabase region on chromosome 22 causes 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), which constitutes one of the strongest genetic risks for schizophrenia. Mouse models of 22q11DS have abnormal short-term synaptic plasticity that contributes to working-memory deficiencies similar to those in schizophrenia. We screened mutant mice carrying hemizygous deletions of 22q11DS genes and identified haploinsufficiency of Mrpl40 (mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit protein 40) as a contributor to abnormal short-term potentiation (STP), a major form of short-term synaptic plasticity. Two-photon imaging of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator GCaMP6, expressed in presynaptic cytosol or mitochondria, showed that Mrpl40 haploinsufficiency deregulates STP via impaired calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial matrix through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This led to abnormally high cytosolic calcium transients in presynaptic terminals and deficient working memory but did not affect long-term spatial memory. Thus, we propose that mitochondrial calcium deregulation is a novel pathogenic mechanism of cognitive deficiencies in schizophrenia. PMID:27184122

  7. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with 1q44 microdeletion: causal or chance association.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rekha; Agarwal, Meenal; Boqqula, Vijay R; Phadke, Rajendra V; Phadke, Shubha R

    2014-01-01

    Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by childhood onset partial motor convulsions, hemiplegia, and epilepsy in sequence. Exact pathogenesis is not clear. Here we are describing a 3-year-old girl with HHE syndrome with cytogenetic microarray (CMA) showing deletion of 1.8 Mb in 1q44 region. Along with HHE syndrome, the patient also had global developmental delay, subtle facial dysmorphism, and preaxial polydactyly. Clinical phenotype of 1q44 microdeletion syndrome is quite variable. Main clinical features are microcephaly, seizures, and abnormality of corpus callosum. We compared the patient's phenotype with other patients in 10 previously published papers of 1q44 microdeletion syndrome. HNRNPU and FAM36A are two important genes in the deleted region. HNRNPU gene mediate long range control of SHH gene which is likely explanation of preaxial polydactyly in the present patient. HHE may be a chance co-occurrence. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Influence of Microdeletions and Microduplications of 16p11.2 on Global Transcription Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kusenda, Mary; Vacic, Vladimir; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Rodgers, Linda; Pavon, Kevin; Meth, Jennifer; Kumar, Ravinesh A.; Christian, Susan L.; Peeters, Hilde; Cho, Shawn S.; Addington, Anjene; Rapoport, Judith L.; Sebat, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) of a 600 kb region on 16p11.2 are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders and changes in brain volume. The authors hypothesize that abnormal brain development associated with this CNV can be attributed to changes in transcriptional regulation. The authors determined the effects of 16p11.2 dosage on gene expression by transcription profiling of lymphoblast cell lines derived from 6 microdeletion carriers, 15 microduplication carriers and 15 controls. Gene dosage had a significant influence on the transcript abundance of a majority (20/34) of genes within the CNV region. In addition, a limited number of genes were dysregulated in trans. Genes most strongly correlated with patient head circumference included SULT1A, KCTD13, and TMEM242. Given the modest effect of 16p11.2 copy number on global transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, larger studies utilizing neuronal cell types may be needed in order to elucidate the signaling pathways that influence brain development in this genetic disorder. PMID:26391891

  9. [22q11.2 microdeletion].

    PubMed

    Schneider, M; Eliez, S

    2010-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), most frequently caused by a de novo microdeletion on the long arm of chromosome 22, is one of the most common neurogenetic syndromes. The cognitive and behavioral characteristics associated with the 22q11.2 phenotype can be quite heterogeneous, part of the reason the syndrome is often detected very late, if at all. Though in individuals with more severe cardiac, respiratory, or speech and language problems, 22q11DS is more easily detected at a young age. The cognitive profile in 22q11DS varies between borderline IQ and mild mental retardation. Less than half children have mental retardation but a majority suffer from learning difficulties. It is also typically characterized by a verbal-visual dissociation, with verbal abilities higher than visuo-spatial and abstract reasoning. Psychiatric comorbidity is also frequent in 22q11DS, and the presence of psychotic symptoms in pre-adolescence may be unique to the syndrome. In older adolescents and young adults, social withdrawal often becomes more intense and can be an indicator of psychiatric disorder. Neuroimaging studies in 22q11DS indicate different patterns of structural alterations in affected children and adults that directly relate to cognitive impairments in the syndrome. For these reasons, we believe that treatment of persons affected by 22q11DS should include periodic evaluations and frequent clinical check-ups that integrate recommendations for medical, speech, psychiatric, and academic problems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Loss-of-function variants of SETD5 cause intellectual disability and the core phenotype of microdeletion 3p25.3 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Alma; Zink, Alexander M; Wieland, Thomas; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Cremer, Kirsten; Salviati, Leonardo; Magini, Pamela; Najafi, Kimia; Zweier, Christiane; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Aretz, Stefan; Endele, Sabine; Tamburrino, Federica; Pinato, Claudia; Clementi, Maurizio; Gundlach, Jasmin; Maylahn, Carina; Mazzanti, Laura; Wohlleber, Eva; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Kariminejad, Roxana; Schlessinger, Avner; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M; Novarino, Gaia; Engels, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) has an estimated prevalence of 2–3%. Due to its extreme heterogeneity, the genetic basis of ID remains elusive in many cases. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) studies revealed that a large proportion of sporadic cases are caused by de novo gene variants. To identify further genes involved in ID, we performed WES in 250 patients with unexplained ID and their unaffected parents and included exomes of 51 previously sequenced child–parents trios in the analysis. Exome analysis revealed de novo intragenic variants in SET domain-containing 5 (SETD5) in two patients. One patient carried a nonsense variant, and the other an 81 bp deletion located across a splice-donor site. Chromosomal microarray diagnostics further identified four de novo non-recurrent microdeletions encompassing SETD5. CRISPR/Cas9 mutation modelling of the two intragenic variants demonstrated nonsense-mediated decay of the resulting transcripts, pointing to a loss-of-function (LoF) and haploinsufficiency as the common disease-causing mechanism of intragenic SETD5 sequence variants and SETD5-containing microdeletions. In silico domain prediction of SETD5, a predicted SET domain-containing histone methyltransferase (HMT), substantiated the presence of a SET domain and identified a novel putative PHD domain, strengthening a functional link to well-known histone-modifying ID genes. All six patients presented with ID and certain facial dysmorphisms, suggesting that SETD5 sequence variants contribute substantially to the microdeletion 3p25.3 phenotype. The present report of two SETD5 LoF variants in 301 patients demonstrates a prevalence of 0.7% and thus SETD5 variants as a relatively frequent cause of ID. PMID:25138099

  11. Maternal riboflavin deficiency, resulting in transient neonatal-onset glutaric aciduria Type 2, is caused by a microdeletion in the riboflavin transporter gene GPR172B.

    PubMed

    Ho, Gladys; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Sim, Keow G; Carpenter, Kevin; Olsen, Rikke K J; Mitchell, John J; Rhead, William J; Peters, Gregory; Christodoulou, John

    2011-01-01

    Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, is a precursor to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) molecules, required in biological oxidation-reduction reactions. We previously reported a case of a newborn female who had clinical and biochemical features of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD), which was corrected by riboflavin supplementation. The mother was then found to be persistently riboflavin deficient, suggesting that a possible genetic defect in riboflavin transport in the mother was the cause of the transient MADD seen in the infant. Two recently-identified riboflavin transporters G protein-coupled receptor 172B (GPR172B or RFT1) and riboflavin transporter 2 (C20orf54 or RFT2) were screened for mutations. Two missense sequence variations, c.209A>G [p.Q70R] and c.886G>A [p.V296M] were found in GPR172B. In vitro functional studies of both missense variations showed that riboflavin transport was unaffected by these variations. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a de novo deletion in GPR172B spanning exons 2 and 3 in one allele from the mother. We postulate that haploinsufficiency of this riboflavin transporter causes mild riboflavin deficiency, and when coupled with nutritional riboflavin deficiency in pregnancy, resulted in the transient riboflavin-responsive disease seen in her newborn infant. This is the first report of a genetic defect in riboflavin transport in humans. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A New Case of 13q12.2q13.1 Microdeletion Syndrome Contributes to Phenotype Delineation

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Calcia, Alessandro; Savin, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    A recently described genetic disorder has been associated with 13q12.3 microdeletion spanning three genes, namely, KATNAL1, LINC00426, and HMGB1. Here, we report a new case with similar clinical features that we have followed from birth to 5 years old. The child carried a complex rearrangement with a double translocation: 46,XX,t(7;13)(p15;q14),t(11;15)(q23;q22). Array-CGH identified a de novo microdeletion at 13q12.2q13.1 spanning 3–3.4 Mb and overlapping 13q12.3 critical region. Clinical features resembling those reported in the literature confirm the existence of a distinct 13q12.3 microdeletion syndrome and provide further evidence that is useful to characterize its phenotypic expression during the 5 years of development. PMID:25506442

  13. Increased first-trimester nuchal translucency associated with a dicentric chromosome and 9q34.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lv-Yin; Yang, Yu; He, Ping; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2016-12-14

    We present prenatal diagnosis and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) of 9q34.3 microdeletion in a foetus with an increased nuchal translucency (NT). Conventional G-banding analysis showed a de novo translocation: 45, XX, dic (9;13)(q34;p13). CMA revealed a 3.6 Mb 9q34.3 microdeletion encompassing an OMIM gene of EHMT1 consistent with the diagnosis of Kleefstra syndrome and 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome. We suggest an application of CMA at prenatal diagnosis in pregnancies with increased NT and an apparent balanced translocation on conventional karyotype.

  14. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23.

    PubMed

    Brisset, Sophie; Slamova, Zuzana; Dusatkova, Petra; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Milcent, Karen; Metay, Corinne; Simandlova, Martina; Sumnik, Zdenek; Tosca, Lucie; Goossens, Michel; Labrune, Philippe; Zemankova, Elsa; Lebl, Jan; Tachdjian, Gerard; Sedlacek, Zdenek

    2014-02-28

    Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases.

  15. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. Results The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. Conclusions The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases. PMID:24581273

  16. Further clinical and molecular delineation of the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shur, Natasha; Slavotinek, Anne M; Cox, Victoria A; Hennekam, Raoul C; Firth, Helen V; Willatt, Lionel; Wheeler, Patricia; Morrow, Eric M; Cook, Joseph; Sullivan, Rachel; Oh, Albert; McDonald, Marie T; Zonana, Jonathan; Keller, Kory; Hannibal, Mark C; Ball, Susie; Kussmann, Jennifer; Gorski, Jerome; Zelewski, Susan; Banks, Valerie; Smith, Wendy; Smith, Rosemarie; Paull, Lindsay; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Amor, David J; Silva, Joao; Lamb, Allen; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is a rare genomic disorder characterised by intellectual disability, growth retardation, unusual facial morphology and other anomalies. To date, 20 patients have been reported; 18 have had detailed breakpoint analysis. Aim To further delineate the features of the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome, the clinical and molecular characterisation of fifteen patients with deletions in the 15q24 region was performed, nearly doubling the number of reported patients. Methods Breakpoints were characterised using a custom, high-density array comparative hybridisation platform, and detailed phenotype information was collected for each patient. Results Nine distinct deletions with different breakpoints ranging in size from 266 kb to 3.75 Mb were identified. The majority of breakpoints lie within segmental duplication (SD) blocks. Low sequence identity and large intervals of unique sequence between SD blocks likely contribute to the rarity of 15q24 deletions, which occur 8–10 times less frequently than 1q21 or 15q13 microdeletions in our series. Two small, atypical deletions were identified within the region that help delineate the critical region for the core phenotype in the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome. Conclusion The molecular characterisation of these patients suggests that the core cognitive features of the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome, including developmental delays and severe speech problems, are largely due to deletion of genes in a 1.1–Mb critical region. However, genes just distal to the critical region also play an important role in cognition and in the development of characteristic facial features associated with 15q24 deletions. Clearly, deletions in the 15q24 region are variable in size and extent. Knowledge of the breakpoints and size of deletion combined with the natural history and medical problems of our patients provide insights that will inform management guidelines. Based on common phenotypic features, all

  17. The Genetics of Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Corey T.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, including microdeletions and microduplications, have long been associated with abnormal developmental outcomes. Early discoveries relied on a common clinical presentation and the ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities by standard karyotype analysis or specific assays such as fluorescence in situ hybridization. Over the past decade, the development of novel genomic technologies has allowed more comprehensive, unbiased discovery of microdeletions and microduplications throughout the human genome. The ability to quickly interrogate large cohorts using chromosome microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing has led to the rapid discovery of novel microdeletions and microduplications associated with disease, including very rare but clinically significant rearrangements. In addition, the observation that some microdeletions are associated with risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our understanding of shared genetic susceptibility for such disorders. Here, we review current knowledge of microdeletion/duplication syndromes, with a particular focus on recurrent rearrangement syndromes. PMID:24773319

  18. The genetics of microdeletion and microduplication syndromes: an update.

    PubMed

    Watson, Corey T; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Sharp, Andrew J; Mefford, Heather C

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, including microdeletions and microduplications, have long been associated with abnormal developmental outcomes. Early discoveries relied on a common clinical presentation and the ability to detect chromosomal abnormalities by standard karyotype analysis or specific assays such as fluorescence in situ hybridization. Over the past decade, the development of novel genomic technologies has allowed more comprehensive, unbiased discovery of microdeletions and microduplications throughout the human genome. The ability to quickly interrogate large cohorts using chromosome microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing has led to the rapid discovery of novel microdeletions and microduplications associated with disease, including very rare but clinically significant rearrangements. In addition, the observation that some microdeletions are associated with risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders contributes to our understanding of shared genetic susceptibility for such disorders. Here, we review current knowledge of microdeletion/duplication syndromes, with a particular focus on recurrent rearrangement syndromes.

  19. Further Characterization of Microdeletion Syndrome Involving 2p15-p16.1

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Têmis Maria; Petrin, Aline Lourenço; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a patient presenting with cognitive delay, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, ptosis of eyelids, high and broad nasal root and camptodactyly. Analysis of a dense whole genome SNP array showed a de novo 3.35Mb deletion on 2p15-p16.1. In order to study the parental origin of the deletion we analyzed selected SNPs in the deleted area in the proband and her parents showing Mendelian incompatibilities suggesting a de novo deletion on the chromosome of paternal origin. Based on the five cases described previously in the literature, we have narrowed the critical region responsible for the 2p15-p16.1 microdeletion syndrome phenotype. The critical region does not include the VRK2 gene that had been speculated to have a role in cortical dysplasia. However, the association of the VRK2 gene with cortical dysplasia remains to be determined, as MRI imaging of the brain and gene content of the 2p15-16 deletion becomes established in more patients. PMID:20799320

  20. 14q12 Microdeletion syndrome and congenital variant of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Katzaki, Eleni; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Cohen, Monika; Pfundt, Rolph; Ariani, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Only two patients with 14q12 deletion have been reported to date. Here, we describe an additional patient with a similar deletion in order to improve the clinical delineation of this new microdeletion syndrome. The emerging phenotype is characterized by a Rett-like clinical course with an almost normal development during the first months of life followed by a period of regression. A peculiar facial phenotype is also present and it is characterized by mild dysmorphisms such as downslanting palpebral fissures, bilateral epicanthic folds, depressed nasal bridge, bulbous nasal tip, tented upper lip, everted lower lip and large ears. The relationship between this microdeletion syndrome and the congenital variant of Rett syndrome due to point mutations in one of the genes included in the deleted region, FOXG1, is discussed.

  1. A patient with a de novo distal 22q11.2 microdeletion and anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Willem; Egger, Jos; Brunner, Han; de Leeuw, Nicole

    2011-02-01

    We report on a young female with normal intelligence evaluated for long-term anxiety. Her history includes prematurity, neonatal feeding problems, surgical correction of congenital heart defects, recurrent upper airway and urinary tract infections, and delayed motor and developmental milestones. Physical examination disclosed small stature and minor dysmorphisms. Chromosome analysis, 22q11.2 FISH analysis, and subtelomeric MLPA testing did not detect any abnormalities. Genome wide SNP Array analysis showed a de novo deletion in 22q11.21q11.22, the so-called distal 22q11 microdeletion that involves the MAPK1 gene. A diagnosis of panic disorder was made and the patient was successfully treated with a daily dose of 20 mg citalopram. To our knowledge, this is the first adolescent patient with a long history of complaints about anxiety and a distal 22q11 microdeletion. We speculate that genes from the deleted region, especially MAPK1, increase the neurobiological susceptibility to anxiety disorders that may be a part of the psychopathological phenotype of the distal 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. An additional patient with 3q27.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Bottillo, Irene; Laino, Luigi; Morlino, Silvia; Grammatico, Barbara; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    The 3q27.3 microdeletion syndrome has been recently delineated in 7 subjects from 5 families sharing a 1.4 Mb smallest region of overlap. This condition appears recognizable by the association of Marfanoid habitus, mild but distinctive facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, psychosis, and mood disorder. Here, we describe an additional 17-year-old man with an ~7.7-Mb deletion encompassing the 3q27.3 microdeletion critical region, previously run undetected at standard karyotyping. The constellation of major clinical findings overlaps with those reported in the 7 previously published patients and thus confirms the existence of a strongly recognizable syndrome linked to imbalance of 3q27.3. The role of AHSG and, possibly, of other genes in determining the 3q27.3 microdeletion habitus is discussed by comparison of the deleted segments. The involvement of adjacent loci and genes, such as OPA1 and GP5, may contribute in this patient to novel satellite features, such as optic atrophy and subclinical coagulopathy.

  3. A 15q13.3 microdeletion segregating with autism

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Wing, Kirsty; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha JL; Bölte, Sven; Schmötzer, Gabriele; Duketis, Eftichia; Poustka, Fritz; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Annemarie; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2009-01-01

    Autism and mental retardation (MR) show high rates of comorbidity and potentially share genetic risk factors. In this study, a rare ∼2 Mb microdeletion involving chromosome band 15q13.3 was detected in a multiplex autism family. This genomic loss lies between distal break points of the Prader–Willi/Angelman syndrome locus and was first described in association with MR and epilepsy. Together with recent studies that have also implicated this genomic imbalance in schizophrenia, our data indicate that this CNV shows considerable phenotypic variability. Further studies should aim to characterise the precise phenotypic range of this CNV and may lead to the discovery of genetic or environmental modifiers. PMID:19050728

  4. A novel microdeletion syndrome at 9q21.13 characterised by mental retardation, speech delay, epilepsy and characteristic facial features.

    PubMed

    Boudry-Labis, Elise; Demeer, Bénédicte; Le Caignec, Cédric; Isidor, Bertrand; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Plessis, Ghislaine; George, Alice M; Taylor, Juliet; Aftimos, Salim; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Annerén, Göran; Firth, Helen; Simonic, Ingrid; Vermeesch, Joris; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Copin, Henri; Love, Donald R; Andrieux, Joris

    2013-03-01

    The increased use of array-CGH and SNP-arrays for genetic diagnosis has led to the identification of new microdeletion/microduplication syndromes and enabled genotype-phenotype correlations to be made. In this study, nine patients with 9q21 deletions were investigated and compared with four previously Decipher reported patients. Genotype-phenotype comparisons of 13 patients revealed several common major characteristics including significant developmental delay, epilepsy, neuro-behavioural disorders and recognizable facial features including hypertelorism, feature-less philtrum, and a thin upper lip. The molecular investigation identified deletions with different breakpoints and of variable lengths, but the 750 kb smallest overlapping deleted region includes four genes. Among these genes, RORB is a strong candidate for a neurological phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of 9q21 microdeletions and our observations strongly suggest that these deletions are responsible for a new genetic syndrome characterised by mental retardation with speech delay, epilepsy, autistic behaviour and moderate facial dysmorphy.

  5. Functional EGFR germline polymorphisms may confer risk for EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer, with a predominant effect on exon 19 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanqing; He, Lijun; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Kanteti, Rajani; Wang, Yi-Ching; Salgia, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain play a critical role in the development and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong genetic influence on susceptibility to these mutations has been suggested. To identify the genetic factors conferring risk for the EGFR TK mutations in NSCLC, a case-control study was conducted in 141 Taiwanese NSCLC patients by focusing on three functional polymorphisms in the EGFR gene [-216G/T, intron 1(CA)n and R497K]. Allelic imbalance (AI) of the EGFR -216G/T polymorphism was also tested in the heterozygous patients as well as in the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to further verify its function. We found that the frequencies of the alleles -216T and CA-19 are significantly higher in the patients with any mutation (p=0.032 and 0.01, respectively), in particular in those with exon 19 microdeletions (p=0.006 and 0.033, respectively), but not in the patients with L858R mutation. The -216T allele is favored to be amplified in both tumor DNA of lung cancer patients and cancer cell lines. We conclude that the local haplotype structures across the EGFR gene may favor the development of cellular malignancies and thus significantly confer risk to the occurrence of EGFR mutations in NSCLC, particularly the exon 19 microdeletions. PMID:21292812

  6. Microdeletions involving chromosomes 12 and 22 associated with syndromic Duane retraction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Kondkar, Altaf A; Oystreck, Darren T; Khan, Arif O; Bosley, Thomas M

    2014-09-01

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is the most common of the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs). CCDDs can be monogenic or chromosomal in origin. Identification of the genetic cause(s) in patients and families with DRS facilitates definitive diagnosis and provides insights into these developmental errors. This study described a young girl with DRS on the left and several additional developmental abnormalities. Clinical examination including neuroimaging, sequencing of candidate genes associated with DRS, and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) were performed. The proband had unilateral DRS type 3 on the left with somewhat low-set ears, mild motor delay with normal intelligence, and an asymmetric neck without a palpable right sternocleidomastoid muscle. Spine X-rays revealed a Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) and an MRI showed a webbed neck. She also had spina bifida at C8-T1 and a submucosal cleft palate. The parents of the proband were related with no other family member affected similarly. Sequencing of SALL4, CHN1, HOXA1, and TUBB3 did not show any mutation. Array CGH revealed de novo deletions of 21 Kb on chromosome 12q24.31 and 11 Kb on chromosome 22q13.31, each encompassing only one gene, ring finger protein 34, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (RNF34) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA) respectively. This patient presents an unusual phenotype associated with a unique combination of two chromosomal microdeletions.

  7. The 15q11.2 BP1–BP2 Microdeletion Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Devin M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the 15q11.2 BP1–BP2 microdeletion can present with developmental and language delay, neurobehavioral disturbances and psychiatric problems. Autism, seizures, schizophrenia and mild dysmorphic features are less commonly seen. The 15q11.2 BP1–BP2 microdeletion involving four genes (i.e., TUBGCP5, CYFIP1, NIPA1, NIPA2) is emerging as a recognized syndrome with a prevalence ranging from 0.57%–1.27% of patients presenting for microarray analysis which is a two to four fold increase compared with controls. Review of clinical features from about 200 individuals were grouped into five categories and included developmental (73%) and speech (67%) delays; dysmorphic ears (46%) and palatal anomalies (46%); writing (60%) and reading (57%) difficulties, memory problems (60%) and verbal IQ scores ≤75 (50%); general behavioral problems, unspecified (55%) and abnormal brain imaging (43%). Other clinical features noted but not considered as common were seizures/epilepsy (26%), autism spectrum disorder (27%), attention deficit disorder (ADD)/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (35%), schizophrenia/paranoid psychosis (20%) and motor delay (42%). Not all individuals with the deletion are clinically affected, yet the collection of findings appear to share biological pathways and presumed genetic mechanisms. Neuropsychiatric and behavior disturbances and mild dysmorphic features are associated with genomic imbalances of the 15q11.2 BP1–BP2 region, including microdeletions, but with an apparent incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. PMID:25689425

  8. The MEF2C-Related and 5q14.3q15 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zweier, M.; Rauch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Disorders related to the autosomal transcription factor MEF2C located in 5q14.3 were first described in 2009 and have since evolved to one of the more common microdeletion syndromes. Mutational screening in a larger cohort revealed heterozygous de novo mutations of MEF2C in about 1% of patients with moderate to severe intellectual disability, and the phenotype is similar in patients with intragenic deletions and multigenic microdeletions. Clinically, MEF2C-related disorders are characterized by severe intellectual disability with absent speech and limited walking abilities, hypotonia, seizures, and a variety of minor brain anomalies. The majority of patients show a similar facial gestalt with broad forehead, flat nasal bridge, hypotonic mouth, and small chin, as well as strabismus, but this phenotype is clinically not well recognized. The course of the disease is generally quite uniform, but patients with point mutations and smaller deletions seem to have a higher chance of walking skills and a lower risk of refractory seizures. Patients in whom the microdeletion also includes the RASA1 gene show features of the respective capillary and arterio-venous malformations and fistula syndrome. The phenotypic overlap with Rett syndrome is explained by a shared pathway and, accordingly, diminished MECP2 and CDKL5 expression is measureable in patients with MEF2C defects. Further research of this pathway may therefore eventually lead to a common therapeutic target. PMID:22670137

  9. Further delineation of the 15q13 microdeletion and duplication syndromes: A clinical spectrum varying from non-pathogenic to a severe outcome

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, B.W.M.; Mefford, H.C.; Menten, B.; Koolen, D. A.; Sharp, A. J.; Nillesen, W.M.; Innis, J.W.; de Ravel, T.J.L.; Mercer, C.L.; Fichera, M.; Stewart, H.; Connell, L. E.; Õunap, K.; Lachlan, K.; Castle, B.; Van der Aa, N.; van Ravenswaaij, C.; Nobrega, M.A.; Serra-Juhé, C; Simonic, I.; de Leeuw, N.; Pfundt, R.; Bongers, E.M.; Baker, C.; Finnemore, P.; Huang, S.; Maloney, V.K.; Crolla, J.A.; van Kalmthout, M.; Elia, M.; Vandeweyer, G.; Fryns, J.P.; Janssens, S.; Foulds, N.; Reitano, S.; Smith, K.; Parkel, S.; Loeys, B.; Woods, C.G.; Oostra, A.; Speleman, F.; Pereira, A.C.; Kurg, A.; Willatt, L.; Knight, S.J.L.; Vermeesch, J.R.; Romano, C.; Barber, J.C.; Mortier, G.; Pérez-Jurado, L.A.; Kooy, F.; Brunner, H.G.; Eichler, E.E.; Kleefstra, T.; de Vries, B.B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recurrent 15q13.3 microdeletions were recently identified with identical proximal (BP4) and distal (BP5) breakpoints and associated with mild to moderate mental retardation and epilepsy. Methods To further assess the clinical implications of this novel 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome, eighteen new probands with a deletion were molecularly and clinically characterised. In addition, we evaluated the characteristics of a family with a more proximal deletion between BP3 and BP4. Finally, four patients with a duplication in the BP3-BP4-BP5 region were included in this study to ascertain the clinical significance of duplications in this region. Results The 15q13.3 microdeletion in our series was associated with a highly variable intra- and inter-familial phenotype. At least 11 of the 18 deletions identified were inherited. Moreover, 7 of 10 siblings from four different families also had this deletion: one had a mild developmental delay, four had only learning problems during childhood, but functioned well in daily life as adults, whereas the other two had no learning problems at all. In contrast to previous findings, seizures were not a common feature in our series (only 2 of 17 living probands). Three patients with deletions had cardiac defects and deletion of the KLF13 gene, located in the critical region, may contribute to these abnormalities. The limited data from the single family with the more proximal BP3-BP4 deletion suggest this deletion may have little clinical significance. Patients with duplications of the BP3-BP4-BP5 region did not share a recognizable phenotype, but psychiatric disease was noted in 2 of 4 patients. Conclusions Overall, our findings broaden the phenotypic spectrum associated with 15q13.3 deletions and suggest that, in some individuals, deletion of 15q13.3 is not sufficient to cause disease. The existence of microdeletion syndromes, associated with an unpredictable and variable phenotypic outcome, will pose the clinician with

  10. The 8q22.1 microdeletion syndrome or Nablus mask-like facial syndrome: report on two patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Werner, Marion; Dagan, Judith; Abeliovich, Devorah; Lerer, Israela

    2009-01-01

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMFLS) is a rare microdeletion syndrome with a mask-like facial appearance as the most characteristic feature. In 2000, Teebi, was the first to report on a 4 years old boy affected with NMFLS. Since then two additional patients have been reported. Three years later, with the development of the array CGH technology, Shieh et al., elucidated the etiology of NMFLS by showing that the two patients studied share a approximately 4 Mb microdeletion in the long arm of chromosome 8 (q21.3-q22.1). Here we report on two NMFLS patients among which the first patient described by Teebi in 2000, and present newly described clinical findings including the common happy behaviour of the children. Array CGH analysis of these two patients permitted to reveal a deletion in the same region, 8q21.3-q22.1. Combining the available literature and our data, we were able to narrow the common deleted region to 2.78 Mb (93.56-96.34 Mb) in 8q22.1. Direct relations between the clinical findings with (one of) the genes in the critical region have to await further studies on NFMLS patients with overlapping or smaller deletions.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: 3q29 microdeletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... social interaction and communication), anxiety, bipolar disorder , and schizophrenia . Infants with 3q29 microdeletion syndrome often have feeding ... Bipolar Disorder Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Schizophrenia Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 15q13.3 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... microdeletion syndrome Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosomal Conditions Educational Resources (7 links) 15q13.3 Research Project Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Intellectual Disability ( ...

  13. Molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 in a large cohort of patients with trigonocephaly.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Johnson, D; Alonso, L G; Cavalcanti, D P; de Sá Moreira, E; Alberto, F L; Kok, F; Kim, C; Wall, S A; Jabs, E W; Boyadjiev, S A; Wilkie, A O M; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2005-06-01

    Trigonocephaly is a rare form of craniosynostosis characterized by the premature closure of the metopic suture. To contribute to a better understanding of the genetic basis of metopic synostosis and in an attempt to restrict the candidate regions related to metopic suture fusion, we studied 76 unrelated patients with syndromic and non-syndromic trigonocephaly. We found a larger proportion of syndromic cases in our population and the ratio of affected male to female was 1.8 : 1 and 5 : 1 in the non-syndromic and syndromic groups, respectively. A microdeletion screening at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 was carried out for all patients and deletions in seven of them were detected, corresponding to 19.4% of all syndromic cases. Deletions were not found in non-syndromic patients. We suggest that a molecular screening for microdeletions at 9p22-p24 and 11q23-q24 should be offered to all syndromic cases with an apparently normal karyotype because it can potentially elucidate the cause of trigonocephaly in this subset of patients. We also suggest that genes on the X-chromosome play a major role in syndromic trigonocephaly.

  14. A microdeletion encompassing PHF21A in an individual with global developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Vogt, Julie; Reali, Lisa; Kong, Il-Keun; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2015-12-01

    In Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS), the full phenotypic spectrum is manifested when deletions are at least 2.1 Mb in size at 11p11.2. The PSS-associated genes EXT2 and ALX4, together with PHF21A, all map to this region flanked by markers D11S1393 and D11S1319. Being proximal to EXT2 and ALX4, a 1.1 Mb region containing 12 annotated genes had been identified by deletion mapping to explain PSS phenotypes except multiple exostoses and parietal foramina. Here, we report a male patient with partial PSS phenotypes including global developmental delay, craniofacial anomalies, minor limb anomalies, and micropenis. Using microarray, qPCR, RT-qPCR, and Western blot analyses, we refined the candidate gene region, which harbors five genes, by excluding two genes, SLC35C1 and CRY2, which resulted in a corroborating role of PHF21A in developmental delay and craniofacial anomalies. This microdeletion contains the least number of genes at 11p11.2 reported to date. Additionally, we also discuss the phenotypes observed in our patient with respect to those of published cases of microdeletions across the Potocki-Shaffer interval.

  15. Clinical report of a 17q12 microdeletion with additionally unreported clinical features.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Gandomi, Stephanie K; Parra, Melissa; Lu, Ira; Gau, Chia-Ling; Dasouki, Majed; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations involving the 17q12 region have been associated with developmental and speech delay, autism, aggression, self-injury, biting and hitting, oppositional defiance, inappropriate language, and auditory hallucinations. We present a tall-appearing 17-year-old boy with marfanoid habitus, hypermobile joints, mild scoliosis, pectus deformity, widely spaced nipples, pes cavus, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and psychiatric manifestations including physical and verbal aggression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and oppositional defiance. An echocardiogram showed borderline increased aortic root size. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a small pancreas, mild splenomegaly with a 1.3 cm accessory splenule, and normal kidneys and liver. A testing panel for Marfan, aneurysm, and related disorders was negative. Subsequently, a 400 K array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) + SNP analysis was performed which identified a de novo suspected pathogenic deletion on chromosome 17q12 encompassing 28 genes. Despite the limited number of cases described in the literature with 17q12 rearrangements, our proband's phenotypic features both overlap and expand on previously reported cases. Since syndrome-specific DNA sequencing studies failed to provide an explanation for this patient's unusual habitus, we postulate that this case represents an expansion of the 17q12 microdeletion phenotype. Further analysis of the deleted interval is recommended for new genotype-phenotype correlations.

  16. A de novo microdeletion of SEMA5A in a boy with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Gueneau, Lucie; Huguet, Guillaume; Goldenberg, Alice; Henry, Céline; Gigot, Nadège; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Falace, Antonio; Duplomb, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien; Duffourd, Yannis; St-Onge, Judith; Chambon, Pascal; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Callier, Patrick; Marle, Nathalie; Payet, Muriel; Ragon, Clemence; Goubran Botros, Hany; Buratti, Julien; Calderari, Sophie; Dumas, Guillaume; Delorme, Richard; Lagarde, Nathalie; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Rosier, Antoine; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Cardoso, Carlos; Mugneret, Francine; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Campion, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted and membrane-associated proteins necessary for wiring of the brain. Semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) acts as a bifunctional guidance cue, exerting both attractive and inhibitory effects on developing axons. Previous studies have suggested that SEMA5A could be a susceptibility gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We first identified a de novo translocation t(5;22)(p15.3;q11.21) in a patient with ASD and intellectual disability (ID). At the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 5, we observed a 861-kb deletion encompassing the end of the SEMA5A gene. We delineated the breakpoint by NGS and observed that no gene was disrupted on chromosome 22. We then used Sanger sequencing to search for deleterious variants affecting SEMA5A in 142 patients with ASD. We also identified two independent heterozygous variants located in a conserved functional domain of the protein. Both variants were maternally inherited and predicted as deleterious. Our genetic screens identified the first case of a de novo SEMA5A microdeletion in a patient with ASD and ID. Although our study alone cannot formally associate SEMA5A with susceptibility to ASD, it provides additional evidence that Semaphorin dysfunction could lead to ASD and ID. Further studies on Semaphorins are warranted to better understand the role of this family of genes in susceptibility to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. A de novo microdeletion of SEMA5A in a boy with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Gueneau, Lucie; Huguet, Guillaume; Goldenberg, Alice; Henry, Céline; Gigot, Nadège; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Falace, Antonio; Duplomb, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien; Duffourd, Yannis; ST-Onge, Judith; Chambon, Pascal; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Callier, Patrick; Marle, Nathalie; Payet, Muriel; Ragon, Clemence; Goubran Botros, Hany; Buratti, Julien; Calderari, Sophie; Dumas, Guillaume; Delorme, Richard; Lagarde, Nathalie; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Rosier, Antoine; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Cardoso, Carlos; Mugneret, Francine; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Campion, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted and membrane-associated proteins necessary for wiring of the brain. Semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) acts as a bifunctional guidance cue, exerting both attractive and inhibitory effects on developing axons. Previous studies have suggested that SEMA5A could be a susceptibility gene for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We first identified a de novo translocation t(5;22)(p15.3;q11.21) in a patient with ASD and intellectual disability (ID). At the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 5, we observed a 861-kb deletion encompassing the end of the SEMA5A gene. We delineated the breakpoint by NGS and observed that no gene was disrupted on chromosome 22. We then used Sanger sequencing to search for deleterious variants affecting SEMA5A in 142 patients with ASD. We also identified two independent heterozygous variants located in a conserved functional domain of the protein. Both variants were maternally inherited and predicted as deleterious. Our genetic screens identified the first case of a de novo SEMA5A microdeletion in a patient with ASD and ID. Although our study alone cannot formally associate SEMA5A with susceptibility to ASD, it provides additional evidence that Semaphorin dysfunction could lead to ASD and ID. Further studies on Semaphorins are warranted to better understand the role of this family of genes in susceptibility to neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26395558

  18. Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Naasse, Yassine; Charoute, Hicham; El Houate, Brahim; Elbekkay, Chadli; Razoki, Lunda; Malki, Abderrahim; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2015-09-18

    Male infertility is responsible for 50% of infertile couples. Thirty percent of male infertility is due to cytogenetic and genetic abnormalities. In Arab and North African populations, several studies have shown the association of these chromosomal abnormalities with male infertility. Our objective is to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men from Morocco. A total of 573 Moroccan infertile men (444 azoospermic and 129 oligozoospermic men) referred for cytogenetic analysis to the Department of Cytogenetics of the Pasteur Institute of Morocco, were screened for the presence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities accounted for approximately 10.5% (60/573). Fifty six cases among them have sex chromosome abnormalities (93.34%), including Klinefelter's syndrome in 41 patients (68.34%). Autosomal chromosome abnormalities (6.66%) were observed in 4 patients. Chromosomal abnormalities were more prevalent in azoospermic men (13.06%) than in oligospermic men (1.55%). Y microdeletions were detected in 16 of 85 patients (AZFc: 14.12%, AZFbc: 4.70%), most of them where azoospermic men with no chromosomal abnormality. These results highlighted the need for efficient molecular genetic testing in male infertility diagnosis. In addition, a genetic screening should be performed in infertile men before starting assisted reproductive treatments.

  19. Expanding the scope of noninvasive prenatal testing: detection of fetal microdeletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wapner, Ronald J; Babiarz, Joshua E; Levy, Brynn; Stosic, Melissa; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Wayham, Nicholas; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Lacroute, Phil; Hu, Jing; Hall, Megan P; Demko, Zachary; Siddiqui, Asim; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Gross, Susan J; Hill, Matthew; Benn, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the performance of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based noninvasive prenatal test for 5 microdeletion syndromes. Four hundred sixty-nine samples (358 plasma samples from pregnant women, 111 artificial plasma mixtures) were amplified with the use of a massively multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and analyzed with the use of the Next-generation Aneuploidy Test Using SNPs algorithm for the presence or absence of deletions of 22q11.2, 1p36, distal 5p, and the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Detection rates were 97.8% for a 22q11.2 deletion (45/46) and 100% for Prader-Willi (15/15), Angelman (21/21), 1p36 deletion (1/1), and cri-du-chat syndromes (24/24). False-positive rates were 0.76% for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (3/397) and 0.24% for cri-du-chat syndrome (1/419). No false positives occurred for Prader-Willi (0/428), Angelman (0/442), or 1p36 deletion syndromes (0/422). SNP-based noninvasive prenatal microdeletion screening is highly accurate. Because clinically relevant microdeletions and duplications occur in >1% of pregnancies, regardless of maternal age, noninvasive screening for the general pregnant population should be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    van Bon, Bregje W M; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Moloney, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert B A

    2010-02-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith-Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems.

  1. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Mariano; Thomas, Sumi; Kamath, Mohan S.; Ramalingam, Ramya; Kongari, Ann Marie; Yuvarani, S; Srivastava, Vivi M.; George, Korula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml) attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5%) men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9%) men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133) of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133). Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87). Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:27803587

  2. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Mariano; Thomas, Sumi; Kamath, Mohan S; Ramalingam, Ramya; Kongari, Ann Marie; Yuvarani, S; Srivastava, Vivi M; George, Korula

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml) attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5%) men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9%) men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133) of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133). Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87). Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  3. Clinical and molecular delineation of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koolen, D A; Sharp, A J; Hurst, J A; Firth, H V; Knight, S J L; Goldenberg, A; Saugier-Veber, P; Pfundt, R; Vissers, L E L M; Destrée, A; Grisart, B; Rooms, L; Aa, N Van der; Field, M; Hackett, A; Bell, K; Nowaczyk, M J M; Mancini, G M S; Poddighe, P J; Schwartz, C E; Rossi, E; De Gregori, M; Antonacci-Fulton, L L; McLellan, M D; Garrett, J M; Wiechert, M A; Miner, T L; Crosby, S; Ciccone, R; Willatt, L; Rauch, A; Zenker, M; Aradhya, S; Manning, M A; Strom, T M; Wagenstaller, J; Krepischi-Santos, A C; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Rosenberg, C; Price, S M; Stewart, H; Shaw-Smith, C; Brunner, H G; Wilkie, A O M; Veltman, J A; Zuffardi, O; Eichler, E E; de Vries, B B A

    2011-01-01

    Background The chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a novel genomic disorder that has originally been identified using high resolution genome analyses in patients with unexplained mental retardation. Aim We report the molecular and/or clinical characterisation of 22 individuals with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. Results We estimate the prevalence of the syndrome to be 1 in 16 000 and show that it is highly underdiagnosed. Extensive clinical examination reveals that developmental delay, hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms including a long face, a tubular or pear-shaped nose and a bulbous nasal tip, and a friendly/amiable behaviour are the most characteristic features. Other clinically important features include epilepsy, heart defects and kidney/urologic anomalies. Using high resolution oligonucleotide arrays we narrow the 17q21.31 critical region to a 424 kb genomic segment (chr17: 41046729–41470954, hg17) encompassing at least six genes, among which is the gene encoding microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT). Mutation screening of MAPT in 122 individuals with a phenotype suggestive of 17q21.31 deletion carriers, but who do not carry the recurrent deletion, failed to identify any disease associated variants. In five deletion carriers we identify a <500 bp rearrangement hotspot at the proximal breakpoint contained within an L2 LINE motif and show that in every case examined the parent originating the deletion carries a common 900 kb 17q21.31 inversion polymorphism, indicating that this inversion is a necessary factor for deletion to occur (p<10–5). Conclusion Our data establish the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome as a clinically and molecularly well recognisable genomic disorder. PMID:18628315

  4. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Nguyen, D.; Greenberg, F.

    1994-09-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous gene deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date no protein encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, Campbell described the cloning and characterization of D. melanogaster fli cDNAs and of homologous cDNAs from caenorhabditis elegans and from humans. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. The amino acid sequence deduced from the FLI cDNA has 52% similarity to the human gelsolin protein and also has a N-terminal leucine-rich domain with 16 consecutive leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines form 12 SMS patients demonstrate that one copy of the FLI gene is deleted in all SMS patients analyzed with the common deletion. Further studies are required to determine if haploinsufficiency of FLI or other as yet unidentified genes is important for the expression of the SMS phenotype.

  5. 2q23.1 microdeletion identified by array comparative genomic hybridisation: an emerging phenotype with Angelman-like features?

    PubMed

    Jaillard, S; Dubourg, C; Gérard-Blanluet, M; Delahaye, A; Pasquier, L; Dupont, C; Henry, C; Tabet, A-C; Lucas, J; Aboura, A; David, V; Benzacken, B; Odent, S; Pipiras, E

    2009-12-01

    Genome-wide screening of patients with mental retardation using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) has identified several novel imbalances. With this genotype-first approach, the 2q22.3q23.3 deletion was recently described as a novel microdeletion syndrome. The authors report two unrelated patients with a de novo interstitial deletion mapping in this genomic region and presenting similar "pseudo-Angelman" phenotypes, including severe psychomotor retardation, speech impairment, epilepsy, microcephaly, ataxia, and behavioural disabilities. The microdeletions were identified by array CGH using oligonucleotide and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays, and further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the two patients were different but an overlapping region of about 250 kb was defined, which mapped to 2q23.1 and included two genes: MBD5 and EPC2. The SIP1 gene associated with the Mowat-Wilson syndrome was not included in the deleted genomic region. Haploinsufficiency of one of the deleted genes (MBD5 or EPC2) could be responsible for the common clinical features observed in the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, and this hypothesis needs further investigation.

  6. 2q23.1 microdeletion identified by array comparative genomic hybridisation: an emerging phenotype with Angelman-like features?

