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Sample records for gene mouse model

  1. Pathophysiology of gene-targeted mouse models for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grubb, B R; Boucher, R C

    1999-01-01

    Pathophysiology of Gene-Targeted Mouse Models for Cystic Fibrosis. Physiol. Rev. 79, Suppl.: S193-S214, 1999. - Mutations in the gene causing the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF) result in abnormal transport of several ions across a number of epithelial tissues. In just 3 years after this gene was cloned, the first CF mouse models were generated. The CF mouse models generated to date have provided a wealth of information on the pathophysiology of the disease in a variety of organs. Heterogeneity of disease in the mouse models is due to the variety of gene-targeting strategies used in the generation of the CF mouse models as well as the diversity of the murine genetic background. This paper reviews the pathophysiology in the tissues and organs (gastrointestinal, airway, hepatobiliary, pancreas, reproductive, and salivary tissue) involved in the disease in the various CF mouse models. Marked similarities to and differences from the human disease have been observed in the various murine models. Some of the CF mouse models accurately reflect the ion-transport abnormalities and disease phenotype seen in human CF patients, especially in gastrointestinal tissue. However, alterations in airway ion transport, which lead to the devastating lung disease in CF patients, appear to be largely absent in the CF mouse models. Reasons for these unexpected findings are discussed. This paper also reviews pharmacotherapeutic and gene therapeutic studies in the various mouse models. PMID:9922382

  2. Mouse models for genes involved in impaired spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, M K; de Kretser, D

    2006-02-01

    Since the introduction of molecular biology and gene ablation technologies there have been substantial advances in our understanding of how sperm are made and fertilization occurs. There have been at least 150 different models of specifically altered gene function produced that have resulted in male infertility spanning virtually all aspects of the spermatogenic, sperm maturation and fertilization processes. While each has, or potentially will reveal, novel aspects of these processes, there is still much of which we have little knowledge. The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models, rather it gives an overview of the potential for such models which up to this point have generally been 'knockouts'; it presents alternative strategies for the production of new models and emphasizes the importance of thorough phenotypic analysis in order to extract a maximum amount of information from each model.

  3. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  4. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  5. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  6. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  7. Perinatal Gjb2 gene transfer rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Takashi; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most widespread sensory disorder, with an incidence of congenital genetic deafness of 1 in 1600 children. For many ethnic populations, the most prevalent form of genetic deafness is caused by recessive mutations in the gene gap junction protein, beta 2, 26 kDa (GJB2), which is also known as connexin 26 (Cx26). Despite this knowledge, existing treatment strategies do not completely recover speech perception. Here we used a gene delivery system to rescue hearing in a mouse model of Gjb2 deletion. Mice lacking Cx26 are characterized by profound deafness from birth and improper development of cochlear cells. Cochlear delivery of Gjb2 using an adeno-associated virus significantly improved the auditory responses and development of the cochlear structure. Using gene replacement to restore hearing in a new mouse model of Gjb2-related deafness may lead to the development of therapies for human hereditary deafness.

  8. The construction of transgenic and gene knockout/knockin mouse models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J

    2012-04-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual's gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  9. The Construction of Transgenic and Gene Knockout/Knockin Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alfred; McGarry, Michael P.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic and physiological similarities between mice and humans have focused considerable attention on rodents as potential models of human health and disease. Together with the wealth of resources, knowledge, and technologies surrounding the mouse as a model system, these similarities have propelled this species to the forefront of biomedical research. The advent of genomic manipulation has quickly led to the creation and use of genetically engineered mice as powerful tools for cutting edge studies of human disease research, including the discovery, refinement, and utility of many currently available therapeutic regimes. In particular, the creation of genetically modified mice as models of human disease has remarkably changed our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways underlying disease states. Moreover, the mouse models resulting from gene transfer technologies have been important components correlating an individual’s gene expression profile to the development of disease pathologies. The objective of this review is to provide physician-scientists with an expansive historical and logistical overview of the creation of mouse models of human disease through gene transfer technologies. Our expectation is that this will facilitate on-going disease research studies and may initiate new areas of translational research leading to enhanced patient care. PMID:21800101

  10. Combination of mouse models and genomewide association studies highlights novel genes associated with human kidney function.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jiaojiao; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoppmann, Anselm; Okada, Yukinori; Fox, Caroline S; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Genomewide association studies have identified numerous chronic kidney disease-associated genetic variants, but often do not pinpoint causal genes. This limitation was addressed by combining Mouse Genome Informatics with human genomewide association studies of kidney function. Genes for which mouse models showed abnormal renal physiology, morphology, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio were identified from Mouse Genome Informatics. The corresponding human orthologs were then evaluated for GFR-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 133,814 individuals and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio-associated SNPs in 54,451 individuals in genome-wide association studies meta-analysis of the CKDGen Consortium. After multiple testing corrections, significant associations with estimated GFR in humans were identified for single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 2, 7, and 17 genes causing abnormal GFR, abnormal physiology, and abnormal morphology in mice, respectively. Genes identified for abnormal kidney morphology showed significant enrichment for estimated GFR-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. In total, 19 genes contained variants associated with estimated GFR or the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of which 16 mapped into previously reported genomewide significant loci. CYP26A1 and BMP4 emerged as novel signals subsequently validated in a large, independent study. An additional gene, CYP24A1, was discovered after conditioning on a published nearby association signal. Thus, our novel approach to combine comprehensive mouse phenotype information with human genomewide association studies data resulted in the identification of candidate genes for kidney disease pathogenesis.

  11. Combination of mouse models and genomewide association studies highlights novel genes associated with human kidney function.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jiaojiao; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoppmann, Anselm; Okada, Yukinori; Fox, Caroline S; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Genomewide association studies have identified numerous chronic kidney disease-associated genetic variants, but often do not pinpoint causal genes. This limitation was addressed by combining Mouse Genome Informatics with human genomewide association studies of kidney function. Genes for which mouse models showed abnormal renal physiology, morphology, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio were identified from Mouse Genome Informatics. The corresponding human orthologs were then evaluated for GFR-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 133,814 individuals and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio-associated SNPs in 54,451 individuals in genome-wide association studies meta-analysis of the CKDGen Consortium. After multiple testing corrections, significant associations with estimated GFR in humans were identified for single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 2, 7, and 17 genes causing abnormal GFR, abnormal physiology, and abnormal morphology in mice, respectively. Genes identified for abnormal kidney morphology showed significant enrichment for estimated GFR-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. In total, 19 genes contained variants associated with estimated GFR or the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of which 16 mapped into previously reported genomewide significant loci. CYP26A1 and BMP4 emerged as novel signals subsequently validated in a large, independent study. An additional gene, CYP24A1, was discovered after conditioning on a published nearby association signal. Thus, our novel approach to combine comprehensive mouse phenotype information with human genomewide association studies data resulted in the identification of candidate genes for kidney disease pathogenesis. PMID:27263491

  12. AAV-mediated gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Lei, Lei; Dai, Xufeng; Shi, Wei; Liu, Xuan; Dinculescu, Astra; McDowell, J. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, more and more mutant genes that cause retinal diseases have been detected. At the same time, many naturally occurring mouse models of retinal degeneration have also been found, which show similar changes to human retinal diseases. These, together with improved viral vector quality allow more and more traditionally incurable inherited retinal disorders to become potential candidates for gene therapy. Currently, the most common vehicle to deliver the therapeutic gene into target retinal cells is the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Following delivery to the immuno-priviledged subretinal space, AAV-vectors can efficiently target both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor cells, the origin of most retinal degenerations. This review focuses on the AAV-based gene therapy in mouse models of recessive retinal degenerations, especially those in which delivery of the correct copy of the wild-type gene has led to significant beneficial effects on visual function, as determined by morphological, biochemical, electroretinographic and behavioral analysis. The past studies in animal models and ongoing successful LCA2 clinical trials, predict a bright future for AAV gene replacement treatment for inherited recessive retinal diseases. PMID:22300136

  13. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  14. Using mouse models of autism spectrum disorders to study the neurotoxicology of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzer, Jared J.; Koenig, Claire M.; Berman, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    To better study the role of genetics in autism, mouse models have been developed which mimic the genetics of specific autism spectrum and related disorders. These models have facilitated research on the role genetic susceptibility factors in the pathogenesis of autism in the absence of environmental factors. Inbred mouse strains have been similarly studied to assess the role of environmental agents on neurodevelopment, typically without the complications of genetic heterogeneity of the human population. What has not been as actively pursued, however, is the methodical study of the interaction between these factors (e.g., gene and environmental interactions in neurodevelopment). This review suggests that a genetic predisposition paired with exposure to environmental toxicants play an important role in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, and may contribute to the largely unexplained rise in the number of children diagnosed with autism worldwide. Specifically, descriptions of the major mouse models of autism and toxic mechanisms of prevalent environmental chemicals are provided followed by a discussion of current and future research strategies to evaluate the role of gene and environment interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23010509

  15. Survival benefit and phenotypic improvement by hamartin gene therapy in a tuberous sclerosis mouse brain model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Shilpa; Zhang, Xuan; Goto, June; Han, Sangyeul; Lai, Charles; Bronson, Roderick; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Ramesh, Vijaya; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the potential benefit of gene therapy in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in which there is embryonic loss of Tsc1 (hamartin) in brain neurons. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (serotype rh8) expressing a tagged form of hamartin was injected into the cerebral ventricles of newborn pups with the genotype Tsc1cc (homozygous for a conditional floxed Tsc1 allele) SynI-cre+, in which Tsc1 is lost selectively in neurons starting at embryonic day 12. Vector-treated Tsc1ccSynIcre+ mice showed a marked improvement in survival from a mean of 22 days in non-injected mice to 52 days in AAV hamartin vector-injected mice, with improved weight gain and motor behavior in the latter. Pathologic studies showed normalization of neuron size and a decrease in markers of mTOR activation in treated as compared to untreated mutant littermates. Hence, we show that gene replacement in the brain is an effective therapeutic approach in this mouse model of TSC1. Our strategy for gene therapy has the advantages that therapy can be achieved from a single application, as compared to repeated treatment with drugs, and that AAV vectors have been found to have minimal to no toxicity in clinical trials for other neurologic conditions. Although there are many additional issues to be addressed, our studies support gene therapy as a useful approach in TSC patients. PMID:26019056

  16. Effects of Subretinal Gene Transfer at Different Time Points in a Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Zhang, Hua; Han, Juanjuan; He, Ying; Zhang, Yangyang; Qi, Yan; Pang, Ji-jing

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is necessary for photoreceptors to generate an important lipid component of their membranes. The absence of LPCAT1 results in early and rapid rod and cone degeneration. Retinal degeneration 11 (rd11) mice carry a mutation in the Lpcat1 gene, and are an excellent model of early-onset rapid retinal degeneration (RD). To date, no reports have documented gene therapy administration in the rd11 mouse model at different ages. In this study, the AAV8 (Y733F)-smCBA-Lpcat1 vector was subretinally injected at postnatal day (P) 10, 14, 18, or 22. Four months after injection, immunohistochemistry and analysis of retinal morphology showed that treatment at P10 rescued about 82% of the wild-type retinal thickness. However, the diffusion of the vector and the resulting rescue were limited to an area around the injection site that was only 31% of the total retinal area. Injection at P14 resulted in vector diffusion that covered approximately 84% of the retina, and we found that gene therapy was more effective against RD when exposure to light was limited before and after treatment. We observed long-term preservation of electroretinogram (ERG) responses, and preservation of retinal structure, indicating that early treatment followed by limited light exposure can improve gene therapy effectiveness for the eyes of rd11 mice. Importantly, delayed treatment still partially preserved M-cones, but not S-cones, and M-cones in the rd11 retina appeared to have a longer window of opportunity for effective preservation with gene therapy. These results provide important information regarding the effects of subretinal gene therapy in the mouse model of LPCAT1-deficiency. PMID:27228218

  17. Altered Regulation of Aquaporin Gene Expression in Allergen and IL-13-Induced Mouse Models of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Carissa M.; Deng, Bijia; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; McDonald, Casey A.; Pazdziorko, Stephen; Mason, Lawrence; Goldman, Samuel; Kasaian, Marion; Chaudhary, Divya; Williams, Cara; Ho, Melisa W.Y.

    2009-01-01

    IL-13 is known to affect many processes that contribute to an asthmatic phenotype, including inflammation, fibrosis, and mucus production. Members of the aquaporin (AQP) family of transmembrane water channels are targets of regulation in models of lung injury and inflammation. Therefore, we examined AQP mRNA and protein expression in allergen and IL-13-induced mouse models of asthma. Lungs from ovalbumin sensitized and ovalbumin challenged (OVA/OVA) and IL-13 treated mice showed airway thickening, increased mucus production, and pulmonary eosinophilia. Pulmonary function tests showed a significant increase in methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in OVA/OVA and IL-13-treated mice as compared with controls. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed differential regulation of AQPs in these two models. AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA expression was downregulated in the OVA/OVA model, but not in the IL-13 model. AQP5 mRNA was reduced in both models, whereas AQP3 was upregulated only in the IL-13 model. Western analysis showed that diminished expression of an apically localized aquaporin, (AQP5), and concomitant upregulation of a basolateral aquaporin (AQP3 or AQP4) are characteristic features of both inducible asthma models. These results demonstrate that aquaporins are common targets of gene expression in both allergen and IL-13 induced mouse models of asthma. PMID:19237298

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  19. Dopaminergic function in relation to genes associated with risk for schizophrenia: translational mutant mouse models.

    PubMed

    Moran, Paula M; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Papaleo, Francesco; Waddington, John L

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mice play an increasingly important role in understanding disease processes at multiple levels. In particular, they illuminate the impact of risk genes for disease on such processes. This article reviews recent advances in the application of mutant mice to study the intricacies of dopaminergic (DAergic) function in relation to the putative pathophysiology of psychotic illness, particularly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drug action. It considers models for understanding the role(s) of risk genes, with a particular focus on DTNBP1 and NRG1, their interactions with environmental factors, and with each other (epistasis). In overview, it considers new schemas for understanding psychotic illness that integrate DAergic pathophysiology with developmental, social, and cognitive processes, and how mutant mouse models can reflect and inform on such schemas.

  20. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice

    PubMed Central

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Aim Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Procedures Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. Results In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a

  1. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiation Dose-Rate Effects on Gene Expression in a Mouse Biodosimetry Model

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Elliston, Carl D.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident or radiological terrorist attack, there will be a pressing need for biodosimetry to triage a large, potentially exposed population and to assign individuals to appropriate treatment. Exposures from fallout are likely, resulting in protracted dose delivery that would, in turn, impact the extent of injury. Biodosimetry approaches that can distinguish such low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures from acute exposures have not yet been developed. In this study, we used the C57BL/6 mouse model in an initial investigation of the impact of low-dose-rate delivery on the transcriptomic response in blood. While a large number of the same genes responded to LDR and acute radiation exposures, for many genes the magnitude of response was lower after LDR exposures. Some genes, however, were differentially expressed (P < 0.001, false discovery rate < 5%) in mice exposed to LDR compared with mice exposed to acute radiation. We identified a set of 164 genes that correctly classified 97% of the samples in this experiment as exposed to acute or LDR radiation using a support vector machine algorithm. Gene expression is a promising approach to radiation biodosimetry, enhanced greatly by this first demonstration of its potential for distinguishing between acute and LDR exposures. Further development of this aspect of radiation biodosimetry, either as part of a complete gene expression biodosimetry test or as an adjunct to other methods, could provide vital triage information in a mass radiological casualty event. PMID:26114327

  3. Gene therapy restores vision and delays degeneration in the CNGB1(-/-) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Schulze, Elisabeth; Becirovic, Elvir; Koch, Fred; Seide, Christina; Beck, Susanne C; Seeliger, Mathias W; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Biel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a severe retinal disease characterized by a progressive degeneration of rod photoreceptors and a secondary loss of cone function. Here, we used CNGB1-deficient (CNGB1(-/-)) mice, a mouse model for autosomal recessive RP, to evaluate the efficacy of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of RP. The treatment restored normal expression of rod CNG channels and rod-driven light responses in the CNGB1(-/-) retina. This led to a substantial delay of retinal degeneration and long-term preservation of retinal morphology. Finally, treated CNGB1(-/-) mice performed significantly better than untreated mice in a rod-dependent vision-guided behavior test. In summary, this study holds promise for the treatment of rod channelopathy-associated retinitis pigmentosa by AAV-mediated gene replacement.

  4. Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) promotes hepatocarcinogenesis: novel insights from a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Siddiq, Ayesha; Emdad, Luni; Santhekadur, Prasanna Kumar; Chen, Dong; Gredler, Rachel; Shen, Xue-Ning; Robertson, Chadia L.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Bhere, Deepak; Shah, Khalid; Ahmad, Rushdy; Giashuddin, Shah; Stafflinger, Jillian; Subler, Mark A.; Windle, Jolene J.; Fisher, Paul B.; Sarkar, Devanand

    2012-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a key contributor to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and progression. To enhance our understanding of the role of AEG-1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, a transgenic mouse with hepatocyte-specific expression of AEG-1 (Alb/AEG1) was developed. Treating Alb/AEG-1, but not Wild type (WT) mice, with N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), resulted in multinodular HCC with steatotic features and associated modulation of expression of genes regulating invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Hepatocytes isolated from Alb/AEG-1 mice displayed profound resistance to chemotherapeutics and growth factor deprivation with activation of pro-survival signaling pathways. Alb/AEG-1 hepatocytes also exhibited marked resistance towards senescence, which correlated with abrogation of activation of a DNA damage response. Conditioned media (CM) from Alb/AEG-1 hepatocytes induced marked angiogenesis with elevation in several coagulation factors. Among these factors, AEG-1 facilitated association of Factor XII (FXII) mRNA with polysomes resulting in increased translation. siRNA-mediated knockdown of FXII resulted in profound inhibition of AEG-1-induced angiogenesis. Conclusion We uncover novel aspects of AEG-1 functions, including induction of steatosis, inhibition of senescence and activation of coagulation pathway to augment aggressive hepatocarcinogenesis. The Alb/AEG-1 mouse provides an appropriate model to scrutinize the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis and to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies targeting HCC. PMID:22689379

  5. Using the GEMM-ESC strategy to study gene function in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, Ivo J; Del Bravo, Jessica; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Braumuller, Tanya M; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Henneman, Linda; Michalak, Ewa M; Berns, Anton; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical in vivo validation of target genes for therapeutic intervention requires careful selection and characterization of the most suitable animal model in order to assess the role of these genes in a particular process or disease. To this end, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are typically used. However, the appropriate engineering of these models is often cumbersome and time consuming. Recently, we and others described a modular approach for fast-track modification of existing GEMMs by re-derivation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that can be modified by recombinase-mediated transgene insertion and subsequently used for the production of chimeric mice. This 'GEMM-ESC strategy' allows for rapid in vivo analysis of gene function in the chimeras and their offspring. Moreover, this strategy is compatible with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. This protocol describes when and how to use the GEMM-ESC strategy effectively, and it provides a detailed procedure for re-deriving and manipulating GEMM-ESCs under feeder- and serum-free conditions. This strategy produces transgenic mice with the desired complex genotype faster than traditional methods: generation of validated GEMM-ESC clones for controlled transgene integration takes 9-12 months, and recombinase-mediated transgene integration and chimeric cohort production takes 2-3 months. The protocol requires skills in embryology, stem cell biology and molecular biology, and it is ideally performed within, or in close collaboration with, a transgenic facility.

  6. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  7. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  8. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  9. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations.

  10. Forging Links between Human Mental Retardation–Associated CNVs and Mouse Gene Knockout Models

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Caleb; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Nguyen, Duc-Quang; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Veltman, Joris A.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    Rare copy number variants (CNVs) are frequently associated with common neurological disorders such as mental retardation (MR; learning disability), autism, and schizophrenia. CNV screening in clinical practice is limited because pathological CNVs cannot be distinguished routinely from benign CNVs, and because genes underlying patients' phenotypes remain largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, statistically robust approach that forges links between 148 MR–associated CNVs and phenotypes from ∼5,000 mouse gene knockout experiments. These CNVs were found to be significantly enriched in two classes of genes, those whose mouse orthologues, when disrupted, result in either abnormal axon or dopaminergic neuron morphologies. Additional enrichments highlighted correspondences between relevant mouse phenotypes and secondary presentations such as brain abnormality, cleft palate, and seizures. The strength of these phenotype enrichments (>100% increases) greatly exceeded molecular annotations (<30% increases) and allowed the identification of 78 genes that may contribute to MR and associated phenotypes. This study is the first to demonstrate how the power of mouse knockout data can be systematically exploited to better understand genetically heterogeneous neurological disorders. PMID:19557186

  11. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  12. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients. PMID:24746732

  13. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  14. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2 (-/-) Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity, and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T(+) Itpr3 (tf) /J (BTBR) and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2 (-/-)), to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2 (-/-) mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2 (-/-) and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2 (+/+)) adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2 (-/-) DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2 (-/-) hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ)-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2

  15. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  16. Postnatal growth restriction and gene expression changes in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaminen-Ahola, Nina; Ahola, Arttu; Flatscher-Bader, Traute; Wilkins, Sarah J; Anderson, Greg J; Whitelaw, Emma; Chong, Suyinn

    2010-10-01

    Growth restriction, craniofacial dysmorphology, and central nervous system defects are the main diagnostic features of fetal alcohol syndrome. Studies in humans and mice have reported that the growth restriction can be prenatal or postnatal, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown.We recently described a mouse model of moderate gestational ethanol exposure that produces measurable phenotypes in line with fetal alcohol syndrome (e.g., craniofacial changes and growth restriction in adolescent mice). In this study, we characterize in detail the growth restriction phenotype by measuring body weight at gestational day 16.5, cross-fostering from birth to weaning, and by extending our observations into adulthood. Furthermore, in an attempt to unravel the molecular events contributing to the growth phenotype, we have compared gene expression patterns in the liver and kidney of nonfostered, ethanol-exposed and control mice at postnatal day 28.We find that the ethanol-induced growth phenotype is not detectable prior to birth, but is present at weaning, even in mice that have been cross-fostered to unexposed dams. This finding suggests a postnatal growth restriction phenotype that is not due to deficient postpartum care by dams that drank ethanol, but rather a physiologic result of ethanol exposure in utero. We also find that, despite some catch-up growth after 5 weeks of age, the effect extends into adulthood, which is consistent with longitudinal studies in humans.Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed interesting ethanol-induced changes in the liver, including genes involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds, iron homeostasis, and lipid metabolism.

  17. Differential Hippocampal Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis in an Etiology-Based Mouse Model of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zubenko, George S.; Hughes, Hugh B.; Jordan, Rick M.; Lyons-Weiler, James; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported the creation and initial characterization of an etiology-based recombinant mouse model of a severe and inherited form of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This was achieved by replacing the corresponding mouse DNA sequence witha6-base DNA sequence from the human CREB1promoterthat is associated with MDD in individuals from families with recurrent, early-onset MDD (RE-MDD). In the current study, we explored the effect of the pathogenic Creb1 allele on gene expression in the mouse hippocampus, a brain region that is altered in structure and function in MDD. Mouse whole-genome profiling was performed using the Illumina MouseWG-6 v2.0 Expression BeadChip microarray. Univariate analysis identified 269 differentially-expressed genes in the hippocampus of the mutant mouse. Pathway analyses highlighted 11 KEGG pathways: the phosphatidylinositol signaling system, which has been widely implicated in MDD, Bipolar Disorder, and the action of mood stabilizers; gap junction and long-term potentiation, which mediate cognition and memory functions often impaired in MDD; cardiac muscle contraction, insulin signaling pathway, and three neurodegenerative brain disorders (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s Diseases) that are associated with MDD; ribosome and proteasome pathways affecting protein synthesis/degradation; and the oxidative phosphorylation pathway that is key to energy production. These findings illustrate the merit of this congenic C57BL/6 recombinant mouse as a model of RE-MDD, and demonstrate its potential for highlighting molecular and cellular pathways that contribute to the biology of MDD. The results also inform our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the comorbidity of MDD with other disorders. PMID:25059218

  18. Novel genes in Human Asthma Based on a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation and Human Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Temesi, Gergely; Virág, Viktor; Hadadi, Éva; Ungvári, Ildikó; Fodor, Lili E; Bikov, András; Nagy, Adrienne; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla; Horváth, Ildikó; Kiss, András; Hullám, Gábor; Gézsi, András; Sárközy, Péter; Antal, Péter; Buzás, Edit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Based on a previous gene expression study in a mouse model of asthma, we selected 60 candidate genes and investigated their possible roles in human asthma. Methods In these candidate genes, 90 SNPs were genotyped using MassARRAY technology from 311 asthmatic children and 360 healthy controls of the Hungarian (Caucasian) population. Moreover, gene expression levels were measured by RT PCR in the induced sputum of 13 asthmatics and 10 control individuals. t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression were carried out in order to assess associations of SNP frequency and expression level with asthma. Permutation tests were performed to account for multiple hypothesis testing. Results The frequency of 4 SNPs in 2 genes differed significantly between asthmatic and control subjects: SNPs rs2240572, rs2240571, rs3735222 in gene SCIN, and rs32588 in gene PPARGC1B. Carriers of the minor alleles had reduced risk of asthma with an odds ratio of 0.64 (0.51-0.80; P=7×10-5) in SCIN and 0.56 (0.42-0.76; P=1.2×10-4) in PPARGC1B. The expression levels of SCIN, PPARGC1B and ITLN1 genes were significantly lower in the sputum of asthmatics. Conclusions Three potentially novel asthma-associated genes were identified based on mouse experiments and human studies. PMID:25374748

  19. Risperidone and NAP protect cognition and normalize gene expression in a schizophrenia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vaisburd, Sinaya; Shemer, Zeev; Yeheskel, Adva; Giladi, Eliezer; Gozes, Illana

    2015-11-10

    Mutated disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a microtubule regulating protein, leads to schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. It is hypothesized that microtubule stabilization may provide neuroprotection in schizophrenia. The NAP (NAPVSIPQ) sequence of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) contains the SxIP motif, microtubule end binding (EB) protein target, which is critical for microtubule dynamics leading to synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Bioinformatics prediction for FDA approved drugs mimicking SxIP-like motif which displace NAP-EB binding identified Risperidone. Risperidone or NAP effectively ameliorated object recognition deficits in the mutated DISC1 mouse model. NAP but not Risperidone, reduced anxiety in the mutated mice. Doxycycline, which blocked the expression of the mutated DISC1, did not reverse the phenotype. Transcripts of Forkhead-BOX P2 (Foxp2), a gene regulating DISC1 and associated with human ability to acquire a spoken language, were increased in the hippocampus of the DISC1 mutated mice and were significantly lowered after treatment with NAP, Risperidone, or the combination of both. Thus, the combination of NAP and standard of care Risperidone in humans may protect against language disturbances associated with negative and cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  20. Phenotypic correction of a mouse model for primary hyperoxaluria with adeno-associated virus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Pena, Marisol; Santana, Alfredo; Beattie, Stuart G; Petry, Harald; Torres, Armando

    2011-05-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGXT or AGT) which leads to overproduction of oxalate by the liver and subsequent urolithiasis and renal failure. The current therapy largely depends on liver transplantation, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To explore an alternative treatment, we used somatic gene transfer in a mouse genetic model for PH1 (Agxt1KO). Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing the human AGXT complementary DNA (cDNA) were pseudotyped with capsids from either serotype 8 or 5, and delivered to the livers of Agxt1KO mice via the tail vein. Both AAV8-AGXT and AAV5-AGXT vectors were able to reduce oxaluria to normal levels. In addition, treated mice showed blunted increase of oxaluria after challenge with ethylene glycol (EG), a glyoxylate precursor. In mice, AGT enzyme activity in whole liver extracts were restored to normal without hepatic toxicity nor immunogenicity for the 50 day follow-up. In summary, this study demonstrates the correction of primary hyperoxaluria in mice treated with either AAV5 or AAV8 vectors. PMID:21119625

  1. Generation of gene-targeted mice using embryonic stem cells derived from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kunio; Watanabe, Sayuri; Maeda, Ryouta; Takahashi, Hideki; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    Gene-targeting technology using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has become the "gold standard" for analyzing gene functions and producing disease models. Recently, genetically modified mice with multiple mutations have increasingly been produced to study the interaction between proteins and polygenic diseases. However, introduction of an additional mutation into mice already harboring several mutations by conventional natural crossbreeding is an extremely time- and labor-intensive process. Moreover, to do so in mice with a complex genetic background, several years may be required if the genetic background is to be retained. Establishing ES cells from multiple-mutant mice, or disease-model mice with a complex genetic background, would offer a possible solution. Here, we report the establishment and characterization of novel ES cell lines from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD mouse, Oddo et al. in Neuron 39:409-421, 2003) harboring 3 mutated genes (APPswe, TauP301L, and PS1M146V) and a complex genetic background. Thirty blastocysts were cultured and 15 stable ES cell lines (male: 11; female: 4) obtained. By injecting these ES cells into diploid or tetraploid blastocysts, we generated germline-competent chimeras. Subsequently, we confirmed that F1 mice derived from these animals showed similar biochemical and behavioral characteristics to the original 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, we introduced a gene-targeting vector into the ES cells and successfully obtained gene-targeted ES cells, which were then used to generate knockout mice for the targeted gene. These results suggest that the present methodology is effective for introducing an additional mutation into mice already harboring multiple mutated genes and/or a complex genetic background.

  2. Preliminary evidence of phenytoin-induced alterations in embryonic gene expression in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Musselman, A C; Bennett, G D; Greer, K A; Eberwine, J H; Finnell, R H

    1994-01-01

    SWV mouse embryos collected on gestational days (GD) 9:12 and 10:00 following chronic in utero exposure to teratogenic concentrations of phenytoin were utilized for in situ transcription studies of gene expression. The substrate cDNA obtained from the frozen embryo sections was amplified into radiolabelled antisense RNA (RT/aRNA) and used as a probe to screen a panel of 20 cDNA clones representing genes that are important regulators of craniofacial and neural development. The magnitude of alteration in gene expression following phenytoin treatment was determined densitometrically by changes in the hybridization intensity of the aRNA probes to the cDNA clones immobilized to the slot blots. We found that both Wnt-1 and the calcium channel gene were developmentally regulated, as their level of expression decreased significantly between the two collection times. Phenytoin treatment produced a significant downregulation in the level of expression for 25% of the genes examined in the GD 9:12 embryos, including the growth factors TGF-beta and NT3, the proto-oncogene Wnt-1, the nicotinic receptor, and the voltage sensitive calcium channel gene. Additional changes in the coordinate expression of several of the growth and transcription factors were observed at both gestational timepoints. The application of RT/aRNA technology has extended our appreciation of the normal patterns of gene expression during craniofacial and neural development, and provided the first demonstration of multiple coordinate changes in transcription patterns following teratogenic insult.

  3. Identification of novel SHOX target genes in the developing limb using a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beiser, Katja U; Glaser, Anne; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Scholl, Isabell; Röth, Ralph; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Karperien, Marcel; Marchini, Antonio; Richter, Wiltrud; Rappold, Gudrun A

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the human short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) has been identified in several disorders characterized by reduced height and skeletal anomalies such as Turner syndrome, Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and Langer mesomelic dysplasia as well as isolated short stature. SHOX acts as a transcription factor during limb development and is expressed in chondrocytes of the growth plates. Although highly conserved in vertebrates, rodents lack a SHOX orthologue. This offers the unique opportunity to analyze the effects of human SHOX expression in transgenic mice. We have generated a mouse expressing the human SHOXa cDNA under the control of a murine Col2a1 promoter and enhancer (Tg(Col2a1-SHOX)). SHOX and marker gene expression as well as skeletal phenotypes were characterized in two transgenic lines. No significant skeletal anomalies were found in transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Quantitative and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that Tg(Col2a1-SHOX), however, affected extracellular matrix gene expression during early limb development, suggesting a role for SHOX in growth plate assembly and extracellular matrix composition during long bone development. For instance, we could show that the connective tissue growth factor gene Ctgf, a gene involved in chondrogenic and angiogenic differentiation, is transcriptionally regulated by SHOX in transgenic mice. This finding was confirmed in human NHDF and U2OS cells and chicken micromass culture, demonstrating the value of the SHOX-transgenic mouse for the characterization of SHOX-dependent genes and pathways in early limb development. PMID:24887312

  4. Mouse models for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Moore, Lynette; Ji, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to learn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Journal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue. PMID:21352691

  5. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  6. Gene Therapy in a Humanized Mouse Model of Familial Hypercholesterolemia Leads to Marked Regression of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H.; Li, Hui; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Marchadier, Dawn; Wilson, Aisha; Cromley, Debra; Redon, Valeska; Yu, Hongwei; Wilson, James M.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal codominant disorder caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene. Homozygous FH patients (hoFH) have severe hypercholesterolemia leading to life threatening atherosclerosis in childhood and adolescence. Mice with germ line interruptions in the Ldlr and Apobec1 genes (Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/−) simulate metabolic and clinical aspects of hoFH, including atherogenesis on a chow diet. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, vectors based on adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) were used to deliver the gene for mouse Ldlr (mLDLR) to the livers of Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/− mice. A single intravenous injection of AAV8.mLDLR was found to significantly reduce plasma cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol levels in chow-fed animals at doses as low as 3×109 genome copies/mouse. Whereas Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/− mice fed a western-type diet and injected with a control AAV8.null vector experienced a further 65% progression in atherosclerosis over 2 months compared with baseline mice, Ldlr−/−Apobec1−/− mice treated with AAV8.mLDLR realized an 87% regression of atherosclerotic lesions after 3 months compared to baseline mice. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed a substantial remodeling of atherosclerotic lesions. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the results presented herein suggest that AAV8-based gene therapy for FH may be feasible and support further development of this approach. The pre-clinical data from these studies will enable for the effective translation of gene therapy into the clinic for treatment of FH. PMID:20976059

  7. Generation of a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Bioluminescent Monitoring of Survivin Gene Activity in Vivo at Various Pathophysiological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengzhi; Cheng, Qiuying; Ling, Xiang; Stablewski, Aimee; Tang, Lei; Foster, Barbara A.; Johnson, Candace S.; Rustum, Youcef M.; Porter, Carl W.

