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Sample records for gene mouse model

  1. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mouse models of Down syndrome: gene content and consequences.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Meenal; Dhanasekaran, A Ranjitha; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), is challenging to model in mice. Not only is it a contiguous gene syndrome spanning 35 Mb of the long arm of Hsa21, but orthologs of Hsa21 genes map to segments of three mouse chromosomes, Mmu16, Mmu17, and Mmu10. The Ts65Dn was the first viable segmental trisomy mouse model for DS; it is a partial trisomy currently popular in preclinical evaluations of drugs for cognition in DS. Limitations of the Ts65Dn are as follows: (i) it is trisomic for 125 human protein-coding orthologs, but only 90 of these are Hsa21 orthologs and (ii) it lacks trisomy for ~75 Hsa21 orthologs. In recent years, several additional mouse models of DS have been generated, each trisomic for a different subset of Hsa21 genes or their orthologs. To best exploit these models and interpret the results obtained with them, prior to proposing clinical trials, an understanding of their trisomic gene content, relative to full trisomy 21, is necessary. Here we first review the functional information on Hsa21 protein-coding genes and the more recent annotation of a large number of functional RNA genes. We then discuss the conservation and genomic distribution of Hsa21 orthologs in the mouse genome and the distribution of mouse-specific genes. Lastly, we consider the strengths and weaknesses of mouse models of DS based on the number and nature of the Hsa21 orthologs that are, and are not, trisomic in each, and discuss their validity for use in preclinical evaluations of drug responses.

  3. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  4. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC.

  5. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC. PMID:26811627

  6. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  7. A Metastatic Mouse Model Identifies Genes That Regulate Neuroblastoma Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Seong, Bo Kyung A; Fathers, Kelly E; Hallett, Robin; Yung, Christina K; Stein, Lincoln D; Mouaaz, Samar; Kee, Lynn; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Irwin, Meredith S; Kaplan, David R

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic relapse is the major cause of death in pediatric neuroblastoma, where there remains a lack of therapies to target this stage of disease. To understand the molecular mechanisms mediating neuroblastoma metastasis, we developed a mouse model using intracardiac injection and in vivo selection to isolate malignant cell subpopulations with a higher propensity for metastasis to bone and the central nervous system. Gene expression profiling revealed primary and metastatic cells as two distinct cell populations defined by differential expression of 412 genes and of multiple pathways, including CADM1, SPHK1, and YAP/TAZ, whose expression independently predicted survival. In the metastatic subpopulations, a gene signature was defined (MET-75) that predicted survival of neuroblastoma patients with metastatic disease. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated causal roles for CADM1, SPHK1, and YAP/TAZ in mediating metastatic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo Notably, pharmacologic targeting of SPHK1 or YAP/TAZ was sufficient to inhibit neuroblastoma metastasis in vivo Overall, we identify gene expression signatures and candidate therapeutics that could improve the treatment of metastatic neuroblastoma. Cancer Res; 77(3); 696-706. ©2017 AACR.

  8. Gene Therapy in Mouse Models of Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L.; Patterson, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Huntingtin, the protein that when mutated causes Huntington disease (HD), has many known interactors and participates in diverse cellular functions. Mutant Htt (mHtt) engages in a variety of aberrant interactions that lead to pathological gain of toxic functions as well as loss of normal functions. The broad symptomatology of HD, including diminished voluntary motor control, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances, reflects the multifaceted neuropathology. Although currently available therapies for HD focus on symptom management, the autosomal dominant cause and the adult onset make this disease an ideal candidate for genetic intervention. A variety of gene therapy approaches have been tested in mouse models of HD, ranging from those aimed at ameliorating downstream pathology or replacing lost neuronal populations to more upstream strategies to reduce mHtt levels. Here the authors review the results of these preclinical trials. PMID:21489966

  9. HFE gene knockout produces mouse model of hereditary hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao Yan; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fleming, Robert E.; Parkkila, Seppo; Waheed, Abdul; Jiang, Jinxing; Fei, Ying; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Ruddy, David A.; Prass, Cynthia E.; Schatzman, Randall C.; O’Neill, Rosemary; Britton, Robert S.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Sly, William S.

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal recessive disease characterized by increased iron absorption and progressive iron storage that results in damage to major organs in the body. Recently, a candidate gene for HH called HFE encoding a major histocompatibility complex class I-like protein was identified by positional cloning. Nearly 90% of Caucasian HH patients have been found to be homozygous for the same mutation (C282Y) in the HFE gene. To test the hypothesis that the HFE gene is involved in regulation of iron homeostasis, we studied the effects of a targeted disruption of the murine homologue of the HFE gene. The HFE-deficient mice showed profound differences in parameters of iron homeostasis. Even on a standard diet, by 10 weeks of age, fasting transferrin saturation was significantly elevated compared with normal littermates (96 ± 5% vs. 77 ± 3%, P < 0.007), and hepatic iron concentration was 8-fold higher than that of wild-type littermates (2,071 ± 450 vs. 255 ± 23 μg/g dry wt, P < 0.002). Stainable hepatic iron in the HFE mutant mice was predominantly in hepatocytes in a periportal distribution. Iron concentrations in spleen, heart, and kidney were not significantly different. Erythroid parameters were normal, indicating that the anemia did not contribute to the increased iron storage. This study shows that the HFE protein is involved in the regulation of iron homeostasis and that mutations in this gene are responsible for HH. The knockout mouse model of HH will facilitate investigation into the pathogenesis of increased iron accumulation in HH and provide opportunities to evaluate therapeutic strategies for prevention or correction of iron overload. PMID:9482913

  10. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  11. Aberrant gene expression profile in a mouse model of endometriosis mirrors that observed in women

    PubMed Central

    Pelch, Katherine E.; Schroder, Amy L.; Kimball, Paul A.; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L.; Davis, J. W.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To define the altered gene expression profile of endometriotic lesions in a mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis Design Autologous experimental mouse model. Setting Medical school department. Animals Adult C57Bl6 mice. Intervention(s) Endometriosis was surgically-induced by auto-transplantation of uterine tissue to the intestinal mesentery. Endometriotic lesions and eutopic uteri were recovered at 3 or 29 days post-induction. Main Outcome Measure(s) Altered gene expression was measured in the endometriotic lesion relative to the eutopic uterus by genome wide cDNA microarray analysis and was confirmed by real time RT-PCR for six genes. Relevant categories of altered genes were identified using gene ontology analysis to determine groups of genes enriched for altered expression. Result(s) The expression of 479 and 114 genes was altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus at 3 or 29 days post-induction, respectively. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that genes associated with the extracellular matrix, cell adhesions, immune function, cell growth, and angiogenesis were altered in the endometriotic lesion compared to the eutopic uterus. Conclusion(s) Based on gene expression analysis, the mouse model of surgically-induced endometriosis appears to be a good model for studying the pathophysiology and treatment of endometriosis. PMID:19473656

  12. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  13. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  14. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  15. Perinatal Gjb2 gene transfer rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Takashi; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most widespread sensory disorder, with an incidence of congenital genetic deafness of 1 in 1600 children. For many ethnic populations, the most prevalent form of genetic deafness is caused by recessive mutations in the gene gap junction protein, beta 2, 26 kDa (GJB2), which is also known as connexin 26 (Cx26). Despite this knowledge, existing treatment strategies do not completely recover speech perception. Here we used a gene delivery system to rescue hearing in a mouse model of Gjb2 deletion. Mice lacking Cx26 are characterized by profound deafness from birth and improper development of cochlear cells. Cochlear delivery of Gjb2 using an adeno-associated virus significantly improved the auditory responses and development of the cochlear structure. Using gene replacement to restore hearing in a new mouse model of Gjb2-related deafness may lead to the development of therapies for human hereditary deafness.

  16. Modeling Chromosomes in Mouse to Explore the Function of Genes, Genomic Disorders, and Chromosomal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Véronique; Pereira, Patricia; Duchon, Arnaud; Hérault, Yann

    2006-01-01

    One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures. PMID:16839184

  17. Common Fragile Site Tumor Suppressor Genes and Corresponding Mouse Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS. PMID:21318118

  18. Common fragile site tumor suppressor genes and corresponding mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS.

  19. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells) in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null). About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change), representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk) of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13) and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11) cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology. PMID:21223590

  20. Mouse model of inducible nephrogenic diabetes insipidus produced by floxed aquaporin-2 gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue; Zhao, Dan; Qian, Liman; Verkman, A S

    2006-08-01

    Transgenic mouse models of defective urinary concentrating ability produced by deletion of various membrane transport or receptor proteins, including aquaporin-2 (AQP2), are associated with neonatal mortality from polyuria. Here, we report an inducible mouse model of AQP2 gene deletion with severe polyuria in adult mice. LoxP sequences were inserted into introns 1 and 2 in the mouse AQP2 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Mating of germ-line AQP2-loxP mice with tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice produced offspring with inducible homozygous Cre-AQP2-loxP, which had a normal phenotype. Tamoxifen injections over 10 days resulted in AQP2 gene excision, with undetectable full-length AQP2 transcript in kidney and a >95% reduction in immunoreactive AQP2 protein. Urine osmolality decreased from approximately 2,000 to <500 mosmol/kgH(2)O after 4-5 days, with urine output increasing from 2 to 25 ml/day. Urine osmolality did not increase after water deprivation. Interestingly, AQP3 protein expression in the collecting duct was increased by about fivefold after AQP2 gene excision. Mild renal damage was seen after 6 wk of polyuria, with collecting duct dilatation, yet normal creatinine clearance and serum chemistries. These results establish the first adult model of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) caused by AQP2 deficiency, with daily urine output comparable to body weight, although remarkable preservation of renal function compared with non-inducible NDI models.

  1. The Construction of Transgenic and Gene Knockout/Knockin Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research, including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual’s gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  2. Lethal graft-versus-host disease in mouse models of T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bendle, Gavin M; Linnemann, Carsten; Hooijkaas, Anna I; Bies, Laura; de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Kaiser, Andrew D M; Pouw, Nadine; Debets, Reno; Kieback, Elisa; Uckert, Wolfgang; Song, Ji-Ying; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-05-01

    The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to induce immune reactivity toward defined antigens to which endogenous T cells are insufficiently reactive. This approach, which is called TCR gene therapy, is being developed to target tumors and pathogens, and its clinical testing has commenced in patients with cancer. In this study we show that lethal cytokine-driven autoimmune pathology can occur in mouse models of TCR gene therapy under conditions that closely mimic the clinical setting. We show that the pairing of introduced and endogenous TCR chains in TCR gene-modified T cells leads to the formation of self-reactive TCRs that are responsible for the observed autoimmunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adjustments in the design of gene therapy vectors and target T cell populations can be used to reduce the risk of TCR gene therapy-induced autoimmune pathology.

  3. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  4. AAV-mediated gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Lei, Lei; Dai, Xufeng; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Dinculescu, Astra; McDowell, J. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, more and more mutant genes that cause retinal diseases have been detected. At the same time, many naturally occurring mouse models of retinal degeneration have also been found, which show similar changes to human retinal diseases. These, together with improved viral vector quality allow more and more traditionally incurable inherited retinal disorders to become potential candidates for gene therapy. Currently, the most common vehicle to deliver the therapeutic gene into target retinal cells is the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Following delivery to the immuno-priviledged subretinal space, AAV-vectors can efficiently target both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor cells, the origin of most retinal degenerations. This review focuses on the AAV-based gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degenerations, especially those in which delivery of the correct copy of the wild-type gene has led to significant beneficial effects on visual function, as determined by morphological, biochemical, electroretinographic and behavioral analysis. The past studies in animal models and ongoing successful LCA2 clinical trials, predict a bright future for AAV gene replacement treatment for inherited recessive retinal diseases. PMID:22300136

  5. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kimberly H; Bonthuis, Paul J; Rissman, Emilie F

    2014-10-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones.

  6. Mouse model systems to study sex chromosome genes and behavior: relevance to humans

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kimberly H.; Bonthuis, Paul J.; Rissman, Emilie F.

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome genes directly influence sex differences in behavior. The discovery of the Sry gene on the Y chromosome (Gubbay et al., 1990; Koopman et al., 1990) substantiated the sex chromosome mechanistic link to sex differences. Moreover, the pronounced connection between X chromosome gene mutations and mental illness produces a strong sex bias in these diseases. Yet, the dominant explanation for sex differences continues to be the gonadal hormones. Here we review progress made on behavioral differences in mouse models that uncouple sex chromosome complement from gonadal sex. We conclude that many social and cognitive behaviors are modified by sex chromosome complement, and discuss the implications for human research. Future directions need to include identification of the genes involved and interactions with these genes and gonadal hormones. PMID:24388960

  7. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  8. RNAe in a transgenic growth hormone mouse model shows potential for use in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Long, Haizhou; Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Yu, Yingting; Hu, Xiongbing; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Hanshuo; Wu, Qiong

    2017-02-01

    RNAe is a new method that enhances protein expression at the post-transcriptional level. RNAe utility was further explored to improve endogenous protein expression. Transgenic mice were created by targeting RNAe to growth hormone gene into the C57/BL mouse genome by transposon mediated integration; the mice showed a heavier body weight and longer body length compared with normal mice. RNAe can also be used for gene therapy through the delivery of in vitro transcribed RNA. This study takes a further step towards applying RNAe in pharmaceutical approaches by transposon-based transgenic mice model construction and the use of in vitro transcribed RNA transfection assay.

  9. Using mouse models of autism spectrum disorders to study the neurotoxicology of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzer, Jared J.; Koenig, Claire M.; Berman, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    To better study the role of genetics in autism, mouse models have been developed which mimic the genetics of specific autism spectrum and related disorders. These models have facilitated research on the role genetic susceptibility factors in the pathogenesis of autism in the absence of environmental factors. Inbred mouse strains have been similarly studied to assess the role of environmental agents on neurodevelopment, typically without the complications of genetic heterogeneity of the human population. What has not been as actively pursued, however, is the methodical study of the interaction between these factors (e.g., gene and environmental interactions in neurodevelopment). This review suggests that a genetic predisposition paired with exposure to environmental toxicants play an important role in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, and may contribute to the largely unexplained rise in the number of children diagnosed with autism worldwide. Specifically, descriptions of the major mouse models of autism and toxic mechanisms of prevalent environmental chemicals are provided followed by a discussion of current and future research strategies to evaluate the role of gene and environment interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23010509

  10. Imaging gene delivery in a mouse model of congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Pike, L S; Tannous, B A; Deliolanis, N C; Hsich, G; Morse, D; Tung, C-H; Sena-Esteves, M; Breakefield, X O

    2011-12-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene replacement for lysosomal disorders have been spurred by the ability of some serotypes to efficiently transduce neurons in the brain and by the ability of lysosomal enzymes to cross-correct among cells. Here, we explored enzyme replacement therapy in a knock-out mouse model of congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), the most severe of the NCLs in humans. The missing protease in this disorder, cathepsin D (CathD) has high levels in the central nervous system. This enzyme has the potential advantage for assessing experimental therapy in that it can be imaged using a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe activated by CathD. Injections of an AAV2/rh8 vector-encoding mouse CathD (mCathD) into both cerebral ventricles and peritoneum of newborn knock-out mice resulted in a significant increase in lifespan. Successful delivery of active CathD by the AAV2/rh8-mCathD vector was verified by NIRF imaging of mouse embryonic fibroblasts from knock-out mice in culture, as well as by ex vivo NIRF imaging of the brain and liver after gene transfer. These studies support the potential effectiveness and imaging evaluation of enzyme replacement therapy to the brain and other organs in CathD null mice via AAV-mediated gene delivery in neonatal animals.

  11. Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene yields a mouse model of malignant colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Parisi, T; Bronson, R T; Lees, J A

    2015-11-26

    The retinoblastoma gene (Rb) is mutated at significant frequency in various human epithelial tumors, including colorectal cancer, and is strongly associated with metastatic disease. However, sole inactivation of Rb in the mouse has so far failed to yield epithelial cancers. Here, we specifically inactivate Rb and/or p53 in the urogenital epithelium and the intestine. We find that the loss of both tumor suppressors is unable to yield tumors in the transitional epithelium lining the bladder, kidneys and ureters. Instead, these mice develop highly metastatic tumors of neuroendocrine, not epithelial, origin within the urogenital tract to give prostate cancer in the males and vaginal tumors in the females. Additionally, we discovered that the sole inactivation of Rb in the intestine was sufficient to induce formation of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. These tumors closely mirror the human disease in regard to the age of onset, histological appearance, invasiveness and metastatic potential. Like most human colorectal carcinomas, our murine Rb-deficient tumors demonstrate genomic instability and they show activation of β-catenin. Deregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is specific to the intestinal tumors, as genomic instability but not activation of β-catenin was observed in the neuroendocrine tumors. To date, attempts to generate genetically engineered mouse models of colorectal cancer tumors have yielded mostly cancer of the small intestine, which rarely occurs in humans. Our system provides the opportunity to accurately model and study colorectal cancer in the mouse via a single gene mutation.

  12. Survival benefit and phenotypic improvement by hamartin gene therapy in a tuberous sclerosis mouse brain model.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Shilpa; Zhang, Xuan; Goto, June; Han, Sangyeul; Lai, Charles; Bronson, Roderick; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Ramesh, Vijaya; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Kwiatkowski, David J; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2015-10-01

    We examined the potential benefit of gene therapy in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in which there is embryonic loss of Tsc1 (hamartin) in brain neurons. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (serotype rh8) expressing a tagged form of hamartin was injected into the cerebral ventricles of newborn pups with the genotype Tsc1(cc) (homozygous for a conditional floxed Tsc1 allele) SynI-cre(+), in which Tsc1 is lost selectively in neurons starting at embryonic day 12. Vector-treated Tsc1(cc)SynIcre(+) mice showed a marked improvement in survival from a mean of 22 days in non-injected mice to 52 days in AAV hamartin vector-injected mice, with improved weight gain and motor behavior in the latter. Pathologic studies showed normalization of neuron size and a decrease in markers of mTOR activation in treated as compared to untreated mutant littermates. Hence, we show that gene replacement in the brain is an effective therapeutic approach in this mouse model of TSC1. Our strategy for gene therapy has the advantages that therapy can be achieved from a single application, as compared to repeated treatment with drugs, and that AAV vectors have been found to have minimal to no toxicity in clinical trials for other neurologic conditions. Although there are many additional issues to be addressed, our studies support gene therapy as a useful approach in TSC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Disease model discovery from 3,328 gene knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Terrence F; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B; Jacobsen, Julius O; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L; Dickinson, Mary E; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K C Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J; Murray, Stephen A; Svenson, Karen L; Braun, Robert E; White, Jacqueline K; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C; Adams, David J; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M; Smedley, Damian

    2017-08-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by a lack of knowledge of the functions and pathobiological mechanisms of most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalog of gene function by characterizing new knockout-mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardized phenotyping tests. All mice will be readily available to the biomedical community. Analyzing the first 3,328 genes identified models for 360 diseases, including the first models, to our knowledge, for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations were novel, providing functional evidence for 1,092 genes and candidates in genetically uncharacterized diseases including arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with The 100,000 Genomes Project and others.

  14. Early maternal alcohol consumption alters hippocampal DNA methylation, gene expression and volume in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Marjonen, Heidi; Sierra, Alejandra; Nyman, Anna; Rogojin, Vladimir; Gröhn, Olli; Linden, Anni-Maija; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Kaminen-Ahola, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The adverse effects of alcohol consumption during pregnancy are known, but the molecular events that lead to the phenotypic characteristics are unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms, we have used a mouse model of gestational ethanol exposure, which is based on maternal ad libitum ingestion of 10% (v/v) ethanol for the first 8 days of gestation (GD 0.5-8.5). Early neurulation takes place by the end of this period, which is equivalent to the developmental stage early in the fourth week post-fertilization in human. During this exposure period, dynamic epigenetic reprogramming takes place and the embryo is vulnerable to the effects of environmental factors. Thus, we hypothesize that early ethanol exposure disrupts the epigenetic reprogramming of the embryo, which leads to alterations in gene regulation and life-long changes in brain structure and function. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in the mouse hippocampus revealed altered expression of 23 genes and three miRNAs in ethanol-exposed, adolescent offspring at postnatal day (P) 28. We confirmed this result by using two other tissues, where three candidate genes are known to express actively. Interestingly, we found a similar trend of upregulated gene expression in bone marrow and main olfactory epithelium. In addition, we observed altered DNA methylation in the CpG islands upstream of the candidate genes in the hippocampus. Our MRI study revealed asymmetry of brain structures in ethanol-exposed adult offspring (P60): we detected ethanol-induced enlargement of the left hippocampus and decreased volume of the left olfactory bulb. Our study indicates that ethanol exposure in early gestation can cause changes in DNA methylation, gene expression, and brain structure of offspring. Furthermore, the results support our hypothesis of early epigenetic origin of alcohol-induced disorders: changes in gene regulation may have already taken place in embryonic stem cells and therefore can be seen in different tissue

  15. Identification of genes escaping X inactivation by allelic expression analysis in a novel hybrid mouse model.

    PubMed

    Berletch, Joel B; Ma, Wenxiu; Yang, Fan; Shendure, Jay; Noble, William S; Disteche, Christine M; Deng, Xinxian

    2015-12-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a female-specific mechanism that serves to balance gene dosage between the sexes whereby one X chromosome in females is inactivated during early development. Despite this silencing, a small portion of genes escape inactivation and remain expressed from the inactive X (Xi). Little is known about the distribution of escape from XCI in different tissues in vivo and about the mechanisms that control tissue-specific differences. Using a new binomial model in conjunction with a mouse model with identifiable alleles and skewed X inactivation we are able to survey genes that escape XCI in vivo. We show that escape from X inactivation can be a common feature of some genes, whereas others escape in a tissue specific manner. Furthermore, we characterize the chromatin environment of escape genes and show that expression from the Xi correlates with factors associated with open chromatin and that CTCF co-localizes with escape genes. Here, we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and data analysis pipeline we used to assay allele-specific expression and epigenetic characteristics of genes escaping X inactivation. The data is publicly available through the GEO database under ascension numbers GSM1014171, GSE44255, and GSE59779. Interpretation and discussion of these data are included in a previously published study (Berletch et al., 2015) [1].

  16. Effects of Subretinal Gene Transfer at Different Time Points in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Hua; Han, Juanjuan; He, Ying; Zhang, Yangyang; Qi, Yan; Pang, Ji-jing

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is necessary for photoreceptors to generate an important lipid component of their membranes. The absence of LPCAT1 results in early and rapid rod and cone degeneration. Retinal degeneration 11 (rd11) mice carry a mutation in the Lpcat1 gene, and are an excellent model of early-onset rapid retinal degeneration (RD). To date, no reports have documented gene therapy administration in the rd11 mouse model at different ages. In this study, the AAV8 (Y733F)-smCBA-Lpcat1 vector was subretinally injected at postnatal day (P) 10, 14, 18, or 22. Four months after injection, immunohistochemistry and analysis of retinal morphology showed that treatment at P10 rescued about 82% of the wild-type retinal thickness. However, the diffusion of the vector and the resulting rescue were limited to an area around the injection site that was only 31% of the total retinal area. Injection at P14 resulted in vector diffusion that covered approximately 84% of the retina, and we found that gene therapy was more effective against RD when exposure to light was limited before and after treatment. We observed long-term preservation of electroretinogram (ERG) responses, and preservation of retinal structure, indicating that early treatment followed by limited light exposure can improve gene therapy effectiveness for the eyes of rd11 mice. Importantly, delayed treatment still partially preserved M-cones, but not S-cones, and M-cones in the rd11 retina appeared to have a longer window of opportunity for effective preservation with gene therapy. These results provide important information regarding the effects of subretinal gene therapy in the mouse model of LPCAT1-deficiency. PMID:27228218

  17. Acat1 knockdown gene therapy decreases amyloid-β in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephanie R; Chang, Catherine Cy; Dogbevia, Godwin; Bryleva, Elena Y; Bowen, Zachary; Hasan, Mazahir T; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Both genetic inactivation and pharmacological inhibition of the cholesteryl ester synthetic enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) have shown benefit in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to test the potential therapeutic applications of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Acat1 gene knockdown in AD mice. We constructed recombinant AAVs expressing artificial microRNA (miRNA) sequences, which targeted Acat1 for knockdown. We demonstrated that our AAVs could infect cultured mouse neurons and glia and effectively knockdown ACAT activity in vitro. We next delivered the AAVs to mouse brains neurosurgically, and demonstrated that Acat1-targeting AAVs could express viral proteins and effectively diminish ACAT activity in vivo, without inducing appreciable inflammation. We delivered the AAVs to the brains of 10-month-old AD mice and analyzed the effects on the AD phenotype at 12 months of age. Acat1-targeting AAV delivered to the brains of AD mice decreased the levels of brain amyloid-β and full-length human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), to levels similar to complete genetic ablation of Acat1. This study provides support for the potential therapeutic use of Acat1 knockdown gene therapy in AD.

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  19. Gene therapy with IL-12 induced enhanced anti-tumor activity in fibrosarcoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Razi Soofiyani, Saiedeh; Kazemi, Tohid; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Mohammad Hosseini, Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-12-01

    Context Immunotherapy is among the most promising modalities for treatment of cancer. Recently, interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been used as an immunotherapeutic agent in cancer gene therapy. IL-12 can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and boost anti-tumor immune responses. Objective In the current study, we have investigated if IL-12 gene therapy can lead to the regression of tumor mass in a mouse model of fibrosarcoma. Material and methods To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, WEHI-164 tumor cells were transfected with murine-IL12 plasmids using Lipofectamine. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to confirm IL-12 expression in transfected cells. The fibrosarcoma mouse model was established by subcutaneous injection of transfected cells to Balb/C mice. Mice were sacrificed and the tumors were extracted. Tumor sizes were measured by caliper. The expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ was studied with real-time PCR and western blotting. The expression of Ki-67(a tumor proliferation marker) in tumor mass was studied by immunohistochemistry staining. Results and discussion The group treated with IL-12 showed a significant decrease in tumor mass volume (P: 0.000). The results of real-time PCR and western blotting showed that IL-12 and IFN-γ expression increased in the group treated with IL-12 (relative expression of IL-12: 1.9 and relative expression of IFN-γ: 1.766). Immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ki-67 expression was reduced in the group treated with IL-12. Conclusion IL-12 gene therapy successfully led to regress of tumor mass in the fibrosarcoma mouse model. This may serve as a candidate therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer.

  20. Dopaminergic function in relation to genes associated with risk for schizophrenia: translational mutant mouse models.

    PubMed

    Moran, Paula M; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Papaleo, Francesco; Waddington, John L

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mice play an increasingly important role in understanding disease processes at multiple levels. In particular, they illuminate the impact of risk genes for disease on such processes. This article reviews recent advances in the application of mutant mice to study the intricacies of dopaminergic (DAergic) function in relation to the putative pathophysiology of psychotic illness, particularly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drug action. It considers models for understanding the role(s) of risk genes, with a particular focus on DTNBP1 and NRG1, their interactions with environmental factors, and with each other (epistasis). In overview, it considers new schemas for understanding psychotic illness that integrate DAergic pathophysiology with developmental, social, and cognitive processes, and how mutant mouse models can reflect and inform on such schemas.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling in the APP/PS1KI Mouse Model of Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Robert; Hüttenrauch, Melanie; Kacprowski, Tim; Bouter, Yvonne; Pradier, Laurent; Bayer, Thomas A; Kuss, Andreas W; Wirths, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by early intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular deposition of Aβ peptides, and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates. These lesions cause dendritic and synaptic alterations and induce an inflammatory response in the diseased brain. Although the neuropathological characteristics of AD have been known for decades, the molecular mechanisms causing the disease are still under investigation. Studying gene expression changes in postmortem AD brain tissue can yield new insights into the molecular disease mechanisms. To that end, one can employ transgenic AD mouse models and the next-generation sequencing technology. In this study, a whole-brain transcriptome analysis was carried out using the well-characterized APP/PS1KI mouse model for AD. These mice display a robust phenotype reflected by working memory deficits at 6 months of age, a significant neuron loss in a variety of brain areas including the CA1 region of the hippocampus and a severe amyloid pathology. Based on deep sequencing, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between 6-month-old WT or PS1KI and APP/PS1KI were identified and verified by qRT-PCR. Compared to WT mice, 250 DEGs were found in APP/PS1KI mice, while 186 DEGs could be found compared to PS1KI control mice. Most of the DEGs were upregulated in APP/PS1KI mice and belong to either inflammation-associated pathways or lysosomal activation, which is likely due to the robust intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ in this mouse model. Our comprehensive brain transcriptome study further highlights APP/PS1KI mice as a valuable model for AD, covering molecular inflammatory and immune responses.

  2. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  3. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice

    PubMed Central

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Aim Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Procedures Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. Results In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a

  4. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Identification of gene expression changes from colitis to CRC in the mouse CAC model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gao, Yuyan; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Guangyu; Yang, Yan Mei; Yang, Yue; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2014-01-01

    A connection between colorectal carcinogenesis and inflammation is well known, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Chemically induced colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is an outstanding mouse model for studying the link between inflammation and cancer. Additionally, the CAC model is used for examining novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers for use in clinical practice. Here, a CAC model was established in less than 100 days using azoxymethane (AOM) with dextran sulfate sodium salt (DSS) in BALB/c mice. We examined the mRNA expression profiles of three groups: control untreated mice (K), DSS-induced chronic colitis mice (D), and AOM/DSS-induced CAC (AD) mice. We identified 6301 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among the three groups, including 93 persistently upregulated genes and 139 persistently downregulated genes. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses revealed that the most persistent DEGs were significantly enriched in metabolic or inflammatory components in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, several associated DEGs were identified as potential DEGs by protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We selected 14 key genes from the DEGs and potential DEGs for further quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) verification. Six persistently upregulated, 3 persistently downregulated DEGs, and the other 3 genes showed results consistent with the microarray data. We demonstrated the regulation of 12 key genes specifically involved in Wnt signaling, cytokine and cytokine receptor interactions, homeostasis, and tumor-associated metabolism during colitis-associated CRC. Our results suggest that a close relationship between metabolic and inflammatory mediators of the tumor microenvironment is present in CAC.

  6. Radiation Dose-Rate Effects on Gene Expression in a Mouse Biodosimetry Model

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Elliston, Carl D.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological terrorist attack, there will be a pressing need for biodosimetry to triage a large, potentially exposed population and to assign individuals to appropriate treatment. Exposures from fallout are likely, resulting in protracted dose delivery that would, in turn, impact the extent of injury. Biodosimetry approaches that can distinguish such low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures from acute exposures have not yet been developed. In this study, we used the C57BL/6 mouse model in an initial investigation of the impact of low-dose-rate delivery on the transcriptomic response in blood. While a large number of the same genes responded to LDR and acute radiation exposures, for many genes the magnitude of response was lower after LDR exposures. Some genes, however, were differentially expressed (P < 0.001, false discovery rate < 5%) in mice exposed to LDR compared with mice exposed to acute radiation. We identified a set of 164 genes that correctly classified 97% of the samples in this experiment as exposed to acute or LDR radiation using a support vector machine algorithm. Gene expression is a promising approach to radiation biodosimetry, enhanced greatly by this first demonstration of its potential for distinguishing between acute and LDR exposures. Further development of this aspect of radiation biodosimetry, either as part of a complete gene expression biodosimetry test or as an adjunct to other methods, could provide vital triage information in a mass radiological casualty event. PMID:26114327

  7. Mouse models of gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Taketo, Makoto Mark

    2006-05-01

    The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has become one of the best model animal species in biomedical research today because of its abundant genetic/genomic information, and easy mutagenesis using transgenic and gene knockout technology. Genetically engineered mice have become essential tools in both mechanistic studies and drug development. In this article I will review recent topics in gastrointestinal cancer model mice, with emphasis on the results obtained in our laboratory. They include: (i) mouse models for familial adenomatous polyposis (Apc mutant mice; modifier genes of Apc intestinal polyposis; stabilizing beta-catenin mutant mice); (ii) mouse models for colon cancer (mouse models for hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer; additional mutations in Apc mutant mice; models with mutations in other genes; models for colon cancer associated with inflammatory bowel diseases); and (iii) mouse models for gastric cancer.

  8. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  9. Correction of the disease phenotype in the mouse model of Stargardt disease by lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Kim, S-R; Binley, K; Pata, I; Doi, K; Mannik, J; Zernant-Rajang, J; Kan, O; Iqball, S; Naylor, S; Sparrow, J R; Gouras, P; Allikmets, R

    2008-10-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a macular dystrophy caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene. The disease phenotype that is most recognized in STGD1 patients, and also in the Abca4-/- mouse (a disease model), is lipofuscin accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium. Here, we tested whether delivery of the normal (wt) human ABCA4 gene to the subretinal space of the Abca4 -/- mice via lentiviral vectors would correct the disease phenotype; that is, reduce accumulation of the lipofuscin pigment A2E. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral vectors were constructed expressing either the human ABCA4 gene or the LacZ reporter gene under the control of the constitutive (CMV) or photoreceptor-specific (Rho) promoters. Abca4-/- mice were injected subretinally with 1 microl ( approximately 5.0 x 10(5) TU) of each EIAV vector in one eye at postnatal days 4 and 5. An injection of saline, an EIAV-null vector, or an uninjected contralateral eye served as a control. Mice were killed at various times after injection to determine photoreceptor (PR) transduction efficiency and A2E concentrations. EIAV-LacZ vectors transduced from 5 to 20% of the PRs in the injected area in mice. Most importantly, a single subretinal injection of EIAV-CMV-ABCA4 to Abca4-/- mouse eyes substantially reduced disease-associated A2E accumulation compared to untreated and mock-treated control eyes. Treated eyes of Abca4-/- mice accumulated 8-12 pmol per eye (s.d.=2.7) of A2E 1 year after treatment, amounts comparable to wt controls, whereas mock-treated or untreated eyes had 3-5 times more A2E (27-39 pmol per eye, s.d.=1.5; P=0.001-0.005). Although extrapolation to humans requires caution, the high transduction efficiency of both rod and cone photoreceptors and the statistically significant reduction of A2E accumulation in the mouse model of STGD1 suggest that lentiviral gene therapy is a potentially efficient tool for treating ABCA4-associated diseases.

  10. Correction of the disease phenotype in the mouse model of Stargardt disease by lentiviral gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, J; Kim, S-R; Binley, K; Pata, I; Doi, K; Mannik, J; Zernant-Rajang, J; Kan, O; Iqball, S; Naylor, S; Sparrow, JR; Gouras, P; Allikmets, R

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a macular dystrophy caused by mutations in the ABCA4 (ABCR) gene. The disease phenotype that is most recognized in STGD1 patients, and also in the Abca4−/− mouse (a disease model), is lipofuscin accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium. Here, we tested whether delivery of the normal (wt) human ABCA4 gene to the subretinal space of the Abca4−/− mice via lentiviral vectors would correct the disease phenotype; that is, reduce accumulation of the lipofuscin pigment A2E. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-derived lentiviral vectors were constructed expressing either the human ABCA4 gene or the LacZ reporter gene under the control of the constitutive (CMV) or photoreceptor-specific (Rho) promoters. Abca4−/− mice were injected subretinally with 1 µl (~5.0 × 105 TU) of each EIAV vector in one eye at postnatal days 4 and 5. An injection of saline, an EIAV-null vector, or an uninjected contralateral eye served as a control. Mice were killed at various times after injection to determine photoreceptor (PR) transduction efficiency and A2E concentrations. EIAV-LacZ vectors transduced from 5 to 20% of the PRs in the injected area in mice. Most importantly, a single subretinal injection of EIAV-CMV-ABCA4 to Abca4−/− mouse eyes substantially reduced disease-associated A2E accumulation compared to untreated and mock-treated control eyes. Treated eyes of Abca4−/− mice accumulated 8–12 pmol per eye (s.d. = 2.7) of A2E 1 year after treatment, amounts comparable to wt controls, whereas mock-treated or untreated eyes had 3–5 times more A2E (27–39 pmol per eye, s.d. = 1.5; P = 0.001–0.005). Although extrapolation to humans requires caution, the high transduction efficiency of both rod and cone photoreceptors and the statistically significant reduction of A2E accumulation in the mouse model of STGD1 suggest that lentiviral gene therapy is a potentially efficient tool for treating ABCA4-associated diseases

  11. Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy: A Mouse Model Generated by Gene Targeting of the GCAP1/Guca1a Gene

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Prateek K.; Mihelec, Marija; Cottrill, Phillippa; Wilkie, Susan E.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Duran, Yanai; West, Emma L.; Michaelides, Michel; Ali, Robin R.; Hunt, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Cone dystrophy 3 (COD3) is a severe dominantly inherited retinal degeneration caused by missense mutations in GUCA1A, the gene encoding Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 1 (GCAP1). The role of GCAP1 in controlling cyclic nucleotide levels in photoreceptors has largely been elucidated using knock-out mice, but the disease pathology in these mice cannot be extrapolated directly to COD3 as this involves altered, rather than loss of, GCAP1 function. Therefore, in order to evaluate the pathology of this dominant disorder, we have introduced a point mutation into the murine Guca1a gene that causes an E155G amino acid substitution; this is one of the disease-causing mutations found in COD3 patients. Disease progression in this novel mouse model of cone dystrophy was determined by a variety of techniques including electroretinography (ERG), retinal histology, immunohistochemistry and measurement of cGMP levels. It was established that although retinal development was normal up to 3 months of age, there was a subsequent progressive decline in retinal function, with a far greater alteration in cone than rod responses, associated with a corresponding loss of photoreceptors. In addition, we have demonstrated that accumulation of cyclic GMP precedes the observed retinal degeneration and is likely to contribute to the disease mechanism. Importantly, this knock-in mutant mouse has many features in common with the human disease, thereby making it an excellent model to further probe disease pathogenesis and investigate therapeutic interventions. PMID:21464903

  12. Using the GEMM-ESC strategy to study gene function in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Ivo J; Del Bravo, Jessica; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Braumuller, Tanya M; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Henneman, Linda; Michalak, Ewa M; Berns, Anton; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical in vivo validation of target genes for therapeutic intervention requires careful selection and characterization of the most suitable animal model in order to assess the role of these genes in a particular process or disease. To this end, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are typically used. However, the appropriate engineering of these models is often cumbersome and time consuming. Recently, we and others described a modular approach for fast-track modification of existing GEMMs by re-derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that can be modified by recombinase-mediated transgene insertion and subsequently used for the production of chimeric mice. This 'GEMM-ESC strategy' allows for rapid in vivo analysis of gene function in the chimeras and their offspring. Moreover, this strategy is compatible with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. This protocol describes when and how to use the GEMM-ESC strategy effectively, and it provides a detailed procedure for re-deriving and manipulating GEMM-ESCs under feeder- and serum-free conditions. This strategy produces transgenic mice with the desired complex genotype faster than traditional methods: generation of validated GEMM-ESC clones for controlled transgene integration takes 9-12 months, and recombinase-mediated transgene integration and chimeric cohort production takes 2-3 months. The protocol requires skills in embryology, stem cell biology and molecular biology, and it is ideally performed within, or in close collaboration with, a transgenic facility.

  13. The SCID mouse model: novel therapeutic targets - lessons from gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Pierer, Matthias; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Pap, Thomas; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen

    2003-08-01

    The hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is progressive destruction of the joints, preceded and accompanied by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation. Spontaneous and induced animal models of RA reflect predominantly the inflammatory aspects of the disease. To reproduce the destruction of cartilage and bone mediated by an activated synovium, it was desirable to develop models that allow the dissection of cellular and molecular components derived from human tissue. The SCID mouse co-implantation model of human RA focuses on RA synovial fibroblasts (RA-SF) and their role in cartilage destruction. The model has provided the best evidence that RA-SF contribute significantly to matrix degradation, even in the absence of human lymphocytes and macrophages, since highly purified RA-SF invade the co-implanted normal human cartilage. Moreover, it became clear that they maintained their aggressive phenotype over long periods of time, particularly at sites of invasion into the co-implanted human cartilage. Targeting different signaling molecules, cytokines and matrix-degrading enzymes by soluble receptors, antagonists or negative mutants in the SCID mouse model of RA has implicated many of them in the mechanisms leading to cartilage destruction. However, since inhibition of a single molecule or pathway is not sufficient to inhibit the aggressive behavior of RA-SF it appears necessary to co-express in the synoviocytes genes for two or even more antagonists of e.g. cytokines, matrix-degrading enzymes or molecules interfering specifically with signaling pathways involved in the apoptosis of RA-SF. Based on the recent observation that the L1 (line-1) endogenous retroviral element appears responsible for the cytokine- independent activation via the MAPK p38delta, the current understanding of disease pathogenesis suggests that both the cytokine-dependent as well as the cytokine-independent pathways of joint destruction must be inhibited. Modulation of both pathways by gene

  14. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqing; Cline, Melissa S.; Osborne, Robert J.; Tuttle, Daniel L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Donohue, John Paul; Hall, Megan P.; Shiue, Lily; Swanson, Maurice S.; Thornton, Charles A.; Ares, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is associated with expression of expanded CTG DNA repeats as RNA (CUGexp RNA). To test whether CUGexp RNA creates a global splicing defect, we compared skeletal muscle of two mouse DM1 models, one expressing a CTGexp transgene, and another homozygous for a defective Mbnl1 gene. Strong correlation in splicing changes for ~100 new Mbnl1-regulated exons indicates loss of Mbnl1 explains >80% of the splicing pathology due to CUGexp RNA. In contrast, only about half of mRNA level changes can be attributed to loss of Mbnl1, indicating CUGexp RNA has Mbnl1-independent effects, particularly on mRNAs for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We propose that CUGexp RNA causes two separate effects: loss of Mbnl1 function, disrupting splicing, and loss of another function that disrupts ECM mRNA regulation, possibly mediated by MBNL2. These findings reveal unanticipated similarities between DM1 and other muscular dystrophies. PMID:20098426

  15. Mouse Models of Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Olivia; Wiseman, Frances K.; Ruparelia, Aarti; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome copy number are called aneuploidies and make up a large health load on the human population. Many aneuploidies are lethal because the resulting abnormal gene dosage is highly deleterious. Nevertheless, some whole chromosome aneuploidies can lead to live births. Alterations in the copy number of sections of chromosomes, which are also known as segmental aneuploidies, are also associated with deleterious effects. Here we examine how aneuploidy of whole chromosomes and segmental aneuploidy of chromosomal regions are modeled in the mouse. These models provide a whole animal system in which we aim to investigate the complex phenotype-genotype interactions that arise from alteration in the copy number of genes. Although our understanding of this subject is still in its infancy, already research in mouse models is highlighting possible therapies that might help alleviate the cognitive effects associated with changes in gene number. Thus, creating and studying mouse models of aneuploidy and copy number variation is important for understanding what it is to be human, in both the normal and genomically altered states. PMID:22262951

  16. Klotho gene silencing promotes pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Li, Zhenzhi; Lindsey, Catherine; Wang, Ying; Welc, Steven S; Ramos, Julian N; Khanlou, Négar; Kuro-O, Makoto; Tidball, James G

    2016-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal muscle disease involving progressive loss of muscle regenerative capacity and increased fibrosis. We tested whether epigenetic silencing of the klotho gene occurs in the mdx mouse model of DMD and whether klotho silencing is an important feature of the disease. Our findings show that klotho undergoes muscle-specific silencing at the acute onset of mdx pathology. Klotho experiences increased methylation of CpG sites in its promoter region, which is associated with gene silencing, and increases in a repressive histone mark, H3K9me2. Expression of a klotho transgene in mdx mice restored their longevity, reduced muscle wasting, improved function and greatly increased the pool of muscle-resident stem cells required for regeneration. Reductions of fibrosis in late, progressive stages of the mdx pathology achieved by transgene expression were paralleled by reduced expression of Wnt target genes (axin-2), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) and collagens types 1 and 3, indicating that Klotho inhibition of the profibrotic Wnt/TGFβ axis underlies its anti-fibrotic effect in aging, dystrophic muscle. Thus, epigenetic silencing of klotho during muscular dystrophy contributes substantially to lost regenerative capacity and increased fibrosis of dystrophic muscle during late progressive stages of the disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Generation of a new transgenic mouse model for assessment of tau gene silencing therapies.

    PubMed

    Fromholt, Susan; Reitano, Christian; Brown, Hilda; Lewis, Jada; Borchelt, David R

    2016-09-05

    Targeting the expression of genes has emerged as a potentially viable therapeutic approach to human disease. In Alzheimer's disease, therapies that silence the expression of tau could be a viable strategy to slow disease progression. We produced a novel strain of transgenic mice that could be used to assess the efficacy of gene knockdown therapies for human tau, in live mice. We designed a tetracycline-regulated transgene construct in which the cDNA for human tau was fused to ubiquitin and to luciferase to create a single fusion polyprotein, termed TUL. When expressed in brain, the TUL polyprotein was cleaved by ubiquitin-processing enzymes to release the luciferase as an independent protein, separating the half-life of luciferase from the long-lived tau protein. Treatment of bigenic tTA/TUL mice with doxycycline produced rapid declines in luciferase levels visualized by in vivo imaging and ex vivo enzyme measurement. This new mouse model can be used as a discovery tool in optimizing gene targeting therapeutics directed to reduce human tau mRNA levels.

  18. Monitoring for potential adverse effects of prenatal gene therapy: mouse models for developmental aberrations and inadvertent germ line transmission.