    PubMed Central

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Dubourg, Christèle; Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Delahaye, Andrée; Pasquier, Laurent; Dupont, Céline; Henry, Catherine; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Lucas, Josette; Aboura, Azzedine; David, Véronique; Benzacken, Brigitte; Odent, Sylvie; Pipiras, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome-wide screening of patients with mental retardation using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) has identified several novel imbalances. With this genotype-first approach, the 2q22.3q23.3 deletion was recently described as a novel microdeletion syndrome. We report two unrelated patients with a de novo interstitial deletion mapping in this genomic region and presenting similar “pseudo-Angelman” phenotypes, including severe psychomotor retardation, speech impairment, epilepsy, microcephaly, ataxia and behavioural disabilities. Methods The microdeletions were identified by array-CGH using oligonucleotide and BAC-arrays, and further confirmed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and semi-quantitative PCR. Results The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the two patients were different but an overlapping region of about 250 kb was defined, which mapped to 2q23.1 and included two genes: MBD5 and EPC2. The SIP1 gene associated with the Mowat Wilson syndrome was not included in the deleted genomic region. Discussion Haploinsufficiency of one of the deleted genes (MBD5 or EPC2) could be responsible for the common clinical features observed in the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and this hypothesis needs further investigation. PMID:18812405

  7. Ring chromosome 18 in combination with 18q12.1 (DTNA) interstitial microdeletion in a patient with multiple congenital defects.

    PubMed

    Zlotina, Anna; Nikulina, Tatiana; Yany, Natalia; Moiseeva, Olga; Pervunina, Tatiana; Grekhov, Eugeny; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Ring chromosome 18 [r(18)] syndrome represents a relatively rare condition with a complex clinical picture including multiple congenital dysmorphia and varying degrees of mental retardation. The condition is cytogenetically characterized by a complete or mosaic form of ring chromosome 18, with ring formation being usually accompanied by the partial loss of both chromosomal arms. Here we observed a 20-year-old male patient who along with the features typical for r(18) carriers additionally manifested a severe congenital subaortic stenosis. To define the genetic basis of such a compound phenotype, standard cytogenetic and high-resolution molecular-cytogenetic analysis of the patient was performed. Standard chromosome analysis of cultured lymphocytes confirmed 46, XY, r(18) karyotype. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) allowed to define precisely the breakpoints of 18p and 18q terminal deletions, thus identifying the hemizygosity extent, and to reveal an additional duplication adjoining the breakpoint of the 18p deletion. Apart from the terminal imbalances, we found an interstitial microdeletion of 442 kb in size (18q12.1) that encompassed DTNA gene encoding α-dystrobrevin, a member of dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex. While limited data on the role of DTNA missense mutations in pathogenesis of human cardiac abnormalities exist, a microdeletion corresponding to whole DTNA sequence and not involving other genes has not been earlier described. A detailed molecular-cytogenetic characterization of the patient with multiple congenital abnormalities enabled to unravel a combination of genetic defects, namely, a ring chromosome 18 with terminal imbalances and DTNA whole-gene deletion. We suggest that such combination could contribute to the complex phenotype. The findings obtained allow to extend the knowledge of the role of DTNA haploinsufficiency in congenital heart malformation, though further comprehensive functional studies are

  8. Identification of a de novo microdeletion 1q44 in a patient with hypogenesis of the corpus callosum, seizures and microcephaly - A case report.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Dominik S; Andres, Stephanie; Beitzel, Kirsten I; Makowski, Christine; Meitinger, Thomas; Hoefele, Julia

    2017-03-21

    Microdeletion 1q44 on the long arm of chromosome 1 leads to a phenotype that includes microcephaly, seizure, agenesis or hypogenesis of the corpus callosum, polydactyly, congenital heart defects and severe developmental delay along with characteristic facial dysmorphic signs. Until today, the distinct genetic causes for the different symptoms remain unclear. We here report a 1.2Mb de novo microdeletion 1q44 identified by performing a SNP array analysis. The female patient presented with microcephaly, seizure, hypogenesis of corpus callosum, postaxial hexadactyly, an atrial septal defect, a ventricular septal defect, hypertelorism, a long and smooth philtrum, thin vermilion borders, and micrognathia, all common features of microdeletion 1q44. An additionally performed chromosome analysis excluded any chromosomal rearrangements. The deleted region included the genes ZBTB18 as well as HNRNPU amongst others. Both are possibly candidate genes for the dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. AKT3, another candidate gene, was not affected by the deletion in this patient. Thus, the genetic findings in this case report spotlight ZBTB18 and HNRNPU in the genesis of the typical microdeletion 1q44 symptoms, especially concerning the dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, and therefore could help to unveil more of the genetic background of this syndrome.

  9. Complex Phenotype Associated with 17q21.31 Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Dornelles-Wawruk, H.; Pic-Taylor, A.; Rosenberg, C.; Krepischi, A.C.V.; Safatle, H.P.N.; Ferrari, I.; Mazzeu, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a patient carrying a 17q21.31 microdeletion and exhibiting many common syndrome features, together with other clinical signs which have rarely or never been described to date. The detected 695-kb 17q21.31 deletion is larger than in most previously reported cases but is still probably the result of recombination between flanking low-copy repeats. Due to the complexity of the patient's clinical condition, together with the presence of 3 previously unreported symptoms, namely chronic anemia, cervical vertebrae arthrosis and vertebrae fusion, this case is an important addition to the existing knowledge about the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:24167466

  10. 3q29 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Willatt, Lionel; Cox, James; Barber, John; Cabanas, Elisabet Dachs; Collins, Amanda; Donnai, Dian; FitzPatrick, David R; Maher, Eddy; Martin, Howard; Parnau, Josep; Pindar, Lesley; Ramsay, Jacqueline; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Sistermans, Erik A; Tettenborn, Michael; Trump, Dorothy; de Vries, Bert B A; Walker, Kate; Raymond, F Lucy

    2005-07-01

    We report the identification of six patients with 3q29 microdeletion syndrome. The clinical phenotype is variable despite an almost identical deletion size. The phenotype includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, with only slightly dysmorphic facial features that are similar in most patients: a long and narrow face, short philtrum, and high nasal bridge. Autism, gait ataxia, chest-wall deformity, and long and tapering fingers were noted in at least two of six patients. Additional features--including microcephaly, cleft lip and palate, horseshoe kidney and hypospadias, ligamentous laxity, recurrent middle ear infections, and abnormal pigmentation--were observed, but each feature was only found once, in a single patient. The microdeletion is approximately 1.5 Mb in length, with molecular boundaries mapping within the same or adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones at either end of the deletion in all patients. The deletion encompasses 22 genes, including PAK2 and DLG1, which are autosomal homologues of two known X-linked mental retardation genes, PAK3 and DLG3. The presence of two nearly identical low-copy repeat sequences in BAC clones on each side of the deletion breakpoint suggests that nonallelic homologous recombination is the likely mechanism of disease causation in this syndrome.

  11. De novo 15q13.3 microdeletion with cryptogenic West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Elodie; Gruchy, Nicolas; Penniello-Valette, Marie-José; Plessis, Ghislaine; Richard, Nicolas; Decamp, Mathieu; Mittre, Hervé; Leporrier, Nathalie; Andrieux, Joris; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Gerard, Marion

    2013-10-01

    West syndrome is a well-recognized form of epilepsy, defined by a triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia and developmental arrest. West syndrome is heterogenous, caused by mutations of genes ARX, STXBP1, KCNT1 among others; 16p13.11 and 17q21.31 microdeletions are less frequent, usually associated with intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. So-called "idiopathic" West syndrome is of better prognostic, without prior intellectual deficiency and usually responsive to anti-epileptic treatment. We report on a boy falling within the scope of idiopathic West syndrome, with no dysmorphic features and normal development before the beginning of West syndrome, with a good resolution after treatment, bearing a de novo 15q13.3 microdeletion. Six genes are located in the deleted region, including CHRNA7, which encodes a subunit of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and is frequently associated with epilepsy. Exploration of the 15q13.3 region should be proposed in idiopathic West syndrome.

  12. A prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal anomaly with mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balci, S; Altugan, F S; Alehan, D; Aypar, E; Baltaci, V

    2009-01-01

    A prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal anomaly with mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion/DiGeorge syndrome: We report a prenatally sonographically diagnosed conotruncal and urogenital anomaly. Postnatally, the patient presented with seizures, hypocalcemia, hypoparathyroidism and thymic aplasia and diagnosed as DiGeorge syndrome. Echocardiography showed malalignment VSD, supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and overriding aorta. Chromosome and FISH studies showed the association of mosaic type trisomy 21 and 22q11.2 microdeletion. The present patient is the second case of mosaic type of Down syndrome associated with 22q11.2 microdeletion. In addition the patient also had clinical and laboratory features of DiGeorge syndrome.

  13. [Familial presentation of microdeletion and inverted microduplication with array-CGH].

    PubMed

    Beseler-Soto, Beatriz; Jiménez-Candel, M Isabel; Pedrón-Marzal, Gema; Pérez-García, Begoña; Carpena-Lucas, Pedro J

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. Over the years the field of genetics has advanced significantly. Following the polymerase chain reaction and mass sequencing techniques, the array-CGH technique (comparative genomic hybridization) has helped to improve genetic procedures. A resolution of up to 200 kb is currently being accomplished in the human genome. CASE REPORTS. We report the case of two sisters with delays in developmental milestones and a characteristic phenotype with normal results from initial studies of the karyotype and subtelomeric regions. Array-CGH was later used to detect a deletion and duplication that were different in each of the sisters, this being the result of a balanced paternal translocation. In the two cases, despite being the result of the same translocation, the genetic and phenotype expression were different. CONCLUSIONS. The precision achieved by means of array-CGH is making it possible to establish a correlation between minimum gains or losses of the genome and the clinical features. Chromosome 3 codes for genes that play a fundamental role in neurological development (contactins, neurotransmitter modulator proteins, etc.) and chromosome 10 codes for proteins involved in apoptosis and proteins regulating transcription. In the literature there have been reports of chromosome 3 deletion syndrome and monosomy 10. Likewise, there are also descriptions of rearrangements between these chromosomes in individuals from the same family. Nevertheless, we describe two cases of a family with a micro-deletion and an inverted microduplication, detected by means of array-CGH, that have not been reported to date. This technique can provide a diagnostic and prognostic approximation as regards development and offer genetic counselling.

  14. 6q22.1 microdeletion and susceptibility to pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Graham, Brett H; Wilfong, Angus A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Ferreira, Jose A; Upton, Sheila J; Moeschler, John B; Bi, Weimin; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Wai Cheung, Sau; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lalani, Seema R

    2015-02-01

    Genomic copy-number variations (CNVs) constitute an important cause of epilepsies and other human neurological disorders. Recent advancement of technologies integrating genome-wide CNV mapping and sequencing is rapidly expanding the molecular field of pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders. In a previous study, a novel epilepsy locus was identified on 6q16.3q22.31 by linkage analysis in a large pedigree. Subsequent array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analysis of four unrelated cases narrowed this region to ∼5 Mb on 6q22.1q22.31. We sought to further narrow the critical region on chromosome 6q22. Array CGH analysis was used in genome-wide screen for CNVs of a large cohort of patients with neurological abnormalities. Long-range PCR and DNA sequencing were applied to precisely map chromosomal deletion breakpoints. Finally, real-time qPCR was used to estimate relative expression in the brain of the candidate genes. We identified six unrelated patients with overlapping microdeletions within 6q22.1q22.31 region, three of whom manifested seizures. Deletions were found to be de novo in 5/6 cases, including all subjects presenting with seizures. We sequenced the deletion breakpoints in four patients and narrowed the critical region to a ∼250-kb segment at 6q22.1 that includes NUS1, several expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that are highly expressed in the brain, and putative regulatory sequences of SLC35F1. Our findings indicate that dosage alteration in particular, of NUS1, EST AI858607, or SLC35F1 are important contributors to the neurodevelopmental phenotype associated with 6q22 deletion, including epilepsy and tremors.

  15. Screening for Y-chromosome microdeletions in a population of infertile males in the Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    Shaqalaih, Ashraf J.; Abu Halima, Masood S.; Ashour, Mohammed J.; Sharif, Fadel A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility is an extraordinary public health problem in the Arab world, as it affects about 15% of couples seeking children. The male partner is responsible for infertility in approximately half of these cases. Classic microdeletions of the Y-chromosome involving the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions are known to be associated with spermatogenic impairment, and non-obstructive azoospermia must be differentiated on the basis of endocrine evaluation and testicular biopsy. Partial AZFc deletions remain controversial because there is no clear agreement regarding their role in spermatogenic failure. In the current study, 50 fertile males (controls) and 125 patients with primary idiopathic male infertility were studied in order to describe the frequency of Y-chromosome mirodeletions among male infertility patients in the Gaza Strip-Palestine area. No Y chromosome classical microdeletions could be detected in any of the 125 infertile men, suggesting that ethnic factors, genetic background, and Y chromosome haplogroups are key factors in such deletions. On the other hand, six gr/gr and one b1/b3 AZFc partial deletions were detected in the infertile population. The gr/gr deletion was also noted in relatives of four of the six patients with this deletion, and in one of the fertile controls. In conclusion, our study shows that the incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in our population is rare; these data suggest that other genetic, epigenetic, nutritional and/or local factors are responsible for impairments in semen parameters observed in this Gazan population. We further hypothesise that the gr/gr deletion is not associated with male infertility, at least in this sub-group. PMID:20485582

  16. Birth seasonality in Korean Prader-Willi syndrome with chromosome 15 microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aram; Lee, Yeon Hee; Nam, Soon Young; Jeong, Yu Ju; Kyung, Yechan; Huh, Rimm; Lee, Jieun; Kwun, Younghee; Cho, Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a well-known genetic disorder, and microdeletion on chromosome 15 is the most common causal mechanism. Several previous studies have suggested that various environmental factors might be related to the pathogenesis of microdeletion in PWS. In this study, we investigated birth seasonality in Korean PWS. Methods A total of 211 PWS patients born from 1980 to 2014 were diagnosed by methylation polymerase chain reaction at Samsung Medical Center. Of the 211 patients, 138 were born from 2000-2013. Among them, the 74 patients of a deletion group and the 22 patients of a maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) group were compared with general populations born from 2000 using the Walter and Elwood method and cosinor analysis. Results There was no statistical significance in seasonal variation in births of the total 211 patients with PWS (χ2=7.2522, P=0.2982). However, a significant difference was found in the monthly variation between PWS with the deletion group and the at-risk general population (P<0.05). In the cosinor model, the peak month of birth for PWS patients in the deletion group was January, while the nadir occurred in July, with statistical significance (amplitude=0.23, phase=1.2, low point=7.2). The UPD group showed the peak birth month in spring; however, this result was not statistically significant (χ2=3.39, P=0.1836). Conclusion Correlation with birth seasonality was identified in a deletion group of Korean PWS patients. Further studies are required to identify the mechanism related to seasonal effects of environmental factors on microdeletion on chromosome 15. PMID:25883926

  17. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  18. Familial 16q24.3 microdeletion involving ANKRD11 causes a KBG-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sacharow, Stephanie; Li, Deling; Fan, Yao Shan; Tekin, Mustafa

    2012-03-01

    Haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 encoding ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein 11 was recently reported as the cause of a syndrome due to microdeletion, characterized by intellectual disability with minor facial anomalies and short stature. Most recently, intragenic mutations of ANKRD11 were found in a cohort of patients with KBG syndrome. KBG is an autosomal dominant intellectual disability syndrome characterized by short stature, characteristic facial appearance, macrodontia, and skeletal anomalies. It remains unknown if deletion of the entire ANKRD11 causes KBG syndrome. We present a mother and child with a heterozygous 365 Kb deletion at 16q24.3 containing ANKRD11, ZNF778, and SPG7 genes. The child presented with developmental delay, facial anomalies, hand anomalies, and a congenital heart defect. The mother has short stature, facial anomalies, macrodontia, hand anomalies, and learning disability. Both individuals had many findings reported in KBG syndrome and the family met the suggested diagnostic criteria. However, typical macrodontia with fused incisors, costovertebral anomalies, and delayed bone age were not present. We conclude that microdeletions involving ANKRD11 result in a phenotype similar to that of KBG syndrome. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genotype–phenotype relationship in three cases with overlapping 19p13.12 microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Bonaglia, Maria C; Marelli, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Commodaro, Simona; Borgatti, Renato; Minardo, Grazia; Memo, Luigi; Mangold, Elisabeth; Beri, Silvana; Zucca, Claudio; Brambilla, Daniele; Molteni, Massimo; Giorda, Roberto; Weber, Ruthild G; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2010-01-01

    We describe the detailed clinical and molecular characterization of three patients (aged 7, 84/12 and 31 years) with overlapping microdeletions in 19p13.12, extending to 19p13.13 in two cases. The patients share the following clinical features with a recently reported 10-year-old girl with a 19p13.12 microdeletion: mental retardation (MR), psychomotor and language delay, hearing impairment, brachycephaly, anteverted nares and ear malformations. All patients share a 359-kb deleted region in 19p13.12 harboring six genes (LPHN1, DDX39, CD97, PKN1, PTGER1 and GIPC1), several of which may be MR candidates because of their function and expression pattern. LPHN1 and PKN1 are the most appealing; LPHN1 for its interaction with Shank family proteins, and PKN1 because it is involved in a variety of functions in neurons, including cytoskeletal organization. Haploinsufficiency of GIPC1 may contribute to hearing impairment for its interaction with myosin VI. A behavioral phenotype was observed in all three patients; it was characterized by overactive disorder associated with MR and stereotyped movements (ICD10) in one patient and hyperactivity in the other two. As Ptger1-null mice show behavioral inhibition and impulsive aggression with defective social interaction, PTGER1 haploinsufficiency may be responsible for the behavioral traits observed in these patients. PMID:20648052

  20. Identification of a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband among patients with myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Asou, Hiroya; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Yuko; Nagamachi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Aki, Daisuke; Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-05-29

    Monosomy 7 and interstitial deletions in the long arm of chromosome 7 (-7/7q-) is a common nonrandom chromosomal abnormality found frequently in myeloid disorders including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Using a short probe-based microarray comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH) technology, we identified a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband, which is adjacent to 'hot deletion region' thus far identified by conventional methods. This common microdeletion cluster contains three poorly characterized genes; Samd9, Samd9L, and a putative gene LOC253012, which we named Miki. Gene copy number assessment of three genes by real-time PCR revealed heterozygous deletion of these three genes in adult patients with AML and MDS at high frequency, in addition to JMML patients. Miki locates to mitotic spindles and centrosomes and downregulation of Miki by RNA interference induced abnormalities in mitosis and nuclear morphology, similar to myelodysplasia. In addition, a recent report indicated Samd9 as a tumor suppressor. These findings indicate the usefulness of the short probe-based CGH to detect microdeletions. The three genes located to 7q21.3 would be candidates for myeloid tumor-suppressor genes on 7q.

  1. The Koolen-de Vries syndrome: a phenotypic comparison of patients with a 17q21.31 microdeletion versus a KANSL1 sequence variant.

    PubMed

    Koolen, David A; Pfundt, Rolph; Linda, Katrin; Beunders, Gea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Conta, Jessie H; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Dugan, Sarah; Halbach, Sara; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Winesett, Heather M; Chung, Wendy K; Dalton, Marguerite; Dimova, Petia S; Mattina, Teresa; Prescott, Katrina; Zhang, Hui Z; Saal, Howard M; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Failla, Pinella; Barone, Concetta; Avola, Emanuela; Brooks, Alice S; Kant, Sarina G; Gerkes, Erica H; Firth, Helen V; Õunap, Katrin; Bird, Lynne M; Masser-Frye, Diane; Friedman, Jennifer R; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Dixit, Abhijit; Splitt, Miranda; Kukolich, Mary K; McGaughran, Julie; Coe, Bradley P; Flórez, Jesús; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Brunner, Han G; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Gecz, Jozef; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E; de Vries, Bert B A

    2016-05-01

    The Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS; OMIM #610443), also known as the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterised by (neonatal) hypotonia, developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial dysmorphism. Expressive language development is particularly impaired compared with receptive language or motor skills. Other frequently reported features include social and friendly behaviour, epilepsy, musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital heart defects, urogenital malformations, and ectodermal anomalies. The syndrome is caused by a truncating variant in the KAT8 regulatory NSL complex unit 1 (KANSL1) gene or by a 17q21.31 microdeletion encompassing KANSL1. Herein we describe a novel cohort of 45 individuals with KdVS of whom 33 have a 17q21.31 microdeletion and 12 a single-nucleotide variant (SNV) in KANSL1 (19 males, 26 females; age range 7 months to 50 years). We provide guidance about the potential pitfalls in the laboratory testing and emphasise the challenges of KANSL1 variant calling and DNA copy number analysis in the complex 17q21.31 region. Moreover, we present detailed phenotypic information, including neuropsychological features, that contribute to the broad phenotypic spectrum of the syndrome. Comparison of the phenotype of both the microdeletion and SNV patients does not show differences of clinical importance, stressing that haploinsufficiency of KANSL1 is sufficient to cause the full KdVS phenotype.

  2. Cell-free DNA screening in clinical practice: abnormal autosomal aneuploidy and microdeletion results.

    PubMed

    Valderramos, Stephanie G; Rao, Rashmi R; Scibetta, Emily W; Silverman, Neil S; Han, Christina S; Platt, Lawrence D

    2016-11-01

    Since its commercial release in 2011 cell-free DNA screening has been rapidly adopted as a routine prenatal genetic test. However, little is known about its performance in actual clinical practice. We sought to investigate factors associated with the accuracy of abnormal autosomal cell-free DNA results. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 121 patients with abnormal cell-free DNA results from a referral maternal-fetal medicine practice from March 2013 through July 2015. Patients were included if cell-free DNA results for trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, or microdeletions (if reported by the laboratory) were positive or nonreportable. The primary outcome was confirmed aneuploidy or microarray abnormality on either prenatal or postnatal karyotype or microarray. Secondary outcomes were identifiable associations with in vitro fertilization, twins, ultrasound findings, testing platform, and testing laboratory. Kruskal-Wallis or Fisher exact tests were used as appropriate. A total of 121 patients had abnormal cell-free DNA results for trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and/or microdeletions. In all, 105 patients had abnormal cell-free DNA results for trisomy 21, trisomy 18, and trisomy 13. Of these, 92 (87.6%) were positive and 13 (12.4%) were nonreportable. The results of the 92 positive cell-free DNA were for trisomy 21 (48, 52.2%), trisomy 18 (22, 23.9%), trisomy 13 (17, 18.5%), triploidy (2, 2.2%), and positive for >1 parameter (3, 3.3%). Overall, the positive predictive value of cell-free DNA was 73.5% (61/83; 95% confidence interval, 63-82%) for all trisomies (by chromosome: trisomy 21, 83.0% [39/47; 95% confidence interval, 69-92%], trisomy 18, 65.0% [13/20; 95% confidence interval, 41-84%], and trisomy 13, 43.8% [7/16; 95% confidence interval, 21-70%]). Abnormal cell-free DNA results were associated with positive serum screening (by group: trisomy 21 [17/48, 70.8%]; trisomy 18 [7/22, 77.8%]; trisomy 13 [3/17, 37.5%]; nonreportable [2/13, 16.7%]; P

  3. Chromosomal aberrations, Yq microdeletion, and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men opting for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Monis B; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Nita; Mittal, Suneeta; Upadhyay, Ashish D; Dada, Rima

    2012-09-01

    Male infertility is a multi-factorial disorder, and identification of its etiology in an individual is critical for treatment. Systematically elucidating the underlying genetic causes (chromosomal and Yq microdeletion) and factors, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), which contribute to sperm DNA damage, may help to reduce the number of men with idiopathic infertility and provide them with the most suitable therapeutics and counseling. This study was done to comprehensively investigate genetic and oxidative stress factors that might be the etiology of a large percentage of men with idiopathic infertility. One hundred twelve infertile men and 76 fertile controls were screened for chromosomal aberrations and Yq microdeletions. ROS, TAC, and sperm DNA damage were assessed in cytogenetically normal, non-azoospermic men with intact Y chromosome (n = 93). ROS was assessed in neat and washed semen by chemiluminescence; seminal TAC with a commercially available kit; and sperm DNA damage by the comet assay. Two men had cytogenetic abnormalities and seven men harbored Yq microdeletions. ROS levels in neat and washed semen of infertile men were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than controls. Infertile men had significantly lower (P < 0.01) TAC levels (1.79 mM), whereas sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than controls. Genetic factors and oxidative stress cumulatively account for large number of idiopathic infertile cases. Unlike, genetic causes, which cannot be cured, timely identification and management of oxidative stress may help to reverse/reduce the effects on induced DNA damage, and improve the outcomes for infertile males. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Caused by 16p11.2 Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Yang, Amy C.; Reiner, Jennifer; Mei, Hui; Scott, Stuart A.; Frucht, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Four cases of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) have been reported in individuals with proximal 16p11.2 microdeletions that include PRRT2. Case Report We describe a fifth patient with PKD, features of Asperger’s syndrome, and mild language delays. Sanger sequencing of the PRRT2 gene did not identify any mutations implicated in PKD. However, microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) detected a 533.9-kb deletion on chromosome 16, encompassing over 20 genes and transcripts. Discussion This case underscores the importance of aCGH testing for individuals with PKD who do not have PRRT2 mutations, particularly when developmental delays, speech problems, intellectual disability, and/or autism spectrum disorder are present. PMID:25667815

  5. Fold-change correction values for testicular somatic transcripts in gene expression studies of human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cappallo-Obermann, Heike; Feig, Caroline; Schulze, Wolfgang; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai

    2013-03-01

    What are the reference values for delineating altered somatic cell gene expression from transcript enrichment/dilution in gene expression studies of human spermatogenesis? We have designed a crosstable and rule-of-thumb values for different stages of spermatogenic impairment that define the reference cut-off values for altered gene expression in Sertoli and Leydig cells in the context of impaired spermatogenesis. Morphometrical studies have shown that on the cellular level, impaired spermatogenesis results in a relative enrichment of somatic cell types. However, until now it is not known how this affects transcript levels in gene expression studies. In this study, 31 testis biopsies from men with different stages of spermatogenic impairment (full spermatogenesis, hypospermatogenesis, meiotic arrest, spermatogonial presence, Sertoli cell-only syndrome, complete tubular atrophy) were used to define reference ratios of somatic transcript enrichment/dilution. The reference ratios were validated on an independent test set of 28 samples and on gene expression data from men with Y-chromosomal microdeletions. High-quality microarray data were filtered with respect to Sertoli- and Leydig-cell-specific genes. General reference enrichment/dilution factors for these two cell types for all combinations of spermatogenic impairment were calculated using robust permutation statistics. To validate the specificity of the filtered transcripts, we calculated ratios for an independent test set of spermatogenic impairment and for transcriptional data from men with Y-chromosomal microdeletions, and checked the functional enrichment (gene ontology) and cellular localization of the corresponding proteins in a histological database and assessed their correlation with testicular size. Filtering of Sertoli- and Leydig-cell-specific genes resulted in a set of 54 and 332 transcripts, respectively. These were used in defining robust reference dilution/enrichment factors of somatic transcripts

  6. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.S.; Gunaratne, P.H.; Greenberg, F.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R.; Hoheisel, J.D.; Young, I.G.; Miklos, G.L.G.; Campbell, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances, and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date, no protein-encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene, fliI, and the homologous human cDNA have been isolated. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for FISH, which localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic-cell hybrid-panel mapping further localized this gene to the SMS critical region. Southern blot analysis of somatic-cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 12 SMS patients demonstrates the deletion of one copy of FLI in all SMS patients analyzed. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A first look at women's perspectives on noninvasive prenatal testing to detect sex chromosome aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes.

    PubMed

    Agatisa, Patricia K; Mercer, Mary Beth; Leek, Angela C; Smith, Marissa B; Philipson, Elliot; Farrell, Ruth M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore women's opinions about the use of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) to assess the risk of sex chromosome aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes. Focus groups were conducted with women who were currently pregnant or had recently delivered. Qualitative analysis using interpretive description was used to generate study findings. Thirty-one women (mean age 32.4 years) participated in the focus groups. Participants were unfamiliar with sex chromosome aneuploidies but expressed support for the use of NIPT to detect these conditions. Participants were uncertain about the utility and actionability of receiving information about microdeletion syndromes with variable or unknown phenotypic expression. Participants voiced their desire to be informed of all conditions assessed by NIPT prior to testing. They considered clinicians to be the key provider of such information, although stated that patients have a responsibility to be knowledgeable prior to testing in order to support informed decision making. The use of NIPT to identify sex chromosome aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes will introduce new challenges for clinicians to ensure pregnant women have the information and resources to make informed choices about NIPT when used for these conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  9. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families.

  10. New microdeletion and microduplication syndromes: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Nevado, Julián; Mergener, Rafaella; Palomares-Bralo, María; Souza, Karen Regina; Vallespín, Elena; Mena, Rocío; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Mori, María Ángeles; Santos, Fernando; García-Miñaur, Sixto; García-Santiago, Fé; Mansilla, Elena; Fernández, Luis; de Torres, María Luisa; Riegel, Mariluce; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Several new microdeletion and microduplication syndromes are emerging as disorders that have been proven to cause multisystem pathologies frequently associated with intellectual disability (ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and other phenotypic findings. In this paper, we review the “new” and emergent microdeletion and microduplication syndromes that have been described and recognized in recent years with the aim of summarizing their main characteristics and chromosomal regions involved. We decided to group them by genomic region and within these groupings have classified them into those that include ID, MCA, ASD or other findings. This review does not intend to be exhaustive but is rather a quick guide to help pediatricians, clinical geneticists, cytogeneticists and/or molecular geneticists. PMID:24764755

  11. [Gene studies and nobel prize].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Ming; Xiao, Bing-Xiu

    2005-01-01

    Gene is a DNA sequence which can be expressed and produces gene products (protein or RNA). By 2003, there are 51 Nobel Prize owners related to gene studies. Among them, 44 persons are in physiology or medicine (account for 24.72% of total 178), 7 persons are in chemistry (account for 5.69% of total 123). The paper reviews them in following 6 aspects: Drosophlie melanogaster is a good material for gene study; the double helix model of DNA structure provides a hard foundation in gene study; the studies on gene regulation illuminate many functions of gene; genetic central dogma researches created 11 Noble Prize laureates; gene engineering technologies make possible to modify and use genes; and the thorough studies of gene characteristic made us easier to understand many life phenomena.

  12. De Novo 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion presenting with generalized hypertrichosis terminalis, gingival fibromatous hyperplasia, and distinctive facial features.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan H; Fukai, Ryoko; Miyake, Noriko; Gamal El Din, Amina A; Eid, Maha M; Eid, Ola M; Thomas, Manal M; El-Badry, Tarek H; Tosson, Angie M S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Generalized hypertrichosis is a feature of several genetic disorders, and the nosology of these entities is still provisional. Recent studies have implicated chromosome 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion and the reciprocal microduplication in a very rare form of congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis (CGHT) with or without gingival hyperplasia. Here, we report on a 5-year-old Egyptian girl born to consanguineous parents. The girl presented with CGHT and gingival hyperplasia for whom we performed detailed clinical, pathological, and molecular studies. The girl had coarse facies characterized by bilateral epicanthic folds, thick and abundant eyelashes, a broad nose, full cheeks, and lips that constituted the distinctive facial features for this syndrome. Biopsy of the gingiva showed epithelial marked acanthosis and hyperkeratosis with hyperplastic thick collagen bundles and dense fibrosis in the underlying tissues. Array analysis indicated a 17q24.2-q24.3 chromosomal microdeletion. We validated this microdeletion by real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed a perfect co-segregation of the disease phenotype within the family. In summary, this study indicates that 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion caused CGHT with gingival hyperplasia and distinctive facies, which should be differentiated from the autosomal recessive type that lacks the distinctive facies.

  13. An individual with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and Smith-Magenis microdeletion syndrome: is chromosome 17p11.2 a candidate region for Tourette syndrome putative susceptibility genes?

    PubMed

    Shelley, B P; Robertson, M M; Turk, J

    2007-08-01

    This is the first published case description in the current literature of the association of definite Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and the Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), both confirmed by DSM-IV-TR criteria and molecular cytogenetic analysis, respectively. The co-occurrence of GTS, SMS and their common behavioural/neuropsychiatric abnormalities should warrant further genetic investigation of chromosome 17p11.2 deletion site as it may be a promising region for containing a gene(s) of aetiological importance in the development of the GTS phenotype. Alternatively, the co-occurrence may be due to the common endophenotypic mechanisms shared by these disorders, rather than being specific for GTS that could be explored using strategies of quantitative trait loci - endophenotype-based approach. Research into this genomic region may also benefit psychiatric genetic research in enhancing understanding of the biological and molecular underpinnings of common behavioural problems that are seen in both GTS and SMS. This would lead to advancement in neurobehavioural/neuropsychiatric genetics which will help in further explaining the broader perspective of gene-brain-behaviour interrelationships.

  14. Palate abnormalities in Chilean patients with chromosome 22q11 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lay-Son, Guillermo; Palomares, Mirta; Guzman, M Luisa; Vasquez, Marcos; Puga, Alonso; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2012-12-01

    Chromosome 22q11 microdeletion syndrome (del22q11) is the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans, with an estimated incidence of 1/4000. It is recognized as a common identifiable cause of cleft palate. We characterized palatal abnormalities in a large cohort of Chilean patients with del22q11. Patients with the deletion were evaluated by geneticists and speech pathologists, including nasopharyngoscopy when indicated. Comparisons between groups with and without palatal abnormalities were performed using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U test. Two hundred and one patients were included in the study. Palate abnormalities were present in 154 patients (76.6%). The most frequent finding was submucous cleft palate (both classic and occult forms) seen in 80 patients (39.8% of the total group). Overt cleft palate or cleft lip/palate was seen in 30 patients (14.9%). Patients without palate abnormalities had significantly greater frequency of congenital heart disease and higher mortality. Our data show a high frequency of palate abnormalities without significant association with congenital heart disease. The most common types of palate defects seen in this series are usually not evident on physical examination and thus require a high index of suspicion and active evaluation through nasopharyngoscopy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of recurrent pathogenic microdeletions and microduplications in over 9500 pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Grati, Francesca Romana; Molina Gomes, Denise; Ferreira, Jose Carlos Pinto B; Dupont, Celine; Alesi, Viola; Gouas, Laetitia; Horelli-Kuitunen, Nina; Choy, Kwong Wai; García-Herrero, Sandra; de la Vega, Alberto Gonzalez; Piotrowski, Krzysztof; Genesio, Rita; Queipo, Gloria; Malvestiti, Barbara; Hervé, Bérénice; Benzacken, Brigitte; Novelli, Antonio; Vago, Philippe; Piippo, Kirsi; Leung, Tak Yeung; Maggi, Federico; Quibel, Thibault; Tabet, Anne Claude; Simoni, Giuseppe; Vialard, François

    2015-08-01

    The implementation of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in prenatal testing for all patients has not achieved a consensus. Technical alternatives such as Prenatal BACs-on-Beads(TM) (PNBoBs(TM) ) have thus been applied. The aim of this study was to provide the frequencies of the submicroscopic defects detectable by PNBoBs(TM) under different prenatal indications. A total of 9648 prenatal samples were prospectively analyzed by karyotyping plus PNBoBs(TM) and classified by prenatal indication. The frequencies of the genomic defects and their 95%CIs were calculated for each indication. The overall incidence of cryptic imbalances was 0.7%. The majority involved the DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGS). The additional diagnostic yield of PNBoBs(TM) in the population with a low a priori risk was 1/298. The prevalences of DGS microdeletion and microduplication in the low-risk population were 1/992 and 1/850, respectively. The constant a priori risk for common pathogenic cryptic imbalances detected by this technology is estimated to be ~0.3%. A prevalence higher than that previously estimated was found for the 22q11.2 microdeletion. Their frequencies were independent of maternal age. These data have implications for cell-free DNA screening tests design and justify prenatal screening for 22q11 deletion, as early recognition of DGS improves its prognosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Microdeletions in the human H19 DMR result in loss of IGF2 imprinting and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sparago, Angela; Cerrato, Flavia; Vernucci, Maria; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Riccio, Andrea

    2004-09-01

    The overgrowth- and tumor-associated Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome results from dysregulation of imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5. Here we show that inherited microdeletions in the H19 differentially methylated region (DMR) that abolish two CTCF target sites cause this disease. Maternal transmission of the deletions results in hypermethylation of the H19 DMR, biallelic IGF2 expression, H19 silencing and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, indicative of loss of function of the IGF2-H19 imprinting control element.

  17. The Low Prevalence of Y Chromosomal Microdeletions is Observed in the Oligozoospermic Men in the Area of Mato Grosso State and Amazonian Region of Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Godoy, Gleice Cristina; Galera, Bianca Borsatto; Araujo, Claudinéia; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva; de Pinho, Max Fernando; Galera, Marcial Francis; de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions on Y chromosome in infertile patients with oligozoospermia or azoospermia in Mato Grosso state, Brazil. METHODS This cross-sectional study enrolled 94 men from infertile couples. Karyotype analysis was performed by lymphocyte culture technique. DNA from each sample was extracted using non-enzymatic method. Microdeletions were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS With the use of cytogenetic analysis, five patients (5.3%) had abnormal karyotype, one azoospermic patient (1.1%) had karyotype 46,XY,t(7;1) (qter-p35), one (1.1%) with mild oligozoospermia had karyotype 46,XY,delY(q), and two other azoospermic patients had karyotype 47,XXY, consistent with Klinefelter syndrome (KS). One of them (1.1%) with severe oligozoospermia had karyotype 46,XY,8p+. Microdeletion on Y chromosome was found in the azoospermia factor c (AZFc) region in only one azoospermic patient (1.1%). CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of genetic abnormalities in oligo/azoospermic Brazilian men from infertile couple was 5.3%, and microdeletion on Y chromosome was not a common finding in this population (1.1%). PMID:25210487

  18. A complex microdeletion 17q12 phenotype in a patient with recurrent de novo membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microdeletions on chromosome 17q12 cause of diverse spectrum of disorders and have only recently been identified as a rare cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuester-Hauser-Syndrome (MRKH), which is characterized by uterus aplasia ± partial/complete vaginal aplasia in females with a regular karyotype. For the first time we report about a patient with a 17q12 microdeletion who is affected by MRKH in combination with a vascular and soft tissue disorder. Repeatedly she suffered from kidney transplant failure caused by consuming membranous nephropathy. Case presentation A 38-year-old female patient had been diagnosed with right kidney aplasia, left kidney dysplasia and significantly impaired renal function during infancy. Aged 16 she had to start hemodialysis. Three years later she received her first kidney transplant. Only then she was diagnosed with MRKH. The kidney transplant was lost due to consuming nephrotic syndrome caused by de novo membranous nephropathy, as was a second kidney transplant years later. In addition, a hyperelasticity syndrome affects the patient with congenital joint laxity, kyphoscoliosis, bilateral hip dysplasia, persistent hypermobility of both elbows, knees and hips. Her clinical picture resembles a combination of traits of a hypermobile and a vascular form of Ehlers-Danlos-Syndrome, but no mutations in the COL3A1 gene was underlying. Instead, array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) detected a heterozygous 1.43 Mb deletion on chromosome 17q12 encompassing the two renal developmental genes HNF1β and LHX1. Conclusions Deletions of HNF1β have recently drawn significant attention in pediatric nephrology as an important cause of prenatally hyperechogenic kidneys, renal aplasia and renal hypodysplasia. In contrast, membranous nephropathy represents an often-unaccounted cause of nephrotic syndrome in the adult population. A causative connection between theses two conditions has never been postulated, but is suggestive enough in

  19. Overlapping microdeletions involving 15q22.2 narrow the critical region for intellectual disability to NARG2 and RORA.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Di Marco, Chiara; Mucciolo, Mafalda; Vascotto, Marina; Balestri, Paolo; Gérard, Marion; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Andrieux, Joris; Breuning, Martijn; Hoffer, Mariëtte J V; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Shimada, Shino; Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Umezu, Ryoji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Mari; Saito, Kayoko; Renieri, Alessandra; Mari, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Microdeletions in the 15q22 region have not been well documented. We collected genotype and phenotype data from five patients with microdeletions involving 15q22.2, which were between 0.7 Mb and 6.5 Mb in size; two were of de novo origin and one was of familial origin. Intellectual disability and epilepsy are frequently observed in patients with 15q22.2 deletions. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis narrowed the critical region for such neurologic symptoms to a genomic region of 654 Kb including the NMDA receptor-regulated 2 gene (NARG2) and the PAR-related orphan receptor A gene (RORA), either of which may be responsible for neurological symptoms commonly observed in patients with deletions in this region. The neighboring regions, including the forkhead box B1 gene (FOXB1), may also be related to the additional neurological features observed in the patients with larger deletions. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Delineation of the 3p14.1p13 microdeletion associated with syndromic distal limb contractures.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Monnier, Nicole; Callier, Patrick; Dieterich, Klaus; Francoise, Michel; Montgomery, Tara; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Neas, Katherine; Dixon, Joanne; Dahm, Thomas Lee; Huet, Frédéric; Ragon, Clémence; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Duplomb, Laurence; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Mugneret, Francine; Vokes, Steve A; Tucker, Haley W; Lunardi, Joël; Faivre, Laurence; Jouk, Pierre Simon; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2014-12-01

    Distal limb contractures (DLC) represent a heterogeneous clinical and genetic condition. Overall, 20-25% of the DLC are caused by mutations in genes encoding the muscle contractile apparatus. Large interstitial deletions of the 3p have already been diagnosed by standard chromosomal analysis, but not associated with a specific phenotype. We report on four patients with syndromic DLC presenting with a de novo 3p14.1p13 microdeletion. The clinical features associated multiple contractures, feeding problems, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. Facial dysmorphism was constant with low-set posteriorly rotated ears and blepharophimosis. Review of previously reported cases with a precise mapping of the deletions, documented a 250 kb smallest region of overlap (SRO) necessary for DLC. This region contained one gene, EIF4E3, the first three exons of the FOXP1 gene, and an intronic enhancer of FOXP1 named hs1149. Sanger sequencing and locus quantification of hs1149, EIF4E3, and FOXP1 in a cohort of 11 French patients affected by DLC appeared normal. In conclusion, we delineate a new microdeletion syndrome involving the 3p14.1p13 locus and associated with DLC and severe developmental delay. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Common variable immunodeficiency associated with microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-q42.3 and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate kinase B (ITPKB) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika G; Yel, Leman; Cao, Jia N; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogenous disorder characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and impaired specific antibody response and increased susceptibility to infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. A number of gene mutations, including ICOS, TACI and BAFF-R, and CD19, CD20, CD21, CD81, MSH5 and LRBA have been described; however, they account for approximately 20–25% of total cases of CVID. In this study, we report a patient with CVID with an intrinsic microdeletion of chromosome 1q42.1-42.3, where gene for inositol 1,3,4, trisphosphate kinase β (ITPKB) is localized. ITPKB has an important role in the development, survival and function of B cells. In this subject, the expression of ITPKB mRNA as well as ITKPB protein was significantly reduced. The sequencing of ITPKB gene revealed three variants, two of them were missense variants and third was a synonymous variant; the significance of each of them in relation to CVID is discussed. This case suggests that a deficiency of ITPKB may have a role in CVID. PMID:26900472

  2. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs), have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears), single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb). Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a frequency of about 0.3% in

  3. 8q21.11 microdeletion in two patients with syndromic peters anomaly.