    2010-01-01

    Survival has been implicated to play an important role in various pathophysiological processes. However, because of a lack of appropriate animal models, the role and dynamic expression of survivin during pathophysiology are not well defined. We generated a human survivin gene promoter-driven luciferase transgenic mouse model (SPlucTg) so that dynamic survivin gene activity can be monitored during various pathophysiological conditions using in vivo imaging. Our results show that, consistent with survivin positivity in testis, luciferase activity in normal SPlucTg mice was detected in the testis of male mice. Furthermore, similar to the known requirement of transient expression of survivin for pathophysiological responses, we observed a transient luciferase expression in castrated SPlucTg male mice after supplement of androgen. Significantly, it was reported that survivin expression turns on during mouse liver injury and regeneration; a transient and dose-dependent luciferase expression in the mouse liver was observed after administration of carbon tetrachloride into SPlucTg mice. We further demonstrated that luciferase activity closely correlates with endogenous survivin expression. We also demonstrated that only a subset of cells expresses survivin, and its expression overlaps with the expression of several stem cell markers tested. Thus, we have generated a unique animal model for analysis of diverse pathophysiological processes and possible stem cell distribution/activity in vivo. PMID:20133811

  8. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  9. Col2CreERT2, A MOUSE MODEL FOR A CHONDROCYTE-SPECIFIC AND INDUCIBLE GENE DELETION

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, B.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008, we published two articles reporting a tamoxifen (TM)-inducible, chondrocyte-specific gene-targeting mouse model in which the expression of CreERT2 is driven by the type II collagen promoter (Col2CreERT2). The fusion protein is specifically expressed and translocated into the nucleus upon TM administration, which in turn triggers gene recombination. Since then, this animal model has become a powerful tool to study the molecular mechanism of skeletal development and degenerative cartilage diseases, including knee joint osteoarthritis (OA), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In this review article, we summarise the application of Col2CreERT2 mice and discuss the potential usage of this animal model in a broad spectrum of cartilage development and molecular pathology studies. PMID:25340803

  10. Col2CreER(T2), a mouse model for a chondrocyte-specific and inducible gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Li, S; Xie, W; Wang, B; Chen, D

    2014-01-01

    In 2007 and 2008, we published two articles reporting a tamoxifen (TM)-inducible, chondrocyte-specific gene-targeting mouse model in which the expression of CreER(T2) is driven by the type II collagen promoter (Col2CreER(T2)). The fusion protein is specifically expressed and translocated into the nucleus upon TM administration, which in turn triggers gene recombination. Since then, this animal model has become a powerful tool to study the molecular mechanism of skeletal development and degenerative cartilage diseases, including knee joint osteoarthritis (OA), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, and intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. In this review article, we summarise the application of Col2CreER(T2) mice and discuss the potential usage of this animal model in a broad spectrum of cartilage development and molecular pathology studies. PMID:25340803

  11. Mouse models of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Beachy, Sarah H.; Aplan, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Three general approaches have been used in an attempt to model myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in mice, including treatment with mutagens or carcinogens, xenotransplantation of human MDS cells, and genetic engineering of mouse hematopoietic cells. Xenotransplantation of cells from MDS patients has proved difficult, possibly due to the innate characteristics of the MDS clone and microenvironmental influences, including adverse effects of a host immune response. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic cells or mice has been accomplished by in vitro transfer of genes to mouse hematopoietic cells with subsequent transplantation into an irradiated host, or by modification of the mouse germline to generate mice with altered expression of genes of interest. A number of genes have been studied using these approaches, including RUNX1, Evi1, Npm1, SALL4B, NUP98-HOXD13, BCL2/NRAS, Arid4a, Polg and Dido. This review discusses the phenotypes observed in available mouse models for MDS with a concentration on a model that leads to aberrant expression of conserved homeobox (HOX) genes that are important regulators of normal hematopoiesis. Utilizing these models of MDS should allow a more complete understanding of the disease process and provide a platform for pre-clinical testing of therapeutic approaches. PMID:20359631

  12. Kidney-targeted Birt-Hogg-Dubé gene inactivation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Masaya; Furihata, Mutsuo; Hong, Seung-Beom; Tessarollo, Lino; Haines, Diana C.; Southon, Eileen; Patel, Vishal; Igarashi, Peter; Alvord, W. Gregory; Leighty, Robert; Yao, Masahiro; Bernardo, Marcelino; Ileva, Lilia; Choyke, Peter; Warren, Michelle B.; Zbar, Berton; Linehan, W. Marston; Schmidt, Laura S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BHD tumor suppressor are associated with an increased risk for kidney cancer among patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome. BHD encodes folliculin, a novel protein that may interact with the energy- and nutrient-sensing 5′-AMP activated protein kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin (AMPK-mTOR) signaling pathways. Methods We used recombineering methods to generate mice with a conditional BHD allele and introduced the cadherin 16 (KSP)-Cre transgene to target BHD inactivation to the kidney. Kidney cell proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation and phosphohistone H3 staining. Kidney weight data were analyzed with Wilcoxon’s rank-sum, Student’s t, and Welch’s t tests. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry of cell cycle and signaling proteins were performed on mouse kidney cells and tissues. BHD knockout mice and kidney cells isolated from BHD knockout and control mice were treated with rapamycin to assess effects of mTOR inhibition on mouse kidney cells and survival. Mouse survival was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results BHD-knockout mice developed enlarged polycystic kidneys and died from renal failure by 3 weeks of age. Targeted BHD-knockout led to the activation of Rafextracellular signal regulated protein kinase (Erk)1/2 and Akt-mTOR pathways in the kidneys and increased expression of cell cycle proteins and cell proliferation. Rapamycin treated BHD knockout mice had reduced kidney size (relative kidney /body weight ratios [100 X kidney weight / (body weight-kidney weight)]; buffer versus rapamycin: mean=12.2% versus 4.64%, difference=7.6%, 95% CI=5.2 to 10.0) and longer median survival time than untreated mice (41.5 versus 23 days). Conclusions Homozygous loss of BHD may be the initiating event for renal tumorigenesis in the mouse. The conditional BHD-knockout mouse is a useful research model for dissecting multistep

  13. Transcriptional Modulation of Intestinal Innate Defense/Inflammation Genes by Preterm Infant Microbiota in a Humanized Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B.; Claud, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Methods Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Results and Conclusion Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes. PMID:25928420

  14. Folic Acid supplementary reduce the incidence of adenocarcinoma in a mouse model of colorectal cancer: microarray gene expression profile

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Whether Folic acid is a potential drug that may prevent the progression of colorectal carcinoma and when to use are important healthy issues we focus on. Our study is to examine the effect of folic acid on the development of the CRC and the optimal time folic acid should be provided in a mouse-ICR model induced by 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine. Also, we investigated the gene expression profile of this model related to folic acid. Method Female ICR mouse (n = 130) were divided into 7 groups either with the treatment of 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine (20 mg/kg bodyweight) weekly or folic acid (8 mg/kg bodyweight) twice a week for 12 or 24 weeks. Using a 4 × 44 K Agilent whole genome oligo microarray assay, different gene expression among groups (NS, DMH, FA2, FA3) were identified and selected genes were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Animals with a supplementary of folic acid showed a significant decrease in the incidence, the maximum diameter and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there were fewer adenomas or adenocarcinomas developed in the group of folic acid supplementation in pre-adenoma stage compared to group of post-adenoma stage. Meanwhile, about 1070 genes that were changed by 1, 2-Dimethylhydrazine can be reversed by folic acid and 172 differentially genes were identified between the groups of pre- and post- adenoma stage using microarray gene expression analysis. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that folic acid supplementary was significantly associated with the decrease risk of CRC. And the subgroup of providing folic acid without precancerous lesions was more effective than that with precancerous lesions. PMID:22206623

  15. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  16. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) as a model of human malignant hypertension: development of lesions and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimokama, T; Haraoka, S; Horiguchi, H; Sugiyama, F; Murakami, K; Watanabe, T

    1998-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has a pivotal role in hypertension. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (THM; a transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) was generated to allow further examination of the renin-angiotensin system in a variety of pathologic conditions. We evaluated the development of renal lesions in these mice and in controls by morphometric, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural methods. Blood pressure was significantly higher in THM than in control mice; 1 year after birth, it was approximately 40 mmHg higher. The kidney-to-body weight ratio was also higher in THM than in control. Morphometrical analysis revealed that the glomerular sclerosis index was significantly elevated in THM with 10% of the glomeruli sclerotic at 18 months. The grade of vascular lesion and the frequency of fibronoid arteritis of the kidney exhibited the same tendency as the glomerular sclerosis index. Murine renin was located exclusively in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, whereas human renin was expressed not only in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, but also in periarteriolar smooth muscle cells and in mesangial and epithelial cells of the glomeruli. Light and electron microscopy revealed significant fibrinoid arteritis of the kidney in THM and also "onion skinning", both pathognomonic for malignant nephrosclerosis. THM may be an excellent model of human malignant hypertension. PMID:9504863

  17. Engineering mouse models with myelodysplastic syndrome human candidate genes; how relevant are they?

    PubMed Central

    Beurlet, Stephanie; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose Ann

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent particularly challenging hematologic malignancies that arise from a large spectrum of genetic events resulting in a disease characterized by a range of different presentations and outcomes. Despite efforts to classify and identify the key genetic events, little improvement has been made in therapies that will increase patient survival. Animal models represent powerful tools to model and study human diseases and are useful pre-clinical platforms. In addition to enforced expression of candidate oncogenes, gene inactivation has allowed the consequences of the genetic effects of human myelodysplastic syndrome to be studied in mice. This review aims to examine the animal models expressing myelodysplastic syndrome-associated genes that are currently available and to highlight the most appropriate model to phenocopy myelodysplastic syndrome disease and its risk of transformation to acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:23065517

  18. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bric, Anka; Miething, Cornelius; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zender, Lars; Krasnitz, Alexander; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zuber, Johannes; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; McCombie, Richard W.; Hemann, Michael T.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor suppressor gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a well-characterized mouse lymphoma model, we identified over ten candidate tumor suppressors, including Sfrp1, Numb, Mek1, and Angiopoietin 2. Several components of the DNA damage response machinery were also identified, including Rad17, which acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that responds to oncogenic stress and whose loss is associated with poor prognosis in human patients. Our results emphasize the utility of in vivo RNAi screens, identify and validate a diverse set of tumor suppressors, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:19800577

  19. Central nervous system gene expression changes in a transgenic mouse model for bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tortosa, Raül; Castells, Xavier; Vidal, Enric; Costa, Carme; Ruiz de Villa, María del Carmen; Sánchez, Alex; Barceló, Anna; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Ariño, Joaquín

    2011-10-28

    Gene expression analysis has proven to be a very useful tool to gain knowledge of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of diseases, particularly in the initial or preclinical stages. With the aim of finding new data on the events occurring in the Central Nervous System in animals affected with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, a comprehensive genome wide gene expression study was conducted at different time points of the disease on mice genetically modified to model the bovine species brain in terms of cellular prion protein. An accurate analysis of the information generated by microarray technique was the key point to assess the biological relevance of the data obtained in terms of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy pathogenesis. Validation of the microarray technique was achieved by RT-PCR confirming the RNA change and immunohistochemistry techniques that verified that expression changes were translated into variable levels of protein for selected genes. Our study reveals changes in the expression of genes, some of them not previously associated with prion diseases, at early stages of the disease previous to the detection of the pathological prion protein, that might have a role in neuronal degeneration and several transcriptional changes showing an important imbalance in the Central Nervous System homeostasis in advanced stages of the disease. Genes whose expression is altered at early stages of the disease should be considered as possible therapeutic targets and potential disease markers in preclinical diagnostic tool development. Genes non-previously related to prion diseases should be taken into consideration for further investigations.

  20. Multiplex Three-Dimensional Brain Gene Expression Mapping in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Vanessa M.; Ossadtchi, Alex; Khan, Arshad H.; Yee, Simon; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate high-throughput 3D imaging of brain gene expression, a new method called voxelation has been developed. Spatially registered voxels (cubes) are analyzed, resulting in multiple volumetric maps of gene expression analogous to the images reconstructed in biomedical imaging systems. Using microarrays, 40 voxel images for 9000 genes were acquired from brains of both normal mice and mice in which a pharmacological model of Parkinson's disease (PD) had been induced by methamphetamine. Quality-control analyses established the reproducibility of the voxelation procedure. The investigation revealed a common network of coregulated genes shared between the normal and PD brain, and allowed identification of putative control regions responsible for these networks. In addition, genes involved in cell/cell interactions were found to be prominently regulated in the PD brains. Finally, singular value decomposition (SVD), a mathematical method used to provide parsimonious explanations of complex data sets, identified gene vectors and their corresponding images that distinguished between normal and PD brain structures, most pertinently the striatum. [All study results and supplementary data are available on the web at http://www.pharmacology.ucla.edu/smithlab/genome_multiplex and at http://www.genome.org. Microarray data are also available at GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo, under the series accession no. GSE30.] PMID:12045141

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A; Anagnostopoulos, A; Baldarelli, R M; Baya, M; Beal, J S; Bello, S M; Boddy, W J; Bradt, D W; Burkart, D L; Butler, N E; Campbell, J; Cassell, M A; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S L; Dahmen, D J; Dene, H; Diehl, A D; Drabkin, H J; Frazer, K S; Frost, P; Glass, L H; Goldsmith, C W; Grant, P L; Lennon-Pierce, M; Lewis, J; Lu, I; Maltais, L J; McAndrews-Hill, M; McClellan, L; Miers, D B; Miller, L A; Ni, L; Ormsby, J E; Qi, D; Reddy, T B K; Reed, D J; Richards-Smith, B; Shaw, D R; Sinclair, R; Smith, C L; Szauter, P; Walker, M B; Walton, D O; Washburn, L L; Witham, I T; Zhu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

  2. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated LARGE Gene Therapy Rescues the Muscular Dystrophic Phenotype in Mouse Models of Dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; He, Yonglin; Wang, Kejian; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Shengle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Dystroglycanopathies are a group of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) often caused by mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases that lead to hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and reduce its extracellular matrix-binding activity. Overexpressing LARGE (formerly known as like-glycosyltransferase) generates an extracellular matrix-binding carbohydrate epitope in cells with CMD-causing mutations in not only LARGE but also other glycosyltransferases, including POMT1, POMGnT1, and fukutin, creating the possibilities of a one-for-all gene therapy. To determine the feasibility of LARGE gene therapy, a serotype 9 adeno-associated viral vector for overexpressing LARGE (AAV9-LARGE) was injected intracardially into newborns of two mouse models of CMD: the natural LARGE mutant Largemyd mice and protein O-mannose N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1) knockout mice. AAV9-LARGE virus treatment yielded partial restoration of α-DG glycosylation and ligand-binding activity. The muscular dystrophy phenotype in skeletal muscles was ameliorated as revealed by significantly reduced fibrosis, necrosis, and numbers of centrally located nuclei with improved motor function. These results indicate that LARGE overexpression in vivo by AAV9-mediated gene therapy is effective at restoring functional glycosylation of α-DG and rescuing the muscular dystrophy phenotype in deficiency of not only LARGE but also POMGnT1, providing evidence that in vivo LARGE gene therapy may be broadly useful in dystroglycanopathies. PMID:23379513

  3. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  4. Differential proteomics and functional research following gene therapy in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinxiang; Ren, Yueping; Tzekov, Radouil; Zhang, Yuanping; Chen, Bo; Hou, Jiangping; Zhao, Chunhui; Zhu, Jiali; Zhang, Ying; Dai, Xufeng; Ma, Shan; Li, Jia; Pang, Jijing; Qu, Jia; Li, Wensheng

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe forms of inherited retinal degeneration and can be caused by mutations in at least 15 different genes. To clarify the proteomic differences in LCA eyes, a cohort of retinal degeneration 12 (rd12) mice, an LCA2 model caused by a mutation in the RPE65 gene, were injected subretinally with an AAV vector (scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65) in one eye, while the contralateral eye served as a control. Proteomics were compared between untreated rd12 and normal control retinas on P14 and P21, and among treated and untreated rd12 retinas and control retinas on P42. Gene therapy in rd12 mice restored retinal function in treated eyes, which was demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG). Proteomic analysis successfully identified 39 proteins expressed differently among the 3 groups. The expression of 3 proteins involved in regulation of apoptosis and neuroptotection (alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6) were investigated further. Immunofluorescence, Western blot and real-time PCR confirmed the quantitative changes in their expression. Furthermore, cell culture studies suggested that peroxiredoxin 6 could act in an antioxidant role in rd12 mice. Our findings support the feasibility of gene therapy in LCA2 patients and support a role for alpha A crystallin, heat shock protein 70 and peroxiredoxin 6 in the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in LCA2 disease process. PMID:22953002

  5. Progranulin Gene Delivery Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M.; Baranowski, David; Kay, Denis G.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia/bradykinesia resulting from the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. To date, only symptomatic treatment is available for PD patients, with no effective means of slowing or stopping the progression of the disease. Progranulin (PGRN) is a 593 amino acid multifunction protein that is widely distributed throughout the CNS, localized primarily in neurons and microglia. PGRN has been demonstrated to be a potent regulator of neuroinflammation and also acts as an autocrine neurotrophic factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. Thus, enhancing PGRN expression may strengthen the cells resistance to disease. In the present study, we have used the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of PD to investigate the possible use of PGRN gene delivery as a therapy for the prevention or treatment of PD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene was an effective means of elevating PGRN expression in nigrostriatal neurons. When PGRN expression was elevated in the SNC, nigrostriatal neurons were protected from MPTP toxicity in mice, along with a preservation of striatal dopamine content and turnover. Further, protection of nigrostriatal neurons by PGRN gene therapy was accompanied by reductions in markers of MPTP-induced inflammation and apoptosis as well as a complete preservation of locomotor function. We conclude that PGRN gene therapy may have beneficial effects in the treatment of PD. PMID:24804730

  6. A mouse model for adult cardiac-specific gene deletion with CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kelli J.; Makarewich, Catherine A.; McAnally, John; Anderson, Douglas M.; Zentilin, Lorena; Liu, Ning; Giacca, Mauro; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas)9 genomic editing has revolutionized the generation of mutant animals by simplifying the creation of null alleles in virtually any organism. However, most current approaches with this method require zygote injection, making it difficult to assess the adult, tissue-specific functions of genes that are widely expressed or which cause embryonic lethality when mutated. Here, we describe the generation of cardiac-specific Cas9 transgenic mice, which express high levels of Cas9 in the heart, but display no overt defects. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used Adeno-Associated Virus 9 (AAV9) to deliver single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that targets the Myh6 locus exclusively in cardiomyocytes. Intraperitoneal injection of postnatal cardiac-Cas9 transgenic mice with AAV9 encoding sgRNA against Myh6 resulted in robust editing of the Myh6 locus. These mice displayed severe cardiomyopathy and loss of cardiac function, with elevation of several markers of heart failure, confirming the effectiveness of this method of adult cardiac gene deletion. Mice with cardiac-specific expression of Cas9 provide a tool that will allow rapid and accurate deletion of genes following a single injection of AAV9-sgRNAs, thereby circumventing embryonic lethality. This method will be useful for disease modeling and provides a means of rapidly editing genes of interest in the heart. PMID:26719419

  7. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J; Subler, Mark A; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B

    2015-11-10

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor "bystander" effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice. PMID:26474456

  8. MDA-7/IL-24 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in vivo in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Mitchell E.; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K.; Emdad, Luni; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Li, You-Jun; Archer, Michael C.; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Windle, Jolene J.; Subler, Mark A.; Ben-David, Yaacov; Sarkar, Devanand; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Fisher, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (MDA-7/IL-24) is a novel member of the IL-10 gene family that selectively induces apoptosis and toxic autophagy in a broad spectrum of human cancers, including breast cancer, without harming normal cells or tissues. The ability to investigate the critical events underlying cancer initiation and progression, as well as the capacity to test the efficacy of novel therapeutics, has been significantly advanced by the development of genetically engineered mice (GEMs) that accurately recapitulate specific human cancers. We utilized three transgenic mouse models to better comprehend the in vivo role of MDA-7/IL-24 in breast cancer. Using the MMTV-PyMT spontaneous mammary tumor model, we confirmed that exogenously introducing MDA-7/IL-24 using a Cancer Terminator Virus caused a reduction in tumor burden and also produced an antitumor “bystander” effect. Next we performed xenograft studies in a newly created MMTV-MDA-7 transgenic model that over-expresses MDA-7/IL-24 in the mammary glands during pregnancy and lactation, and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed tumor growth following orthotopic injection of a murine PDX tumor cell line (mPDX) derived from a tumor formed in an MMTV-PyMT mouse. We also crossed the MMTV-MDA-7 line to MMTV-Erbb2 transgenic mice and found that MDA-7/IL-24 overexpression delayed the onset of mammary tumor development in this model of spontaneous mammary tumorigenesis as well. Finally, we assessed the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in immune regulation, which can potentially contribute to tumor suppression in vivo. Our findings provide further direct in vivo evidence for the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in tumor suppression in breast cancer in immune-competent transgenic mice. PMID:26474456

  9. A comparative transcriptome analysis identifying FGF23 regulated genes in the kidney of a mouse CKD model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing; David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Li, Hua; Jiao, Yan; Gu, Weikuan; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Elevations of circulating Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and progression of renal failure in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Efforts to identify gene products whose transcription is directly regulated by FGF23 stimulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR)/α-Klotho complexes in the kidney is confounded by both systemic alterations in calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism and intrinsic alterations caused by the underlying renal pathology in CKD. To identify FGF23 responsive genes in the kidney that might explain the association between FGF23 and adverse outcomes in CKD, we performed comparative genome wide analysis of gene expression profiles in the kidney of the Collagen 4 alpha 3 null mice (Col4a3(-/-)) model of progressive kidney disease with kidney expression profiles of Hypophosphatemic (Hyp) and FGF23 transgenic mouse models of elevated FGF23. The different complement of potentially confounding factors in these models allowed us to identify genes that are directly targeted by FGF23. This analysis found that α-Klotho, an anti-aging hormone and FGF23 co-receptor, was decreased by FGF23. We also identified additional FGF23-responsive transcripts and activation of networks associated with renal damage and chronic inflammation, including lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling pathways. Finally, we found that FGF23 suppresses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression in the kidney, thereby providing a pathway for FGF23 regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These gene products provide a possible mechanistic links between elevated FGF23 and pathways responsible for renal failure progression and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. A susceptibility gene for kidney disease in an obese mouse model of type II diabetes maps to chromosome 8

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Streamson; Li, Yifu; Liu, Shun Mei; Liu, Ruijie; Chan, Ka Tak; Martino, Jeremiah; Zheng, Zongyu; Susztak, Katalin; D'Agati, Vivette D; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2014-01-01

    Most mouse models of diabetes do not fully reproduce features of human diabetic nephropathy, limiting their utility in inferring mechanisms of human disease. Here we performed detailed phenotypic and genetic characterization of leptin-receptor (Lepr) deficient mice on the FVB/NJ background (FVBdb/db), an obese model of type II diabetes, to determine their suitability to model human diabetic nephropathy. These mice have sustained hyperglycemia, significant albuminuria and characteristic diabetic renal findings including mesangial sclerosis and nodular glomerulosclerosis after 6 months of age. In contrast, equally obese, hyperglycemic Lepr/Sur1 deficient C57BL/6J (Sur1 has defective insulin secretion) mice have minimal evidence of nephropathy. A genome-wide scan in 165 Lepr deficient backcross progeny derived from FVB/NJ and C57BL/6J identified a major locus influencing nephropathy and albuminuria on chromosome 8B1-C5 (Dbnph1 locus, peak lod score 5.0). This locus was distinct from those contrasting susceptibility to beta cell hypertrophy and HIV-nephropathy between the same parental strains, indicating specificity to diabetic kidney disease. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that high and low risk Dbnph1 genotypes were associated with significant enrichment for oxidative phosphorylation and lipid clearance, respectively; molecular pathways shared with human diabetic nephropathy. Hence, we found that the FVBdb/db mouse recapitulates many clinical, histopathological and molecular features of human diabetic nephropathy. Identifying underlying susceptibility gene(s) and downstream dysregulated pathways in these mice may provide insight into the disease pathogenesis in humans. PMID:20520596

  11. A Knock-in Mouse Model of Human PHD2 Gene-associated Erythrocytosis Establishes a Haploinsufficiency Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Patrick R.; Pei, Fei; Lee, Rebecca; Kerestes, Heddy; Percy, Melanie J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste; Lappin, Terence R. J.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lee, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The central pathway for controlling red cell mass is the PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain protein):hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF, which is negatively regulated by PHD, activates numerous genes, including ones involved in erythropoiesis, such as the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene. Recent studies have implicated PHD2 as the key PHD isoform regulating red cell mass. Studies of humans have identified erythrocytosis-associated, heterozygous point mutations in the PHD2 gene. A key question concerns the mechanism by which human mutations lead to phenotypes. In the present report, we generated and characterized a mouse line in which a P294R knock-in mutation has been introduced into the mouse Phd2 locus to model the first reported human PHD2 mutation (P317R). Phd2P294R/+ mice display a degree of erythrocytosis equivalent to that seen in Phd2+/− mice. The Phd2P294R/+-associated erythrocytosis is reversed in a Hif2a+/−, but not a Hif1a+/− background. Additional studies using various conditional knock-outs of Phd2 reveal that erythrocytosis can be induced by homozygous and heterozygous knock-out of Phd2 in renal cortical interstitial cells using a Pax3-Cre transgene or by homozygous knock-out of Phd2 in hematopoietic progenitors driven by a Vav1-Cre transgene. These studies formally prove that a missense mutation in PHD2 is the cause of the erythrocytosis, show that this occurs through haploinsufficiency, and point to multifactorial control of red cell mass by PHD2. PMID:24121508

  12. An African-specific polymorphism in the TP53 gene impairs p53 tumor suppressor function in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jennis, Matthew; Kung, Che-Pei; Basu, Subhasree; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Leu, Julia I-Ju; Khaku, Sakina; Scott, Jeremy P; Cai, Kathy Q; Campbell, Michelle R; Porter, Devin K; Wang, Xuting; Bell, Douglas A; Li, Xiaoxian; Garlick, David S; Liu, Qin; Hollstein, Monica; George, Donna L; Murphy, Maureen E

    2016-04-15

    A nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 47 in TP53 exists in African-descent populations (P47S, rs1800371; referred to here as S47). Here we report that, in human cell lines and a mouse model, the S47 variant exhibits a modest decrease in apoptosis in response to most genotoxic stresses compared with wild-type p53 but exhibits a significant defect in cell death induced by cisplatin. We show that, compared with wild-type p53, S47 has nearly indistinguishable transcriptional function but shows impaired ability to transactivate a subset of p53 target genes, including two involved in metabolism:Gls2(glutaminase 2) and Sco2 We also show that human and mouse cells expressing the S47 variant are markedly resistant to cell death by agents that induce ferroptosis (iron-mediated nonapoptotic cell death). We show that mice expressing S47 in homozygous or heterozygous form are susceptible to spontaneous cancers of diverse histological types. Our data suggest that the S47 variant may contribute to increased cancer risk in individuals of African descent, and our findings highlight the need to assess the contribution of this variant to cancer risk in these populations. These data also confirm the potential relevance of metabolism and ferroptosis to tumor suppression by p53.

  13. An African-specific polymorphism in the TP53 gene impairs p53 tumor suppressor function in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jennis, Matthew; Kung, Che-Pei; Basu, Subhasree; Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Leu, Julia I-Ju; Khaku, Sakina; Scott, Jeremy P; Cai, Kathy Q; Campbell, Michelle R; Porter, Devin K; Wang, Xuting; Bell, Douglas A; Li, Xiaoxian; Garlick, David S; Liu, Qin; Hollstein, Monica; George, Donna L; Murphy, Maureen E

    2016-04-15

    A nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 47 in TP53 exists in African-descent populations (P47S, rs1800371; referred to here as S47). Here we report that, in human cell lines and a mouse model, the S47 variant exhibits a modest decrease in apoptosis in response to most genotoxic stresses compared with wild-type p53 but exhibits a significant defect in cell death induced by cisplatin. We show that, compared with wild-type p53, S47 has nearly indistinguishable transcriptional function but shows impaired ability to transactivate a subset of p53 target genes, including two involved in metabolism:Gls2(glutaminase 2) and Sco2 We also show that human and mouse cells expressing the S47 variant are markedly resistant to cell death by agents that induce ferroptosis (iron-mediated nonapoptotic cell death). We show that mice expressing S47 in homozygous or heterozygous form are susceptible to spontaneous cancers of diverse histological types. Our data suggest that the S47 variant may contribute to increased cancer risk in individuals of African descent, and our findings highlight the need to assess the contribution of this variant to cancer risk in these populations. These data also confirm the potential relevance of metabolism and ferroptosis to tumor suppression by p53. PMID:27034505

  14. Viral gene transfer of APPsα rescues synaptic failure in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fol, Romain; Braudeau, Jerome; Ludewig, Susann; Abel, Tobias; Weyer, Sascha W; Roederer, Jan-Peter; Brod, Florian; Audrain, Mickael; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Buchholz, Christian J; Korte, Martin; Cartier, Nathalie; Müller, Ulrike C

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synaptic failure, dendritic and axonal atrophy, neuronal death and progressive loss of cognitive functions. It is commonly assumed that these deficits arise due to β-amyloid accumulation and plaque deposition. However, increasing evidence indicates that loss of physiological APP functions mediated predominantly by neurotrophic APPsα produced in the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway may contribute to AD pathogenesis. Upregulation of APPsα production via induction of α-secretase might, however, be problematic as this may also affect substrates implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we used a gene therapy approach to directly overexpress APPsα in the brain using AAV-mediated gene transfer and explored its potential to rescue structural, electrophysiological and behavioral deficits in APP/PS1∆E9 AD model mice. Sustained APPsα overexpression in aged mice with already preexisting pathology and amyloidosis restored synaptic plasticity and partially rescued spine density deficits. Importantly, AAV-APPsα treatment also resulted in a functional rescue of spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. Moreover, we demonstrate a significant reduction of soluble Aβ species and plaque load. In addition, APPsα induced the recruitment of microglia with a ramified morphology into the vicinity of plaques and upregulated IDE and TREM2 expression suggesting enhanced plaque clearance. Collectively, these data indicate that APPsα can mitigate synaptic and cognitive deficits, despite established pathology. Increasing APPsα may therefore be of therapeutic relevance for AD.

  15. A novel homologous model for gene therapy of dwarfism by non-viral transfer of the mouse growth hormone gene into immunocompetent dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Claudia R; Higuti, Eliza; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Jakobsen, Maria; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederick; Gissel, Hanne; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2014-02-01

    The possibilities for non-viral GH gene therapy are studied in immunocompetent dwarf mice (lit/lit). As expression vector we used a plasmid previously employed in immunodeficient dwarf mice (pUBI-hGH-gDNA) by replacing the human GH gene with the genomic sequence of mouse-GH DNA (pUBI-mGH-gDNA). HEK-293 human cells transfected with pUBI-mGH-gDNA produced 3.0 µg mGH/10(6) cells/day compared to 3.7 µg hGH/10(6) cells/day for pUBIhGH- gDNA transfected cells. The weight of lit/lit mice treated with the same two plasmids (50 µg DNA/mouse) by electrotransfer into the quadriceps muscle was followed for 3 months. The weight increase up to 15 days for mGH, hGH and saline treated mice were 0.130, 0.112 and 0.027 g/mouse/day. Most sera from hGH-treated mice contained anti-hGH antibodies already on day 15, with the highest titers on day 45, while no significant anti-mGH antibodies were observed in mGH-treated mice. At the end of 3 months, the weight increase for mGH-treated mice was 34.3%, while the nose-to-tail and femur lengths increased 9.5% and 24.3%. Mouse-GH and hGH circulating levels were 4-5 ng/mL 15 days after treatment, versus control levels of ~0.7 ng GH/mL (P<0.001). In mGH-treated mice, mIGF-I determined on days 15, 45 and 94 were 1.5- to 3-fold higher than the control and 1.2- to 1.6-fold higher than hGH-treated mice. The described homologous model represents an important progress forming the basis for preclinical testing of non-viral gene therapy for GH deficiency.

  16. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  17. Prevention and reversal of severe mitochondrial cardiomyopathy by gene therapy in a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Belbellaa, Brahim; Monassier, Laurent; Reutenauer, Laurence; Messaddeq, Nadia; Cartier, Nathalie; Crystal, Ronald G; Aubourg, Patrick; Puccio, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac failure is the most common cause of mortality in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), a mitochondrial disease characterized by neurodegeneration, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and diabetes. FRDA is caused by reduced levels of frataxin (FXN), an essential mitochondrial protein involved in the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, bioenergetics imbalance, deficit of Fe-S cluster enzymes and mitochondrial iron overload occur in the myocardium of individuals with FRDA. No treatment exists as yet for FRDA cardiomyopathy. A conditional mouse model with complete frataxin deletion in cardiac and skeletal muscle (Mck-Cre-Fxn(L3/L-) mice) recapitulates most features of FRDA cardiomyopathy, albeit with a more rapid and severe course. Here we show that adeno-associated virus rh10 vector expressing human FXN injected intravenously in these mice fully prevented the onset of cardiac disease. Moreover, later administration of the frataxin-expressing vector, after the onset of heart failure, was able to completely reverse the cardiomyopathy of these mice at the functional, cellular and molecular levels within a few days. Our results demonstrate that cardiomyocytes with severe energy failure and ultrastructure disorganization can be rapidly rescued and remodeled by gene therapy and establish the preclinical proof of concept for the potential of gene therapy in treating FRDA cardiomyopathy.

  18. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2−/− Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L.; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity, and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2−/−), to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2−/− mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2−/− and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2+/+) adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2−/− hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2−/− DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ)-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2

  19. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Two Mouse Models of Autism: Transcriptome Profiling of the BTBR and En2−/− Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Corradi, Zelia; Monsorno, Katia; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Ricceri, Laura; Scattoni, Maria L.; Bozzi, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity, and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2−/−), to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2−/− mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2−/− and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2+/+) adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2−/− hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2−/− DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2−/− hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ)-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2

  20. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): mouse biology and model systems.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), integrates genetic, genomic and phenotypic information about the laboratory mouse, a primary animal model for studying human biology and disease. MGD data content includes comprehensive characterization of genes and their functions, standardized descriptions of mouse phenotypes, extensive integration of DNA and protein sequence data, normalized representation of genome and genome variant information including comparative data on mammalian genes. Data within MGD are obtained from diverse sources including manual curation of the biomedical literature, direct contributions from individual investigator's laboratories and major informatics resource centers such as Ensembl, UniProt and NCBI. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology. MGD provides a data-mining platform that enables the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the association of gene trap data with mouse genes and a new batch query capability for customized data access and retrieval.

  2. Nicotinamide improves motor deficits and upregulates PGC-1α and BDNF gene expression in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hathorn, Tyisha; Snyder-Keller, Abigail; Messer, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in exon-1 in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). This results in misfolding and accumulation of the huntingtin (htt) protein, forming nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. HD is associated with dysregulation of gene expression as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesized that by improving transcriptional regulation of genes necessary for energy metabolism, the HD motor phenotype would also improve. We therefore examined the protective effects of nicotinamide (NAM), a well-characterized water-soluble B vitamin that is an inhibitor of sirtuin1/class III NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase (HDAC). In this study, both mini-osmotic pumps and drinking water deliveries were tested at 250 mg NAM/kg/day, using the B6.HDR6/1 transgenic mouse model. Results were similar for both modes of delivery, and there was no evidence of toxicity. We found that NAM treatment increased mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Protein levels of BDNF were also significantly increased. In addition, NAM treatment increased PGC-1α activation in HD mice, pointing to a possible mode of action as a therapeutic. Critically, NAM treatment was able to improve motor deficits associated with the HD phenotype, tested as time courses of open field, rotarod, and balance beam activities. These improvements were substantial, despite the fact that NAM did not appear to reduce htt aggregation, or to prevent late-stage weight loss. Our study therefore concludes that NAM or similar drugs may be beneficial in clinical treatment of the motor dysfunctions of HD, while additional therapeutic approaches must be added to combat the aggregation phenotype and overall physiological decline.