    PubMed

    Coutelle, Charles; Waddington, Simon N; Themis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    So far no systematic studies have been conducted to investigate developmental aberrations after prenatal gene transfer in mice. Here, we suggest procedures for such observations to be applied, tested and improved in further in utero gene therapy experiments. They are based on our own experience in husbandry for transgenic human diseases mouse models and breading, rearing, and observing mice after fetal gene transfer as well as on the systematic screens for monitoring of knock-out mutant mouse phenotypes established in international mutagenesis projects (EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC and subsequently the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium). We also describe here the analysis procedures for detection of germ line mutations based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) by sperm-DNA analysis and breeding studies.

  19. Identification of the Rage-dependent gene regulatory network in a mouse model of skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the past, molecular mechanisms that drive the initiation of an inflammatory response have been studied intensively. However, corresponding mechanisms that sustain the expression of inflammatory response genes and hence contribute to the establishment of chronic disorders remain poorly understood. Recently, we provided genetic evidence that signaling via the receptor for advanced glycation end products (Rage) drives the strength and maintenance of an inflammatory reaction. In order to decipher the mode of Rage function on gene transcription levels during inflammation, we applied global gene expression profiling on time-resolved samples of mouse back skin, which had been treated with the phorbol ester TPA, a potent inducer of skin inflammation. Results Ranking of TPA-regulated genes according to their time average mean and peak expression and superimposition of data sets from wild-type (wt) and Rage-deficient mice revealed that Rage signaling is not essential for initial changes in TPA-induced transcription, but absolutely required for sustained alterations in transcript levels. Next, we used a data set of differentially expressed genes between TPA-treated wt and Rage-deficient skin and performed computational analysis of their proximal promoter regions. We found a highly significant enrichment for several transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) leading to the prediction that corresponding transcription factors, such as Sp1, Tcfap2, E2f, Myc and Egr, are regulated by Rage signaling. Accordingly, we could confirm aberrant expression and regulation of members of the E2f protein family in epidermal keratinocytes of Rage-deficient mice. Conclusions In summary, our data support the model that engagement of Rage converts a transient cellular stimulation into sustained cellular dysfunction and highlight a novel role of the Rb-E2f pathway in Rage-dependent inflammation during pathological conditions. PMID:20923549

  20. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  1. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  2. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations. PMID:26795484

  3. Aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and gene expression in a mouse model of RASopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Pina-Fernández, Eneko; Marini, Claudia; Santos, Monica; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Stork, Oliver; Zenker, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by reduced growth, craniofacial abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and variable cognitive deficits. NS belongs to the RASopathies, genetic conditions linked to mutations in components and regulators of the Ras signaling pathway. Approximately 50% of NS cases are caused by mutations in PTPN11. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments in NS patients are still poorly understood. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a new conditional mouse strain that expresses the overactive Ptpn11D61Y allele only in the forebrain. Unlike mice with a global expression of this mutation, this strain is viable and without severe systemic phenotype, but shows lower exploratory activity and reduced memory specificity, which is in line with a causal role of disturbed neuronal Ptpn11 signaling in the development of NS-linked cognitive deficits. To explore the underlying mechanisms we investigated the neuronal activity-regulated Ras signaling in brains and neuronal cultures derived from this model. We observed an altered surface expression and trafficking of synaptic glutamate receptors, which are crucial for hippocampal neuronal plasticity. Furthermore, we show that the neuronal activity-induced ERK signaling, as well as the consecutive regulation of gene expression are strongly perturbed. Microarray-based hippocampal gene expression profiling revealed profound differences in the basal state and upon stimulation of neuronal activity. The neuronal activity-dependent gene regulation was strongly attenuated in Ptpn11D61Y neurons. In silico analysis of functional networks revealed changes in the cellular signaling beyond the dysregulation of Ras/MAPK signaling that is nearly exclusively discussed in the context of NS at present. Importantly, changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and JAK/STAT signaling were experimentally confirmed. In summary, this study uncovers aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and regulation

  4. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  5. Renal Anemia Model Mouse Established by Transgenic Rescue with an Erythropoietin Gene Lacking Kidney-Specific Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Suzuki, Norio; Yamazaki, Shun; Sekine, Hiroki; Minegishi, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The erythropoietin (Epo) gene is under tissue-specific inducible regulation. Because the kidney is the primary EPO-producing tissue in adults, impaired EPO production in chronic kidney disorders results in serious renal anemia. The Epo gene contains a liver-specific enhancer in the 3′ region, but the kidney-specific enhancer for gene expression in renal EPO-producing (REP) cells remains elusive. Here, we examined a conserved upstream element for renal Epo regulation (CURE) region that spans 17.4 kb to 3.6 kb upstream of the Epo gene and harbors several phylogenetically conserved elements. We prepared various Epo gene-reporter constructs utilizing a bacterial artificial chromosome and generated a number of transgenic-mouse lines. We observed that deletion of the CURE region (δCURE) abrogated Epo gene expression in REP cells. Although transgenic expression of the δCURE construct rescued Epo-deficient mice from embryonic lethality, the rescued mice had severe EPO-dependent anemia. These mouse lines serve as an elaborate model for the search for erythroid stimulatory activity and are referred to as AnRED (anemic model with renal EPO deficiency) mice. We also dissected the CURE region by exploiting a minigene harboring four phylogenetically conserved elements in reporter transgenic-mouse analyses. Our analyses revealed that Epo gene regulation in REP cells is a complex process that utilizes multiple regulatory influences. PMID:27920250

  6. Renal Anemia Model Mouse Established by Transgenic Rescue with an Erythropoietin Gene Lacking Kidney-Specific Regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo; Suzuki, Norio; Yamazaki, Shun; Sekine, Hiroki; Minegishi, Naoko; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2017-02-15

    The erythropoietin (Epo) gene is under tissue-specific inducible regulation. Because the kidney is the primary EPO-producing tissue in adults, impaired EPO production in chronic kidney disorders results in serious renal anemia. The Epo gene contains a liver-specific enhancer in the 3' region, but the kidney-specific enhancer for gene expression in renal EPO-producing (REP) cells remains elusive. Here, we examined a conserved upstream element for renal Epo regulation (CURE) region that spans 17.4 kb to 3.6 kb upstream of the Epo gene and harbors several phylogenetically conserved elements. We prepared various Epo gene-reporter constructs utilizing a bacterial artificial chromosome and generated a number of transgenic-mouse lines. We observed that deletion of the CURE region (δCURE) abrogated Epo gene expression in REP cells. Although transgenic expression of the δCURE construct rescued Epo-deficient mice from embryonic lethality, the rescued mice had severe EPO-dependent anemia. These mouse lines serve as an elaborate model for the search for erythroid stimulatory activity and are referred to as AnRED (anemic model with renal EPO deficiency) mice. We also dissected the CURE region by exploiting a minigene harboring four phylogenetically conserved elements in reporter transgenic-mouse analyses. Our analyses revealed that Epo gene regulation in REP cells is a complex process that utilizes multiple regulatory influences.

  7. Gene therapy by allele selection in a mouse model of beta-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Sigrid; Leu, N Adrian; Yanchik, Ashley; Hatada, Seigo; Kyba, Michael; McLaughlin, K John

    2011-02-01

    To be of therapeutic use, autologous stem cells derived from patients with inherited genetic disorders require genetic modification via gene repair or insertion. Here, we present proof of principle that, for diseases associated with dominant alleles (gain-of-function or haploinsufficient loss-of-function), disease allele–free ES cells can be derived from afflicted individuals without genome manipulation. This approach capitalizes on the derivation of uniparental cells, such as parthenogenetic (PG) ES cell lines from disease allele–free gametes. Diploid mammalian uniparental embryos with only maternally (oocyte-) or paternally (sperm-)derived genomes fail early in development due to the nonequivalence of parental genomes caused by genomic imprinting. However, these uniparental embryos develop to the blastocyst stage, allowing the derivation of ES cell lines. Using a mouse model for dominant beta-thalassemia, we developed disease allele–free PG ES cell lines from the oocytes of affected animals. Phenotype correction was obtained in donor-genotype recipients after transplantation of in vitro hematopoietic ES cell derivatives. This genetic correction strategy without gene targeting is potentially applicable to any dominant disease. It could also be the sole approach for larger or more complex mutations that cannot be corrected by homologous recombination.

  8. Altered gene expression profile in a mouse model of SCN8A encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sprissler, Ryan S; Wagnon, Jacy L; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K; Meisler, Miriam H; Hammer, Michael F

    2017-02-01

    SCN8A encephalopathy is a severe, early-onset epilepsy disorder resulting from de novo gain-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.6. To identify the effects of this disorder on mRNA expression, RNA-seq was performed on brain tissue from a knock-in mouse expressing the patient mutation p.Asn1768Asp (N1768D). RNA was isolated from forebrain, cerebellum, and brainstem both before and after seizure onset, and from age-matched wildtype littermates. Altered transcript profiles were observed only in forebrain and only after seizures. The abundance of 50 transcripts increased more than 3-fold and 15 transcripts decreased more than 3-fold after seizures. The elevated transcripts included two anti-convulsant neuropeptides and more than a dozen genes involved in reactive astrocytosis and response to neuronal damage. There was no change in the level of transcripts encoding other voltage-gated sodium, potassium or calcium channels. Reactive astrocytosis was observed in the hippocampus of mutant mice after seizures. There is considerable overlap between the genes affected in this genetic model of epilepsy and those altered by chemically induced seizures, traumatic brain injury, ischemia, and inflammation. The data support the view that gain-of-function mutations of SCN8A lead to pathogenic alterations in brain function contributing to encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective atonal gene delivery improves balance function in a mouse model of vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, C; Praetorius, M; Brough, D E; Presler, R G; Hsu, C; Plinkert, P K; Staecker, H

    2011-09-01

    Loss of balance is often due to loss of vestibular hair cells. In mammals, regeneration of functional hair cells in the mature sensory epithelium is limited; therefore, loss of sensory cells can lead to debilitating balance problems. Delivery of the transcription factor atonal (atoh1) after aminoglycoside ototoxicity has previously been shown to induce the transdifferentiation of supporting cells into new hair cells and restore function. A problem with mouse aminoglycoside models is that the partial loss of hair cells seen in human disease is difficult to establish consistently. To more closely mirror human clinical balance dysfunction, we have used systemic application of 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN), a vestibulotoxic nitrile compound known to cause vestibular hair cell loss, to induce a consistent partial loss of vestibular hair cells. To determine if balance function could be restored, we delivered atoh1 using a new adenovirus vector, based on Ad28. The Ad28 adenovector is based on a human serotype with a low seroprevalence that appears to target gene delivery to vestibular supporting cells. To further provide cell type selectivity of gene delivery, we expressed atoh1 using the supporting cell-specific glial fibrillary acid protein promoter. Delivery of this vector to IDPN-damaged vestibular organs resulted in a significant recovery of vestibular hair cells and restoration of balance, as measured by time on rotarod compared with untreated controls.

  10. Selective atonal gene delivery improves balance function in a mouse model of vestibular disease

    PubMed Central

    Schlecker, Christina; Praetorius, Mark; Brough, Douglas E.; Presler, Robert G.; Hsu, Chi; Plinkert, Peter K.; Staecker, Hinrich

    2011-01-01

    Loss of balance is often due to loss of vestibular hair cells. In mammals, regeneration of functional hair cells in the mature sensory epithelium is limited; therefore, loss of sensory cells can lead to debilitating balance problems. Delivery of the transcription factor atonal (atoh1) after aminoglycoside ototoxicity has previously been shown to induce the transdifferentiation of supporting cells into new hair cells and restore function. A problem with mouse aminoglycoside models is that the partial loss of hair cells seen in human disease is difficult to establish consistently. In order to more closely mirror human clinical balance dysfunction, we have used systemic application of 3,3’-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN), a vestibulotoxic nitrile compound known to cause vestibular hair cell loss, to induce a consistent partial loss of vestibular hair cells. To determine if balance function could be restored we delivered atoh1 using a new adenovirus vector based on Ad28. The Ad28 adenovector is based on a human serotype with a low seroprevalence that appears to target gene delivery to vestibular supporting cells. In order to further provide cell type selectivity of gene delivery, we expressed atoh1 using the supporting cell specific glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) promoter. Delivery of this vector to IDPN-damaged vestibular organs resulted in a significant recovery of vestibular hair cells and restoration of balance as measured by time on rotarod compared to untreated controls. PMID:21472006

  11. Gene therapy based on interleukin-12 loaded chitosan nanoparticles in a mouse model of fibrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Soofiyani, Saiedeh Razi; Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Hosseini, Akbar Mohammad; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Interleukin-12 (IL-12) as a cytokine has been proved to have a critical role in stimulating the immune system and has been used as immunotherapeutic agents in cancer gene therapy. Chitosan as a polymer, with high ability of binding to nucleic acids is a good candidate for gene delivery since it is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-allergenic polysaccharide. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cells transfected with IL-12 loaded chitosan nanoparticles on the regression of fibrosarcoma tumor cells (WEHI-164) in vivo. Materials and Methods: WEHI-164 tumor cells were transfected with IL-12 loaded chitosan nanoparticles and then were injected subcutaneously to inoculate tumor in BALB/c mice. Tumor volumes were determined and subsequently extracted after mice sacrifice. The immunohistochemistry staining was performed for analysis of Ki-67 expression (a tumor proliferation marker) in tumor masses. The expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ were studied using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Results: The group treated with IL-12 loaded chitosan nanoparticles indicated decreasing of tumor mass[r1] volume (P<0.001). The results of western blotting and real-time PCR showed that the IL-12 expression was increased in the group. Immunohistochemistry staining indicated that the Ki-67expression was reduced in the group treated with IL-12 loaded chitosan nanoparticles. Conclusion: IL-12 gene therapy using chitosan nanoparticles has therapeutic effects on the regression of tumor masses in fibrosarcoma mouse model. PMID:27917281

  12. Postnatal growth restriction and gene expression changes in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaminen-Ahola, Nina; Ahola, Arttu; Flatscher-Bader, Traute; Wilkins, Sarah J; Anderson, Greg J; Whitelaw, Emma; Chong, Suyinn

    2010-10-01

    Growth restriction, craniofacial dysmorphology, and central nervous system defects are the main diagnostic features of fetal alcohol syndrome. Studies in humans and mice have reported that the growth restriction can be prenatal or postnatal, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown.We recently described a mouse model of moderate gestational ethanol exposure that produces measurable phenotypes in line with fetal alcohol syndrome (e.g., craniofacial changes and growth restriction in adolescent mice). In this study, we characterize in detail the growth restriction phenotype by measuring body weight at gestational day 16.5, cross-fostering from birth to weaning, and by extending our observations into adulthood. Furthermore, in an attempt to unravel the molecular events contributing to the growth phenotype, we have compared gene expression patterns in the liver and kidney of nonfostered, ethanol-exposed and control mice at postnatal day 28.We find that the ethanol-induced growth phenotype is not detectable prior to birth, but is present at weaning, even in mice that have been cross-fostered to unexposed dams. This finding suggests a postnatal growth restriction phenotype that is not due to deficient postpartum care by dams that drank ethanol, but rather a physiologic result of ethanol exposure in utero. We also find that, despite some catch-up growth after 5 weeks of age, the effect extends into adulthood, which is consistent with longitudinal studies in humans.Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed interesting ethanol-induced changes in the liver, including genes involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds, iron homeostasis, and lipid metabolism.

  13. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  14. A conditional mouse model for measuring the frequency of homologous recombination events in vivo in the absence of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Claybon, Alison B; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2011-09-01

    The ability to detect and repair DNA damage is crucial to the prevention of various diseases. Loss of function of genes involved in these processes is known to result in significant developmental defects and/or predisposition to cancer. One such DNA repair mechanism, homologous recombination, has the capacity to repair a wide variety of lesions. Knockout mouse models of genes thought to be involved in DNA repair processes are frequently lethal, making in vivo studies very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, we set out to develop an in vivo conditional mouse model system to facilitate investigations into the involvement of essential genes in homologous recombination. To test our model, we measured the frequency of spontaneous homologous recombination using the pink-eyed unstable mouse model, in which we conditionally excised either Blm or full-length Brca1 (breast cancer 1, early onset). These two genes are hypothesized to have opposing roles in homologous recombination. In summary, our in vivo data supports in vitro studies suggesting that BLM suppresses homologous recombination, while full-length BRCA1 promotes this process.

  15. Differential Hippocampal Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis in an Etiology-Based Mouse Model of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zubenko, George S.; Hughes, Hugh B.; Jordan, Rick M.; Lyons-Weiler, James; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported the creation and initial characterization of an etiology-based recombinant mouse model of a severe and inherited form of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This was achieved by replacing the corresponding mouse DNA sequence witha6-base DNA sequence from the human CREB1promoterthat is associated with MDD in individuals from families with recurrent, early-onset MDD (RE-MDD). In the current study, we explored the effect of the pathogenic Creb1 allele on gene expression in the mouse hippocampus, a brain region that is altered in structure and function in MDD. Mouse whole-genome profiling was performed using the Illumina MouseWG-6 v2.0 Expression BeadChip microarray. Univariate analysis identified 269 differentially-expressed genes in the hippocampus of the mutant mouse. Pathway analyses highlighted 11 KEGG pathways: the phosphatidylinositol signaling system, which has been widely implicated in MDD, Bipolar Disorder, and the action of mood stabilizers; gap junction and long-term potentiation, which mediate cognition and memory functions often impaired in MDD; cardiac muscle contraction, insulin signaling pathway, and three neurodegenerative brain disorders (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s Diseases) that are associated with MDD; ribosome and proteasome pathways affecting protein synthesis/degradation; and the oxidative phosphorylation pathway that is key to energy production. These findings illustrate the merit of this congenic C57BL/6 recombinant mouse as a model of RE-MDD, and demonstrate its potential for highlighting molecular and cellular pathways that contribute to the biology of MDD. The results also inform our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the comorbidity of MDD with other disorders. PMID:25059218

  16. Risperidone and NAP protect cognition and normalize gene expression in a schizophrenia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Vaisburd, Sinaya; Shemer, Zeev; Yeheskel, Adva; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2015-01-01

    Mutated disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a microtubule regulating protein, leads to schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. It is hypothesized that microtubule stabilization may provide neuroprotection in schizophrenia. The NAP (NAPVSIPQ) sequence of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) contains the SxIP motif, microtubule end binding (EB) protein target, which is critical for microtubule dynamics leading to synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Bioinformatics prediction for FDA approved drugs mimicking SxIP-like motif which displace NAP-EB binding identified Risperidone. Risperidone or NAP effectively ameliorated object recognition deficits in the mutated DISC1 mouse model. NAP but not Risperidone, reduced anxiety in the mutated mice. Doxycycline, which blocked the expression of the mutated DISC1, did not reverse the phenotype. Transcripts of Forkhead-BOX P2 (Foxp2), a gene regulating DISC1 and associated with human ability to acquire a spoken language, were increased in the hippocampus of the DISC1 mutated mice and were significantly lowered after treatment with NAP, Risperidone, or the combination of both. Thus, the combination of NAP and standard of care Risperidone in humans may protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:26553741

  17. Risperidone and NAP protect cognition and normalize gene expression in a schizophrenia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vaisburd, Sinaya; Shemer, Zeev; Yeheskel, Adva; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2015-11-10

    Mutated disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a microtubule regulating protein, leads to schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. It is hypothesized that microtubule stabilization may provide neuroprotection in schizophrenia. The NAP (NAPVSIPQ) sequence of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) contains the SxIP motif, microtubule end binding (EB) protein target, which is critical for microtubule dynamics leading to synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Bioinformatics prediction for FDA approved drugs mimicking SxIP-like motif which displace NAP-EB binding identified Risperidone. Risperidone or NAP effectively ameliorated object recognition deficits in the mutated DISC1 mouse model. NAP but not Risperidone, reduced anxiety in the mutated mice. Doxycycline, which blocked the expression of the mutated DISC1, did not reverse the phenotype. Transcripts of Forkhead-BOX P2 (Foxp2), a gene regulating DISC1 and associated with human ability to acquire a spoken language, were increased in the hippocampus of the DISC1 mutated mice and were significantly lowered after treatment with NAP, Risperidone, or the combination of both. Thus, the combination of NAP and standard of care Risperidone in humans may protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  18. Progranulin gene delivery reduces plaque burden and synaptic atrophy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Kay, Denis G

    2017-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a multifunctional protein that is widely expressed throughout the brain, where it has been shown to act as a critical regulator of CNS inflammation and also functions as an autocrine neuronal growth factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. PGRN has been shown to activate cell signaling pathways regulating excitoxicity, oxidative stress, and synaptogenesis, as well as amyloidogenesis. Together, these critical roles in the CNS suggest that PGRN has the potential to be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the leading cause of dementia and is marked by the appearance of extracellular plaques consisting of aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ), as well as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, neuronal loss and synaptic atrophy. The ability of PGRN to target multiple key features of AD pathophysiology suggests that enhancing its expression may benefit this disease. Here, we describe the application of PGRN gene transfer using in vivo delivery of lentiviral expression vectors in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene effectively enhanced PGRN expression in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. This elevated PGRN expression significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden in these mice, accompanied by reductions in markers of inflammation and synaptic atrophy. The overexpression of PGRN was also found to increase activity of neprilysin, a key amyloid beta degrading enzyme. PGRN regulation of neprilysin activity could play a major role in the observed alterations in plaque burden. Thus, PGRN may be an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  19. Catalytic immunoglobulin gene delivery in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: prophylactic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Kou, Jinghong; Yang, Junling; Lim, Jeong-Eun; Pattanayak, Abhinandan; Song, Min; Planque, Stephanie; Paul, Sudhir; Fukuchi, Ken-Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) in the brain is hypothesized to be a causal event leading to dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ vaccination removes Aβ deposits from the brain. Aβ immunotherapy, however, may cause T cell- and/or Fc-receptor-mediated brain inflammation and relocate parenchymal Aβ deposits to blood vessels leading to cerebral hemorrhages. Because catalytic antibodies do not form stable immune complexes and Aβ fragments produced by catalytic antibodies are less likely to form aggregates, Aβ-specific catalytic antibodies may have safer therapeutic profiles than reversibly-binding anti-Aβ antibodies. Additionally, catalytic antibodies may remove Aβ more efficiently than binding antibodies because a single catalytic antibody can hydrolyze thousands of Aβ molecules. We previously isolated Aβ-specific catalytic antibody, IgVL5D3, with strong Aβ-hydrolyzing activity. Here, we evaluated the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of brain-targeted IgVL5D3 gene delivery via recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (rAAV9) in an AD mouse model. One single injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 into the right ventricle of AD model mice yielded widespread, high expression of IgVL5D3 in the unilateral hemisphere. IgVL5D3 expression was readily detectable in the contralateral hemisphere but to a much lesser extent. IgVL5D3 expression was also confirmed in the cerebrospinal fluid. Prophylactic and therapeutic injection of rAAV9-IgVL5D3 reduced Aβ load in the ipsilateral hippocampus of AD model mice. No evidence of hemorrhages, increased vascular amyloid deposits, increased proinflammatory cytokines, or infiltrating T-cells in the brains was found in the experimental animals. AAV9-mediated anti-Aβ catalytic antibody brain delivery can be prophylactic and therapeutic options for AD.

  20. Detection of novel skeletogenesis target genes by comprehensive analysis of a Runx2(-/-) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hecht, J; Seitz, V; Urban, M; Wagner, F; Robinson, P N; Stiege, A; Dieterich, C; Kornak, U; Wilkening, U; Brieske, N; Zwingman, C; Kidess, A; Stricker, S; Mundlos, S

    2007-01-01

    Runx2 is an essential factor for skeletogenesis and heterozygous loss causes cleidocranial dysplasia in humans and a corresponding phenotype in the mouse. Homozygous Runx2-deficient mice lack hypertrophic cartilage and bone. We compared the expression profiles of E14.5 wildtype and Runx2(-/-) murine embryonal humeri to identify new transcripts potentially involved in cartilage and bone development. Seventy-one differentially expressed genes were identified by two independent oligonucleotide-microarray hybridizations and quantitative RT-PCR experiments. Gene Ontology analysis demonstrated an enrichment of the differentially regulated genes in annotations to terms such as extracellular, skeletal development, and ossification. In situ hybridization on E15.5 limb sections was performed for all 71 differentially regulated genes. For 54 genes conclusive in situ hybridization results were obtained and all of them showed skeletal expression. Co-expression with Runx2 was demonstrated for 44 genes. While 41 of the 71 differentially expressed genes have a known role in bone and cartilage, we identified 21 known genes that have not yet been implicated in skeletal development and 9 entirely new transcripts. Expression in the developing skeleton was demonstrated for 21 of these genes.

  1. Generation of gene-targeted mice using embryonic stem cells derived from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kunio; Watanabe, Sayuri; Maeda, Ryouta; Takahashi, Hideki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    Gene-targeting technology using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has become the "gold standard" for analyzing gene functions and producing disease models. Recently, genetically modified mice with multiple mutations have increasingly been produced to study the interaction between proteins and polygenic diseases. However, introduction of an additional mutation into mice already harboring several mutations by conventional natural crossbreeding is an extremely time- and labor-intensive process. Moreover, to do so in mice with a complex genetic background, several years may be required if the genetic background is to be retained. Establishing ES cells from multiple-mutant mice, or disease-model mice with a complex genetic background, would offer a possible solution. Here, we report the establishment and characterization of novel ES cell lines from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD mouse, Oddo et al. in Neuron 39:409-421, 2003) harboring 3 mutated genes (APPswe, TauP301L, and PS1M146V) and a complex genetic background. Thirty blastocysts were cultured and 15 stable ES cell lines (male: 11; female: 4) obtained. By injecting these ES cells into diploid or tetraploid blastocysts, we generated germline-competent chimeras. Subsequently, we confirmed that F1 mice derived from these animals showed similar biochemical and behavioral characteristics to the original 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we introduced a gene-targeting vector into the ES cells and successfully obtained gene-targeted ES cells, which were then used to generate knockout mice for the targeted gene. These results suggest that the present methodology is effective for introducing an additional mutation into mice already harboring multiple mutated genes and/or a complex genetic background.

  2. A novel mouse model for Down syndrome that harbor a single copy of human artificial chromosome (HAC) carrying a limited number of genes from human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Sakai, Kosuke; Asakawa, Shuichi; Okazaki, Tsuneko; Kudoh, Jun; Ikeno, Masashi; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Down syndrome (DS), also known as Trisomy 21, is the most common chromosome aneuploidy in live-born children and displays a complicated symptom. To date, several kinds of mouse models have been generated to understand the molecular pathology of DS, yet the gene dosage effects and gene(s)-phenotype(s) correlation are not well understood. In this study, we established a novel method to generate a partial trisomy mice using the mouse ES cells that harbor a single copy of human artificial chromosome (HAC), into which a small human DNA segment containing human chromosome 21 genes cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was recombined. The produced mice were found to maintain the HAC carrying human genes as a mini-chromosome, hence termed as a Trans-Mini-Chromosomal (TMC) mouse, and HAC was transmitted for more than twenty generations independent from endogenous mouse chromosomes. The three human transgenes including cystathionine β-synthase, U2 auxiliary factor and crystalline alpha A were expressed in several mouse tissues with various expression levels relative to mouse endogenous genes. The novel system is applicable to any of human and/or mouse BAC clones. Thus, the TMC mouse carrying a HAC with a limited number of genes would provide a novel tool for studying gene dosage effects involved in the DS molecular pathogenesis and the gene(s)-phenotype(s) correlation.

  3. Mouse models for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hafezparast, Majid; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Wood, Nicholas W; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2002-08-01

    The mouse has many advantages over human beings for the study of genetics, including the unique property that genetic manipulation can be routinely carried out in the mouse genome. Most importantly, mice and human beings share the same mammalian genes, have many similar biochemical pathways, and have the same diseases. In the minority of cases where these features do not apply, we can still often gain new insights into mouse and human biology. In addition to existing mouse models, several major programmes have been set up to generate new mouse models of disease. Alongside these efforts are new initiatives for the clinical, behavioural, and physiological testing of mice. Molecular genetics has had a major influence on our understanding of the causes of neurological disorders in human beings, and much of this has come from work in mice.

  4. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Katja U; Glaser, Anne; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Scholl, Isabell; Röth, Ralph; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Karperien, Marcel; Marchini, Antonio; Richter, Wiltrud; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX)). SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX), however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development.

  5. Consequences of the loss of the Grainyhead-like 1 gene for renal gene expression, regulation of blood pressure and heart rate in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Magdalena; Walkowska, Agnieszka; Mlącki, Michał; Pistolic, Jelena; Wrzesiński, Tomasz; Benes, Vladimir; Jane, Stephen M; Wesoły, Joanna; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elżbieta; Wilanowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The Grainyhead-like 1 (GRHL1) transcription factor is tissue-specific and is very highly expressed in the kidney. In humans the GRHL1 gene is located at the chromosomal position 2p25. A locus conferring increased susceptibility to essential hypertension has been mapped to 2p25 in two independent studies, but the causative gene has never been identified. Furthermore, a statistically significant association has been found between a polymorphism in the GRHL1 gene and heart rate regulation. The aim of our study was to investigate the physiological consequences of Grhl1 loss in a mouse model and ascertain whether Grhl1 may be involved in the regulation of blood pressure and heart rate. In our research we employed the Grhl1 "knock-out" mouse strain. We analyzed renal gene expression, blood pressure and heart rate in the Grhl1-null mice in comparison with their "wild-type" littermate controls. Most important results: The expression of many genes is altered in the Grhl1(-/-) kidneys. Some of these genes have previously been linked to blood pressure regulation. Despite this, the Grhl1-null mice have normal blood pressure and interestingly, increased heart rate. Our work did not discover any new evidence to suggest any involvement of Grhl1 in blood pressure regulation. However, we determined that the loss of Grhl1 influences the regulation of heart rate in a mouse model.

  6. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  7. A new mouse model for infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, inad mouse, maps to mouse chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Kikuchi, Tateki; Kikuchi, Hisae; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Ishikawa, Akira; Ishijima, Yasushi; Tachibana, Masayoshi

    2005-02-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary neurodegenerative disease of humans. So far, no responsible gene has been cloned or mapped to any chromosome. For chromosome mapping and positional cloning of the responsible gene, establishment of an animal model would be useful. Here we describe a new mouse model for INAD, named inad mouse. In this mouse, the phenotype is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, symptoms occur in the infantile period, and the mouse dies before sexual maturity. Axonal dystrophic change appearing as spheroid bodies in central and peripheral nervous system was observed. These features more closely resembled human INAD than did those of the gad mouse, the traditional mouse model for INAD. Linkage analysis linked the inad gene to mouse Chromosome 1, with the highest LOD score (=128.6) at the D1Mit45 marker, and haplotype study localized the inad gene to a 7.5-Mb region between D1Mit84 and D1Mit25. In this linkage area some 60 genes exist: Mutation of one of these 60 genes is likely responsible for the inad mouse phenotype. Our preliminary mutation analysis in 15 genes examining the nucleotide sequence of exons of these genes did not find any sequence difference between inad mouse and C57BL/6 mouse.

  8. Using the BLT humanized mouse as a stem cell based gene therapy tumor model.

    PubMed

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Bristol, Gregory C; Kim, Sohn G; Levin, Bernard; Liu, Wei; Radu, Caius G; Kitchen, Scott G; Zack, Jerome A

    2012-12-18

    Small animal models such as mice have been extensively used to study human disease and to develop new therapeutic interventions. Despite the wealth of information gained from these studies, the unique characteristics of mouse immunity as well as the species specificity of viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to the development of humanized mouse models. The earlier models involved the use of C. B 17 scid/scid mice and the transplantation of human fetal thymus and fetal liver termed thy/liv (SCID-hu) (1, 2) or the adoptive transfer of human peripheral blood leukocytes (SCID-huPBL) (3). Both models were mainly utilized for the study of HIV infection. One of the main limitations of both of these models was the lack of stable reconstitution of human immune cells in the periphery to make them a more physiologically relevant model to study HIV disease. To this end, the BLT humanized mouse model was developed. BLT stands for bone marrow/liver/thymus. In this model, 6 to 8 week old NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) immunocompromised mice receive the thy/liv implant as in the SCID-hu mouse model only to be followed by a second human hematopoietic stem cell transplant (4). The advantage of this system is the full reconstitution of the human immune system in the periphery. This model has been used to study HIV infection and latency (5-8). We have generated a modified version of this model in which we use genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) to construct the thy/liv implant followed by injection of transduced autologous hHSC (7, 9). This approach results in the generation of genetically modified lineages. More importantly, we adapted this system to examine the potential of generating functional cytotoxic T cells (CTL) expressing a melanoma specific T cell receptor. Using this model we were able to assess the functionality of our transgenic CTL utilizing live positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to determine

  9. Using the BLT Humanized Mouse as a Stem Cell based Gene Therapy Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N.; Bristol, Gregory C.; Kim, Sohn G.; Levin, Bernard; Liu, Wei; Radu, Caius G.; Kitchen, Scott G.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    Small animal models such as mice have been extensively used to study human disease and to develop new therapeutic interventions. Despite the wealth of information gained from these studies, the unique characteristics of mouse immunity as well as the species specificity of viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to the development of humanized mouse models. The earlier models involved the use of C. B 17 scid/scid mice and the transplantation of human fetal thymus and fetal liver termed thy/liv (SCID-hu) 1, 2 or the adoptive transfer of human peripheral blood leukocytes (SCID-huPBL) 3. Both models were mainly utilized for the study of HIV infection. One of the main limitations of both of these models was the lack of stable reconstitution of human immune cells in the periphery to make them a more physiologically relevant model to study HIV disease. To this end, the BLT humanized mouse model was developed. BLT stands for bone marrow/liver/thymus. In this model, 6 to 8 week old NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) immunocompromised mice receive the thy/liv implant as in the SCID-hu mouse model only to be followed by a second human hematopoietic stem cell transplant 4. The advantage of this system is the full reconstitution of the human immune system in the periphery. This model has been used to study HIV infection and latency 5-8. We have generated a modified version of this model in which we use genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) to construct the thy/liv implant followed by injection of transduced autologous hHSC 7, 9. This approach results in the generation of genetically modified lineages. More importantly, we adapted this system to examine the potential of generating functional cytotoxic T cells (CTL) expressing a melanoma specific T cell receptor. Using this model we were able to assess the functionality of our transgenic CTL utilizing live positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to determine tumor

  10. Knockdown of ROS1 gene sensitizes breast tumor growth to doxorubicin in a syngeneic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tiash, Snigdha; Chua, Ming Jang; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of breast cancer, the second leading cause of female deaths worldwide, with classical drugs is often accompanied by treatment failure and relapse of disease condition. Development of chemoresistance and drug toxicity compels compromising the drug concentration below the threshold level with the consequence of therapeutic inefficacy. Moreover, amplification and over-activation of proto-oncogenes in tumor cells make the treatment more challenging. The oncogene, ROS1 which is highly expressed in diverse types of cancers including breast carcinoma, functions as a survival protein aiding cancer progression. Thus we speculated that selective silencing of ROS1 gene by carrier-mediated delivery of siRNA might sensitize the cancer cells to the classical drugs at a relatively low concentration. In this investigation we showed that intracellular delivery of c-ROS1-targeting siRNA using pH-sensitive inorganic nanoparticles of carbonate apatite sensitizes mouse breast cancer cells (4T1) to doxorubicin, but not to cisplatin or paclitaxel, with the highest enhancement in chemosensitivity obtained at 40 nM of the drug concentration. Although intravenous administrations of ROS1-loaded nanoparticles reduced growth of the tumor, a further substantial effect on growth retardation was noted when the mice were treated with the siRNA- and Dox-bound particles, thus suggesting that silencing of ROS1 gene could sensitize the mouse breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo to doxorubicin as a result of synergistic effect of the gene knockdown and the drug action, eventually preventing activation of the survival pathway protein, AKT1. Our findings therefore provide valuable insight into the potential cross-talk between the pathways of ROS1 and doxorubicin for future development of effective therapeutics for breast cancer.

  11. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  12. Gene Profiles in a Smoke-Induced COPD Mouse Lung Model Following Treatment with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Sun; Kokturk, Nurdan; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Sei Won; Lim, Jaeyun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) effectively reduce airway inflammation and regenerate the alveolus in cigarette- and elastase-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) animal models. The effects of stem cells are thought to be paracrine and immune-modulatory because very few stem cells remain in the lung one day after their systemic injection, which has been demonstrated previously. In this report, we analyzed the gene expression profiles to compare mouse lungs with chronic exposure to cigarette smoke with non-exposed lungs. Gene expression profiling was also conducted in a mouse lung tissue with chronic exposure to cigarette smoke following the systemic injection of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hCB-MSCs). Globally, 834 genes were differentially expressed after systemic injection of hCB-MSCs. Seven and 21 genes, respectively, were up-and downregulated on days 1, 4, and 14 after HCB-MSC injection. The Hbb and Hba, genes with oxygen transport and antioxidant functions, were increased on days 1 and 14. A serine protease inhibitor was also increased at a similar time point after injection of hCB-MSCs. Gene Ontology analysis indicated that the levels of genes related to immune responses, metabolic processes, and blood vessel development were altered, indicating host responses after hCB-MSC injection. These gene expression changes suggest that MSCs induce a regeneration mechanism against COPD induced by cigarette smoke. These analyses provide basic data for understanding the regeneration mechanisms promoted by hCB-MSCs in cigarette smoke-induced COPD.

  13. Gene Profiles in a Smoke-Induced COPD Mouse Lung Model Following Treatment with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sun; Kokturk, Nurdan; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Sei Won; Lim, Jaeyun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) effectively reduce airway inflammation and regenerate the alveolus in cigarette- and elastase-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) animal models. The effects of stem cells are thought to be paracrine and immune-modulatory because very few stem cells remain in the lung one day after their systemic injection, which has been demonstrated previously. In this report, we analyzed the gene expression profiles to compare mouse lungs with chronic exposure to cigarette smoke with non-exposed lungs. Gene expression profiling was also conducted in a mouse lung tissue with chronic exposure to cigarette smoke following the systemic injection of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hCB-MSCs). Globally, 834 genes were differentially expressed after systemic injection of hCB-MSCs. Seven and 21 genes, respectively, were up-and downregulated on days 1, 4, and 14 after HCB-MSC injection. The Hbb and Hba, genes with oxygen transport and antioxidant functions, were increased on days 1 and 14. A serine protease inhibitor was also increased at a similar time point after injection of hCB-MSCs. Gene Ontology analysis indicated that the levels of genes related to immune responses, metabolic processes, and blood vessel development were altered, indicating host responses after hCB-MSC injection. These gene expression changes suggest that MSCs induce a regeneration mechanism against COPD induced by cigarette smoke. These analyses provide basic data for understanding the regeneration mechanisms promoted by hCB-MSCs in cigarette smoke-induced COPD. PMID:27802588

  14. Mouse Models of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    The pace of discovery in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has accelerated dramatically with the discovery of new genetic causes and pathological substrates of the disease. MAPT/Tau, GRN/progranulin, and C9ORF72 have emerged as common FTD genes, and TARDBP/TDP-43, VCP, FUS, and CHMP2B have been identified as less common genetic causes. TDP-43 and FUS have joined Tau as common neuropathological substrates of the disease. Mouse models provide an important tool for understanding the role of these molecules in FTD pathogenesis. Here, we review recent progress with mouse models based on Tau, TDP-43, progranulin, VCP, and CHMP2B. We also consider future prospects for FTD models, including developing new models to address unanswered questions. There are also opportunities for capitalizing on conservation of the salience network, which is selectively vulnerable in FTD, and the availability of FTD-related behavioral paradigms to analyze mouse models of the disease. PMID:23280835

  15. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) gene expression and replication by HBx gene silencing in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model with a new clone of HBV genotype B

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that different hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes may have distinct virological characteristics that correlate with clinical outcomes during antiviral therapy and the natural course of infection. Hydrodynamic injection (HI) of HBV in the mouse model is a useful tool for study of HBV replication in vivo. However, only HBV genotype A has been used for studies with HI. Methods We constructed 3 replication-competent clones containing 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 fold overlength of a HBV genotype B genome and tested them both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, A HBV genotype B clone based on the pAAV-MCS vector was constructed with the 1.3 fold HBV genome, resulting in the plasmid pAAV-HBV1.3B and tested by HI in C57BL/6 mice. Application of siRNA against HBx gene was tested in HBV genotype B HI mouse model. Results The 1.3 fold HBV clone showed higher replication and gene expression than the 1.1 and 1.2 fold HBV clones. Compared with pAAV-HBV1.2 (genotype A), the mice HI with pAAV-HBV1.3B showed higher HBsAg and HBeAg expression as well as HBV DNA replication level but a higher clearance rate. Application of two plasmids pSB-HBxi285 and pSR-HBxi285 expressing a small/short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the HBx gene in HBV genotype B HI mouse model, leading to an inhibition of HBV gene expression and replication. However, HBV gene expression may resume in some mice despite an initial delay, suggesting that transient suppression of HBV replication by siRNA may be insufficient to prevent viral spread, particularly if the gene silencing is not highly effective. Conclusions Taken together, the HI mouse model with a HBV genotype B genome was successfully established and showed different characteristics in vivo compared with the genotype A genome. The effectiveness of gene silencing against HBx gene determines whether HBV replication may be sustainably inhibited by siRNA in vivo. PMID:23805945

  16. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Brittany N.; Baldwin, Wallace H.; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Shafer-Weaver, Kimberly; Cox, Courtney; Jiang, Ping; Kanellopoulou, Chrysi; Lollar, Pete; Meeks, Shannon L.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII, i.e. cross-reacting material (CRM), have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. Objectives We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8TKO strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Methods Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. Results All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8TKO mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8TKO mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8TKO and E16 mice. Conclusions We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice making it valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a defined genetic background. PMID:26588198

  17. Maternal Diet Modulates Placenta Growth and Gene Expression in a Mouse Model of Diabetic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Unfavorable maternal diet during pregnancy can predispose the offspring to diseases later in life, such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. However, the molecular basis for this phenomenon of “developmental programming” is poorly understood. We have recently shown that a diet nutritionally optimized for pregnancy can nevertheless be harmful in the context of diabetic pregnancy in the mouse, associated with a high incidence of neural tube defects and intrauterine growth restriction. We hypothesized that placental abnormalities may contribute to impaired fetal growth in these pregnancies, and therefore investigated the role of maternal diet in the placenta. LabDiet 5015 diet was associated with reduced placental growth, commencing at midgestation, when compared to pregnancies in which the diabetic dam was fed LabDiet 5001 maintenance chow. Furthermore, by quantitative RT-PCR we identify 34 genes whose expression in placenta at midgestation is modulated by diet, diabetes, or both, establishing biomarkers for gene-environment interactions in the placenta. These results implicate maternal diet as an important factor in pregnancy complications and suggest that the early phases of placenta development could be a critical time window for developmental origins of adult disease. PMID:22701643

  18. Maternal diet modulates placenta growth and gene expression in a mouse model of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Unfavorable maternal diet during pregnancy can predispose the offspring to diseases later in life, such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. However, the molecular basis for this phenomenon of "developmental programming" is poorly understood. We have recently shown that a diet nutritionally optimized for pregnancy can nevertheless be harmful in the context of diabetic pregnancy in the mouse, associated with a high incidence of neural tube defects and intrauterine growth restriction. We hypothesized that placental abnormalities may contribute to impaired fetal growth in these pregnancies, and therefore investigated the role of maternal diet in the placenta. LabDiet 5015 diet was associated with reduced placental growth, commencing at midgestation, when compared to pregnancies in which the diabetic dam was fed LabDiet 5001 maintenance chow. Furthermore, by quantitative RT-PCR we identify 34 genes whose expression in placenta at midgestation is modulated by diet, diabetes, or both, establishing biomarkers for gene-environment interactions in the placenta. These results implicate maternal diet as an important factor in pregnancy complications and suggest that the early phases of placenta development could be a critical time window for developmental origins of adult disease.

  19. Neuromuscular disease. DOK7 gene therapy benefits mouse models of diseases characterized by defects in the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Sumimasa; Okada, Takashi; Tezuka, Tohru; Chiyo, Tomoko; Kasahara, Yuko; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Motomura, Masakatsu; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Beeson, David; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2014-09-19

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the synapse between a motor neuron and skeletal muscle. Defects in NMJ transmission cause muscle weakness, termed myasthenia. The muscle protein Dok-7 is essential for activation of the receptor kinase MuSK, which governs NMJ formation, and DOK7 mutations underlie familial limb-girdle myasthenia (DOK7 myasthenia), a neuromuscular disease characterized by small NMJs. Here, we show in a mouse model of DOK7 myasthenia that therapeutic administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding the human DOK7 gene resulted in an enlargement of NMJs and substantial increases in muscle strength and life span. When applied to model mice of another neuromuscular disorder, autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, DOK7 gene therapy likewise resulted in enlargement of NMJs as well as positive effects on motor activity and life span. These results suggest that therapies aimed at enlarging the NMJ may be useful for a range of neuromuscular disorders.