    PubMed

    Happ, Hannah; Schilter, Kala F; Weh, Eric; Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2016-09-01

    Peters anomaly is a form of anterior segment dysgenesis characterized by central ocular opacity and corneo-lenticular adhesions. Isolated and syndromic Peters anomaly can be observed and demonstrate significant genetic heterogeneity. We report the identification of overlapping 8q21.11 deletions in two patients with syndromic Peters anomaly via whole exome sequencing and chromosomal microarray analyses. Microdeletions of 8q21.11 were recently reported in 10 patients with highly variable phenotypes involving craniofacial features, ptosis, intellectual disability, abnormalities of the hands/feet and other defects; sclerocornea and/or microphthalmia were reported in three cases. The two additional cases presented in this report expand the phenotypic spectrum of 8q21.11 microdeletions to include Peters anomaly (seen in both patients) and persistent primary dentition (seen in one patient with a larger deletion). The two novel deletions include the ZFHX4 and PEX2 genes, which were also affected in all three previous cases involving ocular anomalies. Screening of the remaining alleles of ZFHX4 and PEX2 did not identify any additional likely pathogenic variants in either patient, suggesting a dominant mechanism (haploinsufficiency) for the identified deletion. This report provides further insight into the phenotypes associated with 8q21.11 deletions and, for the first time, reports Peters anomaly as an additional ocular feature; screening for copy number variations of the 8q21.11 region should be considered in patients with Peters anomaly and related syndromic features. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Allelic variations at the haploid TBX1 locus do not influence the cardiac phenotype in cases of 22q11 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Voelckel, Marie-Antoinette; Girardot, Lydie; Giusiano, Bernard; Levy, Nicolas; Philip, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Microdeletion at the 22q11 locus is characterised by a high clinical variability. Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most life-threatening manifestations of the syndrome and affect approximately 50% of patients carrying the deleted chromosome 22. The causes of this phenotype variability remain unknown although several hypotheses have been raised. It has been suggested that allelic variations at the haploid locus could modify the phenotypic expression. Regarding this hypothesis, TBX1 was thought to be a major candidate to the cardiac phenotype or its severity in patients carrying the 22q11 microdeletion. A mutational screening was performed in this gene, in a series of 39 deleted patients, with and without CHD. The results indicate that mutations in TBX1 are not likely to be involved in the cardiac phenotype observed in del22q11 patients.

  5. Phenotypic variability in patients with interstitial 6q21-q22 microdeletion and Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anju; Hebbar, Malavika; Harms, Frederike L; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Girisha, Katta M; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2016-11-01

    Deletions of 6q are known to be associated with variable clinical phenotypes including facial dysmorphism, hand malformations, heart defects, microcephaly, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a 7-year-old boy evaluated for facial dysmorphism, trigonocephaly, microcephaly, global developmental delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Molecular karyotyping revealed a 13-Mb deletion within 6q21-q22.31, (chr6:105,771,520-119,130,805; hg19, GRch37) comprising 81 genes. Review of 15 cases with interstitial 6q21-q22.3 deletion from the literature showed that facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and corpus callosum abnormalities are the most consistent clinical features in these individuals. Deleted genes and breakpoints in the 6q21-q22 region of the patient reported here are similar to two earlier reported cases with the clinical diagnosis of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome. However, the present case lacks characteristic clinical findings of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome. We discuss, the considerable phenotypic variability seen in individuals with 6q21-q22 microdeletion and emphasize the need for further scrutiny into the hypothesis of Acro-Cardio-Facial syndrome being a microdeletion syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. De novo microdeletions and point mutations affecting SOX2 in three individuals with intellectual disability but without major eye malformations.

    PubMed

    Dennert, Nicola; Engels, Hartmut; Cremer, Kirsten; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Albrecht, Beate; Ehret, Julia K; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Suri, Mohnish; Carignani, Giulia; Renieri, Alessandra; Kukuk, Guido M; Wieland, Thomas; Andrieux, Joris; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Dieux-Coëslier, Anne; Zink, Alexander M

    2017-02-01

    Loss-of-function mutations and deletions of the SOX2 gene are known to cause uni- and bilateral anophthalmia and microphthalmia as well as related disorders such as anophthalmia-esophageal-genital syndrome. Thus, anophthalmia/microphthalmia is the primary indication for targeted, "phenotype first" analyses of SOX2. However, SOX2 mutations are also associated with a wide range of non-ocular abnormalities, such as postnatal growth retardation, structural brain anomalies, hypogenitalism, and developmental delay. The present report describes three patients without anophthalmia/microphthalmia and loss-of-function mutations or microdeletions of SOX2 who had been investigated in a "genotype first" manner due to intellectual disability/developmental delay using whole exome sequencing or chromosomal microarray analyses. This result prompted us to perform SOX2 Sanger sequencing in 192 developmental delay/intellectual disability patients without anophthalmia or microphthalmia. No additional SOX2 loss-of-function mutations were detected in this cohort, showing that SOX2 is clearly not a major cause of intellectual disability without anophthalmia/microphthalmia. In our three patients and four further, reported "genotype first" SOX2 microdeletion patients, anophthalmia/microphthalmia was present in less than half of the patients. Thus, SOX2 is another example of a gene whose clinical spectrum is broadened by the generation of "genotype first" findings using hypothesis-free, genome-wide methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Establishment of a screening method for AZF microdeletions by capillary technology and a clinical trial].

    PubMed

    He, Tianwen; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Jian; Zheng, Yichun; Zhang, Changbin; Yin, Aihua

    2016-08-01

    To establish an accurate, fast and simple screening method for AZF microdeletions using capillary technology and use it for clinical testing. For each pair of primers, the 5' end of either forward or reverse primer was labeled with a FAM, JOE or TAMRA fluorescence dyes to establish multiplex quantitative fluorescence PCR systems for the establishment of a screening method of Y chromosome AZF microdeletions by capillary technology. The detection of Y chromosome AZF microdeletion was carried out on 725 cases of non-obstructive azoospermia, oligospermia or asthenospermia. A screening method for Y chromosome AZF microdeletions using capillary technology was established. Thirty eight cases of AZF microdeletions were found among 725 cases of non-obstructive azoospermia, oligospermia or asthenospermia, which gave a deletion rate of 5.24%. Y chromosomal microdeletions were found in 8.62% of the azoospermia group, 6.75% of the oligozoospermic group, and 2.23% of the asthenospermia group. An accurate, fast and simple screening method of Y chromosome AZF microdeletions by capillary technology has been established, which may have an important clinical value.

  8. Interstitial 7q31.1 copy number variations disrupting IMMP2L gene are associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the array-CGH technique in the diagnostic workup of mental retardation, new recurrent copy number variations and novel microdeletion/microduplication syndromes were identified. These findings suggest that some genomic disorders have high penetrance but a wide range of phenotypic severity. Results We present the clinical and molecular description of four unrelated patients affected by neurodevelopmental disorders and overlapping 7q31.1 microdeletion/microduplication, identified by array-CGH and involving only part of the IMMP2L gene. Conclusion IMMP2L encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protease-like protein, which is required for processing of cytochromes inside mitochondria. Numerous studies reported that this gene is implicated in behavioural disorders such as autistic spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders, and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We discuss the functions of the gene suggesting that IMMP2L may act as risk factor for neurological disease. PMID:25478008

  9. Interstitial 7q31.1 copy number variations disrupting IMMP2L gene are associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Gimelli, Stefania; Capra, Valeria; Di Rocco, Maja; Leoni, Massimiliano; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Schiaffino, Maria Cristina; Fiorio, Patrizia; Cuoco, Cristina; Gimelli, Giorgio; Tassano, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the array-CGH technique in the diagnostic workup of mental retardation, new recurrent copy number variations and novel microdeletion/microduplication syndromes were identified. These findings suggest that some genomic disorders have high penetrance but a wide range of phenotypic severity. We present the clinical and molecular description of four unrelated patients affected by neurodevelopmental disorders and overlapping 7q31.1 microdeletion/microduplication, identified by array-CGH and involving only part of the IMMP2L gene. IMMP2L encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protease-like protein, which is required for processing of cytochromes inside mitochondria. Numerous studies reported that this gene is implicated in behavioural disorders such as autistic spectrum disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders, and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We discuss the functions of the gene suggesting that IMMP2L may act as risk factor for neurological disease.

  10. A Chinese patient with KBG syndrome and a 9q31.2-33.1 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingzhi; Zhou, Huali; Yong, Jing; Cong, Peikuan; Li, Chengjiang; Yu, Yunsong; Qi, Ming

    2013-05-01

    KBG syndrome is characterized by postnatal short stature, macrodontia, facial and hand anomalies, delayed bone age and intellectual disability. KBG syndrome is an infrequently reported autosomal dominant condition caused by a mutation or haploinsufficiency of ANKRD11 at 16q24.3. We report on a patient, who showed many manifestations of KBG syndrome and was found to harbor a de novo ANKRD11 mutation, c.362T > A (p.Met121Lys). As the patient showed additional characteristics not occurring in KBG syndrome, a CGH array was performed which showed a de novo microdeletion of 9q31.2-q33.1. The majority of findings in our patient can be explained by the combined ANKRD11 mutation and 9q31.2-33.1 deletion. The case demonstrates well the need for comparing an abnormal genotype with a detailed phenotype analysis and the need for further studies in case the phenotype is unusual for the genotype.

  11. Y chromosome microdeletions and alterations of spermatogenesis, patient approach and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Rives, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples at reproductive age and human male infertility appears frequently idiopathic. The main genetic causes of spermatogenesis defect responsible for non-obstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia are constitutional chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome. The improvement of the Yq microdeletion screening method gave new insights in the mechanism responsible for the genesis of Yq microdeletions and for the consequences of the management of male infertility and genetic counselling in case of assisted reproductive technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  13. Y-chromosomal DNA haplotypes in infertile European males carrying Y-microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Paracchini, S; Stuppia, L; Gatta, V; Palka, G; Moro, E; Foresta, C; Mengua, L; Oliva, R; Ballescà, J L; Kremer, J A; van Golde, R J; Tuerlings, J H; Hargreave, T; Ross, A; Cooke, H; Huellen, K; Vogt, P H; Tyler-Smith, C

    2000-11-01

    We have determined Y-chromosomal DNA haplotypes in 73 infertile European males carrying Y microdeletions and compared them with the haplotypes of 299 infertile males lacking microdeletions. Chromosomes were typed with a set of 11 binary Y markers, which identified 8 haplogroups in the sample. Haplogroup frequencies were compared between 3 microdeletion classes and the non-deleted infertile males. Deletions arise on many different haplotypic backgrounds. No statistically significant differences in frequency were seen, although the small number of AZFa deletions lay predominantly on one branch of the Y haplotype tree.

  14. Assessment of 2q23.1 Microdeletion Syndrome Implicates MBD5 as a Single Causal Locus of Intellectual Disability, Epilepsy, and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Mullegama, Sureni V.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Shen, Yiping; Repnikova, Elena A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Ernst, Carl; Lindgren, Amelia M.; Morton, Cynthia C.; An, Yu; Astbury, Caroline; Brueton, Louise A.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Ades, Lesley C.; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Charles A.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Van Allen, Margot I.; Parikh, Aditi; Zhang, Lilei; Wu, Bai-Lin; Pyatt, Robert E.; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Gusella, James F.; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with neurodevelopmental disorders or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often harbor chromosomal microdeletions, yet the individual genetic contributors within these regions have not been systematically evaluated. We established a consortium of clinical diagnostic and research laboratories to accumulate a large cohort with genetic alterations of chromosomal region 2q23.1 and acquired 65 subjects with microdeletion or translocation. We sequenced translocation breakpoints; aligned microdeletions to determine the critical region; assessed effects on mRNA expression; and examined medical records, photos, and clinical evaluations. We identified a single gene, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5), as the only locus that defined the critical region. Partial or complete deletion of MBD5 was associated with haploinsufficiency of mRNA expression, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic features. Fourteen alterations, including partial deletions of noncoding regions not typically captured or considered pathogenic by current diagnostic screening, disrupted MBD5 alone. Expression profiles and clinical characteristics were largely indistinguishable between MBD5-specific alteration and deletion of the entire 2q23.1 interval. No copy-number alterations of MBD5 were observed in 7878 controls, suggesting MBD5 alterations are highly penetrant. We surveyed MBD5 coding variations among 747 ASD subjects compared to 2043 non-ASD subjects analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and detected an association with a highly conserved methyl-CpG-binding domain missense variant, p.79Gly>Glu (c.236G>A) (p = 0.012). These results suggest that genetic alterations of MBD5 cause features of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that this epigenetic regulator significantly contributes to ASD risk, warranting further consideration in research and clinical diagnostic screening and highlighting the importance of chromatin remodeling in the etiology of these complex disorders. PMID:21981781

  15. Microdeletion of chromosome 1q21.3 in fraternal twins is associated with mental retardation, microcephaly, and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Aktas, Dilek; Alikasifoglu, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Summary Reported here are twins, both of whom have a 1q21.3 microdeletion and who exhibit key features common to previously reported cases such as microcephaly and developmental delay. However, some clinical findings and deleted genes differed from those in previously reported cases. The karyotype was normal 46, XX for both of the twins. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) identified a 2.6 Mb deletion on chromosome 1q21.3 (chr1: 153,514,121–156,171,335 bp) in case 1 and a 1.6 Mb deletion on chromosome 1q21.3 (chr1: 154,748,365–156,358,923 bp) in case 2. The deleted region includes DPM3, MUC1, GBA, PKLR, RIT1, and LAMTOR2 in both siblings. To the extent known, this is the second report of a 1q21.3 microdeletion in a family with mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, and some dysmorphic features, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum. PMID:28357185

  16. Large recurrent microdeletions associated with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Hreinn; Rujescu, Dan; Cichon, Sven; Pietiläinen, Olli P. H.; Ingason, Andres; Steinberg, Stacy; Fossdal, Ragnheidur; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Sigmundsson, Thordur; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Muglia, Pierandrea; Francks, Clyde; Matthews, Paul M.; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Bjornsson, Asgeir; Mattiasdottir, Sigurborg; Blondal, Thorarinn; Haraldsson, Magnus; Magnusdottir, Brynja B.; Giegling, Ina; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Hartmann, Annette; Shianna, Kevin V.; Ge, Dongliang; Need, Anna C.; Crombie, Caroline; Fraser, Gillian; Walker, Nicholas; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamarie; Paunio, Tiina; Toulopoulou, Timi; Bramon, Elvira; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin; Ruggeri, Mirella; Vassos, Evangelos; Tosato, Sarah; Walshe, Muriel; Li, Tao; Vasilescu, Catalina; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Wang, August G.; Ullum, Henrik; Djurovic, Srdjan; Melle, Ingrid; Olesen, Jes; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Franke, Barbara; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don H.; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Sabatti, Chiara; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kong, Augustine; Andreassen, Ole A.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Georgi, Alexander; Rietschel, Marcella; Werge, Thomas; Petursson, Hannes; Goldstein, David B.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Peltonen, Leena; Collier, David A.; Clair, David St; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-01-01

    Reduced fecundity, associated with severe mental disorders1, places negative selection pressure on risk alleles and may explain, in part, why common variants have not been found that confer risk of disorders such as autism2 schizophrenia3 and mental retardation4. Thus, rare variants may account for a larger fraction of the overall genetic risk than previously assumed. In contrast to rare single nucleotide mutations, rare copy number variations (CNVs) can be detected using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. This has led to the identification of CNVs associated with mental retardation4,5 and autism2. In a genome-wide search for CNVs associating with schizophrenia, we used a population-based sample to identify de novo CNVs by analysing 9,878 transmissions from parents to offspring. The 66 de novo CNVs identified were tested for association in a sample of 1,433 schizophrenia cases and 33,250 controls. Three deletions at 1q21.1, 15q11.2 and 15q13.3 showing nominal association with schizophrenia in the first sample (phase I) were followed up in a second sample of 3,285 cases and 7,951 controls (phase II). All three deletions significantly associate with schizophrenia and related psychoses in the combined sample. The identification of these rare, recurrent risk variants, having occurred independently in multiple founders and being subject to negative selection, is important in itself. CNV analysis may also point the way to the identification of additional and more prevalent risk variants in genes and pathways involved in schizophrenia. PMID:18668039

  17. "Micro-deletions" of the human Y chromosome and their relationship with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Haines, Christopher J; Han, Yibing

    2008-04-01

    The Y chromosome evolves from an autochromosome and accumulates male-related genes including sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY) and several spermatogenesis-related genes. The human Y chromosome (60 Mb long) is largely composed of repetitive sequences that give it a heterochromatic appearance, and it consists of pseudoautosomal, euchromatic, and heterochromatic regions. Located on the two extremities of the Y chromosome, pseudoautosomal regions 1 and 2 (PAR1 and PAR2, 2.6 Mb and 320 bp long, respectively) are homologs with the termini of the X chromosome. The euchromatic region and some of the repeat-rich heterochromatic parts of the Y chromosome are called "male-specific Y" (MSY), which occupy more than 95% of the whole Y chromosome. After evolution, the Y chromosome becomes the smallest in size with the least number of genes but with the most number of copies of genes that are mostly spermatogenesis-related. The Y chromosome is characterized by highly repetitive sequences (including direct repeats, inverted repeats, and palindromes) and high polymorphism. Several gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome occur during evolution owing to its specific gene structure. The consequences of such rearrangements are not only loss but also gain of specific genes. One hundred and fifty three haplotypes have been discovered in the human Y chromosome. The structure of the Y chromosome in the GenBank belongs to haplotype R1. There are 220 genes (104 coding genes, 111 pseudogenes, and 5 other uncategorized genes) according to the most recent count. The 104 coding genes encode a total of about 48 proteins/protein families (including putative proteins/protein families). Among them, 16 gene products have been discovered in the azoospermia factor region (AZF) and are related to spermatogenesis. It has been discovered that one subset of gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome, "micro-deletions", is a major cause of male infertility in some populations. However, controversies

  18. Frequency of 22q11.2 microdeletion in sporadic non-syndromic tetralogy of Fallot cases.

    PubMed

    Gioli-Pereira, L; Pereira, A C; Bergara, D; Mesquita, S; Lopes, A A; Krieger, J E

    2008-06-06

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is a congenital conotruncal heart defect commonly found in DiGeorge (DGS) and velocardiofacial (VCFS) syndromes. The deletion of chromosome 22q11 has also been demonstrated in sporadic or familial cases of TOF. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of del22q11 in patients with non-syndromic TOF seen at a tertiary Pediatric Cardiology care center. One hundred and twenty three non-syndromic TOF patients were selected and evaluated by history, physical examination and review of medical records. Venous blood was drawn for genomic DNA extraction after informed consent 22q11 microdeletion diagnosis was conducted through a standardized SNP genotyping assay and consecutive homozygosity mapping. Phenotype-genotype correlations regarding cardiac anatomy were conducted. We evaluated 123 non-syndromic TOF patients for a 22q11 deletion. 105 (85.4%) patients presented pulmonary stenosis and 18 (14.6%) had pulmonary atresia. Eight patients (6.5%) were found to have a deletion. Of the deleted patients, three (37.5%) presented pulmonary atresia. We have verified a tendency towards a higher prevalence of pulmonary atresia when comparing TOF patients with and without 22q11 microdeletion. 22q11.2 deletion in non-syndromic TOF patients is present in approximately 6% of patients. We suggest a tendency towards a higher prevalence of pulmonary atresia in non-syndromic TOF patients with 22q11 microdeletion. Molecular genetic screening of non-syndromic TOF patient may be important for the correct care of these patients and a more specific genetic diagnostic and counseling.

  19. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): Cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions and a duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, F.P.M.; de Kok, Y.J.M.; Huber, I.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a 1.8 megabase YAC contig in the Xq21.41 region using DXS169, DXS26, and DXS995. This contig encompasses the X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) gene(s) as judged from detailed physical mapping of large Xq21 deletions associated with contiguous gene syndromes and two microdeletions associated with classical DFN3. As a prerequisite for positional cloning of the DFN3 gene, a 850-kb cosmid contig spanning the critical region was constructed by subcloning of two YACs and by cosmid walking in the ICRF X-chromosome library. Using Southern- and PFGE-analysis, we were able to identify 2 novel microdeletions and a 150-kb duplication associated with DFN3. We also identified a sizeable deletion in a patient suffering from choroideremia and mental retardation. This deletion encompasses 40 kb of the distal end of the cosmid contig. Since this patient does not show hearing loss, this finding positions the distal boundary of the DFN3 critical region in our cosmid contig. Our observations suggest that the DFN3 gene is very large (>400 kb) spanning the loci DXS26 and DXS995. In collaboration with Drs. B. Korn and A. Poustka (DKFZ, Heidelberg), cosmids from the contig were used to enrich for cDNAs from the relevant region. Detailed characterization of these cDNAs should soon enable us to identify the DFN3 gene(s).

  20. The 3q29 Microdeletion Syndrome: Report of Three New Unrelated Patients and In Silico “RNA Binding” Analysis of the 3q29 Region

    PubMed Central

    Dasouki, Majed J.; Lushington, Gerald H.; Hovanes, Karine; Casey, James; Gorre, Mereceds

    2012-01-01

    The human 3q29 microdeletion syndrome is associated with mild facial dysmorphism, developmental delay and variable congenital malformations. We report three new unrelated patients with this syndrome. We also performed in silico RNA binding analysis in silico on the 3q29 critical region genes. Several genes within this genomic region including DLG1 and RNF168 are predicted to bind RNA. While recessive mutations in RNF168 cause RIDDLE syndrome, an immune deficiency and radiosensitivity disorder, the potential impact of heterozygous deletion of RNF168 on patients with the 3q29 deletion syndrome is still unknown. PMID:21626679

  1. Clinical and molecular characterization of a combined 17p13.3 microdeletion with partial monosomy 21q21.3 in a 26-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Hannachi, H; Mougou-Zerelli, S; BenAbdallah, I; Mama, N; Hamdi, I; Labalme, A; Elghezal, H; Sanlaville, D; Saad, A

    2011-01-01

    We led a clinical and molecular characterization of a patient with mild mental delay and dysmorphic features initially referred for cytogenetic exploration of an azoospermia. We employed FISH and array CGH techniques for a better definition and refinement of a double chromosome aberration associating a 17p microdeletion with partial monosomy 21q due to 1:3 meiotic segregation of a maternal reciprocal translocation t(17;21)(p13.3;q21.2) revealed after banding analysis. Brain MRI depicted partial callosal and mild diffuse cerebral atrophies, but without expected signs of lissencephaly. The patient's karyotype formula was: 45,XY,der(17)t(17;21)(p13.3;q21.2)mat,-21. FISH study confirmed these rearrangements and array CGH analysis estimated the loss sizes to at least 635 kb on chromosome 17 and to 15.6 Mb on chromosome 21. The absence of lissencephaly and major brain malformations often associated with 17p terminal deletions could be attributed to the retention of PAFAH1B1, YWHAE and CRK genes. Dysmorphic features, moderate mental impairment and minor brain malformations could result from the 21q monosomy and particularly the partial deletion of the APP-SOD1 region. Azoospermia should result from gamete apoptosis induced by a control mechanism triggered in response to chromosome imbalances. Our study provides an additional case for better understanding and delineating both 17p and 21q deletions.

  2. Y-Chromosomal Microdeletion in Idiopathic Azoospermic and Severe Oligozoospermic Indonesian Men.

    PubMed

    Birowo, Ponco; Putra, Donny Eka; Dewi, Mewahyu; Rasyid, Nur; Taher, Akmal

    2017-01-01

    to detect Y-chromosomal microdeletion in Indonesian men with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia using multiplex PCR. we performed 2 multiplex PCR amplifications of the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) region in 71 men. Criteria for including a patient were fulfilled if they presented with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, with or without additional abnormalities of sperm motility or of head morphology, raised or normal levels of FSH, normal levels of LH and testosterone, and with no evidence of testicular tumors or other abnormalities. Five men participated as control persons. partial deletion of AZFa was found in 11 men (15.49%), complete deletion of AZFb in 1 man (1.4%), and complete deletion of AZFc in 1 man (1.4%). The unspecific type of deletion was also detected, including the DBY gene in 2 men (2.81%), and partial deletion of both AZFa and AZFb in 2 men (2.81%). No AZF deletion was observed in the control probands. Related to the type of deletion, the AZFa and AZFb deletion showed spermatogenesis arrest in most tubules, while deletion of the DBY gene is associated with the sertoli cell only (SCO) syndrome. the frequency of partial deletion of AZFa was found to be relatively high in our center. The type of deletion is associated with the testicular histology.

  3. Investigation of TBR1 Hemizygosity: Four Individuals with 2q24 Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, R.N.; Dobyns, W.B.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Wheeler, P.; Spence, J.E.; Bandholz, A.M.; Bawle, E.V.; Carmany, E.P.; Powell, C.M.; Hudson, B.; Schultz, R.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Ballif, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    TBR1 encodes a transcription factor with critical roles in corticogenesis, including cortical neuron migration and axon pathfinding, establishment of regional and laminar identity of cortical neurons, and control of glutamatergic neuronal cell fate. Based upon TBR1's role in cortical development, we sought to investigate TBR1 hemizygosity in individuals referred for genetic evaluation of intellectual disability and developmental delay. We describe 4 patients with microdeletions identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques, encompassing TBR1 and spanning 2q24.1q31.1, ranging in size from 2.17 to 12.34 Mb. Only the patient with the largest deletion had a possible cortical malformation. Mild ventriculomegaly is the only common brain anomaly, present in all patients; a Chiari I malformation is seen in 2 patients, and mega cisterna magna is seen in a third. Our findings are consistent with Tbr1 mouse models showing that hemizygosity of the gene requires additional genetic factors for the manifestation of severe structural brain malformations. Other syndromic features are present in these patients, including autism spectrum disorders, ocular colobomas, and craniosynostosis, features that are likely affected by the deletion of genes other than TBR1. PMID:23112752

  4. [Prenatal diagnosis of fetal urinary abnormalities and microdeletion on chromosome 1q21.1].

    PubMed

    Fu, Fang; Huang, Yong-hua; Liao, Can; Li, Ru; Feng, Sui-hua; Mai, Qiao-jiao; Li, Wei-kai

    2012-10-01

    To investigate genetic etiology of fetal urinary abnormalities with array-based comparative genomic hycridization(array-CGH). Thirty-two fetuses with variable urinary abnormalities but normal karyotyping by conventional cytogenetic technique were selected. DNA from the fetuses and their parents samples were prepared and hybridization with Affymetrix cytogenetic 2.7M arrays by follwing the manufacture's standard protocol. The data were analyzed by special CHAS software packages. By using array-CGH detection, genomic imbalanced copy number variations (CNVs) were identified in night fetuses(28%), four out of night CNVs were inherited from parental samples; two were indicated to be benign variants(6%) in the database; and the other three CNVs (9%) were all de novo adjacent microdeletions and microduplication mapping on to common chromosome 1q21.1 region, within which was genitourinaty system function associated gene PDZK1. The incidence of genomic unbalanced variations in fetuses with congenital urinary malformations is approximately 28%, including about 9% pathogenic variations. Copy number variations (CNVs) of chromosome 1q21.1 region are associated with congenital urinary malformations which may be due to haploinsufficiency or overexpression of PDZK1 gene.

  5. Clinical and molecular characterization of a second family with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fischetto, Rita; Palumbo, Orazio; Ortolani, Federica; Palumbo, Pietro; Leone, Maria Pia; Causio, Francesco Andrea; Pesce, Sabino; Digilio, Maria Christina; Carella, Massimo; Papadia, Francesco

    2017-04-13

    The 12q14 microdeletion syndrome is a rare condition characterized by low birth weight, failure to thrive, short stature, learning disabilities, and osteopoikilosis. To date, 20 cases of 12q14 deletion have been reported in the literature, displaying both phenotypic than genetic variability. We report on three familial cases, a mother and two brothers, with severe short stature. The mother and elder brother presented with osteopoikilosis while the younger brother had severe short stature and developmental delay. SNP array analysis revealed a 1.9 Mb heterozygous 12q14.2q14.3 deletion in all three patients encompassing 14 genes and 3 miRNAs. In addition, the younger brother carried a paternal 11q13.4 duplication including the SHANK2 gene. This latter patient was investigated for developmental delay and did not show osteopoikilosis, confirming the role of age in the clinical presentation of this condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second family described with the syndrome. Comparing the clinical and molecular data of our patients with those previously reported we performed a detailed genotype-phenotype correlation confirming the association between growth retardation and osteopoikilosis when the rearrangement includes both LEMD3 and HMGA2 genes. In addition, we suggest the XPOT, TBK1, WIF1 genes as candidates for the clinical features observed in our patients and discuss for the first time the possible involvement of some microRNAs, when deleted, in the etiology of the phenotypes in 12q14 microdeletion syndrome patients. We expect the interpretation of our findings to be useful both from a molecular point of view and for genetic counseling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mouse models of 17q21.31 microdeletion and microduplication syndromes highlight the importance of Kansl1 for cognition

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Thomas; Iacono, Giovanni; Chevalier, Claire; Afinowi, Nurudeen O.; Houbaert, Xander; Laliberte, Christine; Birling, Marie-Christine; Linda, Katrin; Meziane, Hamid; Selloum, Mohammed; Sorg, Tania; Koolen, David A.; Stunnenberg, Henk G.; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Humeau, Yann; De Vries, Bert B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS) is a multi-system disorder characterized by intellectual disability, friendly behavior, and congenital malformations. The syndrome is caused either by microdeletions in the 17q21.31 chromosomal region or by variants in the KANSL1 gene. The reciprocal 17q21.31 microduplication syndrome is associated with psychomotor delay, and reduced social interaction. To investigate the pathophysiology of 17q21.31 microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, we generated three mouse models: 1) the deletion (Del/+); or 2) the reciprocal duplication (Dup/+) of the 17q21.31 syntenic region; and 3) a heterozygous Kansl1 (Kans1+/-) model. We found altered weight, general activity, social behaviors, object recognition, and fear conditioning memory associated with craniofacial and brain structural changes observed in both Del/+ and Dup/+ animals. By investigating hippocampus function, we showed synaptic transmission defects in Del/+ and Dup/+ mice. Mutant mice with a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in Kansl1 displayed similar behavioral and anatomical phenotypes compared to Del/+ mice with the exception of sociability phenotypes. Genes controlling chromatin organization, synaptic transmission and neurogenesis were upregulated in the hippocampus of Del/+ and Kansl1+/- animals. Our results demonstrate the implication of KANSL1 in the manifestation of KdVS phenotypes and extend substantially our knowledge about biological processes affected by these mutations. Clear differences in social behavior and gene expression profiles between Del/+ and Kansl1+/- mice suggested potential roles of other genes affected by the 17q21.31 deletion. Together, these novel mouse models provide new genetic tools valuable for the development of therapeutic approaches. PMID:28704368

  7. BACs-on-Beads Technology: A Reliable Test for Rapid Detection of Aneuploidies and Microdeletions in Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples. PMID:24795887

  8. BACs-on-Beads technology: a reliable test for rapid detection of aneuploidies and microdeletions in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    García-Herrero, Sandra; Campos-Galindo, Inmaculada; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Serra, Vicente; Olmo, Inés; Lara, Coral; Simón, Carlos; Rubio, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The risk of fetal aneuploidies is usually estimated based on high resolution ultrasound combined with biochemical determination of criterion in maternal blood, with invasive procedures offered to the population at risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a new rapid aneuploidy screening test on amniotic fluid (AF) or chorionic villus (CV) samples based on BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technology and to compare the results with classical karyotyping by Giemsa banding (G-banding) of cultured cells in metaphase as the gold standard technique. The prenatal-BoBs kit was used to study aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y as well as nine microdeletion syndromes in 321 AF and 43 CV samples. G-banding of metaphase cultured cells was performed concomitantly for all prenatal samples. A microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was also carried out in a subset of samples. Prenatal-BoBs results were widely confirmed by classical karyotyping. Only six karyotype findings were not identified by Prenatal-BoBs, all of them due to the known limitations of the technique. In summary, the BACs-on-Beads technology was an accurate, robust, and efficient method for the rapid diagnosis of common aneuploidies and microdeletion syndromes in prenatal samples.

  9. The Pattern of Cortical Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of a Schizophrenia-Related Microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Fénelon, Karine; Xu, Bin; Lai, Cora S.; Mukai, Jun; Markx, Sander; Stark, Kimberly L.; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Gan, Wen-Biao; Fischbach, Gerald D.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2013-01-01

    We used a mouse model of the schizophrenia-predisposing 22q11.2 microdeletion to evaluate how this genetic lesion affects cortical neural circuits at the synaptic, cellular, and molecular levels. Guided by cognitive deficits, we demonstrated that mutant mice display robust deficits in high-frequency synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity (synaptic depression and potentiation), as well as alterations in long-term plasticity and dendritic spine stability. Apart from previously reported reduction in dendritic complexity of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, altered synaptic plasticity occurs in the context of relatively circumscribed and often subtle cytoarchitectural changes in neuronal density and inhibitory neuron numbers. We confirmed the pronounced DiGeorge critical region 8 (Dgcr8)-dependent deficits in primary micro-RNA processing and identified additional changes in gene expression and RNA splicing that may underlie the effects of this mutation. Reduction in Dgcr8 levels appears to be a major driver of altered short-term synaptic plasticity in prefrontal cortex and working memory but not of long-term plasticity and cytoarchitecture. Our findings inform the cortical synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory impairment in the context of psychiatric disorders. They also provide insight into the link between micro-RNA dysregulation and genetic liability to schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24027283

  10. PCR screening for 22q11.2 microdeletion: development of a new cost-effective diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Gioli-Pereira, L; Pereira, A C; Mesquita, S M; Lopes, A A; Krieger, J E

    2006-07-15

    Del22q11.2 syndrome is the most frequent known chromosomal microdeletion syndrome. Previous studies suggest that a substantial number of patients with congenital heart disease have a 22q11 deletion. The molecular diagnosis of Del22q11.2 is usually made by fluorescence in situ hybridization, an expensive and not widely available technique. We developed an efficient and cost-effective PCR SNP assay designed for the screening of 22q11.2 deletion through consecutive homozygosity. Through the screening of dbSNP we have selected SNP markers located in the 22q11.2 microdeleted region. Population heterozygosities were determined in 213 normal individuals. Designed assays consisted of PCR amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Fragments generated were visualized on agarose gel and genotyped. Selected markers were: rs5748411, rs2238778, rs4819523 and rs4680. All selected markers were localized in the 22q11.2 deleted region. Allele and genotype frequencies of all selected markers were under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Selected SNPs were not in linkage disequilibrium. Predicted assay specificity was estimated to be 92.86% in the Brazilian population. The use of consecutive homozygosity in this SNP-based diagnostic test may be used as a cost-effective tool in reference molecular genetics laboratories.

  11. Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, cat eye, and distal 22q11 microdeletion syndromes: a unique double rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Torti, Erin E; Braddock, Stephen R; Bernreuter, Kristen; Batanian, Jacqueline R

    2013-08-01

    An array-CGH on 19-year-old male showed a proximal 1.11 Mb duplication and a distal 1.7 Mb deletion of 22q11.2 regions flanking the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome region that remained intact. FISH analyses revealed both abnormalities to be on the same homolog 22. This double rearrangement lead to the co-existence of two syndromes: Cat eye and distal 22q11.2 microdeletion syndromes with a rare associated phenotype of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS). A review of the literature indicates that this is the second report of a proximal duplication and the fifth report of a distal deletion and OAVS suggestive of a possible OAVS candidate gene in this region.

  12. Interstitial 1q21.1 Microdeletion Is Associated with Severe Skeletal Anomalies, Dysmorphic Face and Moderate Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Bruno F; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Kokitsu-Nakata, Nancy M; Vendramini-Pittoli, Siulan; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi Santos, Ana C V; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene; Richieri-Costa, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    We report on a Brazilian patient with a 1.7-Mb interstitial microdeletion in chromosome 1q21.1. The phenotypic characteristics include microcephaly, a peculiar facial gestalt, cleft lip/palate, and multiple skeletal anomalies represented by malformed phalanges, scoliosis, abnormal modeling of vertebral bodies, hip dislocation, abnormal acetabula, feet anomalies, and delayed neuropsychological development. Deletions reported in this region are clinically heterogeneous, ranging from subtle phenotypic manifestations to severe congenital heart defects and/or neurodevelopmental findings. A few genes within the deleted region are associated with congenital anomalies, mainly the RBM8A, DUF1220, and HYDIN2 paralogs. Our patient presents with a spectrum of unusual malformations of 1q21.1 deletion syndrome not reported up to date.

  13. A 7q31.33q32.1 microdeletion including LRRC4 and GRM8 is associated with severe intellectual disability and characteristics of autism.

    PubMed

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Takahashi, Yuya; Ohashi, Tsukasa; Tohyama, Jun; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy with severe intellectual disability (ID) and characteristics of autism was found to have a de novo 1.9-Mb microdeletion in 7q31.33q32.1, in which LRRC4, GRM8, and 11 other genes were included. GRM8 is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. LRRC4 is related to synaptic cell adhesion molecules, some of which are associated with autism. The deletion of LRRC4 may be responsible for the severe ID and characteristics of autism observed in the present patient.

  14. A 7q31.33q32.1 microdeletion including LRRC4 and GRM8 is associated with severe intellectual disability and characteristics of autism

    PubMed Central

    Sangu, Noriko; Shimojima, Keiko; Takahashi, Yuya; Ohashi, Tsukasa; Tohyama, Jun; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy with severe intellectual disability (ID) and characteristics of autism was found to have a de novo 1.9-Mb microdeletion in 7q31.33q32.1, in which LRRC4, GRM8, and 11 other genes were included. GRM8 is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. LRRC4 is related to synaptic cell adhesion molecules, some of which are associated with autism. The deletion of LRRC4 may be responsible for the severe ID and characteristics of autism observed in the present patient. PMID:28224041

  15. Decrease in fertilization and cleavage rates, but not in clinical outcomes for infertile men with AZF microdeletion of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Chang; Wu, Tong-Hua; Li, Guan-Gui; Yin, Biao; Liu, Hong-Jie; Song, Cheng; Mo, Mei-Lan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to explore whether the presence of a Y chromosome azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletion confers any adverse effect on embryonic development and clinical outcomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment. Fifty-seven patients with AZF microdeletion were included in the present study and 114 oligozoospermia and azoospermia patients without AZF microdeletion were recruited as controls. Both AZF and control groups were further divided into subgroups based upon the methods of semen collection: the AZF-testicular sperm extraction subgroup (AZF-TESE, n = 14), the AZF-ejaculation subgroup (AZF-EJA, n = 43), the control-TESE subgroup (n = 28) and the control-EJA subgroup (n = 86). Clinical data were analyzed in the two groups and four subgroups respectively. A retrospective case-control study was performed. A significantly lower fertilization rate (69.27 versus 75.70%, P = 0.000) and cleavage rate (89.55 versus 94.39%, P = 0.000) was found in AZF group compared with the control group. Furthermore, in AZF-TESE subgroup, the fertilization rate (67.54 versus 74.25%, P = 0.037) and cleavage rate (88.96 versus 94.79%, P = 0.022) were significantly lower than in the control-TESE subgroup; similarly, the fertilization rate (69.85 versus 75.85%, P = 0.004) and cleavage rate (89.36 versus 94.26%, P = 0.002) in AZF-EJA subgroup were significantly lower than in the control-EJA subgroup; however, the fertilization rate and cleavage rate in AZF-TESE (control-TESE) subgroup was similar to that in the AZF-EJA (control-EJA) subgroup. The other clinical outcomes were comparable between four subgroups (P > 0.05). Therefore, sperm from patients with AZF microdeletion, obtained either by ejaculation or TESE, may have lower fertilization and cleavage rates, but seem to have comparable clinical outcomes to those from patients without AZF microdeletion.

  16. Autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib is associated with a heterozygous microdeletion that likely disrupts a putative imprinting control element of GNAS

    PubMed Central

    Bastepe, Murat; Fröhlich, Leopold F.; Hendy, Geoffrey N.; Indridason, Olafur S.; Josse, Robert G.; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Körkkö, Jarmo; Nakamoto, Jon M.; Rosenbloom, Arlan L.; Slyper, Arnold H.; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles; Crawford, John D.; Jüppner, Harald

    2003-01-01

    Patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) have hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia due to renal parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance, but lack physical features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy. PHP-Ib is thus distinct from PHP-Ia, which is caused by mutations in the GNAS exons encoding the G protein α subunit. However, an imprinted autosomal dominant form of PHP-Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) has been mapped to a region of chromosome 20q13.3 containing GNAS. Furthermore, loss of methylation at a differentially methylated region (DMR) of this locus, exon A/B, has been observed thus far in all investigated sporadic PHP-Ib cases and the affected members of multiple AD-PHP-Ib kindreds. We now report that affected members and obligate gene carriers of 12 unrelated AD-PHP-Ib kindreds and four apparently sporadic PHP-Ib patients, but not healthy controls, have a heterozygous approximately 3-kb microdeletion located approximately 220 kb centromeric of GNAS exon A/B. The deleted region, which is flanked by two direct repeats, includes three exons of STX16, the gene encoding syntaxin-16, for which no evidence of imprinting could be found. Affected individuals carrying the microdeletion show loss of exon A/B methylation but no epigenetic abnormalities at other GNAS DMRs. We therefore postulate that this microdeletion disrupts a putative cis-acting element required for methylation at exon A/B, and that this genetic defect underlies the renal PTH resistance in AD-PHP-Ib. PMID:14561710

  17. Varicocele and male infertility in Northeast China: Y chromosome microdeletion as an underlying cause.

    PubMed

    Dai, R L; Hou, Y; Li, F B; Yue, J M; Xi, Q; Liu, R Z

    2015-06-12

    The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions among azoospermic, severe oligozoospermic, moderate oligozoospermic, and mild oligozoospermic patients with varicocele-related and idiopathic infertility shows conflicting data in Asian countries. We aimed to detect this frequency in Northeast China, and investigated spermatogenic defects whether associated with varicocele or Y chromosome microdeletions. All samples underwent a thorough physical examination, semen analysis, and PCR analyses for Y chromosome microdeletions. We randomly selected 150 infertile non-obstructive azoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 1), 150 idiopathic non-obstructive azoospermic infertility patients (Group 2), 150 infertile severe oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 3), 150 idiopathic severe oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 4), 150 infertile moderate oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 5), 150 idiopathic moderate oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 6), 150 infertile mild oligozoospermic patients with left varicocele (Group 7), 150 idiopathic mild oligozoospermic infertility patients (Group 8), and 60 healthy unrelated men with proven fertility were recruited as control subjects (Group 9). We observed that our samples from Northeastern China had a higher frequency of microdeletions among the non-obstructive azoospermic individuals with varicocele, as compared with other Asian countries. Furthermore, the spermatogenic defect is due to the underlying Y chromosome microdeletion, and not the varicocele itself. Although varicocele is not the cause of male infertility, it may be associated with male infertility in the Northeastern Chinese population.

  18. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  19. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Salvador, Blake J.; Elias, Ellen R.; Cavanaugh, Jean L.; Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  20. Cardiac abnormalities and facial anthropometric measurements in children from the Free State and Northern Cape provinces of South Africa with chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Brown, S C; Henderson, B D; Buys, D A; Theron, M; Long, M A; Smit, F

    2010-01-01

    Microdeletions of chromosome 22 are common and have a prevalence of at least 1/4 000. Cardiac abnormalities, abnormal facial features and palatal abnormalities are frequently present in these patients. To describe the cardiac lesions and selected measurable facial features in children from the Free State and Northern Cape presenting at the Cardiology Unit of the Universitas Academic Hospital complex in Bloemfontein. This was a prospective study in which patients with abnormal facial characteristics were tested using a fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) probe for the 22q11.2 microdeletion. Forty children tested positive for the microdeletion. All patients underwent an echocardiogram and where possible, facial anthropometric measurements were performed. The median age at diagnosis was 3.6 years (range 0.04 years, i.e. 2 weeks to 16.2 years). Tetralogy with or without pulmonary atresia was diagnosed in 43% (n = 17) of the children and truncus arteriosus in 20% (n = 8). A rightsided aortic arch was present in 43% (n = 17) of the patients. Mid-facial height was slightly longer (median = 1.0; range -0.5 to 3.3) and width narrower (median = -1.4; range -2.2 to 0.1) than normal. Ear height and width were notably small compared to normal, with median -scores = -3.3 (range -4.8 to -2.6) and = -2.4 (range -3.4 to -1.4), respectively. Microdeletions of chromosome 22q11 are present in children from the Free State and Northern Cape. Conotruncal cyanotic heart lesions, especially tetralogy with or without pulmonary atresia and truncus arteriosus were the most frequent congenital cardiac diagnoses. A right-sided aortic arch was also commonly present in these children. Facial features varied and small ears were the most noteworthy anthropometric feature. A right-sided aortic arch with or without a congenital cardiac lesion, a long, narrow mid-face and small ears should alert the physician to the possibility of a microdeletion on the long arm of chromosome 22.