  3. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  4. Decreased hippocampal volume and increased anxiety in a transgenic mouse model expressing the human CYP2C19 gene

    PubMed Central

    Persson, A; Sim, S C; Virding, S; Onishchenko, N; Schulte, G; Ingelman-Sundberg, M

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, various psychoactive drugs, as well as endogenous steroids and cannabinoid-like compounds are metabolized by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19). Absence of this enzyme has been recently shown to associate with lower levels of depressive symptoms in human subjects. To investigate endogenous functions of CYP2C19 and its potential role in brain function, we have used a transgenic mouse model carrying the human CYP2C19 gene. Here, CYP2C19 was expressed in the developing fetal, but not adult brain and was associated with altered fetal brain morphology, where mice homozygous for the CYP2C19 transgenic insert had severely underdeveloped hippocampus and complete callosal agenesis and high neonatal lethality. CYP2C19 expression was also found in human fetal brain. In adult hemizygous mice we observed besides decreased hippocampal volume, an altered neuronal composition in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been reported in several psychiatric disorders, supporting the relevance of this model. Here we found that adult hemizygous CYP2C19 transgenic mice demonstrate behavior indicative of increased stress and anxiety based on four different tests. We hypothesize that expression of the CYP2C19 enzyme prenatally may affect brain development by metabolizing endogenous compounds influencing this development. Furthermore, CYP2C19 polymorphism may have a role in interindividual susceptibility for psychiatric disorders. PMID:23877834

  5. Circadian Gene Circuitry Predicts Hyperactive Behavior in a Mood Disorder Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Hideo; Horikawa, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Hironori K; Umemori, Juzoh; Shoji, Hirotaka; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-29

    Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, causes swings in mood and activity levels at irregular intervals. Such changes are difficult to predict, and their molecular basis remains unknown. Here, we use infradian (longer than a day) cyclic activity levels in αCaMKII (Camk2a) mutant mice as a proxy for such mood-associated changes. We report that gene-expression patterns in the hippocampal dentate gyrus could retrospectively predict whether the mice were in a state of high or low locomotor activity (LA). Expression of a subset of circadian genes, as well as levels of cAMP and pCREB, possible upstream regulators of circadian genes, were correlated with LA states, suggesting that the intrinsic molecular circuitry changes concomitant with infradian oscillatory LA. Taken together, these findings shed light onto the molecular basis of how irregular biological rhythms and behavior are controlled by the brain. PMID:27028761

  6. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Wright, Matthew W; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Cox, Laura A; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J; Potter, Phillip M; Redinbo, Matthew R; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and "CES" (human) and "Ces" (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding "P" and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species.

  7. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis.

  8. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  9. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-12-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  10. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  11. The Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD)

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Begley, Dale A.; Corradi, John P.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Hill, David P.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2001-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. By combining the different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide increasingly complete information about the expression profiles of genes in different mouse strains and mutants, thus enabling valuable insights into the molecular networks that underlie normal development and disease. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Extensive interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species, and the development and use of shared controlled vocabularies extend GXD’s utility for the analysis of gene expression information. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics web site at http://www.informatic s.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics.jax.org/me nus/expression_menu.shtml. PMID:11125060

  12. Increasing cholesterol synthesis in 7-dehydrosterol reductase (DHCR7) deficient mouse models through gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Matabosch, Xavier; Ying, Lee; Serra, Montserrat; Wassif, Christopher A.; Porter, Forbes D.; Shackleton, Cedric; Watson, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by deficiency in the terminal step of cholesterol biosynthesis: the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (C), catalyzed by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). This disorder exhibits several phenotypic traits including dysmorphia and mental retardation with a broad range of severity. There are few proven treatment options. That most commonly used is a high cholesterol diet that seems to enhance the quality of life and improve behavioral characteristics of patients, although these positive effects are controversial. The goal of our study was to investigate the possibility of restoring DHCR7 activity by gene transfer. We constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing the DHCR7 gene. After we infused this vector into affected mice, the introduced DHCR7 gene could be identified in liver, mRNA was expressed and a functional enzyme was produced. Evidence of functionality came from the ability to partially normalize the serum ratio of 7DHC/C in treated animals, apparently by increasing cholesterol production with concomitant decrease in 7DHC precursor. By five weeks after treatment the mean ratio (for 7 animals) had fallen to 0.05 while the ratio for untreated littermate controls had risen to 0.14. This provides proof of principle that gene transfer can ameliorate the genetic defect causing SLOS and provides a new experimental tool for studying the pathogenesis of this disease. If effective in humans, it might also offer a possible alternative to exogenous cholesterol therapy. However, it would not offer a complete cure for the disorder as many of the negative implications of defective synthesis are already established during prenatal development. PMID:20800683

  13. Increasing cholesterol synthesis in 7-dehydrosterol reductase (DHCR7) deficient mouse models through gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Matabosch, Xavier; Ying, Lee; Serra, Montserrat; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Shackleton, Cedric; Watson, Gordon

    2010-11-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by deficiency in the terminal step of cholesterol biosynthesis: the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (C), catalyzed by 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). This disorder exhibits several phenotypic traits including dysmorphia and mental retardation with a broad range of severity. There are few proven treatment options. That most commonly used is a high cholesterol diet that seems to enhance the quality of life and improve behavioral characteristics of patients, although these positive effects are controversial. The goal of our study was to investigate the possibility of restoring DHCR7 activity by gene transfer. We constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing the DHCR7 gene. After we infused this vector into affected mice, the introduced DHCR7 gene could be identified in liver, mRNA was expressed and a functional enzyme was produced. Evidence of functionality came from the ability to partially normalize the serum ratio of 7DHC/C in treated animals, apparently by increasing cholesterol production with concomitant decrease in 7DHC precursor. By 5 weeks after treatment the mean ratio (for 7 animals) had fallen to 0.05 while the ratio for untreated littermate controls had risen to 0.14. This provides proof of principle that gene transfer can ameliorate the genetic defect causing SLOS and provides a new experimental tool for studying the pathogenesis of this disease. If effective in humans, it might also offer a possible alternative to exogenous cholesterol therapy. However, it would not offer a complete cure for the disorder as many of the negative implications of defective synthesis are already established during prenatal development.

  14. Sleeping Beauty transposon insertional mutagenesis based mouse models for cancer gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale genomic efforts to study human cancer, such as the cancer gene atlas (TCGA), have identified numerous cancer drivers in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there are limitations to this approach, the mutations and expression or copy number changes that are identified are not always clearly functionally relevant, and only annotated genes and genetic elements are thoroughly queried. The use of complimentary, nonbiased, functional approaches to identify drivers of cancer development and progression is ideal to maximize the rate at which cancer discoveries are achieved. One such approach that has been successful is the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based mutagenesis system in mice. This system uses a conditionally expressed transposase and mutagenic transposon allele to target mutagenesis to somatic cells of a given tissue in mice to cause random mutations leading to tumor development. Analysis of tumors for transposon common insertion sites (CIS) identifies candidate cancer genes specific to that tumor type. While similar screens have been performed in mice with the PiggyBac (PB) transposon and viral approaches, we limit extensive discussion to SB. Here we discuss the basic structure of these screens, screens that have been performed, methods used to identify CIS. PMID:26051241

  15. Analysis of blood stem cell activity and cystatin gene expression in a mouse model presenting a chromosomal deletion encompassing Csta and Stfa2l1.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Mélanie; MacRae, Tara; Gaboury, Louis; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Hardy, Marie-Pierre; Mayotte, Nadine; Paradis, Véronique; Harton, Sébastien; Perreault, Claude; Sauvageau, Guy

    2009-10-19

    The cystatin protein superfamily is characterized by the presence of conserved sequences that display cysteine protease inhibitory activity (e.g., towards cathepsins). Type 1 and 2 cystatins are encoded by 25 genes of which 23 are grouped in 2 clusters localized on mouse chromosomes 16 and 2. The expression and essential roles of most of these genes in mouse development and hematopoiesis remain poorly characterized. In this study, we describe a set of quantitative real-time PCR assays and a global expression profile of cystatin genes in normal mouse tissues. Benefiting from our collection of DelES embryonic stem cell clones harboring large chromosomal deletions (to be reported elsewhere), we selected a clone in which a 95-kb region of chromosome 16 is missing (Del(16qB3Delta/+)). In this particular clone, 2 cystatin genes, namely Csta and Stfa2l1 are absent along with 2 other genes (Fam162a, Ccdc58) and associated intergenic regions. From this line, we established a new homozygous mutant mouse model (Del(16qB3Delta/16qB3Delta)) to assess the in vivo biological functions of the 2 deleted cystatins. Stfa2l1 gene expression is high in wild-type fetal liver, bone marrow, and spleen, while Csta is ubiquitously expressed. Homozygous Del(16qB3Delta/16qB3Delta) animals are phenotypically normal, fertile, and not overtly susceptible to spontaneous or irradiation-induced tumor formation. The hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell activity in these mutant mice are also normal. Interestingly, quantitative real-time PCR expression profiling reveals a marked increase in the expression levels of Stfa2l1/Csta phylogenetically-related genes (Stfa1, Stfa2, and Stfa3) in Del(16qB3Delta/16qB3Delta) hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that these candidate genes might be contributing to compensatory mechanisms. Overall, this study presents an optimized approach to globally monitor cystatin gene expression as well as a new mouse model deficient in Stfa2l1/Csta genes, expanding the

  16. Cancer mouse models: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Walid T; Liu, Pentao

    2014-03-01

    The development and advances in gene targeting technology over the past three decades has facilitated the generation of cancer mouse models that recapitulate features of human malignancies. These models have been and still remain instrumental in revealing the complexities of human cancer biology. However, they will need to evolve in the post-genomic era of cancer research. In this review we will highlight some of the key developments over the past decades and will discuss the new possibilities of cancer mouse models in the light of emerging powerful gene manipulating tools.

  17. Deleting exon 55 from the nebulin gene induces severe muscle weakness in a mouse model for nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Buck, Danielle; de Winter, Josine M; Ferrara, Claudia; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Meng, Hui; Stienen, Ger J M; Beggs, Alan H; Labeit, Siegfried; Poggesi, Corrado; Lawlor, Michael W; Granzier, Henk

    2013-06-01

    Nebulin--a giant sarcomeric protein--plays a pivotal role in skeletal muscle contractility by specifying thin filament length and function. Although mutations in the gene encoding nebulin (NEB) are a frequent cause of nemaline myopathy, the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, the mechanisms by which mutations in NEB cause muscle weakness remain largely unknown. To better understand these mechanisms, we have generated a mouse model in which Neb exon 55 is deleted (Neb(ΔExon55)) to replicate a founder mutation seen frequently in patients with nemaline myopathy with Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Neb(ΔExon55) mice are born close to Mendelian ratios, but show growth retardation after birth. Electron microscopy studies show nemaline bodies--a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy--in muscle fibres from Neb(ΔExon55) mice. Western blotting studies with nebulin-specific antibodies reveal reduced nebulin levels in muscle from Neb(ΔExon55) mice, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies with tropomodulin antibodies and phalloidin reveal that thin filament length is significantly reduced. In line with reduced thin filament length, the maximal force generating capacity of permeabilized muscle fibres and single myofibrils is reduced in Neb(ΔExon55) mice with a more pronounced reduction at longer sarcomere lengths. Finally, in Neb(ΔExon55) mice the regulation of contraction is impaired, as evidenced by marked changes in crossbridge cycling kinetics and by a reduction of the calcium sensitivity of force generation. A novel drug that facilitates calcium binding to the thin filament significantly augmented the calcium sensitivity of submaximal force to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. In conclusion, we have characterized the first nebulin-based nemaline myopathy model, which recapitulates important features of the phenotype observed in patients harbouring this particular mutation, and which has severe muscle weakness caused by

  18. S-SCAM, a rare copy number variation gene, induces schizophrenia-related endophenotypes in transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanyan; Zhong, Peng; Shin, Seung Min; Metallo, Jacob; Danielson, Eric; Olsen, Christopher M; Liu, Qing-song; Lee, Sang H

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating genetic evidence suggests that schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with individually rare copy number variations (CNVs) of diverse genes, often specific to single cases. However, the causality of these rare mutations remains unknown. One of the rare CNVs found in SZ cohorts is the duplication of Synaptic Scaffolding Molecule (S-SCAM, also called MAGI-2), which encodes a postsynaptic scaffolding protein controlling synaptic AMPA receptor levels, and thus the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we report that, in a transgenic mouse model simulating the duplication conditions, elevation of S-SCAM levels in excitatory neurons of the forebrain was sufficient to induce multiple SZ-related endophenotypes. S-SCAM transgenic mice showed an increased number of lateral ventricles and a reduced number of parvalbumin-stained neurons. In addition, the mice exhibited SZ-like behavioral abnormalities, including hyperlocomotor activity, deficits in prepulse inhibition, increased anxiety, impaired social interaction, and working memory deficit. Notably, the S-SCAM transgenic mice showed a unique sex difference in showing these behavioral symptoms, which is reminiscent of human conditions. These behavioral abnormalities were accompanied by hyperglutamatergic function associated with increased synaptic AMPA receptor levels and impaired long-term potentiation. Importantly, reducing glutamate release by the group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 ameliorated the working memory deficits in the transgenic mice, suggesting that hyperglutamatergic function underlies the cognitive functional deficits. Together, these results contribute to validate a causal relationship of the rare S-SCAM CNV and provide supporting evidence for the rare CNV hypothesis in SZ pathogenesis. Furthermore, the S-SCAM transgenic mice provide a valuable new animal model for studying SZ pathogenesis.

  19. Behavior Test Relevant to α2/α3Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Gene Modified Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Toke Jost; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral phenotypes of mice are the result of a complex interplay between overall health, sensory abilities, learning and memory, motor function as well as developmental milestones, feeding, sexual, parental, and social behaviors. This chapter lists a selected number of key behavioral tests, specifically designed to assay fundamental behavioral features such as memory, activity, and motor skills in mice models.

  20. Gene delivery to mitochondria by targeting modified adenoassociated virus suppresses Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Ozdemir, Sacide S; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S; Guy, John

    2012-05-15

    To introduce DNA into mitochondria efficiently, we fused adenoassociated virus capsid VP2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence to carry the mitochondrial gene encoding the human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4). Expression of WT ND4 in cells with the G11778A mutation in ND4 led to restoration of defective ATP synthesis. Furthermore, with injection into the rodent eye, human ND4 DNA levels in mitochondria reached 80% of its mouse homolog. The construct expressed in most inner retinal neurons, and it also suppressed visual loss and optic atrophy induced by a mutant ND4 homolog. The adenoassociated virus cassette accommodates genes of up to ∼5 kb in length, thus providing a platform for introduction of almost any mitochondrial gene and perhaps even allowing insertion of DNA encompassing large deletions of mtDNA, some associated with aging, into the organelle of adults.

  1. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest. PMID:25636481

  2. What's wrong with my mouse cage? Methodological considerations for modeling lifestyle factors and gene-environment interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-05-30

    The mechanistic understanding of lifestyle contributions to disease has been largely driven by work in laboratory rodent models using environmental interventions. These interventions show an array of methodologies and sometimes unclear collective conclusions, hampering clinical interpretations. Here we discuss environmental enrichment, exercise and stress interventions to illustrate how different protocols can affect the interpretations of environmental factors in disease. We use Huntington's disease (HD) as an example because its mouse models exhibit excellent validity and HD was the first genetic animal model in which environmental stimulation was found to be beneficial. We make a number of observations and recommendations. Firstly, environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise generally show benefits across laboratories and mouse models. However, the extent to which these environmental interventions have beneficial effects depends on parameters such as the structural complexity of the cage in the case of enrichment, the timing of the intervention and the nature of the control conditions. In particular, clinical interpretations should consider deprived control living conditions and the ethological relevance of the enrichment. Secondly, stress can have negative effects on the phenotype in mouse models of HD and other brain disorders. When modeling stress, the effects of more than one type of experimental stressor should be investigated due to the heterogeneity and complexity of stress responses. With stress in particular, but ideally in all studies, both sexes should be used and the randomized group sizes need to be sufficiently powered to detect any sex effects. Opportunities for clinical translation will be guided by the 'environmental construct validity' of the preclinical data, including the culmination of complementary protocols across multiple animal models. Environmental interventions in mouse models of HD provide illustrative examples of how valid

  3. What's wrong with my mouse cage? Methodological considerations for modeling lifestyle factors and gene-environment interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-05-30

    The mechanistic understanding of lifestyle contributions to disease has been largely driven by work in laboratory rodent models using environmental interventions. These interventions show an array of methodologies and sometimes unclear collective conclusions, hampering clinical interpretations. Here we discuss environmental enrichment, exercise and stress interventions to illustrate how different protocols can affect the interpretations of environmental factors in disease. We use Huntington's disease (HD) as an example because its mouse models exhibit excellent validity and HD was the first genetic animal model in which environmental stimulation was found to be beneficial. We make a number of observations and recommendations. Firstly, environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise generally show benefits across laboratories and mouse models. However, the extent to which these environmental interventions have beneficial effects depends on parameters such as the structural complexity of the cage in the case of enrichment, the timing of the intervention and the nature of the control conditions. In particular, clinical interpretations should consider deprived control living conditions and the ethological relevance of the enrichment. Secondly, stress can have negative effects on the phenotype in mouse models of HD and other brain disorders. When modeling stress, the effects of more than one type of experimental stressor should be investigated due to the heterogeneity and complexity of stress responses. With stress in particular, but ideally in all studies, both sexes should be used and the randomized group sizes need to be sufficiently powered to detect any sex effects. Opportunities for clinical translation will be guided by the 'environmental construct validity' of the preclinical data, including the culmination of complementary protocols across multiple animal models. Environmental interventions in mouse models of HD provide illustrative examples of how valid

  4. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjun; Lager, Kelly M.; Li, Xi; Janke, Bruce H.; Mosier, Derek A; Painter, Laura E.; Ulery, Eva S.; Ma, Jingqun; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Webby, Richard J.; Richt, Jürgen A.

    2010-01-01

    PB2 627K is a determinant of influenza host range and contributes to the pathogenicity of human-, avian-, and mouse-adapted influenza viruses in the mouse model. Here we used mouse and pig models to analyze the contribution of a swine-origin and avian-origin PB2 carrying either 627K or 627E in the background of the classical swine H1N1 (A/Swine/Iowa/15/30; 1930) virus. The results showed PB2 627K is crucial for virulence in the mouse model, independent of whether PB2 is derived from an avian or swine influenza virus (SIV). In the pig model, PB2 627E decreases pathogenicity of the classical 1930 SIV when it contains the swine-origin PB2, but not when it possesses the avian-origin PB2. Our study suggests the pathogenicity of SIVs with different PB2 genes and mutation of codon 627 in mice does not correlate with the pathogenicity of the same SIVs in the natural host, the pig. PMID:21074235

  5. Combining Zebrafish and Mouse Models to Test the Function of Deubiquitinating Enzyme (Dubs) Genes in Development: Role of USP45 in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Toulis, Vasileios; Garanto, Alejandro; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification. Much effort has been devoted to characterize the function of ubiquitin pathway genes in the cell context, but much less is known on their functional role in the development and maintenance of organs and tissues in the organism. In fact, several ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are implicated in human pathological disorders, from cancer to neurodegeneration. The aim of our work is to explore the relevance of DUBs in retinal function in health and disease, particularly since some genes related to the ubiquitin or SUMO pathways cause retinal dystrophies, a group of rare diseases that affect 1:3000 individuals worldwide. We propose zebrafish as an extremely useful and informative genetic model to characterize the function of any particular gene in the retina, and thus complement the expression data from mouse. A preliminary characterization of gene expression in mouse retinas (RT-PCR and in situ hybridization) was performed to select particularly interesting genes, and we later replicated the experiments in zebrafish. As a proof of concept, we selected ups45 to be knocked down by morpholino injection in zebrafish embryos. Morphant phenotypic analysis showed moderate to severe eye morphological defects, with a defective formation of the retinal structures, therefore supporting the relevance of DUBs in the formation and differentiation of the vertebrate retina, and suggesting that genes encoding ubiquitin pathway enzymes are good candidates for causing hereditary retinal dystrophies. PMID:27613029

  6. Combining Zebrafish and Mouse Models to Test the Function of Deubiquitinating Enzyme (Dubs) Genes in Development: Role of USP45 in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Toulis, Vasileios; Garanto, Alejandro; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification. Much effort has been devoted to characterize the function of ubiquitin pathway genes in the cell context, but much less is known on their functional role in the development and maintenance of organs and tissues in the organism. In fact, several ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are implicated in human pathological disorders, from cancer to neurodegeneration. The aim of our work is to explore the relevance of DUBs in retinal function in health and disease, particularly since some genes related to the ubiquitin or SUMO pathways cause retinal dystrophies, a group of rare diseases that affect 1:3000 individuals worldwide. We propose zebrafish as an extremely useful and informative genetic model to characterize the function of any particular gene in the retina, and thus complement the expression data from mouse. A preliminary characterization of gene expression in mouse retinas (RT-PCR and in situ hybridization) was performed to select particularly interesting genes, and we later replicated the experiments in zebrafish. As a proof of concept, we selected ups45 to be knocked down by morpholino injection in zebrafish embryos. Morphant phenotypic analysis showed moderate to severe eye morphological defects, with a defective formation of the retinal structures, therefore supporting the relevance of DUBs in the formation and differentiation of the vertebrate retina, and suggesting that genes encoding ubiquitin pathway enzymes are good candidates for causing hereditary retinal dystrophies.

  7. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities.

  8. Mouse models for human otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Trune, Dennis R.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2010-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) remains the most common childhood disease and its annual costs exceed $5 billion. Its potential for permanent hearing impairment also emphasizes the need to better understand and manage this disease. The pathogenesis of OM is multifactorial and includes infectious pathogens, anatomy, immunologic status, genetic predisposition, and environment. Recent progress in mouse model development is helping to elucidate the respective roles of these factors and to significantly contribute toward efforts of OM prevention and control. Genetic predisposition is recognized as an important factor in OM and increasing numbers of mouse models are helping to uncover the potential genetic bases for human OM. Furthermore, the completion of the mouse genome sequence has offered a powerful set of tools for investigating gene function and is generating a rich resource of mouse mutants for studying the genetic factors underlying OM. PMID:19272362

  9. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  10. Gene expression of IQGAPs and Ras families in an experimental mouse model for hepatocellular carcinoma: a mechanistic study of cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Zoheir, Khairy MA; Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Abdel-Hamied, Hala E; Abd-Allah, Adel R; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    IQGAPs genes play critical role in either induction or suppression of cancer and its progression, however the relationship between Ras genes and these genes are still unclear. In this study, we tried to understand the mechanistic action of IQGAPs genes and its correlation with Ras genes in mouse hepatic cancer model. The genetic expressions of IQGAP1, IQGAP2, IQGAP3, Hras, Kras, Nras, Mras, Caspase3, and BAX were followed in both hepatocellular carcinoma and normal liver cells of Balbc mice. Genotoxic agent diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatic cancer model was induced in male mice and recorded the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma by morphological and histological changes in the liver. It was observed that mRNA expressions of IQGAP1, Hras, Kras, Nras, Mras, Caspase3, and BAX genes were highly elevated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells when compared with normal liver cells, additionally their expressions increased by concentrating the dose of DEN. While, the expressions of IQGAP2 and IQGAP3 were significantly decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma cells when compared with normal liver cells, as well as their expressions decreased more with increasing the dose of DEN. It was concluded from this study that IQGAP1 has a strong signaling relationship with Ras genes in induction of cancer and it is considered as a key gene for induction or suppression of the hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26464624

  11. Gene therapy into photoreceptors and Müller glial cells restores retinal structure and function in CRB1 retinitis pigmentosa mouse models.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Quinn, Peter M; Alves, C Henrique; Vos, Rogier M; Klooster, Jan; Flannery, John G; Heimel, J Alexander; Wijnholds, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the Crumbs-homologue-1 (CRB1) gene lead to severe recessive inherited retinal dystrophies. Gene transfer therapy is the most promising cure for retinal dystrophies and has primarily been applied for recessive null conditions via a viral gene expression vector transferring a cDNA encoding an enzyme or channel protein, and targeting expression to one cell type. Therapy for the human CRB1 disease will be more complex, as CRB1 is a structural and signaling transmembrane protein present in three cell classes: Müller glia, cone and rod photoreceptors. In this study, we applied CRB1 and CRB2 gene therapy vectors in Crb1-retinitis pigmentosa mouse models at mid-stage disease. We tested if CRB expression restricted to Müller glial cells or photoreceptors or co-expression in both is required to recover retinal function. We show that targeting both Müller glial cells and photoreceptors with CRB2 ameliorated retinal function and structure in Crb1 mouse models. Surprisingly, targeting a single cell type or all cell types with CRB1 reduced retinal function. We show here the first pre-clinical studies for CRB1-related eye disorders using CRB2 vectors and initial elucidation of the cellular mechanisms underlying CRB1 function.

  12. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  13. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  14. Temporal gene profiling of the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model highlights the importance of microglial activation in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 5XFAD early onset mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is gaining momentum. Behavioral, electrophysiological and anatomical studies have identified age-dependent alterations that can be reminiscent of human AD. However, transcriptional changes during disease progression have not yet been investigated. To this end, we carried out a transcriptomic analysis on RNAs from the neocortex and the hippocampus of 5XFAD female mice at the ages of one, four, six and nine months (M1, M4, M6, M9). Results Our results show a clear shift in gene expression patterns between M1 and M4. At M1, 5XFAD animals exhibit region-specific variations in gene expression patterns whereas M4 to M9 mice share a larger proportion of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that are common to both regions. Analysis of DEGs from M4 to M9 underlines the predominance of inflammatory and immune processes in this AD mouse model. The rise in inflammation, sustained by the overexpression of genes from the complement and integrin families, is accompanied by an increased expression of transcripts involved in the NADPH oxidase complex, phagocytic processes and IFN-γ related pathways. Conclusions Overall, our data suggest that, from M4 to M9, sustained microglial activation becomes the predominant feature and point out that both detrimental and neuroprotective mechanisms appear to be at play in this model. Furthermore, our study identifies a number of genes already known to be altered in human AD, thus confirming the use of the 5XFAD strain as a valid model for understanding AD pathogenesis and for screening potential therapeutic molecules. PMID:25213090

  15. Expression of biomarker genes of differentiation in D3 mouse embryonic stem cells after exposure to different embryotoxicant and non-embryotoxicant model chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Andrea C.; del Río, Eva; Vilanova, Eugenio; Sogorb, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a necessity to develop in vitro methods for testing embryotoxicity (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. We studied the progress of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation exposed to model embryotoxicants and non-embryotoxicants chemicals through the expression of biomarker genes. We studied a set of 16 different genes biomarkers of general cellular processes (Cdk1, Myc, Jun, Mixl, Cer and Wnt3), ectoderm formation (Nrcam, Nes, Shh and Pnpla6), mesoderm formation (Mesp1, Vegfa, Myo1e and Hdac7) and endoderm formation (Flk1 and Afp). We offer dose response in order to derive the concentration causing either 50% or 200% of expression of the biomarker gene. These records revealed to be a valuable end-point to predict in vitro the embryotoxicity of chemicals (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26568980

  16. Wnt signaling and gastrointestinal tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Taketo, M M

    2006-12-01

    The canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. For the latter, induced mutations in mice have greatly contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. Here, I will review recent reports on gastrointestinal cancer model mice, with an emphasis on the roles of the Wnt signal pathway. They include: mouse models for familial adenomatous polyposis; modifying factors that affect mouse intestinal polyposis, including the genes that help cancer progression; Wnt target genes that affect mouse intestinal polyposis; and a mouse model of gastric cancer that mimics Helicobacter pyroli infection. PMID:17143296

  17. Gene therapy cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in a mouse model of RPS19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Modlich, Ute; Rothe, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Mutations involving the ribosomal protein S19 gene are detected in 25% of patients. Enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 improves the overall proliferative capacity, erythroid colony-forming potential and erythroid differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors from ribosomal protein S19-deficient patients in vitro and in vivo following xenotransplantation. However, studies using animal models are needed to assess the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the viral vectors. In the present study we have validated the therapeutic potential of gene therapy using mouse models of ribosomal protein S19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Using lentiviral gene transfer we demonstrated that enforced expression of ribosomal protein S19 cures the anemia and lethal bone marrow failure in recipients transplanted with ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells. Furthermore, gene-corrected ribosomal protein S19-deficient cells showed an increased pan-hematopoietic contribution over time compared to untransduced cells without signs of vector-mediated toxicity. Our study provides a proof of principle for the development of clinical gene therapy to cure ribosomal protein 19-deficient Diamond-Blackfan anemia. PMID:25216681

  18. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  19. Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision to the All-Cone Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-1.

    PubMed

    Boye, Sanford L; Peterson, James J; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; McCullough, K Tyler; Zhang, Zhonghong; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Peshenko, Igor V; Hauswirth, William W; Ding, Xi-Qin; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Boye, Shannon E

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are the cause of Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1), a protein expressed exclusively in outer segments of photoreceptors and essential for timely recovery from photoexcitation. Recent clinical data show that, despite a high degree of visual disturbance stemming from a loss of cone function, LCA1 patients retain normal photoreceptor architecture, except for foveal cone outer segment abnormalities and, in some patients, foveal cone loss. These results point to the cone-rich central retina as a target for GUCY2D replacement. LCA1 gene replacement studies thus far have been conducted in rod-dominant models (mouse) or with vectors and organisms lacking clinical translatability. Here we investigate gene replacement in the Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mouse, an all-cone model deficient in retGC1. We show that AAV-retGC1 treatment fully restores cone function, cone-mediated visual behavior, and guanylate cyclase activity, and preserves cones in treated Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice over the long-term. A novel finding was that retinal function could be restored to levels above that in Nrl(-/-) controls, contrasting results in other models of retGC1 deficiency. We attribute this to increased cyclase activity in treated Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice relative to Nrl(-/-) controls. Thus, Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice possess an expanded dynamic range in ERG response to gene replacement relative to other models. Lastly, we show that a candidate clinical vector, AAV5-GRK1-GUCY2D, when delivered to adult Nrl(-/-) Gucy2e(-/-) mice, restores retinal function that persists for at least 6 months. Our results provide strong support for clinical application of a gene therapy targeted to the cone-rich, central retina of LCA1 patients.

  20. Characterization of Timed Changes in Hepatic Copper Concentrations, Methionine Metabolism, Gene Expression, and Global DNA Methylation in the Jackson Toxic Milk Mouse Model of Wilson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh; Shibata, Noreene M.; French, Samuel W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Islam, Mohammad S.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Halsted, Charles H.; Keen, Carl L.; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by hepatic copper accumulation with progressive liver damage to cirrhosis. This study aimed to characterize the toxic milk mouse from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA) (tx-j) mouse model of WD according to changes over time in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, global DNA methylation, and gene expression from gestational day 17 (fetal) to adulthood (28 weeks). Methods Included liver histology and relevant biochemical analyses including hepatic copper quantification, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) liver levels, qPCR for transcript levels of genes relevant to methionine metabolism and liver damage, and DNA dot blot for global DNA methylation. Results Hepatic copper was lower in tx-j fetuses but higher in weanling (three weeks) and adult tx-j mice compared to controls. S-adenosylhomocysteinase transcript levels were significantly lower at all time points, except at three weeks, correlating negatively with copper levels and with consequent changes in the SAM:SAH methylation ratio and global DNA methylation. Conclusion Compared to controls, methionine metabolism including S-adenosylhomocysteinase gene expression is persistently different in the tx-j mice with consequent alterations in global DNA methylation in more advanced stages of liver disease. The inhibitory effect of copper accumulation on S-adenosylhomocysteinase expression is associated with progressively abnormal methionine metabolism and decreased methylation capacity and DNA global methylation. PMID:24810691

  1. Combinational deletion of three membrane protein-encoding genes highly attenuates yersinia pestis while retaining immunogenicity in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Erova, Tatiana E; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; van Lier, Christina J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  2. Combinational Deletion of Three Membrane Protein-Encoding Genes Highly Attenuates Yersinia pestis while Retaining Immunogenicity in a Mouse Model of Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Tiner, Bethany L.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Baze, Wallace B.; van Lier, Christina J.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Motin, Vladimir L.; Chauhan, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and MsbB attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 in mouse and rat models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. While Lpp activates Toll-like receptor 2, the MsbB acyltransferase modifies lipopolysaccharide. Here, we deleted the ail gene (encoding the attachment-invasion locus) from wild-type (WT) strain CO92 or its lpp single and Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutants. While the Δail single mutant was minimally attenuated compared to the WT bacterium in a mouse model of pneumonic plague, the Δlpp Δail double mutant and the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant were increasingly attenuated, with the latter being unable to kill mice at a 50% lethal dose (LD50) equivalent to 6,800 LD50s of WT CO92. The mutant-infected animals developed balanced TH1- and TH2-based immune responses based on antibody isotyping. The triple mutant was cleared from mouse organs rapidly, with concurrent decreases in the production of various cytokines and histopathological lesions. When surviving animals infected with increasing doses of the triple mutant were subsequently challenged on day 24 with the bioluminescent WT CO92 strain (20 to 28 LD50s), 40 to 70% of the mice survived, with efficient clearing of the invading pathogen, as visualized in real time by in vivo imaging. The rapid clearance of the triple mutant, compared to that of WT CO92, from animals was related to the decreased adherence and invasion of human-derived HeLa and A549 alveolar epithelial cells and to its inability to survive intracellularly in these cells as well as in MH-S murine alveolar and primary human macrophages. An early burst of cytokine production in macrophages elicited by the triple mutant compared to WT CO92 and the mutant's sensitivity to the bactericidal effect of human serum would further augment bacterial clearance. Together, deletion of the ail gene from the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant severely attenuated Y. pestis CO92 to evoke pneumonic plague in a

  3. Gene Gun Her2/neu DNA Vaccination: Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in a Syngeneic Her2/neu Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Genetic vaccination using naked plasmid DNA is an immunization strategy both against infectious diseases and cancer. In order to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines, particularly in large animals and humans, different strategies have been pursued. These vaccination strategies are based on different application routes, schedules, and coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules as adjuvants. Our mouse tumor model offers the possibility to investigate Her2/neu DNA vaccines in different settings, i.e., intramuscular or intradermal application with or without coexpression of adjuvants. Protection from tumor growth in tumor challenge experiments and both T cell and humoral immune responses against Her2/neu peptides are used as surrogate parameters for vaccine efficacy. PMID:26072399

  4. Targeted gene therapy and in vivo bioluminescent imaging for monitoring postsurgical recurrence and metastasis in mouse models of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Yao, C L; Li, L; Xin, Z; Jing, Z K; Li, L X

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of combined targeted gene therapy on recurrence and metastasis after liver cancer resection in nude mice. Twenty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control and treatment groups with 10 mice in each group and a male/female ratio of 1:1. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H was then used to prepare a carcinoma model. An optical in vivo imaging technique (OIIT) was used 10 days later to detect the distribution of tumor cells, followed by partial liver resection and gene therapy. In the treatment group, 100 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 x 1012 rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene viral vectors was injected into liver sections and peritumoral posterior peritoneal tissues; in the control group, the same amount of PBS containing 1 x 1012 empty viral vectors was injected at the same sites. OIIT was then used to detect the in vivo tumor metastasis 21 days later. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H successfully infected 20 nude mice, and OIIT showed that the two groups exhibited metastasis after local tumor resection, but there were more tumor cells in the control group (P < 0.05). rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene therapy can inhibit recurrence after liver cancer resection. PMID:27525931

  5. Targeted gene therapy and in vivo bioluminescent imaging for monitoring postsurgical recurrence and metastasis in mouse models of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Yao, C L; Li, L; Xin, Z; Jing, Z K; Li, L X

    2016-08-12

    We investigated the effects of combined targeted gene therapy on recurrence and metastasis after liver cancer resection in nude mice. Twenty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control and treatment groups with 10 mice in each group and a male/female ratio of 1:1. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H was then used to prepare a carcinoma model. An optical in vivo imaging technique (OIIT) was used 10 days later to detect the distribution of tumor cells, followed by partial liver resection and gene therapy. In the treatment group, 100 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 x 1012 rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene viral vectors was injected into liver sections and peritumoral posterior peritoneal tissues; in the control group, the same amount of PBS containing 1 x 1012 empty viral vectors was injected at the same sites. OIIT was then used to detect the in vivo tumor metastasis 21 days later. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H successfully infected 20 nude mice, and OIIT showed that the two groups exhibited metastasis after local tumor resection, but there were more tumor cells in the control group (P < 0.05). rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene therapy can inhibit recurrence after liver cancer resection.