  20. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  1. Normalizing the gene dosage of Dyrk1A in a mouse model of Down syndrome rescues several Alzheimer's disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    García-Cerro, Susana; Rueda, Noemí; Vidal, Verónica; Lantigua, Sara; Martínez-Cué, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    The intellectual disability that characterizes Down syndrome (DS) is primarily caused by prenatal changes in central nervous system growth and differentiation. However, in later life stages, the cognitive abilities of DS individuals progressively decline due to accelerated aging and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. The AD neuropathology in DS has been related to the overexpression of several genes encoded by Hsa21 including DYRK1A (dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A), which encodes a protein kinase that performs crucial functions in the regulation of multiple signaling pathways that contribute to normal brain development and adult brain physiology. Studies performed in vitro and in vivo in animal models overexpressing this gene have demonstrated that the DYRK1A gene also plays a crucial role in several neurodegenerative processes found in DS. The Ts65Dn (TS) mouse bears a partial triplication of several Hsa21 orthologous genes, including Dyrk1A, and replicates many DS-like abnormalities, including age-dependent cognitive decline, cholinergic neuron degeneration, increased levels of APP and Aβ, and tau hyperphosphorylation. To use a more direct approach to evaluate the role of the gene dosage of Dyrk1A on the neurodegenerative profile of this model, TS mice were crossed with Dyrk1A KO mice to obtain mice with a triplication of a segment of Mmu16 that includes this gene, mice that are trisomic for the same genes but only carry two copies of Dyrk1A, euploid mice with a normal Dyrk1A dosage, and CO animals with a single copy of Dyrk1A. Normalizing the gene dosage of Dyrk1A in the TS mouse rescued the density of senescent cells in the cingulate cortex, hippocampus and septum, prevented cholinergic neuron degeneration, and reduced App expression in the hippocampus, Aβ load in the cortex and hippocampus, the expression of phosphorylated tau at the Ser202 residue in the hippocampus and cerebellum and the levels of

  2. Somatic Therapy of a Mouse SMA Model with a U7 snRNA Gene Correcting SMN2 Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, Philipp; Trüb, Judith; Furrer, Lavinia; Fricker, Roger; Marti, Andreas; Schümperli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is due to the loss of SMN1 gene function. The duplicate gene SMN2 produces some, but not enough, SMN protein because most transcripts lack exon 7. Thus, promoting the inclusion of this exon is a therapeutic option. We show that a somatic gene therapy using the gene for a modified U7 RNA which stimulates this splicing has a profound and persistent therapeutic effect on the phenotype of a severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy mouse model. To this end, the U7 gene and vector and the production of pure, highly concentrated self-complementary (sc) adenovirus-associated virus 9 vector particles were optimized. Introduction of the functional vector into motoneurons of newborn Spinal Muscular Atrophy mice by intracerebroventricular injection led to a highly significant, dose-dependent increase in life span and improvement of muscle functions. Besides the central nervous system, the therapeutic U7 RNA was expressed in the heart and liver which may additionally have contributed to the observed therapeutic efficacy. This approach provides an additional therapeutic option for Spinal Muscular Atrophy and could also be adapted to treat other diseases of the central nervous system with regulatory small RNA genes. PMID:27456062

  3. Biological characterization of gene response in Rpe65-/- mouse model of Leber's congenital amaurosis during progression of the disease.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Sandra; Michaut, Lydia; Boisset, Gaëlle; Schlecht, Ulrich; Gehring, Walter; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2006-10-01

    RPE65 is the retinal isomerase essential for conversion of all-trans-retinyl ester to 11-cis-retinol in the visual cycle. Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), an autosomal recessive form of RP resulting in blindness, is commonly caused by mutations in the Rpe65 gene. Whereas the molecular mechanisms by which these mutations contribute to retinal disease remain largely unresolved, affected patients show marked RPE damage and photoreceptor degeneration. We evaluated gene expression in Rpe65-/- mouse model of LCA before and at the onset of photoreceptor cell death in 2, 4, and 6 month old animals. Microarray analysis demonstrates altered expression of genes involved in phototransduction, apoptosis regulation, cytoskeleton organization, and extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents. Cone-specific phototransduction genes are strongly decreased, reflecting early loss of cones. In addition, remaining rods show modified expression of genes encoding components of the cytoskeleton and ECM. This may affect rod physiology and interaction with the adjacent RPE and lead to loss of survival signals, as reflected by the alteration of apoptosis-related genes Together, these results suggest that RPE65 defect triggers an overall remodeling of the neurosensitive retina that may, in turn, disrupt photoreceptor homeostasis and induce apoptosis signaling cascade toward retinal cell death.

  4. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations. PMID:22035425

  5. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tortosa, Raül; Castells, Xavier; Vidal, Enric; Costa, Carme; Ruiz de Villa, María del Carmen; Sánchez, Alex; Barceló, Anna; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Ariño, Joaquín

    2011-10-28

    Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations.

  6. Gene expression profiling of liver metastases and tumour invasion in pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic SCID mouse model.

    PubMed

    Niedergethmann, M; Alves, F; Neff, J K; Heidrich, B; Aramin, N; Li, L; Pilarsky, C; Grützmann, R; Allgayer, H; Post, S; Gretz, N

    2007-11-19

    conclusion, model marker genes for local invasion and liver metastases can be identified using transcriptional profiling in the SCID mouse. Overrepresentation analysis secures a good and fast overview about the significantly regulated genes and can assign genes to certain pathways. These marker genes can be related to the apoptotic cascade, angiogenesis and cell interaction.

  7. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    PubMed

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  8. Gene therapy rescues disease phenotype in a spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Salani, Sabrina; Dametti, Sara; Rinchetti, Paola; Del Bo, Roberto; Foust, Kevin; Kaspar, Brian K.; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P.; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease affecting children. It is caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene (11q13) and presently has no cure. Recently, adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)–mediated gene therapy has been shown to rescue the phenotype of animal models of another lower motor neuron disorder, spinal muscular atrophy 5q, and a clinical trial with this strategy is ongoing. We report rescue of the disease phenotype in a SMARD1 mouse model after therapeutic delivery via systemic injection of an AAV9 construct encoding the wild-type IGHMBP2 to replace the defective gene. AAV9-IGHMBP2 administration restored protein levels and rescued motor function, neuromuscular physiology, and life span (450% increase), ameliorating pathological features in the central nervous system, muscles, and heart. To test this strategy in a human model, we transferred wild-type IGHMBP2 into human SMARD1-induced pluripotent stem cell–derived motor neurons; these cells exhibited increased survival and axonal length in long-term culture. Our data support the translational potential of AAV-mediated gene therapies for SMARD1, opening the door for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials. PMID:26601156

  9. Gene therapy rescues disease phenotype in a spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Salani, Sabrina; Dametti, Sara; Rinchetti, Paola; Del Bo, Roberto; Foust, Kevin; Kaspar, Brian K; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease affecting children. It is caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene (11q13) and presently has no cure. Recently, adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9)-mediated gene therapy has been shown to rescue the phenotype of animal models of another lower motor neuron disorder, spinal muscular atrophy 5q, and a clinical trial with this strategy is ongoing. We report rescue of the disease phenotype in a SMARD1 mouse model after therapeutic delivery via systemic injection of an AAV9 construct encoding the wild-type IGHMBP2 to replace the defective gene. AAV9-IGHMBP2 administration restored protein levels and rescued motor function, neuromuscular physiology, and life span (450% increase), ameliorating pathological features in the central nervous system, muscles, and heart. To test this strategy in a human model, we transferred wild-type IGHMBP2 into human SMARD1-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons; these cells exhibited increased survival and axonal length in long-term culture. Our data support the translational potential of AAV-mediated gene therapies for SMARD1, opening the door for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials.

  10. Expression profiles of proliferative and antiapoptotic genes in sporadic and colitis-related mouse colon cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Švec, Jiří; Ergang, Peter; Mandys, Václav; Kment, Milan; Pácha, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Elevated levels of survivin, telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT), integrin-linked kinase (ILK), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the regulatory factors c-MYB and Tcf-4 are often found in human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC) and have been implicated in the development and progression of tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of these genes in mouse models of sporadic and colitis-associated CRC. To address these issues, we used qRT-PCR approach to determine changes in gene expression patterns of neoplastic cells (high-grade dysplasia/intramucosal carcinoma) and surrounding normal epithelial cells in A/J and ICR mouse strains using laser microdissection. Both strains were injected with azoxymethane and ICR mice were also given drinking water that contained 2% dextran sodium sulphate. In both sporadic (A/J mice) and colitis-associated (ICR mice) models of CRC, the levels of TERT mRNA, COX-2 mRNA and Tcf-4 mRNA were higher in neoplastic cells than in surrounding normal epithelial cells. In contrast, survivin mRNA was upregulated only in neoplastic cells from A/J mice and ILK mRNA was upregulated only in neoplastic cells from ICR mice. However, the expression of iNOS mRNA was similar in normal and neoplastic cells in both models and c-MYB mRNA was actually downregulated in neoplastic cells compared with normal cells in both models. These findings suggest that the genetic background and/or the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis associated with genotoxic insults and colonic inflammation influence the gene expression of mTERT, COX-2, Tcf-4, c-MYB, ILK and survivin in colon epithelial neoplasia. PMID:20096072

  11. A novel transgenic mouse model produced from lentiviral germline integration for the study of beta-thalassemia gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xie, Shuyang; Guo, Xinbing; Gong, Xiuli; Wang, Shu; Lin, Dan; Zhang, Jingzhi; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Fanyi; Zeng, Yitao

    2008-03-01

    beta-thalassemia is one of the most common genetic diseases in the world and requires extensive therapy. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy has been successfully exploited in the treatment of beta-thalassemia and showed promise in clinical application. Using a human beta-globin transgenic mouse line in a beta-thalassemia diseased model generated with a lentiviral-mediated approach, we investigate the stable therapeutic effect on a common thalassemia syndrome. Human beta-globin gene lentiviral vector was constr ucted, followed by subzonal microinjection into single-cell embryos of beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mice to generate a transgenic line. Human beta-globin gene expression was examined with RT-PCR, Western-blotting and ELISA. The hematologic parameters and tissue pathology were investigated over time in founder mice and their off-spring. Transgenic mice with stable expression of the lentivirus carrying human beta-globin gene were obtained. A marked improvement in red blood cell indices and a dramatic reduction in red blood cell anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and target cells were observed. Nucleated cell proportion was greatly decreased in bone marrow, and splenomegaly with extramedullary hematopoiesis was ameliorated. Iron deposition in liver was also reduced. There was a two-fold increase in the survival rate of the beta(IVS-2-654) mice carrying human beta-globin transgene. Significantly, the germline integration of the lentiviral construct was obtained and stable hematologic phenotype correction was observed over the next two generations of the transgenic mice. The generation of human beta-globin transgenic mice in a beta(IVS-2-654)-thalassemia mouse mediated with lentiviral vectors provides a useful model and offers an attractive means to investigate the transgenic stable therapeutic effect in beta-thalassemia.

  12. Lentiviral Gene Transfer of Rpe65 Rescues Survival and Function of Cones in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Sylvain V; Hauswirth, William W; Lem, Janis; Munier, Francis L; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wenzel, Andreas; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    Background RPE65 is specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and is essential for the recycling of 11-cis-retinal, the chromophore of rod and cone opsins. In humans, mutations in RPE65 lead to Leber congenital amaurosis or early-onset retinal dystrophy, a severe form of retinitis pigmentosa. The proof of feasibility of gene therapy for RPE65 deficiency has already been established in a dog model of Leber congenital amaurosis, but rescue of the cone function, although crucial for human high-acuity vision, has never been strictly proven. In Rpe65 knockout mice, photoreceptors show a drastically reduced light sensitivity and are subject to degeneration, the cone photoreceptors being lost at early stages of the disease. In the present study, we address the question of whether application of a lentiviral vector expressing the Rpe65 mouse cDNA prevents cone degeneration and restores cone function in Rpe65 knockout mice. Methods and Findings Subretinal injection of the vector in Rpe65-deficient mice led to sustained expression of Rpe65 in the retinal pigment epithelium. Electroretinogram recordings showed that Rpe65 gene transfer restored retinal function to a near-normal pattern. We performed histological analyses using cone-specific markers and demonstrated that Rpe65 gene transfer completely prevented cone degeneration until at least four months, an age at which almost all cones have degenerated in the untreated Rpe65-deficient mouse. We established an algorithm that allows prediction of the cone-rescue area as a function of transgene expression, which should be a useful tool for future clinical trials. Finally, in mice deficient for both RPE65 and rod transducin, Rpe65 gene transfer restored cone function when applied at an early stage of the disease. Conclusions By demonstrating that lentivirus-mediated Rpe65 gene transfer protects and restores the function of cones in the Rpe65−/− mouse, this study reinforces the therapeutic value of gene therapy

  13. Mouse models for graft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingfeng; Yu, Luyang; Min, Wang

    2013-05-14

    genetic changes into the vessel donor, both models can be used to assess the effect of specific genes on GA progression. Here, we describe detailed protocols for our mouse GA models.

  14. Better understanding of mechanisms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: from human gene expression profiles to mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Sawa, Akira; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of major mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are unclear. To address this fundamental question, many groups have studied molecular expression profiles in postmortem brains and other tissues from patients compared with those from normal controls. Development of unbiased high-throughput approaches, such as microarray, RNA-seq, and proteomics, have supported and facilitated this endeavor. In addition to genes directly involved in neuron/glia signaling, especially those encoding for synaptic proteins, genes for metabolic cascades are differentially expressed in the brains of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, compared with those from normal controls in DNA microarray studies. Here we propose the importance and usefulness of genetic mouse models in which such differentially expressed molecules are modulated. These animal models allow us to dissect the mechanisms of how such molecular changes in patient brains may play a role in neuronal circuitries and overall behavioral phenotypes. We also point out that models in which the metabolic genes are modified are obviously untested from mental illness viewpoints, suggesting the potential to re-address these models with behavioral assays and neurochemical assessments.

  15. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  16. Epigenetic and gene expression alterations of FOXP3 in the T cells of EAE mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar

    2017-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease with demyelination and neurodegeneration of the central nervous system. It has been shown that the regulatory T (Treg) cells are responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigens and can suppress the autoimmune process in several animal models such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. Recent basic studies have demonstrated that forkhead box P (FOXP3) and BTB domain and CNC homolog 2 (BACH2) are the master transcription factors of these cells playing a pivotal role in the polarization of naïve T cells into Treg cells. In the current study, the expression of FOXP3 and BACH2 genes and FOXP3 promoter methylation were evaluated in T cells of the EAE-induced mice. The results of this study showed a prominent and significant hypermethylation of the FOXP3 gene promoter in the EAE-induced mice compared to the sham and control groups. The expression of FOXP3 and BACH2 genes was significantly decreased in the EAE group in comparison with the sham and control groups. This study suggests that the epigenetic modification of FOXP3 gene is involved in the pathogenesis of EAE and this could be important in therapy in an appropriate and logical statement.

  17. Mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Beuzard, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of a natural animal model for sickle cell disease, transgenic mouse models have been generated to better understand the complex pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate potential specific therapies. In the early nineties, the simple addition of human globin genes induced the expression of hemoglobin S (HbS) or HbS-related human hemoglobins in mice still expressing mouse hemoglobin. To increase the proportion of human hemoglobin and the severity of the mouse sickle cell syndrome, the proportion of mouse hemoglobin could be decreased by a combination of mouse alpha- and beta-thalassemic defects, leading to complex genotypes and mild disease. Following the discovery of gene targeting in the mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells), it was made possible to knock out all mouse adult globin genes (2alpha and 2beta) and to add the human homologous genes elsewhere in the mouse genome. In addition, the human gamma gene of fetal hemoglobin was protecting the fetus from HbS polymer formation. Accordingly, the resulting adult mouse models obtained in 1997, expressing human HbS-only, had a very severe anemia (Hb=5-6 g/dL). In order to survive, these "HbS-only mice" had to reduce the HbS concentration within the red blood cells. The phenotype could be less severe by adding modified human gamma genes, still expressed in adult mice. In 2006, a last "S-only" model was obtained by homologous knock in, replacing the mouse globin genes by human genes. This array of models contributes to better understand the role of different interacting factors in the complexity of sickle cell events, such as red cell defects, changes in blood flow and vaso-occlusion, hyperhemolysis, vascular tone dysregulation, oxidations, inflammation, activation and adhesion of cells, ischemia, reperfusion... In addition, each model has an appropriate usefulness to evaluate experimental therapies in vivo and to perform preclinical studies.

  18. Mouse models of human thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.F.; Martinell, J.; Whitney, J.B. III; Popp, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The group of diseases called the thalassemias is the largest single-gene health problem in the world according the World Health Organization. The thalassemias are lethal hereditary anemias in which the infants cannot make their own blood. Three mouse mutants are shown to be models of the human disease ..cap alpha..-thalassemia. However, since an additional gene is affected, these mutants represent a particularly severe condition in which death occurs in the homozygous embryo even before globin genes are activated. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics are described. (ACR)

  19. A transgenic mouse model of plasma cell malignancy shows phenotypic, cytogenetic, and gene expression heterogeneity similar to human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Kristin L M; Gosse, Mary A; Staggs, Sarah E; Janz, Siegfried; Grindle, Suzanne; Kansas, Geoffrey S; Van Ness, Brian G

    2007-05-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable plasma cell malignancy for which existing animal models are limited. We have previously shown that the targeted expression of the transgenes c-Myc and Bcl-X(L) in murine plasma cells produces malignancy that displays features of human myeloma, such as localization of tumor cells to the bone marrow and lytic bone lesions. We have isolated and characterized in vitro cultures and adoptive transfers of tumors from Bcl-xl/Myc transgenic mice. Tumors have a plasmablastic morphology and variable expression of CD138, CD45, CD38, and CD19. Spectral karyotyping analysis of metaphase chromosomes from primary tumor cell cultures shows that the Bcl-xl/Myc tumors contain a variety of chromosomal abnormalities, including trisomies, translocations, and deletions. The most frequently aberrant chromosomes are 12 and 16. Three sites for recurring translocations were also identified on chromosomes 4D, 12F, and 16C. Gene expression profiling was used to identify differences in gene expression between tumor cells and normal plasma cells (NPC) and to cluster the tumors into two groups (tumor groups C and D), with distinct gene expression profiles. Four hundred and ninety-five genes were significantly different between both tumor groups and NPCs, whereas 124 genes were uniquely different from NPCs in tumor group C and 204 genes were uniquely different from NPCs in tumor group D. Similar to human myeloma, the cyclin D genes are differentially dysregulated in the mouse tumor groups. These data suggest the Bcl-xl/Myc tumors are similar to a subset of plasmablastic human myelomas and provide insight into the specific genes and pathways underlying the human disease.

  20. Progranulin gene delivery protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Baranowski, David; Kay, Denis G

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia/bradykinesia resulting from the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. To date, only symptomatic treatment is available for PD patients, with no effective means of slowing or stopping the progression of the disease. Progranulin (PGRN) is a 593 amino acid multifunction protein that is widely distributed throughout the CNS, localized primarily in neurons and microglia. PGRN has been demonstrated to be a potent regulator of neuroinflammation and also acts as an autocrine neurotrophic factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. Thus, enhancing PGRN expression may strengthen the cells resistance to disease. In the present study, we have used the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD to investigate the possible use of PGRN gene delivery as a therapy for the prevention or treatment of PD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene was an effective means of elevating PGRN expression in nigrostriatal neurons. When PGRN expression was elevated in the SNC, nigrostriatal neurons were protected from MPTP toxicity in mice, along with a preservation of striatal dopamine content and turnover. Further, protection of nigrostriatal neurons by PGRN gene therapy was accompanied by reductions in markers of MPTP-induced inflammation and apoptosis as well as a complete preservation of locomotor function. We conclude that PGRN gene therapy may have beneficial effects in the treatment of PD.

  1. The RUNX Genes as Conditional Oncogenes: Insights from Retroviral Targeting and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Neil, James C; Gilroy, Kathryn; Borland, Gillian; Hay, Jodie; Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The observation that the Runx genes act as targets for transcriptional activation by retroviral insertion identified a new family of dominant oncogenes. However, it is now clear that Runx genes are 'conditional' oncogenes whose over-expression is growth inhibitory unless accompanied by another event such as concomitant over-expression of MYC or loss of p53 function. Remarkably, while the oncogenic activities of either MYC or RUNX over-expression are suppressed while p53 is intact, the combination of both neutralises p53 tumour suppression in vivo by as yet unknown mechanisms. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that endogenous, basal RUNX activity is important to maintain the viability and proliferation of MYC-driven lymphoma cells. There is also growing evidence that the human RUNX genes play a similar conditional oncogenic role and are selected for over-expression in end-stage cancers of multiple types. Paradoxically, reduced RUNX activity can also predispose to cell immortalisation and transformation, particularly by mutant Ras. These apparently conflicting observations may be reconciled in a stage-specific model of RUNX involvement in cancer. A question that has yet to be fully addressed is the extent to which the three Runx genes are functionally redundant in cancer promotion and suppression.

  2. Differential proteomics and functional research following gene therapy in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinxiang; Ren, Yueping; Tzekov, Radouil; Zhang, Yuanping; Chen, Bo; Hou, Jiangping; Zhao, Chunhui; Zhu, Jiali; Zhang, Ying; Dai, Xufeng; Ma, Shan; Li, Jia; Pang, Jijing; Qu, Jia; Li, Wensheng

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe forms of inherited retinal degeneration and can be caused by mutations in at least 15 different genes. To clarify the proteomic differences in LCA eyes, a cohort of retinal degeneration 12 (rd12) mice, an LCA2 model caused by a mutation in the RPE65 gene, were injected subretinally with an AAV vector (scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65) in one eye, while the contralateral eye served as a control. Proteomics were compared between untreated rd12 and normal control retinas on P14 and P21, and among treated and untreated rd12 retinas and control retinas on P42. Gene therapy in rd12 mice restored retinal function in treated eyes, which was demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG). Proteomic analysis successfully identified 39 proteins expressed differently among the 3 groups. The expression of 3 proteins involved in regulation of apoptosis and neuroptotection (alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6) were investigated further. Immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time PCR confirmed the quantitative changes in their expression. Furthermore, cell culture studies suggested that peroxiredoxin 6 could act in an antioxidant role in rd12 mice. Our findings support the feasibility of gene therapy in LCA2 patients and support a role for alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6 in the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in LCA2 disease process.

  3. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice.

  4. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Mitchell E.; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K.; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C.; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J.; Subler, Mark A.; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor “bystander” effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice. PMID:26474456

  5. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  6. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Khan, Naheed W.; Cukras, Catherine A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M.; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-01-01

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5+/−) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5+/−mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies. PMID:21349921

  7. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Venkata R M; Khan, Naheed W; Cukras, Catherine A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-05-15

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5(+/-)) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5(+/-) mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies.

  8. A comparative transcriptome analysis identifying FGF23 regulated genes in the kidney of a mouse CKD model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing; David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Li, Hua; Jiao, Yan; Gu, Weikuan; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Elevations of circulating Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and progression of renal failure in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Efforts to identify gene products whose transcription is directly regulated by FGF23 stimulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR)/α-Klotho complexes in the kidney is confounded by both systemic alterations in calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism and intrinsic alterations caused by the underlying renal pathology in CKD. To identify FGF23 responsive genes in the kidney that might explain the association between FGF23 and adverse outcomes in CKD, we performed comparative genome wide analysis of gene expression profiles in the kidney of the Collagen 4 alpha 3 null mice (Col4a3(-/-)) model of progressive kidney disease with kidney expression profiles of Hypophosphatemic (Hyp) and FGF23 transgenic mouse models of elevated FGF23. The different complement of potentially confounding factors in these models allowed us to identify genes that are directly targeted by FGF23. This analysis found that α-Klotho, an anti-aging hormone and FGF23 co-receptor, was decreased by FGF23. We also identified additional FGF23-responsive transcripts and activation of networks associated with renal damage and chronic inflammation, including lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling pathways. Finally, we found that FGF23 suppresses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression in the kidney, thereby providing a pathway for FGF23 regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These gene products provide a possible mechanistic links between elevated FGF23 and pathways responsible for renal failure progression and cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Neuroprotective effect of long-term NDI1 gene expression in a chronic mouse model of Parkinson disorder.

    PubMed

    Barber-Singh, Jennifer; Seo, Byoung Boo; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2009-08-01

    Previously, we showed that the internal rotenone-insensitive nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) can be successfully inserted into the mitochondria of mice and rats and the expressed enzyme was found to be fully functional. In this study, we investigated the ability of the Ndi1 enzyme to protect the dopaminergic neurons in a chronic mouse model of Parkinson disorder. After expression of the NDI1 gene in the unilateral substantia nigra of male C57BL/6 mice for 8 months, a chronic Parkinsonian model was created by administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) with probenecid and evaluated using neurochemical and behavioral responses 1-4 weeks post-MPTP/probenecid injection. We showed that expression of Ndi1 was able to significantly prevent the loss of dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase as well as the dopaminergic transporters in the striatum of the chronic Parkinsonian mice. Behavioral assessment based on a methamphetamine-induced rotation test and spontaneous swing test further supported neurological preservation in the NDI1-treated Parkinsonian mice. The data presented in this study demonstrate a protective effect of the NDI1 gene in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting its therapeutic potential for Parkinson-like disorders.

  10. CNS-targeted gene therapy improves survival and motor function in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Passini, Marco A.; Bu, Jie; Roskelley, Eric M.; Richards, Amy M.; Sardi, S. Pablo; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Shihabuddin, Lamya S.; Cheng, Seng H.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) due to mutations in the SMN1 gene. In this study, an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human SMN (AAV8-hSMN) was injected at birth into the CNS of mice modeling SMA. Western blot analysis showed that these injections resulted in widespread expression of SMN throughout the spinal cord, and this translated into robust improvement in skeletal muscle physiology, including increased myofiber size and improved neuromuscular junction architecture. Treated mice also displayed substantial improvements on behavioral tests of muscle strength, coordination, and locomotion, indicating that the neuromuscular junction was functional. Treatment with AAV8-hSMN increased the median life span of mice with SMA-like disease to 50 days compared with 15 days for untreated controls. Moreover, injecting mice with SMA-like disease with a human SMN–expressing self-complementary AAV vector — a vector that leads to earlier onset of gene expression compared with standard AAV vectors — led to improved efficacy of gene therapy, including a substantial extension in median survival to 157 days. These data indicate that CNS-directed, AAV-mediated SMN augmentation is highly efficacious in addressing both neuronal and muscular pathologies in a severe mouse model of SMA. PMID:20234094

  11. A Knock-in Mouse Model of Human PHD2 Gene-associated Erythrocytosis Establishes a Haploinsufficiency Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Patrick R.; Pei, Fei; Lee, Rebecca; Kerestes, Heddy; Percy, Melanie J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste; Lappin, Terence R. J.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lee, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The central pathway for controlling red cell mass is the PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain protein):hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF, which is negatively regulated by PHD, activates numerous genes, including ones involved in erythropoiesis, such as the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene. Recent studies have implicated PHD2 as the key PHD isoform regulating red cell mass. Studies of humans have identified erythrocytosis-associated, heterozygous point mutations in the PHD2 gene. A key question concerns the mechanism by which human mutations lead to phenotypes. In the present report, we generated and characterized a mouse line in which a P294R knock-in mutation has been introduced into the mouse Phd2 locus to model the first reported human PHD2 mutation (P317R). Phd2P294R/+ mice display a degree of erythrocytosis equivalent to that seen in Phd2+/− mice. The Phd2P294R/+-associated erythrocytosis is reversed in a Hif2a+/−, but not a Hif1a+/− background. Additional studies using various conditional knock-outs of Phd2 reveal that erythrocytosis can be induced by homozygous and heterozygous knock-out of Phd2 in renal cortical interstitial cells using a Pax3-Cre transgene or by homozygous knock-out of Phd2 in hematopoietic progenitors driven by a Vav1-Cre transgene. These studies formally prove that a missense mutation in PHD2 is the cause of the erythrocytosis, show that this occurs through haploinsufficiency, and point to multifactorial control of red cell mass by PHD2. PMID:24121508

  12. Therapeutics Targeting Drivers of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections: Insights from Predisposing Genes and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Prakash, Siddharth K; Ramirez, Francesco

    2017-01-14

    Thoracic aortic diseases, including aneurysms and dissections of the thoracic aorta, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for thoracic aortic disease include increased hemodynamic forces on the ascending aorta, typically due to poorly controlled hypertension, and heritable genetic variants. The altered genes predisposing to thoracic aortic disease either disrupt smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction or adherence to an impaired extracellular matrix, or decrease canonical transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling. Paradoxically, TGF-β hyperactivity has been postulated to be the primary driver for the disease. More recently, it has been proposed that the response of aortic SMCs to the hemodynamic load on a structurally defective aorta is the primary driver of thoracic aortic disease, and that TGF-β overactivity in diseased aortas is a secondary, unproductive response to restore tissue function. The engineering of mouse models of inherited aortopathies has identified potential therapeutic agents to prevent thoracic aortic disease.

  13. Differential expression of genes involved in the degeneration and regeneration pathways in mouse models for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Onofre-Oliveira, P C G; Santos, A L F; Martins, P M; Ayub-Guerrieri, D; Vainzof, M

    2012-03-01

    The genetically determined muscular dystrophies are caused by mutations in genes coding for muscle proteins. Differences in the phenotypes are mainly the age of onset and velocity of progression. Muscle weakness is the consequence of myofiber degeneration due to an imbalance between successive cycles of degeneration/regeneration. While muscle fibers are lost, a replacement of the degraded muscle fibers by adipose and connective tissues occurs. Major investigation points are to elicit the involved pathophysiological mechanisms to elucidate how each mutation can lead to a specific degenerative process and how the regeneration is stimulated in each case. To answer these questions, we used four mouse models with different mutations causing muscular dystrophies, Dmd (mdx), SJL/J, Large (myd) and Lama2 (dy2J) /J, and compared the histological changes of regeneration and fibrosis to the expression of genes involved in those processes. For regeneration, the MyoD, Myf5 and myogenin genes related to the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells were studied, while for degeneration, the TGF-β1 and Pro-collagen 1α2 genes, involved in the fibrotic cascade, were analyzed. The result suggests that TGF-β1 gene is activated in the dystrophic process in all the stages of degeneration, while the activation of the expression of the pro-collagen gene possibly occurs in mildest stages of this process. We also observed that each pathophysiological mechanism acted differently in the activation of regeneration, with distinctions in the induction of proliferation of satellite cells, but with no alterations in stimulation to differentiation. Dysfunction of satellite cells can, therefore, be an important additional mechanism of pathogenesis in the dystrophic muscle.

  14. An African-specific polymorphism in the TP53 gene impairs p53 tumor suppressor function in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jennis, Matthew; Kung, Che-Pei; Basu, Subhasree; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Leu, Julia I-Ju; Khaku, Sakina; Scott, Jeremy P; Cai, Kathy Q; Campbell, Michelle R; Porter, Devin K; Wang, Xuting; Bell, Douglas A; Li, Xiaoxian; Garlick, David S; Liu, Qin; Hollstein, Monica; George, Donna L; Murphy, Maureen E

    2016-04-15

    A nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 47 in TP53 exists in African-descent populations (P47S, rs1800371; referred to here as S47). Here we report that, in human cell lines and a mouse model, the S47 variant exhibits a modest decrease in apoptosis in response to most genotoxic stresses compared with wild-type p53 but exhibits a significant defect in cell death induced by cisplatin. We show that, compared with wild-type p53, S47 has nearly indistinguishable transcriptional function but shows impaired ability to transactivate a subset of p53 target genes, including two involved in metabolism:Gls2(glutaminase 2) and Sco2 We also show that human and mouse cells expressing the S47 variant are markedly resistant to cell death by agents that induce ferroptosis (iron-mediated nonapoptotic cell death). We show that mice expressing S47 in homozygous or heterozygous form are susceptible to spontaneous cancers of diverse histological types. Our data suggest that the S47 variant may contribute to increased cancer risk in individuals of African descent, and our findings highlight the need to assess the contribution of this variant to cancer risk in these populations. These data also confirm the potential relevance of metabolism and ferroptosis to tumor suppression by p53.

  15. Lentivirus-meditated frataxin gene delivery reverses genome instability in Friedreich ataxia patient and mouse model fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khonsari, H; Schneider, M; Al-Mahdawi, S; Chianea, Y G; Themis, M; Parris, C; Pook, M A; Themis, M

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by deficiency of frataxin protein, with the primary sites of pathology being the large sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia and the cerebellum. FRDA is also often accompanied by severe cardiomyopathy and diabetes mellitus. Frataxin is important in mitochondrial iron–sulfur cluster (ISC) biogenesis and low-frataxin expression is due to a GAA repeat expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene. FRDA cells are genomically unstable, with increased levels of reactive oxygen species and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Here we report the identification of elevated levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in FRDA patient and YG8sR FRDA mouse model fibroblasts compared to normal fibroblasts. Using lentivirus FXN gene delivery to FRDA patient and YG8sR cells, we obtained long-term overexpression of FXN mRNA and frataxin protein levels with reduced DSB levels towards normal. Furthermore, γ-irradiation of FRDA patient and YG8sR cells revealed impaired DSB repair that was recovered on FXN gene transfer. This suggests that frataxin may be involved in DSB repair, either directly by an unknown mechanism, or indirectly via ISC biogenesis for DNA repair enzymes, which may be essential for the prevention of neurodegeneration. PMID:27518705

  16. M-cadherin, a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes and related phenotypes in a KK/Ta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shiina, K; Gohda, T; Murakoshi, M; Yamada, K; Aoki, T; Yamazaki, T; Tanimoto, M; Tomino, Y

    2007-03-01

    The KK/Ta strain serves as a suitable polygenic mouse model for type 2 diabetes associated with fasting hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, mild obesity and dyslipidaemia. Recently, we reported the susceptibility loci contributing to type 2 diabetes and related phenotypes in KK/Ta mice. In the present study, to identify susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes and related disorders, GeneChip Expression Analysis was employed to survey the gene expression profile in the liver of KK/Ta and BALB/c mice. M-cadherin, a calciumdependent intercellular adhesion molecule, showed increased expression in the liver of KK/Ta mice, and sequence analysis revealed three missense mutations. The relationship between these polymorphisms and various phenotypes in 208 KK/Ta x (BALB/c x KK/Ta) F1 backcross mice was analysed. Statistical analysis revealed that M-cadherin exhibits linkage to levels of triglyceride and insulin in sera, glucose tolerance and body weight. Although it has been postulated that M-cadherin may be important for the regulation of morphogenesis of skeletal muscle cells, these results suggest that M-cadherin may influence hypertriglyceridaemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinaemia and obesity in KK/Ta mice.

  17. Gene therapy augments the efficacy of hematopoietic cell transplantation and fully corrects mucopolysaccharidosis type I phenotype in the mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Visigalli, Ilaria; Delai, Stefania; Politi, Letterio S.; Di Domenico, Carmela; Cerri, Federica; Mrak, Emanuela; D'Isa, Raffaele; Ungaro, Daniela; Stok, Merel; Sanvito, Francesca; Mariani, Elisabetta; Staszewsky, Lidia; Godi, Claudia; Russo, Ilaria; Cecere, Francesca; del Carro, Ubaldo; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Brambilla, Riccardo; Quattrini, Angelo; Di Natale, Paola; Ponder, Katherine; Naldini, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Type I mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-L-iduronidase, which results in glycosaminoglycan accumulation in tissues. Clinical manifestations include skeletal dysplasia, joint stiffness, visual and auditory defects, cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, and mental retardation (the last being present exclusively in the severe Hurler variant). The available treatments, enzyme-replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, can ameliorate most disease manifestations, but their outcome on skeletal and brain disease could be further improved. We demonstrate here that HSC gene therapy, based on lentiviral vectors, completely corrects disease manifestations in the mouse model. Of note, the therapeutic benefit provided by gene therapy on critical MPS I manifestations, such as neurologic and skeletal disease, greatly exceeds that exerted by HSC transplantation, the standard of care treatment for Hurler patients. Interestingly, therapeutic efficacy of HSC gene therapy is strictly dependent on the achievement of supranormal enzyme activity in the hematopoietic system of transplanted mice, which allows enzyme delivery to the brain and skeleton for disease correction. Overall, our data provide evidence of an efficacious treatment for MPS I Hurler patients, warranting future development toward clinical testing. PMID:20847202

  18. Viral gene transfer of APPsα rescues synaptic failure in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fol, Romain; Braudeau, Jerome; Ludewig, Susann; Abel, Tobias; Weyer, Sascha W; Roederer, Jan-Peter; Brod, Florian; Audrain, Mickael; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Buchholz, Christian J; Korte, Martin; Cartier, Nathalie; Müller, Ulrike C

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synaptic failure, dendritic and axonal atrophy, neuronal death and progressive loss of cognitive functions. It is commonly assumed that these deficits arise due to β-amyloid accumulation and plaque deposition. However, increasing evidence indicates that loss of physiological APP functions mediated predominantly by neurotrophic APPsα produced in the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway may contribute to AD pathogenesis. Upregulation of APPsα production via induction of α-secretase might, however, be problematic as this may also affect substrates implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we used a gene therapy approach to directly overexpress APPsα in the brain using AAV-mediated gene transfer and explored its potential to rescue structural, electrophysiological and behavioral deficits in APP/PS1∆E9 AD model mice. Sustained APPsα overexpression in aged mice with already preexisting pathology and amyloidosis restored synaptic plasticity and partially rescued spine density deficits. Importantly, AAV-APPsα treatment also resulted in a functional rescue of spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. Moreover, we demonstrate a significant reduction of soluble Aβ species and plaque load. In addition, APPsα induced the recruitment of microglia with a ramified morphology into the vicinity of plaques and upregulated IDE and TREM2 expression suggesting enhanced plaque clearance. Collectively, these data indicate that APPsα can mitigate synaptic and cognitive deficits, despite established pathology. Increasing APPsα may therefore be of therapeutic relevance for AD.

  19. Pharmacological and rAAV Gene Therapy Rescue of Visual Functions in a Blind Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a heterogeneous early-onset retinal dystrophy, accounts for ~15% of inherited congenital blindness. One cause of LCA is loss of the enzyme lecithin:retinol acyl transferase (LRAT), which is required for regeneration of the visual photopigment in the retina. Methods and Findings An animal model of LCA, the Lrat−/− mouse, recapitulates clinical features of the human disease. Here, we report that two interventions—intraocular gene therapy and oral pharmacologic treatment with novel retinoid compounds—each restore retinal function to Lrat−/− mice. Gene therapy using intraocular injection of recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the Lrat gene successfully restored electroretinographic responses to ~50% of wild-type levels (p < 0.05 versus wild-type and knockout controls), and pupillary light responses (PLRs) of Lrat−/− mice increased ~2.5 log units (p < 0.05). Pharmacological intervention with orally administered pro-drugs 9-cis-retinyl acetate and 9-cis-retinyl succinate (which chemically bypass the LRAT-catalyzed step in chromophore regeneration) also caused long-lasting restoration of retinal function in LRAT-deficient mice and increased ERG response from ~5% of wild-type levels in Lrat−/− mice to ~50% of wild-type levels in treated Lrat−/− mice (p < 0.05 versus wild-type and knockout controls). The interventions produced markedly increased levels of visual pigment from undetectable levels to 600 pmoles per eye in retinoid treated mice, and ~1,000-fold improvements in PLR and electroretinogram sensitivity. The techniques were complementary when combined. Conclusion Intraocular gene therapy and pharmacologic bypass provide highly effective and complementary means for restoring retinal function in this animal model of human hereditary blindness. These complementary methods offer hope of developing treatment to restore vision in humans with certain forms of hereditary congenital blindness. PMID

  20. SRF modulates seizure occurrence, activity induced gene transcription and hippocampal circuit reorganization in the mouse pilocarpine epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Lösing, Pascal; Niturad, Cristina Elena; Harrer, Merle; Reckendorf, Christopher Meyer Zu; Schatz, Theresa; Sinske, Daniela; Lerche, Holger; Maljevic, Snezana; Knöll, Bernd

    2017-07-17

    A hallmark of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is hippocampal neuronal demise and aberrant mossy fiber sprouting. In addition, unrestrained neuronal activity in TLE patients induces gene expression including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos and Egr1.We employed the mouse pilocarpine model to analyze the transcription factor (TF) serum response factor (SRF) in epileptogenesis, seizure induced histopathology and IEG induction. SRF is a neuronal activity regulated TF stimulating IEG expression as well as nerve fiber growth and guidance. Adult conditional SRF deficient mice (Srf (CaMKCreERT2) ) were more refractory to initial status epilepticus (SE) acquisition. Further, SRF deficient mice developed more spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis uncovered a requirement of SRF for SE and SRS induced IEG induction (e.g. Fos, Egr1, Arc, Npas4, Btg2, Atf3). SRF was required for epilepsy associated neurodegeneration, mossy fiber sprouting and inflammation. We uncovered MAP kinase signaling as SRF target during epilepsy. Upon SRF ablation, seizure evoked induction of dual specific phosphatases (Dusp5 and Dusp6) was reduced. Lower expression of these negative ERK kinase regulators correlated with altered P-ERK levels in epileptic Srf mutant animals.Overall, this study uncovered an SRF contribution to several processes of epileptogenesis in the pilocarpine model.

  1. Gene correction by homologous recombination with zinc finger nucleases in primary cells from a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Jon P; Barker, Jenny C; Pruett-Miller, Shondra; Porteus, Matthew H

    2010-06-01

    Zinc Finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been used to create precise genome modifications at frequencies that might be therapeutically useful in gene therapy. We created a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease to establish a preclinical system to develop the use of ZFN-mediated gene correction for gene therapy. We knocked a mutated GFP gene into the ROSA26 locus in murine embryonic stem (ES) cells and used these cells to create a transgenic mouse. We used ZFNs to determine the frequency of gene correction by gene targeting in different primary cells from this model. We achieved targeting frequencies from 0.17 to 6% in different cell types, including primary fibroblasts and astrocytes. We demonstrate that ex vivo gene-corrected fibroblasts can be transplanted back into a mouse where they retained the corrected phenotype. In addition, we achieved targeting frequencies of over 1% in ES cells, and the targeted ES cells retained the ability to differentiate into cell types from all three germline lineages. In summary, potentially therapeutically relevant frequencies of ZFN-mediated gene targeting can be achieved in a variety of primary cells and these cells can then be transplanted back into a recipient.

  2. Amelioration of both functional and morphological abnormalities in the retina of a mouse model of ocular albinism following AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Surace, Enrico Maria; Domenici, Luciano; Cortese, Katia; Cotugno, Gabriella; Di Vicino, Umberto; Venturi, Consuelo; Cellerino, Alessandro; Marigo, Valeria; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ballabio, Andrea; Auricchio, Alberto

    2005-10-01

    X-linked recessive ocular albinism type I (OA1) is due to mutations in the OA1 gene (approved gene symbol GPR143), which is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The Oa1 (Gpr143) knockout mouse (Oa1(-/-)) model recapitulates many of the OA1 retinal morphological anomalies, including a lower number of melanosomes of increased size in the RPE. The Oa1(-/-) mouse also displays some of the retinal developmental abnormalities observed in albino patients such as misrouting of the optic tracts. Here, we show that these anomalies are associated with retinal electrophysiological abnormalities, including significant decrease in a- and b-wave amplitude and delayed recovery of b-wave amplitude from photoreceptor desensitization following bright light exposure. This suggests that lack of Oa1 in the RPE impacts on photoreceptor activity. More interestingly, adeno-associated viral vector-mediated Oa1 gene transfer to the retina of the Oa1(-/-) mouse model results in significant recovery of its retinal functional abnormalities. In addition, Oa1 retinal gene transfer increases the number of melanosomes in the Oa1(-/-) mouse RPE. Our data show that gene transfer to the adult retina unexpectedly rescues both functional and morphological abnormalities in a retinal developmental disorder, opening novel potential therapeutic perspectives for this and other forms of albinism.