  1. A Korean family with KBG syndrome identified by ANKRD11 mutation, and phenotypic comparison of ANKRD11 mutation and 16q24.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Eunhae; Park, Jong Bum; Im, Woo Young; Kim, Hyon J

    2015-02-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare disease characterized by intellectual disability, typical craniofacial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Recently, ANKRD11 was identified as a gene that is responsible for the disease. In addition, microdeletion of 16q24.3, including ANKRD11, has been reported to result in the KBG syndrome phenotype. Herein, we discuss a Korean family with KBG syndrome, as identified by ANKRD11 gene mutation. The patients included a nine-month-old boy and his 21-month-old sister who failed to thrive and have delayed development. Chromosomal microarray was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause, but the results showed no abnormalities. However, the mother of the children was found to have features similar to her children. Therefore, we strongly suspected an autosomal-dominant inherited disease and performed whole exome sequencing. A mutation of ANKRD11 gene was found in all patients, and the frameshift variant c.2395-2398delAAAG was confirmed. Clinical manifestations of the patients were consistent with KBG syndrome. We reviewed all reported cases with confirmed ANKRD11 mutation or 16q24.3 microdeletion including ANKRD11. As a result, we conclude that severe short stature, intellectual disability, and macrodontia are the main characteristics in KBG syndrome related to ANKRD11 mutation.

  2. EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions: state-of-the-art 2013.

    PubMed

    Krausz, C; Hoefsloot, L; Simoni, M; Tüttelmann, F

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions is a common routine genetic test which is part of the diagnostic workup of azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic men. Since 1999, the European Academy of Andrology (EAA) and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) have been actively involved in supporting the improvement of the quality of the diagnostic assays by publication of the laboratory guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions and by offering external quality assessment trials. The present revision of the 2004 laboratory guidelines summarizes all the clinical novelties related to the Y chromosome (classic, partial and gene-specific deletions, genotype-phenotype correlations, methodological issues) and provides an update on the results of the quality control programme. These aspects also reflect the consensus of a large group of specialists present at a round table session during the recent Florence-Utah-Symposium on 'Genetics of male infertility' (Florence, 19-21 September, 2013). During the last 10 years the gr/gr deletion has been demonstrated as a significant risk factor for impaired sperm production. However, the screening for this deletion type in the routine diagnostic setting is still a debated issue among experts. The original basic protocol based on two multiplex polymerase chain reactions remains fully valid and appropriate for accurate diagnosis of complete AZF deletions and it requires only a minor modification in populations with a specific Y chromosome background. However, in light of novel data on genotype-phenotype correlations, the extension analysis for the AZFa and AZFb deletions is now routinely recommended. Novel methods and kits with excessively high number of markers do not improve the sensitivity of the test, may even complicate the interpretation of the results and are not recommended. Annual participation in an external quality control programme is strongly encouraged. The 12-year

  3. Assessment of cognitive outcome measures in teenagers with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2017-01-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive tests (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten individuals with 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (14–18 years of age), and the results were analyzed to determine feasibility of use, potential for improvement, and internal consistency. It was determined that the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet are valid tests of cognitive function in 15q13.3 microdeletion patients. Therefore, these tests may be considered for use as objective outcome measures in future clinical trials, assessing change in cognitive function over a period of pharmacological treatment. PMID:26754479

  4. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    SciTech Connect

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F.

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  5. Prevalence of 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome in Iranian patients with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Narges; Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Salehi, Mansoor; Nouri, Nayereh; Meamar, Rokhsareh; Behnam, Mahdiyeh; Derakhshandeh, Fatemeh; Kashkoolinejad, Tahereh; Abdali, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is the most common multiple genetic disorder associated with learning disabilities, developmental delays, immune deficiency, hypocalcemia, and cleft palate. Finding some valid criteria for screening of 22q11.2 deletion syndromes in infants would be very helpful in early diagnosis and treatment. Materials and Methods: Since 69% of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion have a palatal abnormality, we studied the prevalence of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in 378 Iranian patients during a 5-year period, including 291 patients affected with cleft palate only without cleft lip (CPO) and 87 patients affected with velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI) and/or submucous cleft palate (SMCP). DNA copy number was analyzed with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique. Results: In our study, 15/378 (3.97%) patients with palatal anomalies showed 22q11.2 deletion. Interestingly, this prevalence between syndromic patients was 15/104 (14.42%). Conclusion: It seems that SMCP or VPI, in addition to one or more another features of 22q11.2 deletions, especially developmental delay, may be good criteria for molecular investigation of 22q11.2 region. PMID:28217639

  6. A rare association of interrupted aortic arch type C and microdeletion 22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Cuturilo, Goran; Drakulic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Milena; Jovanovic, Ida; Djukic, Milan; Miletic-Grkovic, Slobodanka; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina

    2008-10-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 is associated with a variety of findings, and the most common are cardiac defects. It is very frequently associated with interrupted aortic arch (IAA) type B and very rarely with type A and type C. Here we report the first case of IAA type C associated with 22q11.2 deletion in Serbia and, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth case described worldwide so far. By this report we would like to point out that all patients with IAA type C who have additional features specific for 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome should be screened for the presence of this deletion.

  7. Identification of a microdeletion at 7q21.3 with fluorescence in situ hybridization in a patient with split hand/split foot (ectrodactyly)

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.; Massa, H.; Disteche, C.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF), often referred to as ectrodactyly or lobster claw deformity, is a human developmental disorder characterized by a deep median cleft of the hands and feet, missing digits, and fusion of remaining digits. This anomaly can be seen alone, frequently autosomal dominant, or in association with other abnormalities. One locus for this defect has been localized to chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. We report a patient with SHSF plus mental retardation, short stature and dysmorphic features who was found to have a microdeletion at this locus detected only with the aid of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). T.H. is a 7 y.o. male who was referred for evaluation of foot anomalies and mild mental retardation. History was remarkable for growth retardation of postnatal onset and hypotonia. Renal ultrasound and audiology evaluation were normal. Physical exam revealed dysplastic ears, micrognathia, long philtrum, high narrow palate, and malformations of the feet consistent with SHSF. Family history was negative for limb abnormalities and mental retardation. A number of patients with SHSF and other anomalies have been found to have deletions involving chromosome 7q21-q22; therefore, high resolution chromosome analysis was performed in T.H. but was inconclusive. Cosmids and yeast artificial chromosomes which we had previously mapped to the SHSF critical region were used as FISH probes and a microdeletion was detected. We were thus able to determine the etiology of this child`s abnormalities and provide accurate genetic counseling, which would not have been possible with standard cytogenetic techniques. This technique also allowed us to further refine the SHSF critical region. This case illustrates the utility of FISH for the rapid identification of suspect microdeletions in SHSF. This approach should also be useful as an expeditious way of defining the critical regions for the location of genes which give rise to other developmental malformations.

  8. Evidence for a recurrent microdeletion at chromosome 16p11.2 associated with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew G; Coughlin, Curtis R; Kaplan, Paige; Conlin, Laura K; Meyers, Kevin E C; Zackai, Elaine H; Spinner, Nancy B; Copelovitch, Lawrence

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract can be associated with Hirschsprung disease. We report on three children with a similar 16p11.2 microdeletion with a spectrum of clinical anomalies consisting of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in two patients (Patients 1 and 2) and Hirschsprung disease in two patients (Patients 1 and 3), leading us to hypothesize that a gene in this region is associated with these phenotypes. Patient 1 presented with left renal agenesis, grade-IV vesicoureteral reflux, and Hirschsprung disease, Patient 2 with left renal agenesis, chronic kidney disease, chronic constipation, seizures, and developmental delay, and Patient 3 with Hirschsprung disease and normal kidneys. Genome-wide microarray analysis demonstrated overlapping microdeletions within 16p11.2. The shortest region of overlap in the three patients contained only eight genes, including the SH2 domain-containing binding protein 1 (SH2B1), an adaptor protein which has been implicated in enhancement of the tyrosine kinase activity of RET, whose role in developmental disease of the kidney and enteric enervation is well established. Our findings suggest that 16p11.2 deletions are associated with abnormalities of renal and enteric development and we hypothesize that deletion of SH2B1 may account for the observed phenotype.

  9. The complex behavioral phenotype of 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ziats, Mark N; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Berry, Leandra N; Ali, May; Ge, Jun; Guffey, Danielle; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bader, Patricia; Gambello, Michael J; Wolf, Varina; Penney, Lynette S; Miller, Ryan; Lebel, Robert Roger; Kane, Jeffrey; Bachman, Kristine; Troxell, Robin; Clark, Gary; Minard, Charles G; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Beaudet, Arthur; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-11-01

    Chromosome 15q13.3 represents a hotspot for genomic rearrangements due to repetitive sequences mediating nonallelic homologous recombination. Deletions of 15q13.3 have been identified in the context of multiple neurological and psychiatric disorders, but a prospective clinical and behavioral assessment of affected individuals has not yet been reported. Eighteen subjects with 15q13.3 microdeletion underwent a series of behavioral assessments, along with clinical history and physical examination, to comprehensively define their behavioral phenotypes. Cognitive deficits are the most prevalent feature in 15q13.3 deletion syndrome, with an average nonverbal IQ of 60 among the patients studied. Autism spectrum disorder was highly penetrant, with 31% of patients meeting clinical criteria and exceeding cutoff scores on both ADOS-2 and ADI-R. Affected individuals exhibited a complex pattern of behavioral abnormalities, most notably hyperactivity, attention problems, withdrawal, and externalizing symptoms, as well as impairments in functional communication, leadership, adaptive skills, and activities of daily living. The 15q13.3 deletion syndrome encompasses a heterogeneous behavioral phenotype that poses a major challenge to parents, caregivers, and treating providers. Further work to more clearly delineate genotype-phenotype relationships in 15q13.3 deletions will be important for anticipatory guidance and development of targeted therapies.Genet Med 18 11, 1111-1118.

  10. Detection of Fetal Sex, Aneuploidy and a Microdeletion from Single Placental Syncytial Nuclear Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Holland, Olivia; Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin; McDowell-Hook, Maria; Stone, Peter; Sedlmayr, Peter; Chamley, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    A key problem in prenatal screening using extra-embryonic cells is the feasibility of extracting usable DNA from a small number of cells. Syncytial nuclear aggregates (SNAs) are multinucleated structures shed from the placenta. This study assesses the potential of SNAs as a source of fetal DNA for the detection of genetic abnormalities. SNAs were collected in vitro. Whole-genome amplification was used to amplify DNA from single SNAs, and DNA quality and quantity was assessed by spectrophotometry and PCR. Confocal microscopy was used to count nuclei within SNAs, determine metabolic activity and investigate DNA damage. Fetal sex and chromosomal/genetic abnormalities were investigated with array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). DNA was amplified from 81% of the individual SNAs. A mean of 61 ± 43 nuclei were found per SNA. DNA strand breaks were found in 76% of the SNAs. Seventy-five percent of SNAs yielded whole-genome-amplified DNA of sufficient quality for aCGH after storage and shipping. Individual SNAs from the same pregnancy reliably gave the same chromosomal profile, and fetal sex and trisomies could be detected. A microdeletion was detected in one pregnancy. SNAs could provide a source of extra-embryonic DNA for the prenatal screening/diagnosis of fetal sex and chromosomal and sub-chromosomal genetic abnormalities. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Screening of Y chromosome microdeletions in 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis and in patients with a 45,X/46,XY karyotype or its variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Partial and mixed gonadal dysgenesis (PGD and MGD) are characterized by genital ambiguity and the finding of either a streak gonad and a dysgenetic testis or two dysgenetic testes. The karyotype in PGD is 46,XY, whereas a 45,X/46,XY mosaicism or its variants (more than two lineages and/or structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome) is generally found in MGD. Such mosaics are also compatible with female phenotype and Turner syndrome, ovotesticular disorder of sex development, and infertility in men with normal external genitalia. During the last few years, evidences of a linkage between Y microdeletions and 45,X mosaicism have been reported. There are also indications that the instability caused by such deletions might be more significant in germ cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the presence of Y chromosome microdeletions in individuals with PGD and in those with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism or its variants and variable phenotypes. Methods Our sample comprised 13 individuals with PGD and 15 with mosaicism, most of them with a MGD phenotype (n = 11). Thirty-six sequence tagged sites (STS) spanning the male specific region (MSY) on the Y chromosome (Yp, centromere and Yq) were analyzed by multiplex PCR and some individual reactions. Results All STS showed positive amplifications in the PGD group. Conversely, in the group with mosaicism, six individuals with MGD had been identified with Yq microdeletions, two of them without structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome by routine cytogenetic analysis. The deleted STSs were located within AZFb and AZFc (Azoospermia Factor) regions, which harbor several genes responsible for spermatogenesis. Conclusions Absence of deletions in individuals with PGD does not confirm the hypothesis that instability of the Y chromosome in the gonads could be one of the causes of such condition. However, deletions identified in the second group indicate that mosaicism may be associated with Y chromosome abnormalities

  12. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten…

  13. [Prenatal genetic diagnosis for a fetus with atypical neurofibromatosis type 1 microdeletion].

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobin; Wu, Jianzhu; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ji, Yuanjun; Fang, Qun; Chen, Baojiang; Luo, Yanmin

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the correlation between atypical neurofibromatosis type 1(NF1) microdeletion and fetal phenotype. Fetal blood sampling was carried out for a woman bearing a fetus with talipes equinovarus. G-banded karyotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-array) were performed on the fetal blood sample. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to confirm the result of SNP array analysis. FISH assay was also carried out on peripheral blood specimens from the parents to ascertain the origin of mutation. The karyotype of fetus was found to be 46, XY by G-banding analysis. However, a 3.132 Mb microdeletion was detected in chromosome region 17q11.2 by SNP array, which overlaped with the region of NF1 microdeletion syndrome. Analyzing of the specimens from the fetus and its parents with FISH has confirmed it to be a de novo deletion. Talipes equinovarus may be an abnormal sonographic feature of fetus with atypical NF1 microdeletion which can be accurately diagnosed with SNP array.

  14. Microdeletion of chromosome 15q24.3-25.2 and orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Sing, Bindya; Song, Dongli; DeSandre, Glenn; Govindaswami, Balaji; Rosenthal, Scott; Gunn, Shelly; Wallerstein, Robert

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of de novo microdeletion of 15q24.3-q25.2 in an infant with orofacial cleft and general hypotonia and suggest that this may be a critical region in orofacial development. In addition, this case highlights the usefulness of comparative genomic microarray in the evaluation of children with congenital anomalies with such defects.

  15. Assessment of Cognitive Outcome Measures in Teenagers with 15q13.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutcher, Emeline; Ali, May; Harrison, John; Sovago, Judit; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome causes a spectrum of cognitive disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. We aimed to determine if any or all of three cognitive testing systems (the KiTAP, CogState, and Stanford-Binet) are suitable for assessment of cognitive function in affected individuals. These three tests were administered to ten…

  16. Visual memory profile in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: are there differences in performance and neurobiological substrates between tasks linked to ventral and dorsal visual brain structures? A cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bostelmann, Mathilde; Schneider, Maude; Padula, Maria Carmela; Maeder, Johanna; Schaer, Marie; Scariati, Elisa; Debbané, Martin; Glaser, Bronwyn; Menghetti, Sarah; Eliez, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Children affected by the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a specific neuropsychological profile with strengths and weaknesses in several cognitive domains. Specifically, previous evidence has shown that patients with 22q11.2DS have more difficulties memorizing faces and visual-object characteristics of stimuli. In contrast, they have better performance in visuo-spatial memory tasks. The first focus of this study was to replicate these results in a larger sample of patients affected with 22q11.2DS and using a range of memory tasks. Moreover, we analyzed if the deficits were related to brain morphology in the structures typically underlying these abilities (ventral and dorsal visual streams). Finally, since the longitudinal development of visual memory is not clearly characterized in 22q11.2DS, we investigated its evolution from childhood to adolescence. Seventy-one patients with 22q11.2DS and 49 control individuals aged between 9 and 16 years completed the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) and specific subtests assessing visual memory from the Children's Memory Scale (CMS). The BVRT was used to compute spatial and object memory errors. For the CMS, specific subtests were classified into ventral, dorsal, and mixed subtests. Longitudinal data were obtained from a subset of 26 patients and 22 control individuals. Cross-sectional results showed that patients with 22q11.2DS were impaired in all visual memory measures, with stronger deficits in visual-object memory and memory of faces, compared to visuo-spatial memory. No correlations between morphological brain impairments and visual memory were found in patients with 22q11.2DS. Longitudinal findings revealed that participants with 22q11.2DS made more object memory errors than spatial memory errors at baseline. This difference was no longer significant at follow-up. Individuals with 22q11.2DS have impairments in visual memory abilities, with more pronounced difficulties in memorizing faces and visual

  17. A non-syndromic intellectual disability associated with a de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, microduplication at Xp, and 18q partial trisomy detected using chromosomal microarray analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromosome abnormalities that segregate with a disease phenotype can facilitate the identification of disease loci and genes. The relationship between chromosome 18 anomalies with severe intellectual disability has attracted the attention of cytogeneticists worldwide. Duplications of the X chromosome can cause intellectual disability in females with variable phenotypic effects, due in part to variations in X-inactivation patterns. Additionally, deletions of the 7qter region are associated with a range of phenotypes. Results We report the first case of de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, 18q partial trisomy, microduplication at Xp associated to intellectual disability in a Brazilian child, presenting a normal karyotype. Karyotyping showed any chromosome alteration. Chromosomal microarray analysis detected a de novo microdeletion at 18p11.32 and 18q partial trisomy, an inherited microdeletion at 7q31.1 and a de novo microduplication at Xp22.33p21.3. Conclusions Our report illustrates a case that presents complex genomic imbalances which may contribute to a severe clinical phenotypes. The rare and complex phenotypes have to be investigated to define the subsets and allow the phenotypes classification. PMID:25028595

  18. A non-syndromic intellectual disability associated with a de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, microduplication at Xp, and 18q partial trisomy detected using chromosomal microarray analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Irene Plaza; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes; da Cruz, Alex Silva; de Melo, Aldaires Vieira; da Cruz E Cunha, Damiana Míriam; Pereira, Rodrigo Roncato; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; de Melo E Silva, Daniela; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that segregate with a disease phenotype can facilitate the identification of disease loci and genes. The relationship between chromosome 18 anomalies with severe intellectual disability has attracted the attention of cytogeneticists worldwide. Duplications of the X chromosome can cause intellectual disability in females with variable phenotypic effects, due in part to variations in X-inactivation patterns. Additionally, deletions of the 7qter region are associated with a range of phenotypes. We report the first case of de novo microdeletion at 7q and 18p, 18q partial trisomy, microduplication at Xp associated to intellectual disability in a Brazilian child, presenting a normal karyotype. Karyotyping showed any chromosome alteration. Chromosomal microarray analysis detected a de novo microdeletion at 18p11.32 and 18q partial trisomy, an inherited microdeletion at 7q31.1 and a de novo microduplication at Xp22.33p21.3. Our report illustrates a case that presents complex genomic imbalances which may contribute to a severe clinical phenotypes. The rare and complex phenotypes have to be investigated to define the subsets and allow the phenotypes classification.

  19. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B.

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Novel liver findings in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency due to Xp11.4-p21.1 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Natalie M; Gui, Dorina; Lassman, Charles R; Yong, William H; Teitell, Michael; Mandelker, Diana; Lorey, Fred; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2015-02-10

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM 311250), the most common urea cycle disorder, results in impaired synthesis of citrulline from carbamoyl phosphate and ornithine. Individuals have been identified with OTCD due to a contiguous gene deletion at Xp11.4-p21.1 and unique clinical features, described as the "extended OTCD phenotype". We present a male with neonatal-lethal OTCD due to a 1.87Mb microdeletion at Xp11.4-p21.1 (37126841-38998991 hg18). Autopsy revealed a novel histological finding of hepatocyte globular and granular inclusions. Such inclusions have not been described in OTCD or other metabolic disorders and are not an associated finding in neonatal liver failure due to other causes. The deleted region includes the gene SYTL5, potentially involved in RAB27A-dependent membrane trafficking in the liver and placenta. We propose that the contiguous gene deletion could contribute to the severity of the clinical presentation here and hypothesize that deletion of SYTL5 could contribute to the liver findings.

  1. X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3): cloning and characterization of the critical region allows the identification of novel microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Huber, I; Bitner-Glindzicz, M; de Kok, Y J; van der Maarel, S M; Ishikawa-Brush, Y; Monaco, A P; Robinson, D; Malcolm, S; Pembrey, M E; Brunner, H G

    1994-07-01

    We have found that the microsatellite marker AFM207zg5 (DXS995) maps to all previously described deletions which are associated with X-linked mixed deafness (DFN3) with or without choroideremia and mental retardation. Employing this marker and pHU16 (DXS26) we have identified two partially overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones which were used to construct a complete 850 kb cosmid contig. Cosmids from this contig have been tested by Southern blot analysis on DNA from 16 unrelated males with X-linked deafness. Two novel microdeletions were detected in patients which exhibit the characteristic DFN3 phenotype. Both deletions are completely contained within one of the known DFN3-deletions, but one of them does not overlap with two previously described deletions in patients with contiguous gene syndromes consisting of DFN3, choroideremia, and mental retardation. Assuming that only a single gene is involved, this suggests that the DFN3 gene spans a chromosomal region of at least 400 kb.

  2. 14q12 microdeletions excluding FOXG1 give rise to a congenital variant Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Carolyn J; Ho, Gladys; Bettella, Elisa; Knapman, Alisa; Collins, Felicity; Hackett, Anna; McKenzie, Fiona; Darmanian, Artur; Peters, Gregory B; Fagan, Kerry; Christodoulou, John

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome is a clinically defined neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females. Usually sporadic, Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene in ∼90-95% of classic cases and 40-60% of individuals with atypical Rett syndrome. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene have been associated with the early-onset seizure variant of Rett syndrome and mutations in FOXG1 have been associated with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. We report the clinical features and array CGH findings of three atypical Rett syndrome patients who had severe intellectual impairment, early-onset developmental delay, postnatal microcephaly and hypotonia. In addition, the females had a seizure disorder, agenesis of the corpus callosum and subtle dysmorphism. All three were found to have an interstitial deletion of 14q12. The deleted region in common included the PRKD1 gene but not the FOXG1 gene. Gene expression analysis suggested a decrease in FOXG1 levels in two of the patients. Screening of 32 atypical Rett syndrome patients did not identify any pathogenic mutations in the PRKD1 gene, although a previously reported frameshift mutation affecting FOXG1 (c.256dupC, p.Gln86ProfsX35) was identified in a patient with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. There is phenotypic overlap between congenital Rett syndrome variants with FOXG1 mutations and the clinical presentation of our three patients with this 14q12 microdeletion, not encompassing the FOXG1 gene. We propose that the primary defect in these patients is misregulation of the FOXG1 gene rather than a primary abnormality of PRKD1.

  3. A new case of 8q22.1 microdeletion restricts the critical region for Nablus mask-like facial syndrome.

    PubMed

    Debost-Legrand, Anne; Eymard-Pierre, Eleonore; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Gouas, Laetitia; Goumy, Carole; Giollant, Michel; Ayed, Wiem; Tchirkov, Andreï; Francannet, Christine; Vago, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Microdeletions of 8q21.3-8q22.1 have been identified in all patients with Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS). A recent report of a patient without this specific phenotype presented a 1.6 Mb deletion in this region that partially overlapped with previously reported 8q21.3 microdeletions, thus restricting critical region for this syndrome. We report on another case of an 8q21.3 deletion revealed by array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) in a 4-year-old child with global developmental delay, autism, microcephaly, but without Nablus phenotype. The size of the interstitial deletion was estimated to span 5.2 Mb. By combining the data from previous reports on 8q21.3-8q22.1 deletions and our case, we were able to narrow the critical region of Nablus syndrome to 0.5 Mb. The deleted region includes FAM92A1, which seems to be a potential candidate gene in NMLFS.

  4. Derepression of a novel neuronal inhibitor is a major outcome of miRNA dysregulation due to 22q11.2 microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Hsu, Pei-Ken; Stark, Kimberly L.; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary 22q11.2 microdeletions result in specific cognitive deficits and schizophrenia. Analysis of Df(16)A+/− mice, which model this microdeletion, revealed abnormalities in the formation of neuronal dendrites and spines, as well as altered brain microRNAs. Here we show a drastic reduction of miR-185, which resides within the 22q11.2 locus, to levels more than expected by a hemizygous deletion and demonstrate that this reduction alters dendritic and spine development. miR-185 represses, through an evolutionary conserved target site, a previously unknown inhibitor of these processes that resides in the Golgi apparatus and shows higher prenatal brain expression. Sustained derepression of this inhibitor after birth represents the most robust transcriptional disturbance in the brains of Df(16)A+/− mice and results in structural alterations in the hippocampus. Reduction of miR-185 also has milder age and region-specific effects on the expression of a group of Golgi-related genes. Our findings illuminate the contribution of microRNAs in psychiatric disorders and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23332760

  5. A mild phenotype associated with a de novo microdeletion 10q23.1-q23.2: a new patient with a novel feature.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Campisi, Corrado; Falsaperla, Raffaele

    2016-04-18

    Chromosome 10q23 contains several genes, includingPTENandBMPR1A, the mutations or microdeletion of which are associated with aggressive polyposis and malignancies in children. Deletions in this chromosomal region have also been associated with heart anomalies, developmental delay and macrocephaly. Most of the cases reported involve thePTENandBMPR1Agenes, usually associated with complex and severe anomalies. We report a case of a boy with a de novo interstitial microdeletion in 10q23.1-q23.2 spanning 6.7 Mb with boundaries from 82 087 077 to 88 847 906, not includingPTENandBMPR1A Clinical features consisted of mildly dysmorphic facies, frontal telangiectasias, poor scholastic performance and hyperactivity. Furthermore, the boy presented toe anomalies, which appeared to be novel features associated with 10q23 deletion. Further observations of 10q23.1-q23.2 deletions are necessary to confirm the clinical features observed in the proband, and to show that deletion or mutations not involvingPTENandBMPR1Amay not be associated with severe neurological impairment and malformation anomalies. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. AZF gene expression analysis in peripheral leukocytes and testicular cells from idiopathic infertility.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhuo, Zuo-Min; Ding, Guan-Xiong; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Li-Xin; Wu, Hong-Fei

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of AZF microdeletions in peripheral leukocytes and testicular cells in Chinese men with idiopathic infertility. Expression in testicular cells was also determined. In this study, we screened 62 idiopathic infertile patients, in whom karyotype, sperm count and hormonal parameters were evaluated. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral leukocytes. Molecular analysis was performed by two multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCR) using a set of eight sequence tagged sites (STS) from 3 different regions of the Y chromosome. Total cellular RNA was extracted from the testicular tissue using a Trizol-method. Reverse Transcription (RT) reactions were performed to synthesize cDNA. Amplification of DFFRY, RBM and DAZ genes was performed to analyze their expression in testicular cells. In this cohort, we found 12 submicroscopic deletions (12/62, 19.4%). Nine patients (9/33, 27.2%) were detected in the azoospermic group and three (3/29, 10.3%) in the severe oligozoospermic group. RT-PCR analysis from testicular cells gave normal amplifications for SRY and DFFRY mRNA in 62 idiopathic patients; two patients were negative for RBM expression; no RBM and DAZ were detected for a case; 12 patients had no expression in the AZFc region involving the DAZ gene. Of 12 cases, three patients with normal PCR analysis of DAZ gene on genomic DNA showed no RT-PCR amplification for DAZ mRNA. The use of RT-PCR of specific spermatid expressed genes in conjunction with examining microdeletions using peripheral leukocytes is suggested to avoid the transmission of the Y chromosomal microdeletions from a father to a son via testicular sperm aspiration (TESE), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (JCSI).

  7. Mutations of the aurora kinase C gene causing macrozoospermia are the most frequent genetic cause of male infertility in Algerian men.

    PubMed

    Ounis, Leyla; Zoghmar, Abdelali; Coutton, Charles; Rouabah, Leila; Hachemi, Maroua; Martinez, Delphine; Martinez, Guillaume; Bellil, Ines; Khelifi, Douadi; Arnoult, Christophe; Fauré, Julien; Benbouhedja, Sebti; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Ray, Pierre F

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome and Y-chromosomal microdeletion analyses were once the only two genetic tests offered to infertile men. Analyses of aurora kinase C (AURKC) and DPY19L2 are now recommended for patients presenting macrozoospermia and globozoospermia, respectively, two rare forms of teratozoospermia particularly frequent among North African men. We carried out genetic analyses on Algerian patients, to evaluate the prevalence of these syndromes in this population and to compare it with the expected frequency of Klinefelter syndrome and Y-microdeletions. We carried out a retrospective study on 599 consecutive patients consulting for couple infertility at the assisted reproduction unit of the Ibn Rochd Clinique, Constantine, Algeria. Abnormal sperm parameters were observed in 404 men. Fourteen and seven men had typical macrozoospermia and globozoospermia profiles, respectively. Molecular diagnosis was carried out for these patients, for the AURKC and DPY19L2 genes. Eleven men with macrozoospermia had a homozygous AURKC mutation (79%), corresponding to 2.7% of all patients with abnormal spermograms. All the men with globozoospermia studied (n = 5), corresponding to 1.2% of all infertile men, presented a homozygous DPY19L2 deletion. By comparison, we would expect 1.6% of the patients in this cohort to have Klinefelter syndrome and 0.23% to have Y-microdeletion. Our findings thus indicate that AURKC mutations are more frequent than Klinefelter syndrome and constitute the leading genetic cause of infertility in North African men. Furthermore, we estimate that AURKC and DPY19L2 molecular defects are 10 and 5 times more frequent, respectively, than Y-microdeletions.

  8. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  9. Microdeletions of 3q29 Confer High Risk for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mulle, Jennifer Gladys; Dodd, Anne F.; McGrath, John A.; Wolyniec, Paula S.; Mitchell, Adele A.; Shetty, Amol C.; Sobreira, Nara L.; Valle, David; Rudd, M. Katharine; Satten, Glen; Cutler, David J.; Pulver, Ann E.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a severe psychiatric illness that affects ∼1% of the population and has a strong genetic underpinning. Recently, genome-wide analysis of copy-number variation (CNV) has implicated rare and de novo events as important in SZ. Here, we report a genome-wide analysis of 245 SZ cases and 490 controls, all of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Because many studies have found an excess burden of large, rare deletions in cases, we limited our analysis to deletions over 500 kb in size. We observed seven large, rare deletions in cases, with 57% of these being de novo. We focused on one 836 kb de novo deletion at chromosome 3q29 that falls within a 1.3–1.6 Mb deletion previously identified in children with intellectual disability (ID) and autism, because increasing evidence suggests an overlap of specific rare copy-number variants (CNVs) between autism and SZ. By combining our data with prior CNV studies of SZ and analysis of the data of the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN), we identified six 3q29 deletions among 7545 schizophrenic subjects and one among 39,748 controls, resulting in a statistically significant association with SZ (p = 0.02) and an odds ratio estimate of 17 (95% confidence interval: 1.36–1198.4). Moreover, this 3q29 deletion region contains two linkage peaks from prior SZ family studies, and the minimal deletion interval implicates 20 annotated genes, including PAK2 and DLG1, both paralogous to X-linked ID genes and now strong candidates for SZ susceptibility. PMID:20691406

  10. 22q11.2 microdeletion in two adolescent patients who presented with convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Özkale, Murat; Erol, İlknur

    2014-01-01

    22q11.2 microdeletion which involves DiGeorge syndrome, velo-cardiofacial syndrome and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome occurs as a result of a deletion in the short segment of the long arm of the 22th chromosome. Patients with this syndrome have a wide clinical spectrum including learning difficulty, dysmorphic face, cardiac anomalies, hypocalcemia, hypoparathyroidism, cleft palate, thymus anomalies, immune failure and speech and feeding problems. The number of clinical characteristics which have been reported to be related with this syndrome is higher than 180. All anomalies may not be present in all patients. In this article, a 12-year old female patient who was found to have 22q11.2 microdeletion with mild mental retardation and dysmorphic face and who presented to our hospital because of convulsion and a 13-year old male patient who was found to have 22q11.2 microdeletion with hypocalcemia, hypoparathyroidism, dysmorphic face and mental retardation and who presented to our hospital because of convulsion (it was learned from his history that he was being followed up in another center because of autism) were presented. PMID:26078635

  11. 12p13.33 microdeletion including ELKS/ERC1, a new locus associated with childhood apraxia of speech

    PubMed Central

    Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Andrieux, Joris; Delobel, Bruno; David, Albert; Sukno, Sylvie; Minot, Delphine; Mosca Anne, Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Sanlaville, Damien; Bonnet, Marlène; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Levy, Fabienne; Gaunt, Lorraine; Farrell, Sandra; Le Caignec, Cédric; Toutain, Annick; Carmignac, Virginie; Mugneret, Francine; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Faivre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Speech sound disorders are heterogeneous conditions, and sporadic and familial cases have been described. However, monogenic inheritance explains only a small proportion of such disorders, in particular in cases with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Deletions of <5 Mb involving the 12p13.33 locus is one of the least commonly deleted subtelomeric regions. Only four patients have been reported with such a deletion diagnosed with fluorescence in situ hybridisation telomere analysis or array CGH. To further delineate this rare microdeletional syndrome, a French collaboration together with a search in the Decipher database allowed us to gather nine new patients with a 12p13.33 subtelomeric or interstitial rearrangement identified by array CGH. Speech delay was found in all patients, which could be defined as CAS when patients had been evaluated by a speech therapist (5/9 patients). Intellectual deficiency was found in 5/9 patients only, and often associated with psychiatric manifestations of various severity. Two such deletions were inherited from an apparently healthy parent, but reevaluation revealed abnormal speech production at least in childhood, suggesting variable expressivity. The ELKS/ERC1 gene, which encodes for a synaptic factor, is found in the smallest region of overlap. These results reinforce the hypothesis that deletions of the 12p13.33 locus may be responsible for variable phenotypes including CAS associated with neurobehavioural troubles and that the presence of CAS justifies a genetic work-up. PMID:22713806

  12. 12p13.33 microdeletion including ELKS/ERC1, a new locus associated with childhood apraxia of speech.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Andrieux, Joris; Delobel, Bruno; David, Albert; Sukno, Sylvie; Minot, Delphine; Mosca Anne, Laure; Marle, Nathalie; Sanlaville, Damien; Bonnet, Marlène; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Levy, Fabienne; Gaunt, Lorraine; Farrell, Sandra; Le Caignec, Cédric; Toutain, Annick; Carmignac, Virginie; Mugneret, Francine; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Faivre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Speech sound disorders are heterogeneous conditions, and sporadic and familial cases have been described. However, monogenic inheritance explains only a small proportion of such disorders, in particular in cases with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Deletions of <5 Mb involving the 12p13.33 locus is one of the least commonly deleted subtelomeric regions. Only four patients have been reported with such a deletion diagnosed with fluorescence in situ hybridisation telomere analysis or array CGH. To further delineate this rare microdeletional syndrome, a French collaboration together with a search in the Decipher database allowed us to gather nine new patients with a 12p13.33 subtelomeric or interstitial rearrangement identified by array CGH. Speech delay was found in all patients, which could be defined as CAS when patients had been evaluated by a speech therapist (5/9 patients). Intellectual deficiency was found in 5/9 patients only, and often associated with psychiatric manifestations of various severity. Two such deletions were inherited from an apparently healthy parent, but reevaluation revealed abnormal speech production at least in childhood, suggesting variable expressivity. The ELKS/ERC1 gene, which encodes for a synaptic factor, is found in the smallest region of overlap. These results reinforce the hypothesis that deletions of the 12p13.33 locus may be responsible for variable phenotypes including CAS associated with neurobehavioural troubles and that the presence of CAS justifies a genetic work-up.

  13. Refinement of the Van der Woude gene location and construction of a 3.5-Mb YAC contig and STS map spanning the critical region in 1q32-q41.

    PubMed

    Schutte, B C; Sander, A; Malik, M; Murray, J C

    1996-09-15

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is the most frequent form of syndromic clefting. Linkage analysis has localized the gene between D1S245 and D1S414, an interval of 4.1 cM with the following order of loci: centromere-D1S245/D1S471-D1S491-D1S205-D1S414 -telomere. A microdeletion around D1S205 aided in narrowing the critical region to D1S491-D1S414 by heterozygosity testing. In this study, the location was refined by detection of a recombinant with D1S205 in a new family, indicating that VWS lies between D1S491 and D1S205, a 1.6-cM interval. A roughly 3.5-Mb YAC contig was built from D1S245 through D1S414, encompassing the interval D1S491-D1S205 in level 1 or level 2 paths. Clones were assembled by sequence tagged site (STS) content using the five polymorphic markers from above, four novel STSs identified from YAC ends, and a new STS derived from probe CRI-L461 (D1S70). D1S70 was assigned to the critical region. One single YAC, yCEPH785B2, contains both flanking STSs (D1S491, D1S205). STS content mapping suggests neither chimerism nor deletion of yCEPH785B2 but does suggest that the maximum size of the critical region is approximately 850 kb. All STSs were tested for their presence on a somatic cell hybrid containing the microdeleted chromosome 1 as the sole human chromosome 1 component. Both the proximal and distal ends of the microdeletion mapped to the 850-kb YAC, yCEPH785B2. Therefore, the microdeletion overlapped the critical region, confirming the genetic recombinant data.

  14. Two families with sibling recurrence of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome due to low-grade mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Koolen, David A; Dupont, Juliette; de Leeuw, Nicole; Vissers, Lisenka ELM; van den Heuvel, Simone PA; Bradbury, Alyson; Steer, James; de Brouwer, Arjan PM; ten Kate, Leo P; Nillesen, Willy M; de Vries, Bert BA; Parker, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is characterised by intellectual disability, epilepsy, distinctive facial dysmorphism, and congenital anomalies. To date, all individuals reported with this syndrome have been simplex patients, resulting from de novo deletions. Here, we report sibling recurrence of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome in two independent families. In both families, the mother was confirmed to be the parent-of-origin for the 17q21.31 deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation analyses in buccal mucosa cells, of the mother of family 1, identified monosomy 17q21.31 in 4/50 nuclei (8%). In mother of family 2, the deletion was identified in 2/60 (3%) metaphase and in 3/100 (3%) interphase nuclei in peripheral lymphocytes, and in 7/100 (7%) interphase nuclei in buccal cells. A common 17q21.31 inversion polymorphism predisposes to non-allelic homologous recombination and hereby to the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. On the basis of the 17q21.31 inversion status of the parents, we calculated that the probability of the second deletion occurring by chance alone was 1/14 438 and 1/4812, respectively. If the inversion status of the parents of a child with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is unknown, the overall risk of a second child with the 17q21.31 microdeletion is 1/9461. We conclude that the presence of low-level maternal somatic–gonadal mosaicism is associated with the microdeletion recurrence in these families. This suggests that the recurrence risk for parents with a child with a 17q21.31 microdeletion for future pregnancies is higher than by chance alone and testing for mosaicism in the parents might be considered as a helpful tool in the genetic counselling. PMID:22293690

  15. An integrated mBAND and submegabase resolution tiling set (SMRT) CGH array analysis of focal amplification, microdeletions, and ladder structures consistent with breakage-fusion-bridge cycle events in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gloria; Karaskova, Jana; Beheshti, Ben; Vukovic, Bisera; Bayani, Jane; Selvarajah, Shamini; Watson, Spencer K; Lam, Wan L; Zielenska, Maria; Squire, Jeremy A

    2005-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is characterized by chromosomal instability and high-copy-number gene amplification. The breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle is a well-established mechanism of genomic instability in tumors and in vitro models used to study the origins of complex chromosomal rearrangements and cancer genome amplification. However, until now, there have been no high-resolution cytogenetic or genomic array studies of BFB events in OS. In the present study, multicolor banding (mBAND) FISH and submegabase resolution tiling set (SMRT) array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) were used to identify and map genomic signatures of BFB events in four OS cell lines and one patient tumor. The expected intermediates associated with BFB-dicentric chromosomes, inverted duplications, and intra- and interchromosomal amplifications-were identified. mBAND analysis provided detailed mapping of rearrangements in 1p, 6p, and 8q and showed that translocation junctions were often in close proximity to fragile sites. More detailed mBAND studies of OS cell line MG-63 revealed ladderlike FISH signals of equally spaced interchromosomal coamplifications of 6p21, 8q24, and 9p21-p22 in a homogeneously staining region (hsr). Focal amplifications that concordantly mapped to the hsr were localized to discrete genomic intervals by SMRT array CGH. The complex amplicon structure in this hsr suggests focal amplifications immediately adjacent to microdeletions. Moreover, the genomic regions in which there was deletion/amplification had a preponderance of fragile sites. In summary, this study has provided further support for the role of the BFB mechanism and fragile sites in facilitating gene amplification and chromosomal rearrangement in OS.

  16. Identification of a Recurrent Microdeletion at 17q23.1q23.2 Flanked by Segmental Duplications Associated with Heart Defects and Limb Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ballif, Blake C.; Theisen, Aaron; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Traylor, Ryan N.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Astbury, Caroline; Bartholomew, Dennis; McBride, Kim L.; Pyatt, Robert E.; Shane, Kate; Smith, Wendy E.; Banks, Valerie; Gallentine, William B.; Brock, Pamela; Rudd, M. Katharine; Adam, Margaret P.; Keene, Julia A.; Phillips, John A.; Pfotenhauer, Jean P.; Gowans, Gordon C.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bejjani, Bassem A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2010-01-01

    Segmental duplications, which comprise ∼5%–10% of the human genome, are known to mediate medically relevant deletions, duplications, and inversions through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and have been suggested to be hot spots in chromosome evolution and human genomic instability. We report seven individuals with microdeletions at 17q23.1q23.2, identified by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Six of the seven deletions are ∼2.2 Mb in size and flanked by large segmental duplications of >98% sequence identity and in the same orientation. One of the deletions is ∼2.8 Mb in size and is flanked on the distal side by a segmental duplication, whereas the proximal breakpoint falls between segmental duplications. These characteristics suggest that NAHR mediated six out of seven of these rearrangements. These individuals have common features, including mild to moderate developmental delay (particularly speech delay), microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, heart defects, and hand, foot, and limb abnormalities. Although all individuals had at least mild dysmorphic facial features, there was no characteristic constellation of features that would elicit clinical suspicion of a specific disorder. The identification of common clinical features suggests that microdeletions at 17q23.1q23.2 constitute a novel syndrome. Furthermore, the inclusion in the minimal deletion region of TBX2 and TBX4, transcription factors belonging to a family of genes implicated in a variety of developmental pathways including those of heart and limb, suggests that these genes may play an important role in the phenotype of this emerging syndrome. PMID:20206336

  17. Identification of a recurrent microdeletion at 17q23.1q23.2 flanked by segmental duplications associated with heart defects and limb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ballif, Blake C; Theisen, Aaron; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Traylor, Ryan N; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Astbury, Caroline; Bartholomew, Dennis; McBride, Kim L; Pyatt, Robert E; Shane, Kate; Smith, Wendy E; Banks, Valerie; Gallentine, William B; Brock, Pamela; Rudd, M Katharine; Adam, Margaret P; Keene, Julia A; Phillips, John A; Pfotenhauer, Jean P; Gowans, Gordon C; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bejjani, Bassem A; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2010-03-12

    Segmental duplications, which comprise approximately 5%-10% of the human genome, are known to mediate medically relevant deletions, duplications, and inversions through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and have been suggested to be hot spots in chromosome evolution and human genomic instability. We report seven individuals with microdeletions at 17q23.1q23.2, identified by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Six of the seven deletions are approximately 2.2 Mb in size and flanked by large segmental duplications of >98% sequence identity and in the same orientation. One of the deletions is approximately 2.8 Mb in size and is flanked on the distal side by a segmental duplication, whereas the proximal breakpoint falls between segmental duplications. These characteristics suggest that NAHR mediated six out of seven of these rearrangements. These individuals have common features, including mild to moderate developmental delay (particularly speech delay), microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, heart defects, and hand, foot, and limb abnormalities. Although all individuals had at least mild dysmorphic facial features, there was no characteristic constellation of features that would elicit clinical suspicion of a specific disorder. The identification of common clinical features suggests that microdeletions at 17q23.1q23.2 constitute a novel syndrome. Furthermore, the inclusion in the minimal deletion region of TBX2 and TBX4, transcription factors belonging to a family of genes implicated in a variety of developmental pathways including those of heart and limb, suggests that these genes may play an important role in the phenotype of this emerging syndrome. Copyright 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene expression studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tajouri, Lotti; Fernandez, Francesca; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2007-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious neurological disorder affecting young Caucasian individuals, usually with an age of onset at 18 to 40 years old. Females account for approximately 60x of MS cases and the manifestation and course of the disease is highly variable from patient to patient. The disorder is characterised by the development of plaques within the central nervous system (CNS). Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in MS. Human tissues and experimental mice were used in these gene-profiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from these various expression studies. In general, genes showing variable expression include mainly immunological and inflammatory genes, stress and antioxidant genes, as well as metabolic and central nervous system markers. Of particular interest are a number of genes localised to susceptible loci previously shown to be in linkage with MS. However due to the clinical complexity of the disease, the heterogeneity of the tissues used in expression studies, as well as the variable DNA chips/membranes used for the gene profiling, it is difficult to interpret the available information. Although this information is essential for the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS, it is difficult to decipher and define the gene pathways involved in the disorder. Experiments in gene expression profiling in MS have been numerous and lists of candidates are now available for analysis. Researchers have investigated gene expression in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells (PBMCs), in MS animal models Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE) and post mortem MS brain tissues. This review will focus on the results of these studies.