  6. A unified gene catalog for the laboratory mouse reference genome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Richardson, J E; Hale, P; Baldarelli, R M; Reed, D J; Recla, J M; Sinclair, R; Reddy, T B K; Bult, C J

    2015-08-01

    We report here a semi-automated process by which mouse genome feature predictions and curated annotations (i.e., genes, pseudogenes, functional RNAs, etc.) from Ensembl, NCBI and Vertebrate Genome Annotation database (Vega) are reconciled with the genome features in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database (http://www.informatics.jax.org) into a comprehensive and non-redundant catalog. Our gene unification method employs an algorithm (fjoin--feature join) for efficient detection of genome coordinate overlaps among features represented in two annotation data sets. Following the analysis with fjoin, genome features are binned into six possible categories (1:1, 1:0, 0:1, 1:n, n:1, n:m) based on coordinate overlaps. These categories are subsequently prioritized for assessment of annotation equivalencies and differences. The version of the unified catalog reported here contains more than 59,000 entries, including 22,599 protein-coding coding genes, 12,455 pseudogenes, and 24,007 other feature types (e.g., microRNAs, lincRNAs, etc.). More than 23,000 of the entries in the MGI gene catalog have equivalent gene models in the annotation files obtained from NCBI, Vega, and Ensembl. 12,719 of the features are unique to NCBI relative to Ensembl/Vega; 11,957 are unique to Ensembl/Vega relative to NCBI, and 3095 are unique to MGI. More than 4000 genome features fall into categories that require manual inspection to resolve structural differences in the gene models from different annotation sources. Using the MGI unified gene catalog, researchers can easily generate a comprehensive report of mouse genome features from a single source and compare the details of gene and transcript structure using MGI's mouse genome browser.

  7. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  8. Stimulator of interferon genes (STING): A "new chapter" in virus-associated cancer research. Lessons from wild-derived mouse models of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Poltorak, Alexander; Kurmyshkina, Olga; Volkova, Tatyana

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the numerous studies that have been carried out recently in the field of cytosolic DNA sensing, STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes) is now recognized as a key mediator of innate immune signaling. A substantial body of evidence derived from in vivo mouse models demonstrates that STING-regulated pathways underlie the pathogenesis of many diseases including infectious diseases and cancers. It has also become evident from these studies that STING is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. However, mouse strains commonly used for modelling innate immune response against infections or tumors do not allow investigators to accurately reproduce certain specific characteristics of immune response observed in human cells. In this review, we will discuss recent data demonstrating that the use of wild-derived genetically distinct inbred mice as a model for investigation into the innate immunity signaling networks may provide valuable insight into the STING-regulated pathways specific for human cells. The maximum complexity of STING-mediated mechanisms can probably be seen in case of DNA virus-induced carcinogenesis in which STING may perform unexpected biological activities. Therefore, in another part of this review we will summarize emerging data on the role of STING in human DNA virus-related oncopathologies, with particular attention to HPV-associated cervical cancer, aiming to demonstrate that STING indeed "starts a new chapter" in research on this issue and that wild-derived mouse models of STING-mediated response to infections will probably be helpful in finding out molecular basis for clinical observations.

  9. Differential Expression of SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeler Subunits Brahma and Brahma-Related Gene During Drug-Induced Liver Injury and Regeneration in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sonal; Verma, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2016-08-01

    The chromatin remodeling activity of mammalian SWI/SNF complex is carried out by either Brahma (BRM) or Brahma-related gene (BRG-1). The BRG-1 regulates genes involved in cell proliferation, whereas BRM is associated with cell differentiation, and arrest of cell growth. Global modifications of histones and expression of genes of chromatin-remodeling subunits have not been studied in in vivo model systems. In the present study, we investigate epigenetic modifications of histones and the expression of genes in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury and regeneration in a mouse model. In the present study, we report that hepatocyte proliferation and H3S10 phosphorylation occur during 60 to 72 h post TAA treatment in mice. Furthermore, there was change in the H3K9 acetylation and H3K9 trimethylation pattern with respect to liver injury and regeneration phase. Looking into the expression pattern of Brg-1 and Brm, it is evident that they contribute substantially to the process of liver regeneration. The SWI/SNF remodeler might contain BRG-1 as its ATPase subunit during injury phase. Whereas, BRM-associated SWI/SNF remodeler might probably be predominant during decline of injury phase and initiation of regeneration phase. Furthermore, during the regeneration phase, BRG-1-containing remodeler again predominates. Considering all these observations, the present study depicts an interplay between chromatin interacting machineries in different phases of thioacetamide-induced liver injury and regeneration.

  10. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  11. Reference Genes for Real-Time PCR Quantification of Messenger RNAs and MicroRNAs in Mouse Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Boušová, Iva; Hanušová, Veronika; Szotáková, Barbora; Skálová, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing health problem worldwide. Among other ways, nutritional intervention using phytochemicals is important method for treatment and prevention of this disease. Recent studies have shown that certain phytochemicals could alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity. For study of the obesity and its treatment, monosodium glutamate (MSG)-injected mice with developed central obesity, insulin resistance and liver lipid accumulation are frequently used animal models. To understand the mechanism of phytochemicals action in obese animals, the study of selected genes expression together with miRNA quantification is extremely important. For this purpose, real-time quantitative PCR is a sensitive and reproducible method, but it depends on proper normalization entirely. The aim of present study was to identify the appropriate reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in MSG mice treated with green tea catechins, potential anti-obesity phytochemicals. Two sets of reference genes were tested: first set contained seven commonly used genes for normalization of messenger RNA, the second set of candidate reference genes included ten small RNAs for normalization of miRNA. The expression stability of these reference genes were tested upon treatment of mice with catechins using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. Selected normalizers for mRNA quantification were tested and validated on expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, biotransformation enzyme known to be modified by catechins. The effect of selected normalizers for miRNA quantification was tested on two obesity- and diabetes- related miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-29b, respectively. Finally, the combinations of B2M/18S/HPRT1 and miR-16/sno234 were validated as optimal reference genes for mRNA and miRNA quantification in liver and 18S/RPlP0/HPRT1 and sno234/miR-186 in small intestine of MSG mice

  12. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Phillipe D.; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. DPN is characterized by progressive, distal-to-proximal degeneration of peripheral nerves that leads to pain, weakness, and eventual loss of sensation. The mechanisms underlying DPN pathogenesis are uncertain, and other than tight glycemic control in type 1 patients, there is no effective treatment. Mouse models of type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are critical to improving our understanding of DPN pathophysiology and developing novel treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss the most widely used T1DM and T2DM mouse models for DPN research, with emphasis on the main neurologic phenotype of each model. We also discuss important considerations for selecting appropriate models for T1DM and T2DM DPN studies and describe the promise of novel emerging diabetic mouse models for DPN research. The development, characterization, and comprehensive neurologic phenotyping of clinically relevant mouse models for T1DM and T2DM will provide valuable resources for future studies examining DPN pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24615439

  13. Modeling metastasis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Paula D.; Nguyen, Don X.; Massagué, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex clinical and biological problem presently under intense study, and several model systems are in use to experimentally recapitulate and dissect the various steps of the metastatic process. Genetically engineered mouse models provide faithful renditions of events in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and local invasion that set the stage for metastasis, whereas engrafting of human or mouse tumor tissues into mouse hosts has been successfully exploited to investigate metastatic dissemination and colonization of distant organs. Real-time, high-resolution microscopy in live animals, and comprehensive genetic and molecular profiling are effective tools to interrogate diverse metastatic cancer cell phenotypes as well as the metastatic tumor microenvironment in different organs. By integrating the information obtained with these complementary approaches the field is currently obtaining an unprecedented level of understanding of the biology, molecular basis, and therapeutic vulnerabilities of metastasis. PMID:20598638

  14. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  15. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  16. Liver X Receptor Agonist Modifies the DNA Methylation Profile of Synapse and Neurogenesis-Related Genes in the Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, A G; Hernández, H G; Restrepo, A; Muñoz, J I; Bayon, G F; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Cardona-Gómez, G P; Arboleda, H; Arboleda, Gonzalo H

    2016-02-01

    The liver X receptor agonist, GW3965, improves cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. Here, we determined if short-term GW3965 treatment induces changes in the DNA methylation state of the hippocampus, which are associated with cognitive improvement. Twenty-four-month-old triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were treated with GW3965 (50 mg/kg/day for 6 days). DNA methylation state was examined by modified bisulfite conversion and hybridization on Illumina Infinium Methylation BeadChip 450 k arrays. The Morris water maze was used for behavioral analysis. Our results show in addition to improvement in cognition methylation changes in 39 of 13,715 interrogated probes in treated 3xTg-AD mice compared with untreated 3xTg-AD mice. These changes in methylation probes include 29 gene loci. Importantly, changes in methylation status were mainly from synapse-related genes (SYP, SYN1, and DLG3) and neurogenesis-associated genes (HMGB3 and RBBP7). Thus, our results indicate that liver X receptors (LXR) agonist treatment induces rapid changes in DNA methylation, particularly in loci associated with genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic function. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism to explain the beneficial effect of GW3965.

  17. Liver X Receptor Agonist Modifies the DNA Methylation Profile of Synapse and Neurogenesis-Related Genes in the Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Hernández, A G; Hernández, H G; Restrepo, A; Muñoz, J I; Bayon, G F; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Cardona-Gómez, G P; Arboleda, H; Arboleda, Gonzalo H

    2016-02-01

    The liver X receptor agonist, GW3965, improves cognition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. Here, we determined if short-term GW3965 treatment induces changes in the DNA methylation state of the hippocampus, which are associated with cognitive improvement. Twenty-four-month-old triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were treated with GW3965 (50 mg/kg/day for 6 days). DNA methylation state was examined by modified bisulfite conversion and hybridization on Illumina Infinium Methylation BeadChip 450 k arrays. The Morris water maze was used for behavioral analysis. Our results show in addition to improvement in cognition methylation changes in 39 of 13,715 interrogated probes in treated 3xTg-AD mice compared with untreated 3xTg-AD mice. These changes in methylation probes include 29 gene loci. Importantly, changes in methylation status were mainly from synapse-related genes (SYP, SYN1, and DLG3) and neurogenesis-associated genes (HMGB3 and RBBP7). Thus, our results indicate that liver X receptors (LXR) agonist treatment induces rapid changes in DNA methylation, particularly in loci associated with genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic function. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism to explain the beneficial effect of GW3965. PMID:26553261

  18. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  19. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 gene deficiency attenuates nociceptive behaviors in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Rahman, Md Habibur; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) 1-4, expressed in peripheral and central tissues, regulate the activity of the PDH complex (PDC). The PDC is an important mitochondrial gatekeeping enzyme that controls cellular metabolism. The role of PDKs in diverse neurological disorders, including neurometabolic aberrations and neurodegeneration, has been described. Implications for a role of PDKs in inflammation and neurometabolic coupling led us to investigate the effect of genetic ablation of PDK2/4 on nociception in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain. Deficiency in Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice led to attenuation of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors (flinching, licking, biting, or lifting of the injected paw). Likewise, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs substantially diminished the nociceptive responses in the second phase of the formalin test. Furthermore, formalin-provoked paw edema formation and mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities were significantly reduced in Pdk2/4-deficient mice. Formalin-driven neutrophil recruitment at the site of inflammation, spinal glial activation, and neuronal sensitization were substantially lessened in the second or late phase of the formalin test in Pdk2/4-deficient animals. Overall, our results suggest that PDK2/4 can be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931482

  1. Transgenic mouse model of cutaneous adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Yusuke; Saigo, Chiemi; Atsushi, Kurabayashi; Mutsuo, Furihata; Tamotsu, Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    TMEM207 was first characterized as being an important molecule for the invasion activity of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma cells. In order to unravel the pathological properties of TMEM207, we generated several transgenic mouse lines, designated C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207), in which murine TMEM207 was ectopically expressed under a truncated (by ~200 bp) proximal promoter of the murine intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene (also known as Tff3). Unexpectedly, a C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse line exhibited a high incidence of spontaneous intradermal tumors with histopathological features that resembled those of various human cutaneous adnexal tumors. These tumors were found in ~14% female and 13% of male 6- to 12-month-old mice. TMEM207 immunoreactivity was found in hair follicle bulge cells in non-tumorous skin, as well as in cutaneous adnexal tumors of the transgenic mouse. The ITF-TMEM207 construct in this line appeared to be inserted to a major satellite repeat sequence at chromosome 2, in which no definite coding molecule was found. In addition, we also observed cutaneous adnexal tumors in three other C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) transgenic mouse lines. We believe that the C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse might be a useful model to understand human cutaneous adnexal tumors. PMID:25305140

  2. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  3. Gene Therapy Fully Restores Vision to the All-Cone Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-1

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peterson, James J.; Choudhury, Shreyasi; Min, Seok Hong; Ruan, Qing; McCullough, K. Tyler; Zhang, Zhonghong; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ding, Xi-Qin; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Boye, Shannon E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are the cause of Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (retGC1), a protein expressed exclusively in outer segments of photoreceptors and essential for timely recovery from photoexcitation. Recent clinical data show that, despite a high degree of visual disturbance stemming from a loss of cone function, LCA1 patients retain normal photoreceptor architecture, except for foveal cone outer segment abnormalities and, in some patients, foveal cone loss. These results point to the cone-rich central retina as a target for GUCY2D replacement. LCA1 gene replacement studies thus far have been conducted in rod-dominant models (mouse) or with vectors and organisms lacking clinical translatability. Here we investigate gene replacement in the Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mouse, an all-cone model deficient in retGC1. We show that AAV-retGC1 treatment fully restores cone function, cone-mediated visual behavior, and guanylate cyclase activity, and preserves cones in treated Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice over the long-term. A novel finding was that retinal function could be restored to levels above that in Nrl−/− controls, contrasting results in other models of retGC1 deficiency. We attribute this to increased cyclase activity in treated Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice relative to Nrl−/− controls. Thus, Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice possess an expanded dynamic range in ERG response to gene replacement relative to other models. Lastly, we show that a candidate clinical vector, AAV5-GRK1-GUCY2D, when delivered to adult Nrl−/−Gucy2e−/− mice, restores retinal function that persists for at least 6 months. Our results provide strong support for clinical application of a gene therapy targeted to the cone-rich, central retina of LCA1 patients. PMID:26247368

  4. Life-Long Correction of Hyperbilirubinemia with a Neonatal Liver-Specific AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer in a Lethal Mouse Model of Crigler–Najjar Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Giulia; Zentillin, Lorena; Vaníkova, Jana; Bockor, Luka; Bellarosa, Cristina; Mancarella, Antonio; Vianello, Eleonora; Tiribelli, Claudio; Giacca, Mauro; Vitek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Null mutations in the UGT1A1 gene result in Crigler–Najjar syndrome type I (CNSI), characterized by severe hyperbilirubinemia and constant risk of developing neurological damage. Phototherapy treatment lowers plasma bilirubin levels, but its efficacy is limited and liver transplantation is required. To find alternative therapies, we applied AAV liver-specific gene therapy to a lethal mouse model of CNSI. We demonstrated that a single neonatal hUGT1A1 gene transfer was successful and the therapeutic effect lasted up to 17 months postinjection. The therapeutic effect was mediated by the presence of transcriptionally active double-stranded episomes. We also compared the efficacy of two different gene therapy approaches: liver versus skeletal muscle transgene expression. We observed that 5–8% of normal liver expression and activity levels were sufficient to significantly reduce bilirubin levels and maintain lifelong low plasma bilirubin concentration (3.1±1.5 mg/dl). In contrast, skeletal muscle was not able to efficiently lower bilirubin (6.4±2.0 mg/dl), despite 20–30% of hUgt1a1 expression levels, compared with normal liver. We propose that this remarkable difference in gene therapy efficacy could be related to the absence of the Mrp2 and Mrp3 transporters of conjugated bilirubin in muscle. Taken together, our data support the concept that liver is the best organ for efficient and long-term CNSI gene therapy, and suggest that the use of extra-hepatic tissues should be coupled to the presence of bilirubin transporters. PMID:25072305

  5. Liver-Specific Reactivation of the Inactivated Hnf-1α Gene: Elimination of Liver Dysfunction To Establish a Mouse MODY3 Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ying-Hue; Magnuson, Mark A.; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2003-01-01

    Mice deficient in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 α (HNF-1α) develop dwarfism, liver dysfunction, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Liver dysfunction in HNF-1α-null mice includes severe hepatic glycogen accumulation and dyslipidemia. The liver dysfunction may appear as soon as 2 weeks after birth. Since the HNF-1α-null mice become diabetic 2 weeks after birth, the early onset of the liver dysfunction is unlikely to be due to the diabetic status of the mice. More likely, it is due directly to the deficiency of HNF-1α in liver. Although the HNF-1α-null mice have an average life span of 1 year, the severe liver phenotype has thwarted attempts to study the pathogenesis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 (MODY3) and to examine therapeutic strategies for diabetes prevention and treatment in these mice. To circumvent this problem, we have generated a new Hnf-1α mutant mouse line, Hnf-1αkin/kin, using gene targeting to inactivate the Hnf-1α gene and at the same time, to incorporate the Cre-loxP DNA recombination system into the locus for later revival of the Hnf-1α gene in tissues by tissue-specifically expressed Cre recombinase. The Hnf-1αkin/kin mice in which the expression of HNF-1α was inactivated in germ line cells were indistinguishable from the HNF-1α-null mice with regard to both the diabetes and liver phenotypes. Intriguingly, when the inactivated Hnf-1α gene was revived in liver (hepatic Hnf-1α revived) by the Cre recombinase driven by an albumin promoter, the Hnf-1αkin/kin mice, although severely diabetic, grew normally and did not develop any of the liver dysfunctions. In addition, we showed that the expression of numerous genes in pancreas, including a marker gene for pancreas injury, was affected by liver dysfunction but not by the deficiency of HNF-1α in pancreas. Thus, our hepatic-Hnf-1α-revived mice may serve as a useful mouse model to study the human MODY3 disorder. PMID:12529398

  6. Noninvasive 3-dimensional imaging of liver regeneration in a mouse model of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 using the sodium iodide symporter gene.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Raymond D; Mao, Shennen A; Amiot, Bruce; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Miller, Amber; Nace, Rebecca; Glorioso, Jaime; O'Connor, Michael K; Peng, Kah Whye; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Nyberg, Scott L

    2015-04-01

    Cell transplantation is a potential treatment for the many liver disorders that are currently only curable by organ transplantation. However, one of the major limitations of hepatocyte (HC) transplantation is an inability to monitor cells longitudinally after injection. We hypothesized that the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene could be used to visualize transplanted HCs in a rodent model of inherited liver disease: hereditary tyrosinemia type 1. Wild-type C57Bl/6J mouse HCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector containing the mouse Slc5a5 (NIS) gene controlled by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter. NIS-transduced cells could robustly concentrate radiolabeled iodine in vitro, with lentiviral transduction efficiencies greater than 80% achieved in the presence of dexamethasone. Next, NIS-transduced HCs were transplanted into congenic fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase knockout mice, and this resulted in the prevention of liver failure. NIS-transduced HCs were readily imaged in vivo by single-photon emission computed tomography, and this demonstrated for the first time noninvasive 3-dimensional imaging of regenerating tissue in individual animals over time. We also tested the efficacy of primary HC spheroids engrafted in the liver. With the NIS reporter, robust spheroid engraftment and survival could be detected longitudinally after direct parenchymal injection, and this thereby demonstrated a novel strategy for HC transplantation. This work is the first to demonstrate the efficacy of NIS imaging in the field of HC transplantation. We anticipate that NIS labeling will allow noninvasive and longitudinal identification of HCs and stem cells in future studies related to liver regeneration in small and large preclinical animal models.

  7. The Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Gene Product, B18R, Neutralizes Interferon Alpha and Alleviates Histopathological Complications in an HIV Encephalitis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fritz-French, Cari; Shawahna, Ramzi; Ward, Jennifer E.; Maroun, Leonard E.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has been identified as a neurotoxin that plays a prominent role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders and HIV encephalitis (HIVE) pathology. IFN-α is associated with cognitive dysfunction in other inflammatory diseases where IFN-α is upregulated. Trials of monoclonal anti-IFN-α antibodies have been generally disappointing possibly due to high specificity to limited IFN-α subtypes and low affinity. We investigated a novel IFN-α inhibitor, B18R, in an HIVE/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model. Immunostaining for B18R in systemically treated HIVE/SCID mice suggested the ability of B18R to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Real-time PCR indicated that B18R treatment resulted in a decrease in gene expression associated with IFN-α signaling in the brain. Mice treated with B18R were found to have decreased mouse mononuclear phagocytes and significant retention of neuronal arborization compared to untreated HIVE/SCID mice. Increased mononuclear phagocytes and decreased neuronal arborization are key features of HIVE. These results suggest that B18R crosses the BBB, blocks IFN-α signaling, and it prevents key features of HIVE pathology. These data suggest that the high affinity and broad IFN-α subtype specificity of B18R make it a viable alternative to monoclonal antibodies for the inhibition of IFN-α in the immune-suppressed environment. PMID:24564363

  8. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression. PMID:27561302

  9. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression.

  10. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  11. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  12. A transgenic mouse model demonstrates a dominant negative effect of a point mutation in the RPS19 gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Emily E; Dacosta, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Elliott, Gene; Bodine, David M

    2010-10-14

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited erythroblastopenia associated with mutations in at least 8 different ribosomal protein genes. Mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) have been identified in approximately 25% of DBA families. Most of these mutations disrupt either the translation or stability of the RPS19 protein and are predicted to cause DBA by haploinsufficiency. However, approximately 30% of RPS19 mutations are missense mutations that do not alter the stability of the RPS19 protein and are hypothesized to act by a dominant negative mechanism. To formally test this hypothesis, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing an RPS19 mutation in which an arginine residue is replaced with a tryptophan residue at codon 62 (RPS19R62W). Constitutive expression of RPS19R62W in developing mice was lethal. Conditional expression of RPS19R62W resulted in growth retardation, a mild anemia with reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors, and significant inhibition of terminal erythroid maturation, similar to DBA. RNA profiling demonstrated more than 700 dysregulated genes belonging to the same pathways that are disrupted in RNA profiles of DBA patient cells. We conclude that RPS19R62W is a dominant negative DBA mutation.

  13. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1−/− mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0–P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner’s membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1−/− mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  14. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-06-17

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  15. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  16. Three mouse models of human thalassemia.

    PubMed Central

    Martinell, J; Whitney, J B; Popp, R A; Russell, L B; Anderson, W F

    1981-01-01

    Three types of mice with globin gene mutations, called 352HB, 27HB, and Hbath-J, appear to be true animal models of human thalassemia. Expression of the alpha-globin genes in three stocks of mice, each one heterozygous for one of the alpha-globin mutations, was examined at the polypeptide, RNA, and DNA levels. alpha-Globin polypeptide chains, relative to beta-globin chains in heterozygous thalassemic mice, are present at approximately 80% of normal. The ratios of alpha-globin to beta-globin RNA sequences are also 75-80% of normal, exactly reflecting the alpha-globin to beta-globin chain ratios. In the case of mutant 352HB, at least one alpha-globin gene is deleted. Thalassemic mouse erythroid cells appear to compensate partially for the loss of half of their alpha-globin genes. Images PMID:6946454

  17. Therapeutic benefit of lentiviral-mediated neonatal intracerebral gene therapy in a mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Annalisa; Salvagno, Camilla; Maderna, Claudio; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Morena, Francesco; Kulik, Willem; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio; Martino, Sabata; Gritti, Angela

    2014-06-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC) deficiency. Gene therapy (GT) should provide rapid, extensive and lifetime GALC supply in central nervous system (CNS) tissues to prevent or halt irreversible neurologic progression. Here we used a lentiviral vector (LV) to transfer a functional GALC gene in the brain of Twitcher mice, a severe GLD model. A single injection of LV.GALC in the external capsule of Twitcher neonates resulted in robust transduction of neural cells with minimal and transient activation of inflammatory and immune response. Importantly, we documented a proficient transduction of proliferating and post-mitotic oligodendroglia, a relevant target cell type in GLD. GALC activity (30-50% of physiological levels) was restored in the whole CNS of treated mice as early as 8 days post-injection. The early and stable enzymatic supply ensured partial clearance of storage and reduction of psychosine levels, translating in amelioration of histopathology and enhanced lifespan. At 6 months post-injection in non-affected mice, LV genome persisted exclusively in the injected region, where transduced cells overexpressed GALC. Integration site analysis in transduced brain tissues showed no aberrant clonal expansion and preferential targeting of neural-specific genes. This study establishes neonatal LV-mediated intracerebral GT as a rapid, effective and safe therapeutic intervention to correct CNS pathology in GLD and provides a strong rationale for its application in this and similar leukodystrophies, alone or in combination with therapies targeting the somatic pathology, with the final aim of providing an effective and timely treatment of these global disorders.

  18. Genomic organization of mouse gene zfp162.

    PubMed

    Wrehlke, C; Wiedemeyer, W R; Schmitt-Wrede, H P; Mincheva, A; Lichter, P; Wunderlich, F

    1999-05-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of the alternatively spliced mouse gene zfp162, formerly termed mzfm, the homolog of the human ZFM1 gene encoding the splicing factor SF1 and a putative signal transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) protein. The zfp162 gene is about 14 kb long and consists of 14 exons and 13 introns. Comparison of zfp162 with the genomic sequences of ZFM1/SF1 revealed that the exon-intron structure and exon sequences are well conserved between the genes, whereas the introns differ in length and sequence composition. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, the zfp162 gene was assigned to chromosome 19, region B. Screening of a genomic library integrated in lambda DASH II resulted in the identification of the 5'-flanking region of zfp162. Sequence analysis of this region showed that zfp162 is a TATA-less gene containing an initiator control element and two CCAAT boxes. The promoter exhibits the following motifs: AP-2, CRE, Ets, GRE, HNF5, MRE, SP-1, TRE, TCF1, and PU.1. The core promoter, from position -331 to -157, contains the motifs CRE, SP-1, MRE, and AP-2, as determined in transfected CHO-K1 cells and IC-21 cells by reporter gene assay using a secreted form of human placental alkaline phosphatase. The occurrence of PU.1/GRE supports the view that the zfp162 gene encodes a protein involved not only in nuclear RNA metabolism, as the human ZFM1/SF1, but also in as yet unknown macrophage-inherent functions. PMID:10360842

  19. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  20. Gene Therapy Rescues Cone Structure and Function in the 3-Month-Old rd12 Mouse: A Model for Midcourse RPE65 Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Wensheng; Dai, Xufeng; Kong, Fansheng; Zheng, Qinxiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Lü, Fan; Chang, Bo; Rohrer, Bärbel; Hauswirth, William. W.; Qu, Jia; Pang, Ji-jing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. RPE65 function is necessary in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to generate chromophore for all opsins. Its absence results in vision loss and rapid cone degeneration. Recent Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA with RPE65 mutations) phase I clinical trials demonstrated restoration of vision on RPE65 gene transfer into RPE cells overlying cones. In the rd12 mouse, a naturally occurring model of RPE65-LCA early cone degeneration was observed; however, some peripheral M-cones remained. A prior study showed that AAV-mediated RPE65 expression can prevent early cone degeneration. The present study was conducted to test whether the remaining cones in older rd12 mice can be rescued. Methods. Subretinal treatment with the scAAV5-smCBA-hRPE65 vector was initiated at postnatal day (P)14 and P90. After 2 months, electroretinograms were recorded, and cone morphology was analyzed by using cone-specific peanut agglutinin and cone opsin–specific antibodies. Results. Cone degeneration started centrally and spread ventrally, with cells losing cone-opsin staining before that for the PNA-lectin–positive cone sheath. Gene therapy starting at P14 resulted in almost wild-type M- and S-cone function and morphology. Delaying gene-replacement rescued the remaining M-cones, and most important, more M-cone opsin–positive cells were identified than were present at the onset of gene therapy, suggesting that opsin expression could be reinitiated in cells with cone sheaths. Conclusions. The results support and extend those of the previous study that gene therapy can stop early cone degeneration, and, more important, they provide proof that delayed treatment can restore the function and morphology of the remaining cones. These results have important implications for the ongoing LCA2 clinical trials. PMID:21169527

  1. The mouse Engrailed genes: a window into Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kuemerle, Barbara; Gulden, Forrest; Cherosky, Natalie; Williams, Elizabeth; Herrup, Karl

    2009-01-01

    The complex behavioral symptoms and neuroanatomical abnormalities observed in autistic individuals strongly suggest a multi-factorial basis for this perplexing disease. Although not the perfect model, we believe the Engrailed genes provide an invaluable “window” into the elusive etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder. The Engrailed-2 gene has been associated with autism in genetic linkage studies. The En2 knock-out mouse harbors cerebellar abnormalities that are similar to those found in autistic individuals and, as we report here, has a distinct anterior shift in the position of the amygdala in the cerebral cortex. Our initial analysis of background effects in the En1 mouse knock-out provides insight as to possible molecular mechanisms and gender differences associated with autism. These findings further the connection between Engrailed and autism and provide new avenues to explore in the ongoing study of the biological basis of this multifaceted disease. PMID:17055592

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin reduces tau pathology and preserves neuroplastic gene expression in the 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Counts, Scott E; Perez, Sylvia E; He, Bin; Mufson, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent negative results of the Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership (GAP) trial, the good tolerability to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and its potential benefit for patient subpopulations have highlighted the importance of understanding IVIG's mechanism of action. IVIG contains antibodies to amyloid suggesting an amyloid clearance mechanism. However, the suboptimal results of the amyloid immunotherapy trials suggest an additional mechanism. Therefore, we tested whether IVIG alters the expression of tau neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-like deposits within hippocampal CA1 neurons of the 3xTg mouse model of AD. Three-month-old mice were treated intravenously with IVIG (10%, 400 mg/kg) or placebo (10% BSA/saline) every two weeks for either three or six months. At sacrifice, plasma was isolated for gene expression profiling and brains were processed for immunohistochemistry using the AT-180 antibody, which recognizes hyperphosphorylated tau in NFTs. Stereologic analysis of CA1 neurons following three months of treatment revealed no difference in AT-180+ neuron number but a significant 15-20% decrease in AT-180 intraneuronal optical density with IVIG compared to placebo. By contrast, the number of AT-180+ CA1 neurons was reduced by 25-30% following six months of IVIG treatment compared to placebo. Expression profiling studies showed that IVIG treatment resulted in a significant 40-50% increase in plasma levels of genes regulating neuronal cytoskeletal plasticity function and calcium-mediated signaling compared to placebo. Moreover, several transcripts encoding protein phosphatase subunits were 40-50% higher in IVIG-treated mice. Hence, IVIG reduces hippocampal NFT pathology in the 3xTg mouse through a mechanism that may involve preservation of neuronal plasticity and tau phosphorylation homeostasis. PMID:25156574

  3. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D.; Pedersen, R.; Mold, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  4. The senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8): a model of age-related cognitive decline with relevance to alterations of the gene expression and protein abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Poon, H Fai

    2005-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is an accelerated aging model that was established through phenotypic selection from a common genetic pool of AKR/J strain of mice. The SAM model was established in 1981, including nine major senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) substrains and three major senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. Recently, SAMP8 have drawn attention in gerontological research due to its characteristic learning and memory deficits at old age. Many recent reports provide insight into mechanisms of the cognitive impairment and pathological changes in SAMP8. Therefore, this mini review examines the recent findings of SAMP8 mice abnormalities at the gene and protein levels. The genes and proteins described in this review are functionally categorized into neuroprotection, signal transduction, protein folding/degradation, cytoskeleton/transport, immune response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All of these processes are involved in learning and memory. Although these studies provide insight into the mechanisms that contribute to the learning and memory decline in aged SAMP8 mice, higher throughput techniques of proteomics and genomics are necessary to study the alterations of gene expression and protein abnormalities in SAMP8 mice brain in order to more completely understand the central nervous system dysfunction in this mouse model. The SAMP8 is a good animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of age-related learning and memory deficits at the gene and protein levels. PMID:16026957

  5. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; van der Spek, Sophie J. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly implicated in disorders like Alzheimer disease, hydrocephalus or glaucoma. To study human genetic diseases and potential new therapies, mouse models are widely used. This requires a detailed knowledge of similarities and differences in gene expression and functional annotation between the species. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare gene expression and functional annotation of healthy human and mouse CPE. Methods We performed 44k Agilent microarray hybridizations with RNA derived from laser dissected healthy human and mouse CPE cells. We functionally annotated and compared the gene expression data of human and mouse CPE using the knowledge database Ingenuity. We searched for common and species specific gene expression patterns and function between human and mouse CPE. We also made a comparison with previously published CPE human and mouse gene expression data. Results Overall, the human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar. Their major functionalities included epithelial junctions, transport, energy production, neuro-endocrine signaling, as well as immunological, neurological and hematological functions and disorders. The mouse CPE presented two additional functions not found in the human CPE: carbohydrate metabolism and a more extensive list of (neural) developmental functions. We found three genes specifically expressed in the mouse CPE compared to human CPE, being ACE, PON1 and TRIM3 and no human specifically expressed CPE genes compared to mouse CPE. Conclusion Human and mouse CPE transcriptomes are very similar, and display many common functionalities. Nonetheless, we also identified a few genes and pathways which suggest that the CPE between mouse and

  6. Adeno-associated virus serotype 8 gene therapy leads to significant lowering of plasma cholesterol levels in humanized mouse models of homozygous and heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Sadik H; Li, Hui; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Lagor, William; Jacobs, Frank; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a life-threatening genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). As a bridge to clinical trials, we generated a "humanized" mouse model lacking LDLR and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-1 (APOBEC-1) expression and expressing a human ApoB100 transgene in order to permit more authentic simulation of in vivo interactions between the clinical transgene product, human LDLR (hLDLR), and its endogenous ligand, human ApoB100. On a chow diet, the humanized LDLR-deficient mice have substantial hypercholesterolemia and a lipoprotein phenotype more closely resembling human homozygous FH (hoFH) than in previous mouse models of FH. On injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector encoding the human LDLR cDNA, significant correction of hypercholesterolemia was realized at doses as low as 1.5 × 10(11) genome copies (GC)/kg. Given that some patients with heterozygous FH (heFH) cannot be adequately treated with current therapy, we then extended our studies to similarly "humanized" mice that were heterozygous for LDLR deficiency, and that have a lipoprotein phenotype resembling heterozygous FH. Injection of AAV8-hLDLR brought about significant reduction in total and LDL cholesterol at doses as low as 5 × 10(11) GC/kg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the liver-specific AAV8-hLDLR vector in the treatment of humanized mice modeling both hoFH and heFH. PMID:22985273