  3. Mouse Models of Mutations and Variations in Autism Spectrum Disorder-Associated Genes: Mice Expressing Caps2/Cadps2 Copy Number and Alternative Splicing Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Shinoda, Yo; Sato, Akira; Iguchi, Hirotoshi; Ishii, Chiaki; Matsuo, Makoto; Yamaga, Ryosuke; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by disturbances in interpersonal relationships and behavior. Although the prevalence of autism is high, effective treatments have not yet been identified. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified many mutations or variations associated with ASD risk on many chromosome loci and genes. Identification of the biological roles of these mutations or variations is necessary to identify the mechanisms underlying ASD pathogenesis and to develop clinical treatments. At present, mice harboring genetic modifications of ASD-associated gene candidates are the best animal models to analyze hereditary factors involved in autism. In this report, the biological significance of ASD-associated genes is discussed by examining the phenotypes of mouse models with ASD-associated mutations or variations in mouse homologs, with a focus on mice harboring genetic modifications of the Caps2/Cadps2 (Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2) gene. PMID:24287856

  4. Aberrant lung remodeling in a mouse model of surfactant dysregulation induced by modulation of the Abca3 gene.

    PubMed

    Beers, Michael F; Knudsen, Lars; Tomer, Yaniv; Maronn, Julian; Zhao, Ming; Ochs, Matthias; Mulugeta, Surafel

    2017-03-01

    The lipid transporter, ATP binding cassette class A3 (ABCA3), plays a critical role in the biogenesis of alveolar type 2 (AT2) cell lamellar bodies (LBs). A relatively large number of mutations in the ABCA3 gene have been identified in association with diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), the most common of which is a missense mutation (valine substitution for lysine at residue 292 (ABCA3(E292V))) that leads to functional impairment of the transporter in vitro. The consequences of ABCA3(E292)(V) gene expression in vivo are unknown. To address this question, we developed mouse models expressing ABCA3(E292V) knocked-in to the endogenous mouse locus. The parental (F1) mouse line (mAbca3(E292)(V)) that retained an intronic pgk-Neo selection cassette (inserted in reverse orientation) (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo) demonstrated an allele dependent extracellular surfactant phospholipid (PL) deficiency. We hypothesize that this PL deficiency leads to aberrant parenchymal remodeling contributing to the pathophysiology of the DPLD phenotype. Compared to wild type littermates, baseline studies of mice homozygous for the pgk-Neo insert (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo(+/)(+)) revealed nearly 50% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) PL content that was accompanied by quantitative reduction in AT2 LB size with a compensatory increase in LB number. The phenotypic alteration in surfactant lipid homeostasis resulted in an early macrophage predominant alveolitis which peaked at 8 weeks of age. This was followed by age-dependent development of histological DPLD characterized initially by peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration and culminating in both an emphysema-like phenotype (which included stereologically quantifiable reductions in both alveolar septal surface area and volume of septal wall tissue) plus foci of trichrome-positive collagen deposition together with substantial proliferation of hyperplastic AT2 cells. In addition to spontaneous lung remodeling, mABCA3(E292V)-rNeo mice

  5. A novel homologous model for gene therapy of dwarfism by non-viral transfer of the mouse growth hormone gene into immunocompetent dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Claudia R; Higuti, Eliza; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Jakobsen, Maria; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederick; Gissel, Hanne; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2014-02-01

    The possibilities for non-viral GH gene therapy are studied in immunocompetent dwarf mice (lit/lit). As expression vector we used a plasmid previously employed in immunodeficient dwarf mice (pUBI-hGH-gDNA) by replacing the human GH gene with the genomic sequence of mouse-GH DNA (pUBI-mGH-gDNA). HEK-293 human cells transfected with pUBI-mGH-gDNA produced 3.0 µg mGH/10(6) cells/day compared to 3.7 µg hGH/10(6) cells/day for pUBIhGH- gDNA transfected cells. The weight of lit/lit mice treated with the same two plasmids (50 µg DNA/mouse) by electrotransfer into the quadriceps muscle was followed for 3 months. The weight increase up to 15 days for mGH, hGH and saline treated mice were 0.130, 0.112 and 0.027 g/mouse/day. Most sera from hGH-treated mice contained anti-hGH antibodies already on day 15, with the highest titers on day 45, while no significant anti-mGH antibodies were observed in mGH-treated mice. At the end of 3 months, the weight increase for mGH-treated mice was 34.3%, while the nose-to-tail and femur lengths increased 9.5% and 24.3%. Mouse-GH and hGH circulating levels were 4-5 ng/mL 15 days after treatment, versus control levels of ~0.7 ng GH/mL (P<0.001). In mGH-treated mice, mIGF-I determined on days 15, 45 and 94 were 1.5- to 3-fold higher than the control and 1.2- to 1.6-fold higher than hGH-treated mice. The described homologous model represents an important progress forming the basis for preclinical testing of non-viral gene therapy for GH deficiency.

  6. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  7. From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0616 TITLE: From Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a... Breast to Bone: Tracking Gene Expression Changes Responsible for Breast Cancer Metastasis in a Humanized Mouse Model with Molecular Imaging 5b. GRANT... Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer -related death in women worldwide, and metastasis is responsible for the majority of these deaths. Triple

  8. Analysis of hepatic gene expression profile in a spontaneous mouse model of type 2 diabetes under a high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Koji; Sugimoto, Ken; Ueda, Hironori; Babaya, Naru; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Both genetic factors and diabetogenic environmental factors, such as a high-sucrose diet (HSD), are involved in the development of type 2 diabetes. In this study, the Nagoya-Shibata-Yasuda (NSY) mouse, an animal model of type 2 diabetes and C3H mice used as controls, were fed a HSD, a high-fat diet (HFD) or a regular diet (RD) from weaning. In C3H mice, HFD significantly increased body weight gain, but maintained glucose tolerance. In contrast, in NSY mice, HSD resulted in increased body weight gain and liver steatosis and increased glucose intolerance to a greater extent than HFD. Furthermore, we performed DNA microarray analysis to detect differences in hepatic gene expression levels in both strains under HSD. We then performed RT-PCR analysis on selected genes to evaluate basal expression level under RD and changes under HSD conditions. HSD-fed NSY, but not C3H mice, exhibited increased hepatic expression levels of Pparg2, an isoform of Pparg as well as G0s2, a target of Pparg, which are known to be adipocyte-specific genes. Compared to RD-fed C3H mice, hepatic expression levels of Kat2b (transcriptional regulation), Hsd3b5 (steroid hormone metabolism) and Cyp7b1 (bile acid metabolism) were initially lower in RD-fed NSY mice, and were further decreased in HSD-fed NSY mice. Expression of Metallothionein (Mt1) and Metallothionein 2 (Mt2) was significantly lower in NSY mice compared to C3H mice, irrespective of dietary condition. These data suggest that elucidation of this heterogeneity in response to HSD might contribute to further understanding of the gene-environment interactions leading to diabetes in humans.

  9. Three gene-targeted mouse models of RNA splicing factor RP show late-onset RPE and retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Graziotto, John J; Farkas, Michael H; Bujakowska, Kinga; Deramaudt, Bertrand M; Zhang, Qi; Nandrot, Emeline F; Inglehearn, Chris F; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Pierce, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in genes that produce proteins involved in mRNA splicing, including pre-mRNA processing factors 3, 8, and 31 (PRPF3, 8, and 31), RP9, and SNRNP200 are common causes of the late-onset inherited blinding disorder retinitis pigmentosa (RP). It is not known how mutations in these ubiquitously expressed genes lead to retina-specific disease. To investigate the pathogenesis of the RNA splicing factor forms of RP, the authors generated and characterized the retinal phenotypes of Prpf3-T494M, Prpf8-H2309P knockin mice. The retinal ultrastructure of Prpf31-knockout mice was also investigated. The knockin mice have single codon alterations in their endogenous Prpf3 and Prpf8 genes that mimic the most common disease causing mutations in human PRPF3 and PRPF8. The Prpf31-knockout mice mimic the null alleles that result from the majority of mutations identified in PRPF31 patients. The retinal phenotypes of the gene targeted mice were evaluated by electroretinography (ERG), light, and electron microscopy. The RPE cells of heterozygous Prpf3(+/T494M) and Prpf8(+/H2309P) knockin mice exhibited loss of the basal infoldings and vacuolization, with accumulation of amorphous deposits between the RPE and Bruch[b]'s membrane at age two years. These changes were more severe in the homozygous mice, and were associated with decreased rod function in the Prpf3-T494M mice. Similar degenerative changes in the RPE were detected in Prpf31(±) mice at one year of age. The finding of similar degenerative changes in RPE cells of all three mouse models suggests that the RPE may be the primary cell type affected in the RNA splicing factor forms of RP. The relatively late-onset phenotype observed in these mice is consistent with the typical adult onset of disease in patients with RP.

  10. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Morris, Quaid D; Chang, Richard; Shai, Ofer; Bakowski, Malina A; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Mohammad, Naveed; Robinson, Mark D; Zirngibl, Ralph; Somogyi, Eszter; Laurin, Nancy; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Sat, Eric; Grigull, Jörg; Pan, Qun; Peng, Wen-Tao; Krogan, Nevan; Greenblatt, Jack; Fehlings, Michael; van der Kooy, Derek; Aubin, Jane; Bruneau, Benoit G; Rossant, Janet; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J; Hughes, Timothy R

    2004-01-01

    Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics. PMID:15588312

  11. Acute stress enhances the expression of neuroprotection- and neurogenesis-associated genes in the hippocampus of a mouse restraint model.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giuseppina; Pasqualini, Lorenza; Ricciardelli, Eugenia; Montilla, Patricia; Soverchia, Laura; Ruggeri, Barbara; Falcinelli, Silvia; Renzi, Alessandra; Ludka, Colleen; Kirchner, Thomas; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Ubaldi, Massimo; Hardiman, Gary

    2016-02-23

    Stress arises from an external demand placed on an organism that triggers physiological, cognitive and behavioural responses in order to cope with that request. It is thus an adaptive response useful for the survival of an organism. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize global changes in gene expression in the hippocampus in response to acute stress stimuli, by employing a mouse model of short-term restraint stress. In our experimental design mice were subjected to a one time exposure of restraint stress and the regulation of gene expression in the hippocampus was examined 3, 12 and 24 hours thereafter. Microarray analysis revealed that mice which had undergone acute restraint stress differed from non-stressed controls in global hippocampal transcriptional responses. An up-regulation of transcripts contributing directly or indirectly to neurogenesis and neuronal protection including, Ttr, Rab6, Gh, Prl, Ndufb9 and Ndufa6, was observed. Systems level analyses revealed a significant enrichment for neurogenesis, neuron morphogenesis- and cognitive functions-related biological process terms and pathways. This work further supports the hypothesis that acute stress mediates a positive action on the hippocampus favouring the formation and the preservation of neurons, which will be discussed in the context of current data from the literature.

  12. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-02-14

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues.

  13. Efficient in vivo gene editing using ribonucleoproteins in skin stem cells of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenbo; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Wang, Wenjie; Qian, Nannan; Duan, Jinzhi; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing in mammalian cells with the potential to bring curative therapies to patients with genetic diseases. However, efficient in vivo delivery of this genome editing machinery and indeed the very feasibility of using these techniques in vivo remain challenging for most tissue types. Here, we show that nonreplicable Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins can be used to correct genetic defects in skin stem cells of postnatal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) mice. We developed a method to locally deliver Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins into the skin of postnatal mice. This method results in rapid gene editing in epidermal stem cells. Using this method, we show that Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins efficiently excise exon80, which covers the point mutation in our RDEB mouse model, and thus restores the correct localization of the collagen VII protein in vivo. The skin blistering phenotype is also significantly ameliorated after treatment. This study provides an in vivo gene correction strategy using ribonucleoproteins as curative treatment for genetic diseases in skin and potentially in other somatic tissues. PMID:28137859

  14. Acute stress enhances the expression of neuroprotection- and neurogenesis-associated genes in the hippocampus of a mouse restraint model

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Giuseppina; Pasqualini, Lorenza; Ricciardelli, Eugenia; Montilla, Patricia; Soverchia, Laura; Ruggeri, Barbara; Falcinelli, Silvia; Renzi, Alessandra; Ludka, Colleen; Kirchner, Thomas; Grünewald, Thomas G. P.; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Ubaldi, Massimo; Hardiman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Stress arises from an external demand placed on an organism that triggers physiological, cognitive and behavioural responses in order to cope with that request. It is thus an adaptive response useful for the survival of an organism. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize global changes in gene expression in the hippocampus in response to acute stress stimuli, by employing a mouse model of short-term restraint stress. In our experimental design mice were subjected to a one time exposure of restraint stress and the regulation of gene expression in the hippocampus was examined 3, 12 and 24 hours thereafter. Microarray analysis revealed that mice which had undergone acute restraint stress differed from non-stressed controls in global hippocampal transcriptional responses. An up-regulation of transcripts contributing directly or indirectly to neurogenesis and neuronal protection including, Ttr, Rab6, Gh, Prl, Ndufb9 and Ndufa6, was observed. Systems level analyses revealed a significant enrichment for neurogenesis, neuron morphogenesis- and cognitive functions-related biological process terms and pathways. This work further supports the hypothesis that acute stress mediates a positive action on the hippocampus favouring the formation and the preservation of neurons, which will be discussed in the context of current data from the literature. PMID:26863456

  15. A neurodegeneration-specific gene expression signature and immune profile of acutely isolated microglia from an ALS mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Morimoto, Emiko T.A.; Goodarzi, Hani; Liao, Jennifer T.; O’Keeffe, Sean; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Muratet, Michael; Carroll, Michael C.; Levy, Shawn; Tavazoie, Saeed; Myers, Richard M.; Maniatis, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS that are activated by infection, neuronal injury and inflammation. Here we utilize flow cytometry and deep RNA sequencing of acutely isolated spinal cord microglia to define their activation in vivo. Analysis of resting microglia identified 29 genes that distinguish microglia from other CNS cells and peripheral macrophages/monocytes. We then analyzed molecular changes in microglia during neurodegenerative disease activation using the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. We find that SOD1G93A microglia are not derived from infiltrating monocytes, and that both potentially neuroprotective and toxic factors are concurrently up-regulated, including Alzheimer’s disease genes. Mutant microglia differed from SOD1WT, LPS activated microglia, and M1/M2 macrophages, that define an ALS-specific phenotype. Concurrent mRNA/FACS analysis revealed post-transcriptional regulation of microglia surface receptors, and T cell-associated changes in the transcriptome. These results provide insights into microglia biology and establish a resource for future studies of neuroinflammation. PMID:23850290

  16. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  17. Mouse models of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Erik D

    2012-12-01

    The pace of discovery in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has accelerated dramatically with the discovery of new genetic causes and pathological substrates of the disease. MAPT/tau, GRN/progranulin, and C9ORF72 have emerged as common FTD genes, and TARDBP/TDP-43, VCP, FUS, and CHMP2B have been identified as less common genetic causes. TDP-43 and FUS have joined tau as common neuropathological substrates of the disease. Mouse models provide an important tool for understanding the role of these molecules in FTD pathogenesis. Here, we review recent progress with mouse models based on tau, TDP-43, progranulin, VCP, and CHMP2B. We also consider future prospects for FTD models, including developing new models to address unanswered questions. There are also opportunities for capitalizing on conservation of the salience network, which is selectively vulnerable in FTD, and the availability of FTD-related behavioral paradigms to analyze mouse models of the disease. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  18. Severity of Demyelinating and Axonal Neuropathy Mouse Models Is Modified by Genes Affecting Structure and Function of Peripheral Nodes.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Kathryn H; Seburn, Kevin L; Schroeder, David G; Spaulding, Emily L; Dionne, Loiuse A; Cox, Gregory A; Burgess, Robert W

    2017-03-28

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited polyneuropathies. Mutations in 80 genetic loci can cause forms of CMT, resulting in demyelination and axonal dysfunction. The clinical presentation, including sensory deficits, distal muscle weakness, and atrophy, can vary greatly in severity and progression. Here, we used mouse models of CMT to demonstrate genetic interactions that result in a more severe neuropathy phenotype. The cell adhesion molecule Nrcam and the Na(+) channel Scn8a (NaV1.6) are important components of nodes. Homozygous Nrcam and heterozygous Scn8a mutations synergized with both an Sh3tc2 mutation, modeling recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4C, and mutations in Gars, modeling dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D. We conclude that genetic variants perturbing the structure and function of nodes interact with mutations affecting the cable properties of axons by thinning myelin or reducing axon diameter. Therefore, genes integral to peripheral nodes are candidate modifiers of peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chadman, Kathryn K.; Yang, Mu; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing the validity of a mouse model of a human brain dysfunction. We address the common question raised by molecular geneticists and clinical researchers in psychiatry, “what is a ‘good enough’ mouse model”? PMID:18484083

  20. Aging Research Using Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Anderson, Laura C; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A; Chesler, Elissa J; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L

    2015-06-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in "health-span," or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, and immune function, as well as physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process.

  1. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  2. The liver X-receptor gene promoter is hypermethylated in a mouse model of prenatal protein restriction.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Esther M E; Bloks, Vincent W; Huijkman, Nicolette C A; Baller, Julius F W; van Meer, Hester; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuipers, Folkert; Plösch, Torsten

    2010-02-01

    Prenatal nutrition as influenced by the nutritional status of the mother has been identified as a determinant of adult disease. Feeding low-protein diets during pregnancy in rodents is a well-established model to induce programming events in offspring. We hypothesized that protein restriction would influence fetal lipid metabolism by inducing epigenetic adaptations. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were exposed to a protein-restriction protocol (9% vs. 18% casein). Shortly before birth, dams and fetuses were killed. To identify putative epigenetic changes, CG-dinucleotide-rich region in the promoter of a gene (CpG island) methylation microarrays were performed on DNA isolated from fetal livers. Two hundred four gene promoter regions were differentially methylated upon protein restriction. The liver X-receptor (Lxr) alpha promoter was hypermethylated in protein-restricted pups. Lxr alpha is a nuclear receptor critically involved in control of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. The mRNA level of Lxra was reduced by 32% in fetal liver upon maternal protein restriction, whereas expression of the Lxr target genes Abcg5/Abcg8 was reduced by 56% and 51%, respectively, measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The same effect, although less pronounced, was observed in the fetal intestine. In vitro methylation of a mouse Lxra-promoter/luciferase expression cassette resulted in a 24-fold transcriptional repression. Our study demonstrates that, in mice, protein restriction during pregnancy interferes with DNA methylation in fetal liver. Lxra is a target of differential methylation, and Lxra transcription is dependent on DNA methylation. It is tempting to speculate that perinatal nutrition may influence adult lipid metabolism by DNA methylation, which may contribute to the epidemiological relation between perinatal/neonatal nutrition and adult disease.

  3. Decreased hippocampal volume and increased anxiety in a transgenic mouse model expressing the human CYP2C19 gene.

    PubMed

    Persson, A; Sim, S C; Virding, S; Onishchenko, N; Schulte, G; Ingelman-Sundberg, M

    2014-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, various psychoactive drugs, as well as endogenous steroids and cannabinoid-like compounds are metabolized by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19). Absence of this enzyme has been recently shown to associate with lower levels of depressive symptoms in human subjects. To investigate endogenous functions of CYP2C19 and its potential role in brain function, we have used a transgenic mouse model carrying the human CYP2C19 gene. Here, CYP2C19 was expressed in the developing fetal, but not adult brain and was associated with altered fetal brain morphology, where mice homozygous for the CYP2C19 transgenic insert had severely underdeveloped hippocampus and complete callosal agenesis and high neonatal lethality. CYP2C19 expression was also found in human fetal brain. In adult hemizygous mice we observed besides decreased hippocampal volume, an altered neuronal composition in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been reported in several psychiatric disorders, supporting the relevance of this model. Here we found that adult hemizygous CYP2C19 transgenic mice demonstrate behavior indicative of increased stress and anxiety based on four different tests. We hypothesize that expression of the CYP2C19 enzyme prenatally may affect brain development by metabolizing endogenous compounds influencing this development. Furthermore, CYP2C19 polymorphism may have a role in interindividual susceptibility for psychiatric disorders.

  4. Identification of Novel Tissue-Specific Genes by Analysis of Microarray Databases: A Human and Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yeunsu; Davis, Michael E.; Lee, Kichoon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI′s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1) in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2) in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC) in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved. PMID:23741331

  5. Identification of novel tissue-specific genes by analysis of microarray databases: a human and mouse model.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Ahn, Jinsoo; Suh, Yeunsu; Davis, Michael E; Lee, Kichoon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the tissue-specific pattern of gene expression is critical in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of tissue development, gene function, and transcriptional regulations of biological processes. Although tissue-specific gene expression information is available in several databases, follow-up strategies to integrate and use these data are limited. The objective of the current study was to identify and evaluate novel tissue-specific genes in human and mouse tissues by performing comparative microarray database analysis and semi-quantitative PCR analysis. We developed a powerful approach to predict tissue-specific genes by analyzing existing microarray data from the NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository. We investigated and confirmed tissue-specific gene expression in the human and mouse kidney, liver, lung, heart, muscle, and adipose tissue. Applying our novel comparative microarray approach, we confirmed 10 kidney, 11 liver, 11 lung, 11 heart, 8 muscle, and 8 adipose specific genes. The accuracy of this approach was further verified by employing semi-quantitative PCR reaction and by searching for gene function information in existing publications. Three novel tissue-specific genes were discovered by this approach including AMDHD1 (amidohydrolase domain containing 1) in the liver, PRUNE2 (prune homolog 2) in the heart, and ACVR1C (activin A receptor, type IC) in adipose tissue. We further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of these 3 novel genes by real-time PCR. Among them, ACVR1C is adipose tissue-specific and adipocyte-specific in adipose tissue, and can be used as an adipocyte developmental marker. From GEO profiles, we predicted the processes in which AMDHD1 and PRUNE2 may participate. Our approach provides a novel way to identify new sets of tissue-specific genes and to predict functions in which they may be involved.

  6. MEN1 gene replacement therapy reduces proliferation rates in a mouse model of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Walls, Gerard V; Lemos, Manuel C; Javid, Mahsa; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Reed, Anita A C; Harding, Brian; Tyler, Damian J; Stuckey, Daniel J; Piret, Sian; Christie, Paul T; Ansorge, Olaf; Clarke, Kieran; Seymour, Len; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-10-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is characterized by the combined occurrence of pituitary, pancreatic, and parathyroid tumors showing loss of heterozygosity in the putative tumor suppressor gene MEN1. This gene encodes the protein menin, the overexpression of which inhibits cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we conducted a preclinical evaluation of MEN1 gene therapy in pituitary tumors of Men1(+/-) mice, using a recombinant nonreplicating adenoviral serotype 5 vector that contained the murine Men1 cDNA under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter (Men1.rAd5). Pituitary tumors in 55 Men1(+/-) female mice received a transauricular intratumoral injection of Men1.rAd5 or control treatments, followed by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) in drinking water for four weeks before magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemical analysis. Immediate procedure-related and 4-week mortalities were similar in all groups, indicating that the adenoviral gene therapy was not associated with a higher mortality. Menin expression was higher in the Men1.rAd5-treated mice when compared with other groups. Daily proliferation rates assessed by BrdUrd incorporation were reduced significantly in Men1.rAd5-injected tumors relative to control-treated tumors. In contrast, apoptotic rates, immune T-cell response, and tumor volumes remained similar in all groups. Our findings establish that MEN1 gene replacement therapy can generate menin expression in pituitary tumors, and significantly reduce tumor cell proliferation. ©2012 AACR.

  7. Mouse models in tendon and ligament research.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mouse models are valuable resources for the study of tendon and ligament biology. Many mutant mouse models are used because their manifested phenotypes mimic clinical pathobiology for several heritable disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Moreover, these models are helpful for discerning roles of specific genes in the development, maturation, and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. There are several categories of genes with essential roles in the synthesis and maintenance of tendon and ligament structures. The form and function of these tissues depend highly upon fibril-forming collagens, the primary extracellular macromolecules of tendons and ligaments. Models for these fibril-forming collagens, as well as for regulatory molecules like FACITs and SLRPs, are important for studying fibril assembly, growth, and maturation. Additionally, mouse models for growth factors and transcription factors are useful for defining regulation of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cues that stimulate matrix synthesis. Models for membrane-bound proteins assess the roles of cell-cell communication and cell-matrix interaction. In some cases, special considerations need to be given to spatio-temporal control of a gene in a model. Thus, conditional and inducible mouse models allow for specific regulation of genes of interest. Advances in mouse models have provided valuable tools for gaining insight into the form and function of tendons and ligaments.

  8. The effects of quercetin on the gene expression of the GABAA receptor α5 subunit gene in a mouse model of kainic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Moghbelinejad, Sahar; Alizadeh, Safar; Mohammadi, Ghazaleh; Khodabandehloo, Fatemeh; Rashvand, Zahra; Najafipour, Reza; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan

    2017-03-01

    The flavonoid quercetin has recently been reported to have neuroprotective effects, and the role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A alpha 5 subunit (GABAA α5) receptor has been determined in some nervous system disorders. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of the effect of quercetin administered at anticonvulsive doses on the expression of the GABAA α5 receptor gene in kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures in mice. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: control, KA, and KA + quercetin at 50 or 100 mg/kg, respectively. The results showed a dose-dependent reduction in the behavioral seizure score with quercetin pre-treatment in the KA mouse model. Two hours after the end of the 7-day treatment regimen, expression of the GABAA α5 receptor gene in the hippocampus was found to be increased in the KA group, but this increase was reduced in the KA + quercetin 50 or 100 mg/kg treatment groups. These results suggest that expression of the GABAA α5 receptor could be a mechanism for reducing seizure severity or may be a marker of seizure severity. Further studies are necessary to clarify quercetin's mechanism of action and the relation of GABAA α5 receptor gene expression to seizure severity.

  9. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  10. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elso et al.

  11. Increasing cholesterol synthesis in 7-dehydrosterol reductase (DHCR7) deficient mouse models through gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Matabosch, Xavier; Ying, Lee; Serra, Montserrat; Wassif, Christopher A.; Porter, Forbes D.; Shackleton, Cedric; Watson, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by deficiency in the terminal step of cholesterol biosynthesis: the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (C), catalyzed by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). This disorder exhibits several phenotypic traits including dysmorphia and mental retardation with a broad range of severity. There are few proven treatment options. That most commonly used is a high cholesterol diet that seems to enhance the quality of life and improve behavioral characteristics of patients, although these positive effects are controversial. The goal of our study was to investigate the possibility of restoring DHCR7 activity by gene transfer. We constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing the DHCR7 gene. After we infused this vector into affected mice, the introduced DHCR7 gene could be identified in liver, mRNA was expressed and a functional enzyme was produced. Evidence of functionality came from the ability to partially normalize the serum ratio of 7DHC/C in treated animals, apparently by increasing cholesterol production with concomitant decrease in 7DHC precursor. By five weeks after treatment the mean ratio (for 7 animals) had fallen to 0.05 while the ratio for untreated littermate controls had risen to 0.14. This provides proof of principle that gene transfer can ameliorate the genetic defect causing SLOS and provides a new experimental tool for studying the pathogenesis of this disease. If effective in humans, it might also offer a possible alternative to exogenous cholesterol therapy. However, it would not offer a complete cure for the disorder as many of the negative implications of defective synthesis are already established during prenatal development. PMID:20800683

  12. Expression of myometrial activation and stimulation genes in a mouse model of preterm labor: myometrial activation, stimulation, and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Cook, J L; Zaragoza, D B; Sung, D H; Olson, D M

    2000-05-01

    Myometrial contractions of labor result from an increase in myometrial activation and stimulation. Activation develops through the expression of contraction associated proteins (CAPs), including oxytocin receptors (OTR), connexin-43 (Cx-43), and prostaglandin F2 alpha, receptors (FP). Stimulation involves increases in contractile agonists including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostaglandin F2 alpha. (PGF2 alpha) that may result from increases in prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase (PGHS)-2. A mouse model of preterm birth was used to study gene expression involved in myometrial activation and stimulation. To induce preterm birth, pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intubated with 6 g/kg ethanol on gestational day 16 and were killed every 6 h from treatment until birth. RIA was used to measure uterine PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, while PGHS-2, OTR, Cx-43, and FP messenger RNA levels were measured by ribonuclease protection assay. Increases in CAP mRNA were associated with term and preterm birth. There were differences in stimulation effectors associated with preterm and term birth. Uterine PGF2 alpha values were increased only at the time of term birth, but PGE2 was elevated during both preterm and term labor. These data suggest that existing levels of PGF2 alpha are sufficient for preterm birth when CAP expression is increased, but term labor requires increases in PGE2, PGF2alpha, and CAPs. The PGHS-2 messenger RNA expression pattern suggests that it is a CAP.

  13. ΔFosB Regulates Gene Expression and Cognitive Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Brian F; You, Jason C; Zhang, Xiaohong; Pyfer, Mark S; Tosi, Umberto; Iascone, Daniel M; Petrof, Iraklis; Hazra, Anupam; Fu, Chia-Hsuan; Stephens, Gabriel S; Ashok, Annie A; Aschmies, Suzan; Zhao, Lijuan; Nestler, Eric J; Chin, Jeannie

    2017-07-11

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive decline and 5- to 10-fold increased seizure incidence. How seizures contribute to cognitive decline in AD or other disorders is unclear. We show that spontaneous seizures increase expression of ΔFosB, a highly stable Fos-family transcription factor, in the hippocampus of an AD mouse model. ΔFosB suppressed expression of the immediate early gene c-Fos, which is critical for plasticity and cognition, by binding its promoter and triggering histone deacetylation. Acute histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition or inhibition of ΔFosB activity restored c-Fos induction and improved cognition in AD mice. Administration of seizure-inducing agents to nontransgenic mice also resulted in ΔFosB-mediated suppression of c-Fos, suggesting that this mechanism is not confined to AD mice. These results explain observations that c-Fos expression increases after acute neuronal activity but decreases with chronic activity. Moreover, these results indicate a general mechanism by which seizures contribute to persistent cognitive deficits, even during seizure-free periods. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-dose Gene Therapy Reduces the Frequency of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in a Mouse Model of Lysosomal Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alliegro, Marialuisa; Ferla, Rita; Nusco, Edoardo; De Leonibus, Chiara; Settembre, Carmine; Auricchio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is the standard of care for several lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). ERT, however, requires multiple and costly administrations and has limited efficacy. We recently showed that a single high dose administration of adeno-associated viral vector serotype 8 (AAV2/8) is at least as effective as weekly ERT in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI). However, systemic administration of high doses of AAV might result in both cell-mediated immune responses and insertional mutagenesis. Here we evaluated whether the combination of low doses of AAV2/8 with a less frequent (monthly) than canonical (weekly) ERT schedule may be as effective as the single treatments at high doses or frequent regimen. A greater reduction of both urinary glycosaminoglycans, considered a sensitive biomarker of therapeutic efficacy, and storage in the myocardium and heart valves was observed in mice receiving the combined than the single therapies. Importantly, these levels of correction were similar to those we obtained in a previous study following either high doses of AAV2/8 or weekly ERT. Our data show that low-dose gene therapy can be used as a means to rarify ERT administration, thus reducing both the risks and costs associated with either therapies. PMID:27658524

  15. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS. PMID:26051241

  16. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS.

  17. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  18. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Wright, Matthew W; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Cox, Laura A; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J; Potter, Phillip M; Redinbo, Matthew R; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and "CES" (human) and "Ces" (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding "P" and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species.

  19. Identification of arthritis-related gene clusters by microarray analysis of two independent mouse models for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fujikado, Noriyuki; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Previously, we showed that human T-cell leukemia virus type I-transgenic mice and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist-knockout mice develop autoimmunity and joint-specific inflammation that resembles human RA. To identify genes involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of these animal models by using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We found 1,467 genes that were differentially expressed from the normal control mice by greater than threefold in one of these animal models. The gene expression profiles of the two models correlated well. We extracted 554 genes whose expression significantly changed in both models, assuming that pathogenically important genes at the effector phase would change in both models. Then, each of these commonly changed genes was mapped into the whole genome in a scale of the 1-megabase pairs. We found that the transcriptome map of these genes did not distribute evenly on the chromosome but formed clusters. These identified gene clusters include the major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes, complement genes, and chemokine genes, which are well known to be involved in the pathogenesis of RA at the effector phase. The activation of these gene clusters suggests that antigen presentation and lymphocyte chemotaxis are important for the development of arthritis. Moreover, by searching for such clusters, we could detect genes with marginal expression changes. These gene clusters include schlafen and membrane-spanning four-domains subfamily A genes whose function in arthritis has not yet been determined. Thus, by combining two etiologically different RA models, we succeeded in efficiently extracting genes functioning in the development of arthritis at the effector phase. Furthermore, we demonstrated that identification of gene clusters by transcriptome mapping is a useful way to find

  20. Overlapping functions of ABC transporters in topotecan disposition as determined in gene knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Amit K.; Zhang, Rong; Gallo, James M.

    2013-01-01

    It is established that efflux transporters of the ABC superfamily can affect the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of drugs through mechanisms pertaining to drug absorption, elimination and distribution. To characterize the role of multiple transporters in topotecan's PKs, total (lactone+carboxylate) and lactone forms were measured by LC/MS/MS in plasma, bile, urine and feces following IV administration at doses of 1 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg to eight mouse strains; C57BL/6 (WT), Abcb1−/−, Abcc2−/−, Abcc4−/−, Abcg2−/−, Abcc2;Abcb1−/−, Abcc2;Abcg2−/−, Abcc4;Abcg2−/−. Compared with WT mice and at both dose levels, the plasma areas under the curve (AUC) for topotecan lactone were not significantly different in the Abcc2−/−, Abcc4−/−, Abcb1−/− strains, whereas significant differences were found in Abcg2−/−, Abcc2;Abcb1−/− (only at the high dose), Abcc4;Abcg2−/− and Abcc2;Abcg2−/− mice and ranged from 2.1-fold to 3.3-fold higher. Consistent with these changes, the fecal and biliary excretion of topotecan was reduced, while renal elimination was elevated in Abcg2−/− based strains. Similarly, the Abcc2;Abcb1−/− strain also had elevated renal elimination and reduced fecal excretion of topotecan lactone, this was more pronounced at the 4 mg/kg dose level, suggesting possible saturation of Abcg2. The Abcc4 transporter was found not to be a major determinant of topotecan PKs. It is concluded that Abcg2 has the most significant effect on topotecan elimination, whereas both Abcb1 and Abcc2 have overlapping functions with Abcg2. As such it is relevant to examine how polymorphisms in these transporters influence topotecan activity in patients and whether coadministration of transport modulators could positively affect efficacy without increasing toxicity. PMID:23635651

  1. Genetic mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Barkus, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of genetically modified mice in investigating the neurobiology of depressive behaviour. First, the behavioural tests commonly used as a model of depressive-like behaviour in rodents are described. These tests include those sensitive to antidepressant treatment such as the forced swim test and the tail suspension test, as well as other tests that encompass the wider symptomatology of a depressive episode. A selection of example mutant mouse lines is then presented to illustrate the use of these tests. As our understanding of depression increases, an expanding list of candidate genes is being investigated using mutant mice. Here, mice relevant to the monoamine and corticotrophin-releasing factor hypotheses of depression are covered as well as those relating to the more recent candidate, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This selection provides interesting examples of the use of complimentary lines, such as those that have genetic removal or overexpression, and also opposing behavioural changes seen following manipulation of closely related genes. Finally, factors such as the issue of background strain and influence of environmental factors are reflected upon, before considering what can realistically be expected of a mouse model of this complex psychiatric disorder.

  2. Studies of the lethargic (lh/lh) mouse model of absence seizures: regulatory mechanisms and identification of the lh gene.

    PubMed

    Hosford, D A; Lin, F H; Wang, Y; Caddick, S J; Rees, M; Parkinson, N J; Barclay, J; Cox, R D; Gardiner, R M; Hosford, D A; Denton, P; Wang, Y; Seldin, M F; Chen, B

    1999-01-01

    To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie generalized absence seizures sufficiently well to design rational, efficacious new therapies for patients, it is necessary to turn to animal models to gain insights into these mechanisms. The lethargic (lh/lh) mutant mouse expresses spontaneous absence seizures that share behavioral, electrographic, and anticonvulsant profiles with absence seizures in patients. This validates its use to study the mechanisms that underlie absence seizures. This chapter discusses two scientific approaches that involve the use of lh/lh mice. The first part of the chapter discusses neurobiologic approaches used to investigate critical mechanisms that regulate the synchronized burst firing within the thalamocortical network that generates absence seizures. Two of these critical mechanisms have been studied in detail with lh/lh mice. The first critical mechanism involves the required activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) receptors to generate absence seizures. Because the numbers of GABAB receptors are increased in thalamocortical populations among lh/lh mice compared with littermates without epilepsy, these receptors appear to play a pathophysiologic role in the expression of absence seizures among lh/lh mice. Moreover, there may be a role for GABAB receptors in the generation of absence seizures among humans, because administration of compounds that activate GABAB receptors can produce absence seizures among humans. These findings suggest that GABAB receptor antagonists may represent a new class of antiabsence compounds that will be efficacious against absence seizures among patients. A second critical mechanism that regulates generation of absence seizures involves GABAA receptors in the nucleus reticularis thalami (NRT), a nucleus that sends GABA-ergic afferents to thalamic relay nuclei. Activation of GABAA receptors in the NRT appears to suppress the generation of absence seizures among lh/lh mice and in

  3. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  4. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M.; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R.; Malik, Fady I.; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beggs, Alan H.; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Nebulin—a giant sarcomeric protein—plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (NebΔExon55) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. NebΔExon55 mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies—a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy—in muscle fibres from NebΔExon55 mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from NebΔExon55 mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in NebΔExon55 mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in NebΔExon55 mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by thin

  5. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J M; Beggs, Alan H; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W; Granzier, Henk

    2013-06-01

    Nebulin--a giant sarcomeric protein--plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (Neb(ΔExon55)) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Neb(ΔExon55) mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies--a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy--in muscle fibres from Neb(ΔExon55) mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from Neb(ΔExon55) mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in Neb(ΔExon55) mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in Neb(ΔExon55) mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by

  6. S-SCAM, A Rare Copy Number Variation Gene, Induces Schizophrenia-Related Endophenotypes in Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M.; Liu, Qing-song

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis. PMID:25653350

  7. Mouse models of otitis media: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood Fazal

    2012-10-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the use of the mouse to investigate pathobiology of otitis media. This is for good reason, including easy husbandry, but also capacity for genetic manipulation of the mouse. Insights into human disease have been gleaned from mouse models, but there are limitations of the mouse-to-man approach. First, important differences exist between mouse and man, particularly in immune function. Second, functional equivalence of genes in the 2 species is not ensured. Third, laboratory mice of a uniform genetic background and environment are an inadequate model of the plethora of factors affecting complex disease in humans. Finally, gene function in mouse models is often obliterated using gene knockout technology, but this is a poor mimic of normal gene variation in man. These drawbacks of the mouse may in the future limit its usefulness in otitis media research.

  8. The dynamics of gene expression changes in a mouse model of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies in patients with oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Jean-Philippe; Tortereau, Antonin; Caulin, Carlos; Le Texier, Vincent; Lavergne, Emilie; Thomas, Emilie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Perol, David; Lachuer, Joël; Lang, Wenhua; Hong, Waun Ki; Goudot, Patrick; Lippman, Scott M; Bertolus, Chloé; Saintigny, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the dynamics of molecular changes occurring during the early stages of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies. We generated genome-wide expression profiles of microdissected normal mucosa, hyperplasia, dysplasia and tumors derived from the 4-NQO mouse model of oral tumorigenesis. Genes differentially expressed between tumor and normal mucosa defined the “tumor gene set” (TGS), including 4 non-overlapping gene subsets that characterize the dynamics of gene expression changes through different stages of disease progression. The majority of gene expression changes occurred early or progressively. The relevance of these mouse gene sets to human disease was tested in multiple datasets including the TCGA and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. The TGS was able to discriminate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) from normal oral mucosa in 3 independent datasets. The OSCC samples enriched in the mouse TGS displayed high frequency of CASP8 mutations, 11q13.3 amplifications and low frequency of PIK3CA mutations. Early changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with a trend toward a shorter oral cancer-free survival in patients with oral preneoplasia that was not seen in multivariate analysis. Progressive changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with an increased sensitivity to 4 different MEK inhibitors in a panel of 51 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines of the aerodigestive tract. In conclusion, the dynamics of molecular changes in the 4-NQO model reveal that MEK inhibition may be relevant to prevention and treatment of a specific molecularly-defined subgroup of OSCC. PMID:27027432

  9. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  10. What's wrong with my mouse cage? Methodological considerations for modeling lifestyle factors and gene-environment interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-05-30

    The mechanistic understanding of lifestyle contributions to disease has been largely driven by work in laboratory rodent models using environmental interventions. These interventions show an array of methodologies and sometimes unclear collective conclusions, hampering clinical interpretations. Here we discuss environmental enrichment, exercise and stress interventions to illustrate how different protocols can affect the interpretations of environmental factors in disease. We use Huntington's disease (HD) as an example because its mouse models exhibit excellent validity and HD was the first genetic animal model in which environmental stimulation was found to be beneficial. We make a number of observations and recommendations. Firstly, environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise generally show benefits across laboratories and mouse models. However, the extent to which these environmental interventions have beneficial effects depends on parameters such as the structural complexity of the cage in the case of enrichment, the timing of the intervention and the nature of the control conditions. In particular, clinical interpretations should consider deprived control living conditions and the ethological relevance of the enrichment. Secondly, stress can have negative effects on the phenotype in mouse models of HD and other brain disorders. When modeling stress, the effects of more than one type of experimental stressor should be investigated due to the heterogeneity and complexity of stress responses. With stress in particular, but ideally in all studies, both sexes should be used and the randomized group sizes need to be sufficiently powered to detect any sex effects. Opportunities for clinical translation will be guided by the 'environmental construct validity' of the preclinical data, including the culmination of complementary protocols across multiple animal models. Environmental interventions in mouse models of HD provide illustrative examples of how valid

  11. Gene delivery to mitochondria by targeting modified adenoassociated virus suppresses Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Ozdemir, Sacide S; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S; Guy, John

    2012-05-15

    To introduce DNA into mitochondria efficiently, we fused adenoassociated virus capsid VP2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence to carry the mitochondrial gene encoding the human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4). Expression of WT ND4 in cells with the G11778A mutation in ND4 led to restoration of defective ATP synthesis. Furthermore, with injection into the rodent eye, human ND4 DNA levels in mitochondria reached 80% of its mouse homolog. The construct expressed in most inner retinal neurons, and it also suppressed visual loss and optic atrophy induced by a mutant ND4 homolog. The adenoassociated virus cassette accommodates genes of up to ∼5 kb in length, thus providing a platform for introduction of almost any mitochondrial gene and perhaps even allowing insertion of DNA encompassing large deletions of mtDNA, some associated with aging, into the organelle of adults.

  12. CNTF Gene Therapy Confers Lifelong Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Singh, Mandeep S; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward J; Davies, Wayne I L; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioral responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread upregulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  13. Changes of gene expression profiles in the cervical spinal cord by acupuncture in an MPTP-intoxicated mouse model: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2011-07-15

    It has been shown that acupuncture at acupoints GB34 and LR3 inhibits the degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The degeneration of spinal cord was reported to be induced in the MPTP-treated pre-symptomatic mouse. In this study, the gene expression profile changes following acupuncture at the acupoints were investigated in the cervical spinal cord of an MPTP-induced parkinsonism model using a whole transcript array (Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 1.0 ST array). It was shown that 8 of the probes up-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were down-regulated after acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 8 probes, 6 probes (4 annotated genes in 6 probes: Ctla2a, EG383229, Ppbp and Ube2l6) were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for 2 probes as these 2 probes were commonly down-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. In addition, 11 of the probes down-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 11 probes, 10 probes (5 annotated genes in 10 probes: EG665033, ENSMUSG00000055323, Obox6, Pbp2 and Tmem150) were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for the Fut11 because the Fut11 was commonly up-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. The expression levels of the representative genes in the microarray were validated by real-time RT-PCR. These data suggest that the expression of these exclusively regulated 16 probes (9 genes) may be, at least in part, affected by acupuncture at the acupoints in the cervical spinal cord which can be damaged by MPTP intoxication.

  14. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  15. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E; Ulery, Eva S; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J; Richt, Jürgen A

    2011-02-05

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H.; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E.; Ulery, Eva S.; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. PMID:21074235

  17. Behavioural effects of high fat diet in a mutant mouse model for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin 1.

    PubMed

    Holm-Hansen, S; Low, J K; Zieba, J; Gjedde, A; Bergersen, L H; Karl, T

    2016-03-01

    Schizophrenia patients are often obese or overweight and poor dietary choices appear to be a factor in this phenomenon. Poor diet has been found to have complex consequences for the mental state of patients. Thus, this study investigated whether an unhealthy diet [i.e. high fat diet (HFD)] impacts on the behaviour of a genetic mouse model for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin 1 (i.e. transmembrane domain Nrg1 mutant mice: Nrg1 HET). Female Nrg1 HET and wild-type-like littermates (WT) were fed with either HFD or a control chow diet. The mice were tested for baseline (e.g. anxiety) and schizophrenia-relevant behaviours after 7 weeks of diet exposure. HFD increased body weight and impaired glucose tolerance in all mice. Only Nrg1 females on HFD displayed a hyper-locomotive phenotype as locomotion-suppressive effects of HFD were only evident in WT mice. HFD also induced an anxiety-like response and increased freezing in the context and the cued version of the fear conditioning task. Importantly, CHOW-fed Nrg1 females displayed impaired social recognition memory, which was absent in HFD-fed mutants. Sensorimotor gating deficits of Nrg1 females were not affected by diet. In summary, HFD had complex effects on the behavioural phenotype of test mice and attenuated particular cognitive deficits of Nrg1 mutant females. This topic requires further investigations thereby also considering other dietary factors of relevance for schizophrenia as well as interactive effects of diet with medication and sex.

  18. Tetracycline-regulated mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Elizabeth S; Vernon-Grey, Ann; Martin, Heather; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2014-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have proven essential to the study of mammalian gene function in both development and disease. However, traditional constitutive transgenic mouse model systems are limited by the temporal and spatial characteristics of the experimental promoter used to drive transgene expression. To address this limitation, considerable effort has been dedicated to developing conditional and inducible mouse model systems. Although a number of approaches to generating inducible GEMMs have been pursued, several have been restricted by toxic or undesired physiological side effects of the compounds used to activate gene expression. The development of tetracycline (tet)-dependent regulatory systems has allowed for circumvention of these issues resulting in the widespread adoption of these systems as an invaluable tool for modeling the complex nature of cancer progression.

  19. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentilin, Lorena; Baj, Gabriele; Giraudi, Pablo; Bellarosa, Cristina; Giacca, Mauro; Tiribelli, Claudio; Muro, Andrés F.