  19. Why study gene-environment interactions?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We examine the reasons for investigating gene-environment interactions and address recent reports evaluating interactions between genes and environmental modulators in relation to cardiovascular disease and its common risk factors. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies focusing on smoking, phy...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 16p12.2 microdeletion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ... Mark PR, Dickerson J, Garg BP, Ellingwood SA, Smith R, Banks VC, Smith W, McDonald MT, Hoo ...

  1. Gene-environment studies: any advantage over environmental studies?

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Hemminki, Kari

    2007-07-01

    Gene-environment studies have been motivated by the likely existence of prevalent low-risk genes that interact with common environmental exposures. The present study assessed the statistical advantage of the simultaneous consideration of genes and environment to investigate the effect of environmental risk factors on disease. In particular, we contemplated the possibility that several genes modulate the environmental effect. Environmental exposures, genotypes and phenotypes were simulated according to a wide range of parameter settings. Different models of gene-gene-environment interaction were considered. For each parameter combination, we estimated the probability of detecting the main environmental effect, the power to identify the gene-environment interaction and the frequency of environmentally affected individuals at which environmental and gene-environment studies show the same statistical power. The proportion of cases in the population attributable to the modeled risk factors was also calculated. Our data indicate that environmental exposures with weak effects may account for a significant proportion of the population prevalence of the disease. A general result was that, if the environmental effect was restricted to rare genotypes, the power to detect the gene-environment interaction was higher than the power to identify the main environmental effect. In other words, when few individuals contribute to the overall environmental effect, individual contributions are large and result in easily identifiable gene-environment interactions. Moreover, when multiple genes interacted with the environment, the statistical benefit of gene-environment studies was limited to those studies that included major contributors to the gene-environment interaction. The advantage of gene-environment over plain environmental studies also depends on the inheritance mode of the involved genes, on the study design and, to some extend, on the disease prevalence.

  2. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  3. Private inherited microdeletion/microduplications: implications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Katzaki, Eleni; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Sampieri, Katia; Caselli, Rossella; Uliana, Vera; Pollazzon, Marzia; Canitano, Roberto; Mostardini, Rosa; Grosso, Salvatore; Longo, Ilaria; Ariani, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Hayek, Josef; Balestri, Paolo; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of array-CGH analysis is allowing the identification of novel genomic disorders. However, this new high-resolution technique is also opening novel diagnostic challenges when inherited private CNVs of unclear clinical significance are found. Oligo array-CGH analysis of 84 patients with mild to severe mental retardation associated with multiple congenital anomalies revealed 10 private CNVs inherited from a healthy parent. Three were deletions (7q31, 14q21.1, Xq25) and seven duplications (12p11.22, 12q21.31, 13q31.1, 17q12, Xp22.31, Xq28) ranging between 0.1 and 3.8Mb. Six rearrangements were not polymorphic. Four overlapped polymorphic regions to the extent of 10-61%. In one case the size was different between the proband and the healthy relative. Three small rearrangements were gene deserts. The remaining seven had a mean gene content of five (ranging from 1 to 18). None of the rearranged genes is known to be imprinted. Three disease-genes were found in three different cases: KAL1 in dupXp22.31, STS in another dupXp22.31 and TCF2 in dup17q12. The patient carrying the last duplication presents sex reversal, Peters' anomaly and renal cysts and the duplication is located 4Mb away from the HSD17B1 gene, coding a key enzyme of testosterone biosynthesis. Considering the overlap with polymorphic regions, size-identity within the family, gene content, kind of rearrangement and size of rearrangement we suggest that at least in five cases the relationship to the phenotype has not to be excluded. We recommend to maintain caution when asserting that chromosomal abnormalities inherited from a healthy parent are benign. A more complex mechanism may in fact be involved, such as a concurrent variation in the other allele or in another chromosome that influences the phenotype.

  4. AB175. The first large-scale study of VHL gene mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlationship of VHL disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuanghe; Gong, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Objective VHL disease is the most common hereditary renal cancer, and it is an autosomal-dominant inherited familial cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations of the VHL tumor suppressor gene. The golden standard for diagnosing VHL disease is to find the VHL gene mutation in patients’ genes. In the world, the United States had summarized 469 VHL families from the United States, Europe and Japan to summarize VHL gene mutation spectrum and the genotype-phenotype correlationship. However, no such large number of samples’ analysis had been done in China. The purpose of this study is to finish the first large-scale study of VHL gene mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlationship of VHL disease in China. Methods We have gathered 172 Chinese VHL families including 89 families diagnosed in our hospital and 83 families from other domestic hospitals gathered by literature summary. Then we made statistical analysis of data from 172 Chinese VHL families. Results In the 172 Chinese VHL families, germline mutations were identified in 165 (96%) families. Point mutations were found in 103 (62%) families, large deletions were found in 32 (19%) families, micro-deletions or micro-insertions were found in 21 (13%) families, and splice mutations were found in 9 (6%) families. We found 9 hot mutation codons that affected more than 4 families each, and they were codon65, codon76, codon78, codon80, codon86, codon88, codon161, codon162 and codon167. The onset of pheochromocytoma in VHL patients was related to mutations in VHL gene locus 482, 482, 499, 499. Mutations in VHL gene locus 257, 257, 481 was negatively related to the onset of pheochromocytoma. The occurrence of retinal angioma associated with VHL gene large deletions. Mutations in VHL gene locus 226, 233, 239, 257, 263, 481, 486, 499, 500 was related to the onset of renal cell carcinoma. Conclusions We have finished the first large-scale study of VHL gene mutation spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlationship

  5. A pilot study of gene/gene and gene/environment interactions in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ghebranious, Nader; Mukesh, Bickol; Giampietro, Philip F; Glurich, Ingrid; Mickel, Susan F; Waring, Stephen C; McCarty, Catherine A

    2011-03-01

    Although some genes associated with increased risk of Alzheimer Disease (AD) have been identified, few data exist related to gene/gene and gene/environment risk of AD. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore gene/gene and gene/environment associations in AD and to obtain data for sample size estimates for larger, more definitive studies of AD. The effect of gene/gene and gene/environment interaction related to late onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD) was investigated in 153 subjects with LOAD and 302 gender matched controls enrolled in the Personalized Medicine Research Project, a population-based bio-repository. Genetic risk factors examined included APOE, ACE, OLR1,and CYP46 genes, and environmental factors included smoking, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, statin use, and body mass index. The mean age of the cases was 78.2 years and the mean age of the controls was 87.2 years. APOE4 was significantly associated with LOAD (OR=3.55, 95%CL=1.70, 7.45). Cases were significantly more likely to have ever smoked cigarettes during their life (49.3% versus 38.4%, p=0.03). The highest recorded blood pressure and pulse pressure measurements were significantly higher in the controls than the cases (all P<0.005). Although not statistically significant in this pilot study, the relationship of the following factors was associated in opposite directions with LOAD based on the presence of an APOE4 allele: obesity at the age of 50, ACE, OLR1, and CYP46. These pilot data suggest that gene/gene and gene/environment interactions may be important in LOAD, with APOE, a known risk factor for LOAD, affecting the relationship of ACE and OLR1 to LOAD. Replication with a larger sample size and in other racial/ethnic groups is warranted and the allele and risk factor frequencies will assist in choosing an appropriate sample size for a definitive study.

  6. Female patient with autistic disorder, intellectual disability, and co-morbid anxiety disorder: Expanding the phenotype associated with the recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Resches, Mariela; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the advent of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and its use as a first genetic test for the diagnosis of patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes has allowed the identification of novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities (namely, copy number variants or CNVs), imperceptible by conventional cytogenetic techniques. The 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #615433) has been defined as a genomic disorder mainly characterized by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypotonia, genital abnormalities in males, and characteristic craniofacial features. Although the 3q13.31 CNVs are variable in size, a 3.4 Mb recurrently altered region at 3q13.2-q13.31 has been recently described and non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by flanking human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-H) elements has been suggested as the mechanism of deletion formation. We expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with this recurrent deletion performing the clinical description of a 9-year-old female patient with autistic disorder, total absence of language, intellectual disability, anxiety disorder and disruptive, and compulsive eating behaviors. The array-based molecular karyotyping allowed the identification of a de novo recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 deletion encompassing 25 genes. In addition, we compare her clinical phenotype with previous reports of patients with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and proximal 3q microdeletions. Finally, we also review the candidate genes proposed so far for these phenotypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Chen, Zhijuan; Xu, Mingyu; Lin, Shengguo; Wang, Lu

    2004-12-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla. The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  8. The 12q14 microdeletion syndrome: six new cases confirming the role of HMGA2 in growth

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Sally Ann; Foulds, Nicola; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Collins, Amanda L; Annerén, Göran; Hedberg, Bernt-Oves; Delaney, Carol A; Iremonger, James; Murray, Caroline M; Crolla, John A; Costigan, Colm; Lam, Wayne; Fitzpatrick, David R; Regan, Regina; Ennis, Sean; Sharkey, Freddie

    2011-01-01

    We report six patients with array deletions encompassing 12q14. Out of a total of 2538 array investigations carried out on children with developmental delay and dysmorphism in three diagnostic testing centres, six positive cases yielded a frequency of 1 in 423 for this deletion syndrome. The deleted region in each of the six cases overlaps significantly with previously reported cases with microdeletions of this region. The chromosomal range of the deletions extends from 12q13.3q15. In the current study, we report overlapping deletions of variable extent and size but primarily comprising chromosomal bands 12q13.3q14.1. Four of the six deletions were confirmed as de novo events. Two cases had deletions that included HMGA2, and both children had significant short stature. Neither case had osteopoikilosis despite both being deleted for LEMD3. Four cases had deletions that ended proximal to HMGA2 and all of these had much better growth. Five cases had congenital heart defects, including two with atrial septal defects, one each with pulmonary stenosis, sub-aortic stenosis and a patent ductus. Four cases had moderate delay, two had severe developmental delay and a further two had a diagnosis of autism. All six cases had significant speech delay with subtle facial dysmorphism. PMID:21267005

  9. P53 gene mutations in breast cancers in Midwestern U.S. women: Null as well as missense-type mutations are associated with poor prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Blaszyk, H.; Hartmann, A.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Differences in patterns of p53 gene mutation in different types of cancers support the idea that analysis of acquired alterations in this gene will be useful as a {open_quotes}mutagen test{close_quotes}. We are studying the pattern of p53 gene mutation in sporadic breast carcinomas in high and low risk populations. All translated exons and adjacent splice regions have been analyzed in 53 primary breast cancers from Midwestern U.S. Caucasian women. A total of 21 mutations were found in exons 2-11 and splice regions (39.6%). The mutations include 8 missense, 4 nonsense, 1 splice site point mutation, and 8 microdeletions. Comparisons of the pattern of mutations within exons 5-9 show that the frequency of missense mutations (44%) was lower in breast cancers of U.S. Midwestern women than in most tumor types and in breast cancers in other populations. Compared to breast cancers reported in a Scottish population, Midwestern U.S. women have a high frequency of microdeletion mutations (p=0.006) and a low frequency of G:C-T:A transversions (p=0.046). These findings suggest that environmental or endogenous factors contribute to p53 mutagenesis in mammary tissue to different extents among different populations. The presence of a mutation was associated with shorter time to disease recurrence (p=0.05) and shorter survival (p=0.003) (median duration of follow-up 19 months). Both putative dominant negative missense-type mutations (missense and in-frame microdeletions; p=0.001) and null mutations (hemizygous nonsense and frameshift mutations; p=0.007) were associated with poor prognosis. Thus, tumors with missense p53 mutations associated with altered binding to other proteins, altered transcriptional regulation and a dramatic increase in p53 protein concentration have similar clinical outcomes to tumors with null mutations associated with truncated or garbled proteins.

  10. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  11. Clinical consequences of microdeletions of the Y chromosome: the extended Münster experience.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Manuela; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2008-02-01

    A total of 3179 patients were screened for Y-chromosome microdeletions and 821 patients for partial AZFc deletions. Thirty-nine Y-chromosomal microdeletions were found (2.4% of men with <1 x 10(6)/ml spermatozoa): two AZFa, two AZFb, one AZFbc, one partial AZFb, one partial AZFb+c and 32 AZFc (b2/b4). Partial AZFc deletions were found in 45 patients (5.5%), mostly gr/gr deletions (n = 28). In patients with AZFc deletion, azoospermia was found in 53.1% and sperm concentrations of mostly <0.1 x 10(6)/ml were found in 46.9%. Semen analyses and FSH measurements showed no trend over time. Elongated spermatids were seen in 6/15 AZFc patients and bilateral Sertoli cell-only was found in 4/15. Testicular sperm extraction (TESE) was attempted in 10 patients and spermatozoa were found in six. Compared with infertile men matched by sperm concentration, no differences in hormonal and seminal parameters could be found in patients with AZFc or gr/gr deletions. It is concluded that: (i) frequency of AZF deletions in Germany is much lower than in other countries; (ii) AZFc deletions are associated with severe disturbances of spermatogenesis and TESE is not possible in half of these patients; (iii) AZFc and gr/ gr deletions are not associated with any clinical diagnostic parameter; (iv) and no trend is apparent over time.

  12. Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) in two patients with 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raca, Gordana; Baas, Becky S; Kirmani, Salman; Laffin, Jennifer J; Jackson, Craig A; Strand, Edythe A; Jakielski, Kathy J; Shriberg, Lawrence D

    2013-01-01

    We report clinical findings that extend the phenotype of the ∼550 kb 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome to include a rare, severe, and persistent pediatric speech sound disorder termed Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). CAS is the speech disorder identified in a multigenerational pedigree (‘KE') in which half of the members have a mutation in FOXP2 that co-segregates with CAS, oromotor apraxia, and low scores on a nonword repetition task. Each of the two patients in the current report completed a 2-h assessment protocol that provided information on their cognitive, language, speech, oral mechanism, motor, and developmental histories and performance. Their histories and standard scores on perceptual and acoustic speech tasks met clinical and research criteria for CAS. Array comparative genomic hybridization analyses identified deletions at chromosome 16p11.2 in each patient. These are the first reported cases with well-characterized CAS in the 16p11.2 syndrome literature and the first report of this microdeletion in CAS genetics research. We discuss implications of findings for issues in both literatures. PMID:22909774

  13. 12q21 Microdeletion in a fetus with Meckel syndrome involving CEP290/MKS4.

    PubMed

    Molin, Arnaud; Benoist, Guillaume; Jeanne-Pasquier, Corinne; Elkartoufi, Nadia; Litzer, Julie; Decamp, Matthieu; Gruchy, Nicolas; Durand-Malbruny, Marion; Begorre, Marianne; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Leporrier, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    We report on a fetus with Meckel syndrome diagnosed during the 21st gestational week, hydrocephalus and bilateral hyperechogenic kidneys were then detected on ultrasonography. Fetal pathological examination showed facial dysmorphism, occipital meningoencephalocele, characteristic renal cysts, mild hepatic ductal dysplasia, hydrocephalus in association with extreme cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and brainstem anomalies. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis identified a paternally inherited CEP290/MKS4 (MIM611134) (12q21) nonsense mutation and a maternal 12q21 microdeletion. Two cases with such a mechanism have previously been described in the literature, one of them involves an inherited microdeletion. The observation of such cases highlights the existence of a pathogenic mechanism which involves deletion and point mutation, and illustrates how homozygosity can hide hemizygosity when usual sequencing methods are used. The identification of hemizygosity enables to determine precisely the molecular mechanism and to understand some phenotypic variations. As they act as complete loss of function allele, deletions might give indication on the severity of the associated point mutation. This clinical report highlights the importance of fetal pathology following termination of pregnancies in order to guide molecular analysis and the potential role of cytogenetic cryptic disorders in autosomal recessive disease. The use of polymorphic marker analysis in association with FISH or arrayCGH provided an accurate identification of molecular mechanisms, accurate genetic counseling and optimized strategy for next pregnancies or preimplantation diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) in two patients with 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raca, Gordana; Baas, Becky S; Kirmani, Salman; Laffin, Jennifer J; Jackson, Craig A; Strand, Edythe A; Jakielski, Kathy J; Shriberg, Lawrence D

    2013-04-01

    We report clinical findings that extend the phenotype of the ~550 kb 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome to include a rare, severe, and persistent pediatric speech sound disorder termed Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS). CAS is the speech disorder identified in a multigenerational pedigree ('KE') in which half of the members have a mutation in FOXP2 that co-segregates with CAS, oromotor apraxia, and low scores on a nonword repetition task. Each of the two patients in the current report completed a 2-h assessment protocol that provided information on their cognitive, language, speech, oral mechanism, motor, and developmental histories and performance. Their histories and standard scores on perceptual and acoustic speech tasks met clinical and research criteria for CAS. Array comparative genomic hybridization analyses identified deletions at chromosome 16p11.2 in each patient. These are the first reported cases with well-characterized CAS in the 16p11.2 syndrome literature and the first report of this microdeletion in CAS genetics research. We discuss implications of findings for issues in both literatures.

  15. Microdeletion del(22)(q12.2) encompassing the facial development-associated gene, MN1 (meningioma 1) in a child with Pierre-Robin sequence (including cleft palate) and neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2): a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS) is defined by micro- and/or retrognathia, glossoptosis and cleft soft palate, either caused by deformational defect or part of a malformation syndrome. Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q12.2. NF2 is characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas, spinal cord schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas, and juvenile cataracts. To date, NF2 and PRS have not been described together in the same patient. Case presentation We report a female with PRS (micrognathia, cleft palate), microcephaly, ocular hypertelorism, mental retardation and bilateral hearing loss, who at age 15 was also diagnosed with severe NF2 (bilateral cerebellopontine schwannomas and multiple extramedullary/intradural spine tumors). This is the first published report of an individual with both diagnosed PRS and NF2. High resolution karyotype revealed 46, XX, del(22)(q12.1q12.3), FISH confirmed a deletion encompassing NF2, and chromosomal microarray identified a 3,693 kb deletion encompassing multiple genes including NF2 and MN1 (meningioma 1). Five additional patients with craniofacial dysmorphism and deletion in chromosome 22-adjacent-to or containing NF2 were identified in PubMed and the DECIPHER clinical chromosomal database. Their shared chromosomal deletion encompassed MN1, PITPNB and TTC28. MN1, initially cloned from a patient with meningioma, is an oncogene in murine hematopoiesis and participates as a fusion gene (TEL/MN1) in human myeloid leukemias. Interestingly, Mn1-haploinsufficient mice have abnormal skull development and secondary cleft palate. Additionally, Mn1 regulates maturation and function of calvarial osteoblasts and is an upstream regulator of Tbx22, a gene associated with murine and human cleft palate. This suggests that deletion of MN1 in the six patients we describe may be causally linked to their cleft palates and/or craniofacial abnormalities. Conclusions

  16. A recurrent 16p12.1 microdeletion suggests a two-hit model for severe developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Antonacci, Francesca; Siswara, Priscillia; Itsara, Andy; Vives, Laura; Walsh, Tom; McCarthy, Shane E.; Baker, Carl; Mefford, Heather C.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Browning, Sharon R.; Browning, Brian L.; Dickel, Diane E.; Levy, Deborah L.; Ballif, Blake C.; Platky, Kathryn; Farber, Darren M.; Gowans, Gordon C.; Wetherbee, Jessica J.; Asamoah, Alexander; Weaver, David D.; Mark, Paul R.; Dickerson, Jennifer; Garg, Bhuwan P.; Ellingwood, Sara A.; Smith, Rosemarie; Banks, Valerie C.; Smith, Wendy; McDonald, Marie T.; Hoo, Joe J.; French, Beatrice N.; Hudson, Cindy; Johnson, John P.; Ozmore, Jillian R.; Moeschler, John B.; Surti, Urvashi; Escobar, Luis F.; El-Kechen, Dima; Gorski, Jerome L.; Kussman, Jennifer; Salbert, Bonnie; Lacassie, Yves; Biser, Alisha; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Shaikh, Tamim H.; Haan, Eric; Friend, Kathryn L.; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Gécz, Jozef; deLisi, Lynn E.; Sebat, Jonathan; King, Mary-Claire; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the identification of a recurrent 520-kbp 16p12.1 microdeletion significantly associated with childhood developmental delay. The microdeletion was detected in 20/11,873 cases vs. 2/8,540 controls (p=0.0009, OR=7.2) and replicated in a second series of 22/9,254 cases vs. 6/6,299 controls (p=0.028, OR=2.5). Most deletions were inherited with carrier parents likely to manifest neuropsychiatric phenotypes (p=0.037, OR=6). Probands were more likely to carry an additional large CNV when compared to matched controls (10/42 cases, p=5.7×10-5, OR=6.65). Clinical features of cases with two mutations were distinct from and/or more severe than clinical features of patients carrying only the co-occurring mutation. Our data suggest a two-hit model in which the 16p12.1 microdeletion both predisposes to neuropsychiatric phenotypes as a single event and exacerbates neurodevelopmental phenotypes in association with other large deletions or duplications. Analysis of other microdeletions with variable expressivity suggests that this two-hit model may be more generally applicable to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:20154674

  17. Expanding the BP1-BP2 15q11.2 Microdeletion Phenotype: Tracheoesophageal Fistula and Congenital Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Wong, D; Johnson, S M; Young, D; Iwamoto, L; Sood, S; Slavin, T P

    2013-01-01

    The proximal q arm of chromosome 15 contains breakpoint regions BP1-BP5 with the classic deletion of BP1-BP3 best known to be associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The region is approximately 500 kb and microdeletions within the BP1-BP2 region have been reported in patients with developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and motor apraxia as well as dysmorphic features including hypertelorism, cleft or narrow palate, ear abnormalities, and recurrent upper airway infections. We report two patients with unique, never-before-reported 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome findings, one with proximal esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (type C) and one with congenital cataracts. Cataracts have been described in Prader-Willi syndrome but we could not find any description of cataracts in Angelman syndrome. Esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula have not been reported to our knowledge in either syndrome. A chance exists that both cases are sporadic birth defects; however, the findings of the concomitant microdeletion cannot be overlooked as a possible cause. Based on our review of the literature and the presentation of our patients, we recommend that esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula as well as congenital cataracts be included in the phenotypic spectrum of 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome.

  18. Pedigrees of infertile Chinese men with Y chromosome microdeletions derived from natural transmission and de novo mutation.

    PubMed

    Li, L L; Zhu, Y Z; Yu, X W; Wang, R X; Hu, Z M; Liu, R Z

    2015-03-20

    Y chromosome microdeletions can cause male infertility and are classified as natural transmission and de novo mutations. To examine the source of these deletions in Chinese men and to provide a theoretical and laboratory basis for genetic counseling, patients from Northeast China with primary male infertility (N = 22) and their fathers were investigated. Karyotype analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes using standard G-banding. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction amplification using 18 specific sequence-tagged sites was selected to detect Y chromosome microdeletions. De novo mutations were observed in 17 father-son pairs, leading to a mutation rate of 77.27% (17/22), while the vertical transmission of Yq AZFc microdeletions was detected in 5 cases of the families investigated (29.41%, 5/17). There were no statistically significant differences between vertically transmitted and de novo mutations in men with AZFc deletions regarding age, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels. Most Y chromosome microdeletions in men from Northeast China are the result of de novo mutations via natural conception, and men with Yq AZFc deletions showed no clear differences between vertical transmission and de novo mutations.

  19. Human Studies of Angiogenic Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medical, interventional, and surgical therapy for coronary and peripheral arterial disease, the burden of these illnesses remains high. To address this unmet need, the science of therapeutic angiogenesis has been evolving for almost two decades. Early pre-clinical studies and phase I clinical trials achieved promising results with growth factors administered as recombinant proteins or as single-agent gene therapies, and data accumulated through 10 years of clinical trials indicate that gene therapy has an acceptable safety profile. However, more rigorous phase II and phase III clinical trials have failed to unequivocally demonstrate that angiogenic agents are beneficial under the conditions and in the patients studied to date. Investigators have worked to understand the biology of the vascular system and to incorporate their findings into new treatments for patients with ischemic disease. Recent gene- and cell-therapy trials have demonstrated the bioactivity of several new agents and treatment strategies. Collectively, these observations have renewed interest in the mechanisms of angiogenesis and deepened our understanding of the complexity of vascular regeneration. Gene therapy that incorporates multiple growth factors, approaches that combine cell and gene therapy, and the administration of "master switch" agents that activate numerous downstream pathways are among the credible and plausible steps forward. In this review, we will examine the clinical development of angiogenic therapy, summarize several of the lessons learned during the conduct of these trials, and suggest how this prior experience may guide the conduct of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:19815827

  20. Microdeletion 15q26.2qter and Microduplication 18q23 in a Patient with Prader-Willi-Like Syndrome: Clinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Dello Russo, Patrizia; Demori, Eliana; Sechi, Annalisa; Passon, Nadia; Romagno, Daniela; Gnan, Chiara; Zoratti, Raffaele; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The small interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 15 causing Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome is well known, whereas cases that report terminal deletions in 15q in association with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype are very rare. By using GTG-banding analysis, metaphase FISH, MLPA analysis, and genome-wide array CGH, we detected an unbalanced translocation involving a microdeletion of the distal part of 15q and a microduplication of the distal part of 18q. The unbalanced translocation was found in a boy that was referred with clinical suspicion of Prader-Willi syndrome. In the 15q-deleted region, 23 genes have been identified, and 13 of them are included in the OMIM database. Among these, the deleted IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3 genes could contribute to the patient's phenotype. Seven genes are included in the duplicated chromosome segment 18q, but only one (CTDP1) is present in the OMIM database. We suggest that the deleted chromosome segment 15q26.2qter may be responsible for the phenotype of our case and may also be a candidate locus of Prader-Willi-like syndrome.

  1. Neurodevelopmental features in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: report of a new patient with intractable seizures and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Inaba, Yuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Miyatake, Satoko; Niimi, Taemi; Nishimura, Takafumi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Koike, Kenichi

    2012-04-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently characterized chromosomal aberration disorder uncovered through array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Although the cardinal feature is intellectual disability (ID), neurodevelopmental features of the syndrome have not been systematically reviewed. We present a 5-year-old boy with severe psychomotor developmental delay/ID, progressive microcephaly with brain atrophy, growth retardation, and several external anomalies. He manifested intractable epilepsy, effectively treated with combined antiepileptic drug therapy including topiramate. Array CGH demonstrated a de novo interstitial deletion of approximately 1 Mb at 2q23.1-q23.2, involving four genes including MBD5. Nineteen patients have been reported to have the syndrome, including present patient. All patients whose data were available had ID, 17 patients (89%) had seizures, and microcephaly was evident in 9 of 18 patients (50%). Deletion sizes ranged from 200 kb to 5.5 Mb, comprising 1-15 genes. MBD5, the only gene deleted in all patients, is considered to be responsible for ID and epilepsy. Furthermore, the deletion junction was sequenced for the first time in a patient with the syndrome; and homology of three nucleotides, identified at the distal and proximal breakpoints, suggested that the deletion might have been mediated by recently-delineated genomic rearrangement mechanism Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS)/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Refined FISH characterization of a de novo 1p22-p36.2 paracentric inversion and associated 1p21-22 deletion in a patient with signs of 1p36 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finelli, P; Giardino, D; Russo, S; Gottardi, G; Cogliati, F; Grugni, G; Natacci, F; Larizza, L

    2001-04-01

    We report on a 10-year-old boy presenting with obesity, moderate mental retardation, large anterior fontanelle at birth, mild physical anomalies including mid-face hypoplasia, deep-set eyes, long philtrum, and small mouth. He was found to carry a paracentric inversion inv(1)(p22p36.2) associated with a 10 cM deletion at the proximal breakpoint. By YAC FISH, the boundaries of the deletion were established at IB1028 (1p21) and WI-5166 (1p22) STSs contained in YACs 781E8 and 954F6, respectively. This large region, covering about 10 cM, contains the COL11A1 and AMY2B genes, whose haploinsufficiency does not seem to contribute significantly to the clinical phenotype. On the other hand, the patient's clinical manifestations, also including visual problems and moderate mental retardation, are those typically observed in the 1p36 deletion syndrome. Refined mapping of the telomeric 1p36.2 inversion breakpoint was obtained by FISH of a PAC contig constructed to encompass this subinterval of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome region. PACs 1024B10 and 884E7 were found to span the breakpoint, suggesting that the clinical signs of the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome might be due to disruption of a sequence lying at 1p36.2.

  3. MEF2C haploinsufficiency caused by either microdeletion of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, N; Holder-Espinasse, M; Jaillard, S; Goldenberg, A; Joriot, S; Amati-Bonneau, P; Guichet, A; Barth, M; Charollais, A; Journel, H; Auvin, S; Boucher, C; Kerckaert, J-P; David, V; Manouvrier-Hanu, S; Saugier-Veber, P; Frébourg, T; Dubourg, C; Andrieux, J; Bonneau, D

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, array-comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) has considerably improved our ability to detect cryptic unbalanced rearrangements in patients with syndromic mental retardation. Molecular karyotyping of six patients with syndromic mental retardation was carried out using whole-genome oligonucleotide array-CGH. 5q14.3 microdeletions ranging from 216 kb to 8.8 Mb were detected in five unrelated patients with the following phenotypic similarities: severe mental retardation with absent speech, hypotonia and stereotypic movements. Facial dysmorphic features, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations were also present in most of these patients. The minimal common deleted region of these 5q14 microdeletions encompassed only MEF2C, the gene for a protein known to act in brain as a neurogenesis effector, which regulates excitatory synapse number. In a patient with a similar phenotype, an MEF2C nonsense mutation was subsequently identified. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that haploinsufficiency of MEF2C is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, seizures and/or cerebral malformations.

  4. Gene selection heuristic algorithm for nutrigenomics studies.

    PubMed

    Valour, D; Hue, I; Grimard, B; Valour, B

    2013-07-15

    Large datasets from -omics studies need to be deeply investigated. The aim of this paper is to provide a new method (LEM method) for the search of transcriptome and metabolome connections. The heuristic algorithm here described extends the classical canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to a high number of variables (without regularization) and combines well-conditioning and fast-computing in "R." Reduced CCA models are summarized in PageRank matrices, the product of which gives a stochastic matrix that resumes the self-avoiding walk covered by the algorithm. Then, a homogeneous Markov process applied to this stochastic matrix converges the probabilities of interconnection between genes, providing a selection of disjointed subsets of genes. This is an alternative to regularized generalized CCA for the determination of blocks within the structure matrix. Each gene subset is thus linked to the whole metabolic or clinical dataset that represents the biological phenotype of interest. Moreover, this selection process reaches the aim of biologists who often need small sets of genes for further validation or extended phenotyping. The algorithm is shown to work efficiently on three published datasets, resulting in meaningfully broadened gene networks.

  5. Cognitive behavioral therapy in 22q11.2 microdeletion with psychotic symptoms: What do we learn from schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Demily, Caroline; Franck, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is one of the most common microdeletion syndromes, with a widely underestimated prevalence between 1 per 2000 and 1 per 6000. Since childhood, patients with 22q11.2DS are described as having difficulties to initiate and maintain peer relationships. This lack of social skills has been linked to attention deficits/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression. A high incidence of psychosis and positive symptoms is observed in patients with 22q11.2DS and remains correlated with poor social functioning, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Because 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia share several major clinical features, 22q11.2DS is sometimes considered as a genetic model for schizophrenia. Surprisingly, almost no study suggests the use of cognitive and behavioral therapy (CBT) in this indication. We reviewed what should be learned from schizophrenia to develop specific intervention for 22q11.2DS. In our opinion, the first step of CBT approach in 22q11.2DS with psychotic symptoms is to identify precisely which tools can be used among the already available ones. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) targets integrated disorders, i.e. reasoning biases and behavior disorders. In 22q11.2DS, CBT-targeted behavior disorders may take the form of social avoidance and withdrawal or, in the contrary, a more unusual disinhibition and aggressiveness. In our experience, other negative symptoms observed in 22q11.2DS, such as motivation deficit or anhedonia, may also be reduced by CBT. Controlled trials have been studying the benefits of CBT in schizophrenia and several meta-analyses proved its effectiveness. Therefore, it is legitimate to propose this tool in 22q11.2DS, considering symptoms similarities. Overall, CBT is the most effective psychosocial intervention on psychotic symptoms and remains a relevant complement to pharmacological treatments such as antipsychotics.

  6. Familial TAB2 microdeletion and congenital heart defects including unusual valve dysplasia and tetralogy of fallot.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Karin; Applegate, Carolyn; Wang, Tao; Batista, Denise A S

    2015-11-01

    Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 was recently implicated as a cause for a variety of congenital heart defects. Reported cases have genomic deletions of 2-10 Mbs including TAB2 at 6q24-25 are almost always de novo and show variable cardiac and extra cardiac phenotype. We report on an inherited, 281 kb deletion in a three generation family. This is the smallest reported deletion involving TAB2 that segregates with congenital heart defects. Three affected individuals in this family present with myxomatous cardiac valves in addition to structural heart defects commonly associated with TAB2 deletions. Findings from this family support a key role of TAB2 haploinsufficiency in congenital heart defects and expand the phenotypic spectrum of TAB2-microdeletion syndrome.

  7. [Detection of microdeletion in Williams syndrome by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuan-yuan; Meng, Yan; Qiu, Zheng-qing; Wang, Ou; Huang, Shang-zhi

    2009-08-01

    To establish a method of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for clinical screening of Williams syndrome (WS) and for routine use in WS diagnosis. Probes for MLPA were designed according to the frequent deletion regions, and used to screen the two patients suspected with Williams syndrome, and the density of the bands were analyzed with software. Linkage analysis using polymorphic markers was performed to confirm the positive result of MLPA. The MLPA data indicated that the two children had possible microdeletions in the WS critical region. The deletions were confirmed and both were maternal origin by polymorphism analysis. MLPA is a quick and convenient method for detecting deletion or duplication mutations. It can provide reliable and helpful information for clinical diagnose of Williams syndrome.

  8. A unique TBX5 microdeletion with microinsertion detected in patient with Holt-Oram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morine, Mikio; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Inagaki, Hidehito; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Imoto, Issei

    2015-12-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by upper limb and congenital heart defects and caused by numerous germline mutations of TBX5 producing preterminal stop codons. Here, we report on a novel and unusual heterozygous TBX5 microdeletion with microinsertion (microindel) mutation (c.627delinsGTGACTCAGGAAACGCTTTCCTGA), which is predicted to synthesize a truncated TBX5 protein, detected in a sporadic patient with clinical features of HOS prenatally diagnosed by ultrasonography. This uncommon and relatively large inserted sequence contains sequences derived from nearby but not adjacent templates on both sense and antisense strands, suggesting two possible models, which require no repeat sequences, causing this complex microindel through the bypass of large DNA adducts via an error-prone DNA polymerase-mediated translesion synthesis.

  9. Engineering microdeletions and microduplications by targeting segmental duplications with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Tai, Derek J C; Ragavendran, Ashok; Manavalan, Poornima; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Seabra, Catarina M; Erdin, Serkan; Collins, Ryan L; Blumenthal, Ian; Chen, Xiaoli; Shen, Yiping; Sahin, Mustafa; Zhang, Chengsheng; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent, reciprocal genomic disorders resulting from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between near-identical segmental duplications (SDs) are a major cause of human disease, often producing phenotypically distinct syndromes. The genomic architecture of flanking SDs presents a challenge for modeling these syndromes; however, the capability to efficiently generate reciprocal copy number variants (CNVs) that mimic NAHR would represent a valuable modeling tool. We describe here a CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering method, single-guide CRISPR/Cas targeting of repetitive elements (SCORE), to model reciprocal genomic disorders and demonstrate its capabilities by generating reciprocal CNVs of 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, including alteration of one copy-equivalent of the SDs that mediate NAHR in vivo. The method is reproducible, and RNA sequencing reliably clusters transcriptional signatures from human subjects with in vivo CNVs and their corresponding in vitro models. This new approach will provide broad applicability for the study of genomic disorders and, with further development, may also permit efficient correction of these defects.

  10. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  11. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanne R.; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies. PMID:26555275

  12. Growth in Chilean infants with chromosome 22q11 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Maria Luisa; Delgado, Iris; Lay-Son, Guillermo; Willans, Edward; Puga, Alonso; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2012-11-01

    Chromosome 22q11 microdeletion syndrome has a wide range of clinical manifestations including congenital heart malformations, palatal defects, endocrine abnormalities, immunologic deficits, learning difficulties, and an increased predisposition to psychiatric disease. Short stature and poor weight gain in infancy are common findings and are usually seen in the absence of hormone deficiencies. An increased frequency of obesity has been observed in adolescents and adults. We generated gender-specific growth curves from 0 to 24 months of age, based on 479 length and 475 weight measurements from 138 Chilean patients with 22q11 deletion. Final adult height and weight on 25 individuals were analyzed. The 10th, 50th, and 90th centile-smoothed curves for infants were built using the LMS method and compared with World Health Organization Child Growth Standards. The 50th centile for length in the deleted patients was slightly lower than the 10th centile of WHO standards in boys and girls. The same was observed for weight, although a trend toward a gradual increase near 2 years of age was observed, particularly in boys. Average adult height was 152 cm (ranging from 143 to 162 cm) in females, corresponding to the 10th centiles of WHO standards, and 166 cm for males (160-172 cm), at the 20th centile of WHO standards. A third of the adult females and none of the males had body mass index (BMI) greater than 25. The curves should be useful to monitor growth in infants with 22q11 microdeletion syndrome.

  13. Discovering Study-Specific Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Valeria; Curtis, Tanya; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Swift, Stephen; Tucker, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Microarrays are commonly used in biology because of their ability to simultaneously measure thousands of genes under different conditions. Due to their structure, typically containing a high amount of variables but far fewer samples, scalable network analysis techniques are often employed. In particular, consensus approaches have been recently used that combine multiple microarray studies in order to find networks that are more robust. The purpose of this paper, however, is to combine multiple microarray studies to automatically identify subnetworks that are distinctive to specific experimental conditions rather than common to them all. To better understand key regulatory mechanisms and how they change under different conditions, we derive unique networks from multiple independent networks built using glasso which goes beyond standard correlations. This involves calculating cluster prediction accuracies to detect the most predictive genes for a specific set of conditions. We differentiate between accuracies calculated using cross-validation within a selected cluster of studies (the intra prediction accuracy) and those calculated on a set of independent studies belonging to different study clusters (inter prediction accuracy). Finally, we compare our method's results to related state-of-the art techniques. We explore how the proposed pipeline performs on both synthetic data and real data (wheat and Fusarium). Our results show that subnetworks can be identified reliably that are specific to subsets of studies and that these networks reflect key mechanisms that are fundamental to the experimental conditions in each of those subsets. PMID:25191999

  14. Microdeletion/duplication at 15q13.2q13.3 among individuals with features of autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David T.; Shen, Yiping; Weiss, Lauren A.; Korn, Joshua; Anselm, Irina; Bridgemohan, Carolyn; Cox, Gerald F.; Dickinson, Hope; Gentile, Jennifer; Harris, David J.; Hegde, Vijay; Hundley, Rachel; Khwaja, Omar; Kothare, Sanjeev; Luedke, Christina; Nasir, Ramzi; Poduri, Annapurna; Prasad, Kiran; Raffalli, Peter; Reinhard, Ann; Smith, Sharon E.; Sobeih, Magdi M.; Soul, Janet S.; Stoler, Joan; Takeoka, Masanori; Tan, Wen-Hann; Thakuria, Joseph; Wolff, Robert; Yusupov, Roman; Gusella, James F.; Daly, Mark J.; Wu, Bai-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Segmental duplications at breakpoints (BP4–BP5) of chromosome 15q13.2q13.3 mediate a recurrent genomic imbalance syndrome associated with mental retardation, epilepsy, and/or EEG abnormalities. Patients DNA samples from 1,445 unrelated patients submitted consecutively for clinical array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) testing at Children’s Hospital Boston and DNA samples from 1,441 individuals with Autism from 751 families in the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) repository. Results We report the clinical features of five patients with a BP4-BP5 deletion, three with a BP4–BP5 duplication, and two with an overlapping but smaller duplication identified by whole genome high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH. These BP4–BP5 deletion cases exhibit minor dysmorphic features, significant expressive language deficits, and a spectrum of neuropsychiatric impairments that include autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, anxiety disorder, and mood disorder. Cognitive impairment varied from moderate mental retardation to normal IQ with learning disability. BP4–BP5 covers ~1.5Mb (chr15:28.719–30.298Mb) and includes 6 reference genes and 1 miRNA gene, while the smaller duplications cover ~500 kb (chr15:28.902–29.404 Mb) and contain 3 reference genes and one miRNA gene. The BP4–BP5 deletion and duplication events span CHRNA7, a candidate gene for seizures. However, none of these individuals reported here have epilepsy, although two have an abnormal EEG. Conclusions The phenotype of chromosome 15q13.2q13.3 BP4–BP5 microdeletion/duplication syndrome may include features of autism spectrum disorder, a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, and cognitive impairment. Recognition of this broader phenotype has implications for clinical diagnostic testing and efforts to understand the underlying etiology of this syndrome. PMID:18805830

  15. A Combinatorial Approach to Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Family Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Guo-Bo; Yan, Lei; Ma, Jennie Z.; Mangold, Jamie E.; Zhu, Jun; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Ming D.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread multifactor interactions present a significant challenge in determining risk factors of complex diseases. Several combinatorial approaches, such as the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method, have emerged as a promising tool for better detecting gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interactions. We recently developed a general combinatorial approach, namely the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method, which can entertain both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes and allows for both discrete and continuous covariates to detect G × G and G × E interactions in a sample of unrelated individuals. In this article, we report the development of an algorithm that can be used to study G × G and G × E interactions for family-based designs, called pedigree-based GMDR (PGMDR). Compared to the available method, our proposed method has several major improvements, including allowing for covariate adjustments and being applicable to arbitrary phenotypes, arbitrary pedigree structures, and arbitrary patterns of missing marker genotypes. Our Monte Carlo simulations provide evidence that the PGMDR method is superior in performance to identify epistatic loci compared to the MDR-pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT). Finally, we applied our proposed approach to a genetic data set on tobacco dependence and found a significant interaction between two taste receptor genes (i.e., TAS2R16 and TAS2R38) in affecting nicotine dependence. PMID:18834969

  16. A gene-based information gain method for detecting gene-gene interactions in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Huang, Dongli; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Lv, Hongchao; Wang, Limei

    2015-11-01

    Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interactions (GGIs) in genome-wide association studies are divided into SNP-based methods and gene-based methods. Generally, the gene-based methods can be more powerful than SNP-based methods. Some gene-based entropy methods can only capture the linear relationship between genes. We therefore proposed a nonparametric gene-based information gain method (GBIGM) that can capture both linear relationship and nonlinear correlation between genes. Through simulation with different odds ratio, sample size and prevalence rate, GBIGM was shown to be valid and more powerful than classic KCCU method and SNP-based entropy method. In the analysis of data from 17 genes on rheumatoid arthritis, GBIGM was more effective than the other two methods as it obtains fewer significant results, which was important for biological verification. Therefore, GBIGM is a suitable and powerful tool for detecting GGIs in case-control studies.