  7. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Gene Therapy Leads to Significant Lowering of Plasma Cholesterol Levels in Humanized Mouse Models of Homozygous and Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H.; Li, Hui; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Lagor, William; Jacobs, Frank; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a life-threatening genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). As a bridge to clinical trials, we generated a “humanized” mouse model lacking LDLR and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-1 (APOBEC-1) expression and expressing a human ApoB100 transgene in order to permit more authentic simulation of in vivo interactions between the clinical transgene product, human LDLR (hLDLR), and its endogenous ligand, human ApoB100. On a chow diet, the humanized LDLR-deficient mice have substantial hypercholesterolemia and a lipoprotein phenotype more closely resembling human homozygous FH (hoFH) than in previous mouse models of FH. On injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector encoding the human LDLR cDNA, significant correction of hypercholesterolemia was realized at doses as low as 1.5×1011 genome copies (GC)/kg. Given that some patients with heterozygous FH (heFH) cannot be adequately treated with current therapy, we then extended our studies to similarly “humanized” mice that were heterozygous for LDLR deficiency, and that have a lipoprotein phenotype resembling heterozygous FH. Injection of AAV8-hLDLR brought about significant reduction in total and LDL cholesterol at doses as low as 5×1011 GC/kg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the liver-specific AAV8-hLDLR vector in the treatment of humanized mice modeling both hoFH and heFH. PMID:22985273

  8. Obesity resistant mechanisms in the Lean polygenic mouse model as indicated by liver transcriptome and expression of selected genes in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Divergently selected Lean and Fat mouse lines represent unique models for a polygenic form of resistance and susceptibility to obesity development. Previous research on these lines focused mainly on obesity-susceptible factors in the Fat line. This study aimed to examine the molecular basis of obesity-resistant mechanisms in the Lean line by analyzing various fat depots and organs, the liver transcriptome of selected metabolic pathways, plasma and lipid homeostasis and expression of selected skeletal muscle genes. Results Expression profiling using our custom Steroltalk v2 microarray demonstrated that Lean mice exhibit a higher hepatic expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes compared to the Fat line, although this was not reflected in elevation of total plasma or liver cholesterol. However, FPLC analysis showed that protective HDL cholesterol was elevated in Lean mice. A significant difference between the strains was also found in bile acid metabolism. Lean mice had a higher expression of Cyp8b1, a regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, and the Abcb11 bile acid transporter gene responsible for export of acids to the bile. Additionally, a higher content of blood circulating bile acids was observed in Lean mice. Elevated HDL and upregulation of some bile acids synthesis and transport genes suggests enhanced reverse cholesterol transport in the Lean line - the flux of cholesterol out of the body is higher which is compensated by upregulation of endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis. Increased skeletal muscle Il6 and Dio2 mRNA levels as well as increased activity of muscle succinic acid dehydrogenase (SDH) in the Lean mice demonstrates for the first time that changes in muscle energy metabolism play important role in the Lean line phenotype determination and corroborate our previous findings of increased physical activity and thermogenesis in this line. Finally, differential expression of Abcb11 and Dio2 identifies novel strong positional candidate

  9. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels; Cecchi, Claudia R.; Dalsgaard, Trine; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function. PMID:26046536

  10. Maternal choline modifies fetal liver copper, gene expression, DNA methylation, and neonatal growth in the tx-j mouse model of Wilson disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Islam, Mohammad S; Keen, Carl L; Kim, Kyoungmi; Tillman, Brittany; French, Samuel W; Halsted, Charles H; LaSalle, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diet can affect fetal gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Wilson disease (WD), which is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in ATP7B encoding a biliary copper transporter, is characterized by excessive hepatic copper accumulation, but variability in disease severity. We tested the hypothesis that gestational supply of dietary methyl groups modifies fetal DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in methionine and lipid metabolism that are impaired prior to hepatic steatosis in the toxic milk (tx-j) mouse model of WD. Female C3H control and tx-j mice were fed control (choline 8 mmol/Kg of diet) or choline-supplemented (choline 36 mmol/Kg of diet) diets for 2 weeks throughout mating and pregnancy to gestation day 17. A second group of C3H females, half of which were used to cross foster tx-j pups, received the same diet treatments that extended during lactation to 21 d postpartum. Compared with C3H, fetal tx-j livers had significantly lower copper concentrations and significantly lower transcript levels of Cyclin D1 and genes related to methionine and lipid metabolism. Maternal choline supplementation prevented the transcriptional deficits in fetal tx-j liver for multiple genes related to cell growth and metabolism. Global DNA methylation was increased by 17% in tx-j fetal livers after maternal choline treatment (P < 0.05). Maternal dietary choline rescued the lower body weight of 21 d tx-j mice. Our results suggest that WD pathogenesis is modified by maternal in utero factors, including dietary choline. PMID:24220304

  11. Deletion of the Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Improves Cognitive Deficits and Synaptic Pathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dziewczapolski, Gustavo; Glogowski, Carolina M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Heinemann, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenic peptide amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42) binds to the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) with high affinity and the α7nAChR and Aβ1-42 are both found co-localized in neuritic plaques of human brains with AD. Moreover, the intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ1-42 was shown to be facilitated by its high-affinity binding to the α7nAChR and α7nAChR activation mediates Aβ-induced tau protein phosphorylation. To test the hypothesis that α7nAChRs are involved in AD pathogenesis, we used a transgenic mouse model of AD over-expressing a mutated form of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and lacking the α7nAChR gene (APPα7KO). We have shown that, despite the presence of high amounts of APP and amyloid deposits, deleting the α7nAChR subunit in the mouse model of AD leads to a protection from the dysfunction in synaptic integrity (pathology and plasticity) and learning and memory behavior. Specifically, APPα7KO mice express APP and Aβ at similar levels to APP mice and yet they were able to solve a cognitive challenge such as the Morris water maze test significantly better than APP, with performances comparable to control groups. Moreover, deleting the α7nAChR subunit protected the brain from loss of the synaptic markers, synaptophysin and MAP2, reduced the gliosis, and preserved the capacity to elicit LTP otherwise deficient in APP mice. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the α7nAChR plays a role in AD and suggests that interrupting α7nAChR function could be beneficial in the treatment of AD. PMID:19587288

  12. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  13. Overexpression of mouse TTF-2 gene causes cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Tian; Shi, Jia-Yu; Wu, Min; Wang, Yan; Li, Ling; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Qian; Huang, Lei; Shi, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In humans, mutations of the gene encoding for thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2 or FOXE1) result in Bamforth syndrome. Bamforth syndrome is characterized by agenesis, cleft palate, spiky hair and choanal atresia. TTF-2 null mice (TTF-2−/−) also exhibit cleft palate, suggesting its involvement in the palatogenesis. However, the molecular pathology and genetic regulation by TTF2 remain largely unknown. In the present study, the recombinant expression vector pBROAD3-TTF-2 containing the promoter of the mouse ROSA26 gene was created to form the structural gene of mouse TTF-2 and was microinjected into the male pronuclei of fertilized ova. Sequence analysis confirmed that the TTF-2 transgenic mouse model was established successfully. The transgenic mice displayed a phenotype of cleft palate. In addition, we found that TTF-2 was highly expressed in the medial edge epithelium (MEE) from the embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) to E14.5 in TTF-2 transgenic mice. These observations suggest that overexpression of TTF-2 during palatogenesis may contribute to formation of cleft palate. PMID:22304410

  14. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  15. Insights from mouse models into human retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, David

    2008-01-01

    Novel murine models of retinoblastoma based on Rb gene deletion in concert with inactivation of Rb family members have recently been developed. These new Rb knockout models of retinoblastoma provide excellent tools for pre-clinical studies and for the exploration of the genetics of tumorigenesis driven by RB inactivation. This review focuses on the developmental consequences of Rb deletion in the retina and the genetic interactions between Rb and the two other members of the pocket protein family, p107 (Rbl1) and p130 (Rbl2). There is increasing appreciation that homozygous RB mutations are insufficient for human retinoblastoma. Identifying and understanding secondary gene alterations that cooperate with RB inactivation in tumorigenesis may be facilitated by mouse models. Recent investigation of the p53 pathway in retinoblastoma, and evidence of spatial topology to early murine retinoblastoma are also discussed in this review. PMID:18489754

  16. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Patient iPSC-Derived NSCs Reverses Pathology in the Brain of a Homologous Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Tagan A.; Anderson, Hayley C.; Wolfe, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation is a promising strategy for delivering therapeutic proteins in the brain. We evaluated a complete process of ex vivo gene therapy using human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived NSC transplants in a well-characterized mouse model of a human lysosomal storage disease, Sly disease. Human Sly disease fibroblasts were reprogrammed into iPSCs, differentiated into a stable and expandable population of NSCs, genetically corrected with a transposon vector, and assessed for engraftment in NOD/SCID mice. Following neonatal intraventricular transplantation, the NSCs engraft along the rostrocaudal axis of the CNS primarily within white matter tracts and survive for at least 4 months. Genetically corrected iPSC-NSCs transplanted post-symptomatically into the striatum of adult Sly disease mice reversed neuropathology in a zone surrounding the grafts, while control mock-corrected grafts did not. The results demonstrate the potential for ex vivo gene therapy in the brain using human NSCs from autologous, non-neural tissues. PMID:25866157

  17. Neural Stem Cell Gene Therapy Ameliorates Pathology and Function in a Mouse Model of Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Margherita; Ricca, Alessandra; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Alcala'-Franco, Beatriz; Cavazzin, Chiara; Orlacchio, Aldo; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Murine neural stem cells (mNSCs), either naive or genetically modified to express supranormal levels of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), were transplanted into the brain of Twitcher mice, a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy, a severe sphingolipidosis. Cells engrafted long-term into the host cytoarchitecture, producing functional GALC. Levels of enzyme activity in brain and spinal cord tissues were enhanced when GALC-overexpressing NSC were used. Enzymatic correction correlated with reduced tissue storage, decreased activation of astroglia and microglia, delayed onset of symptoms, and longer lifespan. Mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of mNSC included widespread enzyme distribution, cross-correction of host cells, anti-inflammatory activity, and neuroprotection. Similar cell engraftment and metabolic correction were reproduced using human NSC. Thus, NSC gene therapy rapidly reconstitutes sustained and long-lasting enzyme activity in central nervous system tissues. Combining this approach with treatments targeting the systemic disease associated with leukodystrophies may provide significant therapeutic benefit. Stem Cells 2011;29:1559–1571 PMID:21809420

  18. Characterization of BPSS1521 (bprD), a Regulator of Burkholderia pseudomallei Virulence Gene Expression in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Karoonutaisiri, Nitsara; Talaat, Adel M.; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Ernst, Robert K.; Sermswan, Rasana W.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infectious disease of both humans and animals. Severity of the disease is thought to be dependent on both the health status of the host, including diabetes mellitus and kidney disease, and bacterial-derived factors. To identify the bacterial factors important during an acute infection, gene expression profiles in the spleen, lung, and liver of BALB/c (Th2 prototype) and C57BL/6 mice (Th1 prototype) were determined using DNA microarrays. This analysis identified BPSS1521 (bprD), a predicted transcriptional regulator located in the type III secretion system (T3SS-3) operon, to be up regulated, specifically in C57BL/6 mice. BALB/c mice infected with a bprD mutant showed a shorter time to death and increased inflammation, as determined by histopathological analysis and enumeration of bacteria in the spleen. Elevated numbers of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs), which is the hallmark of melioidosis, were detected in both the wild-type and the bprD mutants; a similar elevation occurs in melioidosis patients. One striking observation was the increased expression of BPSS1520 (bprC), located downstream of bprD, in the bprD mutant. BprC is a regulator of T6SS-1 that is required for the virulence of B. pseudomallei in murine infection models. Deletion of bprD led to the overexpression of bprC and a decreased time to death. bprD expression was elevated in C57BL/6 —as compared to BALB/c—mice, suggesting a role for BprD in the natural resistance of C57BL/6 mice to B. pseudomallei. Ultimately, this analysis using mice with different immune backgrounds may enhance our understanding of the outcomes of infection in a variety of models. PMID:25111708

  19. A new mouse model of Peyronie's disease: an increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 target genes during the development of penile changes.

    PubMed

    Lucattelli, Monica; Lunghi, Benedetta; Fineschi, Silvia; Mirone, Vincenzo; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Longo, Nicola; Imbimbo, Ciro; De Palma, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is characterized by an inflammatory response beneath the tunica albuginea with fibroblast proliferation forming a thickened fibrous plaque that may cause pain, penile curvature and erectile dysfunction. The progression of the PD plaque may eventually lead to calcification or ossification. Current therapeutic success is often unsatisfactory because of limited insight into disease mechanisms. Research has been hampered by the lack of a universally accepted animal model. We describe an animal model of spontaneous PD in tight skin (Tsk) mice, a C57Bl/6J subline that reproduces with age important features of the human disease (fibrous plaque formation, penile bending and areas of chondroid metaplasia with heterotopic ossification). Histological analysis demonstrated an evident structural disorganization of the tunica albuginea with excessive accumulation of type I collagen. At 12 months of age, fibrous plaques with areas of chondroid metaplasia and heterotopic ossification characterized Tsk penises. The up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) leads to an increased downstream expression of HIF-1 target genes, such as TGFbeta and iNOS. These factors, together with some PDGF family members, can cause collagen deposition in Tsk penises. They can also influence chondrocyte differentiation and heterotopic bone formation. In conclusion, hypoxia, HIF-1 and HIF-1 target genes appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD in Tsk mice. This mouse model that is the first example of naturally occurring model of PD in laboratory animals may aid in the identification of signalling pathways crucial for PD and should facilitate the designing and testing of new therapeutic interventions.

  20. Digenic Inheritance in Cystinuria Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Meritxell; Font-Llitjós, Mariona; Vilches, Clara; Salido, Eduardo; Prat, Esther; López de Heredia, Miguel; Palacín, Manuel; Nunes, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Cystinuria is an aminoaciduria caused by mutations in the genes that encode the two subunits of the amino acid transport system b0,+, responsible for the renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids. The clinical symptoms of cystinuria relate to nephrolithiasis, due to the precipitation of cystine in urine. Mutations in SLC3A1, which codes for the heavy subunit rBAT, cause cystinuria type A, whereas mutations in SLC7A9, which encodes the light subunit b0,+AT, cause cystinuria type B. By crossing Slc3a1-/- with Slc7a9-/- mice we generated a type AB cystinuria mouse model to test digenic inheritance of cystinuria. The 9 genotypes obtained have been analyzed at early (2- and 5-months) and late stage (8-months) of the disease. Monitoring the lithiasic phenotype by X-ray, urine amino acid content analysis and protein expression studies have shown that double heterozygous mice (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/-) present lower expression of system b0,+ and higher hyperexcretion of cystine than single heterozygotes (Slc7a9+/-Slc3a1+/+ and Slc7a9+/+Slc3a1+/-) and give rise to lithiasis in 4% of the mice, demonstrating that cystinuria has a digenic inheritance in this mouse model. Moreover in this study it has been demonstrated a genotype/phenotype correlation in type AB cystinuria mouse model providing new insights for further molecular and genetic studies of cystinuria patients. PMID:26359869

  1. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11-15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in the brain, heart, liver and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II+III were upregulated in the imprinting center deletion (PWS-IC) mice compared to the wild type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  2. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  3. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes.

    PubMed

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D' Amato, Francesca R; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice's respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders. PMID:27121911

  4. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D’ Amato, Francesca R.; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice’s respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders. PMID:27121911

  5. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues.

  6. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. PMID:27059198

  7. Characterization of an immunodeficient mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I suitable for preclinical testing of human stem cell and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rivera, Mayra F.; Colvin-Wanshura, Leah E.; Nelson, Matthew S.; Nan, Zhenhong; Khan, Shaukat A.; Rogers, Tyson B.; Maitra, Indrani; Low, Walter C.; Gupta, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I or Hurler syndrome) is an inherited deficiency of the lysosomal glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-degrading enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) in which GAG accumulation causes progressive multi-system dysfunction and death. Early allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) ameliorates clinical features and extends life but is not available to all patients, and inadequately corrects its most devastating features including mental retardation and skeletal deformities. To test novel therapies, we characterized an immunodeficient MPS-I mouse model less likely to develop immune reactions to transplanted human or gene-corrected cells or secreted IDUA. In the liver, spleen, heart, lung, kidney and brain of NOD/SCID/MPS-I mice IDUA was undetectable, and reduced to half in heterozygotes. MPS-I mice developed marked GAG accumulation (3-38 fold) in these organs. Neuropathological examination showed GM3 ganglioside accumulation in the striatum, cerebral peduncles, cerebellum and ventral brainstem of MPS-I mice. Urinary GAG excretion (6.5-fold higher in MPS-I mice) provided a non-invasive and reliable method suitable for serially following the biochemical efficacy of therapeutic interventions. We identified and validated using rigorous biostatistical methods, a highly reproducible method for evaluating sensorimotor function and motor skills development. This Rotarod test revealed marked abnormalities in sensorimotor integration involving the cerebellum, striatum, proprioceptive pathways, motor cortex, and in acquisition of motor coordination. NOD/SCID/MPS-I mice exhibit many of the clinical, skeletal, pathological and behavioral abnormalities of human MPS-I, and provide an extremely suitable animal model for assessing the systemic and neurological effects of human stem cell transplantation and gene therapeutic approaches, using the above techniques to measure efficacy. PMID:17920451

  8. Structure and genetic polymorphism of the mouse KCC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shmukler, B E; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L

    2000-07-24

    The KCC1 K-Cl cotransporter is a major regulator of erythroid and non-erythroid cell volume, and the KCC1 gene is a candidate modifier gene for sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies. We have cloned and sequenced the mouse KCC1 (mKCC1) gene, defined its intron-exon junctions, and analyzed (AC)/(TG) intragenic polymorphisms. A highly polymorphic (AC) repeat of mKCC1 intron 1 was characterized in musculus strains, and used to prove lack of linkage between the mKCC1 gene and the rol (resistant to osmotic lysis) locus. The intron 1 (AC) repeat in CAST/Ei and SPRET/Ei was not only more divergent in length but also underwent additional sequence variation. A dimorphic (TG) repeat in intron 2 distinguished CAST/Ei from other strains, and an intron 17 B1 Alu-like SINE present in all musculus strains was found to be absent from intron 17 in SPRET/Ei. These and additional described strain-specific polymorphisms will be useful mapping and genetic tools in the study of mouse models of sickle cell disease.

  9. Prenyl Ammonium Salts – New Carriers for Gene Delivery: A B16-F10 Mouse Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grecka, Emilia; Statkiewicz, Malgorzata; Gorska, Agnieszka; Biernacka, Marzena; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Masnyk, Marek; Chmielewski, Marek; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Malecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prenyl ammonium iodides (Amino-Prenols, APs), semi-synthetic polyprenol derivatives were studied as prospective novel gene transfer agents. Methods AP-7, -8, -11 and -15 (aminoprenols composed of 7, 8, 11 or 15 isoprene units, respectively) were examined for their capacity to form complexes with pDNA, for cytotoxicity and ability to transfect genes to cells. Results All the carriers were able to complex DNA. The highest, comparable to commercial reagents, transfection efficiency was observed for AP-15. Simultaneously, AP-15 exhibited the lowest negative impact on cell viability and proliferation—considerably lower than that of commercial agents. AP-15/DOPE complexes were also efficient to introduce pDNA to cells, without much effect on cell viability. Transfection with AP-15/DOPE complexes influenced the expression of a very few among 44 tested genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism. Furthermore, complexes containing AP-15 and therapeutic plasmid, encoding the TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 (TIMP2), introduced the TIMP2 gene with high efficiency to B16-F10 melanoma cells but not to B16-F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice, as confirmed by TIMP2 protein level determination. Conclusion Obtained results indicate that APs have a potential as non-viral vectors for cell transfection. PMID:27088717

  10. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Seldin, M.F.

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Mouse models of mantle cell lymphoma, complex changes in gene expression and phenotype of engrafted MCL cells: implications for preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Klanova, Magdalena; Soukup, Tomas; Jaksa, Radek; Molinsky, Jan; Lateckova, Lucie; Maswabi, Bokang C L; Prukova, Dana; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra; Vockova, Petra; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Kulvait, Vojtech; Zivny, Jan; Vokurka, Martin; Necas, Emanuel; Trneny, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with poor prognosis. Animal models of MCL are scarce. We established and characterized various in vivo models of metastatic human MCL by tail vein injection of either primary cells isolated from patients with MCL or established MCL cell lines (Jeko-1, Mino, Rec-1, Hbl-2, and Granta-519) into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. MCL infiltration was assessed with immunohistochemistry (tissues) and flow cytometry (peripheral blood). Engraftment of primary MCL cells was observed in 7 out of 12 patient samples. The pattern of engraftment of primary MCL cells varied from isolated involvement of the spleen to multiorgan infiltration. On the other hand, tumor engraftment was achieved in all five MCL cell lines used and lymphoma involvement of murine bone marrow, spleen, liver, and brain was observed. Overall survival of xenografted mice ranged from 22 ± 1 to 54 ± 3 days depending on the cell line used. Subsequently, we compared the gene expression profile (GEP) and phenotype of the engrafted MCL cells compared with the original in vitro growing cell lines (controls). We demonstrated that engrafted MCL cells displayed complex changes of GEP, protein expression, and sensitivity to cytotoxic agents when compared with controls. We further demonstrated that our MCL mouse models could be used to test the therapeutic activity of systemic chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, or angiogenesis inhibitors. The characterization of MCL murine models is likely to aid in improving our knowledge in the disease biology and to assist scientists in the preclinical and clinical development of novel agents in relapsed/refractory MCL patients.

  12. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Matthew A; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J; Reilly, John F; Young, Warren G; Bloom, Floyd E; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-07-19

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional "imprint" consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org).

  13. Ultrasound-based molecular imaging and specific gene delivery to mesenteric vasculature by endothelial adhesion molecule targeted microbubbles in a mouse model of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tlaxca, José L.; Rychak, Joshua J.; Ernst, Peter B.; Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Shevchenko, Talent I.; Pizzaro, Theresa T.; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) for which treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have significant side-effects. Consequently, there is a clinical need for site-specific and non-toxic delivery of therapeutic genes or drugs for CD and related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to validate a gene delivery platform based on ultrasound-activated lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) targeted to inflamed mesenteric endothelium in the CD-like TNFΔARE mouse model. MBs bearing luciferase plasmid were functionalized with antibodies to MAdCAM-1 (MB-M) or VCAM-1 (MB-V), biomarkers of gut endothelial cell inflammation and evaluated in an in vitro flow chamber assay with appropriate ligands to confirm targeting specificity. Following MB retro-orbital injection in TNFΔARE mice, the mean contrast intensity in the ileocecal region from accumulated MB-M and MB-V was 8.5-fold and 3.6-fold greater, respectively, compared to MB-C. Delivery of luciferase plasmid to the GI tract in TNFΔARE mice was achieved by insonating the endothelial cell-bound agents using a commercial sonoporator. Luciferase expression in the midgut was detected 48 h later by bioluminescence imaging and further confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The liver, spleen, heart, and kidney had no detectable bioluminescence following insonation. Transfection of the microcirculation guided by a targeted, acoustically-activated platform such as an ultrasound contrast agent microbubble has the potential to be a minimally-invasive treatment strategy to ameliorate CD and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:23142578

  14. Deletion of Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen-activating protease-encoding genes attenuates Yersinia pestis in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Christina J; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Cao, Anthony; Tiner, Bethany L; Erova, Tatiana E; Cong, Yingzi; Kozlova, Elena V; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; Chopra, Ashok K

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there is no FDA-approved vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Since both humoral immunity and cell-mediated immunity are essential in providing the host with protection against plague, we developed a live-attenuated vaccine strain by deleting the Braun lipoprotein (lpp) and plasminogen-activating protease (pla) genes from Y. pestis CO92. The Δlpp Δpla double isogenic mutant was highly attenuated in evoking both bubonic and pneumonic plague in a mouse model. Further, animals immunized with the mutant by either the intranasal or the subcutaneous route were significantly protected from developing subsequent pneumonic plague. In mice, the mutant poorly disseminated to peripheral organs and the production of proinflammatory cytokines concurrently decreased. Histopathologically, reduced damage to the lungs and livers of mice infected with the Δlpp Δpla double mutant compared to the level of damage in wild-type (WT) CO92-challenged animals was observed. The Δlpp Δpla mutant-immunized mice elicited a humoral immune response to the WT bacterium, as well as to CO92-specific antigens. Moreover, T cells from mutant-immunized animals exhibited significantly higher proliferative responses, when stimulated ex vivo with heat-killed WT CO92 antigens, than mice immunized with the same sublethal dose of WT CO92. Likewise, T cells from the mutant-immunized mice produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4. These animals had an increasing number of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells than WT CO92-infected mice. These data emphasize the role of TNF-α and IFN-γ in protecting mice against pneumonic plague. Overall, our studies provide evidence that deletion of the lpp and pla genes acts synergistically in protecting animals against pneumonic plague, and we have demonstrated an immunological basis for this protection.

  15. Overexpression of the Flii gene increases dermal-epidermal blistering in an autoimmune ColVII mouse model of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Arkell, Ruth M; Strudwick, Xanthe L; Hirose, Misa; Ludwig, Ralf J; Kern, Johannes S; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Zillikens, Detlef; Murrell, Dedee F; Cowin, Allison J

    2011-11-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a severe genetic skin fragility syndrome characterized by blister formation. The molecular basis of EB is still largely unknown and wound healing in patients suffering from EB remains a major challenge to their survival. Our previous studies have identified the actin remodelling protein Flightless I (Flii) as an important mediator of wound repair. Here we identify Flii as a novel target involved in skin blistering. Flii expression was significantly elevated in 30 patients with EB, most prominently in patients with recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB) who have defects in production of type VII collagen (ColVII). Using an autoimmune ColVII murine model of EB acquisita (EBA) and an immunocompetent-ColVII-hypomorphic genetic mouse model of RDEB together with murine Flii alleles, we investigated the contribution of Flii to EB. Overexpression of Flii produced severe blistering post-induction of EBA, while decreased Flii reduced blister severity, elevated integrin expression, and improved ColVII production. Flii(+/-) blistered skin showed reduced α-SMA, TGF-β1, and Smad 2/3 expression, suggesting that decreasing Flii may affect fibrosis. In support of this, Flii-deficient fibroblasts from EBA mice were less able to contract collagen gels in vitro; however, addition of TGF-β1 restored collagen contraction, suggesting an interplay between Flii and TGF-β1. Elevated Flii gene and protein expression was further observed in the blisters of ColVII hypomorphic mice, a murine model of RDEB, suggesting that reducing Flii in blistered skin could be a potential new approach for treating patients with EB.

  16. Mouse gastric tumor models with prostaglandin E2 pathway activation show similar gene expression profiles to intestinal-type human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastric cancers are generally classified into better differentiated intestinal-type tumor and poorly differentiated diffuse-type one according to Lauren's histological categorization. Although induction of prostaglandin E2 pathway promotes gastric tumors in mice in cooperation with deregulated Wnt or BMP signalings, it has remained unresolved whether the gastric tumor mouse models recapitulate either of human gastric cancer type. This study assessed the similarity in expression profiling between gastric tumors of transgenic mice and various tissues of human cancers to find best-fit human tumors for the transgenic mice models. Results Global expression profiling initially found gastric tumors from COX-2/mPGES-1 (C2mE)-related transgenic mice (K19-C2mE, K19-Wnt1/C2mE, and K19-Nog/C2mE) resembled gastric cancers among the several tissues of human cancers including colon, breast, lung and gastric tumors. Next, classification of the C2mE-related transgenic mice by a gene signature to distinguish human intestinal- and diffuse-type tumors showed C2mE-related transgenic mice were more similar to intestinal-type compared with diffuse one. We finally revealed that induction of Wnt pathway cooperating with the prostaglandin E2 pathway in mice (K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice) further reproduce features of human gastric intestinal-type tumors. Conclusion We demonstrated that C2mE-related transgenic mice show significant similarity to intestinal-type gastric cancer when analyzed by global expression profiling. These results suggest that the C2mE-related transgenic mice, especially K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice, serve as a best-fit model to study molecular mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of human gastric intestinal-type cancers. PMID:20015407

  17. Comprehensive comparative homeobox gene annotation in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Boychenko, Veronika; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a group of genes coding for transcription factors with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix structure called a homeodomain and which play a crucial role in pattern formation during embryogenesis. Many homeobox genes are located in clusters and some of these, most notably the HOX genes, are known to have antisense or opposite strand long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes that play a regulatory role. Because automated annotation of both gene clusters and non-coding genes is fraught with difficulty (over-prediction, under-prediction, inaccurate transcript structures), we set out to manually annotate all homeobox genes in the mouse and human genomes. This includes all supported splice variants, pseudogenes and both antisense and flanking lncRNAs. One of the areas where manual annotation has a significant advantage is the annotation of duplicated gene clusters. After comprehensive annotation of all homeobox genes and their antisense genes in human and in mouse, we found some discrepancies with the current gene set in RefSeq regarding exact gene structures and coding versus pseudogene locus biotype. We also identified previously un-annotated pseudogenes in the DUX, Rhox and Obox gene clusters, which helped us re-evaluate and update the gene nomenclature in these regions. We found that human homeobox genes are enriched in antisense lncRNA loci, some of which are known to play a role in gene or gene cluster regulation, compared to their mouse orthologues. Of the annotated set of 241 human protein-coding homeobox genes, 98 have an antisense locus (41%) while of the 277 orthologous mouse genes, only 62 protein coding gene have an antisense locus (22%), based on publicly available transcriptional evidence. PMID:26412852

  18. Disease severity in a mouse model of ataxia telangiectasia is modulated by the DNA damage checkpoint gene Hus1

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Zhu, Min; Mukherjee, Sucheta; Lyndaker, Amy M.; Hume, Kelly R.; Lee, Jaesung; Riccio, Mark L.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Noden, Drew M.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The human genomic instability syndrome ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), caused by mutations in the gene encoding the DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM, is characterized by multisystem defects including neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency and increased cancer predisposition. ATM is central to a pathway that responds to double-strand DNA breaks, whereas the related kinase ATR leads a parallel signaling cascade that is activated by replication stress. To dissect the physiological relationship between the ATM and ATR pathways, we generated mice defective for both. Because complete ATR pathway inactivation causes embryonic lethality, we weakened the ATR mechanism to different degrees by impairing HUS1, a member of the 911 complex that is required for efficient ATR signaling. Notably, simultaneous ATM and HUS1 defects caused synthetic lethality. Atm/Hus1 double-mutant embryos showed widespread apoptosis and died mid-gestationally. Despite the underlying DNA damage checkpoint defects, increased DNA damage signaling was observed, as evidenced by H2AX phosphorylation and p53 accumulation. A less severe Hus1 defect together with Atm loss resulted in partial embryonic lethality, with the surviving double-mutant mice showing synergistic increases in genomic instability and specific developmental defects, including dwarfism, craniofacial abnormalities and brachymesophalangy, phenotypes that are observed in several human genomic instability disorders. In addition to identifying tissue-specific consequences of checkpoint dysfunction, these data highlight a robust, cooperative configuration for the mammalian DNA damage response network and further suggest HUS1 and related genes in the ATR pathway as candidate modifiers of disease severity in A-T patients. PMID:22575700

  19. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  20. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  1. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1−/−), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1−/− mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1−/− mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1−/− mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1−/− mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-κB/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  2. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  3. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  4. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  5. Uterine disorders and pregnancy complications: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Wang, Haibin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of human uterine physiology and pathology has been extrapolated from the study of diverse animal models, as there is no ideal system for studying human uterine biology in vitro. Although it remains debatable whether mouse models are the most suitable system for investigating human uterine function(s), gene-manipulated mice are considered by many the most useful tool for mechanistic analysis, and numerous studies have identified many similarities in female reproduction between the two species. This Review brings together information from studies using animal models, in particular mouse models, that shed light on normal and pathologic aspects of uterine biology and pregnancy complications. PMID:20364098

  6. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. AAV2/1 CD74 Gene Transfer Reduces β-amyloidosis and Improves Learning and Memory in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Zhang, Gang; Morrison, Christine M; Bosch, Megan E; Weir, Robert A; Lu, Yaman; Dong, Weiguo; Gendelman, Howard E

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) trafficking pathway heralds a new therapeutic frontier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). As CD74 binds to the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and can suppresses Aβ processing, we investigated whether recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery of CD74 could reduce Aβ production and affect disease outcomes. This idea was tested in a mouse AD model. Cotransduction of AAV-tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) and AAV-tet-response element (TRE)-CD74 resulted in CD74 expression, reduced Aβ production in mouse neurons containing the human APP with familial AD-linked mutations. Stereotaxic injection of AAV-TRE-GFP or CD74 into the hippocampi of an AD mouse, defined as a TgCRND8 × calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II derived promoter-tTA double-transgenic, reduced Aβ loads and pyramidal neuronal Aβ accumulation in the hippocampus. Immunofluorescent studies showed that APP colocalization with Lamp1 was increased in CD74-expressing neurons. Moreover, Morris water maze tasks demonstrated that mice treated with AAV-TRE-CD74 showed improved learning and memory compared to AAV-TRE-GFP control animals. These results support the idea that CD74-induced alteration of Aβ processing could improve AD-associated memory deficits as shown in mouse models of human disease. PMID:26227349

  8. N-ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Induced Mutations within the Klotho Gene Lead to Ectopic Calcification and Reduced Lifespan in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Babinsky, Valerie N.; Potter, Paul; Thomas, Gethin P.; Croucher, Peter I.; Brown, Matthew A.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Cox, Roger D.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification (EC), which is the pathological deposition of calcium and phosphate in extra-skeletal tissues, may be associated with hypercalcaemic and hyperphosphataemic disorders, or it may occur in the absence of metabolic abnormalities. In addition, EC may be inherited as part of several monogenic disorders and studies of these have provided valuable insights into the metabolic pathways regulating mineral metabolism. For example, studies of tumoural calcinosis, a disorder characterised by hyperphosphataemia and progressive EC, have revealed mutations of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), polypeptide N-acetyl galactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3) and klotho (KL), which are all part of a phosphate-regulating pathway. However, such studies in humans are limited by the lack of available large families with EC, and to facilitate such studies we assessed the progeny of mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) for EC. This identified two mutants with autosomal recessive forms of EC, and reduced lifespan, designated Ecalc1 and Ecalc2. Genetic mapping localized the Ecalc1 and Ecalc2 loci to a 11.0 Mb region on chromosome 5 that contained the klotho gene (Kl), and DNA sequence analysis identified nonsense (Gln203Stop) and missense (Ile604Asn) Kl mutations in Ecalc1 and Ecalc2 mice, respectively. The Gln203Stop mutation, located in KL1 domain, was severely hypomorphic and led to a 17-fold reduction of renal Kl expression. The Ile604Asn mutation, located in KL2 domain, was predicted to impair klotho protein stability and in vitro expression studies in COS-7 cells revealed endoplasmic reticulum retention of the Ile604Asn mutant. Further phenotype studies undertaken in Ecalc1 (kl203X/203X) mice demonstrated elevations in plasma concentrations of phosphate, FGF23 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Thus, two allelic variants of Kl that develop EC and represent mouse models for tumoural calcinosis have been established. PMID:25860694

  9. Immunologic Applications of Conditional Gene Modification Technology in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources. PMID:24700321

  10. Disruption of the sigS gene attenuates the local innate immune response to Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Peton, Vincent; Breyne, Koen; Rault, Lucie; Demeyere, Kristel; Berkova, Nadia; Meyer, Evelyne; Even, Sergine; Le Loir, Yves

    2016-04-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major pathogen involved in ruminant mastitis and present worldwide. Clinical signs of S. aureus mastitis vary considerably and are largely dependent on strain-specific factors. A comparison of two S. aureus strains that reproducibly induced either severe (O11) or mild (O46) mastitis in ewes revealed that the transcriptional regulator sigS was mutated in O46 (Le Maréchal et al., 2011. PLoS One. 6 (11) e27354. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027354). In the present paper, we analysed the sigS sequence in 18 other S. aureus strains isolated from goat or ewe mastitis and found a 4-bp deletion similar to that of the O46 sigS gene in three strains associated with subclinical ewe mastitis. This sigS gene was disrupted in strain O11 (O11ΔsigS), so our aim was to investigate its involvement in the severity of infections in the context of mastitis. The wild type (wt) and mutant strains were then characterized in vitro to determine the involvement of sigS in the response S. aureus under various stress conditions, and assess its influence on the cytotoxicity of the pathogen, its invasive capacity and biofilm formation. The strains were compared in vivo in an experimental mouse mastitis model in which clinical signs and cytokine production were evaluated at 24h post-infection. While no significant differences in the effect on bacterial growth between O11 and O11ΔsigS were observed either in vitro or in vivo, a significantly weaker in vivo production of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α was measured in the mammary glands infected with the mutant strain, suggesting that infection with O11ΔsigS induced an attenuated local innate immune response. These results suggest an impact of sigS disruption on S. aureus pathogenesis in a ruminant mastitis context. This disruption is probably involved in, and may partly explain, the milder symptoms previously observed in S. aureus O46-induced mastitis in ewes.