    2012-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar type I (CNI) syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) deficiency. The disease is lethal due to bilirubin-induced neurological damage unless phototherapy is applied from birth. However, treatment becomes less effective during growth, and liver transplantation is required. To investigate the pathophysiology of the disease and therapeutic approaches in mice, we generated a mouse model by introducing a premature stop codon in the UGT1a1 gene, which results in an inactive enzyme. Homozygous mutant mice developed severe jaundice soon after birth and died within 11 d, showing significant cerebellar alterations. To rescue neonatal lethality, newborns were injected with a single dose of adeno-associated viral vector 9 (AAV9) expressing the human UGT1A1. Gene therapy treatment completely rescued all AAV-treated mutant mice, accompanied by lower plasma bilirubin levels and normal brain histology and motor coordination. Our mouse model of CNI reproduces genetic and phenotypic features of the human disease. We have shown, for the first time, the full recovery of the lethal effects of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We believe that, besides gene-addition-based therapies, our mice could represent a very useful model to develop and test novel technologies based on gene correction by homologous recombination.—Bortolussi, G., Zentilin, L., Baj, G., Giraudi, P., Bellarosa, C., Giacca, M., Tiribelli, C., Muro, A. F. Rescue of bilirubin-induced neonatal lethality in a mouse model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by AAV9-mediated gene transfer. PMID:22094718

  20. An in vivo mouse reporter gene (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) model to monitor ovarian tumor growth and response to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Eric E; Westfall, Suzanne D; McDonald, Claudia; Lison, Tiffany; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Skinner, Michael K

    2002-02-01

    . Carboplatin treatment decreased both cell proliferation and SEAP levels in culture medium. The constitutive rate of SEAP secretion per cell (nanograms SEAP per microgram DNA) was found not to be altered by carboplatin treatment. Therefore changes in SEAP level reflect changes in OCC1 tumor cell number, and not changes in regulation of SEAP secretion due to platinum containing chemotherapeutic drug treatment. OCC1 cells were injected intraperitoneally into nude mice and the mice were treated with the platinum-containing drugs cisplatin or carboplatin. Measurements of plasma SEAP over the treatment period showed OCC1-SEAP ovarian carcinoma growth to be inhibited by cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. The SEAP marker protein is constitutively expressed by tumor cells and blood levels are correlated with tumor cell number and burden. The results of these studies indicate that SEAP may be used as an in vivo reporter gene in a mouse model to monitor tumor growth and response to therapeutics. Future studies will utilize this model to investigate novel chemotherapeutic approaches to treating ovarian cancer.

  1. Properties of genes essential for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mitra; Barradas, Ana; Tzotzos, George T.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    Essential genes are those that are critical for life. In the specific case of the mouse, they are the set of genes whose deletion means that a mouse is unable to survive after birth. As such, they are the key minimal set of genes needed for all the steps of development to produce an organism capable of life ex utero. We explored a wide range of sequence and functional features to characterise essential (lethal) and non-essential (viable) genes in mice. Experimental data curated manually identified 1301 essential genes and 3451 viable genes. Very many sequence features show highly significant differences between essential and viable mouse genes. Essential genes generally encode complex proteins, with multiple domains and many introns. These genes tend to be: long, highly expressed, old and evolutionarily conserved. These genes tend to encode ligases, transferases, phosphorylated proteins, intracellular proteins, nuclear proteins, and hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. They are involved with regulating protein-protein interactions, gene expression and metabolic processes, cell morphogenesis, cell division, cell proliferation, DNA replication, cell differentiation, DNA repair and transcription, cell differentiation and embryonic development. Viable genes tend to encode: membrane proteins or secreted proteins, and are associated with functions such as cellular communication, apoptosis, behaviour and immune response, as well as housekeeping and tissue specific functions. Viable genes are linked to transport, ion channels, signal transduction, calcium binding and lipid binding, consistent with their location in membranes and involvement with cell-cell communication. From the analysis of the composite features of essential and viable genes, we conclude that essential genes tend to be required for intracellular functions, and viable genes tend to be involved with extracellular functions and cell-cell communication. Knowledge of the features that are over

  2. Evidence that increased Kcnj6 gene dose is necessary for deficits in behavior and dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Yu, Jessica; Kim, Jeesun; Lysenko, Larisa V; Zeng, Zheng; Yu, Y Eugene; Mobley, William C

    2017-03-22

    Down syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is caused by increased dose of genes present on human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The gene-dose hypothesis argues that a change in the dose of individual genes or regulatory sequences on HSA21 is necessary for creating DS-related phenotypes, including cognitive impairment. We focused on a possible role for Kcnj6, the gene encoding Kir3.2 (Girk2) subunits of a G-protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channel. This gene resides on a segment of mouse Chromosome 16 that is present in one extra copy in the genome of the Ts65Dn mouse, a well-studied genetic model of DS. Kir3.2 subunit-containing potassium channels serve as effectors for a number of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors including GABAB receptors. Several studies raise the possibility that increased Kcnj6 dose contributes to synaptic and cognitive abnormalities in DS. To assess directly a role for Kcnj6 gene dose in cognitive deficits in DS, we produced Ts65Dn mice that harbor only 2 copies of Kcnj6 (Ts65Dn:Kcnj6++- mice). The reduction in Kcnj6 gene dose restored to normal the hippocampal level of Kir3.2. Long-term memory, examined in the novel object recognition test with the retention period of 24h, was improved to the level observed in the normosomic littermate control mice (2N:Kcnj6++). Significantly, both short-term and long-term potentiation (STP and LTP) was improved to control levels in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the Ts65Dn:Kcnj6++- mouse. In view of the ability of fluoxetine to suppress Kir3.2 channels, we asked if fluoxetine-treated DG slices of Ts65Dn:Kcnj6+++ mice would rescue synaptic plasticity. Fluoxetine increased STP and LTP to control levels. These results are evidence that increased Kcnj6 gene dose is necessary for synaptic and cognitive dysfunction in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Strategies aimed at pharmacologically reducing channel function should be explored for enhancing cognition in DS.

  3. Gene delivery to mitotic and postmitotic photoreceptors via compacted DNA nanoparticles results in improved phenotype in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M; Nash, Zack; Fliesler, Steven J; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the therapeutic efficiency and safety of compacted-DNA nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery into the subretinal space of a juvenile mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Nanoparticles containing the mouse opsin promoter and wild-type mouse Rds gene were injected subretinally into mice carrying a haploinsufficiency mutation in the retinal degeneration slow (rds(+ or -)) gene at postnatal day (P)5 and 22. Control mice were either injected with saline, injected with uncompacted naked plasmid DNA carrying the Rds gene, or remained untreated. Rds mRNA levels peaked at postinjection day 2 to 7 (PI-2 to PI-7) for P5 injections, stabilized at levels 2-fold higher than in uninjected controls for both P5 and P22 injections, and remained elevated at the latest time point examined (PI-120). Rod function (measured by electroretinography) showed modest but statistically significant improvement compared with controls after both P5 and P22 injections. Cone function in nanoparticle-injected eyes reached wild-type levels for both ages of injections, indicating full prevention of cone degeneration. Ultrastructural examination at PI-120 revealed significant improvement in outer segment structures in P5 nanoparticle-injected eyes, while P22 injection had a modest structural improvement. There was no evidence of macrophage activation or induction of IL-6 or TNF-alpha mRNA in P5 or P22 nanoparticle-dosed eyes at either PI-2 or PI-30. Thus, compacted-DNA nanoparticles can efficiently and safely drive gene expression in both mitotic and postmitotic photoreceptors and retard degeneration in this model. These findings, using a clinically relevant treatment paradigm, illustrate the potential for application of nanoparticle-based gene replacement therapy for treatment of human retinal degenerations.-Cai, X., Conley, S. M., Nash, Z., Fliesler, S. J., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Gene delivery to mitotic and postmitotic photoreceptors via compacted DNA

  4. Deletion of atrophy enhancing genes fails to ameliorate the phenotype in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Chitra C; McGovern, Vicki L; Wise, Dawnne O; Glass, David J; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease causing degeneration of lower motor neurons and muscle atrophy. One therapeutic avenue for SMA is targeting signaling pathways in muscle to ameliorate atrophy. Muscle Atrophy F-box, MAFbx, and Muscle RING Finger 1, MuRF1, are muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases upregulated in skeletal and cardiac muscle during atrophy. Homozygous knock-out of MAFbx or MuRF1 causes muscle sparing in adult mice subjected to atrophy by denervation. We wished to determine whether blockage of the major muscle atrophy pathways by deletion of MAFbx or MuRF1 in a mouse model of SMA would improve the phenotype. Deletion of MAFbx in the Δ7 SMA mouse model had no effect on the weight and the survival of the mice while deletion of MuRF1 was deleterious. MAFbx(-/-)-SMA mice showed a significant alteration in fiber size distribution tending towards larger fibers. In skeletal and cardiac tissue MAFbx and MuRF1 transcripts were upregulated whereas MuRF2 and MuRF3 levels were unchanged in Δ7 SMA mice. We conclude that deletion of the muscle ubiquitin ligases does not improve the phenotype of a Δ7 SMA mouse. Furthermore, it seems unlikely that the beneficial effect of HDAC inhibitors is mediated through inhibition of MAFbx and MuRF1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of an efficient screening system to identify novel bone metabolism-related genes using the exchangeable gene trap mutagenesis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Kurogi, Syuji; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Funamoto, Taro; Ota, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shihoko; Nagai, Takuya; Nakahara, Mai; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Chosa, Etsuo

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous genetic studies on bone metabolism, understanding of the specific mechanisms is lacking. We developed an efficient screening system to identify novel genes involved in bone metabolism using mutant mouse strains registered with the Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) database. From 1278 trap clones in the EGTC database, 52 candidate lines were selected in the first screening, determined based on “EST profile”, “X-gal”, “Related article”, and “Novel gene”. For the second screening, bone morphometric analysis, biomechanical strength analysis, bone X-gal staining, etc. were performed on candidate lines. Forty-two male trap lines (80.8%) showed abnormalities with either bone morphometric analysis or biomechanical strength analysis. In the screening process, X-gal staining was significantly efficient (P = 0.0057). As examples, Lbr and Nedd4 trap lines selected using the screening system showed significant bone decrease and fragility, suggesting a relationship with osteoblast differentiation. This screening system using EGTC mouse lines is extremely efficient for identifying novel genes involved in bone metabolism. The gene trap lines identified as abnormal using this screening approach are highly likely to trap important genes for bone metabolism. These selected trap mice will be valuable for use as novel bio-resources in bone research. PMID:28106071

  6. [Gene chip study on cerebral gene of effect of Jinkui Shenqiwan and Youguiwan on mouse model of kidney-yang asthenia with syndrome disproved according to therapeutic efficacy of drugs used].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhua; Li, Zhen; Sun, Jing

    2009-05-01

    To inquire into the cerebral gene change of effect of Jingui Shenqiwan and Youguiwan for animal model of kidney-yang asthenia caused by excessive physical and sexual activities, which may study the effect mechanism of the medicine with syndrome disproved therapeutic efficacy of drugs used. Male mice of Kunming species, weight 35-40 g, and female weight 28-35 g were randomly divided into four groups: control group, model group and treatment groups of Jigui Shenqiwan and Youguiwan in which there were ten male mice, fifteen ones, ten ones and ten ones, respectively. All of them were fed normally, and poured into their stomach with 0.5 mL of distill water for each mouse in the control group and model group, and with 0.5 mL suspension of the drugs (including 1.1 g x kg(-1) drug) for each one in the treatment groups every day. The mice in the model group and treatment groups were kept by means of each male mouse with six female mice in the same cage, and all male mice swam until they gradully submerged and were scooped up from water once everyday for lasting four weeks to induce the kidney-yang asthenia with excessive physical and sexual activities. Animals' manifestation such as fearing cold, activity and responses, mouse' fur and so on were observed. The brain gene were detected with the mouse brain gene chip of 36K Mouse genome array made by Capital Bio Corp. Beijing, China, and the differential expression gene were screened according to the ratio equal to or above 2 and equal to or below 0.5 with the related fluorescent intensity comparing the two groups, which could be further verified in the light of partly differential expression gene with qRT-PCR. The mouse model of kidney-yang asthenia in the model group was successfully induced by way of excessive physical and sexual activities. There were twenty-three genes among up-regulated genes in the model group versus control group but down-regulated genes in the treatment groups versus model group, chiefly including the

  7. Muscle and Heart Function Restoration in a Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) Mouse Model by Systemic FKRP Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276IKI) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276IKI mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  8. Muscle and heart function restoration in a limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) mouse model by systemic FKRP gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276I(KI)) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276I(KI) mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective.

  9. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

  10. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  11. A transgenic mouse model with inducible Tyrosinase gene expression using the tetracycline (Tet-on) system allows regulated rescue of abnormal chiasmatic projections found in albinism.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Estela; Lavado, Alfonso; Giraldo, Patricia; Cozar, Patricia; Jeffery, Glen; Montoliu, Lluís

    2004-08-01

    Congenital defects in retinal pigmentation, as in oculocutaneous albinism Type I (OCA1), where tyrosinase is defective, result in visual abnormalities affecting the retina and pathways into the brain. Transgenic animals expressing a functional tyrosinase gene on an albino genetic background display a correction of all these abnormalities, implicating a functional role for tyrosinase in normal retinal development. To address the function of tyrosinase in the development of the mammalian visual system, we have generated a transgenic mouse model with inducible expression of the tyrosinase gene using the tetracycline (TET-ON) system. We have produced two types of transgenic mice: first, mice expressing the transactivator rtTA chimeric protein under the control of mouse tyrosinase promoter and its locus control region (LCR), and; second, transgenic mice expressing a mouse tyrosinase cDNA construct driven by a minimal promoter inducible by rtTA in the presence of doxycycline. Inducible experiments have been carried out with selected double transgenic mouse lines. Tyrosinase expression has been induced from early embryo development and its impact assessed with histological and biochemical methods in heterozygous and homozygous double transgenic individuals. We have found an increase of tyrosinase activity in the eyes of induced animals, compared with littermate controls. However, there was significant variability in the activation of this gene, as reported in analogous experiments. In spite of this, we could observe corrected uncrossed chiasmatic pathways, decreased in albinism, in animals induced from their first gestational week. These mice could be instrumental in revealing the role of tyrosinase in mammalian visual development.

  12. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  13. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  14. Inner ear and kidney anomalies caused by IAP insertion in an intron of the Eya1 gene in a mouse model of BOR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K R; Cook, S A; Erway, L C; Matthews, A N; Sanford, L P; Paradies, N E; Friedman, R A

    1999-04-01

    A spontaneous mutation causing deafness and circling behavior was discovered in a C3H/HeJ colony of mice at the Jackson Laboratory. Pathological analysis of mutant mice revealed gross morphological abnormalities of the inner ear, and also dysmorphic or missing kidneys. The deafness and abnormal behavior were shown to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and mapped to mouse chromosome 1 near the position of the Eya1 gene. The human homolog of this gene, EYA1, has been shown to underly branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hearing loss with associated branchial and renal anomalies. Molecular analysis of the Eya1 gene in mutant mice revealed the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) element in intron 7. The presence of the IAP insertion was associated with reduced expression of the normal Eya1 message and formation of additional aberrant transcripts. The hypomorphic nature of the mutation may explain its recessive inheritance, if protein levels in homozygotes, but not heterozygotes, are below a critical threshold needed for normal developmental function. The new mouse mutation is designated Eya1(bor) to denote its similarity to human BOR syndrome, and will provide a valuable model for studying mutant gene expression and etiology.

  15. A rapid gene delivery-based mouse model for early-stage Alzheimer disease-type tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Siman, Robert; Lin, Yin-Guo; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri; Dong, Yina

    2013-11-01

    The perforant pathway projection from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to the hippocampal dentate gyrus is critically important for long-term memory and develops tau and amyloid pathologies and progressive degeneration starting in the early stages of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, perforant pathway function has not been assessed in experimental models of AD, and a therapeutic agent that protects its structure and function has not yet been identified. Therefore, we developed a new adeno-associated virus-based mouse model for perforant pathway tauopathy. Microinjection into the lateral EC of vectors designed to express either human tau bearing a pathogenic P301L mutation or enhanced green fluorescent protein as a control selectively drove transgene expression in lateral EC layer II perikarya and along the entire rostrocaudal extent of the lateral perforant pathway afferents and dentate terminal field. After human tau expression, hyperphosphorylated tau accumulated only within EC layer II perikarya, thereby modeling Braak stage I of transentorhinal AD tauopathy. Expression of pathologic human tau but not enhanced green fluorescent protein led to specific dose-dependent apoptotic death of perforant pathway neurons and loss of synapses in as little as 2 weeks. This novel adeno-associated virus-based method elicits rapid tauopathy and tau-mediated neurodegeneration localized to the mouse perforant pathway and represents a new experimental approach for studying tau-driven pathogenic processes and tau-based treatment strategies in a highly vulnerable neural circuit.

  16. IKAP Deficiency in an FD Mouse Model and in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Results in Downregulation of Genes Involved in Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelin Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheishvili, David; Dietrich, Paula; Maayan, Channa; Even, Aviel; Weil, Miguel; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Razin, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD). The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology. PMID:24760006

  17. IKAP deficiency in an FD mouse model and in oligodendrocyte precursor cells results in downregulation of genes involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation.

    PubMed

    Cheishvili, David; Dietrich, Paula; Maayan, Channa; Even, Aviel; Weil, Miguel; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Razin, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD). The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology.

  18. Structure of the mouse IL-10 gene and chromosomal localization of the mouse and human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.M.; Khan, T.A.; Moore, K.W. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1992-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.2-kb segment containing the mouse IL-10 (mIL-10) gene was determined. Comparison to the mIL-10 cDNA sequence revealed the presence of five exons that span [approximately]5.1 kb of genomic DNA. The noncoding regions of the mIL-10 gene contain sequences that have been associated with transcriptional regulation of several cytokine genes. The mIL-10 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 1 and the human IL-10 gene was also mapped to human chromosome 1. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Hsp70 gene transfer by adeno-associated virus inhibits MPTP-induced nigrostriatal degeneration in the mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhizhong; Wolfer, David P; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been implicated in Parkinson disease (PD). In addition, genetic evidence points to an important role of protein misfolding, aggregation, and failure in the proteasomal degradation of specific neuronal proteins in the pathogenesis of PD. The chaperone heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) reduces protein misfolding and aggregation and protects cells against a variety of adverse conditions, including oxidative stress. Moreover, Hsp70 exerts antiapoptotic activity by blocking the function of several key proapoptotic factors. Recently, Hsp70 was shown to inhibit alpha-synuclein toxicity in a Drosophila model of inherited PD. Here we tested the potential of Hsp70 (approved gene symbol HSPA1A) for gene therapy in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of idiopathic PD. We show that Hsp70 gene transfer to dopamine neurons by a recombinant adeno-associated virus significantly protects the mouse dopaminergic system against MPTP-induced dopamine neuron loss and the associated decline in striatal dopamine levels and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers. Hsp70 reduced MPTP-induced apoptosis in the substantia nigra, and unilateral protection of the dopaminergic system by Hsp70 was associated with increased amphetamine-induced turning toward the uninjected side. Collectively, these results suggest that increasing chaperone activity may be beneficial for the treatment of idiopathic PD.

  20. Whole-genome microarray analysis and functional characterization reveal distinct gene expression profiles and patterns in two mouse models of ileal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Avula, Leela Rani; Knapen, Dries; Buckinx, Roeland; Vergauwen, Lucia; Adriaensen, Dirk; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-08-06

    Although a number of intestinal inflammatory conditions pertain to the ileum, whole-genome gene expression analyses in animal models of ileal inflammation are lacking to date. Therefore, we aimed to identify and characterize alterations in gene expression in the acutely inflamed ileum of two murine models of intestinal inflammation, namely intestinal schistosomiasis and TNBS-induced ileitis, compared to healthy controls. To this end, we used whole-genome microarrays, followed by bioinformatics analyses to detect over-represented Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways and Gene Ontology categories. Following screening of almost all known mouse genes and transcripts represented on the array, intestinal schistosomiasis and TNBS-induced ileitis yielded 207 and 1417 differentially expressed genes, respectively, with only 30 overlapping concordantly changed genes. Functional category groups consisting of complement and coagulation cascades, extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, Fc epsilon receptor I signaling pathways and protein activation cascade, cell adhesion categories were over-represented in the differential gene list of intestinal schistosomiasis. Antigen processing and presentation, cell adhesion molecules, ABC transporters, Toll-like receptor signaling pathways and response to chemical stimulus categories were over-represented in the differential gene list of TNBS-induced ileitis. Although cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, intestinal immune network for IgA production, focal adhesion pathways and immune, inflammatory and defense response categories were over-represented in the differential gene lists of both inflammation models, the vast majority of the associated genes and changes were unique to each model. This study characterized two models of ileal inflammation at a whole-genome level and outlined distinct gene expression profiles and patterns in the two models. The results indicate that intestinal schistosomiasis involves Th2

  1. Gene therapy cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in a mouse model of RPS19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Modlich, Ute; Rothe, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Mutations involving the ribosomal protein S19 gene are detected in 25% of patients. Enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 improves the overall proliferative capacity, erythroid colony-forming potential and erythroid differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors from ribosomal protein S19-deficient patients in vitro and in vivo following xenotransplantation. However, studies using animal models are needed to assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the viral vectors. In the present study we have validated the therapeutic potential of gene therapy using mouse models of ribosomal protein S19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Using lentiviral gene transfer we demonstrated that enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in recipients transplanted with ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells. Furthermore, gene-corrected ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells showed an increased pan-hematopoietic contribution over time compared to untransduced cells without signs of vector-mediated toxicity. Our study provides a proof of principle for the development of clinical gene therapy to cure ribosomal protein 19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia. PMID:25216681

  2. Gene therapy cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in a mouse model of RPS19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Modlich, Ute; Rothe, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Mutations involving the ribosomal protein S19 gene are detected in 25% of patients. Enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 improves the overall proliferative capacity, erythroid colony-forming potential and erythroid differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors from ribosomal protein S19-deficient patients in vitro and in vivo following xenotransplantation. However, studies using animal models are needed to assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the viral vectors. In the present study we have validated the therapeutic potential of gene therapy using mouse models of ribosomal protein S19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Using lentiviral gene transfer we demonstrated that enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in recipients transplanted with ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells. Furthermore, gene-corrected ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells showed an increased pan-hematopoietic contribution over time compared to untransduced cells without signs of vector-mediated toxicity. Our study provides a proof of principle for the development of clinical gene therapy to cure ribosomal protein 19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  3. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  4. Channa striatus cream down-regulates tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha gene expression and alleviates chronic-like dermatitis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Isa, Irma Izani; Abu Bakar, Suhaili; Md Tohid, Siti Farah; Mat Jais, Abdul Manan

    2016-12-24

    Haruan, Channa striatus, is a freshwater fish which has been well-known locally to accelerate wound healing during post-operative and post-partum periods. The fish extract also has potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. To assess topical anti-inflammatory effect of Haruan cream on 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced chronic-like dermatitis in mice. Male ICR mice were randomized into six groups of five mice each: acetone (vehicle), TPA alone (negative control), three Haruan treatment groups (Haruan 1%, Haruan 5% and Haruan 10%) and hydrocortisone 1% (positive control). Briefly, both surfaces of mouse ears were applied with TPA (2.5μg/20μl acetone) for five times on alternate days and with Haruan or hydrocortisone 1% cream for the last three days. Mouse ear thickness was measured 24h after final treatment with the cream and the ears were harvested for further histological analysis and gene expression studies of TNF-α by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Topical application of Haruan cream had reduced the mouse ear thickness 18.1-28%) with comparable effect to the positive control. In addition, histopathological comparison had shown evident reduction in various parameters of cutaneous inflammation including dermal oedema, inflammatory cells infiltration and proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Furthermore, TPA application had resulted in the up-regulation of TNF-α gene expression by 353-fold, which was subsequently down-regulated by the Haruan cream (34- to 112-fold). Haruan is an effective topical anti-inflammatory agent in this mouse model of chronic-like dermatitis, thus suggesting its potential as a non-steroidal treatment option for chronic inflammatory dermatoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision to the All-Cone Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-1.

    PubMed

    Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; McCullough, K Tyler; Zhang, Zhonghong; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Peshenko, Igor V; Hauswirth, William W; Ding, Xi-Qin; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are the cause of Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1), a protein expressed exclusively in outer segments of photoreceptors and essential for timely recovery from photoexcitation. Recent clinical data show that, despite a high degree of visual disturbance stemming from a loss of cone function, LCA1 patients retain normal photoreceptor architecture, except for foveal cone outer segment abnormalities and, in some patients, foveal cone loss. These results point to the cone-rich central retina as a target for GUCY2D replacement. LCA1 gene replacement studies thus far have been conducted in rod-dominant models (mouse) or with vectors and organisms lacking clinical translatability. Here we investigate gene replacement in the Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mouse, an all-cone model deficient in retGC1. We show that AAV-retGC1 treatment fully restores cone function, cone-mediated visual behavior, and guanylate cyclase activity, and preserves cones in treated Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice over the long-term. A novel finding was that retinal function could be restored to levels above that in Nrl(-/-) controls, contrasting results in other models of retGC1 deficiency. We attribute this to increased cyclase activity in treated Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice relative to Nrl(-/-) controls. Thus, Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice possess an expanded dynamic range in ERG response to gene replacement relative to other models. Lastly, we show that a candidate clinical vector, AAV5-GRK1-GUCY2D, when delivered to adult Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice, restores retinal function that persists for at least 6 months. Our results provide strong support for clinical application of a gene therapy targeted to the cone-rich, central retina of LCA1 patients.

  6. BRAFV600E-Associated Gene Expression Profile: Early Changes in the Transcriptome, Based on a Transgenic Mouse Model of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Dagmara; Swierniak, Michal; Chmielik, Ewa; Kowal, Monika; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Cyplinska, Renata; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Piglowski, Wojciech; Korfanty, Joanna; Chekan, Mykola; Krajewska, Jolanta; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Jarzab, Michal; Widlak, Wieslawa; Jarzab, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms driving the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are still poorly understood. The most frequent genetic alteration in PTC is the BRAFV600E mutation–its impact may extend even beyond PTC genomic profile and influence the tumor characteristics and even clinical behavior. Methods In order to identify BRAF-dependent signature of early carcinogenesis in PTC, a transgenic mouse model with BRAFV600E-induced PTC was developed. Mice thyroid samples were used in microarray analysis and the data were referred to a human thyroid dataset. Results Most of BRAF(+) mice developed malignant lesions. Nevertheless, 16% of BRAF(+) mice displayed only benign hyperplastic lesions or apparently asymptomatic thyroids. After comparison of non-malignant BRAF(+) thyroids to BRAF(−) ones, we selected 862 significantly deregulated genes. When the mouse BRAF-dependent signature was transposed to the human HG-U133A microarray, we identified 532 genes, potentially indicating the BRAF signature (representing early changes, not related to developed malignant tumor). Comparing BRAF(+) PTCs to healthy human thyroids, PTCs without BRAF and RET alterations and RET(+), RAS(+) PTCs, 18 of these 532 genes displayed significantly deregulated expression in all subgroups. All 18 genes, among them 7 novel and previously not reported, were validated as BRAFV600E-specific in the dataset of independent PTC samples, made available by The Cancer Genome Atlas Project. Conclusion The study identified 7 BRAF-induced genes that are specific for BRAF V600E-driven PTC and not previously reported as related to BRAF mutation or thyroid carcinoma: MMD, ITPR3, AACS, LAD1, PVRL3, ALDH3B1, and RASA1. The full signature of BRAF-related 532 genes may encompass other BRAF-related important transcripts and require further study. PMID:26625260

  7. Characterization of Timed Changes in Hepatic Copper Concentrations, Methionine Metabolism, Gene Expression, and Global DNA Methylation in the Jackson Toxic Milk Mouse Model of Wilson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh; Shibata, Noreene M.; French, Samuel W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Islam, Mohammad S.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Halsted, Charles H.; Keen, Carl L.; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by hepatic copper accumulation with progressive liver damage to cirrhosis. This study aimed to characterize the toxic milk mouse from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA) (tx-j) mouse model of WD according to changes over time in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, global DNA methylation, and gene expression from gestational day 17 (fetal) to adulthood (28 weeks). Methods Included liver histology and relevant biochemical analyses including hepatic copper quantification, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) liver levels, qPCR for transcript levels of genes relevant to methionine metabolism and liver damage, and DNA dot blot for global DNA methylation. Results Hepatic copper was lower in tx-j fetuses but higher in weanling (three weeks) and adult tx-j mice compared to controls. S-adenosylhomocysteinase transcript levels were significantly lower at all time points, except at three weeks, correlating negatively with copper levels and with consequent changes in the SAM:SAH methylation ratio and global DNA methylation. Conclusion Compared to controls, methionine metabolism including S-adenosylhomocysteinase gene expression is persistently different in the tx-j mice with consequent alterations in global DNA methylation in more advanced stages of liver disease. The inhibitory effect of copper accumulation on S-adenosylhomocysteinase expression is associated with progressively abnormal methionine metabolism and decreased methylation capacity and DNA global methylation. PMID:24810691

  8. Characterization of timed changes in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, gene expression, and global DNA methylation in the Jackson toxic milk mouse model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh; Shibata, Noreene M; French, Samuel W; Kim, Kyoungmi; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; LaSalle, Janine M; Halsted, Charles H; Keen, Carl L; Medici, Valentina

    2014-05-07

    Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by hepatic copper accumulation with progressive liver damage to cirrhosis. This study aimed to characterize the toxic milk mouse from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA) (tx-j) mouse model of WD according to changes over time in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, global DNA methylation, and gene expression from gestational day 17 (fetal) to adulthood (28 weeks). Included liver histology and relevant biochemical analyses including hepatic copper quantification, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) liver levels, qPCR for transcript levels of genes relevant to methionine metabolism and liver damage, and DNA dot blot for global DNA methylation. Hepatic copper was lower in tx-j fetuses but higher in weanling (three weeks) and adult tx-j mice compared to controls. S-adenosylhomocysteinase transcript levels were significantly lower at all time points, except at three weeks, correlating negatively with copper levels and with consequent changes in the SAM:SAH methylation ratio and global DNA methylation. Compared to controls, methionine metabolism including S-adenosylhomocysteinase gene expression is persistently different in the tx-j mice with consequent alterations in global DNA methylation in more advanced stages of liver disease. The inhibitory effect of copper accumulation on S-adenosylhomocysteinase expression is associated with progressively abnormal methionine metabolism and decreased methylation capacity and DNA global methylation.

  9. Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Williams, Bart O.

    2011-01-01

    The development and optimization of high-throughput screening methods has identified a multitude of genetic changes associated with human disease. The use of immunodeficient and genetically engineered mouse models that mimic the human disease has been crucial in validating the importance of these genetic pathways in prostate cancer. These models provide a platform for finding novel therapies to treat human patients afflicted with prostate cancer as well as those who have debilitating bone metastases. In this paper, we focus on the historical development and phenotypic descriptions of mouse models used to study prostate cancer. We also comment on how closely each model recapitulates human prostate cancer. PMID:22111002

  10. Neuroprotective changes of thalamic degeneration-related gene expression by acupuncture in an MPTP mouse model of parkinsonism: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sujung; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Lim, Sabina

    2013-02-25

    Acupuncture stimulations at GB34 and LR3 inhibit the reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in the parkinsonism animal models. Especially, behavioral tests showed that acupuncture stimulations improved the motor dysfunction in a previous study by almost 87.7%. The thalamus is a crucial area for the motor circuit and has been identified as one of the most markedly damaged areas in Parkinson's disease (PD), so acupuncture stimulations might also have an effect on the thalamic damage. In this study, gene expression changes following acupuncture at the acupoints were investigated in the thalamus of a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced parkinsonism model using a whole transcript array. It was confirmed that acupuncture at these acupoints could inhibit the decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase in the thalamic regions of the MPTP model, while acupuncture at the non-acupoints could not suppress this decrease by its level shown in the acupoints. GeneChip gene array analysis showed that 18 (5 annotated genes: Dnase1l2, Dusp4, Mafg, Ndph and Pgm5) of the probes down-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints, but not at the non-acupoints. In addition, 14 (3 annotated genes; Serinc2, Sp2 and Ucp2) of the probes up-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints, but not at the non-acupoints. The expression levels of the representative genes in the microarray were validated by real-time RT-PCR. These results suggest that the 32 probes (8 annotated genes) which are affected by MPTP and acupuncture may be responsible for exerting the inhibitory effect of acupuncture in the thalamus which can be damaged by MPTP intoxication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic backgrounds and modifier genes of NTD mouse models: An opportunity for greater understanding of the multifactorial etiology of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Renee Y M; Singh, Parmveer; McDermid, Heather E

    2016-10-21

    Neurulation, the early embryonic process of forming the presumptive brain and spinal cord, is highly complex and involves hundreds of genes in multiple genetic pathways. Mice have long served as a genetic model for studying human neurulation, and the resulting neural tube defects (NTDs) that arise when neurulation is disrupted. Because mice appear to show mostly single gene inheritance for NTDs and humans show multifactorial inheritance, mice sometimes have been characterized as a simpler model for the identification and study of NTD genes. But are they a simple model? When viewed on different genetic backgrounds, many genes show significant variation in the penetrance and expressivity of NTD phenotypes, suggesting the presence of modifier loci that interact with the target gene to affect the phenotypic expression. Looking at mutations on different genetic backgrounds provides us with an opportunity to explore these complex genetic interactions, which are likely to better emulate similar processes in human neurulation. Here, we review NTD genes known to show strain-specific phenotypic variation. We focus particularly on the gene Cecr2, which is studied using both a hypomorphic and a presumptive null mutation on two different backgrounds: one susceptible (BALB/c) and one resistant (FVB/N) to NTDs. This strain difference has led to a search for genetic modifiers within a region on murine chromosome 19. Understanding how genetic variants alter the phenotypic outcome in NTD mouse models will help to direct future studies in humans, particularly now that more genome wide sequencing approaches are being used. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse–human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human–Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene–phenotype–disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  13. Long-Term Preservation of Cones and Improvement in Visual Function Following Gene Therapy in a Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis Caused by Guanylate Cyclase-1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mihelec, Marija; Pearson, Rachael A.; Robbie, Scott J.; Buch, Prateek K.; Azam, Selina A.; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Smith, Alexander J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe retinal dystrophy manifesting from early infancy as poor vision or blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in GUCY2D cause LCA1 and are one of the most common causes of LCA, accounting for 20% of all cases. Human GUCY2D and mouse Gucy2e genes encode guanylate cyclase-1 (GC1), which is responsible for restoring the dark state in photoreceptors after light exposure. The Gucy2e–/– mouse shows partially diminished rod function, but an absence of cone function before degeneration. Although the cones appear morphologically normal, they exhibit mislocalization of proteins involved in phototransduction. In this study we tested the efficacy of an rAAV2/8 vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase promoter and the human GUCY2D gene. Following subretinal delivery of the vector in Gucy2e–/– mice, GC1 protein was detected in the rod and cone outer segments, and in transduced areas of retina cone transducin was appropriately localized to cone outer segments. Moreover, we observed a dose-dependent restoration of rod and cone function and an improvement in visual behavior of the treated mice. Most importantly, cone preservation was observed in transduced areas up to 6 months post injection. To date, this is the most effective rescue of the Gucy2e–/– mouse model of LCA and we propose that a vector, similar to the one used in this study, could be suitable for use in a clinical trial of gene therapy for LCA1. PMID:21671801

  14. Combinational deletion of three membrane protein-encoding genes highly attenuates yersinia pestis while retaining immunogenicity in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Erova, Tatiana E; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; van Lier, Christina J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  15. Combinational Deletion of Three Membrane Protein-Encoding Genes Highly Attenuates Yersinia pestis while Retaining Immunogenicity in a Mouse Model of Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Tiner, Bethany L.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Baze, Wallace B.; van Lier, Christina J.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Chauhan, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  16. Progressive gene dose-dependent disruption of the methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator-driven rhythms in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Koliane; Aungier, Juliet; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive genetic neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor and cognitive deficits, as well as sleep and circadian abnormalities. In the R6/2 mouse, a fragment model of HD, rest-activity rhythms controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus disintegrate completely by 4months of age. Rhythms driven by a second circadian oscillator, the methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO), are disrupted even earlier, and cannot be induced after 2months of age. Here, we studied the effect of the HD mutation on the expression of MASCO-driven rhythms in a more slowly developing, genetically relevant mouse model of HD, the Q175 'knock-in' mouse. We induced expression of MASCO output by administering low dose methamphetamine (0.005%) chronically via the drinking water. We measured locomotor activity in constant darkness in wild-type and Q175 mice at 2 (presymptomatic), 6 (early symptomatic), and 12 (symptomatic) months of age. At 2months, all mice expressed MASCO-driven rhythms, regardless of genotype. At older ages, however, there was a progressive gene dose-dependent deficit in MASCO output in Q175 mice. At 6months of age, these rhythms could be observed in only 45% of heterozygous and 15% of homozygous mice. By 1year of age, 90% of homozygous mice had an impaired MASCO output. There was also an age-dependent disruption of MASCO output seen in wild-type mice. The fact that the progressive deficit in MASCO-driven rhythms in Q175 mice is HD gene dose-dependent suggests that, whatever its role in humans, abnormalities in MASCO output may contribute to the HD circadian phenotype.

  17. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  18. Differences in Gene Expression between Mouse and Human for Dynamically Regulated Genes in Early Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Madissoon, Elo; Töhönen, Virpi; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Katayama, Shintaro; Unneberg, Per; Inzunza, Jose; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide concern that can be treated with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Improvements in IVF and infertility treatment depend largely on better understanding of the molecular mechanisms for human preimplantation development. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to identify gene expression patterns for the first five days of human development, and many functional studies utilize mouse as a model system. We have identified genes of possible importance for this time period by analyzing human microarray data and available data from online databases. We selected 70 candidate genes for human preimplantation development and investigated their expression in the early mouse development from oocyte to the 8-cell stage. Maternally loaded genes expectedly decreased in expression during development both in human and mouse. We discovered that 25 significantly upregulated genes after fertilization in human included 13 genes whose orthologs in mouse behaved differently and mimicked the expression profile of maternally expressed genes. Our findings highlight many significant differences in gene expression patterns during mouse and human preimplantation development. We also describe four cancer-testis antigen families that are also highly expressed in human embryos: PRAME, SSX, GAGE and MAGEA. PMID:25089626

  19. Differences in gene expression between mouse and human for dynamically regulated genes in early embryo.

    PubMed

    Madissoon, Elo; Töhönen, Virpi; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Katayama, Shintaro; Unneberg, Per; Inzunza, Jose; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide concern that can be treated with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Improvements in IVF and infertility treatment depend largely on better understanding of the molecular mechanisms for human preimplantation development. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to identify gene expression patterns for the first five days of human development, and many functional studies utilize mouse as a model system. We have identified genes of possible importance for this time period by analyzing human microarray data and available data from online databases. We selected 70 candidate genes for human preimplantation development and investigated their expression in the early mouse development from oocyte to the 8-cell stage. Maternally loaded genes expectedly decreased in expression during development both in human and mouse. We discovered that 25 significantly upregulated genes after fertilization in human included 13 genes whose orthologs in mouse behaved differently and mimicked the expression profile of maternally expressed genes. Our findings highlight many significant differences in gene expression patterns during mouse and human preimplantation development. We also describe four cancer-testis antigen families that are also highly expressed in human embryos: PRAME, SSX, GAGE and MAGEA.

  20. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes.

  1. A unified gene catalog for the laboratory mouse reference genome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Richardson, J E; Hale, P; Baldarelli, R M; Reed, D J; Recla, J M; Sinclair, R; Reddy, T B K; Bult, C J

    2015-08-01

    We report here a semi-automated process by which mouse genome feature predictions and curated annotations (i.e., genes, pseudogenes, functional RNAs, etc.) from Ensembl, NCBI and Vertebrate Genome Annotation database (Vega) are reconciled with the genome features in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database (http://www.informatics.jax.org) into a comprehensive and non-redundant catalog. Our gene unification method employs an algorithm (fjoin--feature join) for efficient detection of genome coordinate overlaps among features represented in two annotation data sets. Following the analysis with fjoin, genome features are binned into six possible categories (1:1, 1:0, 0:1, 1:n, n:1, n:m) based on coordinate overlaps. These categories are subsequently prioritized for assessment of annotation equivalencies and differences. The version of the unified catalog reported here contains more than 59,000 entries, including 22,599 protein-coding coding genes, 12,455 pseudogenes, and 24,007 other feature types (e.g., microRNAs, lincRNAs, etc.). More than 23,000 of the entries in the MGI gene catalog have equivalent gene models in the annotation files obtained from NCBI, Vega, and Ensembl. 12,719 of the features are unique to NCBI relative to Ensembl/Vega; 11,957 are unique to Ensembl/Vega relative to NCBI, and 3095 are unique to MGI. More than 4000 genome features fall into categories that require manual inspection to resolve structural differences in the gene models from different annotation sources. Using the MGI unified gene catalog, researchers can easily generate a comprehensive report of mouse genome features from a single source and compare the details of gene and transcript structure using MGI's mouse genome browser.

  2. Clonal Dominance With Retroviral Vector Insertions Near the ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 Genes in a Human Xenotransplant Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Haemmerle, Reinhard; Phaltane, Ruhi; Rothe, Michael; Schröder, Simon; Schambach, Axel; Moritz, Thomas; Modlich, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Insertional leukemogenesis represents the major risk factor of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) based gene therapy utilizing integrating viral vectors. To develop a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of vector-related genotoxicity directly in the relevant human target cells, cord blood CD34+ HSCs were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD.SCID.IL2rg−/− (NSG) mice after transduction with an LTR-driven gammaretroviral vector (GV). Furthermore, we specifically investigated the effect of prolonged in vitro culture in the presence of cytokines recently described to promote HSC expansion or maintenance. Clonality of human hematopoiesis in NSG mice was assessed by high throughput insertion site analyses and validated by insertion site-specific PCR depicting a GV typical integration profile with insertion sites resembling to 25% those of clinical studies. No overrepresentation of integrations in the vicinity of cancer-related genes was observed, however, several dominant clones were identified including two clones harboring integrations in the ANGPT1 and near the ANGPT2 genes associated with deregulated ANGPT1- and ANGPT2-mRNA levels. While these data underscore the potential value of the NSG model, our studies also identified short-comings such as overall low numbers of engrafted HSCs, limited in vivo observation time, and the challenges of in-depth insertion site analyses by low contribution of gene modified hematopoiesis. PMID:25291142

  3. Clonal Dominance With Retroviral Vector Insertions Near the ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 Genes in a Human Xenotransplant Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Haemmerle, Reinhard; Phaltane, Ruhi; Rothe, Michael; Schröder, Simon; Schambach, Axel; Moritz, Thomas; Modlich, Ute

    2014-10-07

    Insertional leukemogenesis represents the major risk factor of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) based gene therapy utilizing integrating viral vectors. To develop a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of vector-related genotoxicity directly in the relevant human target cells, cord blood CD34(+) HSCs were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD.SCID.IL2rg(-/-) (NSG) mice after transduction with an LTR-driven gammaretroviral vector (GV). Furthermore, we specifically investigated the effect of prolonged in vitro culture in the presence of cytokines recently described to promote HSC expansion or maintenance. Clonality of human hematopoiesis in NSG mice was assessed by high throughput insertion site analyses and validated by insertion site-specific PCR depicting a GV typical integration profile with insertion sites resembling to 25% those of clinical studies. No overrepresentation of integrations in the vicinity of cancer-related genes was observed, however, several dominant clones were identified including two clones harboring integrations in the ANGPT1 and near the ANGPT2 genes associated with deregulated ANGPT1- and ANGPT2-mRNA levels. While these data underscore the potential value of the NSG model, our studies also identified short-comings such as overall low numbers of engrafted HSCs, limited in vivo observation time, and the challenges of in-depth insertion site analyses by low contribution of gene modified hematopoiesis.

  4. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  5. A novel human gamma-globin gene vector for genetic correction of sickle cell anemia in a humanized sickle mouse model: critical determinants for successful correction.

    PubMed

    Perumbeti, Ajay; Higashimoto, Tomoyasu; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Franco, Robert; Meiselman, Herbert J; Witte, David; Malik, Punam

    2009-08-06

    We show that lentiviral delivery of human gamma-globin gene under beta-globin regulatory control elements in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in sufficient postnatal fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression to correct sickle cell anemia (SCA) in the Berkeley "humanized" sickle mouse. Upon de-escalating the amount of transduced HSCs in transplant recipients, using reduced-intensity conditioning and varying gene transfer efficiency and vector copy number, we assessed critical parameters needed for correction. A systematic quantification of functional and hematologic red blood cell (RBC) indices, organ pathology, and life span was used to determine the minimal amount of HbF, F cells, HbF/F-cell, and gene-modified HSCs required for correcting the sickle phenotype. We show that long-term amelioration of disease occurred (1) when HbF exceeded 10%, F cells constituted two-thirds of the circulating RBCs, and HbF/F cell was one-third of the total hemoglobin in sickle RBCs; and (2) when approximately 20% gene-modified HSCs repopulated the marrow. Moreover, we show a novel model using reduced-intensity conditioning to determine genetically corrected HSC threshold that corrects a hematopoietic disease. These studies provide a strong preclinical model for what it would take to genetically correct SCA and are a foundation for the use of this vector in a human clinical trial.