  17. Clinical characterization of a male patient with the recently described 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-06-01

    The 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM # 614230) has been recently described and is primarily characterized by intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. We describe here a male patient of 9 years 9 months of age with moderate intellectual disability and dysmorphic facial features. A high resolution copy number variation analysis, performed with the Affymetrix Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7 M SNP array, allowed the identification of a heterozygous 7.069 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 8q21.11-q21.13. Clinical comparison of our patient with literature shows many similarities. However, the whole facial appearance of our patient, especially the elongated rather than rounded face and the absence of a wide nasal bridge and epicanthal folds, confers him a phenotype similar only to a subset, but not to the majority, of the hitherto described patients.

  18. 6q22.33 microdeletion in a family with intellectual disability, variable major anomalies, and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Beyer, Anke; Schallner, Jens; Novotna, Barbara; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome six have been described for several regions including 6q16, 6q22.1, and 6q21q22.1, and with variable phenotypes such as intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, major and minor facial anomalies. However, an isolated microdeletion of the sub-band 6q22.33 has not been reported so far and thus, no information about the specific phenotype associated with such a copy number variant is available. Here, we define the clinical picture of an isolated 6q22.33 microdeletion based on the phenotype of six members of one family with loss of approximately 1 Mb in this region. Main clinical features include mild intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities as well as microcephaly, heart defect, and cleft lip and palate.

  19. Screening for Y Chromosome Microdeletion in a Nonobstructive Azoospermic Male Patient with Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation from His Sister

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Hakan; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Akman, Tolga; Aydın, Filiz; Kadioglu, Ates

    2010-01-01

    Genomic DNA of a patient diagnosed with nonobstructive azoospermia and with the history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation from his sister due to chronic myeloid leukemia was isolated from peripheral blood in order to screen Y chromosome microdeletions. 13 short tagged sites belonging to AZF a, b, and c loci were detected with multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. Bands were determined in ZFX/ZFY wells, whereas no bands were determined in wells of other STS regions. DNA isolation was done from buccal mucosa smear to obtain genomic DNA from patient's own cells and multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique was performed again. Bands were seen in all wells of 13 STS regions. Y chromosome microdeletion was not detected in the patient. In conclusion, genomic DNA isolation in patients undergoing BMT should be done from patients' own cells. PMID:21209805

  20. 16p13.11 microdeletion in a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miteff, Christina I; Smith, Robert L; Bain, Nicole L; Subramanian, Gopinath; Brown, Janis E; Kamien, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. The pathophysiology of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome remains uncertain and there are probably multiple potential contributing factors. Our patient had a chromosomal 16p13.11 microdeletion that confers susceptibility to various types of epilepsy. This is the first report detailing an association of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome with a 16p13.11 deletion and identifies another potential causal factor for hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome.

  1. Study of KIR genes in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Méndez, A; Granda, H; Meenagh, A; Contreras, S; Zavaleta, R; Mendoza, M F; Izquierdo, L; Sarmiento, M E; Acosta, A; Middleton, D

    2006-11-01

    A total of 97 patients with tuberculosis (TB) and 51 controls from Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico, were studied for the presence and absence of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes. The number of patients with either KIR2DL1 or KIR2DL3 differed significantly compared with the controls. However, only the difference in KIR2DL3 remained significant after correction for the number of factors analysed. We also found KIR2DS2 with its presumed C1 group ligand less prevalent in TB patients than in the control group, but this result lost significance after correction.

  2. [Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities and nine microdeletion syndromes using both traditional karyotyping and BoBs].

    PubMed

    Tang, X H; Yang, B C; Zhu, S; Su, J; Zhang, J M; Yin, Y F; Feng, Y; Li, D M; Zhao, Q F; Yu, R; Zhu, B S

    2016-05-25

    To evaluate a new prenatal diagnosis model of chromosomal abnormalities and nine microdeletion syndromes by using both traditional karyotyping and a newly-developed rapid prenatal diagnosis technology, BACs-on-Beads (BoBs) technique. From June 2012 to December 2014, 807 pregnant women with high risk after screening or with other indicators, were performed amniocentesis. Traditional karyotyping and BoBs were employed simultaneously for prenatal diagnosis. Thirty-two cases with chromosome aneupoidies were successfully detected both by BoBs and karyotyping, including 18 cases of trisomy 21, 6 cases of trisomy 18, 1 case of trisomy 13, and 7 cases with sex chromosome abnormality. All 8 fetuses with chromosome structural abnormalities detected by karyotyping were missed by BoBs; while BoBs contributed more in detection of five microdeletion syndrome cases, including 3 cases of DiGeorge syndromes (two with microduplication and one with microdeletion), one case of Miller-Dieker syndrome, and one case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Combined use of traditional karyotyping and BoBs, is a rapid and effective prenatal diagnosis model that may enlarge our horizon on chromosomal diseases and should be widely used in future clinical service.

  3. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-02-24

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome.

  4. PIAS4 is associated with macro/microcephaly in the novel interstitial 19p13.3 microdeletion/microduplication syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nevado, Julián; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Mena, Rocío; Palomares-Bralo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Ángeles Mori, María; Tenorio, Jair A; Gripp, Karen W; Denenberg, Elizabeth; del Campo, Miguel; Plaja, Alberto; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Armengol, Lluis; Gowans, Gordon; Orera, María; Sanchez-Hombre, M Carmen; Corbacho-Fernández, Esther; Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Saitta, Sulagna; Dubbs, Holly; Bénédicte, Duban B; Li, Xia; Devaney, Lani; Dinulos, Mary Beth; Vallee, Stephanie; Crespo, M Carmen; Fernández, Blanca; Fernández-Montaño, Victoria E; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; de Torres, María Luisa; Ellison, Jay W; Raskin, Salmo; Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Delicado, Alicia; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful genetic tool that has enabled the identification of novel imbalances in individuals with intellectual disability (ID), autistic disorders and congenital malformations. Here we report a ‘genotype first' approach using aCGH on 13 unrelated patients with 19p13.3 submicroscopic rearrangement (11 deletions and 2 duplications) and review cases in the literature and in public databases. Shared phenotypic features suggest that these patients represent an interstitial microdeletion/microduplication syndrome at 19p13.3. Common features consist of abnormal head circumference in most patients (macrocephaly with the deletions and microcephaly with the duplications), ID with developmental delay (DD), hypotonia, speech delay and common dysmorphic features. The phenotype is associated with at least a ~0.113 Mb critical region harboring three strong candidate genes probably associated with DD, ID, speech delay and other dysmorphic features: MAP2K2, ZBTB7A and PIAS4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the ubiquitin signaling pathways, which we hypothesize for the first time to be associated with head size in humans. PMID:25853300

  5. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome. PMID:26907467

  6. Multivariate Gene Selection and Testing in Studying the Exposure Effects on a Gene Set.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Tamar; Maity, Arnab; Coull, Brent; Baccarelli, Andrea; Schwartz, Joel; Lin, Xihong

    2012-11-01

    Studying the association between a gene set (e.g., pathway) and exposures using multivariate regression methods is of increasing importance in genomic studies. Such an analysis is often more powerful and interpretable than individual gene analysis. Since many genes in a gene set are likely not affected by exposures, one is often interested in identifying a subset of genes in the gene set that are affected by exposures. This allows for better understanding of the underlying biological mechanism and for pursuing further biological investigation of these genes. The selected subset of "signal" genes also provides an attractive vehicle for a more powerful test for the association between the gene set and exposures. We propose two computationally simple Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) based variable selection methods: Sparse Outcome Selection (SOS) CCA and step CCA, to jointly select a subset of genes in a gene set that are associated with exposures. Several model selection criteria, such as BIC and the new Correlation Information Criterion (CIC), are proposed and compared. We also develop a global test procedure for testing the exposure effects on the whole gene set, accounting for gene selection. Through simulation studies, we show that the proposed methods improve upon an existing method when the genes are correlated and are more computationally efficient. We apply the proposed methods to the analysis of the Normative Aging DNA methylation Study to examine the effects of airborne particular matter exposures on DNA methylations in a genetic pathway.

  7. 19q13.11 microdeletion concomitant with ins(2;19)(p25.3;q13.1q13.4)dn in a boy: potential role of UBA2 in the associated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos; Nieto-Martínez, Karem; Martínez-Herrera, Alejandro; Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Berumen, Jaime; Cervantes, Alicia; Kofman, Susana; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome (MIM613026) is a clinically recognisable condition in which a 324-kb minimal overlapping critical region has been recently described. However, genes not included within this region, such as WTIP and UBA2, have been proposed to contribute to the clinical characteristics observed in patients. Using cytogenetic techniques, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and the quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we identified a novel case with a 2.49-Mb deletion derived from a de novo chromosomal rearrangement. Based on a review of the literature, we support the notion that UBA2 haploinsufficiency could contribute to the phenotype of this rare genomic disorder. UBA2 belongs to a protein complex with sumoylation activity, and several transcription factors, hormone receptors, and signalling proteins related to brain and sexual development are regulated by this post-translational modification. Additional clinical reports and further research on UBA2 molecular function are warranted.

  8. Leader genes in osteogenesis: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Bruno; Giacomelli, Luca; Ricci, Massimiliano; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    Little is still known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of osteogenesis. In this paper, the leader genes approach, a new bioinformatics method which has already been experimentally validated, is adopted in order to identify the genes involved in human osteogenesis. Interactions among genes are then calculated and genes are ranked according to their relative importance in this process. In total, 167 genes were identified as being involved in osteogenesis. Genes were divided into 4 groups, according to their main function in the osteogenic processes: skeletal development; cell adhesion and proliferation; ossification; and calcium ion binding. Seven genes were consistently identified as leader genes (i.e. the genes with the greatest importance in osteogenesis), while 14 were found to have slightly less importance (class B genes). It was interesting to notice that the larger part of leader and class B genes belonged to the cell adhesion and proliferation or to the ossification sub-groups. This finding suggested that these two particular sub-processes could play a more important role in osteogenesis. Moreover, among the 7 leader genes, it is interesting to notice that RUNX2, BMP2, SPARC, PTH play a direct role in bone formation, while the 3 other leader genes (VEGF, IL6, FGF2) seem to be more connected with an angiogenetic process. Twenty-nine genes have no known interactions (orphan genes). From these results, it may be possible to plan an ad hoc experimentation, for instance by microarray analyses, focused on leader, class B and orphan genes, with the aim to shed new light on the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenesis.

  9. [Current gene study in etiological analysis of congenital craniofacial abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-miao; Fang, Bing

    2007-04-01

    The cause of congenital craniofacial abnormalities are very complicated. Understanding of the gene mechanisms of abnormalities taking place are very important for prevention and therapy.DNA sequence analysis provides the fundaments of gene study of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities. Human genome project (HGP) paved the confirmation of candidate gene of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.Transgenic animal models and gene knockout techniques are effective methods in study of gene function. This paper reviews current gene study in etiopathogenisis analysis of the congenital craniofacial abnormalities.

  10. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

    PubMed

    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  11. Identification of human HK genes and gene expression regulation study in cancer from transcriptomics data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer.

  12. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  13. Validation of reference genes for gene expression studies in soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a common tool for quantifying mRNA transcripts. To normalize results, a reference gene is mandatory. Aphis glycines is a significant soybean pest, yet gene expression and functional genomics studies are hindered by a lack of stable reference genes. We evalu...

  14. Angelman syndrome and severe infections in a patient with de novo 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion and maternally inherited 2q21.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Gerda; von Au, Katja; Drossel, Katrin; Tzschach, Andreas; Horn, Denise; Nickel, Renate; Kaindl, Angela M

    2013-01-10

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, severe speech disorder, facial dysmorphism, secondary microcephaly, ataxia, seizures, and abnormal behaviors such as easily provoked laughter. It is most frequently caused by a de novo maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 (about 70-90%), but can also be caused by paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15q11-q13 (3-7%), an imprinting defect (2-4%) or in mutations in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene UBE3A mostly leading to frame shift mutation. In addition, for patients with overlapping clinical features (Angelman-like syndrome), mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene MECP2 and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene CDKL5 as well as a microdeletion of 2q23.1 including the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 5 gene MBD5 have been described. Here, we describe a patient who carries a de novo 5Mb-deletion of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 known to be associated with Angelman syndrome and a further, maternally inherited deletion 2q21.3 (~364kb) of unknown significance. In addition to classic features of Angelman syndrome, she presented with severe infections in the first year of life, a symptom that has not been described in patients with Angelman syndrome. The 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion contains genes critical for Prader-Willi syndrome, the Angelman syndrome causing genes UBE3A and ATP10A/C, and several non-imprinted genes: GABRB3 and GABRA5 (both encoding subunits of GABA A receptor), GOLGA6L2, HERC2 and OCA2 (associated with oculocutaneous albinism II). The deletion 2q21.3 includes exons of the genes RAB3GAP1 (associated with Warburg Micro syndrome) and ZRANB3 (not disease-associated). Despite the normal phenotype of the mother, the relevance of the 2q21.3 microdeletion for the phenotype of the patient cannot be excluded, and further case reports will need to address this point.

  15. Studying the complex expression dependences between sets of coexpressed genes.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Mario; Casanova, Oriol; Barchino, Roberto; Flores, Jose; Querol, Enrique; Cedano, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  16. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  17. Bacterial reference genes for gene expression studies by RT-qPCR: survey and analysis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Danilo J P; Santos, Carolina S; Pacheco, Luis G C

    2015-09-01

    The appropriate choice of reference genes is essential for accurate normalization of gene expression data obtained by the method of reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). In 2009, a guideline called the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) highlighted the importance of the selection and validation of more than one suitable reference gene for obtaining reliable RT-qPCR results. Herein, we searched the recent literature in order to identify the bacterial reference genes that have been most commonly validated in gene expression studies by RT-qPCR (in the first 5 years following publication of the MIQE guidelines). Through a combination of different search parameters with the text mining tool MedlineRanker, we identified 145 unique bacterial genes that were recently tested as candidate reference genes. Of these, 45 genes were experimentally validated and, in most of the cases, their expression stabilities were verified using the software tools geNorm and NormFinder. It is noteworthy that only 10 of these reference genes had been validated in two or more of the studies evaluated. An enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology classifications demonstrated that genes belonging to the functional categories of DNA Replication (GO: 0006260) and Transcription (GO: 0006351) rendered a proportionally higher number of validated reference genes. Three genes in the former functional class were also among the top five most stable genes identified through an analysis of gene expression data obtained from the Pathosystems Resource Integration Center. These results may provide a guideline for the initial selection of candidate reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in several different bacterial species.

  18. Palindromic GOLGA8 core duplicons promote chromosome 15q13.3 microdeletion and evolutionary instability

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Francesca; Dennis, Megan Y.; Huddleston, John; Sudmant, Peter H.; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Miroballo, Mattia; Graves, Tina A.; Vives, Laura; Malig, Maika; Denman, Laura; Raja, Archana; Stuart, Andrew; Tang, Joyce; Munson, Brenton; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Amemiya, Chris T.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of chromosome 15q13.3 associate with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. To gain insight into its instability, we sequenced the region in patients, normal individuals and nonhuman primates. We discovered five structural configurations of the human chromosome 15q13.3 region ranging in size from 2 to 3 Mbp. These configurations arose recently (~0.5–0.9 million years ago) as a result of human-specific expansions of segmental duplications and two independent inversion events. All inversion breakpoints map near GOLGA8 core duplicons—a ~14 kbp primate-specific chromosome 15 repeat that became organized into larger palindromic structures. GOLGA8-flanked palindromes also demarcate the breakpoints of recurrent 15q13.3 microdeletions, the expansion of chromosome 15 segmental duplications in the human lineage, and independent structural changes in apes. The significant clustering (p=0.002) of breakpoints provides mechanistic evidence for the role of this core duplicon and its palindromic architecture in promoting evolutionary and disease-related instability of chromosome 15. PMID:25326701

  19. Detection of ≥1Mb microdeletions and microduplications in a single cell using custom oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Breman, Amy; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Gambin, Tomasz; Lu, Xinyan; Cheung, Sau Wai; Jackson, Laird G; Lupski, James R; Van den Veyver, Ignatia B; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2012-01-01

    High resolution detection of genomic copy number abnormalities in a single cell is relevant to preimplantation genetic diagnosis and potentially to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Our objective is to develop a reliable array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) platform to detect genomic imbalances as small as ~1Mb ina single cell. We empirically optimized the conditions for oligonucleotide-based array CGH using single cells from multiple lymphoblastoid cell lines with known copy number abnormalities. To improve resolution, we designed custom arrays with high density probes covering clinically relevant genomic regions. The detection of megabase-sized copy number variations (CNVs) in a single cell was influenced by the number of probes clustered in the interrogated region. Using our custom array, we reproducibly detected multiple chromosome abnormalities including trisomy 21, a 1.2Mb Williams syndrome deletion, and a 1.3Mb CMT1A duplication. Replicate analyses yielded consistent results. Aneuploidy and genomic imbalances with CNVs as small as 1.2Mb in a single cell are detectable by array CGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions. This approach has the potential to be applied for preimplantation genetic diagnosis to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/duplication syndromes and for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis if single fetal cells can be isolated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-01-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this…

  1. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-01-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this…

  2. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1), ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027), and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1). In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1) and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193) were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire) grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen) and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production. PMID:21951810

  3. Further characterization of the new microdeletion syndrome of 16p11.2-p12.2.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Agatino; Novelli, Antonio; Bernardini, Laura; Igliozzi, Roberta; Parrini, Barbara

    2009-06-01

    Using aCGH, we have identified a pericentromeric deletion, spanning about 8.2 Mb, within 16p11.2-p12.2 in a patient with developmental delay (DD) and dysmorphic features. This deletion arose de novo and is flanked by segmental duplications. The proposita was the only child of healthy nonconsanguineous parents, born after an uneventful pregnancy, at 40 weeks gestation, by normal delivery. She was referred to us at age 3 10/12 years for evaluation of DD and absent speech. On examination, there were a flat face; low-set, posteriorly rotated ears; high-arched palate; hypotonic face; right single palmar crease; long, thin fingers; and a sacral dimple. Her height was at the 50th centile, weight at the 25th, and OFC at the 30th. Results of DNA FraX, HRB chromosomes, metabolic work-up, audiologic evaluation, brain MRI, electroencephalogram, and heart/abdomen ultrasonography were normal. When last seen, aged 8 years, she had a moderate intellectual disability (ID) and poor speech. She was hyperactive with short attention span and difficulty in concentration, but, based on formal testing, did not have autism. Our patient shows common clinical features to the four individuals described by Ballif et al. [Ballif et al. (2007); Nat Genet 39:1071-1073], and further characterizes the new microdeletion syndrome of 16p11.2-p12.2. aCGH suggests that the deletions of all cases share the same distal breakpoint. Of note, the proximal breakpoint of our proposita overlaps the distal breakpoint of the autistic patients studied by Kumar et al. [Kumar et al. (2008); Hum Mol Genet 17:628-638] and Weiss et al. [Weiss et al. (2008); N Eng J Med 358:667-675], confirming that the 16p region carrying susceptibility to autism is more centromeric. Our observation further defines two different, contiguous 16p genomic regions, responsible for a distinct MCA/ID syndrome, and for autism, respectively.

  4. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression studies in peach using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR in such studies requires the use of reference gene(s) as an internal control to normalize mRNA levels between different samples for an exact comparison of gene expression level. However, recent studies have shown that no single reference gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, the identification of high quality reference gene(s) is of paramount importance for the interpretation of data generated by RT-qPCR. Only a few studies on reference genes have been done in plants and none in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch). Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify suitable reference gene(s) for normalization of gene expression in peach. Results In this work, eleven reference genes were investigated in different peach samples using RT-qPCR with SYBR green. These genes are: actin 2/7 (ACT), cyclophilin (CYP2), RNA polymerase II (RP II), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ribosomal protein L13 (RPL13), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), tubblin beta (TUB), tubblin alpha (TUA), translation elongation factor 2 (TEF2) and ubiquitin 10 (UBQ10). All eleven reference genes displayed a wide range of Cq values in all samples, indicating that they expressed variably. The stability of these genes except for RPL13 was determined by three different descriptive statistics, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper, which produced highly comparable results. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that expression stability varied greatly between genes studied in peach. Based on the results from geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper analyses, for all the sample pools analyzed, TEF2, UBQ10 and RP II were found to be the most suitable reference genes with a very high statistical reliability, and TEF2 and RP II for the other sample series, while 18S rRNA, RPL13 and PLA2 were unsuitable as internal controls. GAPDH and ACT

  5. Validation of endogenous control reference genes for normalizing gene expression studies in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayakannu, Thangesweran; Taylor, Anthony H; Willets, Jonathon M; Brown, Laurence; Lambert, David G; McDonald, John; Davies, Quentin; Moss, Esther L; Konje, Justin C

    2015-09-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique used for the relative quantification of target genes, using reference (housekeeping) genes for normalization to ensure the generation of accurate and robust data. A systematic examination of the suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in endometrial cancer tissues is absent. The aims of this study were therefore to identify and evaluate from the thirty-two possible reference genes from a TaqMan(®) array panel their suitability as an internal control gene. The mathematical software packages geNorm qBasePLUS identified Pumilio homolog 1 (Drosophila) (PUM1), ubiquitin C (UBC), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L19 (MRPL19) and peptidylpropyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A) (PPIA) as the best reference gene combination, whilst NormFinder identified MRPL19 as the best single reference gene, with importin 8 (IPO8) and PPIA being the best combination of two reference genes. BestKeeper ranked MRPL19 as the most stably expressed gene. In addition, the study was validated by examining the relative expression of a test gene, which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). A significant difference in CB1 mRNA expression between malignant and normal endometrium using MRPL19, PPIA, and IP08 in combination was observed. The use of MRPL19, IPO8 and PPIA was identified as the best reference gene combination for the normalization of gene expression levels in endometrial carcinoma. This study demonstrates that the arbitrary selection of endogenous control reference genes for normalization in qRT-PCR studies of endometrial carcinoma, without validation, risks the production of inaccurate data and should therefore be discouraged.

  6. The patterns of p53 gene mutations differ inside and outside of exons 5-8 in breast and other cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, A.; Blaszyk, H.; McGovern, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Most studies of the p53 gene in tumors examine only exons 5-8. In these exons, there is a predominance of missense mutations clustered in four regions of high evolutionary conservation. We previously found 64 mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene in 194 primary breast cancers. Herein, we report 18 additional mutations found by analyzing the promotor region, the first noncoding exon, and the remaining coding exons. Mutations were found in exons 4, 9, and 10, and flanking splice junctions, but not in the promotor region or in exons 1, 2, 3, and 11. Outside of exons 5-8 not a single missense mutation was found. Microdeletions and microinsertions predominate but nonsense and splice site mutations also occur. In contrast, the majority of mutations in exons 5-8 were missense changes which exclusively occurred at amino acids that were identical in all known p53 sequences which represent about 1.6 billion years of evolutionary divergence. The difference in the mutational pattern between these two regions of the p53 gene is due to a lack of missense and inframe microdeletion mutations outside exons 5-8 (p<.0001), whereas frameshift deletions and insertions, nonsense mutations and splicing defects are equally distributed over the gene. A review of the literature shows that the difference in the patterns of mutation inside and outside of exons 5-8 we have found in breast cancer is present in other types of cancers as well. These data show the importance of comparing equivalent exons when examining the pattern of p53 gene mutation in different populations. In addition, the paucity of missense mutations in breast and other cancers (even at amino acids identical throughout p53 gene evolution) indicates that at least some of the missense mutations in exons 2-4 and 9-11 result in a phenotype other than malignant transformation.

  7. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  8. Fortuitous FISH diagnosis of an interstitial microdeletion (5)(q31.1q31.2) in a girl suspected to present a cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mosca, A L; Callier, P; Leheup, B; Marle, N; Jalloul, M; Coffinet, L; Feillet, F; Valduga, M; Jonveaux, P; Mugneret, F

    2007-06-15

    Constitutional interstitial deletions of 5q are relatively rare and most are poorly characterized cytogenetically. Consequently a definite karyotype-phenotype correlation is difficult to establish. We report on a new case of a girl presenting with an abnormal cry, upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, anteverted nostrils, microretrognathia, growth retardation, and an adenoid cyst at the base of the tongue. The first suspected diagnosis was cri-du-chat syndrome because of the mewing cry. Standard cytogenetic analyses were interpreted as normal, but FISH studies using the probe of cri-du-chat syndrome with the control probe EGR1 (5q31.2)/D5S23 (Abbott) revealed a 5q31.2 microdeletion which was then confirmed by CGH-array (Abbott). FISH studies using PACs and BACs clones (Rocchi, Italia) enabled us to characterize the breakpoints of the deleted region. Cytogenetic analysis with FISH studies revealed a normal karyotype with normal 5q31 region in both parents. This case is compared with the other cases reported in the literature.

  9. Assessment of Suitable Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in Melon Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qiusheng; Gao, Lingyun; Cao, Lei; Liu, Yue; Saba, Hameed; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Melon (Cucumis melo L.) is an attractive model plant for investigating fruit development because of its morphological, physiological, and biochemical diversity. Quantification of gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with stably expressed reference genes for normalization can effectively elucidate the biological functions of genes that regulate fruit development. However, the reference genes for data normalization in melon fruits have not yet been systematically validated. This study aims to assess the suitability of 20 genes for their potential use as reference genes in melon fruits. Expression variations of these genes were measured in 24 samples that represented different developmental stages of fertilized and parthenocarpic melon fruits by qRT-PCR analysis. GeNorm identified ribosomal protein L (CmRPL) and cytosolic ribosomal protein S15 (CmRPS15) as the best pair of reference genes, and as many as five genes including CmRPL, CmRPS15, TIP41-like family protein (CmTIP41), cyclophilin ROC7 (CmCYP7), and ADP ribosylation factor 1 (CmADP) were required for more reliable normalization. NormFinder ranked CmRPS15 as the best single reference gene, and RAN GTPase gene family (CmRAN) and TATA-box binding protein (CmTBP2) as the best combination of reference genes in melon fruits. Their effectiveness was further validated by parallel analyses on the activities of soluble acid invertase and sucrose phosphate synthase, and expression profiles of their respective encoding genes CmAIN2 and CmSPS1, as well as sucrose contents during melon fruit ripening. The validated reference genes will help to improve the accuracy of gene expression studies in melon fruits. PMID:27536316

  10. A Discovery Lab for Studying Gene Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents a laboratory in which students are provided with cultures of three bacterial strains. Using the results, students will determine which of the strains corresponds to a mutant lacking a particular functional gene. (DDR)

  11. Validation of housekeeping genes for studying differential gene expression in the bovine myometrium.

    PubMed

    Rekawiecki, Robert; Kowalik, Magdalena K; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the steady-state expression of 13 selected housekeeping genes in the myometrium of cyclic and pregnant cows. Cells taken from bovine myometrium on days 1-5, 6-10, 11-16 and 17-20 of the oestrous cycle and in weeks 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 of pregnancy were used. Reverse transcribed RNA was amplified in real-time PCR using designed primers. Reaction efficiency was determined with the Linreg programme. The geNorm and NormFinder programmes were used to select the best housekeeping genes. They calculate the expression stability factor for each used housekeeping gene with the smallest value for most stably expressed genes. According to geNorm, the most stable housekeeping genes in the myometrium were C2orf29, TPB and TUBB2B, while the least stably expressed genes were 18S RNA, HPRT1 and GAPDH. NormFinder identified the best genes in the myometrium as C2orf29, MRPL12 and TBP, while the worst genes were 18S RNA, B2M and SF3A1. Differences in stability factors between the two programmes may also indicate that the physiological status of the female, e.g. pregnancy, affects the stability of expression of housekeeping genes. The different expression stability of housekeeping genes did not affect progesterone receptor expression but it could be important if small differences in gene expression were measured between studies.

  12. Simple F Test Reveals Gene-Gene Interactions in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanjie; Yuan, Ao; Zhou, Jie; Bentley, Amy R.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Missing heritability is still a challenge for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Gene-gene interactions may partially explain this residual genetic influence and contribute broadly to complex disease. To analyze the gene-gene interactions in case-control studies of complex disease, we propose a simple, non-parametric method that utilizes the F-statistic. This approach consists of three steps. First, we examine the joint distribution of a pair of SNPs in cases and controls separately. Second, an F-test is used to evaluate the ratio of dependence in cases to that of controls. Finally, results are adjusted for multiple tests. This method was used to evaluate gene-gene interactions that are associated with risk of Type 2 Diabetes among African Americans in the Howard University Family Study. We identified 18 gene-gene interactions (P < 0.0001). Compared with the commonly-used logistical regression method, we demonstrate that the F-ratio test is an efficient approach to measuring gene-gene interactions, especially for studies with limited sample size. PMID:22837643

  13. Identification of reference genes in human myelomonocytic cells for gene expression studies in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Unverdorben, Felix; Buttron, Isabell; Lauber, Beatrice; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes ("housekeeping genes") are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity.

  14. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-02-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this example, students used genes annotated for the steroid biosynthesis pathway in soybean. The authoritative Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) interactive database and other online resources were used to design primers based first on soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), then on ESTs from an alternate organism if soybean sequence was unavailable. Students designed a total of 50 gene-based primer pairs (37 soybean, 13 alternative) and tested these for polymorphism state and similarity between two soybean and two pea lines. Student assessment was based on acquisition of laboratory skills and successful project completion. This simple procedure illustrates conservation of genes and is not limited to soybean or pea. Cost per student estimates are included, along with a detailed protocol and flow diagram of the procedure.

  15. Clinical Experience with a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Noninvasive Prenatal Test for Five Clinically Significant Microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kimberly; Iyengar, Sushma; Kalyan, Akshita; Lan, Christine; Simon, Alexander L; Stosic, Melissa; Kobara, Katie; Ravi, Harini; Truong, Tina; Ryan, Allison; Demko, Zachary P; Benn, Peter

    2017-07-11

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) can currently predict a subset of submicroscopic abnormalities associated with severe clinical manifestations. We retrospectively analyzed the performance of SNP-based NIPT in 80,449 referrals for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and 42,326 referrals for 1p36, cri-du-chat, Prader-Willi, and Angelman microdeletion syndromes over a one-year period, and compared the original screening protocol with a revision that reflexively sequenced high-risk calls at a higher depth of read. The prevalence of these microdeletion syndromes was also estimated in the referral population. The positive predictive value of the original test was 15.7% for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and 5.2% for the other four disorders combined. With the revised protocol, these values increased to 44.2% for 22q11.2 and 31.7% for the others. The 0.33% false positive rate for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome decreased to 0.07% with the revised protocol. Similarly, the false positive rate for the other four disorders combined decreased from 0.56% to 0.07%. Minimal prevalences were estimated to be 1/1,255 for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and 1/1,464 for 1p36, cri-du-chat, and Angelman syndromes combined. Our results show that these microdeletions are relatively common in the referral population, and that the performance of SNP-based NIPT is improved with high-depth resequencing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical genomics for studying parasite gene function and interaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Chin-chien; Inglese, James; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2013-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in genome sequencing, gene expression profiling, genotyping, and high-throughput screening of chemical compound libraries, small molecules are playing increasingly important roles in studying gene expression regulation, gene-gene interaction, and gene function. Here we briefly review and discuss some recent advancements in drug target identification and phenotype characterization using combinations of high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries and various genome-wide methods such as whole genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, and genome-wide expressional analysis. These approaches can be used to search for new drugs against parasitic infections, to identify drug targets or drug-resistance genes, and to infer gene function. PMID:24215777

  17. Identification of Reference Genes in Human Myelomonocytic Cells for Gene Expression Studies in Altered Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Cora S.; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Paulsen, Katrin; Raig, Christiane; Raem, Arnold; Biskup, Josefine; Gutewort, Annett; Hürlimann, Eva; Philpot, Claudia; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Layer, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression studies are indispensable for investigation and elucidation of molecular mechanisms. For the process of normalization, reference genes (“housekeeping genes”) are essential to verify gene expression analysis. Thus, it is assumed that these reference genes demonstrate similar expression levels over all experimental conditions. However, common recommendations about reference genes were established during 1 g conditions and therefore their applicability in studies with altered gravity has not been demonstrated yet. The microarray technology is frequently used to generate expression profiles under defined conditions and to determine the relative difference in expression levels between two or more different states. In our study, we searched for potential reference genes with stable expression during different gravitational conditions (microgravity, normogravity, and hypergravity) which are additionally not altered in different hardware systems. We were able to identify eight genes (ALB, B4GALT6, GAPDH, HMBS, YWHAZ, ABCA5, ABCA9, and ABCC1) which demonstrated no altered gene expression levels in all tested conditions and therefore represent good candidates for the standardization of gene expression studies in altered gravity. PMID:25654098

  18. On improving the credibility of candidate gene studies: A review of candidate gene studies published in Emotion.

    PubMed

    Okbay, Aysu; Rietveld, Cornelius A

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of genetic variants associated with psychological traits deepens our knowledge about causes and consequences of individual differences. In psychology, the standard approach to identify these variants is the "candidate gene study." In a candidate gene study, a limited set of genetic variants is selected based on their hypothesized or known biological function, and these variants are tested for association with the psychological trait of interest. The successful replication of published candidate gene studies, however, is alarmingly scarce. In this article we describe the challenges to successfully identifying genetic associations, and review the candidate gene studies published in Emotion. We conclude that the implementation of 4 methodological guidelines developed by the Behavior Genetics Association for evaluating candidate gene studies will help to increase the credibility of candidate gene study findings.

  19. Localization of the human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein gene to chromosome 22Q11 in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region.

    PubMed

    Heisterkamp, N; Mulder, M P; Langeveld, A; ten Hoeve, J; Wang, Z; Roe, B A; Groffen, J

    1995-09-20

    A high percentage of patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome have interstitial deletions on chromosome 22q11. The shortest region of overlap is currently estimated to be around 55 kb. Two segments of DNA from chromosome 22q11, located 160 kb apart, were cloned because they contained NotI restriction enzyme sites. In the current study we demonstrate that these segments are absent from chromosomes 22 carrying microdeletions of two different DiGeorge patients. Fluorescence in situ and Southern blot hybridization was further used to show that this locus is within the DiGeorge critical region. Phylogenetically conserved sequences adjacent to one human cell lines. cDNAs isolated with a probe from this segment showed it to contain the gene for teh human mitochondrial citrate transporter protein. Deletion of this gene in DiGeorge syndrome and velocardio-facial syndrome may contribute to the mental deficiency seen in the patients.

  20. [Polymeric nanoparticles with therapeutic gene for gene therapy: I. Preparation and in vivo gene transfer study].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Song, Cunxian; Sun, Hongfan; Wu, Li; Tang, Lina; Leng, Xigang; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yiyao; Li, Yongjun; Guan, Heng

    2005-06-01

    VEGF nanoparticle (VEGF-NP) was prepared by a multi-emulsification technique using a biodegradable poly-dl-lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA) as matrix material. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, VEGF loading capacity, and in vitro release. VEGF-NP and naked VEGF plasmid were intramuscularly injected into the ischemia site of the rabbit chronic hindlimb ischemia model and the efficiency of VEGF-NP as gene delivery carrier for gene therapy in animal model was evaluated. Gene therapuetic effect was assessed evaluated by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and angiography assay. The average size of VEGF-NP was around 300 nm. The encapsulation efficiency of VEGF was above 96%. Loading amount of VEGF in the nanoparticles was about 4%. In vitro, nanoparticles maintained sustained-release of VEGF for two weeks. Two weeks post gene injection the capillary density in VEGF-NP group (81.22 per mm2) was significantly higher than that in control group (29.54 mm2). RT-PCR results showed greatly higher VEGF expression in VEGF-NP group (31.79au * mm) than that in naked VEGF group (9.15 au * mm). As a carrier system for gene therapy in animal model, VEGF-NP is much better than naked DNA plasmid. The results demonstrate great possibility of using NP carrier in human gene therapy.

  1. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in Erythroxylum coca.

    PubMed

    Docimo, Teresa; Schmidt, Gregor W; Luck, Katrin; Delaney, Sven K; D'Auria, John C

    2013-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is a powerful technique for the investigation of comparative gene expression, but its accuracy and reliability depend on the reference genes used as internal standards. Only genes that show a high level of expression stability are suitable for use as reference genes, and these must be identified on a case-by-case basis. Erythroxylum coca produces and accumulates high amounts of the pharmacologically active tropane alkaloid cocaine (especially in the leaves), and is an emerging model for the investigation of tropane alkaloid biosynthesis. The identification of stable internal reference genes for this species is important for its development as a model species, and would enable comparative analysis of candidate biosynthetic genes in the different tissues of the coca plant. In this study, we evaluated the expression stability of nine candidate reference genes in E. coca ( Ec6409, Ec10131, Ec11142, Actin, APT2, EF1α, TPB1, Pex4, Pp2aa3). The expression of these genes was measured in seven tissues (flowers, stems, roots and four developmental leaf stages) and the stability of expression was assessed using three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). From our results we conclude that Ec10131 and TPB1 are the most appropriate internal reference genes in leaves (where the majority of cocaine is produced), while Ec10131 and Ec6409 are the most suitable internal reference genes across all of the tissues tested.

  2. Imaging genetics studies on monoaminergic genes in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Won, Eunsoo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-04

    Although depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, current understanding of the neurobiology of depression has failed to be translated into clinical practice. Major depressive disorder (MDD) pathogenesis is considered to be significantly influenced by multiple risk genes, however genetic effects are not simply expressed at a behavioral level. Therefore the concept of endophenotype has been applied in psychiatric genetics. Imaging genetics applies anatomical or functional imaging technologies as phenotypic assays to evaluate genetic variation and their impact on behavior. This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive review of available imaging genetics studies, including reports on genetic variants that have most frequently been linked to MDD, such as the monoaminergic genes (serotonin transporter gene, monoamine oxidase A gene, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene, serotonin receptor 1A gene and catechol-O-methyl transferase gene), with regard to key structures involved in emotion processing, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex.

  3. Beyond Genomics: Studying Evolution with Gene Coexpression Networks.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Colin; Vaid, Neha; Proost, Sebastian; Persson, Staffan; Mutwil, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how genomes change as organisms become more complex is a central question in evolution. Molecular evolutionary studies typically correlate the appearance of genes and gene families with the emergence of biological pathways and morphological features. While such approaches are of great importance to understand how organisms evolve, they are also limited, as functionally related genes work together in contexts of dynamic gene networks. Since functionally related genes are often transcriptionally coregulated, gene coexpression networks present a resource to study the evolution of biological pathways. In this opinion article, we discuss recent developments in this field and how coexpression analyses can be merged with existing genomic approaches to transfer functional knowledge between species to study the appearance or extension of pathways.

  4. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in heart failure for left and right ventricles.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Rao, Man; Chen, Kai; Zhou, Jianye; Song, Jiangping

    2017-07-15

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a feasible tool for determining gene expression profiles, but the accuracy and reliability of the results depends on the stable expression of selected housekeeping genes in different samples. By far, researches on stable housekeeping genes in human heart failure samples are rare. Moreover the effect of heart failure on the expression of housekeeping genes in right and left ventricles is yet to be studied. Therefore we aim to provide stable housekeeping genes for both ventricles in heart failure and normal heart samples. In this study, we selected seven commonly used housekeeping genes as candidates. By using the qRT-PCR, the expression levels of ACTB, RAB7A, GAPDH, REEP5, RPL5, PSMB4 and VCP in eight heart failure and four normal heart samples were assessed. The stability of candidate housekeeping genes was evaluated by geNorm and Normfinder softwares. GAPDH showed the least variation in all heart samples. Results also indicated the difference of gene expression existed in heart failure left and right ventricles. GAPDH had the highest expression stability in both heart failure and normal heart samples. We also propose using different sets of housekeeping genes for left and right ventricles respectively. The combination of RPL5, GAPDH and PSMB4 is suitable for the right ventricle and the combination of GAPDH, REEP5 and RAB7A is suitable for the left ventricle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Confirmation and further delineation of the 3q26.33-3q27.2 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed; Roberts, Jennifer; Santiago, Angela; Saadi, Irfan; Hovanes, Karine

    2014-02-01

    Recently, 3 unrelated children with a potentially novel 3q26.33-3q27.2 microdeletion syndrome were reported. We now report a new 9 ½ years old Caucasian boy with a 2 Mb deletion of the same genomic region in combination with Klinefelter syndrome. He presented with facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, Asperger syndrome, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections and hypogammaglobulinemia. The deletion in our patient improves upon the minimum region of the novel 3q26.33-3q27.2 microdeletion, and provides additional insights into the underlying genetic basis of the observed phenotypes. Consistent with two of three previously described patients, our patient also presents with thrombocytopenia, which we postulate is caused by haploinsufficiency of THPO. In addition, haploinsufficiency of LAMP3, a lymphoid and dendritic cell expressed protein that is implicated in bacterial and viral infections, pulmonary surfactant protein transport and amelogenin degradation, may be a novel cause for the immune deficiency, lung disease and dental abnormalities respectively as seen in these patients.

  6. Assessing the Cognitive Translational Potential of a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Simon RO.; Fejgin, Kim; Gastambide, Francois; Vogt, Miriam A.; Kent, Brianne A.; Nielsen, Vibeke; Nielsen, Jacob; Gass, Peter; Robbins, Trevor W.; Saksida, Lisa M.; Stensbøl, Tine B.; Tricklebank, Mark D.; Didriksen, Michael; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A chromosomal microdeletion at the 22q11.2 locus is associated with extensive cognitive impairments, schizophrenia and other psychopathology in humans. Previous reports indicate that mouse models of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) may model the genetic basis of cognitive deficits relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. To assess the models usefulness for drug discovery, a novel mouse (Df(h22q11)/+) was assessed in an extensive battery of cognitive assays by partners within the NEWMEDS collaboration (Innovative Medicines Initiative Grant Agreement No. 115008). This battery included classic and touchscreen-based paradigms with recognized sensitivity and multiple attempts at reproducing previously published findings in 22q11.2DS mouse models. This work represents one of the most comprehensive reports of cognitive functioning in a transgenic animal model. In accordance with previous reports, there were non-significant trends or marginal impairment in some tasks. However, the Df(h22q11)/+ mouse did not show comprehensive deficits; no robust impairment was observed following more than 17 experiments and 14 behavioral paradigms. Thus – within the current protocols – the 22q11.2DS mouse model fails to mimic the cognitive alterations observed in human 22q11.2 deletion carriers. We suggest that the 22q11.2DS model may induce liability for cognitive dysfunction with additional “hits” being required for phenotypic expression. PMID:27507786

  7. Identification and characterization of marker chromosomes, de novo rearrangements and microdeletions in 100 cases with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Liu, Y.; Papenhausen, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    Results of molecular cytogenetic analysis are presented for 100 cases in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as an adjunct to standard cytogenetics. Commercially available centromeric, telomeric, chromosome painting and unique sequence probes were used. Cases were from a 12-month period (June 1993-May 1994) and included examples of sex chromosome abnormalities (8), duplications (5), de novo translocations (6), satellited (12) and non-satellited (7) markers, and microdeletion syndromes (62). Satellited marker chromosomes were evaluated using a combination of DAPI/Distamycin A staining, hybridization with a classical satellite probe for chromosome 15 and hybridization with alpha-satellite probes for chromosomes 13, 14, 21 and 22. Markers positive for the chromosome 15 probe were further evaluated using unique sequence probes for the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Microdeletion analysis was performed for Prader-Willi/Angelman (49) and DiGeorge/VCF (13) syndromes. Seven cases evaluated for Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome demonstrated evidence of a deletion within this region. Uniparental disomy analysis was available in cases where a deletion was not detected by FISH, yet follow-up was clinically indicated. Two cases evaluated for DiGeorge/VCF syndrome demonstrated molecular evidence of a deletion. Included in our analysis is an example of familial DiGeorge syndrome.