  11. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  12. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  13. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  14. Modeling cytomegalovirus infection in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard Lee; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that cytomegalovirus (CMV) modulates cancer is evolving. Originally discovered in glioblastoma in 2002, the number of cancers, where intratumoral CMV antigen is detected, has increased in recent years suggesting that CMV actively affects the pathobiology of certain tumors. These findings are controversial as several groups have also reported inability to replicate these results. Regardless, several clinical trials for glioblastoma are underway or have been completed that target intratumoral CMV with anti-viral drugs or immunotherapy. Therefore, a better understanding of the possible pathobiology of CMV in cancer needs to be ascertained. We have developed genetic, syngeneic, and orthotopic malignant glioma mouse models to study the role of CMV in cancer development and progression. These models recapitulate for the most part intratumoral CMV expression as seen in human tumors. Additionally, we discovered that CMV infection in Trp53(-/+) mice promotes pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas. These mouse models are not only a vehicle for studying pathobiology of the viral-tumor interaction but also a platform for developing and testing cancer therapeutics. PMID:25853089

  15. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS. PMID:25606362

  16. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  17. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  18. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  19. Molecular characterization of hepatocarcinogenesis using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Wei Wei; Xie, Min; Vijayaraghavan, Aadhitthya; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Tong, Wei Min; Goh, Liang Kee; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease, often unnoticed until the late stages, when treatment options become limited. Thus, there is a crucial need to identify biomarkers for early detection of developing HCC, as well as molecular pathways that would be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Although analysis of human HCC tissues and serum components may serve these purposes, inability of early detection also precludes possibilities of identification of biomarkers or pathways that are sequentially perturbed at earlier phases of disease progression. We have therefore explored the option of utilizing mouse models to understand in a systematic and longitudinal manner the molecular pathways that are progressively deregulated by various etiological factors in contributing to HCC formation, and we report the initial findings in characterizing their validity. Hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice, which had been exposed to aflatoxin B1 at various stages in life, were used as a hepatitis model. Our findings confirm a synergistic effect of both these etiological factors, with a gender bias towards males for HCC predisposition. Time-based aflatoxin B1 treatment also demonstrated the requirement of non-quiescent liver for effective transformation. Tumors from these models with various etiologies resemble human HCCs histologically and at the molecular level. Extensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of an 11-gene HCC-expression signature that was able to discern transformed human hepatocytes from primary cells, regardless of etiology, and from other cancer types. Moreover, distinct molecular pathways appear to be deregulated by various etiological agents en route to formation of HCCs, in which common pathways converge, highlighting the existence of etiology-specific as well as common HCC-specific molecular perturbations. This study therefore highlights the utility of these mouse models, which provide a rich resource for the

  20. Mapping of the Tuple1 gene to mouse chromosome 16A-B1

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Halford, S.; Scambler, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    The human TUPLE1 gene encodes a putative transcriptional regulator and maps to chromosome 22, and therefore may play a role in Di-George syndrome (DGS), relo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), or a related pathology. The murine TUPLE1 gene has also been cloned and shows strong sequence similarity to TUPLE1. Comparative mapping is useful in the study of chromosome evolution and is sometimes able to indicate possible mouse mutations that are potential models of human genetic disorders. As TIPLE1 is a candidate gene for the haploinsufficient phenotype in DGS, we mapped TUPLE1 to mouse chromosome 16A-B1. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Mouse models for human hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Michel; Safieddine, Saaid; Petit, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a frequent condition in humans. Identification of the causative genes for the early onset forms of isolated deafness began 15 years ago and has been very fruitful. To date, approximately 50 causative genes have been identified. Yet, limited information regarding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms can be derived from hearing tests in deaf patients. This chapter describes the success of mouse models in the elucidation of some pathophysiological processes in the auditory sensory organ, the cochlea. These models have revealed a variety of defective structures and functions at the origin of deafness genetic forms. This is illustrated by three different examples: (1) the DFNB9 deafness form, a synaptopathy of the cochlear sensory cells where otoferlin is defective; (2) the Usher syndrome, in which deafness is related to abnormal development of the hair bundle, the mechanoreceptive structure of the sensory cells to sound; (3) the DFNB1 deafness form, which is the most common form of inherited deafness in Caucasian populations, mainly caused by connexin-26 defects that alter gap junction communication between nonsensory cochlear cells. PMID:19186249

  2. Genetically engineered humanized mouse models for preclinical antibody studies.

    PubMed

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V; Roopenian, Derry C

    2014-04-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies.

  3. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  4. The impact of Bdnf gene deficiency to the memory impairment and brain pathology of APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rantamäki, Tomi; Kemppainen, Susanna; Autio, Henri; Stavén, Saara; Koivisto, Hennariikka; Kojima, Masami; Antila, Hanna; Miettinen, Pasi O; Kärkkäinen, Elisa; Karpova, Nina; Vesa, Liisa; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Tanila, Heikki; Castrén, Eero

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) importantly regulates learning and memory and supports the survival of injured neurons. Reduced BDNF levels have been detected in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients but the exact role of BDNF in the pathophysiology of the disorder remains obscure. We have recently shown that reduced signaling of BDNF receptor TrkB aggravates memory impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 (APdE9) mice, a model of AD. The present study examined the influence of Bdnf gene deficiency (heterozygous knockout) on spatial learning, spontaneous exploratory activity and motor coordination/balance in middle-aged male and female APdE9 mice. We also studied brain BDNF protein levels in APdE9 mice in different ages showing progressive amyloid pathology. Both APdE9 and Bdnf mutations impaired spatial learning in males and showed a similar trend in females. Importantly, the effect was additive, so that double mutant mice performed the worst. However, APdE9 and Bdnf mutations influenced spontaneous locomotion in contrasting ways, such that locomotor hyperactivity observed in APdE9 mice was normalized by Bdnf deficiency. Obesity associated with Bdnf deficiency did not account for the reduced hyperactivity in double mutant mice. Bdnf deficiency did not alter amyloid plaque formation in APdE9 mice. Before plaque formation (3 months), BDNF protein levels where either reduced (female) or unaltered (male) in the APdE9 mouse cortex. Unexpectedly, this was followed by an age-dependent increase in mature BDNF protein. Bdnf mRNA and phospho-TrkB levels remained unaltered in the cortical tissue samples of middle-aged APdE9 mice. Immunohistological studies revealed increased BDNF immunoreactivity around amyloid plaques indicating that the plaques may sequester BDNF protein and prevent it from activating TrkB. If similar BDNF accumulation happens in human AD brains, it would suggest that functional BDNF levels in the AD brains are even lower than reported, which could

  5. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  6. Characterization and chromosomal mapping of a mouse ortholog of the late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis gene CLN2.

    PubMed

    Katz, M L; Liu, P C; Grob-Nunn, S E; Shibuya, H; Johnson, G S

    1999-11-01

    Late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis (CLN2) is an autosomal recessively inherited, neurodegenerative disease in humans. The CLN2 locus has been mapped to Chromosome (Chr) 11p15, and its sequence and genomic organization have recently been reported. In the present study, the cDNA sequence, exon/intron organization, and chromosomal localization of a mouse ortholog of the CLN2 gene are described. The mouse cDNA contains an open reading frame that predicts a protein product of 562 amino acids. The mouse and human coding regions are 86% and 88% identical at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, respectively. One less codon appears in the mouse cDNA when compared with the human ortholog. The mouse gene (Cln2) spans more than 6 kb and consists of 13 exons separated by introns ranging in size from 111 to 1259 bp. Length polymorphism in an (AC)(n) microsatellite in intron 3 of the mouse Cln2 gene was used to perform segregation analysis with The Jackson Laboratory DNA Panel Mapping Resource. On the basis of this analysis, the Cln2 gene was localized to a region of mouse Chr 7 that corresponds to human Chr 11p15. Characterization of the mouse Cln2 gene will facilitate generation of a mouse model for late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis by gene targeting and identification of functionally important regions of the Cln2 protein.

  7. Inducible and combinatorial gene manipulation in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K.; Marticorena-Alvarez, Ricardo; Bausen, Melanie; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2015-01-01

    We have deployed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches to manipulate gene expression in mouse brain. Here, we show a combinatorial genetic approach for inducible, cell type-specific gene expression and Cre/loxP mediated gene recombination in different brain regions. Our chemical-genetic approach will help to investigate ‘when’, ‘where’, and ‘how’ gene(s) control neuronal circuit dynamics, and organize, for example, sensory signal processing, learning and memory, and behavior. PMID:25954155

  8. Mouse models for BRAF-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, C; Carragher, L; Aldridge, V; Giblett, S; Jin, H; Foster, C; Andreadi, C; Kamata, T

    2007-11-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the BRAF gene are detected in approximately 7% of human cancer samples with a particularly high frequency of mutation in malignant melanomas. Over 40 different missense BRAF mutations have been found, but the vast majority (>90%) represent a single nucleotide change resulting in a valine-->glutamate mutation at residue 600 ((V600E)BRAF). In cells cultured in vitro, (V600E)BRAF is able to stimulate endogenous MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase] and ERK phosphorylation leading to an increase in cell proliferation, cell survival, transformation, tumorigenicity, invasion and vascular development. Many of these hallmarks of cancer can be reversed by treatment of cells with siRNA (small interfering RNA) to BRAF or by inhibiting MEK, indicating that BRAF and MEK are attractive therapeutic targets in cancer samples with BRAF mutations. In order to fully understand the role of oncogenic BRAF in cancer development in vivo as well as to test the in vivo efficacy of anti-BRAF or anti-MEK therapies, GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models) have been generated in which expression of oncogenic BRaf is conditionally dependent on the Cre recombinase. The delivery/activation of the Cre recombinase can be regulated in both a temporal and spatial manner and therefore these mouse models can be used to recapitulate the somatic mutation of BRAF that occurs in different tissues in the development of human cancer. The data so far obtained following Cre-mediated activation in haemopoietic tissue and the lung indicate that (V600E)BRAF mutation can drive tumour initiation and that its primary effect is to induce high levels of cyclin D1-mediated cell proliferation. However, hallmarks of OIS (oncogene-induced senescence) are evident that restrain further development of the tumour.

  9. Differences in the timing and magnitude of Pkd1 gene deletion determine the severity of polycystic kidney disease in an orthologous mouse model of ADPKD.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kelly A; Moreno, Sarah E; Smith, Laurie A; Husson, Hervé; Bukanov, Nikolay O; Ledbetter, Steven R; Budman, Yeva; Lu, Yuefeng; Wang, Bing; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana; Natoli, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Development of a disease-modifying therapy to treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) requires well-characterized preclinical models that accurately reflect the pathology and biochemical changes associated with the disease. Using a Pkd1 conditional knockout mouse, we demonstrate that subtly altering the timing and extent of Pkd1 deletion can have a significant impact on the origin and severity of kidney cyst formation. Pkd1 deletion on postnatal day 1 or 2 results in cysts arising from both the cortical and medullary regions, whereas deletion on postnatal days 3-8 results in primarily medullary cyst formation. Altering the extent of Pkd1 deletion by modulating the tamoxifen dose produces dose-dependent changes in the severity, but not origin, of cystogenesis. Limited Pkd1 deletion produces progressive kidney cystogenesis, accompanied by interstitial fibrosis and loss of kidney function. Cyst growth occurs in two phases: an early, rapid growth phase, followed by a later, slow growth period. Analysis of biochemical pathway changes in cystic kidneys reveals dysregulation of the cell cycle, increased proliferation and apoptosis, activation of Mek-Erk, Akt-mTOR, and Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathways, and altered glycosphingolipid metabolism that resemble the biochemical changes occurring in human ADPKD kidneys. These pathways are normally active in neonatal mouse kidneys until repressed around 3 weeks of age; however, they remain active following Pkd1 deletion. Together, this work describes the key parameters to accurately model the pathological and biochemical changes associated with ADPKD in a conditional mouse model.

  10. Differences in the timing and magnitude of Pkd1 gene deletion determine the severity of polycystic kidney disease in an orthologous mouse model of ADPKD.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kelly A; Moreno, Sarah E; Smith, Laurie A; Husson, Hervé; Bukanov, Nikolay O; Ledbetter, Steven R; Budman, Yeva; Lu, Yuefeng; Wang, Bing; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana; Natoli, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Development of a disease-modifying therapy to treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) requires well-characterized preclinical models that accurately reflect the pathology and biochemical changes associated with the disease. Using a Pkd1 conditional knockout mouse, we demonstrate that subtly altering the timing and extent of Pkd1 deletion can have a significant impact on the origin and severity of kidney cyst formation. Pkd1 deletion on postnatal day 1 or 2 results in cysts arising from both the cortical and medullary regions, whereas deletion on postnatal days 3-8 results in primarily medullary cyst formation. Altering the extent of Pkd1 deletion by modulating the tamoxifen dose produces dose-dependent changes in the severity, but not origin, of cystogenesis. Limited Pkd1 deletion produces progressive kidney cystogenesis, accompanied by interstitial fibrosis and loss of kidney function. Cyst growth occurs in two phases: an early, rapid growth phase, followed by a later, slow growth period. Analysis of biochemical pathway changes in cystic kidneys reveals dysregulation of the cell cycle, increased proliferation and apoptosis, activation of Mek-Erk, Akt-mTOR, and Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathways, and altered glycosphingolipid metabolism that resemble the biochemical changes occurring in human ADPKD kidneys. These pathways are normally active in neonatal mouse kidneys until repressed around 3 weeks of age; however, they remain active following Pkd1 deletion. Together, this work describes the key parameters to accurately model the pathological and biochemical changes associated with ADPKD in a conditional mouse model. PMID:27356569

  11. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing.

    PubMed

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2010-08-01

    Tumor-driving mutations in the TP53 gene occur frequently in human cancers. These inactivating mutations arise predominantly from a single-point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of this tumor suppressor gene (i.e., exons 4-9). The human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was constructed using gene-targeting technology to create a mouse strain that harbors human wild-type TP53 DNA sequences in both copies of the mouse TP53 gene. Replacement of exons 4-9 of the endogenous mouse TP53 alleles in the Hupki mouse with the homologous normal human TP53 gene sequences has offered a humanized replica of the TP53 gene in a murine genetic environment. The Hupki mouse model system has proven to be an invaluable research tool for studying the underlying mechanisms of human TP53 mutagenesis. The utility of the Hupki mouse model system for exploring carcinogen-induced TP53 mutagenesis has been demonstrated in both in vivo animal experiments and in vitro cell culture experiments. Here, we highlight applications of the Hupki mouse model system for investigating mutagenesis induced by a variety of environmental carcinogens, including sunlight ultraviolet radiation, benzo[a]pyrene (a tobacco smoke-derived carcinogen), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (an urban air pollutant), aristolochic acid (a component of Chinese herbal medicine), and aflatoxin B1 (a food contaminant). We summarize the salient findings of the respective studies and discuss their relevance to human cancer etiology.

  12. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-01

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism.

  13. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y.Q. Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G.; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L.; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E.; Murphy, William J.; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sequenced the MSY (Male-Specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only two percent of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 50 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs, but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  14. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Mouse Model in Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cong; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of granulocytic cells without the loss of their capability to differentiate. CML is a clonal disease, originated at the level of Hematopoietic Stem Cells with the Philadelphia chromosome resulting from a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22t(9;22)-(q34;q11). This translocation produces a fusion gene known as BCR-ABL which acquires uncontrolled tyrosine kinase activity, constantly turning on its downstream signaling molecules/pathways, and promoting proliferation of leukemia cell through anti-apoptosis and acquisition of additional mutations. To evaluate the role of each critical downstream signaling molecule of BCR-ABL and test therapeutic drugs in vivo, it is important to use physiological mouse disease models. Here, we describe a mouse model of CML induced by BCR-ABL retrovirus (MSCV-BCR-ABL-GFP; MIG-BCR-ABL) and how to use this model in translational research.Moreover, to expand the application of this retrovirus induced CML model in a lot of conditional knockout mouse strain, we modified this vector to a triple gene coexpression vector in which we can co-express BCR-ABL, GFP, and a third gene which will be tested in different systems. To apply this triple gene system in conditional gene knockout strains, we can validate the CML development in the knockout mice and trace the leukemia cell following the GFP marker. In this protocol, we also describe how we utilize this triple gene system to prove the function of Pten as a tumor suppressor in leukemogenesis. Overall, this triple gene system expands our research spectrum in current conditional gene knockout strains and benefits our CML translational research. PMID:27150093

  15. A Survey of Imprinted Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, J. Mauro; Starmer, Joshua; Schertzer, Megan D.; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Several hundred mammalian genes are expressed preferentially from one parental allele as the result of a process called genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is prevalent in extra-embryonic tissue, where it plays an essential role during development. Here, we profiled imprinted gene expression via RNA-Seq in a panel of six mouse trophoblast stem lines, which are ex vivo derivatives of a progenitor population that gives rise to the placental tissue of the mouse. We found evidence of imprinted expression for 48 genes, 31 of which had been described previously as imprinted and 17 of which we suggest as candidate imprinted genes. An equal number of maternally and paternally biased genes were detected. On average, candidate imprinted genes were more lowly expressed and had weaker parent-of-origin biases than known imprinted genes. Several known and candidate imprinted genes showed variability in parent-of-origin expression bias between the six trophoblast stem cell lines. Sixteen of the 48 known and candidate imprinted genes were previously or newly annotated noncoding RNAs and six encoded for a total of 60 annotated microRNAs. Pyrosequencing across our panel of trophoblast stem cell lines returned levels of imprinted expression that were concordant with RNA-Seq measurements for all eight genes examined. Our results solidify trophoblast stem cells as a cell culture-based experimental model to study genomic imprinting, and provide a quantitative foundation upon which to delineate mechanisms by which the process is maintained in the mouse. PMID:25711832

  16. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yifat; Livne, Adva; Mints, Meshi; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat (HF) diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a HF diet induces diabetes mellitus (DM)-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, HF diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via HF nutrition. PMID:27656136

  17. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yifat; Livne, Adva; Mints, Meshi; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat (HF) diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a HF diet induces diabetes mellitus (DM)-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, HF diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via HF nutrition. PMID:27656136

  18. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yifat; Livne, Adva; Mints, Meshi; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat (HF) diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE4) mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a HF diet induces diabetes mellitus (DM)-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, HF diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via HF nutrition.

  19. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  20. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  1. Generating Transgenic Mouse Models for Studying Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Ju, Josephine M; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of current animal models for studying celiac disease, with a focus on generating HLA transgenic mouse models. Human Leukocyte Antigen class II molecules have been a particular target for transgenic mice due to their tight association with celiac disease, and a number of murine models have been developed which had the endogenous MHC class II genes replaced with insertions of disease susceptible HLA class II alleles DQ2 or DQ8. Additionally, transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-15 (IL-15), a key player in the inflammatory cascade that leads to celiac disease, have also been generated to model a state of chronic inflammation. To explore the contribution of specific bacteria in gluten-sensitive enteropathy, the nude mouse and rat models have been studied in germ-free facilities. These reductionist mouse models allow us to address single factors thought to have crucial roles in celiac disease. No single model has incorporated all of the multiple factors that make up celiac disease. Rather, these mouse models can allow the functional interrogation of specific components of the many stages of, and contributions to, the pathogenic mechanisms that will lead to gluten-dependent enteropathy. Overall, the tools for animal studies in celiac disease are many and varied, and provide ample space for further creativity as well as to characterize the complete and complex pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  2. Recent segmental and gene duplications in the mouse genome

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Wilson, Michael D; Zhang, Junjun; Khaja, Razi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Heng, Henry HQ; Koop, Ben F; Scherer, Stephen W

    2003-01-01

    Background The high quality of the mouse genome draft sequence and its associated annotations are an invaluable biological resource. Identifying recent duplications in the mouse genome, especially in regions containing genes, may highlight important events in recent murine evolution. In addition, detecting recent sequence duplications can reveal potentially problematic regions of the genome assembly. We use BLAST-based computational heuristics to identify large (≥ 5 kb) and recent (≥ 90% sequence identity) segmental duplications in the mouse genome sequence. Here we present a database of recently duplicated regions of the mouse genome found in the mouse genome sequencing consortium (MGSC) February 2002 and February 2003 assemblies. Results We determined that 33.6 Mb of 2,695 Mb (1.2%) of sequence from the February 2003 mouse genome sequence assembly is involved in recent segmental duplications, which is less than that observed in the human genome (around 3.5-5%). From this dataset, 8.9 Mb (26%) of the duplication content consisted of 'unmapped' chromosome sequence. Moreover, we suspect that an additional 18.5 Mb of sequence is involved in duplication artifacts arising from sequence misassignment errors in this genome assembly. By searching for genes that are located within these regions, we identified 675 genes that mapped to duplicated regions of the mouse genome. Sixteen of these genes appear to have been duplicated independently in the human genome. From our dataset we further characterized a 42 kb recent segmental duplication of Mater, a maternal-effect gene essential for embryogenesis in mice. Conclusion Our results provide an initial analysis of the recently duplicated sequence and gene content of the mouse genome. Many of these duplicated loci, as well as regions identified to be involved in potential sequence misassignment errors, will require further mapping and sequencing to achieve accuracy. A Genome Browser database was set up to display the

  3. Overlapping genes in the human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Chaitanya R; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Zhang, Liqing

    2008-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that overlapping genes are much more common in eukaryotic genomes than previously thought. In this study we identified and characterized the overlapping genes in a set of 13,484 pairs of human-mouse orthologous genes. Results About 10% of the genes under study are overlapping genes, the majority of which are different-strand overlaps. The majority of the same-strand overlaps are embedded forms, whereas most different-strand overlaps are not embedded and in the convergent transcription orientation. Most of the same-strand overlapping gene pairs show at least a tenfold difference in length, much larger than the length difference between non-overlapping neighboring gene pairs. The length difference between the two different-strand overlapping genes is less dramatic. Over 27% of the different-strand-overlap relationships are shared between human and mouse, compared to only ~8% conservation for same-strand-overlap relationships. More than 96% of the same-strand and different-strand overlaps that are not shared between human and mouse have both genes located on the same chromosomes in the species that does not show the overlap. We examined the causes of transition between the overlapping and non-overlapping states in the two species and found that 3' UTR change plays an important role in the transition. Conclusion Our study contributes to the understanding of the evolutionary transition between overlapping genes and non-overlapping genes and demonstrates the high rates of evolutionary changes in the un-translated regions. PMID:18410680

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584552

  5. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  6. Mouse ataxin-3 functional knock-out model.

    PubMed

    Switonski, Pawel M; Fiszer, Agnieszka; Kazmierska, Katarzyna; Kurpisz, Maciej; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Figiel, Maciej

    2011-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is a genetic disorder resulting from the expansion of the CAG repeats in the ATXN3 gene. The pathogenesis of SCA3 is based on the toxic function of the mutant ataxin-3 protein, but the exact mechanism of the disease remains elusive. Various types of transgenic mouse models explore different aspects of SCA3 pathogenesis, but a knock-in humanized mouse has not yet been created. The initial aim of this study was to generate an ataxin-3 humanized mouse model using a knock-in strategy. The human cDNA for ataxin-3 containing 69 CAG repeats was cloned from SCA3 patient and introduced into the mouse ataxin-3 locus at exon 2, deleting it along with exon 3 and intron 2. Although the human transgene was inserted correctly, the resulting mice acquired the knock-out properties and did not express ataxin-3 protein in any analyzed tissues, as confirmed by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of RNA expression revealed that the entire locus consisting of human and mouse exons was expressed and alternatively spliced. We detected mRNA isoforms composed of exon 1 spliced with mouse exon 4 or with human exon 7. After applying 37 PCR cycles, we also detected a very low level of the correct exon 1/exon 2 isoform. Additionally, we confirmed by bioinformatic analysis that the structure and power of the splicing site between mouse intron 1 and human exon 2 (the targeted locus) was not changed compared with the native mouse locus. We hypothesized that these splicing aberrations result from the deletion of further splicing sites and the presence of a strong splicing site in exon 4, which was confirmed by bioinformatic analysis. In summary, we created a functional ataxin-3 knock-out mouse model that is viable and fertile and does not present a reduced life span. Our work provides new insights into the splicing characteristics of the Atxn3 gene and provides useful information for future attempts to create knock-in SCA3 models.

  7. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  8. From transplantation to transgenics: mouse models of developmental hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Lizama, Carlos O; Zovein, Ann C

    2014-08-01

    The mouse is integral to our understanding of hematopoietic biology. Serving as a mammalian model system, the mouse has allowed for the discovery of self-renewing multipotent stem cells, provided functional assays to establish hematopoietic stem cell identity and function, and has become a tool for understanding the differentiation capacity of early hematopoietic progenitors. The advent of genetic technology has strengthened the use of mouse models for identifying critical pathways in hematopoiesis. Full genetic knockout models, tissue-specific gene deletion, and genetic overexpression models create a system for the dissection and identification of critical cellular and genetic processes underlying hematopoiesis. However, the murine model has also introduced perplexity in understanding developmental hematopoiesis. Requisite in utero development paired with circulation has historically made defining sites of origin and expansion in the murine hematopoietic system challenging. However, the genetic accessibility of the mouse as a mammalian system has identified key regulators of hematopoietic development. Technological advances continue to generate extremely powerful tools that when translated to the murine system provide refined in vivo spatial and temporal control of genetic deletion or overexpression. Future advancements may add the ability of reversible genetic manipulation. In this review, we describe the major contributions of the murine model to our understanding of hematopoiesis.

  9. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming.

  10. Characterization of the mouse DAX-1 gene reveals evolutionary conservation of a unique amino-terminal motif and widespread expression in mouse tissue.

    PubMed

    Bae, D S; Schaefer, M L; Partan, B W; Muglia, L

    1996-09-01

    The human genetic disorder adrenal hypoplasia congenita with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism results from mutations in the recently isolated DAX-1 gene, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. To study the role of DAX-1 in adrenal development and activation of the hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, animal model systems will be essential. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the mouse DAX-1 gene and its tissue-specific pattern of expression. The mouse DAX-1 gene codes for a 472-amino acid protein, with 75% overall nucleotide sequence homology to its human homolog. The 3.5 amino-terminal repeats of a unique motif with probable DNA-binding activity have been conserved between mouse and human, although highest conservation in the DAX-1 peptide exists in the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. The DAX-1 gene remains X-linked in the mouse, consistent with its potential role in sex determination. We have developed a sensitive reverse transcription-PCR assay that detects DAX-1 messenger RNA in the central nervous system, pituitary, lung, heart, spleen, kidney, and thymus in addition to the adrenal and testis DAX-1 expression noted for the human DAX-1 gene. Future studies using mouse models of altered DAX-1 expression will be critical in defining the role of this factor in tissue- and development-specific gene regulation.

  11. Guwiyang Wurra--'Fire Mouse': a global gene knockout model for TSPO/PBR drug development, loss-of-function and mechanisms of compensation studies.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Ryan J; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard B

    2015-08-01

    The highly conserved 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) or peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is being investigated as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for disease conditions ranging from inflammation to neurodegeneration and behavioural illnesses. Many functions have been attributed to TSPO/PBR including a role in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), steroidogenesis and energy metabolism. In this review, we detail the recent developments in determining the physiological role of TSPO/PBR, specifically based on data obtained from the recently generated Tspo knockout mouse models. In addition to defining the role of TSPO/PBR, we also describe the value of Tspo knockout mice in determining the selectivity, specificity and presence of any off-target effects of TSPO/PBR ligands.

  12. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  13. Thymoquinone overcomes chemoresistance and enhances the anticancer effects of bortezomib through abrogation of NF-κB regulated gene products in multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Mustafa, Nurulhuda; Li, Feng; Kannaiyan, Radhamani; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kumar, Alan Prem; Chng, Wee-Joo; Sethi1, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell malignancy characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. With the advent of novel targeted agents, the median survival rate has increased to 5−7 years. However, majority of patients with myeloma suffer relapse or develop chemoresistance to existing therapeutic agents. Thus, there is a need to develop novel alternative therapies for the treatment of MM. Thus in the present study, we investigated whether thymoquinone (TQ), a bioactive constituent of black seed oil, could suppress the proliferation and induce chemosensitization in human myeloma cells and xenograft mouse model. Our results show that TQ inhibited the proliferation of MM cells irrespective of their sensitivity to doxorubicin, melphalan or bortezomib. Interestingly, TQ treatment also resulted in a significant inhibition in the proliferation of CD138+ cells isolated from MM patient samples in a concentration dependent manner. TQ also potentiated the apoptotic effects of bortezomib in various MM cell lines through the activation of caspase-3, resulting in the cleavage of PARP. TQ treatment also inhibited chemotaxis and invasion induced by CXCL12 in MM cells. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, TQ potentiated the antitumor effects of bortezomib (p < 0.05, vehicle versus bortezomib + TQ; p < 0.05, bortezomib versus bortezomib + TQ), and this correlated with modulation of various markers for survival and angiogenesis, such as Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Bcl-2 and p65 expression. Overall, our results demonstrate that TQ can enhance the anticancer activity of bortezomib in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM. PMID:24504138

  14. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  15. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mikako; Kaneda, Asako; Sugiyama, Tae; Iida, Ryousuke; Otokuni, Keiko; Kaburagi, Misako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk(+/-)) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk(+/-) mice ranged from 0.41-0.68 versus that in wild (Gk(+/+)) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95-1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk(+/-) strain fed the CD, and Gk(+/-) strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk(+/-) strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  16. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Mikako; KANEDA, Asako; SUGIYAMA, Tae; IIDA, Ryousuke; OTOKUNI, Keiko; KABURAGI, Misako; MATSUOKA, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk+/−) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk+/− mice ranged from 0.41–0.68 versus that in wild (Gk+/+) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95–1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk+/− strain fed the CD, and Gk+/− strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk+/− strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  17. EMAGE: a spatial database of gene expression patterns during mouse embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Jeffrey H.; Yang, Yiya; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Richardson, Lorna; Stevenson, Peter; Burton, Nicholas; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.

    2006-01-01

    EMAGE () is a freely available, curated database of gene expression patterns generated by in situ techniques in the developing mouse embryo. It is unique in that it contains standardized spatial representations of the sites of gene expression for each gene, denoted against a set of virtual reference embryo models. As such, the data can be interrogated in a novel and abstract manner by using space to define a query. Accompanying the spatial representations of gene expression patterns are text descriptions of the sites of expression, which also allows searching of the data by more conventional text-based methods. PMID:16381949

  18. Novel mouse model for carcinoembryonic antigen-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P

    2004-06-01

    Many novel cancer therapies, including immunotherapy and gene therapy, are specifically targeted to tumor-associated molecules, among which carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) represents a popular example. Discrepancies between preclinical experimental data in animal models and clinical outcome in terms of therapeutic response and toxicity, however, often arise. Preclinical testing can be compromised by the lack of CEA and other closely related human CEA family members in rodents, which lack analogous genes for most human CEA family members. Here, we report the construction of a transgenic mouse with a 187-kb human bacterial artificial chromosome (CEABAC) that contains part of the human CEA family gene cluster including complete human CEA (CEACAM5), CEACAM3, CEACAM6, and CEACAM7 genes. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes in the CEABAC mice was found to be remarkably similar to that of humans. This novel mouse will ensure better assessment than previously utilized models for the preclinical testing of CEA-targeted therapies and perhaps allow the testing of CEACAM6, which is overexpressed in many solid tumors and leukemias, as a therapeutic target. Moreover, expression of CEA family genes in gastrointestinal, breast, hematopoietic, urogenital, and respiratory systems could facilitate other clinical applications, such as the development of therapeutic agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections, which use CEA family members as major receptors. PMID:15194045

  19. Ric-8A gene deletion or phorbol ester suppresses tumorigenesis in a mouse model of GNAQQ209L-driven melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B R; Tall, G G

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein α subunit oncogenes GNAQ or GNA11 carry Q209X or R183X activating mutations and are present with ~90% frequency in human uveal melanomas. Forced expression of GNAQ/11Q209L in melanocytes is sufficient to drive metastatic melanoma in immune-compromised mice. No known drugs directly target these oncogenic G proteins. Ric-8A is the molecular chaperone that selectively folds Gαq/i/13 subunits. Targeting Ric-8A serves as a rational, yet unexplored approach to reduce the functional abundance of oncogenic Gαq/11 in order to blunt cancer signaling. Here, using mouse melanocyte cell graft tumorigenesis models, we determined that Ric-8A genetic ablation attenuated the abundance and melanoma-driving potential of Gαq-Q209L. A new conditional Ric-8AFlox/Flox; Rosa-CreER+/− mouse strain was derived and used as a tissue source to culture an immortalized, tamoxifen-inducible Ric-8A knockout melanocyte cell line that required 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, phorbol ester) for growth. The cell line failed to grow tumors when grafted into immune-compromised mice regardless of Ric-8A expression. Stable expression of human GNAQQ209L, but not GNAQWT in the cell line promoted TPA-independent cell proliferation, and upon cell grafting in mice, the initiation and robust growth of darkly-pigmented melanoma tumors. Deletion of Ric-8A in GNAQQ209L cells restored TPA-dependent growth, reduced Gαq-Q209L below detectable levels and completely mitigated tumorigenesis from primary or secondary cell line grafts. Interestingly, TPA treatment of cultured GNAQQ209L cells or host animals grafted with GNAQQ209L cells also sharply reduced Gαq-Q209L abundance and tumorigenic capacity. Finally, tumorigenesis initiated from GNAQQ209L cell grafts, followed by host mouse systemic tamoxifen treatment to delete Ric-8A in the grafted cells completely abrogated GNAQQ209L-driven tumor progression unless a stable human RIC-8A transgene was used to rescue the floxed

  20. Ric-8A gene deletion or phorbol ester suppresses tumorigenesis in a mouse model of GNAQ(Q209L)-driven melanoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, B R; Tall, G G

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein α subunit oncogenes GNAQ or GNA11 carry Q209X or R183X activating mutations and are present with ~90% frequency in human uveal melanomas. Forced expression of GNAQ/11(Q209L) in melanocytes is sufficient to drive metastatic melanoma in immune-compromised mice. No known drugs directly target these oncogenic G proteins. Ric-8A is the molecular chaperone that selectively folds Gαq/i/13 subunits. Targeting Ric-8A serves as a rational, yet unexplored approach to reduce the functional abundance of oncogenic Gαq/11 in order to blunt cancer signaling. Here, using mouse melanocyte cell graft tumorigenesis models, we determined that Ric-8A genetic ablation attenuated the abundance and melanoma-driving potential of Gαq-Q209L. A new conditional Ric-8A(Flox/Flox); Rosa-CreER(+/)(-) mouse strain was derived and used as a tissue source to culture an immortalized, tamoxifen-inducible Ric-8A knockout melanocyte cell line that required 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, phorbol ester) for growth. The cell line failed to grow tumors when grafted into immune-compromised mice regardless of Ric-8A expression. Stable expression of human GNAQ(Q209L), but not GNAQ(WT) in the cell line promoted TPA-independent cell proliferation, and upon cell grafting in mice, the initiation and robust growth of darkly-pigmented melanoma tumors. Deletion of Ric-8A in GNAQ(Q209L) cells restored TPA-dependent growth, reduced Gαq-Q209L below detectable levels and completely mitigated tumorigenesis from primary or secondary cell line grafts. Interestingly, TPA treatment of cultured GNAQ(Q209L) cells or host animals grafted with GNAQ(Q209L) cells also sharply reduced Gαq-Q209L abundance and tumorigenic capacity. Finally, tumorigenesis initiated from GNAQ(Q209L) cell grafts, followed by host mouse systemic tamoxifen treatment to delete Ric-8A in the grafted cells completely abrogated GNAQ(Q209L)-driven tumor progression unless a stable human RIC-8A transgene was used to

  1. Identification and characterization of a second mouse Nramp gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenheid, S.; Cellier, M.; Vidal, S.