  6. Reference genes for real-time PCR quantification of messenger RNAs and microRNAs in mouse model of obesity.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice. These

  7. EIAV-Based Retinal Gene Therapy in the shaker1 Mouse Model for Usher Syndrome Type 1B: Development of UshStat

    PubMed Central

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Binley, Katie; Lad, Yatish; Ellis, Scott; Widdowson, Peter; Iqball, Sharifah; Scripps, Vicky; Kelleher, Michelle; Loader, Julie; Miskin, James; Peng, You-Wei; Wang, Wei-Min; Cheung, Linda; Delimont, Duane; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1B is a combined deaf-blindness condition caused by mutations in the MYO7A gene. Loss of functional myosin VIIa in the retinal pigment epithelia (RPE) and/or photoreceptors leads to blindness. We evaluated the impact of subretinally delivered UshStat, a recombinant EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing human MYO7A, on photoreceptor function in the shaker1 mouse model for Usher type 1B that lacks a functional Myo7A gene. Subretinal injections of EIAV-CMV-GFP, EIAV-RK-GFP (photoreceptor specific), EIAV-CMV-MYO7A (UshStat) or EIAV-CMV-Null (control) vectors were performed in shaker1 mice. GFP and myosin VIIa expression was evaluated histologically. Photoreceptor function in EIAV-CMV-MYO7A treated eyes was determined by evaluating α-transducin translocation in photoreceptors in response to low light intensity levels, and protection from light induced photoreceptor degeneration was measured. The safety and tolerability of subretinally delivered UshStat was evaluated in macaques. Expression of GFP and myosin VIIa was confirmed in the RPE and photoreceptors in shaker1 mice following subretinal delivery of the EIAV-CMV-GFP/MYO7A vectors. The EIAV-CMV-MYO7A vector protected the shaker1 mouse photoreceptors from acute and chronic intensity light damage, indicated by a significant reduction in photoreceptor cell loss, and restoration of the α-transducin translocation threshold in the photoreceptors. Safety studies in the macaques demonstrated that subretinal delivery of UshStat is safe and well-tolerated. Subretinal delivery of EIAV-CMV-MYO7A (UshStat) rescues photoreceptor phenotypes in the shaker1 mouse. In addition, subretinally delivered UshStat is safe and well-tolerated in macaque safety studies These data support the clinical development of UshStat to treat Usher type 1B syndrome. PMID:24705452

  8. EIAV-based retinal gene therapy in the shaker1 mouse model for usher syndrome type 1B: development of UshStat.

    PubMed

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Binley, Katie; Lad, Yatish; Ellis, Scott; Widdowson, Peter; Iqball, Sharifah; Scripps, Vicky; Kelleher, Michelle; Loader, Julie; Miskin, James; Peng, You-Wei; Wang, Wei-Min; Cheung, Linda; Delimont, Duane; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1B is a combined deaf-blindness condition caused by mutations in the MYO7A gene. Loss of functional myosin VIIa in the retinal pigment epithelia (RPE) and/or photoreceptors leads to blindness. We evaluated the impact of subretinally delivered UshStat, a recombinant EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing human MYO7A, on photoreceptor function in the shaker1 mouse model for Usher type 1B that lacks a functional Myo7A gene. Subretinal injections of EIAV-CMV-GFP, EIAV-RK-GFP (photoreceptor specific), EIAV-CMV-MYO7A (UshStat) or EIAV-CMV-Null (control) vectors were performed in shaker1 mice. GFP and myosin VIIa expression was evaluated histologically. Photoreceptor function in EIAV-CMV-MYO7A treated eyes was determined by evaluating α-transducin translocation in photoreceptors in response to low light intensity levels, and protection from light induced photoreceptor degeneration was measured. The safety and tolerability of subretinally delivered UshStat was evaluated in macaques. Expression of GFP and myosin VIIa was confirmed in the RPE and photoreceptors in shaker1 mice following subretinal delivery of the EIAV-CMV-GFP/MYO7A vectors. The EIAV-CMV-MYO7A vector protected the shaker1 mouse photoreceptors from acute and chronic intensity light damage, indicated by a significant reduction in photoreceptor cell loss, and restoration of the α-transducin translocation threshold in the photoreceptors. Safety studies in the macaques demonstrated that subretinal delivery of UshStat is safe and well-tolerated. Subretinal delivery of EIAV-CMV-MYO7A (UshStat) rescues photoreceptor phenotypes in the shaker1 mouse. In addition, subretinally delivered UshStat is safe and well-tolerated in macaque safety studies These data support the clinical development of UshStat to treat Usher type 1B syndrome.

  9. Functional promoter polymorphisms direct the expression of cystathionine gamma-lyase gene in mouse models of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Kapopara, Piyushkumar R; Khan, Abrar A; Arige, Vikas; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Sonawane, Parshuram J; Sasi, Binu K; Mahapatra, Nitish R

    2017-01-01

    Despite the well-known role of cystathionine γ-lyase (Cth) in cardiovascular pathophysiology, transcriptional regulation of Cth remains incompletely understood. Sequencing of the Cth promoter region in mouse models of genetic/essential hypertension (viz. Blood Pressure High [BPH], Blood Pressure Low [BPL] and Blood Pressure Normal [BPN] mice) identified several genetic variations. Transient transfections of BPH/BPL-Cth promoter-reporter plasmids into various cell types revealed higher promoter activity of BPL-Cth than that of BPH-Cth. Corroboratively, endogenous Cth mRNA levels in kidney and liver tissues were also elevated in BPL mice. Computational analysis of the polymorphic Cth promoter region predicted differential binding affinity of c-Rel, HOXA3 and IRF1 with BPL/BPH-Cth promoter domains. Over-expression of c-Rel/HOXA3/IRF1 modulated BPL/BPH-Cth promoter activities in a consistent manner. Gel shift assays using BPH/BPL-Cth-promoter oligonucleotides with/without binding sites for c-Rel/HOXA3/IRF1 displayed formation of specific complexes with c-Rel/HOXA3/IRF1; addition of antibodies to reaction mixtures resulted in supershifts/inhibition of Cth promoter-transcription factor complexes. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays proved differential binding of c-Rel, HOXA3 and IRF1 with the polymorphic promoter region of BPL/BPH-Cth. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) reduced the activities of BPL/BPH-Cth promoters to different extents that were further declined by ectopic expression of IRF1; on the other hand, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of IRF1 rescued the TNF-α-mediated suppression of the BPL/BPH-Cth promoter activities. In corroboration, ChIP analysis revealed enhanced binding of IRF1 with BPH/BPL-Cth promoter following TNF-α treatment. BPL/BPH-Cth promoter activity was diminished upon exposure of hepatocytes and cardiomyoblasts to ischemia-like pathological condition due to reduced binding of c-Rel with BPL/BPH-Cth-promoter. Taken

  10. Gene-environment interaction during early development in the heterozygous reeler mouse: clues for modelling of major neurobehavioral syndromes.

    PubMed

    Laviola, Giovanni; Ognibene, Elisa; Romano, Emilia; Adriani, Walter; Keller, Flavio

    2009-04-01

    Autism and schizophrenia are multifactorial disorders with increasing prevalence in the young population. Among candidate molecules, reelin (RELN) is a protein of the extracellular matrix playing a key role in brain development and synaptic plasticity. The heterozygous (HZ) reeler mouse provides a model for studying the role of reelin deficiency for the onset of these syndromes. We investigated whether early indices of neurobehavioral disorders can be identified in the infant reeler, and whether the consequences of ontogenetic adverse experiences may question or support the suitability of this model. A first study focused on the link between early exposure to Chlorpyryfos and its enduring neurobehavioral consequences. Our data are interesting in view of recently discovered cholinergic abnormalities in autism and schizophrenia, and may suggest new avenues for early pharmacological intervention. In a second study, we analyzed the consequences of repeated maternal separation early in ontogeny. The results provide evidence of how unusual stress early in development are converted into altered behavior in some, but not all, individuals depending on gender and genetic background. A third study aimed to verify the reliability of the model at critical age windows. Data suggest reduced anxiety, increased impulsivity and disinhibition, and altered pain threshold in response to morphine for HZ, supporting a differential organization of brain dopaminergic, serotonergic and opioid systems in this genotype. In conclusion, HZ exhibited a complex behavioral and psycho-pharmacological phenotype, and differential responsivity to ontogenetic adverse conditions. HZ may be used to disentangle interactions between genetic vulnerability and environmental factors. Such an approach could help to model the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental psychiatric diseases.

  11. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  12. Cloning, characterization, and genomic structure of the mouse Ikbkap gene.

    PubMed

    Cuajungco, M P; Leyne, M; Mull, J; Gill, S P; Gusella, J F; Slaugenhaupt, S A

    2001-09-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that mutations in the human I-kappaB kinase-associated protein (IKBKAP) gene are responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD). Interestingly, amino acid substitutions in the IKAP correlate with increased risk for childhood bronchial asthma. Here, we report the cloning and genomic characterization of the mouse Ikbkap gene, the homolog of human IKBKAP. Like its human counterpart, Ikbkap encodes a protein of 1332 amino acids with a molecular weight of approximately 150 kDa. The Ikbkap gene product, Ikap, contains 37 exons that span approximately 51 kb. The protein shows 80% amino acid identity with human IKAP. It shows very high conservation across species and is homologous to the yeast Elp1/Iki3p protein, which is a member of the Elongator complex. The Ikbkap gene maps to chromosome 4 in a region that is syntenic to human chromosome 9q31.3. Because no animal model of FD currently exists, cloning of the mouse Ikbkap gene is an important first step toward creating a mouse model for FD. In addition, cloning of Ikbkap is crucial to the characterization of the putative mammalian Elongator complex.

  13. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models.

  14. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  15. Now and future of mouse mutagenesis for human disease models.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Yoichi

    2010-09-01

    One of the major objectives of the Human Genome Project is to understand the biological function of the gene and genome as well as to develop clinical applications for human diseases. For this purpose, the experimental validations and preclinical trails by using animal models are indispensable. The mouse (Mus musculus) is one of the best animal models because genetics is well established in the mouse and embryonic manipulation technologies are also well developed. Large-scale mouse mutagenesis projects have been conducted to develop various mouse models since 1997. Originally, the phenotype-driven mutagenesis with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has been the major efforts internationally then knockout/conditional mouse projects and gene-driven mutagenesis have been following. At the beginning, simple monogenic traits in the experimental condition have been elucidated. Then, more complex traits with variety of environmental interactions and gene-to-gene interactions (epistasis) have been challenged with mutant mice. In addition, chromosomal substitution strains and collaborative cross strains are also available to elucidate the complex traits in the mouse. Altogether, mouse models with mutagenesis and various laboratory strains will accelerate the studies of functional genomics in the mouse as well as in human. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meechan, Daniel W; Tucker, Eric S; Maynard, Thomas M; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-09-22

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for "diseases of cortical connectivity" thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism.

  17. Liver X Receptor Agonist Modifies the DNA Methylation Profile of Synapse and Neurogenesis-Related Genes in the Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, A G; Hernández, H G; Restrepo, A; Muñoz, J I; Bayon, G F; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Cardona-Gómez, G P; Arboleda, H; Arboleda, Gonzalo H

    2016-02-01

    The liver X receptor agonist, GW3965, improves cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. Here, we determined if short-term GW3965 treatment induces changes in the DNA methylation state of the hippocampus, which are associated with cognitive improvement. Twenty-four-month-old triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were treated with GW3965 (50 mg/kg/day for 6 days). DNA methylation state was examined by modified bisulfite conversion and hybridization on Illumina Infinium Methylation BeadChip 450 k arrays. The Morris water maze was used for behavioral analysis. Our results show in addition to improvement in cognition methylation changes in 39 of 13,715 interrogated probes in treated 3xTg-AD mice compared with untreated 3xTg-AD mice. These changes in methylation probes include 29 gene loci. Importantly, changes in methylation status were mainly from synapse-related genes (SYP, SYN1, and DLG3) and neurogenesis-associated genes (HMGB3 and RBBP7). Thus, our results indicate that liver X receptors (LXR) agonist treatment induces rapid changes in DNA methylation, particularly in loci associated with genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic function. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism to explain the beneficial effect of GW3965.

  18. Assessment of a passive immunity mouse model to quantitatively analyze the impact of neutralizing antibodies on adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Tu, Lingli; Gao, Guangping; Sun, Xun; Duan, Jiachuan; Lu, You

    2013-01-31

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are common infective agents of primates. As such, healthy primates carry a large pool of AAV-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), which inhibit AAV-mediated gene transfer therapeutic strategies. Thus, a clinical method to screen patient candidates for AAV-specific NAbs prior to treatment, especially with the frequently used AAV8 capsid component, will facilitate individualized treatment design and enhance therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and sensitivity of a passive immunity mouse model to quantitatively assess anti-AAV8 NAb titers, as compared to an in vitro immunoassay. The passive transfer model was established in C57BL/6 mice by tail vein injection of pre-defined sera from 23 male rhesus monkeys. The mice were then administered low dose (3e10 GC/mouse) self-complementary (sc) AAV8. The in vitro NAb assay indicated that 69.57% of the rhesus donors had pre-existing anti-AAV8 NAb. The in vivo NAb assay, however, was better able to detect low NAb titer (≤ 1:5), which can mediate neutralization in vivo. Indeed, 17 rhesus donors (74.0%) had pre-existing anti-AAV8 neutralization by in vivo NAb assay. Our findings indicated that the in vivo NAb assay is superior to the in vitro assay for detecting low NAb titers.

  19. Induction and prevention of severe hyperammonemia in the spfash mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency using shRNA and rAAV-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sharon C; Kok, Cindy Y; Dane, Allison P; Carpenter, Kevin; Kizana, Eddy; Kuchel, Philip W; Alexander, Ian E

    2011-05-01

    Urea cycle defects presenting early in life with hyperammonemia remain difficult to treat and commonly necessitate liver transplantation. Gene therapy has the potential to prevent hyperammonemic episodes while awaiting liver transplantation, and possibly also to avert the need for transplantation altogether. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most prevalent urea cycle disorder, provides an ideal model for the development of liver-targeted gene therapy. While we and others have successfully cured the spf(ash) mouse model of OTC deficiency using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, a major limitation of this model is the presence of residual OTC enzymatic activity which confers a mild phenotype without clinically significant hyperammonemia. To better model severe disease we devised a strategy involving AAV2/8-mediated delivery of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to specifically knockdown residual endogenous OTC messenger RNA (mRNA). This strategy proved highly successful with vector-treated mice developing severe hyperammonemia and associated neurological impairment. Using this system, we showed that the dose of an AAV rescue construct encoding the murine OTC (mOTC) cDNA required to prevent hyperammonemia is fivefold lower than that required to control orotic aciduria. This result is favorable for clinical translation as it indicates that the threshold for therapeutic benefit is likely to be lower than indicated by earlier studies.

  20. Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts intraneocortical circuitry, cortical gene expression, and behavior in a mouse model of FASD.

    PubMed

    El Shawa, Hani; Abbott, Charles W; Huffman, Kelly J

    2013-11-27

    In utero ethanol exposure from a mother's consumption of alcoholic beverages impacts brain and cognitive development, creating a range of deficits in the child (Levitt, 1998; Lebel et al., 2012). Children diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are often born with facial dysmorphology and may exhibit cognitive, behavioral, and motor deficits from ethanol-related neurobiological damage in early development. Prenatal ethanol exposure (PrEE) is the number one cause of preventable mental and intellectual dysfunction globally, therefore the neurobiological underpinnings warrant systematic research. We document novel anatomical and gene expression abnormalities in the neocortex of newborn mice exposed to ethanol in utero. This is the first study to demonstrate large-scale changes in intraneocortical connections and disruption of normal patterns of neocortical gene expression in any prenatal ethanol exposure animal model. Neuroanatomical defects and abnormal neocortical RZRβ, Id2, and Cadherin8 expression patterns are observed in PrEE newborns, and abnormal behavior is present in 20-d-old PrEE mice. The vast network of neocortical connections is responsible for high-level sensory and motor processing as well as complex cognitive thought and behavior in humans. Disruptions to this network from PrEE-related changes in gene expression may underlie some of the cognitive-behavioral phenotypes observed in children with FASD.

  1. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision to the All-Cone Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-1

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peterson, James J.; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; McCullough, K. Tyler; Zhang, Zhonghong; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ding, Xi-Qin; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Boye, Shannon E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are the cause of Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1), a protein expressed exclusively in outer segments of photoreceptors and essential for timely recovery from photoexcitation. Recent clinical data show that, despite a high degree of visual disturbance stemming from a loss of cone function, LCA1 patients retain normal photoreceptor architecture, except for foveal cone outer segment abnormalities and, in some patients, foveal cone loss. These results point to the cone-rich central retina as a target for GUCY2D replacement. LCA1 gene replacement studies thus far have been conducted in rod-dominant models (mouse) or with vectors and organisms lacking clinical translatability. Here we investigate gene replacement in the Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mouse, an all-cone model deficient in retGC1. We show that AAV-retGC1 treatment fully restores cone function, cone-mediated visual behavior, and guanylate cyclase activity, and preserves cones in treated Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice over the long-term. A novel finding was that retinal function could be restored to levels above that in Nrl−/− controls, contrasting results in other models of retGC1 deficiency. We attribute this to increased cyclase activity in treated Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice relative to Nrl−/− controls. Thus, Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice possess an expanded dynamic range in ERG response to gene replacement relative to other models. Lastly, we show that a candidate clinical vector, AAV5-GRK1-GUCY2D, when delivered to adult Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice, restores retinal function that persists for at least 6 months. Our results provide strong support for clinical application of a gene therapy targeted to the cone-rich, central retina of LCA1 patients. PMID:26247368

  3. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  4. Life-Long Correction of Hyperbilirubinemia with a Neonatal Liver-Specific AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Lethal Mouse Model of Crigler–Najjar Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentillin, Lorena; Vaníkova, Jana; Bockor, Luka; Bellarosa, Cristina; Mancarella, Antonio; Vianello, Eleonora; Tiribelli, Claudio; Giacca, Mauro; Vitek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Null mutations in the UGT1A1 gene result in Crigler–Najjar syndrome type I (CNSI), characterized by severe hyperbilirubinemia and constant risk of developing neurological damage. Phototherapy treatment lowers plasma bilirubin levels, but its efficacy is limited and liver transplantation is required. To find alternative therapies, we applied AAV liver-specific gene therapy to a lethal mouse model of CNSI. We demonstrated that a single neonatal hUGT1A1 gene transfer was successful and the therapeutic effect lasted up to 17 months postinjection. The therapeutic effect was mediated by the presence of transcriptionally active double-stranded episomes. We also compared the efficacy of two different gene therapy approaches: liver versus skeletal muscle transgene expression. We observed that 5–8% of normal liver expression and activity levels were sufficient to significantly reduce bilirubin levels and maintain lifelong low plasma bilirubin concentration (3.1±1.5 mg/dl). In contrast, skeletal muscle was not able to efficiently lower bilirubin (6.4±2.0 mg/dl), despite 20–30% of hUgt1a1 expression levels, compared with normal liver. We propose that this remarkable difference in gene therapy efficacy could be related to the absence of the Mrp2 and Mrp3 transporters of conjugated bilirubin in muscle. Taken together, our data support the concept that liver is the best organ for efficient and long-term CNSI gene therapy, and suggest that the use of extra-hepatic tissues should be coupled to the presence of bilirubin transporters. PMID:25072305

  5. Molecular insight into the association between cartilage regeneration and ear wound healing in genetic mouse models: targeting new genes in regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rai, Muhammad Farooq; Schmidt, Eric J; McAlinden, Audrey; Cheverud, James M; Sandell, Linda J

    2013-11-06

    Tissue regeneration is a complex trait with few genetic models available. Mouse strains LG/J and MRL are exceptional healers. Using recombinant inbred strains from a large (LG/J, healer) and small (SM/J, nonhealer) intercross, we have previously shown a positive genetic correlation between ear wound healing, knee cartilage regeneration, and protection from osteoarthritis. We hypothesize that a common set of genes operates in tissue healing and articular cartilage regeneration. Taking advantage of archived histological sections from recombinant inbred strains, we analyzed expression of candidate genes through branched-chain DNA technology directly from tissue lysates. We determined broad-sense heritability of candidates, Pearson correlation of candidates with healing phenotypes, and Ward minimum variance cluster analysis for strains. A bioinformatic assessment of allelic polymorphisms within and near candidate genes was also performed. The expression of several candidates was significantly heritable among strains. Although several genes correlated with both ear wound healing and cartilage healing at a marginal level, the expression of four genes representing DNA repair (Xrcc2, Pcna) and Wnt signaling (Axin2, Wnt16) pathways was significantly positively correlated with both phenotypes. Cluster analysis accurately classified healers and nonhealers for seven out of eight strains based on gene expression. Specific sequence differences between LG/J and SM/J were identified as potential causal polymorphisms. Our study suggests a common genetic basis between tissue healing and osteoarthritis susceptibility. Mapping genetic variations causing differences in diverse healing responses in multiple tissues may reveal generic healing processes in pursuit of new therapeutic targets designed to induce or enhance regeneration and, potentially, protection from osteoarthritis.

  6. Amylin Treatment Reduces Neuroinflammation and Ameliorates Abnormal Patterns of Gene Expression in the Cerebral Cortex of an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erming; Zhu, Haihao; Wang, Xiaofan; Gower, Adam C.; Wallack, Max; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Kowall, Neil; Qiu, Wei Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Our recent study has demonstrated that peripheral amylin treatment reduces the amyloid pathology in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mouse models, and improves their learning and memory. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of amylin for AD was beyond reducing the amyloids in the brain, and have now directly tested the actions of amylin on other aspects of AD pathogenesis, especially neuroinflammation. A 10-week course of peripheral amylin treatment significantly reduced levels of cerebral inflammation markers, Cd68 and Iba1, in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. Mechanistic studies indicated the protective effect of amylin required interaction with its cognate receptor because silencing the amylin receptor expression blocked the amylin effect on Cd68 in microglia. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we discovered that amylin treatment influenced two gene modules linked with amyloid pathology: 1) a module related to proinflammation and transport/vesicle process that included a hub gene of Cd68, and 2) a module related to mitochondria function that included a hub gene of Atp5b. Amylin treatment restored the expression of most genes in the APP cortex toward levels observed in the wild-type (WT) cortex in these two modules including Cd68 and Atp5b. Using a human dataset, we found that the expression levels of Cd68 and Atp5b were significantly correlated with the neurofibrillary tangle burden in the AD brain and with their cognition. These data suggest that amylin acts on the pathological cascade in animal models of AD, and further supports the therapeutic potential of amylin-type peptides for AD. PMID:27911303

  7. Inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous gene in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ruilin; Zhao, Kai; Shen, Ruling; Cai, Lei; Yang, Xingyu; Kuang, Ying; Mao, Jifang; Huang, Fang; Wang, Zhugang; Fei, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Methods for generating loss-of-function mutations, such as conventional or conditional gene knockout, are widely used in deciphering gene function in vivo. By contrast, inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous gene expression has not been well established. Using a mouse model, we demonstrate that a chimeric transcriptional repressor molecule (tTS) can reversibly inhibit the expression of an endogenous gene, Nmyc. In this system, a tetracycline response element (TRE) artificially inserted near the target gene’s promoter region turns the gene on and off in a tetracycline-inducible manner. NmycTRE mice were generated by inserting a TRE into the first intron of Nmyc by the knockin technique. NmycTRE mice were crossed to tTS transgenic mice to produce NmycTRE/TRE: tTS embryos. In these embryos, tTS blocked Nmyc expression, and embryonic lethality was observed at E11.5d. When the dam was exposed to drinking water containing doxycycline (dox), normal endogenous Nmyc expression was rescued, and the embryo survived to birth. This novel genetic modification strategy based on the tTS–dox system for inducible and reversible regulation of endogenous mouse genes will be a powerful tool to investigate target genes that cause embryonic lethality or other defects where reversible regulation or temporary shutdown of the target gene is needed. PMID:22879379

  8. Anti-tumor effects of canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cell-based interferon-β gene therapy and cisplatin in a mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyoung-Won; Lee, Hee-Woo; Oh, Ye-In; Ahn, Jin-Ok; Koh, Ye-Rin; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2011-09-01

    Adipose tissue (AT)-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) (AT-MSC) represent a novel tool for delivering therapeutic genes to tumor cells. Interferon (IFN)-β is a cytokine with pleiotropic cellular functions, including anti-proliferative, immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic activities. The purpose of this study was to engineer canine AT-MSC (cAT-MSC) producing IFN-β and to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of cAT-MSC-IFN-β combined with cisplatin in mouse melanoma model. cAT-MSC engineered to express mouse IFN-β were generated using a lentiviral vector (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) and the secreted IFN-β-induced inhibition of tumor cell growth and apoptosis on B16F10 cells was investigated in vitro prior to in vivo studies. Melanoma-bearing mouse was developed by injecting B16F10 cells subcutaneously into 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, cisplatin (10 mg/kg) was injected intratumorally, and 3 days later the engineered cAT-MSC were injected subcutaneously every 3 days to death. Tumor volume and survival times were measured. The combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with cisplatin was more effective in inhibiting the growth of melanoma and resulted in significantly extended survival time than both an unengineered cAT-MSC-cisplatin combination group and a cisplatin-alone group. Interestingly, subcutaneously injected cAT-MSC-IFN-β were migrated to tumor sites. Our data suggest that canine AT-MSC could serve as a powerful cell-based delivery vehicle for releasing therapeutic proteins to tumor lesions. Maximal anti-tumor effects were seen when this therapy was combined with a DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent. This study demonstrates the possible applicability of AT-MSC-mediated IFN-β in treating canine and human cancer patients.

  9. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Males are from Mars, and females are from Venus: sex-specific fetal brain gene expression signatures in a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Andrea G; Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Sverdlov, Deanna; Neri, Caterina; Bianchi, Diana W

    2016-05-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in children, including autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously identified second-trimester amniotic fluid and term cord blood gene expression patterns suggesting dysregulated brain development in fetuses of obese compared with lean women. We sought to investigate the biological significance of these findings in a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity. We evaluated sex-specific differences in fetal growth, brain gene expression signatures, and associated pathways. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a 60% high-fat diet or 10% fat control diet for 12-14 weeks prior to mating. During pregnancy, obese dams continued on the high-fat diet or transitioned to the control diet. Lean dams stayed on the control diet. On embryonic day 17.5, embryos were weighed and fetal brains were snap frozen. RNA was extracted from male and female forebrains (10 per diet group per sex) and hybridized to whole-genome expression arrays. Significantly differentially expressed genes were identified using a Welch's t test with the Benjamini-Hochberg correction. Functional analyses were performed using ingenuity pathways analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Embryos of dams on the high-fat diet were significantly smaller than controls, with males more severely affected than females (P = .01). Maternal obesity and maternal obesity with dietary change in pregnancy resulted in significantly more dysregulated genes in male vs female fetal brains (386 vs 66, P < .001). Maternal obesity with and without dietary change in pregnancy was associated with unique brain gene expression signatures for each sex, with an overlap of only 1 gene. Changing obese dams to a control diet in pregnancy resulted in more differentially expressed genes in the fetal brain than maternal obesity alone. Functional analyses identified common

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Chemically Induced Mouse Lung Adenomas1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruisheng; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Because of similarities in histopathology and tumor progression stages between mouse and human lung adenocarcinomas, the mouse lung tumor model with lung adenomas as the endpoint has been used extensively to evaluate the efficacy of putative lung cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, a competitive cDNA library screening (CCLS) was employed to determine changes in the expression of mRNA in chemically induced lung adenomas compared with paired normal lung tissues. A total of 2555 clones having altered expression in tumors were observed following competitive hybridization between normal lung and lung adenomas after primary screening of over 160,000 clones from a mouse lung cDNA library. Among the 755 clones confirmed by dot blot hybridization, 240 clones were underexpressed, whereas 515 clones were overexpressed in tumors. Sixty-five clones with the most frequently altered expression in six individual tumors were confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. When examining the 58 known genes, 39 clones had increased expression and 19 had decreased expression, whereas the 7 novel genes showed overexpression. A high percentage (>60%) of overexpressed or underexpressed genes was observed in at least two or three of the lesions. Reproducibly overexpressed genes included ERK-1, JAK-1, surfactant proteins A, B, and C, NFAT1, α-1 protease inhibitor, helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase (CHUK), α-adaptin, α-1 PI2, thioether S-methyltransferase, and CYP2C40. Reproducibly underexpressed genes included paroxanase, ALDH II, CC10, von Ebner salivary gland protein, and α- and β-globin. In addition, CCLS identified several novel genes or genes not previously associated with lung carcinogenesis, including a hypothetical protein (FLJ11240) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor homologue. This study shows the efficacy of this methodology for identifying genes with altered expression. These genes may prove to be helpful in our understanding of the genetic basis of lung

  12. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  13. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  14. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  15. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1−/− mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0–P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner’s membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1−/− mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  17. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  18. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  19. Therapeutic benefit of lentiviral-mediated neonatal intracerebral gene therapy in a mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Annalisa; Salvagno, Camilla; Maderna, Claudio; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Morena, Francesco; Kulik, Willem; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio; Martino, Sabata; Gritti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC) deficiency. Gene therapy (GT) should provide rapid, extensive and lifetime GALC supply in central nervous system (CNS) tissues to prevent or halt irreversible neurologic progression. Here we used a lentiviral vector (LV) to transfer a functional GALC gene in the brain of Twitcher mice, a severe GLD model. A single injection of LV.GALC in the external capsule of Twitcher neonates resulted in robust transduction of neural cells with minimal and transient activation of inflammatory and immune response. Importantly, we documented a proficient transduction of proliferating and post-mitotic oligodendroglia, a relevant target cell type in GLD. GALC activity (30–50% of physiological levels) was restored in the whole CNS of treated mice as early as 8 days post-injection. The early and stable enzymatic supply ensured partial clearance of storage and reduction of psychosine levels, translating in amelioration of histopathology and enhanced lifespan. At 6 months post-injection in non-affected mice, LV genome persisted exclusively in the injected region, where transduced cells overexpressed GALC. Integration site analysis in transduced brain tissues showed no aberrant clonal expansion and preferential targeting of neural-specific genes. This study establishes neonatal LV-mediated intracerebral GT as a rapid, effective and safe therapeutic intervention to correct CNS pathology in GLD and provides a strong rationale for its application in this and similar leukodystrophies, alone or in combination with therapies targeting the somatic pathology, with the final aim of providing an effective and timely treatment of these global disorders. PMID:24463623

  20. CBP gene transfer increases BDNF levels and ameliorates learning and memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Caccamo, Antonella; Maldonado, Monica A.; Bokov, Alex F.; Majumder, Smita; Oddo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and memory loss are common features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abnormalities in the expression profile of immediate early genes that play a critical role in memory formation, such as the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), have been reported in the brains of AD patients. Here we show that amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, which plays a primary role in the cognitive deficits of AD, interferes with CREB activity. We further show that restoring CREB function via brain viral delivery of the CREB-binding protein (CBP) improves learning and memory deficits in an animal model of AD. Notably, such improvements occur without changes in Aβ and tau pathology, and instead are linked to an increased level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The resulting data suggest that Aβ-induced learning and memory deficits are mediated by alterations in CREB function, based on the finding that restoring CREB activity by directly modulating CBP levels in the brains of adult mice is sufficient to ameliorate learning and memory. Therefore, increasing CBP expression in adult brains may be a valid therapeutic approach not only for AD, but also for various brain disorders characterized by alterations in immediate early genes, further supporting the concept that viral vector delivery may be a viable therapeutic approach in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21149712

  1. CRTH2 antagonism significantly ameliorates airway hyperreactivity and downregulates inflammation-induced genes in a mouse model of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Nicholas W; Berlin, Aaron A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Sásik, Roman; Sprague, L James; Ly, Tai Wei; Hardiman, Gary; Boehme, Stefen A; Bacon, Kevin B

    2008-11-01

    Prostaglandin D(2), the ligand for the G protein-coupled receptors DP1 and CRTH2, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the allergic response in diseases such as asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis. This prostanoid also fulfills a number of physiological, anti-inflammatory roles through its receptor DP1. We investigated the role of PGD(2) and CRTH2 in allergic pulmonary inflammation by using a highly potent and specific antagonist of CRTH2. Administration of this antagonist ameliorated inflammation caused by either acute or subchronic sensitization using the cockroach egg antigen. Gene expression and ELISA analysis revealed that there was reduced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA or protein produced, as well as a wide array of genes associated with the Th2-type proinflammatory response. Importantly, the CRTH2 antagonist reduced antigen-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a antibody levels as well as decreased mucus deposition and leukocyte infiltration in the large airways. Collectively, these findings suggest that the PGD(2)-CRTH2 activation axis has a pivotal role in mediating the inflammation and the underlying immune response in a T cell-driven model of allergic airway inflammation.

  2. Neural stem cell gene therapy ameliorates pathology and function in a mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Ricca, Alessandra; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Alcala'-Franco, Beatriz; Cavazzin, Chiara; Orlacchio, Aldo; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2011-10-01

    Murine neural stem cells (mNSCs), either naive or genetically modified to express supranormal levels of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), were transplanted into the brain of Twitcher mice, a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy, a severe sphingolipidosis. Cells engrafted long-term into the host cytoarchitecture, producing functional GALC. Levels of enzyme activity in brain and spinal cord tissues were enhanced when GALC-overexpressing NSC were used. Enzymatic correction correlated with reduced tissue storage, decreased activation of astroglia and microglia, delayed onset of symptoms, and longer lifespan. Mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of mNSC included widespread enzyme distribution, cross-correction of host cells, anti-inflammatory activity, and neuroprotection. Similar cell engraftment and metabolic correction were reproduced using human NSC. Thus, NSC gene therapy rapidly reconstitutes sustained and long-lasting enzyme activity in central nervous system tissues. Combining this approach with treatments targeting the systemic disease associated with leukodystrophies may provide significant therapeutic benefit.

  3. Gene Therapy Rescues Cone Structure and Function in the 3-Month-Old rd12 Mouse: A Model for Midcourse RPE65 Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William. W.; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Methods. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin–specific antibodies. Results. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin–positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin–positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. Conclusions. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials. PMID:21169527

  4. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-27

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  5. Disconnect between alcohol-induced alterations in chromatin structure and gene transcription in a mouse embryonic stem cell model of exposure.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Kylee J; Wang, Haiqing; Bedi, Yudhishtar S; Skiles, William M; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Golding, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    Alterations to chromatin structure induced by environmental insults have become an attractive explanation for the persistence of exposure effects into subsequent life stages. However, a growing body of work examining the epigenetic impact that alcohol and other drugs of abuse exert consistently notes a disconnection between induced changes in chromatin structure and patterns of gene transcription. Thus, an important question is whether perturbations in the 'histone code' induced by prenatal exposures to alcohol implicitly subvert gene expression, or whether the hierarchy of cellular signaling networks driving development is such that they retain control over the transcriptional program. To address this question, we examined the impact of ethanol exposure in mouse embryonic stem cells cultured under 2i conditions, where the transcriptional program is rigidly enforced through the use of small molecule inhibitors. We find that ethanol-induced changes in post-translational histone modifications are dose-dependent, unique to the chromatin modification under investigation, and that the extent and direction of the change differ between the period of exposure and the recovery phase. Similar to in vivo models, we find post-translational modifications affecting histone 3 lysine 9 are the most profoundly impacted, with the signature of exposure persisting long after alcohol has been removed. These changes in chromatin structure associate with dose-dependent alterations in the levels of transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Tet1, Tet2, Tet3, and Polycomb complex members Eed and Ezh2. However, in this model, ethanol-induced changes to the chromatin template do not consistently associate with changes in gene transcription, impede the process of differentiation, or affect the acquisition of monoallelic patterns of expression for the imprinted gene Igf2R. These findings question the inferred universal relevance of epigenetic changes induced by drugs of abuse and suggest that changes

  6. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  7. In-Vivo Characterization of Mammalian Polarity Genes as Novel Tumor Suppressors Involved in Breast Cancer Development and Progression in a Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724 REPORT DATE: March...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724...Development and Progression in a Mouse Model PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Avi Z. Rosenberg CONTRACTING

  8. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Gene Therapy Leads to Significant Lowering of Plasma Cholesterol Levels in Humanized Mouse Models of Homozygous and Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H.; Li, Hui; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Lagor, William; Jacobs, Frank; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a life-threatening genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). As a bridge to clinical trials, we generated a “humanized” mouse model lacking LDLR and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-1 (APOBEC-1) expression and expressing a human ApoB100 transgene in order to permit more authentic simulation of in vivo interactions between the clinical transgene product, human LDLR (hLDLR), and its endogenous ligand, human ApoB100. On a chow diet, the humanized LDLR-deficient mice have substantial hypercholesterolemia and a lipoprotein phenotype more closely resembling human homozygous FH (hoFH) than in previous mouse models of FH. On injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector encoding the human LDLR cDNA, significant correction of hypercholesterolemia was realized at doses as low as 1.5×1011 genome copies (GC)/kg. Given that some patients with heterozygous FH (heFH) cannot be adequately treated with current therapy, we then extended our studies to similarly “humanized” mice that were heterozygous for LDLR deficiency, and that have a lipoprotein phenotype resembling heterozygous FH. Injection of AAV8-hLDLR brought about significant reduction in total and LDL cholesterol at doses as low as 5×1011 GC/kg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the liver-specific AAV8-hLDLR vector in the treatment of humanized mice modeling both hoFH and heFH. PMID:22985273

  9. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  10. [Psoriasis SCID-mouse model].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Kaufmann, R; Boehncke, W-H

    2006-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by a complex phenotype and pathogenesis along with polygenic determination. Several psoriasis animal models have only been able to incompletely reproduce the disease. A xenogeneic transplantation approach, grafting skin from psoriatic patients onto mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), was the first to meet the criteria for a psoriasis model. During the last 10 years, this psoriasis SCID-mouse model not only allowed telling experiments focusing on pathogenetic aspects, but also proved being a powerful tool for drug discovery with a good predictive value.

  11. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Letts, V.A.; Valenzuela, A.; Dunbar, C.; Zheng, Q.Y.; Johnson, K.R.; Frankel, W.N.

    2010-01-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1pkr), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1pkr mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21. PMID:11003695

  12. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene.

    PubMed

    Letts, V A; Valenzuela, A; Dunbar, C; Zheng, Q Y; Johnson, K R; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1(pkr)), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1(pkr) mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21.

  13. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels; Cecchi, Claudia R; Dalsgaard, Trine; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function.

  14. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels; Cecchi, Claudia R.; Dalsgaard, Trine; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function. PMID:26046536

  15. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  16. Structural and functional characterization of the mouse Hlx homeobox gene.

    PubMed

    Bates, M D; Schatzman, L C; Lints, T; Hamlin, P E; Harvey, R P; Potter, S S

    2000-10-01

    Hlx is a mesenchymally expressed homeobox transcription factor gene that is essential for normal intestinal and hepatic development in the mouse. Here we report further characterization of the mouse Hlx gene, including an additional 3.7 kb of 5' sequence as well as the sequence of the three introns. Comparison of the sequence of the mouse Hlx gene 5' to the coding region with that of the human gene revealed multiple regions of high conservation. Neither the mouse nor the human gene contained a TATA box, and ribonuclease protection studies defined heterogeneous transcription start sites for the mouse gene. A number of consensus transcription factor binding sites were conserved between the mouse and human Hlx genes both within and outside of the highly conserved regions. Reporter constructs containing 4.2 or 1.4 kb of mouse 5' sequence showed active expression in cell lines that express Hlx. Further characterization of the mouse Hlx gene will provide insight into the developmental regulation of the mouse digestive system.

  17. Expression of selected genes escaping from X inactivation in the 41, XX(Y)* mouse model for Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Werler, Steffi; Poplinski, Andreas; Gromoll, Jörg; Wistuba, Joachim

    2011-06-01

    We hypothesized that patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) not only undergo X inactivation, but also that genes escape from inactivation. Their transcripts would constitute a significant difference, as male metabolism is not adapted to a 'female-like' gene dosage. We evaluated the expression of selected X-linked genes in our 41, XX(Y)* male mice to determine whether these genes escape inactivation and whether tissue-specific differences occur. Correct X inactivation was identified by Xist expression. Relative expression of X-linked genes was examined in liver, kidney and brain tissue by real-time PCR in adult XX(Y)* and XY* males and XX females. Expression of genes known to escape X inactivation was analysed. Relative mRNA levels of Pgk1 (control, X inactivated), and the genes Eif2s3x, Kdm5c, Ddx3x and Kdm6a escaping from X inactivation were quantified from liver, kidney and brain. Pgk1 mRNA expression showed no difference, confirming correct X inactivation. In kidney and liver, XX(Y)* males resembled the female expression pattern in all four candidate genes and were distinguishable from XY* males. Contrastingly, in brain tissue XX(Y)* males expressed all four genes higher than male and female controls. Altered expression of genes escaping X inactivation probably contributes directly to the XX(Y)* phenotype. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. Assessment of Transcriptional Activity of Borrelia burgdorferi and Host Cytokine Genes During Early and Late Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sunlian; Barthold, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Differential gene expression by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes during mammalian infection facilitates their dissemination as well as immune evasion. Modulation of gene transcription in response to host immunity has been documented with the outer surface protein C, but the influence of transcription of other genes is largely unknown. A low-density array (LDA) was developed to study transcriptional activity of 43 B. burgdorferi genes and 19 host genes that may be involved in various host–agent interactions. Gene transcription in heart, joint, and muscle tissue was compared in immunocompetent C3H and immunodeficient C3H-scid mice during early (3 weeks) and late (2 months) B. burgdorferi infection. Among all tissue types, levels of relative transcription of over 80% of B. burgdorferi genes tested were one- to nine-fold less in C3H mice compared to C3H-scid mice. At the later time point, all genes were transcribed in C3H-scid mice, whereas transcription of 16 genes out of 43 tested was not detected in analyzed tissues of C3H mice. Our data suggest that during infection of immunocompetent mice, a majority of B. burgdorferi genes tested are downregulated in response to acquired host immunity. LDA revealed variable patterns of host gene expression in different tissues and at different intervals in infected mice. Higher levels of relative expression for IL-10 during both early and late infection were detected in heart base, and it was unchanged in the tibiotarsal joint. Comparative analysis of B. burgdorferi and host genes transcriptional activity revealed that increased flaB mRNA during early infection was followed by increases of CCL7, CCL8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in all assessed tissue types. LDA represents a valuable approach for sensitive and quantitative gene transcription profiling and for understanding Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23930938

  19. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; van der Spek, Sophie J. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. Methods We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. Results Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural) developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. Conclusion Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE between mouse and

  20. Micrognathia in mouse models of ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adel Al-Lami, Hadeel; Barrell, William B; Liu, Karen J

    2016-12-15

    Defects in the development of the mandible can lead to micrognathia, or small jaw, which manifests in ciliopathic conditions, such as orofaciodigital syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Although micrognathia occurs frequently in human and mouse ciliopathies, it has been difficult to pinpoint the underlying cellular causes. In this mini-review, we shed light on the tissue-specific contributions to ciliary dysfunction in the development of the mandible. First, we outline the steps involved in setting up the jaw primordium and subsequent steps in the outgrowth of the mandibular skeleton. We then determine the critical tissue interactions using mice carrying a conditional mutation in the cilia gene Ofd1 Our studies highlight the usefulness of the Ofd1 mouse model and illustrate long-term possibilities for understanding the cellular and biochemical events underlying micrognathia. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Maternal choline modifies fetal liver copper, gene expression, DNA methylation, and neonatal growth in the tx-j mouse model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; Keen, Carl L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W; Halsted, Charles H; LaSalle, Janine M

    2014-02-01

    Maternal diet can affect fetal gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Wilson disease (WD), which is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP7B encoding a biliary copper transporter, is characterized by excessive hepatic copper accumulation, but variability in disease severity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational supply of dietary methyl groups modifies fetal DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in methionine and lipid metabolism that are impaired prior to hepatic steatosis in the toxic milk (tx-j) mouse model of WD. Female C3H control and tx-j mice were fed control (choline 8 mmol/Kg of diet) or choline-supplemented (choline 36 mmol/Kg of diet) diets for 2 weeks throughout mating and pregnancy to gestation day 17. A second group of C3H females, half of which were used to cross foster tx-j pups, received the same diet treatments that extended during lactation to 21 d postpartum. Compared with C3H, fetal tx-j livers had significantly lower copper concentrations and significantly lower transcript levels of Cyclin D1 and genes related to methionine and lipid metabolism. Maternal choline supplementation prevented the transcriptional deficits in fetal tx-j liver for multiple genes related to cell growth and metabolism. Global DNA methylation was increased by 17% in tx-j fetal livers after maternal choline treatment (P<0.05). Maternal dietary choline rescued the lower body weight of 21 d tx-j mice. Our results suggest that WD pathogenesis is modified by maternal in utero factors, including dietary choline.