  8. Loss of function of the retinoid-related nuclear receptor (RORB) gene and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Mehrjouy, Mana M; Labalme, Audrey; Salmi, Manal; Bache, Iben; Bruneau, Nadine; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Fluss, Joel; de Bellescize, Julitta; Scholly, Julia; Møller, Rikke S; Craiu, Dana; Tommerup, Niels; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria Paola; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Sloan-Béna, Frédérique; Helbig, Katherine L; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Edery, Patrick; Coulbaut, Safia; Abbas, Mohamed; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Tang, Sha; Myers, Candace T; Stamberger, Hannah; Carvill, Gemma L; Shinde, Deepali N; Mefford, Heather C; Neagu, Elena; Huether, Robert; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Dica, Alice; Cohen, Julie S; Iliescu, Catrinel; Pomeran, Cristina; Rubenstein, James; Helbig, Ingo; Sanlaville, Damien; Hirsch, Edouard; Szepetowski, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE), formerly known as idiopathic generalized epilepsy, is the most common form of epilepsy and is thought to have predominant genetic etiology. GGE are clinically characterized by absence, myoclonic, or generalized tonic-clonic seizures with electroencephalographic pattern of bilateral, synchronous, and symmetrical spike-and-wave discharges. Despite their strong heritability, the genetic basis of generalized epilepsies remains largely elusive. Nevertheless, recent advances in genetic technology have led to the identification of numerous genes and genomic defects in various types of epilepsies in the past few years. In the present study, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a family with GGE consistent with the diagnosis of eyelid myoclonia with absences. We found a nonsense variant (c.196C>T/p.(Arg66*)) in RORB, which encodes the beta retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor (RORβ), in four affected family members. In addition, two de novo variants (c.218T>C/p.(Leu73Pro); c.1249_1251delACG/p.(Thr417del)) were identified in sporadic patients by trio-based exome sequencing. We also found two de novo deletions in patients with behavioral and cognitive impairment and epilepsy: a 52-kb microdeletion involving exons 5-10 of RORB and a larger 9q21-microdeletion. Furthermore, we identified a patient with intellectual disability and a balanced translocation where one breakpoint truncates RORB and refined the phenotype of a recently reported patient with RORB deletion. Our data support the role of RORB gene variants/CNVs in neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy, and especially in generalized epilepsies with predominant absence seizures.

  9. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular study of the interferon genes in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Larripa, I; Giere, I; Slavutsky, I; Diaz, M

    1995-08-01

    The interferons alpha, beta, and w (IFNA, IFNB, IFNW), are a family of genes that have been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 9 (9p21-22). Deletions of genetic material on 9p are frequently observed in hematological diseases, particularly in lymphoid neoplasias. In this paper we have performed the molecular studies of IFNA and IFNB genes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in order to determine if the deletions of these genes are prevalent in this pathology. Forty CML patients, Philadelphia positive or with BCR/ABL rearrangement, were studied at diagnosis. The analysis of IFNA and IFNB genes was performed by Southern and dot blot techniques. Homozygous or hemizygous deletions of IFNA and IFNB genes could not be detected, indicating that deletions of these genes would not be present or would be a very infrequent event in the chronic phase of the CML patients.

  11. Suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in gene expression studies for space radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Stojicic, N.; Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Research on the effects of ionizing radiation exposure involves the use of real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for measuring changes in gene expression. Several variables need to be controlled for gene expression analysis, such as different amounts of starting material between the samples, variations in enzymatic efficiencies of the reverse transcription step, and differences in RNA integrity. Normalization of the obtained data to an invariant endogenous control gene (reference gene) is the elementary step in relative quantification strategy. There is a strong correlation between the quality of the normalized data and the stability of the reference gene itself. This is especially relevant when the samples have been obtained after exposure to radiation qualities inducing different amounts and kinds of damage, leading to effects on cell cycle delays or even on cell cycle blocks. In order to determine suitable reference genes as internal controls in qRT-PCR assays after exposure to ionizing radiation, we studied the gene expression levels of nine commonly used reference genes which are constitutively expressed in A549 lung cancer cells. Expression levels obtained for ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, PBGD, 18S rRNA, G6PDH, HPRT, UBC, TFRC and SDHA were determined after exposure to 2 and 6 Gy X-radiation. Gene expression data for Growth arrest and damage-inducible gene 45 (GADD45α) and Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A/p21CIP1) were selected to elucidate the influence of normalization by using appropriate and inappropriate internal control genes. According to these results, we strongly recommend the use of a panel of reference genes instead of only one.

  12. Importance of reference gene selection for articular cartilage mechanobiology studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabah, A.; Stadnik, P.; Gilbert, S.J.; Duance, V.C.; Blain, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Identification of genes differentially expressed in mechano-biological pathways in articular cartilage provides insight into the molecular mechanisms behind initiation and/or progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used to measure gene expression, and is reliant on the use of reference genes for normalisation. Appropriate validation of reference gene stability is imperative for accurate data analysis and interpretation. This study determined in vitro reference gene stability in articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes subjected to different compressive loads and tensile strain, respectively. Design The expression of eight commonly used reference genes (18s, ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, PPIA, RPL4, SDHA and YWHAZ) was determined by qPCR and data compared using four software packages (comparative delta-Ct method, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). Calculation of geometric means of the ranked weightings was carried out using RefFinder. Results Appropriate reference gene(s) for normalisation of mechanically-regulated transcript levels in articular cartilage tissue or isolated chondrocytes were dependent on experimental set-up. SDHA, YWHAZ and RPL4 were the most stable genes whilst glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and to a lesser extent Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), showed variable expression in response to load, demonstrating their unsuitability in such in vitro studies. The effect of using unstable reference genes to normalise the expression of aggrecan (ACAN) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) resulted in inaccurate quantification of these mechano-sensitive genes and erroneous interpretation/conclusions. Conclusion This study demonstrates that commonly used ‘reference genes’ may be unsuitable for in vitro cartilage chondrocyte mechanobiology studies, reinforcing the principle that careful validation of reference genes is essential prior to each experiment to

  13. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Mackowski, Mariusz; Czyzak-Runowska, Grazyna; Wojtowski, Jacek; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Pawlak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the genetic background of horse's milk variability presents and interesting study model. Relying on 39 milk samples collected from mares representing three breeds (Polish Primitive Horse, Polish Cold-blooded Horse, Polish Warmblood Horse) we aimed to investigate the utility of equine milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA and to screen the best reference genes for RT-qPCR using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The results showed that despite relatively low somatic cell counts in mare's milk, the amount and the quality of the extracted RNA are sufficient for gene expression studies. The analysis of the utility of 7 potential reference genes for RT-qPCR experiments for the normalization of equine milk somatic cells revealed some differences between the outcomes of the applied algorithms, although in both cases the KRT8 and TOP2B genes were pointed as the most stable. Analysis by geNorm showed that the combination of 4 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, TOP2B and KRT8) is required for apropriate RT-qPCR experiments normalization, whereas NormFinder algorithm pointed the combination of KRT8 and RPS9 genes as the most suitable. The trial study of the relative transcript abundance of the beta-casein gene with the use of various types and numbers of internal control genes confirmed once again that the selection of proper reference gene combinations is crucial for the final results of each real-time PCR experiment.

  14. Gene Transfer & Hybridization Studies in Hyperthermophilic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karen E.

    2005-10-14

    A. ABSTRACT The importance of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microbial species has become increasingly evident with each completed microbial genome sequence. Most significantly, the genome of Thermotoga maritima MSB8, a hyperthermophilic bacterium isolated by Karl Stetter and workers from Vulcano Italy in 1986, and sequenced at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville Maryland in 1999, revealed extensive LGT between % . this bacterium and members of the archaeal domain (in particular Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyracoccus frcriosus species). Based on whole genome comparisons, it was estimated that 24% of the genetic information in this organism was acquired by genetic exchange with archaeal species, Independent analyses including periodicity analysis of the T. maritimu genomic DNA sequence, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genes that appear archaeal-like, and codon and amino acid usage, have provided additional evidence for LGT between T. maritima and the archaea. More recently, DiRuggiero and workers have identified a very recent LGT event between two genera of hyperthermophilic archaea, where a nearly identical DNA fragment of 16 kb in length flanked by insertion sequence (IS) elements, exists. Undoubtedly, additional examples of LGT will be identified as more microbial genomes are completed. For the present moment however, the genome sequence of T. maritima and other hyperthermophiles including P. furiosus, Pyrococcus horikoshii, Pyrococcus abyssi, A. fulgidus, and Aquifex aeolicus, have significantly increased out awareness of evolution being a web of life rather than a tree of life, as suggested by single gene phylogenies. In this proposal, we will aim to determine the extent of LGT across the hyperthemophiles, employing iY maritima as the model organism. A variety of biochemical techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions will allow for a detailed and thorough characterization of the extent of LGT in this species. The

  15. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies of shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Cohen, Carina; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Pochini, Alberto Castro; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder instability is a common shoulder injury, and patients present with plastic deformation of the glenohumeral capsule. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for increasing the general understanding of capsule deformation, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. Although RT-qPCR is highly sensitive and specific, it requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization to guarantee meaningful and reproducible results. In the present study, we evaluated the suitability of a set of reference genes using samples from the glenohumeral capsules of individuals with and without shoulder instability. We analyzed the expression of six commonly used reference genes (ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, TBP and TFRC) in the antero-inferior, antero-superior and posterior portions of the glenohumeral capsules of cases and controls. The stability of the candidate reference gene expression was determined using four software packages: NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1 and B2M composed the best pair of reference genes from different analysis groups, including simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. GenEx software was used to identify the optimal number of reference genes to be used for normalization and demonstrated that the accumulated standard deviation resulting from the use of 2 reference genes was similar to that resulting from the use of 3 or more reference genes. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1. Although the use of different reference gene combinations yielded variable normalized quantities, the relative quantities within sample groups were similar and confirmed that no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes. Consequently, the use of 2 stable reference genes for normalization, especially HPRT1 and B2M, is a

  16. Selection of Reliable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Rhododendron molle G. Don

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zheng; Sun, Xiaobo; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Chang; He, Lisi; Chen, Shangping; Su, Jiale

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) approach has become a widely used method to analyze expression patterns of target genes. The selection of an optimal reference gene is a prerequisite for the accurate normalization of gene expression in qRT-PCR. The present study constitutes the first systematic evaluation of potential reference genes in Rhododendron molle G. Don. Eleven candidate reference genes in different tissues and flowers at different developmental stages of R. molle were assessed using the following three software packages: GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. The results showed that EF1-α (elongation factor 1-alpha), 18S (18s ribosomal RNA), and RPL3 (ribosomal protein L3) were the most stable reference genes in developing rhododendron flowers and, thus, in all of the tested samples, while tublin (TUB) was the least stable. ACT5 (actin), RPL3, 18S, and EF1-α were found to be the top four choices for different tissues, whereas TUB was not found to favor qRT-PCR normalization in these tissues. Three stable reference genes are recommended for the normalization of qRT-PCR data in R. molle. Furthermore, the expression profiles of RmPSY (phytoene synthase) and RmPDS (phytoene dehydrogenase) were assessed using EF1-α, 18S, ACT5, RPL3, and their combination as internals. Similar trends were found, but these trends varied when the least stable reference gene TUB was used. The results further prove that it is necessary to validate the stability of reference genes prior to their use for normalization under different experimental conditions. This study provides useful information for reliable qRT-PCR data normalization in gene studies of R. molle. PMID:27803707

  17. Gene therapy for osteosarcoma: steps towards clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Dass, Crispin R; Choong, Peter F M

    2008-04-01

    Gene therapy, an applied form of biotechnology, relies on the delivery of foreign DNA into cells. More than 50% of all reported clinical trials for gene therapy are for cancer, though only a scant number for osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma is a neoplasm afflicting young adults, who in their prime years of life suffer debilitation if not death. The disease is not entirely curable, even with surgery combined with aggressive chemotherapy. Thus, other forms of therapies are being evaluated, including gene therapy. There exist two major forms of gene transfer: viral and non-viral. This review only covers proof-of-principle work carried out in cancer beyond the cell culture stage, in animals. Drawing from the experiences of gene therapy against other cancers, studies for which have already reached the clinical phase, the review discusses potential pitfalls and solutions to enhance gene therapy for osteosarcoma.

  18. Preclinical studies for gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Odom, Guy L; Banks, Glen B; Schultz, Brian R; Gregorevic, Paul; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2010-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of genetic disorders without an effective treatment. Because they are caused by mutations in various genes, the most direct way to treat them involves correcting the underlying gene defect (ie, gene therapy). Such a gene therapy approach involves delivering a therapeutic gene cassette to essentially all the muscles of the body in a safe and efficacious manner. The authors describe gene delivery methods using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus that are showing great promise in preclinical studies for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. It is hoped that variations on these methods might be applicable for most, if not all, of the different types of muscular dystrophy.

  19. Chronic periodontitis genome-wide association studies: gene-centric and gene set enrichment analyses.

    PubMed

    Rhodin, K; Divaris, K; North, K E; Barros, S P; Moss, K; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2014-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10(-7); ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10(-7); WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10(-6); AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10(-6)) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex-KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10(-7); Porphyromonas gingivalis-DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10(-6)). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10(-5)), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10(-5)), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10(-5)), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10(-5)). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism-based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP ("endoplasmic reticulum membrane," "cytochrome P450," "microsome," and "oxidation reduction") and moderate CP ("regulation of gene expression," "zinc ion binding," "BMP signaling pathway," and "ruffle"). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and new candidate genes and pathways

  20. Autistic-like behavioral phenotypes in a mouse model with copy number variation of the CAPS2/CADPS2 gene.

    PubMed

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Shinoda, Yo; Oka, Megumi; Sekine, Yukiko; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2013-01-04

    Ca²⁺-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2 or CADPS2) facilitates secretion and trafficking of dense-core vesicles. Recent genome-wide association studies of autism have identified several microdeletions due to copy number variation (CNV) in one of the chromosome 7q31.32 alleles on which the locus for CAPS2 is located in autistic patients. To evaluate the biological significance of reducing CAPS2 copy number, we analyzed CAPS2 heterozygous mice. Our present findings suggest that adequate levels of CAPS2 protein are critical for normal brain development and behavior, and that allelic changes due to CNV may contribute to autistic symptoms in combination with deficits in other autism-associated genes.

  1. Understanding the Role of Tbx1 as a Candidate Gene for 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is caused by a commonly occurring microdeletion on chromosome 22. Clinical findings include cardiac malformations, thymic and parathyroid hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and dental defects. These phenotypes are due mainly to abnormal development of the pharyngeal apparatus. Targeted deletion studies in mice and analysis of naturally occurring mutations in humans have implicated Tbx1 as a candidate gene for 22q11.2DS. Tbx1 belongs to an evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors, whose expression is precisely regulated during embryogenesis, and it appears to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of various progenitor cells during organogenesis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of Tbx1 during development of the heart, thymus and parathyroid glands, as well as during formation of the palate, teeth, and other craniofacial features. PMID:23996541

  2. Superior Cross-Species Reference Genes: A Blueberry Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Die, Jose V.; Rowland, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of affordable Next Generation Sequencing technologies has had major impact on studies of many crop species, where access to genomic technologies and genome-scale data sets has been extremely limited until now. The recent development of genomic resources in blueberry will enable the application of high throughput gene expression approaches that should relatively quickly increase our understanding of blueberry physiology. These studies, however, require a highly accurate and robust workflow and make necessary the identification of reference genes with high expression stability for correct target gene normalization. To create a set of superior reference genes for blueberry expression analyses, we mined a publicly available transcriptome data set from blueberry for orthologs to a set of Arabidopsis genes that showed the most stable expression in a developmental series. In total, the expression stability of 13 putative reference genes was evaluated by qPCR and a set of new references with high stability values across a developmental series in fruits and floral buds of blueberry were identified. We also demonstrated the need to use at least two, preferably three, reference genes to avoid inconsistencies in results, even when superior reference genes are used. The new references identified here provide a valuable resource for accurate normalization of gene expression in Vaccinium spp. and may be useful for other members of the Ericaceae family as well. PMID:24058469

  3. Superior cross-species reference genes: a blueberry case study.

    PubMed

    Die, Jose V; Rowland, Lisa J

    2013-01-01

    The advent of affordable Next Generation Sequencing technologies has had major impact on studies of many crop species, where access to genomic technologies and genome-scale data sets has been extremely limited until now. The recent development of genomic resources in blueberry will enable the application of high throughput gene expression approaches that should relatively quickly increase our understanding of blueberry physiology. These studies, however, require a highly accurate and robust workflow and make necessary the identification of reference genes with high expression stability for correct target gene normalization. To create a set of superior reference genes for blueberry expression analyses, we mined a publicly available transcriptome data set from blueberry for orthologs to a set of Arabidopsis genes that showed the most stable expression in a developmental series. In total, the expression stability of 13 putative reference genes was evaluated by qPCR and a set of new references with high stability values across a developmental series in fruits and floral buds of blueberry were identified. We also demonstrated the need to use at least two, preferably three, reference genes to avoid inconsistencies in results, even when superior reference genes are used. The new references identified here provide a valuable resource for accurate normalization of gene expression in Vaccinium spp. and may be useful for other members of the Ericaceae family as well.

  4. Functionally Enigmatic Genes: A Case Study of the Brain Ignorome

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Lu, Lu; Wang, Xusheng; Homayouni, Ramin; Williams, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    What proportion of genes with intense and selective expression in specific tissues, cells, or systems are still almost completely uncharacterized with respect to biological function? In what ways do these functionally enigmatic genes differ from well-studied genes? To address these two questions, we devised a computational approach that defines so-called ignoromes. As proof of principle, we extracted and analyzed a large subset of genes with intense and selective expression in brain. We find that publications associated with this set are highly skewed—the top 5% of genes absorb 70% of the relevant literature. In contrast, approximately 20% of genes have essentially no neuroscience literature. Analysis of the ignorome over the past decade demonstrates that it is stubbornly persistent, and the rapid expansion of the neuroscience literature has not had the expected effect on numbers of these genes. Surprisingly, ignorome genes do not differ from well-studied genes in terms of connectivity in coexpression networks. Nor do they differ with respect to numbers of orthologs, paralogs, or protein domains. The major distinguishing characteristic between these sets of genes is date of discovery, early discovery being associated with greater research momentum—a genomic bandwagon effect. Finally we ask to what extent massive genomic, imaging, and phenotype data sets can be used to provide high-throughput functional annotation for an entire ignorome. In a majority of cases we have been able to extract and add significant information for these neglected genes. In several cases—ELMOD1, TMEM88B, and DZANK1—we have exploited sequence polymorphisms, large phenome data sets, and reverse genetic methods to evaluate the function of ignorome genes. PMID:24523945

  5. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    All projects are working toward a goal for describing the three dimensional nuclear topography in terms of relative spatial relationships among genes (specific DNA sequence). Methods are now being perfected to detect these genes, quantitatively and spatially, to perturb these genes specifically, and to measure the perturbation in order to assure specificity. We are developing methods to assay, after perturbation of the target DNA within living cells, whether or not only the target sequence are attacked while other sequences remain unharmed. We are now at the stage to do chemical gene modification or masking within living cells in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Soon, we will be able to study the function and the physical location of each gene in living cells with exquisite specificity. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Reconstructability analysis as a tool for identifying gene-gene interactions in studies of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Shervais, Stephen; Kramer, Patricia L; Westaway, Shawn K; Cox, Nancy J; Zwick, Martin

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of common human diseases for which the genetic component may include an epistatic interaction of multiple genes. Detecting these interactions with standard statistical tools is difficult because there may be an interaction effect, but minimal or no main effect. Reconstructability analysis (RA) uses Shannon's information theory to detect relationships between variables in categorical datasets. We applied RA to simulated data for five different models of gene-gene interaction, and find that even with heritability levels as low as 0.008, and with the inclusion of 50 non-associated genes in the dataset, we can identify the interacting gene pairs with an accuracy of > or =80%. We applied RA to a real dataset of type 2 non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) cases and controls, and closely approximated the results of more conventional single SNP disease association studies. In addition, we replicated prior evidence for epistatic interactions between SNPs on chromosomes 2 and 15.

  7. Reliable reference gene selection for Cordyceps militaris gene expression studies under different developmental stages and media.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Liu, Guijun; Sun, Junde; Dong, Caihong

    2014-07-01

    Cordyceps militaris is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species, which are highly prized in traditional Chinese medicine. Gene expression analysis has become more popular and important in studies of this fungus. Reference gene validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. In this study, eight candidate reference genes, actin, cox5, gpd, rpb1, tef1, try, tub, and ubi, were selected and their expression stability was evaluated in C. militaris samples using four algorithms, genorm, normfinder, bestkeeper, and the comparative ∆Ct method. Three sets of samples, five different developmental stages cultured in wheat medium and pupae, and all the samples pool were included. The results showed that rpb1 was the best reference gene during all developmental stages examined, while the most common reference genes, actin and tub, were not suitable internal controls. Cox5 also performed poorly and was less stable in our analysis. The ranks of ubi and gpd were inconsistent in different sample sets by different methods. Our results provide guidelines for reference gene selection at different developmental stages and also represent a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in C. militaris gene expression analysis. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of reference genes for gene expression studies in human brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Taube, Magdalena; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C; Lindberg, Kristin; Pereira, Maria J; Gäbel, Markus; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W; Svensson, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has during the last 5 year been subjected to an increasing research interest, due to its putative function as a target for future obesity treatments. The most commonly used method for molecular studies of human BAT is the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). This method requires normalization to a reference gene (genes with uniform expression under different experimental conditions, e.g. similar expression levels between human BAT and WAT), but so far no evaluation of reference genes for human BAT has been performed. Two different microarray datasets with samples containing human BAT were used to search for genes with low variability in expression levels. Seven genes (FAM96B, GNB1, GNB2, HUWE1, PSMB2, RING1 and TPT1) identified by microarray analysis, and 8 commonly used reference genes (18S, B2M, GAPDH, LRP10, PPIA, RPLP0, UBC, and YWHAZ) were selected and further analyzed by quantitative PCR in both BAT containing perirenal adipose tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Results were analyzed using 2 different algorithms (Normfinder and geNorm). Most of the commonly used reference genes displayed acceptably low variability (geNorm M-values <0.5) in the samples analyzed, but the novel reference genes identified by microarray displayed an even lower variability (M-values <0.25). Our data suggests that PSMB2, GNB2 and GNB1 are suitable novel reference genes for qPCR analysis of human BAT and we recommend that they are included in future gene expression studies of human BAT.

  9. Identification of reference genes and validation for gene expression studies in diverse axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) tissues.

    PubMed

    Guelke, Eileen; Bucan, Vesna; Liebsch, Christina; Lazaridis, Andrea; Radtke, Christine; Vogt, Peter M; Reimers, Kerstin

    2015-04-10

    For the precise quantitative RT-PCR normalization a set of valid reference genes is obligatory. Moreover have to be taken into concern the experimental conditions as they bias the regulation of reference genes. Up till now, no reference targets have been described for the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). In a search in the public database SalSite for genetic information of the axolotl we identified fourteen presumptive reference genes, eleven of which were further tested for their gene expression stability. This study characterizes the expressional patterns of 11 putative endogenous control genes during axolotl limb regeneration and in an axolotl tissue panel. All 11 reference genes showed variable expression. Strikingly, ACTB was to be found most stable expressed in all comparative tissue groups, so we reason it to be suitable for all different kinds of axolotl tissue-type investigations. Moreover do we suggest GAPDH and RPLP0 as suitable for certain axolotl tissue analysis. When it comes to axolotl limb regeneration, a validated pair of reference genes is ODC and RPLP0. With these findings, new insights into axolotl gene expression profiling might be gained.

  10. Validation of internal reference genes for relative quantitation studies of gene expression in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; He, Jinting; Wang, Wei; Ren, Ming; Gao, Sujie; Zhao, Guanjie

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the expression stabilities of 12 common internal reference genes for the relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by reverse transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in human laryngeal cancer. Methods Hep-2 cells and 14 laryngeal cancer tissue samples were investigated. The expression characteristics of 12 internal reference gene candidates (18S rRNA, GAPDH, ACTB, HPRT1, RPL29, HMBS, PPIA, ALAS1, TBP, PUM1, GUSB, and B2M) were assessed by RT-qPCR. The data were analyzed by three commonly used software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. Results The use of the combination of four internal reference genes was more appropriate than the use of a single internal reference gene. The optimal combination was PPIA + GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 for both the cell line and tissues; while the most appropriate combination was GUSB + RPL29 + HPRT1 + HMBS for the tissues. Conclusions Our recommended internal reference genes may improve the accuracy of relative quantitation analysis of target gene expression performed by the RT-qPCR method in further gene expression research on laryngeal tumors. PMID:27957397

  11. A Whole-Transcriptome Approach to Evaluating Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies: A Case Study in Mimulus

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Kimmy A.; Edger, Patrick P.; Puzey, Joshua R.; Kinser, Taliesin; Cheng, Philip; Vernon, Daniel M.; Forsthoefel, Nancy R.; Cooley, Arielle M.

    2017-01-01

    While quantitative PCR (qPCR) is widely recognized as being among the most accurate methods for quantifying gene expression, it is highly dependent on the use of reliable, stably expressed reference genes. With the increased availability of high-throughput methods for measuring gene expression, whole-transcriptome approaches may be increasingly utilized for reference gene selection and validation. In this study, RNA-seq was used to identify a set of novel qPCR reference genes and evaluate a panel of traditional “housekeeping” reference genes in two species of the evolutionary model plant genus Mimulus. More broadly, the methods proposed in this study can be used to harness the power of transcriptomes to identify appropriate reference genes for qPCR in any study organism, including emerging and nonmodel systems. We find that RNA-seq accurately estimates gene expression means in comparison to qPCR, and that expression means are robust to moderate environmental and genetic variation. However, measures of expression variability were only in agreement with qPCR for samples obtained from a shared environment. This result, along with transcriptome-wide comparisons, suggests that environmental changes have greater impacts on expression variability than on expression means. We discuss how this issue can be addressed through experimental design, and suggest that the ever-expanding pool of published transcriptomes represents a rich and low-cost resource for developing better reference genes for qPCR. PMID:28258113

  12. A Whole-Transcriptome Approach to Evaluating Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies: A Case Study in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Kimmy A; Edger, Patrick P; Puzey, Joshua R; Kinser, Taliesin; Cheng, Philip; Vernon, Daniel M; Forsthoefel, Nancy R; Cooley, Arielle M

    2017-04-03

    While quantitative PCR (qPCR) is widely recognized as being among the most accurate methods for quantifying gene expression, it is highly dependent on the use of reliable, stably expressed reference genes. With the increased availability of high-throughput methods for measuring gene expression, whole-transcriptome approaches may be increasingly utilized for reference gene selection and validation. In this study, RNA-seq was used to identify a set of novel qPCR reference genes and evaluate a panel of traditional "housekeeping" reference genes in two species of the evolutionary model plant genus Mimulus More broadly, the methods proposed in this study can be used to harness the power of transcriptomes to identify appropriate reference genes for qPCR in any study organism, including emerging and nonmodel systems. We find that RNA-seq accurately estimates gene expression means in comparison to qPCR, and that expression means are robust to moderate environmental and genetic variation. However, measures of expression variability were only in agreement with qPCR for samples obtained from a shared environment. This result, along with transcriptome-wide comparisons, suggests that environmental changes have greater impacts on expression variability than on expression means. We discuss how this issue can be addressed through experimental design, and suggest that the ever-expanding pool of published transcriptomes represents a rich and low-cost resource for developing better reference genes for qPCR. Copyright © 2017 Stanton et al.

  13. Comparative studies of gene expression and the evolution of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Irene Gallego; Ruvinsky, Ilya; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that differences in gene regulation play an important role in speciation and adaptation is more than 40 years old. With the advent of new sequencing technologies, we are able to characterize and study gene expression levels and associated regulatory mechanisms in a large number of individuals and species at unprecedented resolution and scale. We have thus gained new insights into the evolutionary pressures that shape gene expression levels, as well as developed an appreciation for the relative importance of evolutionary changes in different regulatory genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The current challenge is to link gene regulatory changes to adaptive evolution of complex phenotypes. Here we mainly focus on comparative studies in primates, and how they are complemented by studies in model organisms. PMID:22705669

  14. Gene-centric genomewide association study via entropy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuehua; Kang, Guolian; Sun, Kelian; Qian, Minping; Romero, Roberto; Fu, Wenjiang

    2008-05-01

    Genes are the functional units in most organisms. Compared to genetic variants located outside genes, genic variants are more likely to affect disease risk. The development of the human HapMap project provides an unprecedented opportunity for genetic association studies at the genomewide level for elucidating disease etiology. Currently, most association studies at the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or the haplotype level rely on the linkage information between SNP markers and disease variants, with which association findings are difficult to replicate. Moreover, variants in genes might not be sufficiently covered by currently available methods. In this article, we present a gene-centric approach via entropy statistics for a genomewide association study to identify disease genes. The new entropy-based approach considers genic variants within one gene simultaneously and is developed on the basis of a joint genotype distribution among genetic variants for an association test. A grouping algorithm based on a penalized entropy measure is proposed to reduce the dimension of the test statistic. Type I error rates and power of the entropy test are evaluated through extensive simulation studies. The results indicate that the entropy test has stable power under different disease models with a reasonable sample size. Compared to single SNP-based analysis, the gene-centric approach has greater power, especially when there is more than one disease variant in a gene. As the genomewide genic SNPs become available, our entropy-based gene-centric approach would provide a robust and computationally efficient way for gene-based genomewide association study.

  15. Validation of commonly used reference genes for sleep-related gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kil S; Alvarenga, Tathiana A; Guindalini, Camila; Andersen, Monica L; Castro, Rosa MRPS; Tufik, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Sleep is a restorative process and is essential for maintenance of mental and physical health. In an attempt to understand the complexity of sleep, multidisciplinary strategies, including genetic approaches, have been applied to sleep research. Although quantitative real time PCR has been used in previous sleep-related gene expression studies, proper validation of reference genes is currently lacking. Thus, we examined the effect of total or paradoxical sleep deprivation (TSD or PSD) on the expression stability of the following frequently used reference genes in brain and blood: beta-actin (b-actin), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). Results Neither TSD nor PSD affected the expression stability of all tested genes in both tissues indicating that b-actin, B2M, GAPDH and HPRT are appropriate reference genes for the sleep-related gene expression studies. In order to further verify these results, the relative expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) was evaluated in brain and blood, respectively. The normalization with each of four reference genes produced similar pattern of expression in control and sleep deprived rats, but subtle differences in the magnitude of expression fold change were observed which might affect the statistical significance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that sleep deprivation does not alter the expression stability of commonly used reference genes in brain and blood. Nonetheless, the use of multiple reference genes in quantitative RT-PCR is required for the accurate results. PMID:19445681

  16. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes under gene-environment independence, but it still persists if estimating the gene-environment interaction parameter itself is of interest. Uncontrolled environmental confounding will bias estimates of gene-environment interaction parameters even under gene-environment independence, but it will not do so if the unmeasured confounding variable itself does not interact with the genetic factor. Under gene-environment independence, if the interaction parameter without controlling for the environmental confounder is nonzero, then there is gene-environment interaction either between the genetic factor and the environmental factor of interest or between the genetic factor and the unmeasured environmental confounder. We evaluate several recently proposed joint tests in a simulation study and discuss the implications of these results for the conduct of gene-environment interaction studies.

  17. A longitudinal study of gene expression in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Karlovich, Chris; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Johnson, Andrea; McLoughlin, Patricia; Navarro, Mercidita; Fleurbaey, Carole; Steiner, Lori; Tessier, Michel; Nguyen, Tracy; Wilhelm-Seiler, Monika; Caulfield, John P

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of gene expression in venous blood either as a pharmacodynamic marker in clinical trials of drugs or as a diagnostic test requires knowledge of the variability in expression over time in healthy volunteers. Here we defined a normal range of gene expression over 6 months in the blood of four cohorts of healthy men and women who were stratified by age (22–55 years and > 55 years) and gender. Methods Eleven immunomodulatory genes likely to play important roles in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and infection in addition to four genes typically used as reference genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), as well as the full genome as represented by Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Results Gene expression levels as assessed by qRT-PCR and microarray were relatively stable over time with ~2% of genes as measured by microarray showing intra-subject differences over time periods longer than one month. Fifteen genes varied by gender. The eleven genes examined by qRT-PCR remained within a limited dynamic range for all individuals. Specifically, for the seven most stably expressed genes (CXCL1, HMOX1, IL1RN, IL1B, IL6R, PTGS2, and TNF), 95% of all samples profiled fell within 1.5–2.5 Ct, the equivalent of a 4- to 6-fold dynamic range. Two subjects who experienced severe adverse events of cancer and anemia, had microarray gene expression profiles that were distinct from normal while subjects who experienced an infection had only slightly elevated levels of inflammatory markers. Conclusion This study defines the range and variability of gene expression in healthy men and women over a six-month period. These parameters can be used to estimate the number of subjects needed to observe significant differences from normal gene expression in clinical studies. A set of genes that varied by gender was also identified as were a set of genes with elevated expression in a subject with

  18. A longitudinal study of gene expression in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Karlovich, Chris; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Johnson, Andrea; McLoughlin, Patricia; Navarro, Mercidita; Fleurbaey, Carole; Steiner, Lori; Tessier, Michel; Nguyen, Tracy; Wilhelm-Seiler, Monika; Caulfield, John P

    2009-06-07

    The use of gene expression in venous blood either as a pharmacodynamic marker in clinical trials of drugs or as a diagnostic test requires knowledge of the variability in expression over time in healthy volunteers. Here we defined a normal range of gene expression over 6 months in the blood of four cohorts of healthy men and women who were stratified by age (22-55 years and > 55 years) and gender. Eleven immunomodulatory genes likely to play important roles in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and infection in addition to four genes typically used as reference genes were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), as well as the full genome as represented by Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Gene expression levels as assessed by qRT-PCR and microarray were relatively stable over time with approximately 2% of genes as measured by microarray showing intra-subject differences over time periods longer than one month. Fifteen genes varied by gender. The eleven genes examined by qRT-PCR remained within a limited dynamic range for all individuals. Specifically, for the seven most stably expressed genes (CXCL1, HMOX1, IL1RN, IL1B, IL6R, PTGS2, and TNF), 95% of all samples profiled fell within 1.5-2.5 Ct, the equivalent of a 4- to 6-fold dynamic range. Two subjects who experienced severe adverse events of cancer and anemia, had microarray gene expression profiles that were distinct from normal while subjects who experienced an infection had only slightly elevated levels of inflammatory markers. This study defines the range and variability of gene expression in healthy men and women over a six-month period. These parameters can be used to estimate the number of subjects needed to observe significant differences from normal gene expression in clinical studies. A set of genes that varied by gender was also identified as were a set of genes with elevated expression in a subject with iron deficiency anemia and

  19. Gene-targeting technologies for the study of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Beglopoulos, Vassilios; Shen, Jie

    2004-01-01

    Studies using genetic manipulations have proven invaluable in the research of neurological disorders. In the forefront of these approaches is the knockout technology that engineers a targeted gene mutation in mice resulting in inactivation of gene expression. In many cases, important roles of a particular gene in embryonic development have precluded the in vivo study of its function in the adult brain, which is usually the most relevant experimental context for the study of neurological disorders. The conditional knockout technology has provided a tool to overcome this restriction and has been used successfully to generate viable mouse models with gene inactivation patterns in certain regions or cell types of the postnatal brain. This review first describes the methodology of gene targeting in mice, detailing the aspects of designing a targeting vector, introducing it into embryonic stem cells in culture and screening for correct recombination events, and generating chimeric and null mutant mice from the positive clones. It then discusses the special issues and considerations for the generation of conditional knockout mice, including a section about approaches for inducible gene inactivation in the brain and some of their applications. An overview of gene-targeted mouse models that have been used in the study of several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, seizure disorders, and schizophrenia, is also presented. The importance of the results obtained by these models for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism underlying the disorders is discussed.

  20. Using the Gene Ontology to Scan Multi-Level Gene Sets for Associations in Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schaid, Daniel J.; Sinnwell, Jason P.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Ingle, James N.; Kubo, Michiaki; Goss, Paul E.; Costantino, Joseph P.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene-set analyses have been widely used in gene expression studies, and some of the developed methods have been extended to genome wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, complications due to linkage disequilibrium (LD) among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and variable numbers of SNPs per gene and genes per gene-set, have plagued current approaches, often leading to ad hoc “fixes”. To overcome some of the current limitations, we developed a general approach to scan GWAS SNP data for both gene-level and gene-set analyses, building on score statistics for generalized linear models, and taking advantage of the directed acyclic graph structure of the gene ontology when creating gene-sets. However, other types of gene-set structures can be used, such as the popular Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Our approach combines SNPs into genes, and genes into gene-sets, but assures that positive and negative effects of genes on a trait do not cancel. To control for multiple testing of many gene-sets, we use an efficient computational strategy that accounts for LD and provides accurate step-down adjusted p-values for each gene-set. Application of our methods to two different GWAS provide guidance on the potential strengths and weaknesses of our proposed gene-set analyses. PMID:22161999

  1. Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0282 TITLE: Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pedro Gonzalez...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Developing Gene Silencing for the Study and Treatment of Dystonia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0282 5c...cause abnormal twisting postures. DYT1 dystonia is an autosomal dominant disease with onset of dystonia during childhood . The most common early onset

  2. Endogenous Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Bicuspid Aortic Valve Associated Aortopathy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Moorjani, Narain; Torrens, Christopher; Ohri, Sunil K.; Cagampang, Felino R.

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality and predisposes patients to life-threatening aortic complications including aortic aneurysm. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the most commonly used methods to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms involved in aortopathy. The accuracy of the gene expression data is dependent on normalization by appropriate housekeeping (HK) genes, whose expression should remain constant regardless of aortic valve morphology, aortic diameter and other factors associated with aortopathy. Here, we identified an appropriate set of HK genes to be used as endogenous reference for quantifying gene expression in ascending aortic tissue using a spin column-based RNA extraction method. Ascending aortic biopsies were collected intra-operatively from patients undergoing aortic valve and/or ascending aortic surgery. These patients had BAV or tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), and the aortas were either dilated (≥4.5cm) or undilated. The cohort had an even distribution of gender, valve disease and hypertension. The expression stability of 12 reference genes were investigated (ATP5B, ACTB, B2M, CYC1, EIF4A2, GAPDH, SDHA, RPL13A, TOP1, UBC, YWHAZ, and 18S) using geNorm software. The most stable HK genes were found to be GAPDH, UBC and ACTB. Both GAPDH and UBC demonstrated relative stability regardless of valve morphology, aortic diameter, gender and age. The expression of B2M and SDHA were found to be the least stable HK genes. We propose the use of GAPDH, UBC and ACTB as reference genes for gene expression studies of BAV aortopathy using ascending aortic tissue. PMID:27727313

  3. Endogenous Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Bicuspid Aortic Valve Associated Aortopathy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Oliver J; Moorjani, Narain; Torrens, Christopher; Ohri, Sunil K; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality and predisposes patients to life-threatening aortic complications including aortic aneurysm. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the most commonly used methods to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms involved in aortopathy. The accuracy of the gene expression data is dependent on normalization by appropriate housekeeping (HK) genes, whose expression should remain constant regardless of aortic valve morphology, aortic diameter and other factors associated with aortopathy. Here, we identified an appropriate set of HK genes to be used as endogenous reference for quantifying gene expression in ascending aortic tissue using a spin column-based RNA extraction method. Ascending aortic biopsies were collected intra-operatively from patients undergoing aortic valve and/or ascending aortic surgery. These patients had BAV or tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), and the aortas were either dilated (≥4.5cm) or undilated. The cohort had an even distribution of gender, valve disease and hypertension. The expression stability of 12 reference genes were investigated (ATP5B, ACTB, B2M, CYC1, EIF4A2, GAPDH, SDHA, RPL13A, TOP1, UBC, YWHAZ, and 18S) using geNorm software. The most stable HK genes were found to be GAPDH, UBC and ACTB. Both GAPDH and UBC demonstrated relative stability regardless of valve morphology, aortic diameter, gender and age. The expression of B2M and SDHA were found to be the least stable HK genes. We propose the use of GAPDH, UBC and ACTB as reference genes for gene expression studies of BAV aortopathy using ascending aortic tissue.

  4. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  5. Behavioral abnormalities are common and severe in patients with distal 22q11.2 microdeletions and microduplications

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Valerie; McRae, Anne; Dineen, Richard; Saulsberry, Alexandria; Hoganson, George; Schrift, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We describe six individuals with microdeletions and microduplications in the distal 22q11.2 region detected by microarray. Five of the abnormalities have breakpoints in the low-copy repeats (LCR) in this region and one patient has an atypical rearrangement. Two of the six patients with abnormalities in the region between LCR22 D–E have hearing loss, which has previously been reported only once in association with these abnormalities. We especially note the behavioral/neuropsychiatric problems, including the severity and early onset, in patients with distal 22q11.2 rearrangements. Our patients add to the genotype–phenotype correlations which are still being generated for these chromosomal anomalies. PMID:26247050

  6. Anti-inflammatory genes associated with multiple sclerosis: a gene expression study.

    PubMed

    Perga, S; Montarolo, F; Martire, S; Berchialla, P; Malucchi, S; Bertolotto, A

    2015-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by a complex interaction between multiple genes and environmental factors. HLA region is the strongest susceptibility locus, but recent huge genome-wide association studies identified new susceptibility genes. Among these, BACH2, PTGER4, RGS1 and ZFP36L1 were highlighted. Here, a gene expression analysis revealed that three of them, namely BACH2, PTGER4 and ZFP36L1, are down-regulated in MS patients' blood cells compared to healthy subjects. Interestingly, all these genes are involved in the immune system regulation with predominant anti-inflammatory role and their reduction could predispose to MS development.

  7. Gene Prioritization for Imaging Genetics Studies Using Gene Ontology and a Stratified False Discovery Rate Approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal; Park, Min Tae M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Knight, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging field in which the association between genes and neuroimaging-based quantitative phenotypes are used to explore the functional role of genes in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology in the context of healthy function and neuropsychiatric disorders. The main obstacle for researchers in the field is the high dimensionality of the data in both the imaging phenotypes and the genetic variants commonly typed. In this article, we develop a novel method that utilizes Gene Ontology, an online database, to select and prioritize certain genes, employing a stratified false discovery rate (sFDR) approach to investigate their associations with imaging phenotypes. sFDR has the potential to increase power in genome wide association studies (GWAS), and is quickly gaining traction as a method for multiple testing correction. Our novel approach addresses both the pressing need in genetic research to move beyond candidate gene studies, while not being overburdened with a loss of power due to multiple testing. As an example of our methodology, we perform a GWAS of hippocampal volume using both the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA2) and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative datasets. The analysis of ENIGMA2 data yielded a set of SNPs with sFDR values between 10 and 20%. Our approach demonstrates a potential method to prioritize genes based on biological systems impaired in a disease.