    1995-01-20

    Nramp gene was isolated as a candidate for the host resistance locus Bcg/Ity/Lsh, which controls natural resistance of mice to several types of infections. We have isolated by cross-hybridization cDNA clones corresponding to a second mouse Nramp gene, which we designate Nramp2. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of full-length cDNA clones for Nramp2 indicate that this novel Nramp protein is closely homologous to the previously described Nramp and that the two genes form part of a small gene family. The two Nramp proteins encode integral membrane proteins that share 63% identical residues and an overall homology of 78%. They share very similar secondary structure, including identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane organization, with a minimum of 10 and most probably 12 transmembrane domains, a cluster of predicted N-linked glycosylation sites, and a consensus transport motif. Analysis of the distribution of Nramp2 mRNA transcripts in normal mouse tissues by Northern blotting revealed that the Nramp2 gene produces several mRNAs, including prominent 3.3- and 2.3-kb species generated by the use of alternative polyadenylation signals. In contrast to the previously described macrophage-specific Nramp gene, Nramp2 mRNAs were found to be expressed at low levels in all tissues tested. Using a polymorphic (GT)26 dinucleotide repeat identified in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the mRNA, we have mapped the Nramp2 gene to the distal part of mouse chromosome 15 between markers D15Mit41 and D15Mit15, with the gene order and intergene distance (in cM): centromere-56.1-D15Mit41-(1{+-}1)-Nramp2-(5{+-}2)-D15Mit15. 59 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  3. Mouse models for assessing the cross-protective efficacy of oral non-typhoidal Salmonella vaccine candidates harbouring in-frame deletions of the ATP-dependent protease lon and other genes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Fukiya, Satoru; Kodama-Akaboshi, Chie; Eguchi, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    In BALB/c mouse models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, a single oral immunization with a mutant strain with an insertion of the chloramphenicol resistance gene into the ATP-dependent protease clpP or lon gene decreased the number of salmonellae in each tissue sample 5 days after oral challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium at weeks 26 and 54 post-immunization. These data suggested that an oral immunization with the ClpP- or Lon-disrupted S. Typhimurium strain could provide long-term protection against oral challenge with virulent S. Typhimurium. Accordingly, recombinant oral non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) vaccines were constructed by incorporating mutants of both S. Typhimurium and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis harbouring stable in-frame markerless deletions of the clpP-lon-sulA (suppressor of lon), lon-sulA or lon-msbB (acyltransferase) genes. Amongst these orally administered vaccine candidates, those with the lon-sulA gene deletion mutants of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis protected BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice against oral challenge with both virulent S. Typhimurium and virulent S. Enteritidis. Therefore, the in-frame markerless lon-sulA gene deletion mutant of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis could be a promising cross-protective NTS live vaccine candidate for practical use in humans.

  4. Manual Gene Ontology annotation workflow at the Mouse Genome Informatics Database.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, Harold J; Blake, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, the Gene Expression Database and the Mouse Tumor Biology database are integrated components of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource (http://www.informatics.jax.org). The MGI system presents both a consensus view and an experimental view of the knowledge concerning the genetics and genomics of the laboratory mouse. From genotype to phenotype, this information resource integrates information about genes, sequences, maps, expression analyses, alleles, strains and mutant phenotypes. Comparative mammalian data are also presented particularly in regards to the use of the mouse as a model for the investigation of molecular and genetic components of human diseases. These data are collected from literature curation as well as downloads of large datasets (SwissProt, LocusLink, etc.). MGI is one of the founding members of the Gene Ontology (GO) and uses the GO for functional annotation of genes. Here, we discuss the workflow associated with manual GO annotation at MGI, from literature collection to display of the annotations. Peer-reviewed literature is collected mostly from a set of journals available electronically. Selected articles are entered into a master bibliography and indexed to one of eight areas of interest such as 'GO' or 'homology' or 'phenotype'. Each article is then either indexed to a gene already contained in the database or funneled through a separate nomenclature database to add genes. The master bibliography and associated indexing provide information for various curator-reports such as 'papers selected for GO that refer to genes with NO GO annotation'. Once indexed, curators who have expertise in appropriate disciplines enter pertinent information. MGI makes use of several controlled vocabularies that ensure uniform data encoding, enable robust analysis and support the construction of complex queries. These vocabularies range from pick-lists to structured vocabularies such as the GO. All data associations are supported

  5. Mouse models as a tool to unravel the genetic basis for human otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qing Yin; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Brown, Steve D.M.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of otitis media (OM) is multifactorial and includes infection, anatomical factors, immunologic status, genetic predisposition, and environmental factors. OM remains the most common cause of hearing impairment in childhood. Genetic predisposition is increasingly recognized as an important factor. The completion of the mouse genome sequence has offered a powerful basket of tools for investigating gene function and can expect to generate a rich resource of mouse mutants for the elucidation of genetic factors underlying OM. We review the literature and discuss recent progresses in developing mouse models and using mouse models to uncover the genetic basis for human OM. PMID:16917982

  6. Spatial gene expression in the T-stage mouse metanephros.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Georgina; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Nelson, Amy L; Kostoulias, Xenia; Woods, Kyra; Gardiner, Brooke; Davis, Melissa J; Taylor, Darrin F; Teasdale, Rohan D; Grimmond, Sean M; Little, Melissa H; Bertram, John F

    2006-10-01

    The E11.5 mouse metanephros is comprised of a T-stage ureteric epithelial tubule sub-divided into tip and trunk cells surrounded by metanephric mesenchyme (MM). Tip cells are induced to undergo branching morphogenesis by the MM. In contrast, signals within the mesenchyme surrounding the trunk prevent ectopic branching of this region. In order to identify novel genes involved in the molecular regulation of branching morphogenesis we compared the gene expression profiles of isolated tip, trunk and MM cells using Compugen mouse long oligo microarrays. We identified genes enriched in the tip epithelium, sim-1, Arg2, Tacstd1, Crlf-1 and BMP7; genes enriched in the trunk epithelium, Innp1, Itm2b, Mkrn1, SPARC, Emu2 and Gsta3 and genes spatially restricted to the mesenchyme surrounding the trunk, CSPG2 and CV-2, with overlapping and complimentary expression to BMP4, respectively. This study has identified genes spatially expressed in regions of the developing kidney involved in branching morphogenesis, nephrogenesis and the development of the collecting duct system, calyces, renal pelvis and ureter.

  7. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely "functional," i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  8. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  9. Cloning and chromosome localization of the mouse Ews gene

    SciTech Connect

    Plougastel, B.; Thomas, G.; Delattre, O.; Mattei, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The human EWS gene encodes a putative RNA binding protein. As a result of acquired chromosome rearrangement, the N-terminal portion of the EWS protein is fused to the DNA binding domain of either FLI1-or ERG in the Ewing family of tumors and to the DNA binding domain of ATF1 in malignant melanoma of soft parts. We have determined the cDNA sequence of the mouse Ews gene. Its nucleotide sequence and its translation product demonstrate 93 and 98% homology with the human EWS cDNA and protein, respectively. The murine Ews locus lies within a conserved synteny segment between human chromosome 22q12 and mouse chromosome 11A1-A3.

  10. The mouse genome database (MGD): new features facilitating a model system.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2007-01-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), the international community database for mouse, provides access to extensive integrated data on the genetics, genomics and biology of the laboratory mouse. The mouse is an excellent and unique animal surrogate for studying normal development and disease processes in humans. Thus, MGD's primary goals are to facilitate the use of mouse models for studying human disease and enable the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Core MGD data content includes gene characterization and functions, phenotype and disease model descriptions, DNA and protein sequence data, polymorphisms, gene mapping data and genome coordinates, and comparative gene data focused on mammals. Data are integrated from diverse sources, ranging from major resource centers to individual investigator laboratories and the scientific literature, using a combination of automated processes and expert human curation. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards, and it incorporates key ontologies into the MGD annotation system, including the Gene Ontology (GO), the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and the Anatomical Dictionary for Mouse Development and the Adult Anatomy. MGD is the authoritative source for mouse nomenclature for genes, alleles, and mouse strains, and for GO annotations to mouse genes. MGD provides a unique platform for data mining and hypothesis generation where one can express complex queries simultaneously addressing phenotypic effects, biochemical function and process, sub-cellular location, expression, sequence, polymorphism and mapping data. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the incorporation of single nucleotide polymorphism data and search tools, the addition of PIR gene superfamily classifications

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A 950-GENE DNA ARRAY FOR EXAMINING GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of a 950-gene DNA array for examining gene expression patterns in mouse testis.

    Rockett JC, Christopher Luft J, Brian Garges J, Krawetz SA, Hughes MR, Hee Kirn K, Oudes AJ, Dix DJ.

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effec...

  12. Mouse models rarely mimic the transcriptome of human neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic bioinformatics-based critique of preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Burns, Terry C; Li, Matthew D; Mehta, Swapnil; Awad, Ahmed J; Morgan, Alexander A

    2015-07-15

    Translational research for neurodegenerative disease depends intimately upon animal models. Unfortunately, promising therapies developed using mouse models mostly fail in clinical trials, highlighting uncertainty about how well mouse models mimic human neurodegenerative disease at the molecular level. We compared the transcriptional signature of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), Parkinson׳s disease (PD), Huntington׳s disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to human disease. In contrast to aging, which demonstrated a conserved transcriptome between humans and mice, only 3 of 19 animal models showed significant enrichment for gene sets comprising the most dysregulated up- and down-regulated human genes. Spearman׳s correlation analysis revealed even healthy human aging to be more closely related to human neurodegeneration than any mouse model of AD, PD, ALS or HD. Remarkably, mouse models frequently upregulated stress response genes that were consistently downregulated in human diseases. Among potential alternate models of neurodegeneration, mouse prion disease outperformed all other disease-specific models. Even among the best available animal models, conserved differences between mouse and human transcriptomes were found across multiple animal model versus human disease comparisons, surprisingly, even including aging. Relative to mouse models, mouse disease signatures demonstrated consistent trends toward preserved mitochondrial function protein catabolism, DNA repair responses, and chromatin maintenance. These findings suggest a more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology in human neurodegeneration than is captured through standard animal models, and suggest that even among conserved physiological processes such as aging, mice are less prone to exhibit neurodegeneration-like changes. This work may help explain the poor track record of mouse-based translational therapies for neurodegeneration and provides a path

  13. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  14. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Drug Development and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho

    2014-01-01

    Drug development and preclinical trials are challenging processes and more than 80% to 90% of drug candidates fail to gain approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration. Predictive and efficient tools are required to discover high quality targets and increase the probability of success in the process of new drug development. One such solution to the challenges faced in the development of new drugs and combination therapies is the use of low-cost and experimentally manageable in vivo animal models. Since the 1980’s, scientists have been able to genetically modify the mouse genome by removing or replacing a specific gene, which has improved the identification and validation of target genes of interest. Now genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are widely used and have proved to be a powerful tool in drug discovery processes. This review particularly covers recent fascinating technologies for drug discovery and preclinical trials, targeted transgenesis and RNAi mouse, including application and combination of inducible system. Improvements in technologies and the development of new GEMMs are expected to guide future applications of these models to drug discovery and preclinical trials. PMID:25143803

  15. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing

    PubMed Central

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-driving mutations in the TP53 gene occur frequently in human cancers. These inactivating mutations arise predominantly from a single-point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of this tumor suppressor gene (i.e., exons 4–9). The human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was constructed using gene-targeting technology to create a mouse strain that harbors human wild-type TP53 DNA sequences in both copies of the mouse TP53 gene. Replacement of exons 4–9 of the endogenous mouse TP53 alleles in the Hupki mouse with the homologous normal human TP53 gene sequences has offered a humanized replica of the TP53 gene in a murine genetic environment. The Hupki mouse model system has proven to be an invaluable research tool for studying the underlying mechanisms of human TP53 mutagenesis. The utility of the Hupki mouse model system for exploring carcinogen-induced TP53 mutagenesis has been demonstrated in both in vivo animal experiments and in vitro cell culture experiments. Here, we highlight applications of the Hupki mouse model system for investigating mutagenesis induced by a variety of environmental carcinogens, including sunlight ultraviolet radiation, benzo[a]pyrene (a tobacco smoke-derived carcinogen), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (an urban air pollutant), aristolochic acid (a component of Chinese herbal medicine), and aflatoxin B1 (a food contaminant). We summarize the salient findings of the respective studies and discuss their relevance to human cancer etiology.—Besaratinia, A., Pfeifer, G. P. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing. PMID:20371617

  16. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY MUTAGENS IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS INDUCED BY BROMATE AND N- ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA IN THE TK GENE OF MOUSE L YMPHOMA CELLS

    The mouse lymphoma assay is widely used to identify chemical mutagens The Tk +1- gene located on an autosome in mouse lymphoma cells may recover a wide ra...

  17. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  18. Mouse lysozyme M gene: isolation, characterization, and expression studies.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Wedel, A; Renkawitz, R

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized both cDNA and genomic DNA of the mouse lysozyme M gene. Derivation of the amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequences revealed six positions in the carboxyl terminus that differ from partial sequences previously published. The differential detection of specific mRNAs from the closely related lysozyme M and P genes has revealed different but overlapping tissue specificities of expression. The M gene is expressed weakly in myeloblasts, moderately in immature macrophages, and strongly in both mature macrophages and macrophage-rich tissues, while high levels of P transcripts are present only in small intestine. Sites of protein accumulation, rather than gene expression, have been identified by comparative quantitation of mRNA and enzyme levels. Images PMID:3413093

  19. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): new features and how to use them effectively

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Xu, Jingxia; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is an extensive and freely available community resource of mouse developmental expression data. GXD curates and integrates expression data from the literature, via electronic data submissions, and by collaborations with large-scale projects. As an integral component of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) Resource, GXD combines expression data with genetic, functional, phenotypic and disease-related data, and provides tools for the research community to search for and analyze expression data in this larger context. Recent enhancements include: an interactive browser to navigate the mouse developmental anatomy and find expression data for specific anatomical structures; the capability to search for expression data of genes located in specific genomic regions, supporting the identification of disease candidate genes; a summary displaying all the expression images that meet specified search criteria; interactive matrix views that provide overviews of spatio-temporal expression patterns (Tissue × Stage Matrix) and enable the comparison of expression patterns between genes (Tissue × Gene Matrix); data zoom and filter utilities to iteratively refine summary displays and data sets; and gene-based links to expression data from other model organisms, such as chicken, Xenopus and zebrafish, fostering comparative expression analysis for species that are highly relevant for developmental research. PMID:26045019

  20. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiugong Sprando, Robert L.; Yourick, Jeffrey J.

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure to 0.25 mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment. - Highlights: • Studied genomic changes in mouse embryonic stem cells upon thalidomide exposure • Identified gene expression changes that may represent thalidomide embryotoxicity • The toxicogenomic changes coincide well with known thalidomide clinical outcomes. • The mouse embryonic stem cell model is suitable for developmental toxicity testing. • The model has the potential for high-throughput screening of a multitude of compounds.

  1. Mouse models of liver cancer: Progress and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Tian, De-An; Li, Pei-Yuan; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigate the effects of potential therapies, a number of mouse models have been developed. Subcutaneous xenograft models are widely used in the past decades. Yet, with the advent of in vivo imaging technology, investigators are more and more concerned with the orthotopic models nowadays. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEM) have greatly facilitated studies of gene function in HCC development. Recently, GEM of miR-122 and miR-221 provided new approaches for better understanding of the in vivo functions of microRNA in hepatocarcinogenesis. Chemically induced liver tumors in animals share many of the morphological, histogenic, and biochemical features of human HCC. Yet, the complicated and obscure genomic alternation restricts their applications. In this review, we highlight both the frequently used mouse models and some emerging ones with emphasis on their merits or defects, and give advises for investigators to chose a “best-fit” animal model in HCC research. PMID:26259234

  2. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    PubMed

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  3. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  4. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  5. Delivery of the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene to the central nervous system using adeno-associated virus vector in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pasta, Saloni; Akhile, Omoye; Tabron, Dorothy; Ting, Flora; Shackleton, Cedric; Watson, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Smith Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an inherited malformation and mental retardation metabolic disorder with no cure. Mutations in the last enzyme of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), lead to cholesterol insufficiency and accumulation of its dehyrdocholesterol precursors, and contribute to its pathogenesis. The central nervous system (CNS) constitutes a major pathophysiological component of this disorder and remains unamenable to dietary cholesterol therapy due to the impenetrability of the blood brain barrier (BBB). The goal of this study was to restore sterol homeostasis in the CNS. To bypass the BBB, gene therapy using an adeno-associated virus (AAV-8) vector carrying a functional copy of the DHCR7 gene was administered by intrathecal (IT) injection directly into the cerebrospinal fluid of newborn mice. Two months post-treatment, vector DNA and DHCR7 expression was observed in the brain and a corresponding improvement of sterol levels seen in the brain and spinal cord. Interestingly, sterol levels in the peripheral nervous system also showed a similar improvement. This study shows that IT gene therapy can have a positive biochemical effect on sterol homeostasis in the central and peripheral nervous systems in a SLOS animal model. A single dose delivered three days after birth had a sustained effect into adulthood, eight weeks post-treatment. These observations pave the way for further studies to understand the effect of biochemical improvement of sterol levels on neuronal function, to provide a greater understanding of neuronal cholesterol homeostasis, and to develop potential therapies. PMID:26347274

  6. On Models and Mickey Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, Deanna

    2005-01-01

    The re-issue of a nineteenth-century French "Drawing Course" is the occasion for an examination of issues of "models of good practice" in current art teaching. These are listed as an expanded set of student-centred pedagogical paradigms, which embrace the forceful popular imagery of electronic games and comic strips. The formalist adaptations of…

  7. Genetic mapping of tumor susceptibility genes involved in mouse plasmacytomagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; Krall, M.M.; Dosik, J.K. )

    1993-10-15

    Plasmacytomas (PCTs) were induced in 47% of BALB/cAnPt mice by the intraperitoneal injection of pristane, in 2% of (BALB/c [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1], and in 11% of 773 BALB/cAnPt [times] (BALB/cAnPt [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1]N[sub 2] backcross mice. This result indicates a multigenic mode of inheritance for PCT susceptibility. To locate genes controlling this complex genetic trait, tumor susceptibility in backcross progeny generated from BALB/c and DBA/2N (resistant) mice was correlated with alleles of 83 marker loci. The genotypes of the PCT-susceptible progeny displayed an excess homozygosity for BALB/c alleles with a 32-centimorgan stretch of mouse chromosome 4 (>95% probability of linkage) with minimal recombination (12%) near Gt10. Another susceptibility gene on mouse chromosome 1 may be linked to Fcgr2 (90% probability of linkage); there were excess heterozygotes for Fcgr2 among the susceptible progeny and excess homozygotes among the resistant progeny. Regions of mouse chromosomes 4 and 1 that are correlated with PCT susceptibility share extensive linkage homology with regions of human chromosome 1 that have been associated with cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and lymphoid, breast, and endocrine tumors. 68 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Using standard nomenclature to adequately name transgenes, knockout gene alleles and any mutation associated to a genetically modified mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Lluís; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    Mice provide an unlimited source of animal models to study mammalian gene function and human diseases. The powerful genetic modification toolbox existing for the mouse genome enables the creation of, literally, thousands of genetically modified mouse strains, carrying spontaneous or induced mutations, transgenes or knock-out/knock-in alleles which, in addition, can exist in hundreds of different genetic backgrounds. Such an immense diversity of individuals needs to be adequately annotated, to ensure that the most relevant information is kept associated with the name of each mouse line, and hence, the scientific community can correctly interpret and benefit from the reported animal model. Therefore, rules and guidelines for correctly naming genes, alleles and mouse strains are required. The Mouse Genome Informatics Database is the authoritative source of official names for mouse genes, alleles, and strains. Nomenclature follows the rules and guidelines established by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. Herewith, both from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) and from the scientific journal Transgenic Research, we would like to encourage all our colleagues to adhere and follow adequately the standard nomenclature rules when describing mouse models. The entire scientific community using genetically modified mice in experiments will benefit.

  9. Gene transfer techniques in whole embryo cultured post-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Trainor, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer techniques such as electroporation and lipofection are powerful systems for investigating gene function. In this chapter we focus on the methods and applications of gene transfer into specific cells and tissues of post-implantation mouse embryos.

  10. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular

  11. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Giovannini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors. PMID:12082543

  12. Glycine receptor mouse mutants: model systems for human hyperekplexia

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Natascha; Langlhofer, Georg; Kluck, Christoph J; Villmann, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Human hyperekplexia is a neuromotor disorder caused by disturbances in inhibitory glycine-mediated neurotransmission. Mutations in genes encoding for glycine receptor subunits or associated proteins, such as GLRA1, GLRB, GPHN and ARHGEF9, have been detected in patients suffering from hyperekplexia. Classical symptoms are exaggerated startle attacks upon unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli, massive tremor, loss of postural control during startle and apnoea. Usually patients are treated with clonazepam, this helps to dampen the severe symptoms most probably by up-regulating GABAergic responses. However, the mechanism is not completely understood. Similar neuromotor phenotypes have been observed in mouse models that carry glycine receptor mutations. These mouse models serve as excellent tools for analysing the underlying pathomechanisms. Yet, studies in mutant mice looking for postsynaptic compensation of glycinergic dysfunction via an up-regulation in GABAA receptor numbers have failed, as expression levels were similar to those in wild-type mice. However, presynaptic adaptation mechanisms with an unusual switch from mixed GABA/glycinergic to GABAergic presynaptic terminals have been observed. Whether this presynaptic adaptation explains the improvement in symptoms or other compensation mechanisms exist is still under investigation. With the help of spontaneous glycine receptor mouse mutants, knock-in and knock-out studies, it is possible to associate behavioural changes with pharmacological differences in glycinergic inhibition. This review focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of the various mouse models used to elucidate the underlying signal transduction pathways and adaptation processes and describes a novel route that uses gene-therapeutic modulation of mutated receptors to overcome loss of function mutations. PMID:23941355

  13. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary-tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus, making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field. PMID:25136513

  16. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  17. Changes in gene expression associated with retinal degeneration in the rd3 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christiana L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify and characterize changes in gene expression associated with photoreceptor degeneration in the rd3 mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) type 12. Methods Global genome expression profiling using microarray technology was performed on total RNA extracts from rd3 and wild-type control mouse retinas at postnatal day 21. Quantitative PCR analysis of selected transcripts was performed to validate the microarray results. Results Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes in the rd3 mouse defined key canonical pathways, including phototransduction, glycerophospholipid metabolism, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling, and endothelin signaling. Overall, 1,140 of approximately 55,800 transcripts were differentially represented. In particular, a large percentage of the upregulated transcripts encode proteins involved in the immune response; whereas the downregulated transcripts encode proteins involved in phototransduction and lipid metabolism. Conclusions This analysis has elucidated several candidate genes and pathways, thus providing insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the photoreceptor degeneration in the rd3 mouse retina and indicating directions for future studies. PMID:23687432

  18. Expression of a mouse metallothionein-Escherichia coli. beta. -galactosidase fusion gene (MT-. beta. gal) in early mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.E.; Meneses, J.J.; Pedersen, R.A. )

    1989-08-01

    The authors have microinjected DNA containing the inducible mouse metallothionein-I (MT-I) promoter, coupled to the structural gene for Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase (lacZ), into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. A qualitative histochemical assay, with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl {beta}-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) as a substrate, was used to detect expression of lacZ at several preimplantation stages. They observed staining indicative of exogenous {beta}-galactosidase activity in 5-17% of DNA-injected embryos assayed at preimplantation stages after 16-24 h treatment with ZnSO{sub 4}. Thus, lacZ can be used as an indicator gene for promoter function during early mouse embryogenesis, and the incorporation of the MT-I promoter into fusion genes can be a useful means of controlling the expression of exogenous genes in preimplantation mouse embryos.

  19. Mutations in the exon 7 of Trp53 gene and the level of p53 protein in double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dorszewska, Jolanta; Oczkowska, Anna; Suwalska, Monika; Rozycka, Agata; Florczak-Wyspianska, Jolanta; Dezor, Mateusz; Lianeri, Margarita; Jagodzinski, Paweł P; Kowalczyk, Michal J; Prendecki, Michal; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. Alzheimer's disease model PS/APP mice show a markedly accelerated accumulation of Aβ, which may lead to apoptosis induction e.g. in cells expressing wild-type p53. The TP53 gene is found to be the most frequently mutated gene in human tumour cells. There is accumulating evidence pointing out to the contribution of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in both AD and cancer. The purpose of this study was to analyze exon 7 mutations of the murine Trp53 gene and Aβ/A4 and p53 protein levels in PS/APP and control mice. The studies were performed on female double transgenic PS/APP mice and young adults (8-12 weeks old) and age-matched control mice. The Trp53 mutation analysis was carried out with the use of PCR and DNA sequencing. The Aβ/A4 and p53 levels were analyzed by Western blotting. The frequency of mutations was almost quadrupled in PS/APP mice (44%), compared to controls (14%). PS/APP mice with the A929T and A857G mutations had a similar p53 level. In cerebral gray matter of PS/APP mice the level of p53 positive correlated with the level of Aβ protein (RS = +0.700, p < 0.05). In younger control animals, the T854G mutation was related to p53 down-regulation, while in aging ones, G859A substitution was most likely associated with over-expression of p53. In silico protein analysis revealed a possibly substantial impact of all four mutations on p53 activity. Three mutations were in close proximity to zinc-coordinating cysteine residues. It seems that in PS/APP mice missense Trp53 exon 7 mutations may be associated with the degenerative process by changes of p53 protein function. PMID:24729341

  20. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Methods Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT–PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue

  1. Gene expression and dental enamel structure in developing mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Risnes, Steinar; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Khuu, Cuong; Osmundsen, Harald

    2010-04-01

    At the mouse incisor tip the initially differentiated ameloblasts produce a thin, prism-free enamel, while further apically, in the immediate adjacent segment, the enamel thickness increases and the four-layered enamel of mouse incisor is formed. Comparative gene-expression profiling was carried out on RNA isolated from these two segments of incisor tooth germs at embryonic day (E)17.5 and at postnatal days (P)0, 1, 2, and 10 using microarrays to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) species present in the segments. Validation of expression data was achieved using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Bioinformatic data suggested enhanced cellular apoptosis in the incisal tip segment, which, together with diminished expression of the Amelx and Enam genes, may contribute to the production of the thin enamel seen in this tooth segment. For genes exhibiting higher levels of expression in the adjacent segment where complex enamel is being formed, bioinformatic analysis suggested significant associations with cellular functions involving the actin cytoskeleton, cellular development, morphology, and movement. This is suggested to reflect that ameloblasts with Tomes' process are being organized in transverse rows, facilitating the transverse movement that results in prism decussation in the inner enamel of the adjacent segment. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression data lends support to these suggestions.

  2. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2010 update

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Burton, Nicholas; Rao, Jianguo; Fisher, Malcolm; Baldock, Richard A.; Davidson, Duncan R.; Christiansen, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage) is a freely available online database of in situ gene expression patterns in the developing mouse embryo. Gene expression domains from raw images are extracted and integrated spatially into a set of standard 3D virtual mouse embryos at different stages of development, which allows data interrogation by spatial methods. An anatomy ontology is also used to describe sites of expression, which allows data to be queried using text-based methods. Here, we describe recent enhancements to EMAGE including: the release of a completely re-designed website, which offers integration of many different search functions in HTML web pages, improved user feedback and the ability to find similar expression patterns at the click of a button; back-end refactoring from an object oriented to relational architecture, allowing associated SQL access; and the provision of further access by standard formatted URLs and a Java API. We have also increased data coverage by sourcing from a greater selection of journals and developed automated methods for spatial data annotation that are being applied to spatially incorporate the genome-wide (∼19 000 gene) ‘EURExpress’ dataset into EMAGE. PMID:19767607

  3. EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2010 update.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lorna; Venkataraman, Shanmugasundaram; Stevenson, Peter; Yang, Yiya; Burton, Nicholas; Rao, Jianguo; Fisher, Malcolm; Baldock, Richard A; Davidson, Duncan R; Christiansen, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage) is a freely available online database of in situ gene expression patterns in the developing mouse embryo. Gene expression domains from raw images are extracted and integrated spatially into a set of standard 3D virtual mouse embryos at different stages of development, which allows data interrogation by spatial methods. An anatomy ontology is also used to describe sites of expression, which allows data to be queried using text-based methods. Here, we describe recent enhancements to EMAGE including: the release of a completely re-designed website, which offers integration of many different search functions in HTML web pages, improved user feedback and the ability to find similar expression patterns at the click of a button; back-end refactoring from an object oriented to relational architecture, allowing associated SQL access; and the provision of further access by standard formatted URLs and a Java API. We have also increased data coverage by sourcing from a greater selection of journals and developed automated methods for spatial data annotation that are being applied to spatially incorporate the genome-wide (approximately 19,000 gene) 'EURExpress' dataset into EMAGE. PMID:19767607

  4. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Hayamizu, Terry F; McCright, Ingeborg J; Xu, Jingxia; Berghout, Joanne; Campbell, Jeff; Corbani, Lori E; Forthofer, Kim L; Frost, Pete J; Miers, Dave; Shaw, David R; Stone, Kevin R; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; http://www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD collects different types of expression data from studies of wild-type and mutant mice, covering all developmental stages and including data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. The data are acquired from the scientific literature and from researchers, including groups doing large-scale expression studies. Integration with the other data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and interconnections with other databases places GXD's gene expression information in the larger biological and biomedical context. Since the last report, the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by the addition of new data and by the implementation of more powerful and versatile search and display features. Web interface enhancements include the capability to search for expression data for genes associated with specific phenotypes and/or human diseases; new, more interactive data summaries; easy downloading of data; direct searches of expression images via associated metadata; and new displays that combine image data and their associated annotations. At present, GXD includes >1.4 million expression results and 250,000 images that are accessible to our search tools. PMID:24163257

  5. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2007 update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Constance M.; Finger, Jacqueline H.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) provides the scientific community with an extensive and easily searchable database of gene expression information about the mouse. Its primary emphasis is on developmental studies. By integrating different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide comprehensive information about expression patterns of transcripts and proteins in wild-type and mutant mice. Integration with the other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) databases places the gene expression information in the context of genetic, sequence, functional and phenotypic information, enabling valuable insights into the molecular biology that underlies developmental and disease processes. In recent years the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by a large increase in data content, obtained from the literature and provided by researchers doing large-scale in situ and cDNA screens. In addition, we have continued to refine our query and display features to make it easier for users to interrogate the data. GXD is available through the MGI web site at or directly at . PMID:17130151

  6. BodyMap: a human and mouse gene expression database.

    PubMed

    Hishiki, T; Kawamoto, S; Morishita, S; Okubo, K

    2000-01-01

    BodyMap is a human and mouse gene expression database that has been maintained since 1993. It is based on site-directed 3'-ESTs collected from non-biased cDNA libraries constructed at Osaka University and contains >270 000 sequences from 60 human and 38 mouse tissues. The site-directed nature of the sequence tags allows unequivocal grouping of tags representing the same transcript and provides abundance information for each transcript in different parts of the body. Our collection of ESTs was compared periodically with other public databases for cross referencing. The histological resolution of source tissues and unique cloning strategy that minimized cloning bias enabled BodyMap to support three unique mRNA based experiments in silico. First, the recurrence information for clones in each library provides a rough estimate of the mRNA composition of each source tissue. Second, a user can search the entire data set with nucleotide sequences or keywords to assess expression patterns of particular genes. Third, and most important, BodyMap allows a user to select genes that have a desired expression pattern in humans and mice. BodyMap is accessible through the WWW at http://bodymap.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:10592203

  7. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  8. A novel mouse model of creatine transporter deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Laura; Alessandrì, Maria Grazia; Tola, Jonida; Putignano, Elena; Migliore, Martina; Amendola, Elena; Gross, Cornelius; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Cioni, Giovanni; Pizzorusso, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the creatine (Cr) transporter (CrT) gene lead to cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome-1 (CCDS1), an X-linked metabolic disorder characterized by cerebral Cr deficiency causing intellectual disability, seizures, movement  and behavioral disturbances, language and speech impairment ( OMIM #300352). CCDS1 is still an untreatable pathology that can be very invalidating for patients and caregivers. Only two murine models of CCDS1, one of which is an ubiquitous knockout mouse, are currently available to study the possible mechanisms underlying the pathologic phenotype of CCDS1 and to develop therapeutic strategies. Given the importance of validating phenotypes and efficacy of promising treatments in more than one mouse model we have generated a new murine model of CCDS1 obtained by ubiquitous deletion of 5-7 exons in the Slc6a8 gene. We showed a remarkable Cr depletion in the murine brain tissues and cognitive defects, thus resembling the key features of human CCDS1. These results confirm that CCDS1 can be well modeled in mice. This CrT −/y murine model will provide a new tool for increasing the relevance of preclinical studies to the human disease. PMID:25485098

  9. Simultaneous synthesis of human-, mouse- and chimeric epidermal growth factor genes via 'hybrid gene synthesis' approach.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, W L; Zahab, D M; Yao, F L; Wu, R; Narang, S A

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous synthesis of two DNA duplexes encoding human and mouse epidermal growth factors (EGF) was accomplished in a single step. A 174 b.p. DNA heteroduplex, with 16 single and double base pair mismatches, was designed. One strand encoded the human EGF, and the opposite strand indirectly encoded the mouse EGF. The heteroduplex DNA was synthesized by ligation of seven overlapping oligodeoxyribonucleotides with a linearized plasmid. After transformation in E. coli HB101 (recA 13), the resulting heteroduplex plasmid served as the template in plasmid replication. Two different plasmid progenies bearing either the human or mouse EGF-coding sequence were identified by colony hybridization using the appropriate probes. However, in E. coli JM103, the same process yielded plasmid progenies encoding different chimeric EGF molecules, presumably due to crossover of human and mouse EGF gene sequences. Images PMID:3529034

  10. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  11. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments.