  2. Maternal choline modifies fetal liver copper, gene expression, DNA methylation, and neonatal growth in the tx-j mouse model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; Keen, Carl L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W; Halsted, Charles H; LaSalle, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet can affect fetal gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Wilson disease (WD), which is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP7B encoding a biliary copper transporter, is characterized by excessive hepatic copper accumulation, but variability in disease severity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational supply of dietary methyl groups modifies fetal DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in methionine and lipid metabolism that are impaired prior to hepatic steatosis in the toxic milk (tx-j) mouse model of WD. Female C3H control and tx-j mice were fed control (choline 8 mmol/Kg of diet) or choline-supplemented (choline 36 mmol/Kg of diet) diets for 2 weeks throughout mating and pregnancy to gestation day 17. A second group of C3H females, half of which were used to cross foster tx-j pups, received the same diet treatments that extended during lactation to 21 d postpartum. Compared with C3H, fetal tx-j livers had significantly lower copper concentrations and significantly lower transcript levels of Cyclin D1 and genes related to methionine and lipid metabolism. Maternal choline supplementation prevented the transcriptional deficits in fetal tx-j liver for multiple genes related to cell growth and metabolism. Global DNA methylation was increased by 17% in tx-j fetal livers after maternal choline treatment (P < 0.05). Maternal dietary choline rescued the lower body weight of 21 d tx-j mice. Our results suggest that WD pathogenesis is modified by maternal in utero factors, including dietary choline. PMID:24220304

  3. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  4. Effects of striatal transplantation of cells transfected with GDNF gene without pre- and pro-regions in mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Revishchin, A; Moiseenko, L; Kust, N; Bazhenova, N; Teslia, P; Panteleev, D; Kovalzon, V; Pavlova, G

    2016-06-10

    Previously, we have shown that transgenic cells bearing the GDNF gene with deleted pre- and pro-regions (mGDNF) can release transgenic GDNF. The medium conditioned by transgenic cells with mGDNF induced axonal growth in rat embryonic spinal ganglion in vitro. Here we demonstrate a neurotrophic effect of mGDNF on PC12 cells in vitro as well as its neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta in vivo as indicated by improved motor coordination and sleep-wakefulness cycle in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. HEK293 cells were transfected with a vector encoding an isoform of the human GDNF gene with deleted pre- and pro-regions (mGDNF). This factor in the medium conditioned by the transfected cells was shown to induce axonal growth in PC12 cells. The early Parkinson's disease model was established by injection of the dopaminergic pro-neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) into C57Bl/6 mice. Transgenic HEK293/mGDNF/GFP cells were transplanted into the striatum (caudate-putamen) of experimental mice. The sleep-wakefulness cycle was studied by continuous EEG and motor activity monitoring 1 and 2 weeks after MPTP injection. After the experiment, the motor coordination of experimental animals was evaluated in the rotarod test, and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta were counted in cross-sections of the midbrain. MPTP administration lowered the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta, decreased motor coordination, and increased the total wake time during the dark period. The transplantation of HEK293/mGDNF cells into the caudate-putamen 3 days prior to MPTP injection smoothed these effects, while the control transplantation of HEK293 cells showed no notable impact. Transplantation of transgenic cells with the GDNF gene lacking the pre- and pro-sequences can protect dopaminergic neurons in the mouse midbrain from the subsequent

  5. Deletion of the Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Improves Cognitive Deficits and Synaptic Pathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dziewczapolski, Gustavo; Glogowski, Carolina M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Heinemann, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenic peptide amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42) binds to the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) with high affinity and the α7nAChR and Aβ1-42 are both found co-localized in neuritic plaques of human brains with AD. Moreover, the intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ1-42 was shown to be facilitated by its high-affinity binding to the α7nAChR and α7nAChR activation mediates Aβ-induced tau protein phosphorylation. To test the hypothesis that α7nAChRs are involved in AD pathogenesis, we used a transgenic mouse model of AD over-expressing a mutated form of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and lacking the α7nAChR gene (APPα7KO). We have shown that, despite the presence of high amounts of APP and amyloid deposits, deleting the α7nAChR subunit in the mouse model of AD leads to a protection from the dysfunction in synaptic integrity (pathology and plasticity) and learning and memory behavior. Specifically, APPα7KO mice express APP and Aβ at similar levels to APP mice and yet they were able to solve a cognitive challenge such as the Morris water maze test significantly better than APP, with performances comparable to control groups. Moreover, deleting the α7nAChR subunit protected the brain from loss of the synaptic markers, synaptophysin and MAP2, reduced the gliosis, and preserved the capacity to elicit LTP otherwise deficient in APP mice. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the α7nAChR plays a role in AD and suggests that interrupting α7nAChR function could be beneficial in the treatment of AD. PMID:19587288

  6. Neural Stem Cell Gene Therapy Ameliorates Pathology and Function in a Mouse Model of Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Margherita; Ricca, Alessandra; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Alcala'-Franco, Beatriz; Cavazzin, Chiara; Orlacchio, Aldo; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Murine neural stem cells (mNSCs), either naive or genetically modified to express supranormal levels of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), were transplanted into the brain of Twitcher mice, a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy, a severe sphingolipidosis. Cells engrafted long-term into the host cytoarchitecture, producing functional GALC. Levels of enzyme activity in brain and spinal cord tissues were enhanced when GALC-overexpressing NSC were used. Enzymatic correction correlated with reduced tissue storage, decreased activation of astroglia and microglia, delayed onset of symptoms, and longer lifespan. Mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of mNSC included widespread enzyme distribution, cross-correction of host cells, anti-inflammatory activity, and neuroprotection. Similar cell engraftment and metabolic correction were reproduced using human NSC. Thus, NSC gene therapy rapidly reconstitutes sustained and long-lasting enzyme activity in central nervous system tissues. Combining this approach with treatments targeting the systemic disease associated with leukodystrophies may provide significant therapeutic benefit. Stem Cells 2011;29:1559–1571 PMID:21809420

  7. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15). The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N : P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200 nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5 mg/kg) with 50.7 ± 19.5% knockdown (P = 0.031) of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site. PMID:24159333

  8. Intrapleural Adenoviral-mediated Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor Gene Transfer Suppresses the Progression of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Keshava, Shiva; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive thoracic cancer with a high mortality rate as it responds poorly to standard therapeutic interventions. Our recent studies showed that expression of endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) in MPM cells suppresses tumorigenicity. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanism by which EPCR suppresses MPM tumor growth and evaluate whether EPCR gene therapy could suppress the progression of MPM in a mouse model of MPM. Measurement of cytokines from the pleural lavage showed that mice implanted with MPM cells expressing EPCR had elevated levels of IFNγ and TNFα compared to mice implanted with MPM cells lacking EPCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that EPCR expression renders MPM cells highly susceptible to IFNγ + TNFα-induced apoptosis. Intrapleural injection of Ad.EPCR into mice with an established MPM originating from MPM cells lacking EPCR reduced the progression of tumor growth. Ad.EPCR treatment elicited recruitment of macrophages and NK cells into the tumor microenvironment and increased IFNγ and TNFα levels in the pleural space. Ad.EPCR treatment resulted in a marked increase in tumor cell apoptosis. In summary, our data show that EPCR expression in MPM cells promotes tumor cell apoptosis, and intrapleural EPCR gene therapy suppresses MPM progression. PMID:27833109

  9. Protective Effect of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus 2/8-Mediated Gene Therapy from the Maternal Hyperphenylalaninemia in Offsprings of a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Won; Oh, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Ok; Seo, Kyung-In; Park, Eun-Sook; Park, Hae-Young

    2008-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The accumulation of phenylalanine leads to severe mental and psychomotor retardation, and the fetus of an uncontrolled pregnant female patient presents with maternal PKU syndrome. We have reported previously on the cognitive outcome of biochemical and phenotypic reversal of PKU in a mouse model, Pahenu2, by the AAV serotype 2-mediated gene delivery of a human PAH transgene. However, the therapeutic efficacy had been limited to only male PKU mice. In this study, we generated a pseudotyped recombinant AAV2/8-hPAH vector and infused it into female PKU mice through the hepatic portal vein or tail vein. Two weeks after injection, complete fur color change to black was observed in female PKU, as in males. The PAH activity in the liver increased to 65-70% of the wild-type activity in female PKU mice and to 90% in male PKU mice. Plasma phenylalanine concentration in female PKU mice decreased to the normal value. In addition, the offsprings of the treated female PKU mice can rescue from the harmful effect of maternal hyperphenylalaninemia. These results indicate that recombinant AAV2/8-mediated gene therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for PKU. PMID:18955797

  10. Gene expression biomarkers in the brain of a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease: mining of microarray data by logic classification and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Arisi, Ivan; D'Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Felsani, Armando; Capsoni, Simona; Drovandi, Guido; Felici, Giovanni; Weitschek, Emanuel; Bertolazzi, Paola; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    The identification of early and stage-specific biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is critical, as the development of disease-modification therapies may depend on the discovery and validation of such markers. The identification of early reliable biomarkers depends on the development of new diagnostic algorithms to computationally exploit the information in large biological datasets. To identify potential biomarkers from mRNA expression profile data, we used the Logic Mining method for the unbiased analysis of a large microarray expression dataset from the anti-NGF AD11 transgenic mouse model. The gene expression profile of AD11 brain regions was investigated at different neurodegeneration stages by whole genome microarrays. A new implementation of the Logic Mining method was applied both to early (1-3 months) and late stage (6-15 months) expression data, coupled to standard statistical methods. A small number of "fingerprinting" formulas was isolated, encompassing mRNAs whose expression levels were able to discriminate between diseased and control mice. We selected three differential "signature" genes specific for the early stage (Nudt19, Arl16, Aph1b), five common to both groups (Slc15a2, Agpat5, Sox2ot, 2210015, D19Rik, Wdfy1), and seven specific for late stage (D14Ertd449, Tia1, Txnl4, 1810014B01Rik, Snhg3, Actl6a, Rnf25). We suggest these genes as potential biomarkers for the early and late stage of AD-like neurodegeneration in this model and conclude that Logic Mining is a powerful and reliable approach for large scale expression data analysis. Its application to large expression datasets from brain or peripheral human samples may facilitate the discovery of early and stage-specific AD biomarkers.

  11. [Genetically engineered mice: mouse models for cancer research].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Hanna

    2007-10-26

    Genetically engineered mice (GEM) have been extensively used to model human cancer. Mouse models mimic the morphology, histopathology, phenotype, and genotype of the corresponding cancer in humans. GEM mice are created by random integration of a transgene into the genome, which results in gene overexpression (transgenic mice); gene deletion (knock-out mice); or targeted insertion of the transgene in a selected locus (knock-in mice). Knock-out may be constitutive, i.e. total inactivation of the gene of interest in any cell, or conditional, i.e. tissue-specific inactivation of the gene. Gene knock-down (RNAi) and humanization of the mouse are more sophisticated models of GEM mice. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism in which double-stranded RNAs inhibits the respective gene expression by inducing degradation of its mRNA. Humanization is based on replacing a mouse gene by its human counterpart. The alterations in genes in GEM have to be heritable. The opportunities provided by employing GEM cancer models are: analysis of the role of specific cancer genes and modifier genes, evaluation of conventional cancer therapies and new drugs, identification of cancer markers of tumor growth, analysis of the influence of the tumor's microenvironment on tumor formation, and the definition of the pre-clinical, discrete steps of tumorigenesis. The validation of mouse models of human cancer is the task of the MMHCC (Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium). The GEM models of breast, pancreatic, intestinal and colon, and prostate cancer are the most actively explored. In contrast, the models of brain tumors and ovary, cervical, and skin cancer are in the early stage of investigation.

  12. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader–Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Puya G.; Su, Hailing; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11–15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity, and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes in the brain, heart, liver, and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II‫III were up‐regulated in the PWS imprinting center deletion mice compared to the wild‐type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  13. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  14. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  15. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  16. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes.

    PubMed

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D' Amato, Francesca R; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-04-28

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice's respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders.

  17. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D’ Amato, Francesca R.; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice’s respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders. PMID:27121911

  18. Anatomical and Gene Expression Changes in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Atrophy 1 (rpea1) Mouse: A Potential Model of Serous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Gabriel; Lewis, Geoffrey P.; Linberg, Kenneth A.; Chang, Bo; Hu, Quiri; Munson, Peter J.; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Miller, Sheldon S.; Fisher, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the rpea1 mouse whose retina spontaneously detaches from the underlying RPE as a potential model for studying the cellular effects of serous retinal detachment (SRD). Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed immediately prior to euthanasia; retinal tissue was subsequently prepared for Western blotting, microarray analysis, immunocytochemistry, and light and electron microscopy (LM, EM). Results By postnatal day (P) 30, OCT, LM, and EM revealed the presence of small shallow detachments that increased in number and size over time. By P60 in regions of detachment, there was a dramatic loss of PNA binding around cones in the interphotoreceptor matrix and a concomitant increase in labeling of the outer nuclear layer and rod synaptic terminals. Retinal pigment epithelium wholemounts revealed a patchy loss in immunolabeling for both ezrin and aquaporin 1. Anti-ezrin labeling was lost from small regions of the RPE apical surface underlying detachments at P30. Labeling for tight-junction proteins provided a regular array of profiles outlining the periphery of RPE cells in wild-type tissue, however, this pattern was disrupted in the mutant as early as P30. Microarray analysis revealed a broad range of changes in genes involved in metabolism, signaling, cell polarity, and tight-junction organization. Conclusions These data indicate changes in this mutant mouse that may provide clues to the underlying mechanisms of SRD in humans. Importantly, these changes include the production of multiple spontaneous detachments without the presence of a retinal tear or significant degeneration of outer segments, changes in the expression of proteins involved in adhesion and fluid transport, and a disrupted organization of RPE tight junctions that may contribute to the formation of focal detachments. PMID:27603725

  19. Head Transplantation in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Shen, Zi-Long; Han, Ke-Cheng; Song, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The mouse model of allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR) has recently been established to further the clinical development of this strategy for patients who are suffering from mortal bodily trauma or disease, yet whose mind remains healthy. Animal model studies are indispensable for developing such novel surgical practices. The goal of this work was to establish head transplant mouse model, then the next step through the feasible biological model to investigate immune rejection and brain function in next step, thereby promoting the goal of translation of AHBR to the clinic in the future. Our approach involves retaining adequate blood perfusion in the transplanted head throughout the surgical procedure by establishing donor-to-recipient cross-circulation by cannulating and anastomosing the carotid artery on one side of the body and the jugular vein on the other side. Neurological function was preserved by this strategy as indicated by electroencephalogram and intact cranial nerve reflexes. The results of this study support the feasibility of this method for avoiding brain ischemia during transplantation, thereby allowing for the possibility of long-term studies of head transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nicotinamide improves motor deficits and upregulates PGC-1α and BDNF gene expression in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hathorn, Tyisha; Snyder-Keller, Abigail; Messer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in exon-1 in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). This results in misfolding and accumulation of the huntingtin (htt) protein, forming nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. HD is associated with dysregulation of gene expression as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesized that by improving transcriptional regulation of genes necessary for energy metabolism, the HD motor phenotype would also improve. We therefore examined the protective effects of nicotinamide (NAM), a well-characterized water-soluble B vitamin that is an inhibitor of sirtuin1/class III NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase (HDAC). In this study, both mini-osmotic pumps and drinking water deliveries were tested at 250mg NAM/kg/day, using the B6.HDR6/1 transgenic mouse model. Results were similar for both modes of delivery, and there was no evidence of toxicity. We found that NAM treatment increased mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Protein levels of BDNF were also significantly increased. In addition, NAM treatment increased PGC-1α activation in HD mice, pointing to a possible mode of action as a therapeutic. Critically, NAM treatment was able to improve motor deficits associated with the HD phenotype, tested as time courses of open field, rotarod, and balance beam activities. These improvements were substantial, despite the fact that NAM did not appear to reduce htt aggregation, or to prevent late-stage weight loss. Our study therefore concludes that NAM or similar drugs may be beneficial in clinical treatment of the motor dysfunctions of HD, while additional therapeutic approaches must be added to combat the aggregation phenotype and overall physiological decline. PMID:20736066

  1. Effectiveness of intracavernous delivery of adenovirus encoding Smad7 gene on erectile function in a mouse model of cavernous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Kang Moon; Chung, Jae-Seung; Choi, Min Ji; Jin, Hai-Rong; Yin, Guo Nan; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Park, Jin-Mi; Kim, Woo Jean; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Seong-Jin; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Men with erectile dysfunction (ED) respond poorly to oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors following radical prostatectomy. Recent studies have reported that up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and activation of the Smad signaling pathway play important roles in cavernous fibrosis and in the deterioration of erectile function in a mouse model of cavernous nerve injury (CNI) and in patients with spinal cord injury. The mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 7 (Smad7) is known to inhibit the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3. To investigate the effectiveness of adenoviruses encoding Smad7 gene (Ad-Smad7) on erectile function in a mouse model of CNI. Twelve-week-old C57BL/6J mice were used and distributed into 7 groups: sham operation group, untreated CNI group, and CNI groups receiving a single intracavernous injection of adenovirus encoding LacZ (1 × 10(8) virus particles [vp]/20 μL) or adenovirus encoding Smad7 (Ad-Smad7; 1 × 10(7), 1 × 10(8), 2 × 10(8), or 1 × 10(9) vp/20 μL). Two weeks after bilateral cavernous nerve crushing and treatment, erectile function was measured by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. The penis was harvested for histologic examinations and Western blot analysis. The highest erectile response was noted in CNI mice treated with Ad-Smad7 at a dose of 1 × 10(8)  vp, which reached up to 82-85% of sham control values. Local delivery of Ad-Smad7 significantly decreased endothelial cell apoptosis and the production of extracellular matrix proteins, including plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV, and induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation in the corpus cavernosum tissue of CNI mice. The adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of Smad7 successfully restored erectile function by enhancing endothelial cell function and through antifibrotic effects. These findings suggest that inhibition of the TGF-β signaling pathway by use of

  2. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  3. Heat Hyperalgesia and Mechanical Hypersensitivity Induced by Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in a Mouse Model of Neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F.; Hammond, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/− mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/− mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/− and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/− and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/− mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/− mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/− mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/− mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients. PMID:25184332

  4. Development of mouse models for analysis of human virus infections.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Hiromi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shingai, Masashi; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2017-04-01

    Viruses usually exhibit strict species-specificity as a result of co-evolution with the host. Thus, in mouse models, a great barrier exists for analysis of infections with human-tropic viruses. Mouse models are unlikely to faithfully reproduce the human immune response to viruses or viral compounds and it is difficult to evaluate human therapeutic efficacy with antiviral reagents in mouse models. Humans and mice essentially have different immune systems, which makes it difficult to extrapolate mouse results to humans. In addition, apart from immunological reasons, viruses causing human diseases do not always infect mice because of species tropism. One way to determine tropism would be a virus receptor that is expressed on affected cells. The development of gene-disrupted mice and Tg mice, which express human receptor genes, enables us to analyze several viral infections in mice. Mice are, indeed, susceptible to human viruses when artificially infected in receptor-supplemented mice. Although the mouse cells less efficiently permit viral replication than do human cells, the models for analysis of human viruses have been established in vivo as well as in vitro, and explain viral pathogenesis in the mouse systems. In most systems, however, nucleic acid sensors and type I interferon suppress viral propagation to block the appearance of infectious manifestation. We herein review recent insight into in vivo antiviral responses induced in mouse infection models for typical human viruses. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Long-term skeletal muscle protection after gene transfer in a mouse model of LGMD-2D.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; Walter, Glenn A; Gaidosh, Gabe; Bryant, Nathan; Lewis, Melissa A; Germain, Sean; Mah, Cathryn S; Campbell, Kevin P; Byrne, Barry J

    2007-10-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) describes a group of inherited diseases resulting from mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in maintaining skeletal muscle membrane stability. LGMD type-2D is caused by mutations in alpha-sarcoglycan (sgca). Here we describe muscle-specific gene delivery of the human sgca gene into dystrophic muscle using an adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1) capsid and creatine kinase promoter. Delivery of this construct to adult sgca(-/-) mice resulted in localization of the sarcoglycan complex to the sarcolemma and a reduction in muscle fiber damage. Sgca expression prevented disease progression as observed in vivo by T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed in vitro by decreased Evan's blue dye accumulation. The ability of recombinant AAV-mediated gene delivery to restore normal muscle mechanical properties in sgca(-/-) mice was verified by in vitro force mechanics on isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, with a decrease in passive resistance to stretch as compared with untreated controls. In summary, AAV/AAV-sgca gene transfer provides long-term muscle protection from LGMD and can be non-invasively evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Altered cellular redox status, sirtuin abundance and clock gene expression in a mouse model of developmentally primed NASH.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Sihota, Kiran K; Ravindraanandan, Manoj; Thomas, Hugh; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A; Byrne, Christopher D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-07-01

    We have previously shown that high fat (HF) feeding during pregnancy primes the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) in the adult offspring. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Since the endogenous molecular clock can regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, we investigated whether exposure to a HF diet during development could alter hepatic clock gene expression and contribute to NASH onset in later life. Female mice were fed either a control (C, 7%kcal fat) or HF (45%kcal fat) diet. Offspring were fed either a C or HF diet resulting in four offspring groups: C/C, C/HF, HF/C and HF/HF. NAFLD progression, cellular redox status, sirtuin expression (Sirt1, Sirt3), and the expression of core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry2) and clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism (Rev-Erbα, Rev-Erbβ, RORα, and Srebp1c) were measured in offspring livers. Offspring fed a HF diet developed NAFLD. However HF fed offspring of mothers fed a HF diet developed NASH, coupled with significantly reduced NAD(+)/NADH (p<0.05, HF/HF vs C/C), Sirt1 (p<0.001, HF/HF vs C/C), Sirt3 (p<0.01, HF/HF vs C/C), perturbed clock gene expression, and elevated expression of genes involved lipid metabolism, such as Srebp1c (p<0.05, C/HF and HF/HF vs C/C). Our results suggest that exposure to excess dietary fat during early and post-natal life increases the susceptibility to develop NASH in adulthood, involving altered cellular redox status, reduced sirtuin abundance, and desynchronized clock gene expression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The mouse model for influenza.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lamirande, Elaine W; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    A major challenge in influenza research is the selection of an appropriate animal model that accurately reflects the disease and protective immune response to influenza infection in humans. Ferrets are exquisitely susceptible to infection with human influenza viruses and are widely believed to be the ideal small animal model for influenza research. Mice have also been used for influenza vaccine research for decades. Although human influenza viruses generally cause disease in mice only if they are first adapted to the species, the ready availability of mice, their relatively low cost, and the variety of genetic backgrounds and targeted defects, and the immunologic reagents available make the mouse an attractive and heavily utilized animal model for studies of influenza. Although they are not discussed in detail in this unit, hamsters, guinea pigs, cotton rats (Sigmodon), and rats (Rattus) have also been used for influenza research.

  8. Prenyl Ammonium Salts – New Carriers for Gene Delivery: A B16-F10 Mouse Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grecka, Emilia; Statkiewicz, Malgorzata; Gorska, Agnieszka; Biernacka, Marzena; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Masnyk, Marek; Chmielewski, Marek; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Malecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prenyl ammonium iodides (Amino-Prenols, APs), semi-synthetic polyprenol derivatives were studied as prospective novel gene transfer agents. Methods AP-7, -8, -11 and -15 (aminoprenols composed of 7, 8, 11 or 15 isoprene units, respectively) were examined for their capacity to form complexes with pDNA, for cytotoxicity and ability to transfect genes to cells. Results All the carriers were able to complex DNA. The highest, comparable to commercial reagents, transfection efficiency was observed for AP-15. Simultaneously, AP-15 exhibited the lowest negative impact on cell viability and proliferation—considerably lower than that of commercial agents. AP-15/DOPE complexes were also efficient to introduce pDNA to cells, without much effect on cell viability. Transfection with AP-15/DOPE complexes influenced the expression of a very few among 44 tested genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism. Furthermore, complexes containing AP-15 and therapeutic plasmid, encoding the TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 (TIMP2), introduced the TIMP2 gene with high efficiency to B16-F10 melanoma cells but not to B16-F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice, as confirmed by TIMP2 protein level determination. Conclusion Obtained results indicate that APs have a potential as non-viral vectors for cell transfection. PMID:27088717

  9. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Niclas E; Hall, John K; Odom, Guy L; Phelps, Michael P; Andrus, Colin R; Hawkins, R David; Hauschka, Stephen D; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-14

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx(4cv) mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders.

  10. Muscle-specific CRISPR/Cas9 dystrophin gene editing ameliorates pathophysiology in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Niclas E.; Hall, John K.; Odom, Guy L.; Phelps, Michael P.; Andrus, Colin R.; Hawkins, R. David; Hauschka, Stephen D.; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Gene replacement therapies utilizing adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors hold great promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A related approach uses AAV vectors to edit specific regions of the DMD gene using CRISPR/Cas9. Here we develop multiple approaches for editing the mutation in dystrophic mdx4cv mice using single and dual AAV vector delivery of a muscle-specific Cas9 cassette together with single-guide RNA cassettes and, in one approach, a dystrophin homology region to fully correct the mutation. Muscle-restricted Cas9 expression enables direct editing of the mutation, multi-exon deletion or complete gene correction via homologous recombination in myogenic cells. Treated muscles express dystrophin in up to 70% of the myogenic area and increased force generation following intramuscular delivery. Furthermore, systemic administration of the vectors results in widespread expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Our results demonstrate that AAV-mediated muscle-specific gene editing has significant potential for therapy of neuromuscular disorders. PMID:28195574

  11. Prenyl Ammonium Salts--New Carriers for Gene Delivery: A B16-F10 Mouse Melanoma Model.

    PubMed

    Grecka, Emilia; Statkiewicz, Malgorzata; Gorska, Agnieszka; Biernacka, Marzena; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Masnyk, Marek; Chmielewski, Marek; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Malecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Prenyl ammonium iodides (Amino-Prenols, APs), semi-synthetic polyprenol derivatives were studied as prospective novel gene transfer agents. AP-7, -8, -11 and -15 (aminoprenols composed of 7, 8, 11 or 15 isoprene units, respectively) were examined for their capacity to form complexes with pDNA, for cytotoxicity and ability to transfect genes to cells. All the carriers were able to complex DNA. The highest, comparable to commercial reagents, transfection efficiency was observed for AP-15. Simultaneously, AP-15 exhibited the lowest negative impact on cell viability and proliferation--considerably lower than that of commercial agents. AP-15/DOPE complexes were also efficient to introduce pDNA to cells, without much effect on cell viability. Transfection with AP-15/DOPE complexes influenced the expression of a very few among 44 tested genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism. Furthermore, complexes containing AP-15 and therapeutic plasmid, encoding the TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 (TIMP2), introduced the TIMP2 gene with high efficiency to B16-F10 melanoma cells but not to B16-F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice, as confirmed by TIMP2 protein level determination. Obtained results indicate that APs have a potential as non-viral vectors for cell transfection.

  12. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0331 TITLE: Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Miklos Sahin-Toth, M.D., Ph.D...CONTRACT NUMBER Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0331 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...The aim of our research is to generate and characterize mouse models of human hereditary pancreatitis that develop pancreatitis spontaneously or

  13. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Bronson, Roderick T; Li, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions) have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1) and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion) were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/-) male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these two events

  14. Mouse models of mantle cell lymphoma, complex changes in gene expression and phenotype of engrafted MCL cells: implications for preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Klanova, Magdalena; Soukup, Tomas; Jaksa, Radek; Molinsky, Jan; Lateckova, Lucie; Maswabi, Bokang C L; Prukova, Dana; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra; Vockova, Petra; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Kulvait, Vojtech; Zivny, Jan; Vokurka, Martin; Necas, Emanuel; Trneny, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with poor prognosis. Animal models of MCL are scarce. We established and characterized various in vivo models of metastatic human MCL by tail vein injection of either primary cells isolated from patients with MCL or established MCL cell lines (Jeko-1, Mino, Rec-1, Hbl-2, and Granta-519) into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. MCL infiltration was assessed with immunohistochemistry (tissues) and flow cytometry (peripheral blood). Engraftment of primary MCL cells was observed in 7 out of 12 patient samples. The pattern of engraftment of primary MCL cells varied from isolated involvement of the spleen to multiorgan infiltration. On the other hand, tumor engraftment was achieved in all five MCL cell lines used and lymphoma involvement of murine bone marrow, spleen, liver, and brain was observed. Overall survival of xenografted mice ranged from 22 ± 1 to 54 ± 3 days depending on the cell line used. Subsequently, we compared the gene expression profile (GEP) and phenotype of the engrafted MCL cells compared with the original in vitro growing cell lines (controls). We demonstrated that engrafted MCL cells displayed complex changes of GEP, protein expression, and sensitivity to cytotoxic agents when compared with controls. We further demonstrated that our MCL mouse models could be used to test the therapeutic activity of systemic chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, or angiogenesis inhibitors. The characterization of MCL murine models is likely to aid in improving our knowledge in the disease biology and to assist scientists in the preclinical and clinical development of novel agents in relapsed/refractory MCL patients.

  15. A genomic analysis of mouse models of breast cancer reveals molecular features of mouse models and relationships to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hollern, Daniel P; Andrechek, Eran R

    2014-06-05

    Genomic variability limits the efficacy of breast cancer therapy. To simplify the study of the molecular complexity of breast cancer, researchers have used mouse mammary tumor models. However, the degree to which mouse models model human breast cancer and are reflective of the human heterogeneity has yet to be demonstrated with gene expression studies on a large scale. To this end, we have built a database consisting of 1,172 mouse mammary tumor samples from 26 different major oncogenic mouse mammary tumor models. In this dataset we identified heterogeneity within mouse models and noted a surprising amount of interrelatedness between models, despite differences in the tumor initiating oncogene. Making comparisons between models, we identified differentially expressed genes with alteration correlating with initiating events in each model. Using annotation tools, we identified transcription factors with a high likelihood of activity within these models. Gene signatures predicted activation of major cell signaling pathways in each model, predictions that correlated with previous genetic studies. Finally, we noted relationships between mouse models and human breast cancer at both the level of gene expression and predicted signal pathway activity. Importantly, we identified individual mouse models that recapitulate human breast cancer heterogeneity at the level of gene expression. This work underscores the importance of fully characterizing mouse tumor biology at molecular, histological and genomic levels before a valid comparison to human breast cancer may be drawn and provides an important bioinformatic resource.

  16. Genetic deletion of TNFRII gene enhances the Alzheimer-like pathology in an APP transgenic mouse model via reduction of phosphorylated IκBα.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; He, Ping; Xie, Junxia; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Li, Rena; Shen, Yong

    2014-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRII) is one of the TNF receptor superfamily members and our recent pathological studies show that TNFRII is deficient in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms of TNFRII in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. In the present study, by using the gene-targeting approach to delete TNFRII in AD transgenic mouse model, we found that, in the brain of APP23 mice with TNFRII deletion (APP23/TNFRII(-/-)), AD-like pathology, i.e. plaque formation and microglial activation, occurs as early as 6 months of age. To test whether the increased levels of Aβ plaques was due to elevated Aβ, we measured Aβ and found that Aβ levels indeed were significantly increased at this age. Because β-secretase, BACE1, is critical enzyme for Aβ production, we have examined BACE1 and found that BACE1 is increased in both protein levels and enzymatic activity as early as 6 months of age; Having shown that BACE1 promoter region contains NF-κB binding sites, we found that cytoplasmic NF-κB was elevated and SUMO1 binding to IκBα was decreased. To further verify these findings, we have overexpressed TNFRII and identified that overexpressing TNFRII can reverse the findings from APP23/TNFRII(-/-) mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate novel roles of TNFRII in the regulation of Aβ production, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for AD by up-regulating TNFRII levels and elevating phosphorylated IκBα by SUMOylation.

  17. ATP7A Gene Addition to the Choroid Plexus Results in Long-term Rescue of the Lethal Copper Transport Defect in a Menkes Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Donsante, Anthony; Yi, Ling; Zerfas, Patricia M; Brinster, Lauren R; Sullivan, Patricia; Goldstein, David S; Prohaska, Joseph; Centeno, Jose A; Rushing, Elisabeth; Kaler, Stephen G

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease is a lethal infantile neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism caused by mutations in a P-type ATPase, ATP7A. Currently available treatment (daily subcutaneous copper injections) is not entirely effective in the majority of affected individuals. The mottled-brindled (mo-br) mouse recapitulates the Menkes phenotype, including abnormal copper transport to the brain owing to mutation in the murine homolog, Atp7a, and dies by 14 days of age. We documented that mo-br mice on C57BL/6 background were not rescued by peripheral copper administration, and used this model to evaluate brain-directed therapies. Neonatal mo-br mice received lateral ventricle injections of either adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) harboring a reduced-size human ATP7A (rsATP7A) complementary DNA (cDNA), copper chloride, or both. AAV5-rsATP7A showed selective transduction of choroid plexus epithelia and AAV5-rsATP7A plus copper combination treatment rescued mo-br mice; 86% survived to weaning (21 days), median survival increased to 43 days, 37% lived beyond 100 days, and 22% survived to the study end point (300 days). This synergistic treatment effect correlated with increased brain copper levels, enhanced activity of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, a copper-dependent enzyme, and correction of brain pathology. Our findings provide the first definitive evidence that gene therapy may have clinical utility in the treatment of Menkes disease. PMID:21878905

  18. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  19. The Effects of Tissue-Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Therapy on Craniosynostosis and Craniofacial Morphology in the FGFR2C342Y/+ Mouse Model of Crouzon Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E; Nam, HK; Liu, J; Hatch, NE

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of cranial bones, has traditionally been described as a disease of increased bone mineralization. However, multiple mouse models of craniosynostosis display craniosynostosis simultaneously with diminished cranial bone volume and/or density. We propose an alternative hypothesis that craniosynostosis results from abnormal tissue mineralization through the downregulation of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) enzyme downstream of activating mutations in FGFRs. Material & Methods Neonatal Crouzon (FGFRC342Y/+) and wild type (FGFR+/+) mice were injected with lentivirus to deliver a recombinant form of TNAP. Mice were sacrificed at four weeks post-natal. Serum was collected to test for alkaline phosphatase (AP), phosphorus, and calcium levels. Craniofacial bone fusion and morphology was assessed by micro-computed tomography. Results Injection with the TNAP lentivirus significantly increased serum AP levels (increased serum AP levels are indicative of efficient transduction and production of the recombinant protein), but results were variable and dependent upon viral lot and the litter of mice injected. Morphologic analysis revealed craniofacial form differences for inferior surface (p=.023) and cranial height (p=.014) regions between TNAP lentivirus injected and vehicle-injected Crouzon mice. With each unit increase in AP level, the odds of lambdoid suture fusion decreased by 84.2% and these results came close to statistical significance (p=.068). Conclusion These results suggest that TNAP deficiency may mediate FGFR2-associated craniosynostosis. Future studies should incorporate injection of recombinant TNAP protein, to avoid potential side effects and variable efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery. PMID:25865549

  20. AAV8(Y733F)-mediated gene therapy in a Spata7 knockout mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Eblimit, A; Moayedi, Y; Boye, S L; Chiodo, V A; Chen, Y; Li, Y; Nichols, R M; Hauswirth, W W; Chen, R; Mardon, G

    2015-08-01

    Loss of SPATA7 function causes the pathogenesis of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa. Spata7 knockout mice mimic human SPATA7-related retinal disease with apparent photoreceptor degeneration observed as early as postnatal day 15 (P15). To test the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for rescue of photoreceptor survival and function in Spata7 mutant mice, we employed the AAV8(Y733F) vector carrying hGRK1-driven full-length FLAG-tagged Spata7 cDNA to target both rod and cone photoreceptors. Following subretinal injection of this vector, FLAG-tagged SPATA7 was found to colocalize with endogenous SPATA7 in wild-type mice. In Spata7 mutant mice initially treated at P15, we observed improvement of photoresponse, photoreceptor ultrastructure and significant alleviation of photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore, we performed treatments at P28 and P56 and found that all treatments (P15-P56) can ameliorate rod and cone loss in the long term (1 year); however, none efficiently protect photoreceptors from degeneration by 86 weeks of age as only a small amount of treated photoreceptors can survive to this time. This study demonstrates long-term improvement of photoreceptor function by AAV8(Y733F)-introduced Spata7 expression in a mouse model as potential treatment of the human disease, but also suggests that treated mutant photoreceptors still undergo progressive degeneration.

  1. AAV8(Y733F)-mediated gene therapy in a Spata7 knockout mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Eblimit, Aiden; Moayedi, Yalda; Boye, Sanford L; Chiodo, Vince A; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Nichols, Ralph M; Hauswirth, William W; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Loss of SPATA7 function causes the pathogenesis of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa. Spata7 knockout mice mimic human SPATA7–related retinal disease with apparent photoreceptor degeneration observed as early as postnatal day 15 (P15). To test the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for rescue of photoreceptor survival and function in Spata7 mutant mice, we employed the AAV8(Y733F) vector carrying hGRK1-driven full-length FLAG-tagged Spata7 cDNA to target both rod and cone photoreceptors. Following subretinal injection of this vector, FLAG-tagged SPATA7 was found to co-localize with endogenous SPATA7 in wild-type mice. In Spata7 mutant mice initially treated at P15, we observed improvement of photoresponse, photoreceptor ultrastructure, and significant alleviation of photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore we performed treatments at P28 and P56 and found that all treatments (P15-P56) can ameliorate rod and cone loss in the long term (1 year); however, none efficiently protect photoreceptors from degeneration by 86 weeks of age since only a small amount of treated photoreceptors can survive to this time. This study demonstrates long-term improvement of photoreceptor function by AAV8(Y733F)-introduced Spata7 expression in a mouse model as potential treatment of the human disease but also suggests that treated mutant photoreceptors still undergo progressive degeneration. PMID:25965394

  2. Surgically-induced mouse models in the study of bone regeneration: Current models and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bin; Zhao, Yunpeng; Buza, John A.; Li, Wei; Wang, Wenzhao; Jia, Tanghong

    2017-01-01

    Bone regeneration has been extensively studied over the past several decades. The surgically-induced mouse model is the key animal model for studying bone regeneration, of the various research strategies used. These mouse models mimic the trauma and recovery processes in vivo and serve as carriers for tissue engineering and gene modification to test various therapies or associated genes in bone regeneration. The present review introduces a classification of surgically induced mouse models in bone regeneration, evaluates the application and value of these models and discusses the potential development of further innovations in this field in the future. PMID:28138711

  3. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  4. Random cloning of genes from mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1987-01-01

    We describe a method for isolating cosmid clones randomly from mouse chromosome 17. A cosmid library was constructed from the mouse-Chinese hamster cell line R4 4-1 that contains a limited amount of mouse DNA (chromosomes 17 and 18 and some other unidentified material) on a Chinese hamster background. The library was screened with the murine repetitive sequence probe pMBA14, which selectively hybridizes with mouse DNA. The mouse-derived cosmid clones thus identified were individually hybridized with DNA from the mouse-Syrian hamster cell line JS17 containing all mouse chromosomes except chromosome 17 on a Syrian hamster background. We deduced that the cosmid clones that contained sequences absent in JS17 were derived from mouse chromosome 17. One of the chromosome 17-derived cosmid clones, 3-4-1 (located proximal to the T122/T66C segment) was found to be highly polymorphic among European wild-mouse populations and may be a useful probe to elucidate the evolution and migration of Mus species. The randomly isolated mouse-derived cosmid clones can also be screened for the presence of functional genes. Using testicular cDNA as a probe, a testis-specific gene was cloned from mouse chromosome 17. Images PMID:3472212

  5. Discovery and characterization of spontaneous mouse models of craniofacial dysmorphology

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Kristina; Fairfield, Heather; Borgeia, Suhaib; Curtain, Michelle; Hassan, Mohamed G.; Dionne, Louise; Karst, Son Yong; Coombs, Harold; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Bergstrom, David E.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Cox, Timothy C.; Murray, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial abnormalities are among the most common features of human genetic syndromes and disorders. The etiology of these conditions is often complex, influenced by both genetic context and the environment. Frequently, craniofacial abnormalities present as part of a syndrome with clear comorbid phenotypes, providing additional insight into mechanisms of the causative gene or pathway. The mouse has been a key tool in our understanding of the genetic mechanisms of craniofacial development and disease, and can provide excellent models for human craniofacial abnormalities. While powerful genetic engineering tools in the mouse have contributed significantly our understanding of craniofacial development and dysmorphology, forward genetic approaches provide an unbiased means to identify new genes and pathways. Moreover, spontaneous mutations can occur on any number of genetic backgrounds, potentially revealing critical genes that require a specific genetic context. Here we report discovery and phenotyping of 43 craniofacial mouse models, derived primarily from a screen for spontaneous mutations in production colonies at the Jackson Laboratory. We identify the causative gene for 33 lines, including novel genes in pathways not previously connected to craniofacial development, and novel alleles of known genes that present with unique phenotypes. Together with our detailed characterization, this work provides a valuable gene discovery resource for the craniofacial community, and a rich source of mouse models for further investigation. PMID:26234751

  6. Deletion of Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen-activating protease-encoding genes attenuates Yersinia pestis in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Cao, Anthony; Tiner, Bethany L; Erova, Tatiana E; Cong, Yingzi; Kozlova, Elena V; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; Chopra, Ashok K

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there is no FDA-approved vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Since both humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity are essential in providing the host with protection against plague, we developed a live-attenuated vaccine strain by deleting the Braun lipoprotein (lpp) and plasminogen-activating protease (pla) genes from Y. pestis CO92. The Δlpp Δpla double isogenic mutant was highly attenuated in evoking both bubonic and pneumonic plague in a mouse model. Further, animals immunized with the mutant by either the intranasal or the subcutaneous route were significantly protected from developing subsequent pneumonic plague. In mice, the mutant poorly disseminated to peripheral organs and the production of proinflammatory cytokines concurrently decreased. Histopathologically, reduced damage to the lungs and livers of mice infected with the Δlpp Δpla double mutant compared to the level of damage in wild-type (WT) CO92-challenged animals was observed. The Δlpp Δpla mutant-immunized mice elicited a humoral immune response to the WT bacterium, as well as to CO92-specific antigens. Moreover, T cells from mutant-immunized animals exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses, when stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed WT CO92 antigens, than mice immunized with the same sublethal dose of WT CO92. Likewise, T cells from the mutant-immunized mice produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4. These animals had an increasing number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells than WT CO92-infected mice. These data emphasize the role of TNF-α and IFN-γ in protecting mice against pneumonic plague. Overall, our studies provide evidence that deletion of the lpp and pla genes acts synergistically in protecting animals against pneumonic plague, and we have demonstrated an immunological basis for this protection.

  7. Deletion of Braun Lipoprotein and Plasminogen-Activating Protease-Encoding Genes Attenuates Yersinia pestis in Mouse Models of Bubonic and Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    van Lier, Christina J.; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Cao, Anthony; Tiner, Bethany L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Cong, Yingzi; Kozlova, Elena V.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Baze, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no FDA-approved vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Since both humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity are essential in providing the host with protection against plague, we developed a live-attenuated vaccine strain by deleting the Braun lipoprotein (lpp) and plasminogen-activating protease (pla) genes from Y. pestis CO92. The Δlpp Δpla double isogenic mutant was highly attenuated in evoking both bubonic and pneumonic plague in a mouse model. Further, animals immunized with the mutant by either the intranasal or the subcutaneous route were significantly protected from developing subsequent pneumonic plague. In mice, the mutant poorly disseminated to peripheral organs and the production of proinflammatory cytokines concurrently decreased. Histopathologically, reduced damage to the lungs and livers of mice infected with the Δlpp Δpla double mutant compared to the level of damage in wild-type (WT) CO92-challenged animals was observed. The Δlpp Δpla mutant-immunized mice elicited a humoral immune response to the WT bacterium, as well as to CO92-specific antigens. Moreover, T cells from mutant-immunized animals exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses, when stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed WT CO92 antigens, than mice immunized with the same sublethal dose of WT CO92. Likewise, T cells from the mutant-immunized mice produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4. These animals had an increasing number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than WT CO92-infected mice. These data emphasize the role of TNF-α and IFN-γ in protecting mice against pneumonic plague. Overall, our studies provide evidence that deletion of the lpp and pla genes acts synergistically in protecting animals against pneumonic plague, and we have demonstrated an immunological basis for this protection. PMID:24686064

  8. Ultrasound-based molecular imaging and specific gene delivery to mesenteric vasculature by endothelial adhesion molecule targeted microbubbles in a mouse model of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tlaxca, José L.; Rychak, Joshua J.; Ernst, Peter B.; Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Shevchenko, Talent I.; Pizzaro, Theresa T.; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) for which treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have significant side-effects. Consequently, there is a clinical need for site-specific and non-toxic delivery of therapeutic genes or drugs for CD and related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to validate a gene delivery platform based on ultrasound-activated lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) targeted to inflamed mesenteric endothelium in the CD-like TNFΔARE mouse model. MBs bearing luciferase plasmid were functionalized with antibodies to MAdCAM-1 (MB-M) or VCAM-1 (MB-V), biomarkers of gut endothelial cell inflammation and evaluated in an in vitro flow chamber assay with appropriate ligands to confirm targeting specificity. Following MB retro-orbital injection in TNFΔARE mice, the mean contrast intensity in the ileocecal region from accumulated MB-M and MB-V was 8.5-fold and 3.6-fold greater, respectively, compared to MB-C. Delivery of luciferase plasmid to the GI tract in TNFΔARE mice was achieved by insonating the endothelial cell-bound agents using a commercial sonoporator. Luciferase expression in the midgut was detected 48 h later by bioluminescence imaging and further confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The liver, spleen, heart, and kidney had no detectable bioluminescence following insonation. Transfection of the microcirculation guided by a targeted, acoustically-activated platform such as an ultrasound contrast agent microbubble has the potential to be a minimally-invasive treatment strategy to ameliorate CD and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:23142578

  9. Rearing Light Intensity Affects Inner Retinal Pathology in a Mouse Model of X-Linked Retinoschisis but Does Not Alter Gene Therapy Outcome.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Dario; Yong, Zeng; Kjellström, Sten; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; A Sieving, Paul; Bush, Ronald A

    2017-03-01

    To test the effects of rearing light intensity on retinal function and morphology in the retinoschisis knockout (Rs1-KO) mouse model of X-linked retinoschisis, and whether it affects functional outcome of RS1 gene replacement. Seventy-six Rs1-KO mice were reared in either cyclic low light (LL, 20 lux) or moderate light (ML, 300 lux) and analyzed at 1 and 4 months. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinogram and cavity size by optical coherence tomography. Expression of inward-rectifier K+ channel (Kir4.1), water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were analyzed by Western blotting. In a separate study, Rs1-KO mice reared in LL (n = 29) or ML (n = 27) received a unilateral intravitreal injection of scAAV8-hRs-IRBP at 21 days, and functional outcome was evaluated at 4 months by electroretinogram. At 1 month, no functional or structural differences were found between LL- or ML-reared Rs1-KO mice. At 4 months, ML-reared Rs1-KO mice showed significant reduction of b-wave amplitude and b-/a-wave ratio with no changes in a-wave, and a significant increase in cavity size, compared to LL-reared animals. Moderate light rearing increased Kir4.1 expression in Rs1-KO mice by 4 months, but not AQP4 and GFAP levels. Administration of scAAV8-hRS1-IRBP to Rs1-KO mice showed similar improvement of inner retinal ERG function independent of LL or ML rearing. Rearing light conditions affect the development of retinal cavities and post-photoreceptor function in Rs1-KO mice. However, the effect of rearing light intensity does not interact with the efficacy of RS1 gene replacement in Rs1-KO mice.