  8. Gene Prioritization for Imaging Genetics Studies Using Gene Ontology and a Stratified False Discovery Rate Approach

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sejal; Park, Min Tae M.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Knight, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging field in which the association between genes and neuroimaging-based quantitative phenotypes are used to explore the functional role of genes in neuroanatomy and neurophysiology in the context of healthy function and neuropsychiatric disorders. The main obstacle for researchers in the field is the high dimensionality of the data in both the imaging phenotypes and the genetic variants commonly typed. In this article, we develop a novel method that utilizes Gene Ontology, an online database, to select and prioritize certain genes, employing a stratified false discovery rate (sFDR) approach to investigate their associations with imaging phenotypes. sFDR has the potential to increase power in genome wide association studies (GWAS), and is quickly gaining traction as a method for multiple testing correction. Our novel approach addresses both the pressing need in genetic research to move beyond candidate gene studies, while not being overburdened with a loss of power due to multiple testing. As an example of our methodology, we perform a GWAS of hippocampal volume using both the Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA2) and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative datasets. The analysis of ENIGMA2 data yielded a set of SNPs with sFDR values between 10 and 20%. Our approach demonstrates a potential method to prioritize genes based on biological systems impaired in a disease. PMID:27092072

  9. Design and analysis issues in gene and environment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Both nurture (environmental) and nature (genetic factors) play an important role in human disease etiology. Traditionally, these effects have been thought of as independent. This perspective is ill informed for non-mendelian complex disorders which result as an interaction between genetics and environment. To understand health and disease we must study how nature and nurture interact. Recent advances in human genomics and high-throughput biotechnology make it possible to study large numbers of genetic markers and gene products simultaneously to explore their interactions with environment. The purpose of this review is to discuss design and analytic issues for gene-environment interaction studies in the “-omics” era, with a focus on environmental and genetic epidemiological studies. We present an expanded environmental genomic disease paradigm. We discuss several study design issues for gene-environmental interaction studies, including confounding and selection bias, measurement of exposures and genotypes. We discuss statistical issues in studying gene-environment interactions in different study designs, such as choices of statistical models, assumptions regarding biological factors, and power and sample size considerations, especially in genome-wide gene-environment studies. Future research directions are also discussed. PMID:23253229

  10. Design and analysis issues in gene and environment studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-yu; Maity, Arnab; Lin, Xihong; Wright, Robert O; Christiani, David C

    2012-12-19

    Both nurture (environmental) and nature (genetic factors) play an important role in human disease etiology. Traditionally, these effects have been thought of as independent. This perspective is ill informed for non-mendelian complex disorders which result as an interaction between genetics and environment. To understand health and disease we must study how nature and nurture interact. Recent advances in human genomics and high-throughput biotechnology make it possible to study large numbers of genetic markers and gene products simultaneously to explore their interactions with environment. The purpose of this review is to discuss design and analytic issues for gene-environment interaction studies in the "-omics" era, with a focus on environmental and genetic epidemiological studies. We present an expanded environmental genomic disease paradigm. We discuss several study design issues for gene-environmental interaction studies, including confounding and selection bias, measurement of exposures and genotypes. We discuss statistical issues in studying gene-environment interactions in different study designs, such as choices of statistical models, assumptions regarding biological factors, and power and sample size considerations, especially in genome-wide gene-environment studies. Future research directions are also discussed.

  11. Natural gene expression variation studies in yeast.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dawn A; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2017-01-01

    The rise of sequence information across different yeast species and strains is driving an increasing number of studies in the emerging field of genomics to associate polymorphic variants, mRNA abundance and phenotypic differences between individuals. Here, we gathered evidence from recent studies covering several layers that define the genotype-phenotype gap, such as mRNA abundance, allele-specific expression and translation efficiency to demonstrate how genetic variants co-evolve and define an individual's genome. Moreover, we exposed several antecedents where inter- and intra-specific studies led to opposite conclusions, probably owing to genetic divergence. Future studies in this area will benefit from the access to a massive array of well-annotated genomes and new sequencing technologies, which will allow the fine breakdown of the complex layers that delineate the genotype-phenotype map. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A Common Polymorphism in a Williams Syndrome Gene Predicts Amygdala Reactivity and Extraversion in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Johnna R; Waller, Rebecca; Bogdan, Ryan; Knodt, Annchen R; Sabhlok, Aditi; Hyde, Luke W; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2017-02-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder resulting from hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23, has emerged as a model for identifying the genetic architecture of socioemotional behavior. Common polymorphisms in GTF2I, which is found within the WS microdeletion, have been associated with reduced social anxiety in the general population. Identifying neural phenotypes affected by these polymorphisms would help advance our understanding not only of this specific genetic association but also of the broader neurogenetic mechanisms of variability in socioemotional behavior. Through an ongoing parent protocol, the Duke Neurogenetics Study, we measured threat-related amygdala reactivity to fearful and angry facial expressions using functional magnetic resonance imaging, assessed trait personality using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, and imputed GTF2I rs13227433 from saliva-derived DNA using custom Illumina arrays. Participants included 808 non-Hispanic Caucasian, African American, and Asian university students. The GTF2I rs13227433 AA genotype, previously associated with lower social anxiety, predicted decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity. An indirect effect of GTF2I genotype on the warmth facet of extraversion was mediated by decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity in women but not men. A common polymorphism in the WS gene GTF2I associated with reduced social anxiety predicts decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity, which mediates an association between genotype and increased warmth in women. These results are consistent with reduced threat-related amygdala reactivity in WS and suggest that common variation in GTF2I contributes to broader variability in socioemotional brain function and behavior, with implications for understanding the neurogenetic bases of WS as well as social anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The genetics of alcoholism: identifying specific genes through family studies.

    PubMed

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2006-09-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Studies in humans have begun to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of the risk for alcoholism. Here we briefly review strategies for identifying individual genes in which variations affect the risk for alcoholism and related phenotypes, in the context of one large study that has successfully identified such genes. The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is a family-based study that has collected detailed phenotypic data on individuals in families with multiple alcoholic members. A genome-wide linkage approach led to the identification of chromosomal regions containing genes that influenced alcoholism risk and related phenotypes. Subsequently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in positional candidate genes located within the linked chromosomal regions, and analyzed for association with these phenotypes. Using this sequential approach, COGA has detected association with GABRA2, CHRM2 and ADH4; these associations have all been replicated by other researchers. COGA has detected association to additional genes including GABRG3, TAS2R16, SNCA, OPRK1 and PDYN, results that are awaiting confirmation. These successes demonstrate that genes contributing to the risk for alcoholism can be reliably identified using human subjects.

  14. Association and gene-gene interactions study of reelin signaling pathway related genes with autism in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yidong; Xun, Guanglei; Guo, Hui; He, Yiqun; Ou, Jianjun; Dong, Huixi; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unclear etiology. Reelin had been proposed to participate in the etiology of autism due to its important role in brain development. The goal of this study was to explore the association and gene-gene interactions of reelin signaling pathway related genes (RELN, VLDLR, LRP8, DAB1, FYN, and CDK5) with autism in Han Chinese population. Genotyping data of the six genes were obtained from a recent genome-wide association study performed in 430 autistic children who fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and 1,074 healthy controls. Single marker case-control association analysis and haplotype case-control association analysis were conducted after the data was screened. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was applied to further test gene-gene interactions. Neither the single marker nor the haplotype association tests found any significant difference between the autistic group and the control group after permutation test of 1,000 rounds. The 4-locus MDR model (comprising rs6143734, rs1858782, rs634500, and rs1924267 which belong to RELN and DAB1) was determined to be the model with the highest cross-validation consistency (CVC) and testing balanced accuracy. The results indicate that an interaction between RELN and DAB1 may increase the risk of autism in the Han Chinese population. Furthermore, it can also be inferred that the involvement of RELN in the etiology of autism would occur through interaction with DAB1. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  16. Catabolic gene expression is monitored by bioluminescence in bioreactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.; Kuo, D.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the expression of specific catabolic genes under defined conditions, and to determine whether certain conditions tend to increase or decrease metal catabolic activities, a bioreporter gene can be introduced into the microorganism. Activity from such bioreporter gene would indicate successful bioremediation. Our laboratory has produced several bioreporter strains using the bioluminescent lux genes of Vibrio fischeri. A bioreporter producing visible light when genetic expression is induced. The bioluminescent system include sensitivity of detection, analysis of response in real- time, and on-line capability. We constructed a bioreporter strain aimed at following the degradation of toluene and related compounds in order to study expression of the catabolic genes with various substrates and under optimized bioreactor conditions. We have been able to detect the induction of a specific operon in response to the addition of oxylene, as a gratuitous inducer of the catabolic genes. A strong bioluminescent signal in these studies. We have varied the medium of an induced bioreactor culture of RB1401, and our data suggest that conditions for optimal expression of the catabolic operon might not be identical with optimal growth conditions.

  17. Studies of Neurofibromatosis-1 Modifier Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    In his presentation Dr. Levine spoke about his recent human genetic studies, which identified MDM2 and AKTI SNPs associated with accelerated tumor...cancer: a genome scan provides comparative evidence for multiple tumor suppressors and identifies novel candidate regions. Am J Hum Genet 73, 748-767...families. Thus, it is now possible to estimate how many Ras superfamily members are encoded by, for example, the human genome (Colicelli, 2004). Since many

  18. Holoprosencephaly and ZIC2 microdeletions: novel clinical and epidemiological specificities delineated.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, E; Willekens, D; Vermeesch, J R; Fryns, J-P

    2012-06-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human brain results from abnormal cleavage of the forebrain during the early embryonic developmental stages. The spectrum of malformations in HPE is wide, ranging from the classical cyclopia/proboscis to fairly asymptomatic forms [i.e. a single maxillary central incisor (SMCI)]. HPE may be caused by environmental or genetic factors. ZIC2 (13q32) was the second gene identified in which mutations cause HPE and recently a specific phenotype was ascribed to ZIC2-mutation HPE. Earlier, we reported a boy presenting HPE and deafness. Cytogenetic analyses were normal. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we found a de novo 129 kb del(13)(q32) encompassing ZIC2 and ZIC5. There is no evidence for the involvement of ZIC5 in human diseases. We reviewed the literature for ZIC2-ZIC5 deletions and their involvement in neural tube defects (NTDs). Interestingly, we found evidence for a specific facial phenotype for ZIC2 gene deletion patients distinct from those with point mutations. In addition, based on the clinical data together with pathology, imaging and functional studies, we suggest an outline for a model explaining the genetic heterogeneity of ZIC2-ZIC5-associated NTDs and propose further studies for validation.

  19. A candidate gene study of canine joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Short, Andrea D; Barnes, Annette; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ferguson, John F; Butterworth, Steven J; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Pead, Matthew; Bennett, David; Innes, John F; Carter, Stuart D; Ollier, William E R

    2010-01-01

    Canine osteoarthritis (OA) commonly occurs in association with articular diseases, such as hip dysplasia (HD), elbow dysplasia (ED), or cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). We hypothesized that a common genomic risk for the development of canine joint disease and canine OA would be identified by evaluating the allele frequencies of candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in dogs with OA associated with different articular diseases when compared with a general population of breed-matched dogs. DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers surgically treated for ED, HD, and CCLR and confirmed to have radiographic evidence of OA. One hundred and thirteen SNPs in 20 candidate genes were genotyped. No significant associations were identified for SNPs or haplotypes in the candidate genes for the diseases evaluated. The candidate gene approach for the study of genetic association is unlikely to be successful for complex canine diseases such as OA without prior trait mapping evaluation.

  20. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-12-30

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  1. Validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in banana fruit under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhong, Hai-ying; Kuang, Jian-fei; Li, Jian-guo; Lu, Wang-jin; Chen, Jian-ye

    2011-08-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression, but its success depends on the stability of the reference gene(s) used for data normalization. Only a few studies on validation of reference genes have been conducted in fruit trees and none in banana yet. In the present work, 20 candidate reference genes were selected, and their expression stability in 144 banana samples were evaluated and analyzed using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples consisted of eight sample sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, stresses (chilling, high temperature, and pathogen), and hormone treatments. Our results showed that different suitable reference gene(s) or combination of reference genes for normalization should be selected depending on the experimental conditions. The RPS2 and UBQ2 genes were validated as the most suitable reference genes across all tested samples. More importantly, our data further showed that the widely used reference genes, ACT and GAPDH, were not the most suitable reference genes in many banana sample sets. In addition, the expression of MaEBF1, a gene of interest that plays an important role in regulating fruit ripening, under different experimental conditions was used to further confirm the validated reference genes. Taken together, our results provide guidelines for reference gene(s) selection under different experimental conditions and a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in banana.

  2. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

    PubMed

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Rodríguez González-Moro, José Miguel; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar; López Martín, Soledad; Bandrés, Fernando; Lucia, Alejandro; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence) with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A) [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G) [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T) [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G), CYP2A13*4 (579G>A), CYP2A13*7 (578C>T) [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G), CYP2B6*9 (516G>T), CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A) [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126) and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80). The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both P<0.001). Compared with carriers of variant alleles, the odds ratio (OR) for being a non-smoker in individuals with the wild-type genotype of CYP2A6*12 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A) polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44) and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89) respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65). We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017) for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i) cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii) pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A); (iii) nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test) and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms) are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e

  3. Evaluation and Validation of Housekeeping Genes as Reference for Gene Expression Studies in Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) Under Drought Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pallavi; Singh, Vikas K.; Suryanarayana, V.; Krishnamurthy, L.; Saxena, Rachit K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a very sensitive technique and its sensitivity depends on the stable performance of reference gene(s) used in the study. A number of housekeeping genes have been used in various expression studies in many crops however, their expression were found to be inconsistent under different stress conditions. As a result, species specific housekeeping genes have been recommended for different expression studies in several crop species. However, such specific housekeeping genes have not been reported in the case of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) despite the fact that genome sequence has become available for the crop. To identify the stable housekeeping genes in pigeonpea for expression analysis under drought stress conditions, the relative expression variations of 10 commonly used housekeeping genes (EF1α, UBQ10, GAPDH, 18SrRNA, 25SrRNA, TUB6, ACT1, IF4α, UBC and HSP90) were studied on root, stem and leaves tissues of Asha (ICPL 87119). Three statistical algorithms geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were used to define the stability of candidate genes. geNorm analysis identified IF4α and TUB6 as the most stable housekeeping genes however, NormFinder analysis determined IF4α and HSP90 as the most stable housekeeping genes under drought stress conditions. Subsequently validation of the identified candidate genes was undertaken in qRT-PCR based gene expression analysis of uspA gene which plays an important role for drought stress conditions in pigeonpea. The relative quantification of the uspA gene varied according to the internal controls (stable and least stable genes), thus highlighting the importance of the choice of as well as validation of internal controls in such experiments. The identified stable and validated housekeeping genes will facilitate gene expression studies in pigeonpea especially under drought stress conditions. PMID:25849964

  4. Evaluation and validation of housekeeping genes as reference for gene expression studies in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) under drought stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pallavi; Singh, Vikas K; Suryanarayana, V; Krishnamurthy, L; Saxena, Rachit K; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a very sensitive technique and its sensitivity depends on the stable performance of reference gene(s) used in the study. A number of housekeeping genes have been used in various expression studies in many crops however, their expression were found to be inconsistent under different stress conditions. As a result, species specific housekeeping genes have been recommended for different expression studies in several crop species. However, such specific housekeeping genes have not been reported in the case of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) despite the fact that genome sequence has become available for the crop. To identify the stable housekeeping genes in pigeonpea for expression analysis under drought stress conditions, the relative expression variations of 10 commonly used housekeeping genes (EF1α, UBQ10, GAPDH, 18SrRNA, 25SrRNA, TUB6, ACT1, IF4α, UBC and HSP90) were studied on root, stem and leaves tissues of Asha (ICPL 87119). Three statistical algorithms geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper were used to define the stability of candidate genes. geNorm analysis identified IF4α and TUB6 as the most stable housekeeping genes however, NormFinder analysis determined IF4α and HSP90 as the most stable housekeeping genes under drought stress conditions. Subsequently validation of the identified candidate genes was undertaken in qRT-PCR based gene expression analysis of uspA gene which plays an important role for drought stress conditions in pigeonpea. The relative quantification of the uspA gene varied according to the internal controls (stable and least stable genes), thus highlighting the importance of the choice of as well as validation of internal controls in such experiments. The identified stable and validated housekeeping genes will facilitate gene expression studies in pigeonpea especially under drought stress conditions.

  5. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Studies of the Musculoskeletal System PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Subburaman Mohan, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Loma Linda Veterans...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03...proposed research projects focuses on bone health, including relevance to the musculoskeletal system in battlefield performance and in battlefield

  6. Muscle plasticity and high throughput gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Carlo; Kronnie, Geertruuy Te

    2004-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are known to contribute to muscle plasticity. Until recently most studies have described differences of one or few genes at a time, in the last few years, however, the development of new technology of high throughput mRNA expression analysis has allowed the study of a large part if not all transcripts in the same experiment. Knowledge on any muscle adaptive response has already gained from the application of this novel approach, but the most important new findings have come from studies on muscle atrophy. A new and unexpected groups of genes, which increase their expression during atrophy and are, therefore, designated as atrogins, have been discovered. In spite of the impressive power of the new technology many problems are still to be resolved to optimize the experimental design and to extract all information which are provided by the outcome of the global mRNA assessment.

  7. Partial Deletion of Chromosome 1p31.1 Including only the Neuronal Growth Regulator 1 Gene in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Ann; Cox, Devin M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    We present two siblings with a partial deletion of chromosome 1p31.1 involving only the neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) gene. The siblings had a history of neuropsychiatric and behavioral problems, learning difficulties, hypotonia, mild aortic root dilatation, hypermobility, and scoliosis. This is the first clinical report of a microdeletion of chromosome 1p31.1 involving only the NEGR1 gene. PMID:27617112

  8. Bioinformatics approach for choosing the correct reference genes when studying gene expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Beer, Lucian; Mlitz, Veronika; Gschwandtner, Maria; Berger, Tanja; Narzt, Marie-Sophie; Gruber, Florian; Brunner, Patrick M; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) has become a mainstay in many areas of skin research. To enable quantitative analysis, it is necessary to analyse expression of reference genes (RGs) for normalization of target gene expression. The selection of reliable RGs therefore has an important impact on the experimental outcome. In this study, we aimed to identify and validate the best suited RGs for qRT-PCR in human primary keratinocytes (KCs) over a broad range of experimental conditions using the novel bioinformatics tool 'RefGenes', which is based on a manually curated database of published microarray data. Expression of 6 RGs identified by RefGenes software and 12 commonly used RGs were validated by qRT-PCR. We assessed whether these 18 markers fulfilled the requirements for a valid RG by the comprehensive ranking of four bioinformatics tools and the coefficient of variation (CV). In an overall ranking, we found GUSB to be the most stably expressed RG, whereas the expression values of the commonly used RGs, GAPDH and B2M were significantly affected by varying experimental conditions. Our results identify RefGenes as a powerful tool for the identification of valid RGs and suggest GUSB as the most reliable RG for KCs.

  9. Intestinal lactase as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for in vivo gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Siamak; Eckley, Lorna; Sawyer, Greta J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dong, Xuebin; Freund, Jean-Noel; Fabre, John W

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal lactase has potential as an autologous beta-galactosidase reporter gene for long-term gene expression studies in vivo, using chromogenic, luminescent, and fluorogenic substrates developed for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. In normal rat tissues, reactivity with a chromogenic fucopyranoside (X-Fuc, the preferred substrate of lactase) was present only at the lumenal surface of small intestine epithelial cells. Full-length lactase (domains I-IV), mature lactase (domains III and IV), and a cytosolic form of mature lactase (domains III and IV, without the signal sequence or transmembrane region) were evaluated. Transfection of HuH-7 cells in vitro, and hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver in vivo, resulted in excellent gene expression. The full-length and mature (homodimeric, membrane-bound) forms reacted strongly with X-Fuc but not with the corresponding galactopyranoside (X-Gal). However, the presumptively monomeric cytosolic lactase unexpectedly reacted equally well with both substrates. The fluorogenic substrate fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside was cleaved by cytosolic lactase, but not by full-length or mature lactase. Full-length lactase, when expressed ectopically in hepatocytes in vivo, localized exclusively to the bile canalicular membrane. Intestinal lactase is highly homologous in mice, rats, and humans and has considerable potential for evaluating long-term gene expression in experimental animals and the clinic.

  10. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  11. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: a candidate gene study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice W; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Doherty, Jennifer A; Stram, Douglas A; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Thompson, Pamela J; Goodman, Marc T; Wilkens, Lynne R; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L; Salvesen, Helga B; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Aben, Katja K H; van Altena, Anne M; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D; Cook, Linda S; Kelemen, Linda E; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Whittemore, Alice S; McLaughlin, John R; Risch, Harvey A; Phelan, Catherine M; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B; Pharoah, Paul D P; Stram, Daniel O; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2015-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p=0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p=0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p=0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p=0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p=0.060, overall invasive). Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of reference genes in Penicillium echinulatum to enable gene expression study using real-time quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Denise; Nora, Luísa C; Basso, Vanessa; Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo J P

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a methodology that facilitates the quantification of mRNA expression in a given sample. Analysis of relative gene expression by qRT-PCR requires normalization of the data using a reference gene that is expressed at a similar level in all evaluated conditions. Determining an internal control gene is essential for gene expression studies. Gene expression studies in filamentous fungi frequently use the β-actin gene (actb), β-tubulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as reference genes because they are known to have consistent expression levels. Until now, no study has been performed to select an internal control gene for the filamentous fungal species Penicillium echinulatum. The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate internal control genes to enable the study of gene expression in P. echinulatum using qRT-PCR. P. echinulatum strain S1M29 was grown in conditions to either induce (cellulose and sugar cane bagasse) or repress (glucose) gene expression to analyze 23 candidate normalization genes for stable expression. Two software programs, BestKeeper and geNorm, were used to assess the expression of the candidate normalization genes. The results indicate that the actb reference gene is more stably expressed in P. echinulatum. This is the first report in the literature that determines a normalization gene for this fungus. From the results obtained, we recommend the use of the P. echinulatum actb gene as an endogenous control for gene expression studies of cellulases and hemicellulases by qRT-PCR.

  13. A Candidate Gene Study of Folate-Associated One Carbon Metabolism Genes and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Levine, A. Joan; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Lee, Won; Conti, David V.; Kennedy, Kathleen; Duggan, David J; Poynter, Jenny N.; Campbell, Peter T.; Newcomb, Polly; Martinez, Maria Elena; Hopper, John L.; Le Marchand, Loic; Baron, John A.; Limburg, Paul J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Haile, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Folate-associated one carbon metabolism (FOCM) may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Variation in FOCM genes may explain some of the underlying risk of colorectal cancer. Methods This study utilized data from 1,805 population-based colorectal cancer cases and 2,878 matched sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (C-CFR). We used a comprehensive tagSNP approach to select 395 tagSNPs in 15 genes involved in folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina GoldenGate or Sequenom platforms. Risk factor and dietary data were collected using self-completed questionnaires. MSI status was determined using standard techniques and tumor subsite was obtained from pathology reports. The association between SNPs and colorectal cancer was assessed using conditional logistic regression with sibships as the matching factor and assuming a log additive or co-dominant model. Results In the log additive model, two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs in the DHFR gene (rs1677693 and rs1643659) were associated with a significant decrease in CRC risk after correction for multiple testing (OR=0.87; 95% CI=0.71 – 0.94; P=0.029 and OR=0.87 95% CI=0.71 – 0.95, P=0.034 for rs1677693 and rs1643659 respectively. These two linked (r2=0.99) tagSNPs and one tagSNP in the MTR gene (rs4659744) were significantly associated with reduced CRC risk only among individuals not using multivitamin supplements. Conclusions Overall, we found only moderate evidence that genetic variation in 15 folate pathway genes may affect CRC risk except in non multivitamin users. Impact This study suggests that multivitamin supplement use may modify the association between folate pathway genes and CRC risk in a post folic acid supplemented population. PMID:20615890

  14. Validation of Reference Housekeeping Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera)

    PubMed Central

    Barros Rodrigues, Thaís; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Matz, Natalie; Cunha Cardoso, Danielle; Valicente, Fernando Hercos; Zhou, Xuguo; Siegfried, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to investigate comparative gene expression. In general, normalization of results using a highly stable housekeeping gene (HKG) as an internal control is recommended and necessary. However, there are several reports suggesting that regulation of some HKGs is affected by different conditions. The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States and Europe. The expression profile of target genes related to insecticide exposure, resistance, and RNA interference has become an important experimental technique for study of western corn rootworms; however, lack of information on reliable HKGs under different conditions makes the interpretation of qRT-PCR results difficult. In this study, four distinct algorithms (Genorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and delta-CT) and five candidate HKGs to genes of reference (β-actin; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; β-tubulin; RPS9, ribosomal protein S9; EF1a, elongation factor-1α) were evaluated to determine the most reliable HKG under different experimental conditions including exposure to dsRNA and Bt toxins and among different tissues and developmental stages. Although all the HKGs tested exhibited relatively stable expression among the different treatments, some differences were noted. Among the five candidate reference genes evaluated, β-actin exhibited highly stable expression among different life stages. RPS9 exhibited the most similar pattern of expression among dsRNA treatments, and both experiments indicated that EF1a was the second most stable gene. EF1a was also the most stable for Bt exposure and among different tissues. These results will enable researchers to use more accurate and reliable normalization of qRT-PCR data in WCR experiments. PMID:25356627

  15. Validation of reference housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Thaís Barros; Barros Rodrigues, Thaís; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Matz, Natalie; Cunha Cardoso, Danielle; Valicente, Fernando Hercos; Zhou, Xuguo; Siegfried, Blair

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to investigate comparative gene expression. In general, normalization of results using a highly stable housekeeping gene (HKG) as an internal control is recommended and necessary. However, there are several reports suggesting that regulation of some HKGs is affected by different conditions. The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is a serious pest of corn in the United States and Europe. The expression profile of target genes related to insecticide exposure, resistance, and RNA interference has become an important experimental technique for study of western corn rootworms; however, lack of information on reliable HKGs under different conditions makes the interpretation of qRT-PCR results difficult. In this study, four distinct algorithms (Genorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and delta-CT) and five candidate HKGs to genes of reference (β-actin; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; β-tubulin; RPS9, ribosomal protein S9; EF1a, elongation factor-1α) were evaluated to determine the most reliable HKG under different experimental conditions including exposure to dsRNA and Bt toxins and among different tissues and developmental stages. Although all the HKGs tested exhibited relatively stable expression among the different treatments, some differences were noted. Among the five candidate reference genes evaluated, β-actin exhibited highly stable expression among different life stages. RPS9 exhibited the most similar pattern of expression among dsRNA treatments, and both experiments indicated that EF1a was the second most stable gene. EF1a was also the most stable for Bt exposure and among different tissues. These results will enable researchers to use more accurate and reliable normalization of qRT-PCR data in WCR experiments.

  16. Functional studies of regulatory genes in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Di Bernardo, Maria; Spinelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  17. Functional Studies of Regulatory Genes in the Sea Urchin Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Bernardo, Maria Di; Spinelli, Giovanni

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  18. A study of structural properties of gene network graphs for mathematical modeling of integrated mosaic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Petrovskaya, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2017-04-01

    Gene network modeling is one of the widely used approaches in systems biology. It allows for the study of complex genetic systems function, including so-called mosaic gene networks, which consist of functionally interacting subnetworks. We conducted a study of a mosaic gene networks modeling method based on integration of models of gene subnetworks by linear control functionals. An automatic modeling of 10,000 synthetic mosaic gene regulatory networks was carried out using computer experiments on gene knockdowns/knockouts. Structural analysis of graphs of generated mosaic gene regulatory networks has revealed that the most important factor for building accurate integrated mathematical models, among those analyzed in the study, is data on expression of genes corresponding to the vertices with high properties of centrality.

  19. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) using qPCR.

    PubMed

    Obrero, Angeles; Die, Jose V; Román, Belén; Gómez, Pedro; Nadal, Salvador; González-Verdejo, Clara I

    2011-05-25

    The zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) is an important food crop, the transcriptomics of which are a fundamental tool to accelerate the development of new varieties by breeders. However, the suitability of reference genes for data normalization in zucchini has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of 13 genes for their potential use as reference genes in quantitative real-time PCR. Assays were performed on 34 cDNA samples representing plants under different stresses and at different developmental stages. The application of geNorm and NormFinder software revealed that the use of a combination of UFP, EF-1A, RPL36aA, PP2A, and CAC genes for the different experimental sets was the best strategy for reliable normalization. In contrast, 18S rRNA and TUA were less stable and unsuitable for use as internal controls. These results provide the possibility to allow more accurate use of qPCR in this horticultural crop.

  20. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies by qRT-PCR in the blister beetle Mylabris cichorii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhong-Kang; Huang, Yi; Liao, Yu-Feng; Yin, You-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The blister beetle Mylabris cichorii L. (Coleoptera: Meloidae) is a traditional medicinal insect recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. It synthesizes cantharidin, which kills cancer cells efficiently. Only males produce large amounts of cantharidin. Reference genes are required as endogenous controls for the analysis of differential gene expression in M. cichorii. Our study chose 10 genes as candidate reference genes. The stability of expression of these genes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and determined with two algorithms, geNorm and Normfinder. We recommend UBE3A and RPL22e as suitable reference genes in females and UBE3A, TAF5, and RPL22e in males.

  1. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for gene Expression Studies by qRT-PCR in the Blister Beetle Mylabris cichorii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhong-Kang; Huang, Yi; Liao, Yu-Feng; Yin, You-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The blister beetle Mylabris cichorii L. (Coleoptera: Meloidae) is a traditional medicinal insect recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. It synthesizes cantharidin, which kills cancer cells efficiently. Only males produce large amounts of cantharidin. Reference genes are required as endogenous controls for the analysis of differential gene expression in M. cichorii. Our study chose 10 genes as candidate reference genes. The stability of expression of these genes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and determined with two algorithms, geNorm and Normfinder. We recommend UBE3A and RPL22e as suitable reference genes in females and UBE3A, TAF5, and RPL22e in males. PMID:25368050

  2. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid-inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome.

  3. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith–Magenis and Potocki–Lupski Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki–Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid–inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome. PMID:27617127

  4. Tumor suppressor genes which encode transcriptional repressors: studies on the EGR and Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene products.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F J

    1993-01-01

    The study of the WT1 and EGR-1 transcription factors has provided a molecular paradigm for regulation of a coordinate set of target genes during cell growth and differentiation. The next critical questions that must be addressed are: what are the target genes which are normally regulated by WT1-EGR-1, and how does misregulation of these genes result in tumor formation?

  5. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for qRT-PCR Studies of Gene Expression in Dioscorea opposita

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiting; Zhang, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Shujie; Han, Linlin; Song, Zhihui; Wang, Yunying; Li, Junhua; Li, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is one of the most common methods for gene expression studies. Data normalization based on reference genes is essential for obtaining reliable results for qRT-PCR assays. This study evaluated potential reference genes of Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb.), which is an important tuber crop and medicinal plant in East Asia. The expression of ten candidate reference genes across 20 samples from different organs and development stages was assessed. We identified the most stable genes for qRT-PCR studies using combined samples from different organs. Our results also suggest that different suitable reference genes or combinations of reference genes for normalization should be applied according to different organs and developmental stages. To validate the suitability of the reference genes, we evaluated the relative expression of PE2.1 and PE53, which are two genes that may be associated with microtuber formation. Our results provide the foundation for reference gene(s) selection in D. opposita and will contribute toward more accurate gene analysis studies of the genus Dioscorea. PMID:27314014

  6. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for qRT-PCR Studies of Gene Expression in Dioscorea opposita.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiting; Zhang, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Shujie; Han, Linlin; Song, Zhihui; Wang, Yunying; Li, Junhua; Li, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is one of the most common methods for gene expression studies. Data normalization based on reference genes is essential for obtaining reliable results for qRT-PCR assays. This study evaluated potential reference genes of Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita Thunb.), which is an important tuber crop and medicinal plant in East Asia. The expression of ten candidate reference genes across 20 samples from different organs and development stages was assessed. We identified the most stable genes for qRT-PCR studies using combined samples from different organs. Our results also suggest that different suitable reference genes or combinations of reference genes for normalization should be applied according to different organs and developmental stages. To validate the suitability of the reference genes, we evaluated the relative expression of PE2.1 and PE53, which are two genes that may be associated with microtuber formation. Our results provide the foundation for reference gene(s) selection in D. opposita and will contribute toward more accurate gene analysis studies of the genus Dioscorea.

  7. Candidate Gene Studies in Hypodontia Suggest Role for FGF3

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; D’Souza, Rena N.; Mues, Gabriele; Deeley, Kathleen; Hsin, Hong-Yuan; Küchler, Erika C.; Meira, Raquel; Patir, Asli; Tannure, Patricia N.; Lips, Andrea; Costa, Marcelo C.; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Seymen, Figen; Modesto, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The majority of tooth agenesis cases are mild (hypodontia) and typically not associated with the gene mutations linked to oligodontia. From this, we hypothesize that most cases of tooth agenesis fit a polygenic mode of inheritance, where several genes with small effects cause a variety of varying phenotypes. In this study, we looked at 18 not typically studied genes in this condition, to ascertain their contribution to hypodontia. Our study subjects consisted of 167 patients with hypodontia and their parents from two cohorts (one from Brazil and one from Turkey). An additional 465 DNA samples (93 cases with hypodontia and 372 controls without family history for tooth agenesis or oral clefts) from Brazil were also available for this study. 93 single nucleotide polymorphisms that maximally represent the linkage disequilibrium structure of the genes for the 18 genes were selected and genotyped using Taqman chemistry. Chi-square was used to test if genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and 24 markers that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and had allele frequencies higher than 5% in a panel of 50 CEPH samples were further tested. Association between hypodontia and genetic variants was tested with the transmission disequilibrium test within the program Family-Based Association Test (FBAT) and by using chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Alpha at a level of 0.05 was used to report results. Results suggest possible associations between several genes and hypodontia in the three populations. In the Turkish cohort (n=51 parent-affected child trios) the most significant results were as follows: FGF3 rs1893047, p=0.08; GLI3 rs929387, p=0.03; GLI3 haplotype rs929387-rs846266, p=0.002; and PAX9 rs2073242, p=0.03. In the Brazilian cohort (n=116 parent-affected child trios), the results were as follows: DLX1 rs788173, p=0.07; FGF3 rs12574452, p=0.03; GLI2 rs1992901, p=0.03; and PITX2 rs2595110, p=0.01. The second Brazilian cohort also suggested that FGF3

  8. Validation of reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in Volvox carteri using real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a sensitive technique for analysis of gene expression under a wide diversity of biological conditions. However, the identification of suitable reference genes is a critical factor for analysis of gene expression data. To determine potential reference genes for normalization of qRT-PCR data in the green alga Volvox carteri, the transcript levels of ten candidate reference genes were measured by qRT-PCR in three experimental sample pools containing different developmental stages, cell types and stress treatments. The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was then calculated using the algorithms geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. The genes for 18S ribosomal RNA (18S) and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1α2 (eef1) turned out to have the most stable expression levels among the samples both from different developmental stages and different stress treatments. The genes for the ribosomal protein L23 (rpl23) and the TATA-box binding protein (tbpA) showed equivalent transcript levels in the comparison of different cell types, and therefore, can be used as reference genes for cell-type specific gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that more than one reference gene is required for accurate normalization of qRT-PCRs in V. carteri. The reference genes in our study show a much better performance than the housekeeping genes used as a reference in previous studies.

  9. A genome-wide association study of global gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Anna L; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F; Chen, Wei; Heath, Simon; Wong, Kenny C C; Taylor, Jenny; Burnett, Edward; Gut, Ivo; Farrall, Martin; Lathrop, G Mark; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Cookson, William O C

    2007-10-01

    We have created a global map of the effects of polymorphism on gene expression in 400 children from families recruited through a proband with asthma. We genotyped 408,273 SNPs and identified expression quantitative trait loci from measurements of 54,675 transcripts representing 20,599 genes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. We found that 15,084 transcripts (28%) representing 6,660 genes had narrow-sense heritabilities (H2) > 0.3. We executed genome-wide association scans for these traits and found peak lod scores between 3.68 and 59.1. The most highly heritable traits were markedly enriched in Gene Ontology descriptors for response to unfolded protein (chaperonins and heat shock proteins), regulation of progression through the cell cycle, RNA processing, DNA repair, immune responses and apoptosis. SNPs that regulate expression of these genes are candidates in the study of degenerative diseases, malignancy, infection and inflammation. We have created a downloadable database to facilitate use of our findings in the mapping of complex disease loci.

  10. Studies on the C2-deficiency gene in man.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, J P; Buskjaer, L; Lamm, L U

    1980-01-01

    A one-step haemolytic assay using cellular intermediates was used to determine C2 levels in 50 HLA-A25 and B18 positive blood donors and four families suspected to have the C2-deficiency gene. The method clearly discriminated between homozygous normals and heterozygous deficient individuals, and it was found that approx. 50% of individuals with the haplotype HLA-A25, B18 had low levels of functional C2. In the four families studied, the close linkage of the C2-deficiency gene and the haplotype HLA-A25, B18 was confirmed. Furthermore, the C2-deficiency gene was shown to be a silent or null allele at the structural locus. PMID:7380478

  11. A Robust Model-free Approach for Rare Variants Association Studies Incorporating Gene-Gene and Gene-Environmental Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruixue; Lo, Shaw-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Recently more and more evidence suggest that rare variants with much lower minor allele frequencies play significant roles in disease etiology. Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies will lead to many more rare variants association studies. Several statistical methods have been proposed to assess the effect of rare variants by aggregating information from multiple loci across a genetic region and testing the association between the phenotype and aggregated genotype. One limitation of existing methods is that they only look into the marginal effects of rare variants but do not systematically take into account effects due to interactions among rare variants and between rare variants and environmental factors. In this article, we propose the summation of partition approach (SPA), a robust model-free method that is designed specifically for detecting both marginal effects and effects due to gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environmental (G×E) interactions for rare variants association studies. SPA has three advantages. First, it accounts for the interaction information and gains considerable power in the presence of unknown and complicated G×G or G×E interactions. Secondly, it does not sacrifice the marginal detection power; in the situation when rare variants only have marginal effects it is comparable with the most competitive method in current literature. Thirdly, it is easy to extend and can incorporate more complex interactions; other practitioners and scientists can tailor the procedure to fit their own study friendly. Our simulation studies show that SPA is considerably more powerful than many existing methods in the presence of G×G and G×E interactions. PMID:24358248

  12. Gene-Environment-Wide Association Studies: Emerging Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the yield of recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies, the identified variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of most complex diseases. This unexplained heritability could be partly due to gene-environment (G×E) interactions or more complex pathways involving multiple genes and exposures. This article provides a tutorial on the available epidemiological designs and statistical analysis approaches for studying specific G×E interactions and choosing the most appropriate methods. I discuss the approaches that are being developed to study entire pathways and available techniques for mining interactions in GWA data. I also explore approaches to marrying hypothesis-driven pathway-based approaches with “agnostic” GWA studies. PMID:20212493

  13. Using synthetic biology to study gene regulatory evolution.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Ilsley, Garth R

    2017-09-29

    Transcriptional enhancers specify the precise time, level, and location of gene expression. Disentangling and characterizing the components of enhancer activity in multicellular eukaryotic development has proven challenging because enhancers contain activator and repressor binding sites for multiple factors that each exert nuanced, context-dependent control of enhancer activity. Recent advances in synthetic biology provide an almost unlimited ability to create and modify regulatory elements and networks, offering unprecedented power to study gene regulation. Here we review several studies demonstrating the utility of synthetic biology for studying enhancer function during development and evolution. These studies clearly show that synthetic biology can provide a way to reverse-engineer and reengineer transcriptional regulation in animal genomes with enormous potential for understanding evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Network of European studies of genes in growth (NESTEGG).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Linda B; Ester, Wiestske; Caliebe, Janina; Molinas, Catherine; Wollmann, Hartmut; Fryklund, Linda; Clark, Adrian J; Ranke, Michael B; Tauber, Maithe; Hokken Koelega, Anita; Savage, Martin O

    2009-04-01

    The network of European studies of genes in growth (NESTEGG) is an international growth genomics project, focusing on the birth size phenotypes of small for gestational age (SGA) and idiopathic short stature. Seven hundred controls and 1,275 cases with their parents have been recruited. Detailed clinical histories and auxological measurements are recorded in a clinical database. Candidate gene studies are being undertaken with the study DNA samples. These genetic data will be used to explore associations with the clinical phenotypes of short stature and SGA birth size, and, in a subset, response to growth hormone (GH) therapy. This article describes the study methodology and reviews the association of the exon 3-deleted genotype of the GH receptor with GH responsiveness in GH-treated children born SGA. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hache, Hendrik; Lehrach, Hans; Herwig, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks has been an intensively studied topic in bioinformatics since it constitutes an intermediate step from explorative to causative gene expression analysis. Many methods have been proposed through recent years leading to a wide range of mathematical approaches. In practice, different mathematical approaches will generate different resulting network structures, thus, it is very important for users to assess the performance of these algorithms. We have conducted a comparative study with six different reverse engineering methods, including relevance networks, neural networks, and Bayesian networks. Our approach consists of the generation of defined benchmark data, the analysis of these data with the different methods, and the assessment of algorithmic performances by statistical analyses. Performance was judged by network size and noise levels. The results of the comparative study highlight the neural network approach as best performing method among those under study.

  16. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in larvae from flatfish using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Matsuoka, Makoto P; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Reith, Michael; Manchado, Manuel

    2008-03-06

    Flatfish metamorphosis involves major physiological and morphological changes. Due to its importance in aquaculture and as a model for developmental studies, some gene expression studies have focused on the understanding of this process using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technique. Therefore, adequate reference genes for accurate normalization are required. The stability of 12 potential reference genes was examined during larval development in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) to determine the most suitable genes for qRT-PCR analysis. Transcription levels of genes encoding beta-Actin (ACTB), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), annexin A2 (ANXA2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1), ubiquitin (UBQ), elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A1), 18S ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal proteins S4 (RPS4) and L13a (RPL13a) were quantitated. Two paralogous genes for ACTB were analyzed in each of both flatfish species. In addition, two paralogous genes for GAPDH were studied in Senegalese sole. RPL13a represented non-orthologous genes between both flatfish species. GeNorm and NormFinder analyses for expression stability revealed RPS4, UBQ and eEF1A1 as the most stable genes in Senegalese sole, Atlantic halibut and in a combined analysis. In all cases, paralogous genes exhibited differences in expression stability. This work suggests RPS4, UBQ, and eEF1A1 genes as useful reference genes for accurate normalization in qRT-PCR studies in Senegalese sole and Atlantic halibut larvae. The congruent results between both species in spite of the drastic differences in larval development suggest that selected housekeeping genes (HKGs) could be useful in other flatfish species. However, the finding of paralogous gene copies differentially expressed during development in some HKGs underscores the necessity to identify orthologous genes.

  17. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in larvae from flatfish using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Carlos; Matsuoka, Makoto P; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Reith, Michael; Manchado, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Flatfish metamorphosis involves major physiological and morphological changes. Due to its importance in aquaculture and as a model for developmental studies, some gene expression studies have focused on the understanding of this process using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technique. Therefore, adequate reference genes for accurate normalization are required. Results The stability of 12 potential reference genes was examined during larval development in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) to determine the most suitable genes for qRT-PCR analysis. Transcription levels of genes encoding β-Actin (ACTB), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), annexin A2 (ANXA2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1), ubiquitin (UBQ), elongation factor 1 alpha (eEF1A1), 18S ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal proteins S4 (RPS4) and L13a (RPL13a) were quantitated. Two paralogous genes for ACTB were analyzed in each of both flatfish species. In addition, two paralogous genes for GAPDH were studied in Senegalese sole. RPL13a represented non-orthologous genes between both flatfish species. GeNorm and NormFinder analyses for expression stability revealed RPS4, UBQ and eEF1A1 as the most stable genes in Senegalese sole, Atlantic halibut and in a combined analysis. In all cases, paralogous genes exhibited differences in expression stability. Conclusion This work suggests RPS4, UBQ, and eEF1A1 genes as useful reference genes for accurate normalization in qRT-PCR studies in Senegalese sole and Atlantic halibut larvae. The congruent results between both species in spite of the drastic differences in larval development suggest that selected housekeeping genes (HKGs) could be useful in other flatfish species. However, the finding of paralogous gene copies differentially expressed during development in some HKGs underscores the necessity to identify orthologous