  10. Rearing Light Intensity Affects Inner Retinal Pathology in a Mouse Model of X-Linked Retinoschisis but Does Not Alter Gene Therapy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Yong, Zeng; Kjellström, Sten; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; A. Sieving, Paul; Bush, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To test the effects of rearing light intensity on retinal function and morphology in the retinoschisis knockout (Rs1-KO) mouse model of X-linked retinoschisis, and whether it affects functional outcome of RS1 gene replacement. Methods Seventy-six Rs1-KO mice were reared in either cyclic low light (LL, 20 lux) or moderate light (ML, 300 lux) and analyzed at 1 and 4 months. Retinal function was assessed by electroretinogram and cavity size by optical coherence tomography. Expression of inward-rectifier K+ channel (Kir4.1), water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were analyzed by Western blotting. In a separate study, Rs1-KO mice reared in LL (n = 29) or ML (n = 27) received a unilateral intravitreal injection of scAAV8-hRs-IRBP at 21 days, and functional outcome was evaluated at 4 months by electroretinogram. Results At 1 month, no functional or structural differences were found between LL- or ML-reared Rs1-KO mice. At 4 months, ML-reared Rs1-KO mice showed significant reduction of b-wave amplitude and b-/a-wave ratio with no changes in a-wave, and a significant increase in cavity size, compared to LL-reared animals. Moderate light rearing increased Kir4.1 expression in Rs1-KO mice by 4 months, but not AQP4 and GFAP levels. Administration of scAAV8-hRS1-IRBP to Rs1-KO mice showed similar improvement of inner retinal ERG function independent of LL or ML rearing. Conclusions Rearing light conditions affect the development of retinal cavities and post-photoreceptor function in Rs1-KO mice. However, the effect of rearing light intensity does not interact with the efficacy of RS1 gene replacement in Rs1-KO mice. PMID:28297725

  11. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Seldin, M.F.

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  12. The mouse ileal lipid-binding protein gene: a model for studying axial patterning during gut morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Normal, chimeric-transgenic, and transgenic mice have been used to study the axial patterns of ileal lipid-binding protein gene (Ilbp) expression during and after completion of gut morphogenesis. Ilbp is initially activated in enterocytes in bidirectional wave that expands proximally in the ileum and distally to the colon during late gestation and the first postnatal week. This activation occurs at the same time that a wave of cytodifferentiation of the gut endoderm is completing its unidirectional journey from duodenum to colon. The subsequent contraction of Ilbp's expression domain, followed by its reexpansion from the distal to proximal ileum, coincides with a critical period in gut morphogenesis (postnatal days 7-28) when its proliferative units (crypts) form, establish their final stem cell hierarchy, and then multiply through fission. The wave of reactivation is characterized by changing patterns of Ilbp expression: (a) at the proximal most boundary of the wave, villi contain a mixed population of scattered ileal lipid- binding protein (ILBP)-positive and ILBP-negative enterocytes derived from the same monoclonal crypt; (b) somewhat more distally, villi contain vertical coherent stripes of wholly ILBP-positive enterocytes derived from monoclonal crypts and adjacent, wholly ILBP-negative stripes of enterocytes emanating from other monoclonal crypts; and (c) more distally, all the enterocytes on a villus support Ilbp expression. Functional mapping studies of Ilbp's promoter in transgenic mice indicate that nucleotides -145 to +48 contain cis-acting elements sufficient to produce an appropriately directed distal-to-proximal wave of Ilbp activation in the ileum, to maintain an appropriate axial distribution of monophenotypic wholly reporter-positive villi in the distal portion of the ileum, as well as striped and speckled villi in the proximal portion of its expression domain, and to correctly support reporter production in villus-associated ileal enterocytes

  13. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  14. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Galen W; Everson, Joshua L; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Melberg, Cal G; Fink, Dustin M; Parins, Kia F; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Ulschmid, Caden M; Lipinski, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect.

  15. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Galen W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Melberg, Cal G.; Fink, Dustin M.; Parins, Kia F.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Ulschmid, Caden M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect. PMID:27585885

  16. Sense-antisense gene pairs: sequence, transcription, and structure are not conserved between human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Emily J.; Chin-Inmanu, Kwanrutai; Jia, Hui; Lipovich, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Previous efforts to characterize conservation between the human and mouse genomes focused largely on sequence comparisons. These studies are inherently limited because they don't account for gene structure differences, which may exist despite genomic sequence conservation. Recent high-throughput transcriptome studies have revealed widespread and extensive overlaps between genes, and transcripts, encoded on both strands of the genomic sequence. This overlapping gene organization, which produces sense-antisense (SAS) gene pairs, is capable of effecting regulatory cascades through established mechanisms. We present an evolutionary conservation assessment of SAS pairs, on three levels: genomic, transcriptomic, and structural. From a genome-wide dataset of human SAS pairs, we first identified orthologous loci in the mouse genome, then assessed their transcription in the mouse, and finally compared the genomic structures of SAS pairs expressed in both species. We found that approximately half of human SAS loci have single orthologous locations in the mouse genome; however, only half of those orthologous locations have SAS transcriptional activity in the mouse. This suggests that high human-mouse gene conservation overlooks widespread distinctions in SAS pair incidence and expression. We compared gene structures at orthologous SAS loci, finding frequent differences in gene structure between human and orthologous mouse SAS pair members. Our categorization of human SAS pairs with respect to mouse conservation of expression as well as structure points to limitations of mouse models. Gene structure differences, including at SAS loci, may account for some of the phenotypic distinctions between primates and rodents. Genes in non-conserved SAS pairs may contribute to evolutionary lineage-specific regulatory outcomes. PMID:24133500

  17. 3D confocal reconstruction of gene expression in mouse.

    PubMed

    Hecksher-Sørensen, J; Sharpe, J

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer reconstructions of gene expression data will become a valuable tool in biomedical research in the near future. However, at present the process of converting in situ expression data into 3D models is a highly specialized and time-consuming procedure. Here we present a method which allows rapid reconstruction of whole-mount in situ data from mouse embryos. Mid-gestation embryos were stained with the alkaline phosphotase substrate Fast Red, which can be detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and cut into 70 microm sections. Each section was then scanned and digitally reconstructed. Using this method it took two days to section, digitize and reconstruct the full expression pattern of Shh in an E9.5 embryo (a 3D model of this embryo can be seen at genex.hgu.mrc.ac.uk). Additionally we demonstrate that this technique allows gene expression to be studied at the single cell level in intact tissue.

  18. Mouse models of colorectal cancer as preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Buczacki, Simon J.A.; Arends, Mark J.; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the application of mouse models to the identification and pre‐clinical validation of novel therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer, and to the search for early disease biomarkers. Large‐scale genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling of colorectal carcinomas has led to the identification of many candidate genes whose direct contribution to tumourigenesis is yet to be defined; we discuss the utility of cross‐species comparative ‘omics‐based approaches to this problem. We highlight recent progress in modelling late‐stage disease using mice, and discuss ways in which mouse models could better recapitulate the complexity of human cancers to tackle the problem of therapeutic resistance and recurrence after surgical resection. PMID:26115037

  19. Autistic-like behavioral phenotypes in a mouse model with copy number variation of the CAPS2/CADPS2 gene.

    PubMed

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Shinoda, Yo; Oka, Megumi; Sekine, Yukiko; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2013-01-04

    Ca²⁺-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2 or CADPS2) facilitates secretion and trafficking of dense-core vesicles. Recent genome-wide association studies of autism have identified several microdeletions due to copy number variation (CNV) in one of the chromosome 7q31.32 alleles on which the locus for CAPS2 is located in autistic patients. To evaluate the biological significance of reducing CAPS2 copy number, we analyzed CAPS2 heterozygous mice. Our present findings suggest that adequate levels of CAPS2 protein are critical for normal brain development and behavior, and that allelic changes due to CNV may contribute to autistic symptoms in combination with deficits in other autism-associated genes.

  20. Disease severity in a mouse model of ataxia telangiectasia is modulated by the DNA damage checkpoint gene Hus1

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Zhu, Min; Mukherjee, Sucheta; Lyndaker, Amy M.; Hume, Kelly R.; Lee, Jaesung; Riccio, Mark L.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Noden, Drew M.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The human genomic instability syndrome ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), caused by mutations in the gene encoding the DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM, is characterized by multisystem defects including neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency and increased cancer predisposition. ATM is central to a pathway that responds to double-strand DNA breaks, whereas the related kinase ATR leads a parallel signaling cascade that is activated by replication stress. To dissect the physiological relationship between the ATM and ATR pathways, we generated mice defective for both. Because complete ATR pathway inactivation causes embryonic lethality, we weakened the ATR mechanism to different degrees by impairing HUS1, a member of the 911 complex that is required for efficient ATR signaling. Notably, simultaneous ATM and HUS1 defects caused synthetic lethality. Atm/Hus1 double-mutant embryos showed widespread apoptosis and died mid-gestationally. Despite the underlying DNA damage checkpoint defects, increased DNA damage signaling was observed, as evidenced by H2AX phosphorylation and p53 accumulation. A less severe Hus1 defect together with Atm loss resulted in partial embryonic lethality, with the surviving double-mutant mice showing synergistic increases in genomic instability and specific developmental defects, including dwarfism, craniofacial abnormalities and brachymesophalangy, phenotypes that are observed in several human genomic instability disorders. In addition to identifying tissue-specific consequences of checkpoint dysfunction, these data highlight a robust, cooperative configuration for the mammalian DNA damage response network and further suggest HUS1 and related genes in the ATR pathway as candidate modifiers of disease severity in A-T patients. PMID:22575700

  1. Systems Analysis of a Mouse Xenograft Model Reveals Annexin A1 as a Regulator of Gene Expression in Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Annexin A1 is a multi functional molecule which is involved in inflammation, innate and adaptive immune systems, tumor progression and metastasis. We have previously showed the impaired tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and wound healing in annexin A1 knockout mice. While tumor is a piece of heterogeneous mass including not only malignant tumor cells but also the stroma, the importance of the tumor stroma for tumor progression and metastasis is becoming increasingly clear. The tumor stroma is comprised by various components including extracellular matrix and non-malignant cells in the tumor, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune cells, inflammatory cells. Based on our previous finding of pro-angiogenic functions for annexin A1 in vascular endothelial cell sprouting, wound healing, tumor growth and metastasis, and the previously known properties for annexin A1 in immune cells and inflammation, this study hypothesized that annexin A1 is a key functional player in tumor development, linking the various components in tumor stroma by its actions in endothelial cells and immune cells. Using systems analysis programs commercially available, this paper further compared the gene expression between tumors from annexin A1 wild type mice and annexin A1 knockout mice and found a list of genes that significantly changed in the tumor stroma that lacked annexin A1. This revealed annexin A1 to be an effective regulator in tumor stroma and suggested a mechanism that annexin A1 affects tumor development and metastasis through interaction with the various components in the microenvironment surrounding the tumor cells. PMID:23077482

  2. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  3. Mouse models of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Hung, Holly A.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of the organogenesis, homeostasis, and tumorigenesis of the adrenal cortex has been the subject of intense study for many decades. Specifically, characterization of tumor predisposition syndromes with adrenocortical manifestations and molecular profiling of sporadic adrenocortical tumors have led to the discovery of key molecular pathways that promote pathological adrenal growth. However, given the observational nature of such studies, several important questions regarding the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors have remained. This review will summarize naturally occurring and genetically engineered mouse models that have provided novel tools to explore the molecular and cellular underpinnings of adrenocortical tumors. New paradigms of cancer initiation, maintenance, and progression that have emerged from this work will be discussed. PMID:26678830

  4. Effects of Mono-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate and Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Administrations on Oocyte Meiotic Maturation, Apoptosis and Gene Quantification in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Absalan, Forouzan; Saremy, Sadegh; Mansori, Esrafil; Taheri Moghadam, Mahin; Eftekhari Moghadam, Ali Reza; Ghanavati, Razie

    2017-01-01

    Objective Phthalates, which are commonly used to render plastics into soft and flexible materials, have also been determined as developmental and reproductive toxicants in human and animals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mono-(2- ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) oral administrations on maturation of mouse oocytes, apoptosis and gene transcription levels. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, immature oocytes recovered from Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mouse strain (6-8 weeks), were divided into seven different experimental and control groups. Control group oocytes were retrieved from mice that received only normal saline. The experimental groups I, II or III oocytes were retrieved from mice treated with 50, 100 or 200 µl DEHP (2.56 µM) solution, respectively. The experimental groups IV, V or VI oocytes were retrieved from mouse exposed to 50, 100 or 200 µl MEHP (2.56 µM) solution, respectively. Fertilization and embryonic development were carried out in OMM and T6 medium. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-FITC/Dead Cell Apoptosis Kit, with PI staining. In addition, the mRNA levels of Pou5f1, Ccna1 and Asah1 were examined in oocytes. Finally, mouse embryo at early blastocyst stage was stained with acridine-orange (AO) and ethidium-bromide (EB), in order to access their viability. Results The proportion of oocytes that progressed up to metaphase II (MII) and 2-cells embryo formation stage was significantly decreased by exposure to MEHP or DEHP, in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V and PI positive oocytes showed greater quantity in the treated mice than control. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that expression levels of Pou5f1, Asah1 and Ccna1 were significantly lower in the treated mouse oocytes than control. The total cell count for blastocyst developed from the treated mouse oocytes was lower than the controls. Conclusion These

  5. Mouse model of Noonan syndrome reveals cell type- and gene dosage-dependent effects of Ptpn11 mutation.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshiyuki; Mohi, M Golam; Ismat, Fraz A; Bronson, Roderick T; Williams, Ifor R; Kutok, Jeffery L; Yang, Wentian; Pao, Lily I; Gilliland, D Gary; Epstein, Jonathan A; Neel, Benjamin G

    2004-08-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common human autosomal dominant birth defect, characterized by short stature, facial abnormalities, heart defects and possibly increased risk of leukemia. Mutations of Ptpn11 (also known as Shp2), which encodes the protein-tyrosine phosphatase Shp2, occur in approximately 50% of individuals with Noonan syndrome, but their molecular, cellular and developmental effects, and the relationship between Noonan syndrome and leukemia, are unclear. We generated mice expressing the Noonan syndrome-associated mutant D61G. When homozygous, the D61G mutant is embryonic lethal, whereas heterozygotes have decreased viability. Surviving Ptpn11(D61G/+) embryos ( approximately 50%) have short stature, craniofacial abnormalities similar to those in Noonan syndrome, and myeloproliferative disease. Severely affected Ptpn11(D61G/+) embryos ( approximately 50%) have multiple cardiac defects similar to those in mice lacking the Ras-GAP protein neurofibromin. Their endocardial cushions have increased Erk activation, but Erk hyperactivation is cell and pathway specific. Our results clarify the relationship between Noonan syndrome and leukemia and show that a single Ptpn11 gain-of-function mutation evokes all major features of Noonan syndrome by acting on multiple developmental lineages in a gene dosage-dependent and pathway-selective manner.

  6. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  7. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1−/−), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1−/− mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1−/− mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1−/− mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1−/− mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-κB/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  8. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  9. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Wilming, Laurens G; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence.

  10. Deletion of the gene encoding MyD88 protects from anorexia in a mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Johan; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2010-05-01

    The anorexia-cachexia syndrome, characterized by a rise in energy expenditure and loss of body weight that paradoxically are associated with loss of appetite and decreased food intake, contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality in cancer. While the pathophysiology of cancer anorexia-cachexia is poorly understood, evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory cytokines are key mediators of this response. Although inflammation hence is recognized as an important component of cancer anorexia-cachexia, the molecular pathways involved are largely unknown. We addressed this issue in mice carrying a deletion of the gene encoding MyD88, the key intracellular adaptor molecule in Toll-like and interleukin-1 family receptor signaling. Wild-type and MyD88-deficient mice were transplanted subcutaneously with a syngenic methylcholanthrene-induced tumor (MCG 101) and daily food intake and body weight were recorded. Wild-type mice showed progressively reduced food intake from about 5days after tumor transplantation and displayed a slight body weight loss after 10days when the experiment was terminated. In contrast, MyD88-deficient mice did not develop anorexia, and displayed a positive body weight development during the observation period. While the MyD88-deficient mice on average developed somewhat smaller tumors than wild-type mice, this did not explain the absence of anorexia, because anorexia was seen in wild-type mice with similar tumor mass as non-anorexic knock-out mice. These data suggest that MyD88-dependent mechanisms are involved in the metabolic derangement during cancer anorexia-cachexia and that innate immune signaling is important for the development of this syndrome.

  11. Resveratrol decreases inflammation and increases utrophin gene expression in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley S; Delgado Díaz, Diana C; Kostek, Matthew C

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic disease with no cure. Reducing inflammation or increasing utrophin expression can alleviate DMD pathology. Resveratrol can reduce inflammation and activate the utrophin promoter. The aims of this study were to identify an active dose of resveratrol in mdx mice and examine if this dose decreased inflammation and increased utrophin expression. 5-week old mdx mice were given 0, 10, 100, or 500 mg/kg of resveratrol everyday for 10 days. Sirt1 was measured by qRT-PCR and used to determine the most active dose. Muscle inflammation was measured by H&E staining, CD45 and F4/80 immunohistochemistry. IL-6, TNFα, PGC-1α, and utrophin gene expression were measured by qRT-PCR. Utrophin, Sirt1, and PGC-1α protein were quantified by western blot. The 100 mg/kg dose of resveratrol, the most active dose, increased Sirt1 mRNA 60 ± 10% (p < 0.01), reduced immune cell infiltration 21 ± 6% (H&E) and 42 ± 8% (CD45 immunohistochemistry (p < 0.05)), reduced macrophage infiltration 48 ± 10% (F4/80 immunohistochemistry (p < 0.05)), and increased IL-6, PGC-1α, and utrophin mRNA 247 ± 77%, 27 ± 17%, and 43 ± 23% respectively (p ≤ 0.05). Utrophin, Sirt1, and PGC-1α protein expression did not change. Resveratrol may be a therapy for DMD by reducing inflammation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  13. Uterine disorders and pregnancy complications: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Wang, Haibin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of human uterine physiology and pathology has been extrapolated from the study of diverse animal models, as there is no ideal system for studying human uterine biology in vitro. Although it remains debatable whether mouse models are the most suitable system for investigating human uterine function(s), gene-manipulated mice are considered by many the most useful tool for mechanistic analysis, and numerous studies have identified many similarities in female reproduction between the two species. This Review brings together information from studies using animal models, in particular mouse models, that shed light on normal and pathologic aspects of uterine biology and pregnancy complications. PMID:20364098

  14. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  15. Mouse models for filovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Bradfute, Steven B; Warfield, Kelly L; Bray, Mike

    2012-09-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study.

  16. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  17. Complexity, polymorphism, and connectivity of mouse Vk gene families.

    PubMed

    Kofler, R; Duchosal, M A; Dixon, F J

    1989-01-01

    To define the polymorphism and extent of the mouse immunoglobulin kappa (Igk) gene complex, we have analyzed restriction-enzyme digested genomic DNA from 33 inbred strains of mice with labeled DNA probes corresponding to 16 Vk protein groups (1 of them previously undescribed) and the Jk/Ck region (V, variable; J, joining; C, constant). These probes detected between 1 and 25 distinct restriction enzyme fragments (REF) that appeared in up to eight polymorphic patterns, thus defining eight mouse Igk haplotypes. The investigated portion of the Vk repertoire was estimated to encompass between 60 and 120 discernable Vk gene-containing REFs. In contrast to mouse VH gene families, several Vk gene families defined by these probes appeared to overlap. This observation has implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and raises the possibility that the Vk gene complex is a continuum of related sequences.

  18. AAV2/1 CD74 Gene Transfer Reduces β-amyloidosis and Improves Learning and Memory in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Zhang, Gang; Morrison, Christine M; Bosch, Megan E; Weir, Robert A; Lu, Yaman; Dong, Weiguo; Gendelman, Howard E

    2015-11-01

    Modulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) trafficking pathway heralds a new therapeutic frontier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CD74 binds to the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and can suppresses Aβ processing, we investigated whether recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery of CD74 could reduce Aβ production and affect disease outcomes. This idea was tested in a mouse AD model. Cotransduction of AAV-tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) and AAV-tet-response element (TRE)-CD74 resulted in CD74 expression, reduced Aβ production in mouse neurons containing the human APP with familial AD-linked mutations. Stereotaxic injection of AAV-TRE-GFP or CD74 into the hippocampi of an AD mouse, defined as a TgCRND8 × calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II derived promoter-tTA double-transgenic, reduced Aβ loads and pyramidal neuronal Aβ accumulation in the hippocampus. Immunofluorescent studies showed that APP colocalization with Lamp1 was increased in CD74-expressing neurons. Moreover, Morris water maze tasks demonstrated that mice treated with AAV-TRE-CD74 showed improved learning and memory compared to AAV-TRE-GFP control animals. These results support the idea that CD74-induced alteration of Aβ processing could improve AD-associated memory deficits as shown in mouse models of human disease.

  19. Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer: A 2015 Update

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Lawrence S.; Qamri, Zahida; Kari, Suresh; Ashtekar, Amruta

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasm, and its rate is rising at an alarming pace. Thus, there is a compelling need to develop in vivo models which will not only enable the confirmation of the oncogenic potential of driver genes, but also point the way towards the development of new therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, techniques for the generation of mouse models of human diseases have progressed substantially, accompanied by parallel advances in the genetics and genomics of human tumors. This convergence has enabled the development of mouse lines carrying mutations in the genes that cause thyroid cancers of all subtypes, including differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, poorly differentiated/anaplastic cancers, and medullary thyroid cancers. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of mouse modeling of thyroid cancer, with the eventual goal of providing insight into tumor biology and treatment. PMID:26123589

  20. Optimizing mouse models for precision cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Le Magnen, Clémentine; Dutta, Aditya; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2017-01-01

    As cancer has become increasingly more prevalent in our society, cancer prevention research has evolved toward placing a greater emphasis on reducing cancer deaths and minimizing the adverse consequences of having cancer. “Precision cancer prevention” takes into account the collaboration of intrinsic and extrinsic factors for influencing cancer incidence and aggressiveness in the context of the individual, as well as the recognition that such knowledge can improve early detection and more accurate discrimination of cancerous lesions. The premise of this review is that analyses of mouse models can greatly augment precision cancer prevention. However, as of now, mouse models, and particularly genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) models, have yet to be fully integrated into prevention research. Herein we discuss opportunities and challenges for “precision mouse modeling”, including their essential criteria of mouse models for prevention research, representative success stories, and opportunities for the more refined analyses in future studies. PMID:26893066

  1. The effects of tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase gene therapy on craniosynostosis and craniofacial morphology in the FGFR2C342Y/+ mouse model of Crouzon craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, E; Nam, H K; Liu, J; Hatch, N E

    2015-04-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of cranial bones, has traditionally been described as a disease of increased bone mineralization. However, multiple mouse models of craniosynostosis display craniosynostosis simultaneously with diminished cranial bone volume and/or density. We propose an alternative hypothesis that craniosynostosis results from abnormal tissue mineralization through the downregulation of tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) enzyme downstream of activating mutations in FGFRs. Neonatal Crouzon (FGFRC342Y/+) and wild-type (FGFR+/+) mice were injected with lentivirus to deliver a recombinant form of TNAP. Mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postnatal. Serum was collected to test for alkaline phosphatase (AP), phosphorus, and calcium levels. Craniofacial bone fusion and morphology were assessed by micro-computed tomography. Injection with the TNAP lentivirus significantly increased serum AP levels (increased serum AP levels are indicative of efficient transduction and production of the recombinant protein), but results were variable and dependent upon viral lot and the litter of mice injected. Morphological analysis revealed craniofacial form differences for inferior surface (p=0.023) and cranial height (p=0.014) regions between TNAP lentivirus-injected and vehicle-injected Crouzon mice. With each unit increase in AP level, the odds of lambdoid suture fusion decreased by 84.2% and these results came close to statistical significance (p=0.068). These results suggest that TNAP deficiency may mediate FGFR2-associated craniosynostosis. Future studies should incorporate injection of recombinant TNAP protein, to avoid potential side effects and variable efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. N-ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Induced Mutations within the Klotho Gene Lead to Ectopic Calcification and Reduced Lifespan in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Babinsky, Valerie N.; Potter, Paul; Thomas, Gethin P.; Croucher, Peter I.; Brown, Matthew A.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Cox, Roger D.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification (EC), which is the pathological deposition of calcium and phosphate in extra-skeletal tissues, may be associated with hypercalcaemic and hyperphosphataemic disorders, or it may occur in the absence of metabolic abnormalities. In addition, EC may be inherited as part of several monogenic disorders and studies of these have provided valuable insights into the metabolic pathways regulating mineral metabolism. For example, studies of tumoural calcinosis, a disorder characterised by hyperphosphataemia and progressive EC, have revealed mutations of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), polypeptide N-acetyl galactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3) and klotho (KL), which are all part of a phosphate-regulating pathway. However, such studies in humans are limited by the lack of available large families with EC, and to facilitate such studies we assessed the progeny of mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) for EC. This identified two mutants with autosomal recessive forms of EC, and reduced lifespan, designated Ecalc1 and Ecalc2. Genetic mapping localized the Ecalc1 and Ecalc2 loci to a 11.0 Mb region on chromosome 5 that contained the klotho gene (Kl), and DNA sequence analysis identified nonsense (Gln203Stop) and missense (Ile604Asn) Kl mutations in Ecalc1 and Ecalc2 mice, respectively. The Gln203Stop mutation, located in KL1 domain, was severely hypomorphic and led to a 17-fold reduction of renal Kl expression. The Ile604Asn mutation, located in KL2 domain, was predicted to impair klotho protein stability and in vitro expression studies in COS-7 cells revealed endoplasmic reticulum retention of the Ile604Asn mutant. Further phenotype studies undertaken in Ecalc1 (kl203X/203X) mice demonstrated elevations in plasma concentrations of phosphate, FGF23 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Thus, two allelic variants of Kl that develop EC and represent mouse models for tumoural calcinosis have been established. PMID:25860694

  3. The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Triplicated Gene Impairs Neuronal Precursor Differentiation and Neurite Development through Two Different Domains in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model for Down Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Trazzi, Stefania; Fuchs, Claudia; Valli, Emanuele; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability in Down syndrome (DS) appears to be related to severe proliferation impairment during brain development. Recent evidence shows that it is not only cellular proliferation that is heavily compromised in DS, but also cell fate specification and dendritic maturation. The amyloid precursor protein (APP), a gene that is triplicated in DS, plays a key role in normal brain development by influencing neural precursor cell proliferation, cell fate specification, and neuronal maturation. APP influences these processes via two separate domains, the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the soluble secreted APP. We recently found that the proliferation impairment of neuronal precursors (NPCs) from the Ts65Dn mouse model for DS was caused by derangement of the Shh pathway due to overexpression of patched1(Ptch1), its inhibitory regulator. Ptch1 overexpression was related to increased levels within the APP/AICD system. The overall goal of this study was to determine whether APP contributes to neurogenesis impairment in DS by influencing in addition to proliferation, cell fate specification, and neurite development. We found that normalization of APP expression restored the reduced neuronogenesis, the increased astrogliogenesis, and the reduced neurite length of trisomic NPCs, indicating that APP overexpression underpins all aspects of neurogenesis impairment. Moreover, we found that two different domains of APP impair neuronal differentiation and maturation in trisomic NPCs. The APP/AICD system regulates neuronogenesis and neurite length through the Shh pathway, whereas the APP/secreted AP system promotes astrogliogenesis through an IL-6-associated signaling cascade. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying brain development alterations in DS. PMID:23740250

  4. A mouse model of mandibular osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Paccione, M F; Warren, S M; Spector, J A; Greenwald, J A; Bouletreau, P J; Longaker, M T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing. By applying this model to transgenic mice or using in situ hybridization techniques, we can subsequently investigate candidate genes that are believed to be important in membranous osteotomy healing. In the current study, 20 adult male CD-1 mice underwent a full-thickness osteotomy between the second and third molars of the right hemimandible using a 3-mm diamond disc and copious irrigation. Compo-Post pins were secured into the mandible, 2 mm anterior and posterior to the osteotomy. After the soft tissues were reapproximated and the skin was closed, an acrylic external fixator was attached to the exposed posts for stabilization. The animals were killed on postoperative day number 7, 10, 14, and 28 (n=5 animals per time point). The right hemimandibles were decalcified and embedded in paraffin for histologic evaluation or immunohistochemistry localizing osteocalcin. At 7 days after the osteotomy, early intramembranous bone formation could be seen extending from either edge of the osteotomized bone. By 10 days, an increasing number of small blood vessels could be seen within and around the osteotomy. At 14 days, the bone edges were in close approximation, and by 28 days the callus had been replaced by actively remodeling woven bone in all specimens examined. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that osteocalcin expression correlated temporally with the transition from a soft to a hard callus. Furthermore, osteocalcin was spatially confined to osteoblasts actively laying down new osteoid or remodeling bone. This study describes a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing that can be used as a paradigm for future osteotomy healing studies investigating candidate genes critical for osteogenesis and successful bone repair.

  5. Age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2) in a novel mouse model due to a nonsense mutation in the Mdm1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo; Mandal, Md Nawajes A; Chavali, Venkata R M; Hawes, Norman L; Khan, Naheed W; Hurd, Ronald E; Smith, Richard S; Davisson, Muriel L; Kopplin, Laura; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Iyengar, Sudha K; Heckenlively, John R; Ayyagari, Radha

    2008-12-15

    We observed that a naturally occurring mouse strain developed age-related retinal degeneration (arrd2). These mice had normal fundi, electroretinograms (ERGs) and retinal histology at 6 months of age; vessel attenuation, RPE atrophy and pigmentary abnormalities at 14 months, which progressed to complete loss of photoreceptors and extinguished ERG by 22 months. Genetic analysis revealed that the retinal degeneration in arrd2 segregates in an autosomal recessive manner and the disease gene localizes to mouse chromosome 10. A positional candidate cloning approach detected a nonsense mutation in the mouse double minute-1 gene (Mdm1), which results in the truncation of the putative protein from 718 amino acids to 398. We have identified a novel transcript of the Mdm1 gene, which is the predominant transcript in the retina. The Mdm1 transcript is localized to the nuclear layers of neural retina. Expression of Mdm1 in the retina increases steadily from post-natal day 30 to 1 year, and a high level of Mdm1 are subsequently maintained. The Mdm1 transcript was found to be significantly depleted in the retina of arrd2 mice and the transcript was observed to degrade by nonsense-mediated decay. These results indicate that the depletion of the Mdm1 transcript may underlie the mechanism leading to late-onset progressive retinal degeneration in arrd2 mice. Analysis of a cohort of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) wherein the susceptibility locus maps to chromosome 12q, a region bearing the human ortholog to MDM1, did not reveal association between human MDM1 and AMD.

  6. Photoreceptors Regulating Circadian Behavior: A Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-14

    retina (Dr. M. Applebury. personal communication). On the basis of their similarity to human opsins and ERG responses recorded from the mouse eye they... opsin that is almost identical to the mouse and human green cone opsins . Whether mammalian circadian responses to light are mediated by cones themselves...transgenic (Tm) mice of various ages. Transgenic mice carry a DT-A gene under the control of the human rod opsin promoter. Phase shifting paradigm is

  7. Beethoven, a mouse model for dominant, progressive hearing loss DFNA36.

    PubMed

    Vreugde, Sarah; Erven, Alexandra; Kros, Corné J; Marcotti, Walter; Fuchs, Helmut; Kurima, Kiyoto; Wilcox, Edward R; Friedman, Thomas B; Griffith, Andrew J; Balling, Rudi; Hrabé De Angelis, Martin; Avraham, Karen B; Steel, Karen P

    2002-03-01

    Despite recent progress in identifying genes underlying deafness, there are still relatively few mouse models of specific forms of human deafness. Here we describe the phenotype of the Beethoven (Bth) mouse mutant and a missense mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane cochlear-expressed gene 1). Progressive hearing loss (DFNA36) and profound congenital deafness (DFNB7/B11) are caused by dominant and recessive mutations of the human ortholog, TMC1 (ref. 1), for which Bth and deafness (dn) are mouse models, respectively.

  8. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  10. Disruption of the sigS gene attenuates the local innate immune response to Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Peton, Vincent; Breyne, Koen; Rault, Lucie; Demeyere, Kristel; Berkova, Nadia; Meyer, Evelyne; Even, Sergine; Le Loir, Yves

    2016-04-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major pathogen involved in ruminant mastitis and present worldwide. Clinical signs of S. aureus mastitis vary considerably and are largely dependent on strain-specific factors. A comparison of two S. aureus strains that reproducibly induced either severe (O11) or mild (O46) mastitis in ewes revealed that the transcriptional regulator sigS was mutated in O46 (Le Maréchal et al., 2011. PLoS One. 6 (11) e27354. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027354). In the present paper, we analysed the sigS sequence in 18 other S. aureus strains isolated from goat or ewe mastitis and found a 4-bp deletion similar to that of the O46 sigS gene in three strains associated with subclinical ewe mastitis. This sigS gene was disrupted in strain O11 (O11ΔsigS), so our aim was to investigate its involvement in the severity of infections in the context of mastitis. The wild type (wt) and mutant strains were then characterized in vitro to determine the involvement of sigS in the response S. aureus under various stress conditions, and assess its influence on the cytotoxicity of the pathogen, its invasive capacity and biofilm formation. The strains were compared in vivo in an experimental mouse mastitis model in which clinical signs and cytokine production were evaluated at 24h post-infection. While no significant differences in the effect on bacterial growth between O11 and O11ΔsigS were observed either in vitro or in vivo, a significantly weaker in vivo production of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α was measured in the mammary glands infected with the mutant strain, suggesting that infection with O11ΔsigS induced an attenuated local innate immune response. These results suggest an impact of sigS disruption on S. aureus pathogenesis in a ruminant mastitis context. This disruption is probably involved in, and may partly explain, the milder symptoms previously observed in S. aureus O46-induced mastitis in ewes.

  11. Immunologic Applications of Conditional Gene Modification Technology in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources. PMID:24700321

  12. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Immunologic applications of conditional gene modification technology in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-04-02

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources.

  14. SPC-Cre-ERT2 Transgenic Mouse for Temporal Gene Deletion in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Yao-Song; Wang, Lianmei; Tian, Xinlun; Feng, Ruie; Ma, Aiping; Cai, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although several Cre-loxP-based gene knockout mouse models have been generated for the study of gene function in alveolar epithelia in the lung, their applications are still limited. In this study, we developed a SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse model, in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ERT2) is under the control of the human surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter. The specificity and efficiency of Cre-ERT2 activity was first evaluated by crossing SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse with ROSA26R mouse, a β-galactosidase reporter strain. We found that Cre-ERT2 was expressed in 30.7% type II alveolar epithelial cells of SPC-Cre-ERT2/ROSA26R mouse lung tissues in the presence of tamoxifen. We then tested the tamoxifen-inducible recombinase activity of Cre-ERT2 in a mouse strain bearing TSC1 conditional knockout alleles (TSC1fx/fx). TSC1 deletion was detected in the lungs of tamoxifen treated SPC-Cre-ERT2/TSC1fx/fx mice. Therefore this SPC-Cre-ERT2 mouse model may be a valuable tool to investigate functions of genes in lung development, physiology and disease. PMID:23049940

  15. SPC-Cre-ERT2 transgenic mouse for temporal gene deletion in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yao-Song; Wang, Lianmei; Tian, Xinlun; Feng, Ruie; Ma, Aiping; Cai, Baiqiang; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Although several Cre-loxP-based gene knockout mouse models have been generated for the study of gene function in alveolar epithelia in the lung, their applications are still limited. In this study, we developed a SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model, in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER(T2)) is under the control of the human surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter. The specificity and efficiency of Cre-ER(T2) activity was first evaluated by crossing SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse with ROSA26R mouse, a β-galactosidase reporter strain. We found that Cre-ER(T2) was expressed in 30.7% type II alveolar epithelial cells of SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/ROSA26R mouse lung tissues in the presence of tamoxifen. We then tested the tamoxifen-inducible recombinase activity of Cre-ER(T2) in a mouse strain bearing TSC1 conditional knockout alleles (TSC1(fx/fx)). TSC1 deletion was detected in the lungs of tamoxifen treated SPC-Cre-ER(T2)/TSC1(fx/fx) mice. Therefore this SPC-Cre-ER(T2) mouse model may be a valuable tool to investigate functions of genes in lung development, physiology and disease.

  16. Mouse models for inherited endocrine and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Piret, Siân E; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2011-12-01

    In vivo models represent important resources for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying endocrine and metabolic disorders, and for pre-clinical translational studies that may include the assessments of new treatments. In the study of endocrine diseases, which affect multiple organs, in vivo models provide specific advantages over in vitro models, which are limited to investigation of isolated systems. In recent years, the mouse has become the popular choice for developing such in vivo mammalian models, as it has a genome that shares ∼85% identity to that of man, and has many physiological systems that are similar to those in man. Moreover, methods have been developed to alter the expression of genes in the mouse, thereby generating models for human diseases, which may be due to loss- or gain-of-function mutations. The methods used to generate mutations in the mouse genome include: chemical mutagenesis; conventional, conditional and inducible knockout models; knockin models and transgenic models, and these strategies are often complementary. This review describes some of the different strategies that are utilised for generating mouse models. In addition, some mouse models that have been successfully generated by these methods for some human hereditary endocrine and metabolic disorders are reviewed. In particular, the mouse models generated for parathyroid disorders, which include: the multiple endocrine neoplasias; hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome; disorders of the calcium-sensing receptor and forms of inherited hypoparathyroidism are discussed. The advances that have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms of these human diseases by investigations of these mouse models are described.

  17. Identification of suitable reference genes in the mouse placenta.

    PubMed

    Solano, María Emilia; Thiele, Kristin; Kowal, Mirka Katharina; Arck, Petra Clara

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable tool to analyse gene expression profiles. The expression of housekeeping genes generally serves as a reference for mRNA amount, assuming that it remains stable under pathophysiological and experimental conditions. To date, an empirical validation of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR-based studies in the mouse placenta is missing. We used NormFinder and BestKeeper statistical software to analyse the expression stability of candidate housekeeping genes quantified by RT-qPCR in mouse placentas. Fifteen of 32 potential candidate housekeeping genes analysed on gestation day (gd) 16.5 in mouse placentas exhibited an optimal cycle threshold (Ct). Among them B2m, Polr2a, Ubc, and Ywhaz genes showed the highest expression stability in placentas from control, but also experimentally-challenged mice. These genes as well as the currently widely used housekeeping genes Hprt1, Actb, and Gapdh were selected for further quality assessments. We quantified the Ct values of these selected genes in placental samples obtained from wild-type or genetically engineered dams at different gds, or upon selected experimental interventions known to affect placental phenotype. Among all housekeeping genes analysed, Polr2a was the most stably expressed and its expression stability excelled in combination with Ubc. Polr2a, especially in combination with Ubc, can be proposed as highly suitable endogenous reference for gene expression analysis in mouse-derived placental tissue. Moreover, the validation of both genes as a stable reference gene in human placenta-derived tissue strengthens the translational relevance of RT-qPCR findings using mouse placenta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  19. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  20. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  1. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology.

    PubMed

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  2. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G; Mindrinos, Michael N; Baker, Henry V; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C; López, Cecilia M; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B; Billiar, Timothy R; West, Michael A; Jeschke, Marc G; Klein, Matthew B; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Brownstein, Bernard H; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E; Mason, Philip H; Cobb, J Perren; Rahme, Laurence G; Lowry, Stephen F; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Herndon, David N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R(2) between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases.

  3. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  4. Genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Yann S; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally.

  5. Genetic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mineur, Yann S.; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E.; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally. PMID:16444901

  6. Mig-6 Mouse Model of Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a frequently occurring gynecological disorder. Estrogen-dependent endometrioid carcinoma is the most common type of gynecological cancer. One of the major pathologic phenomena of endometrial cancer is the loss of estrogen (E2) and progesterone (P4) control over uterine epithelial cell proliferation. P4 antagonizes the growth-promoting properties of E2 in the uterus. P4 prevents the development of endometrial cancer associated with unopposed E2 by blocking E2 actions. Mitogen inducible gene 6 (Mig-6, Errfi1, RALT, or gene 33) is an immediate early response gene that can be induced by various mitogens and common chronic stress stimuli. Mig-6 has been identified as an important component of P4-mediated inhibition of E2 signaling in the uterus. Decreased expression of MIG-6 is observed in human endometrial carcinomas. Transgenic mice with Mig-6 ablation in the uterus develop endometrial hyperplasia and E2-dependent endometrial cancer. Thus, MIG-6 has a tumor suppressor function in endometrial tumorigenesis. The following discussion summarizes our current knowledge of Mig-6 mouse models and their role in understanding the molecular mechanisms of endometrial tumorigenesis and in the development of therapeutic approaches for endometrial cancer.

  7. Genetic mouse models for bone studies—Strengths and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2012-01-01

    Mice have become a preferred model system for bone research because of their genetic and pathophysiological similarities to humans: a relatively short reproductive period, leading to relatively low cost of maintenance and the availability of the entire mouse genome sequence information. The success in producing the first transgenic mouse line that expressed rabbit β-globin protein in mouse erythrocytes three decades ago marked the beginning of the use of genetically engineered mice as model system to study human diseases. Soon afterward the development of cultured pluripotent embryonic stem cells provided the possibility of gene replacement or gene deletion in mice. These technologies have been critical to identify new genes involved in bone development, growth, remodeling, repair, and diseases, but like many other approaches, they have limitations. This review will introduce the approaches that allow the generation of transgenic mice and global or conditional (tissue-specific and inducible) mutant mice. A list of the various promoters used to achieve bone-specific gene deletion or overexpression is included. The limitations of these approaches are discussed, and general guidelines related to the analysis of genetic mouse models are provided. PMID:21907838

  8. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-11-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS.

  9. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  10. Behavioral and Neuroanatomical Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Ellegood, Jacob; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the consequences of the mutation on behavioral and biological phenotypes relevant to autism, mutations in many of the risk genes for autism spectrum disorder have been experimentally generated in mice. Here, we summarize behavioral outcomes and neuroanatomical abnormalities, with a focus on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of postmortem mouse brains. Results are described from multiple mouse models of autism spectrum disorder and comorbid syndromes, including the 15q11-13, 16p11.2, 22q11.2, Cntnap2, Engrailed2, Fragile X, Integrinβ3, MET, Neurexin1a, Neuroligin3, Reelin, Rett, Shank3, Slc6a4, tuberous sclerosis, and Williams syndrome models, and inbred strains with strong autism-relevant behavioral phenotypes, including BTBR and BALB. Concomitant behavioral and neuroanatomical abnormalities can strengthen the interpretation of results from a mouse model, and may elevate the usefulness of the model system for therapeutic discovery.

  11. Mouse models for human hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Michel; Safieddine, Saaid; Petit, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a frequent condition in humans. Identification of the causative genes for the early onset forms of isolated deafness began 15 years ago and has been very fruitful. To date, approximately 50 causative genes have been identified. Yet, limited information regarding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms can be derived from hearing tests in deaf patients. This chapter describes the success of mouse models in the elucidation of some pathophysiological processes in the auditory sensory organ, the cochlea. These models have revealed a variety of defective structures and functions at the origin of deafness genetic forms. This is illustrated by three different examples: (1) the DFNB9 deafness form, a synaptopathy of the cochlear sensory cells where otoferlin is defective; (2) the Usher syndrome, in which deafness is related to abnormal development of the hair bundle, the mechanoreceptive structure of the sensory cells to sound; (3) the DFNB1 deafness form, which is the most common form of inherited deafness in Caucasian populations, mainly caused by connexin-26 defects that alter gap junction communication between nonsensory cochlear cells.

  12. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  13. Genetically Engineered Humanized Mouse Models for Preclinical Antibody Studies

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V.; Roopenian, Derry C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies. PMID:24150980

  14. Mouse Models of Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pavan; Negrin, Robert; Hill, Geoffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, mouse models of bone marrow transplantation have provided the critical links between graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) pathophysiology and clinical practice. The initial insight from mouse models that GVHD and GVL were T cell dependent has long been confirmed clinically. More recent translations from mouse models have included the important role of inflammatory cytokines in GVHD. Newly developed concepts relating to the ability of antigen presenting cell (APC) and T cell subsets to mediate GVHD now promise significant clinical advances. The ability to use knockout and transgenic approaches to dissect mechanisms of GVHD and GVL mean that mouse systems will continue as the predominant preclinical platform. The basic transplant approach in these models, coupled with modern “real-time” immunologic imaging of GVHD and GVL is discussed. PMID:18162233