  12. Gene expression profiling in primary mouse hepatocytes discriminates true from false-positive genotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Mathijs, K; Brauers, K J J; Jennen, D G J; Lizarraga, D; Kleinjans, J C S; van Delft, J H M

    2010-11-01

    Well-established in vitro methods for testing the genotoxic potency of chemicals--such as the Ames/Salmonella test, the mouse lymphoma assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosomal aberration test--show a high false-positive rate for predicting in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Thus, there is a need for more reliable in vitro assays. We investigated whether gene expression profiling in metabolically competent primary mouse hepatocytes is capable of discriminating true genotoxic (GTX) compounds from false-positive genotoxic (FP-GTX) compounds. Sandwich-cultured primary hepatocytes from male C57Bl6 mice were treated for 24 and 48 h with five true GTX and five FP-GTX compounds. Whole genome gene expression modifications were analysed by means of Affymetrix mouse genome 430 2.0 microarrays. Filtered genes were used for hierarchical clustering and class prediction methods. Classifiers were generated by prediction analysis of microarray using a leave-one-compound-out method and selecting the genes that were common to the 10 training sets. For the training compounds, all but one were correctly classified. Validation of the classification model with five new compounds resulted in a 100% correct classification at 24 h and 80% at 48 h. The generated classifiers were mostly involved in metabolic and biosynthetic processes, immune responses and apoptosis. Applying genes whose expression change correlates with γH2AX foci, a measure for DNA damage, did not improve the classification. The present study shows that gene expression profiling in primary mouse hepatocytes is capable of discriminating between true GTX and FP-GTX compounds.

  13. Unstressing intemperate models: how cold stress undermines mouse modeling.

    PubMed

    Karp, Christopher L

    2012-06-01

    Mus musculus enjoys pride of place at the center of contemporary biomedical research. Despite being the current model system of choice for in vivo mechanistic analysis, mice have clear limitations. The literature is littered with examples of therapeutic approaches that showed promise in mouse models but failed in clinical trials. More generally, mice often provide poor mimics of the human diseases being modeled. Available data suggest that the cold stress to which laboratory mice are ubiquitously subjected profoundly affects mouse physiology in ways that impair the modeling of human homeostasis and disease. Experimental attention to this key, albeit largely ignored, environmental variable is likely to have a broad transformative effect on biomedical research.

  14. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  15. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2011 update

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD integrates different types of expression data at the transcript and protein level and captures expression information from many different mouse strains and mutants. GXD places these data in the larger biological context through integration with other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resources and interconnections with many other databases. Web-based query forms support simple or complex searches that take advantage of all these integrated data. The data in GXD are obtained from the literature, from individual laboratories, and from large-scale data providers. All data are annotated and reviewed by GXD curators. Since the last report, the GXD data content has increased significantly, the interface and data displays have been improved, new querying capabilities were implemented, and links to other expression resources were added. GXD is available through the MGI web site (www.informatics.jax.org), or directly at www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml. PMID:21062809

  16. Decrease of gene expression of astrocytic 5-HT2B receptors parallels development of depressive phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xique; Song, Dan; Gu, Li; Ren, Yan; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes contribute to pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression. Stimulation of astroglial 5-HT2B receptors transactivates epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and regulates gene expression. Previously we reported that expression of 5-HT2B receptors in cortical astrocytes is down-regulated in animals, which developed anhedonia in response to chronic stress; moreover this down-regulation as well as anhedonia, are reversed by chronic treatment with fluoxetine. In this study we have investigated whether astrocytic 5-HT2B receptor is involved in anhedonia in C57BL/6 mice model of Parkinson' disease (PD) induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 days. The MPTP treatment induced anhendonia in 66.7% of animals. The appearance of depressive behavior was accompanied with motor deficiency and decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression. Expression of mRNA and protein of 5-HT2B receptor in animals that became anhedonic decreased to 77.3 and 79.3% of control groups, respectively; in animals that received MPTP but did not develop anhedonia the expression of 5-HT2B receptor did not change. Experiments with FACS-sorted isolated cells demonstrated that decrease in 5-HT2B receptor expression was confined to astrocytes, and did not occur in neurons. Fluoxetine corrected MPTP-induced decrease of 5-HT2B receptor expression and depressive behavior. Our findings indicate that regulation of gene expression of 5-HT2B receptors in astroglia may be associated with pathophysiological evolution of PD-induced depression.

  17. Decrease of gene expression of astrocytic 5-HT2B receptors parallels development of depressive phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xique; Song, Dan; Gu, Li; Ren, Yan; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes contribute to pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression. Stimulation of astroglial 5-HT2B receptors transactivates epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and regulates gene expression. Previously we reported that expression of 5-HT2B receptors in cortical astrocytes is down-regulated in animals, which developed anhedonia in response to chronic stress; moreover this down-regulation as well as anhedonia, are reversed by chronic treatment with fluoxetine. In this study we have investigated whether astrocytic 5-HT2B receptor is involved in anhedonia in C57BL/6 mice model of Parkinson’ disease (PD) induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 days. The MPTP treatment induced anhendonia in 66.7% of animals. The appearance of depressive behavior was accompanied with motor deficiency and decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression. Expression of mRNA and protein of 5-HT2B receptor in animals that became anhedonic decreased to 77.3 and 79.3% of control groups, respectively; in animals that received MPTP but did not develop anhedonia the expression of 5-HT2B receptor did not change. Experiments with FACS-sorted isolated cells demonstrated that decrease in 5-HT2B receptor expression was confined to astrocytes, and did not occur in neurons. Fluoxetine corrected MPTP-induced decrease of 5-HT2B receptor expression and depressive behavior. Our findings indicate that regulation of gene expression of 5-HT2B receptors in astroglia may be associated with pathophysiological evolution of PD-induced depression. PMID:26500493

  18. Decrease of gene expression of astrocytic 5-HT2B receptors parallels development of depressive phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xique; Song, Dan; Gu, Li; Ren, Yan; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes contribute to pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression. Stimulation of astroglial 5-HT2B receptors transactivates epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and regulates gene expression. Previously we reported that expression of 5-HT2B receptors in cortical astrocytes is down-regulated in animals, which developed anhedonia in response to chronic stress; moreover this down-regulation as well as anhedonia, are reversed by chronic treatment with fluoxetine. In this study we have investigated whether astrocytic 5-HT2B receptor is involved in anhedonia in C57BL/6 mice model of Parkinson' disease (PD) induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 days. The MPTP treatment induced anhendonia in 66.7% of animals. The appearance of depressive behavior was accompanied with motor deficiency and decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression. Expression of mRNA and protein of 5-HT2B receptor in animals that became anhedonic decreased to 77.3 and 79.3% of control groups, respectively; in animals that received MPTP but did not develop anhedonia the expression of 5-HT2B receptor did not change. Experiments with FACS-sorted isolated cells demonstrated that decrease in 5-HT2B receptor expression was confined to astrocytes, and did not occur in neurons. Fluoxetine corrected MPTP-induced decrease of 5-HT2B receptor expression and depressive behavior. Our findings indicate that regulation of gene expression of 5-HT2B receptors in astroglia may be associated with pathophysiological evolution of PD-induced depression. PMID:26500493

  19. Characterization of the p16 gene in the mouse: Evidence for a large gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.W.; Giendening, J.M.; Flores, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene product is an inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)/cyclin D complex. When uninhibited, the CDK4/cyclin D complex participates in the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and renders it inactive. Upon inactivation of the RB protein, transition from the G{sub 1} to the S phase of mitosis occurs and results in cellular proliferation. Thus, p16 is presumed to act as a negative regulator of cell growth by preventing the phosphorylation, and thereby subsequent inactivation, of RB by CDK4/cyclin D. Recently, the p16 gene (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene) has been mapped to chromosome 9p21 and found to be deleted or mutated in a number of tumor cell lines. These findings support the role of p16 as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor gene and suggest that the mutation of this gene may have global implications in carcinogenesis. We have chosen to test the functional significance of p16 mutations in vivo through the generation of a mouse mutant for p16. In preparation for this undertaking, eight apparently independent (as judged by restriction enzyme digestion and differential hybridization) mouse genomic embryonic stem cell clones have been identified using exon 2 from the human p16 gene as a probe. The identification of these multiple nonoverlapping clones was not entirely surprising since the reduced stringency hybridization of a zoo blot with the same probe also revealed 10-15 positive EcoRI fragments in all species tested, including human, monkey, cow, dog, cat, rabbit, hamster, mouse, chicken and D. melanogaster. Taken together, these findings suggest that the p16 gene is a member of a large gene family. The location of these genomic clones, as well as their potential expression in the mouse, is currently under investigation.

  20. Inheritance of a functional mouse metallothionein gene in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Wagner, G.J.; Yeargan, R.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1989-04-01

    Morphologically normal plants were obtained from progeny (Ro, R1 and R2) originating from tobacco leaf tissue transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing a chimeric gene for kanamycin resistance an the mouse metallothionein cDNA gene directed by the constitutive promote 35S from CaMV. Integration and expression in R1 progeny was demonstrated by Southern, Northern blot analysis and metallothionein assay. Kanamycin resistance analysis of R1 and R2 progeny showed inheritance to be as a dominant Mendelian trait. Seedlings obtained from self-fertilized transgenic tobacco are more tolerant to cadmium stress than nontransformed controls. Cadmium accumulation in leaves of transgenic seedlings exposed to a low, field-like Cd concentration was about 20% lower than that in nontransformed controls.

  1. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  2. Memory Improvement in the AβPP/PS1 Mouse Model of Familial Alzheimer’s Disease Induced by Carbamylated-Erythropoietin is Accompanied by Modulation of Synaptic Genes.

    PubMed

    Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Aso, Ester; Moreno, Jesús; Riera-Codina, Miquel; Sánchez, Alex; Vegas, Esteban; Ferrer, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprotection of erythropoietin (EPO) following long-term administration is hampered by the associated undesirable effects on hematopoiesis and body weight. For this reason, we tested carbamylated-EPO (CEPO), which has no effect on erythropoiesis, and compared it with EPO in the AβPP/PS1 mouse model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Groups of 5-month old wild type (WT) and transgenic mice received chronic treatment consisting of CEPO (2,500 or 5,000 UI/kg) or EPO (2,500 U I/kg) 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Memory at the end of treatment was assessed with the object recognition test. Microarray analysis and quantitative-PCR were used for gene expression studies. No alterations in erythropoiesis were observed in CEPO-treated WT and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. EPO and CEPO improved memory in AβPP/PS1 animals. However, only EPO decreased amyloid-β (Aβ)plaque burden and soluble Aβ(40). Microarray analysis of gene expression revealed a limited number of common genes modulated by EPO and CEPO. CEPO but not EPO significantly increased gene expression of dopamine receptors 1 and 2, and adenosine receptor 2a, and significantly down-regulated adrenergic receptor 1D and gastrin releasing peptide. CEPO treatment resulted in higher protein levels of dopamine receptors 1 and 2 in WT and AβPP/PS1 animals, whereas the adenosine receptor 2a was reduced in WT animals. The present results suggest that the improved behavior observed in AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice after CEPO treatment may be mediated, at least in part, by the observed modulation of the expression of molecules involved in neurotransmission. PMID:25790933

  3. Identifying aging-related genes in mouse hippocampus using gateway nodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput studies continue to produce volumes of metadata representing valuable sources of information to better guide biological research. With a stronger focus on data generation, analysis models that can readily identify actual signals have not received the same level of attention. This is due in part to high levels of noise and data heterogeneity, along with a lack of sophisticated algorithms for mining useful information. Networks have emerged as a powerful tool for modeling high-throughput data because they are capable of representing not only individual biological elements but also different types of relationships en masse. Moreover, well-established graph theoretic methodology can be applied to network models to increase efficiency and speed of analysis. In this project, we propose a network model that examines temporal data from mouse hippocampus at the transcriptional level via correlation of gene expression. Using this model, we formally define the concept of “gateway” nodes, loosely defined as nodes representing genes co-expressed in multiple states. We show that the proposed network model allows us to identify target genes implicated in hippocampal aging-related processes. Results By mining gateway genes related to hippocampal aging from networks made from gene expression in young and middle-aged mice, we provide a proof-of-concept of existence and importance of gateway nodes. Additionally, these results highlight how network analysis can act as a supplement to traditional statistical analysis of differentially expressed genes. Finally, we use the gateway nodes identified by our method as well as functional databases and literature to propose new targets for study of aging in the mouse hippocampus. Conclusions This research highlights the need for methods of temporal comparison using network models and provides a systems biology approach to extract information from correlation networks of gene expression. Our results identify a

  4. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  5. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  6. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4 -induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis.

  7. Linkage analysis of the whirler deafness gene on mouse chromosome 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.; Rogers, M.J.C.; Steel, K.P. ); Brown, S.D.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The whirler mouse harbors an autosomal recessive mutation on mouse chromosome 4 that causes deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the adult that is manifested as head-bobbing and circling behavior. Although there is no obvious human homologue for this mutation as yet, whirler is a potential mouse model for human autosomal recessive deafness. Many genetic markers for this region of mouse chromosome 4 are now available, and the authors have used these to construct genetic linkage maps in both inter- and intraspecific backcrosses as the first step toward the cloning of the whirler gene. A total of 19 loci were analyzed in these crosses, giving the following gene orders: Interspecific cross, centromere-(D4Mit5, D4Mit38)-D4Mit6-(Lv,Tzn,D4Mit44)-wi-Hxb-(D4Mit25, D4Nds9)-(D4Mit7, D4Ler2)-b-D4Mit45-(D4Wsm1, D4Mit27b)-(D4Rck65, D4Mit15), and intraspecific cross, centromere-(Mup-1, wi, Hxb)-b-D4Wsm1. This analysis has positioned the wi locus in the interval between the genes for [delta]-aminolevulinate dehydratase (Lv) and hexabrachion (Hxb). The human homologues of these genes, ALAD and HXB, both lie on human chromosome 9q32-q34. They therefore predict that a human homologue of the wi gene, involved in autosomal recessive deafness, lies in this region of conserved homology on 9q32-q34. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 10(4) C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  9. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Genetically diverse CC-founder mouse strains replicate the human influenza gene expression signature.

    PubMed

    Elbahesh, Husni; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-05-19

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are zoonotic pathogens that pose a major threat to human and animal health. Influenza virus disease severity is influenced by viral virulence factors as well as individual differences in host response. We analyzed gene expression changes in the blood of infected mice using a previously defined set of signature genes that was derived from changes in the blood transcriptome of IAV-infected human volunteers. We found that the human signature was reproduced well in the founder strains of the Collaborative Cross (CC) mice, thus demonstrating the relevance and importance of mouse experimental model systems for studying human influenza disease.

  11. AAV-Dominant Negative Tumor Necrosis Factor (DN-TNF) Gene Transfer to the Striatum Does Not Rescue Medium Spiny Neurons in the YAC128 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Laura Taylor; Chen, Xi; Ruhn, Kelly A.; Treviño, Isaac; Tansey, Malú G.

    2014-01-01

    CNS inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies suggest that the inflammatory response may contribute to neuronal demise. In particular, increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling is implicated in the pathology of both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown that localized gene delivery of dominant negative TNF to the degenerating brain region can limit pathology in animal models of PD and AD. TNF is upregulated in Huntington's disease (HD), like in PD and AD, but it is unknown whether TNF signaling contributes to neuronal degeneration in HD. We used in vivo gene delivery to test whether selective reduction of soluble TNF signaling could attenuate medium spiny neuron (MSN) degeneration in the YAC128 transgenic (TG) mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). AAV vectors encoding cDNA for dominant-negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF) or GFP (control) were injected into the striatum of young adult wild type WT and YAC128 TG mice and achieved 30–50% target coverage. Expression of dominant negative TNF protein was confirmed immunohistologically and biochemically and was maintained as mice aged to one year, but declined significantly over time. However, the extent of striatal DN-TNF gene transfer achieved in our studies was not sufficient to achieve robust effects on neuroinflammation, rescue degenerating MSNs or improve motor function in treated mice. Our findings suggest that alternative drug delivery strategies should be explored to determine whether greater target coverage by DN-TNF protein might afford some level of neuroprotection against HD-like pathology and/or that soluble TNF signaling may not be the primary driver of striatal neuroinflammation and MSN loss in YAC128 TG mice. PMID:24824433

  12. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U.; Soldatow, Valerie Y.; Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S.

    2010-12-15

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

  13. Mouse Models of Frailty: an Emerging Field.

    PubMed

    Seldeen, K L; Pang, M; Troen, B R

    2015-10-01

    Frailty is highly prevalent in the elderly, increasing the risk of poor outcomes that include falls, incident disability, hospitalization, and mortality. Thus, a great need exists to characterize the underlying mechanisms and ultimately identify strategies that prevent, delay, and even reverse frailty. Mouse models can provide insight into molecular mechanisms of frailty by reducing variability in lifestyle and genetic factors that can complicate interpretation of human clinical data. Frailty, generally recognized as a syndrome involving reduced homeostatic reserve in response to physiologic challenges and increasing susceptibility to poor health outcomes, is predominantly assessed using two independent strategies, integrated phenotype and deficit accumulation. The integrated phenotype defines frailty by the presentation of factors affecting functional capacity such as weight loss, exhaustion, low activity levels, slow gait, and grip strength. The deficit accumulation paradigm draws parameters from a greater range of physiological systems, such as the ability to perform daily activities, coordination and gait, mental components, physiological problems, and history and presence of medical morbidities. This strategic division also applies within the emerging field of mouse frailty models, with both methodologies showing usefulness in providing insight into physiologic mechanisms and testing interventions. Our review will explore the strategies used, caveats in methodology, and future directions in the application of animal models for the study of the frailty syndrome.

  14. Systems Biology-Based Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence Genes in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Veeramani, Balaji; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Karakousis, Petros C.; Bader, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence genes is important for developing novel drugs to shorten the duration of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We developed computational algorithms that predict M. tuberculosis genes required for long-term survival in mouse lungs. As the input, we used high-throughput M. tuberculosis mutant library screen data, mycobacterial global transcriptional profiles in mice and macrophages, and functional interaction networks. We selected 57 unique, genetically defined mutants (18 previously tested and 39 untested) to assess the predictive power of this approach in the murine model of TB infection. We observed a 6-fold enrichment in the predicted set of M. tuberculosis genes required for persistence in mouse lungs relative to randomly selected mutant pools. Our results also allowed us to reclassify several genes as required for M. tuberculosis persistence in vivo. Finally, the new results implicated additional high-priority candidate genes for testing. Experimental validation of computational predictions demonstrates the power of this systems biology approach for elucidating M. tuberculosis persistence genes. PMID:24549847

  15. Localization of dystrophin gene transcripts during mouse embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The spatial and temporal expression of the dystrophin gene has been examined during mouse embryogenesis, using in situ hybridization on tissue sections with a probe from the 5' end of the dystrophin coding sequence. In striated muscle, dystrophin transcripts are detectable from about 9 d in the heart and slightly later in skeletal muscle. However, there is an important difference between the two types of muscle: the heart is already functional as a contractile organ before the appearance of dystrophin transcripts, whereas this is not the case in skeletal muscle, where dystrophin and myosin heavy chain transcripts are first detectable at the same time. In the heart, dystrophin transcripts accumulate initially in the outflow tract and, at later stages, in both the atria and ventricles. In skeletal muscle, the gene is expressed in all myocytes irrespective of fiber type. In smooth muscle dystrophin transcripts are first detectable from 11 d post coitum in blood vessels, and subsequently in lung bronchi and in the digestive tract. The other major tissue where the dystrophin gene is expressed is the brain, where transcripts are clearly detectable in the cerebellum from 13 d. High-level expression of the gene is also seen in particular regions of the forebrain involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms, the endocrine system, and olfactory function, not previously identified in this context. The findings are discussed in the context of the pathology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:1429837

  16. Structure and polymorphism of the mouse prion protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Westaway, D; Cooper, C; Turner, S; Da Costa, M; Carlson, G A; Prusiner, S B

    1994-01-01

    Missense mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene, overexpression of the cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC), and infection with prions containing the scrapie isoform of PrP (PrPSc) all cause neurodegenerative disease. To understand better the physiology and expression of PrPC, we retrieved mouse PrP gene (Prn-p) yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), cosmid, phage, and cDNA clones. Physical mapping positions Prn-p approximately 300 kb from ecotropic virus integration site number 4 (Evi-4), compatible with failure to detect recombination between Prn-p and Evi-4 in genetic crosses. The Prn-pa allele encompasses three exons, with exons 1 and 2 encoding the mRNA 5' untranslated region. Exon 2 has no equivalent in the Syrian hamster and human PrP genes. The Prn-pb gene shares this intron/exon structure but harbors an approximately 6-kb deletion within intron 2. While the Prn-pb open reading frame encodes two amino acid substitutions linked to prolonged scrapie incubation periods, a deletion of intron 2 sequences also characterizes inbred strains such as RIII/S and MOLF/Ei with shorter incubation periods, making a relationship between intron 2 size and scrapie pathogenesis unlikely. The promoter regions of a and b Prn-p alleles include consensus Sp1 and AP-1 sites, as well as other conserved motifs which may represent binding sites for as yet unidentified transcription factors. Images PMID:7912827

  17. A mouse embryonic stem cell bank for inducible overexpression of human chromosome 21 genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dosage imbalance is responsible for several genetic diseases, among which Down syndrome is caused by the trisomy of human chromosome 21. Results To elucidate the extent to which the dosage imbalance of specific human chromosome 21 genes perturb distinct molecular pathways, we developed the first mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell bank of human chromosome 21 genes. The human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank includes, in triplicate clones, 32 human chromosome 21 genes, which can be overexpressed in an inducible manner. Each clone was transcriptionally profiled in inducing versus non-inducing conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional response yielded results that were consistent with the perturbed gene's known function. Comparison between mouse ES cells containing the whole human chromosome 21 (trisomic mouse ES cells) and mouse ES cells overexpressing single human chromosome 21 genes allowed us to evaluate the contribution of single genes to the trisomic mouse ES cell transcriptome. In addition, for the clones overexpressing the Runx1 gene, we compared the transcriptome changes with the corresponding protein changes by mass spectroscopy analysis. Conclusions We determined that only a subset of genes produces a strong transcriptional response when overexpressed in mouse ES cells and that this effect can be predicted taking into account the basal gene expression level and the protein secondary structure. We showed that the human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank is an important resource, which may be instrumental towards a better understanding of Down syndrome and other human aneuploidy disorders. PMID:20569505

  18. Gene expression profiling of loss of TET2 and/or JAK2V617F mutant hematopoietic stem cells from mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Takuro; Shide, Kotaro; Yamaji, Takumi; Kamiunten, Ayako; Sekine, Masaaki; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kubuki, Yoko; Sashida, Goro; Aoyama, Kazumasa; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Abe, Hiroo; Miike, Tadashi; Iwakiri, Hisayoshi; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Iwama, Atsushi; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clinically characterized by the chronic overproduction of differentiated peripheral blood cells and the gradual expansion of malignant intramedullary/extramedullary hematopoiesis. In MPNs mutations in JAK2 MPL or CALR are detected mutually exclusive in more than 90% of cases [1], [2]. Mutations in them lead to the abnormal activation of JAK/STAT signaling and the autonomous growth of differentiated cells therefore they are considered as “driver” gene mutations. In addition to the above driver gene mutations mutations in epigenetic regulators such as TET2 DNMT3A ASXL1 EZH2 or IDH1/2 are detected in about 5%–30% of cases respectively [3]. Mutations in TET2 DNMT3A EZH2 or IDH1/2 commonly confer the increased self-renewal capacity on normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but they do not lead to the autonomous growth of differentiated cells and only exhibit subtle clinical phenotypes [[4], [6], [7], [8],5]. It was unclear how mutations in such epigenetic regulators influenced abnormal HSCs with driver gene mutations how they influenced the disease phenotype or whether a single driver gene mutation was sufficient for the initiation of human MPNs. Therefore we focused on JAK2V617F and loss of TET2—the former as a representative of driver gene mutations and the latter as a representative of mutations in epigenetic regulators—and examined the influence of single or double mutations on HSCs (Lineage−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells (LSKs)) by functional analyses and microarray whole-genome expression analyses [9]. Gene expression profiling showed that the HSC fingerprint genes [10] was statistically equally enriched in TET2-knockdown-LSKs but negatively enriched in JAK2V617F–LSKs compared to that in wild-type-LSKs. Double-mutant-LSKs showed the same tendency as JAK2V617F–LSKs in terms of their HSC fingerprint genes but the expression of individual genes differed between the two groups. Among 245 HSC fingerprint genes 100 were more

  19. Lysosomal Dysfunctions Associated with Mutations at Mouse Pigment Genes

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Edward K.; Swank, Richard T.

    1979-01-01

    Melanosomes and lysosomes share several structural and biosynthetic properties. Therefore, a large number of mouse pigment mutants were tested to determine whether genes affecting melanosome structure or function might also affect the lysosome. Among 31 mouse pigment mutants, six had 1.5- to 2.5- fold increased concentrations of kidney β-glucuronidase. Three mutants, pale ear, pearl and pallid, had a generalized effect on lysosomal enzymes since there were coordinate increases in kidney β-galactosidase and α-mannosidase. The effects of these three mutations are lysosome specific since rates of kidney protein synthesis and activities of three nonlysosomal kidney enzymes were normal. Also, the mutants are relatively tissue specific in that all had normal liver lysomal enzyme concentrations.—A common dysfunction in all three mutants was a lowered rate of lysosomal enzyme secretion from kidney into urine. While normal C57BL/6J mice daily secreted 27 to 30% of total kidney β-glucuronidase and β-galactosidase, secretion of these two enzymes was coordinately depressed to 1 to 2%, 8 to 9% and 4 to 5% of total kidney enzyme in the pale-ear, pearl and pallid mutants, respectively. Although depressed lysosomal enzyme secretion is the major pigment mutant alteration, the higher lysomal enzyme concentrations in pearl and pallid may be partly due to an increase in lysosomal enzyme synthesis. In these mutants kidney glucuronidase synthetic rate was increased 1.4- to 1.5-fold.—These results suggest that there are several critical genes in mammals that control the biogenesis, processing and/or function of related classes of subcellular organelles. The mechanism of action of these genes is amenable to further analysis since they have been incorporated into congenic inbred strains of mice. PMID:115747

  20. Transgenic Mouse Models of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Feng, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Childhood onset psychiatric disorders, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (OCSD), and Schizophrenia (SZ), affect many school age children leading to a lower quality of life, including difficulties in school and personal relationships that persists into adulthood. Currently, the causes of these psychiatric disorders are poorly understood resulting in difficulty diagnosing affected children, and insufficient treatment options. Family and twin studies implicate a genetic contribution for ADHD, ASD, Mood Disorders, OCSD, and SZ. Identification of candidate genes and chromosomal regions associated with a particular disorder provide targets for directed research, and understanding how these genes influence the disease state will provide valuable insights for improving the diagnosis and treatment of children with psychiatric disorders. Animal models are one important approach in the study of human diseases, allowing for the use of a variety of experimental approaches to dissect the contribution of a specific chromosomal or genetic abnormality in human disorders. While it is impossible to model an entire psychiatric disorder in a single animal model, these models can be extremely valuable in dissecting out the specific role of a gene, pathway, neuron subtype, or brain region in a particular abnormal behavior. In this review we discuss existing transgenic mouse models for childhood onset psychiatric disorders. We compare the strength and weakness of various transgenic animal models proposed for each of the common childhood onset psychiatric disorders, and discuss future directions for the study of these disorders using cutting-edge genetic tools. PMID:21309772

  1. Investigation of gene effects and epistatic interactions between Akt1 and neuregulin 1 in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes and social functions in genetic mouse models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Hsun; Pei, Ju-Chun; Luo, Da-Zhong; Chen, Ching; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from human genetic studies has suggested several functional candidate genes that might contribute to susceptibility to schizophrenia, including AKT1 and neuregulin 1 (NRG1). Recent findings also revealed that NRG1 stimulates the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway, which might be involved in the functional outcomes of some schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Akt1-deficiency and Nrg1-deficiency alone or in combination in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes, cognition, and social functions using genetically modified mice as a model. Male Akt1+/−, Nrg1+/−, and double mutant mice were bred and compared with their wild-type (WT) littermate controls. In Experiment 1, general physical examination revealed that all mutant mice displayed a normal profile of body weight during development and a normal brain activity with microPET scan. In Experiment 2, no significant genotypic differences were found in our basic behavioral phenotyping, including locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, and sensorimotor gating function. However, both Nrg1+/− and double mutant mice exhibited impaired episodic-like memory. Double mutant mice also had impaired sociability. In Experiment 3, a synergistic epistasis between Akt1 and Nrg1 was further confirmed in double mutant mice in that they had impaired social interaction compared to the other 3 groups, especially encountering with a novel male or an ovariectomized female. Double mutant and Nrg1+/− mice also emitted fewer female urine-induced ultrasonic vocalization calls. Collectively, our results indicate that double deficiency of Akt1 and Nrg1 can result in the impairment of social cognitive functions, which might be pertinent to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-related social cognition. PMID:25688191

  2. A Mouse Model for Meckel Syndrome Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Susan A.; Collin, Gayle B.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Liu, Dong P.; Akeson, Ellen C.; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2009-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3; OMIM 607361) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral polycystic kidney disease. Other malformations associated with MKS3 include cystic changes in the liver, polydactyly, and brain abnormalities (occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus, and Dandy Walker–type cerebellar anomalies). The disorder is hypothesized to be caused by defects in primary cilia. In humans, the underlying mutated gene, TMEM67, encodes transmembrane protein 67, also called meckelin (OMIM 609884), which is an integral protein of the renal epithelial cell and membrane of the primary cilium. Here, we describe a spontaneous deletion of the mouse ortholog, Tmem67, which results in polycystic kidney disease and death by 3 wk after birth. Hydrocephalus also occurs in some mutants. We verified the mutated gene by transgenic rescue and characterized the phenotype with microcomputed tomography, histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. This mutant provides a mouse model for MKS3 and adds to the growing set of mammalian models essential for studying the role of the primary cilium in kidney function. PMID:19211713

  3. Liver aging and pseudocapillarization in a Werner syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cogger, Victoria C; Svistounov, Dmitri; Warren, Alessandra; Zykova, Svetlana; Melvin, Richard G; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; O'Reilly, Jennifer N; McMahon, Aisling C; Ballard, J William O; De Cabo, Rafa; Le Couteur, David G; Lebel, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Werner syndrome is a progeric syndrome characterized by premature atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and death in humans. The knockout mouse model created by deletion of the RecQ helicase domain of the mouse Wrn homologue gene (Wrn(∆hel/∆hel)) is of great interest because it develops atherosclerosis and hypertriglyceridemia, conditions associated with aging liver and sinusoidal changes. Here, we show that Wrn(∆hel/∆hel) mice exhibit increased extracellular matrix, defenestration, decreased fenestration diameter, and changes in markers of liver sinusoidal endothelial cell inflammation, consistent with age-related pseudocapilliarization. In addition, hepatocytes are larger, have increased lipofuscin deposition, more frequent nuclear morphological anomalies, decreased mitochondria number, and increased mitochondrial diameter compared to wild-type mice. The Wrn(∆hel/∆hel) mice also have altered mitochondrial function and altered nuclei. Microarray data revealed that the Wrn(∆hel/∆hel) genotype does not affect the expression of many genes within the isolated hepatocytes or liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. This study reveals that Wrn(∆hel/∆hel) mice have accelerated typical age-related liver changes including pseudocapillarization. This confirms that pseudocapillarization of the liver sinusoid is a consistent feature of various aging models. Moreover, it implies that DNA repair may be implicated in normal aging changes in the liver.

  4. Thalidomide induced early gene expression perturbations indicative of human embryopathy in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiugong; Sprando, Robert L; Yourick, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-15

    Developmental toxicity testing has traditionally relied on animal models which are costly, time consuming, and require the sacrifice of large numbers of animals. In addition, there are significant disparities between human beings and animals in their responses to chemicals. Thalidomide is a species-specific developmental toxicant that causes severe limb malformations in humans but not in mice. Here, we used microarrays to study transcriptomic changes induced by thalidomide in an in vitro model based on differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). C57BL/6 mESCs were allowed to differentiate spontaneously and RNA was collected at 24, 48, and 72h after exposure to 0.25mM thalidomide. Global gene expression analysis using microarrays revealed hundreds of differentially expressed genes upon thalidomide exposure that were enriched in gene ontology (GO) terms and canonical pathways associated with embryonic development and differentiation. In addition, many genes were found to be involved in small GTPases-mediated signal transduction, heart development, and inflammatory responses, which coincide with clinical evidences and may represent critical embryotoxicities of thalidomide. These results demonstrate that transcriptomics in combination with mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation is a promising alternative model for developmental toxicity assessment.

  5. Co-expression of interleukin 12 enhances antitumor effects of a novel chimeric promoter-mediated suicide gene therapy in an immunocompetent mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yu; Liu, Zhengchun; Kong, Haiyan; Sun, Wenjie; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; and others

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A novel chimeric promoter consisting of CArG element and hTERT promoter was developed. {yields} The promoter was characterized with radiation-inducibility and tumor-specificity. {yields} Suicide gene system driven by the promoter showed remarkable cytotoxicity in vitro. {yields} Co-expression of IL12 enhanced the promoter mediated suicide gene therapy in vivo. -- Abstract: The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter has been widely used in target gene therapy of cancer. However, low transcriptional activity limited its clinical application. Here, we designed a novel dual radiation-inducible and tumor-specific promoter system consisting of CArG elements and the hTERT promoter, resulting in increased expression of reporter genes after gamma-irradiation. Therapeutic and side effects of adenovirus-mediated horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) system downstream of the chimeric promoter were evaluated in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, combining with or without adenovirus-mediated interleukin 12 (IL12) gene driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The combination treatment showed more effective suppression of tumor growth than those with single agent alone, being associated with pronounced intratumoral T-lymphocyte infiltration and minor side effects. Our results suggest that the combination treatment with HRP/IAA system driven by the novel chimeric promoter and the co-expression of IL12 might be an effective and safe target gene therapy strategy of cancer.

  6. Nicotinamide riboside restores cognition through an upregulation of proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α regulated β-secretase 1 degradation and mitochondrial gene expression in Alzheimer's mouse models.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Pan, Yong; Vempati, Prashant; Zhao, Wei; Knable, Lindsay; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Sastre, Magdalena; Ono, Kenjiro; Sauve, Anthony A; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2013-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+), a coenzyme involved in redox activities in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, has been identified as a key regulator of the lifespan-extending effects, and the activation of NAD(+) expression has been linked with a decrease in beta-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is a NAD(+) precursor, it promotes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 (PGC)-1α expression in the brain. Evidence has shown that PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of Aβ generation because it affects β-secretase (BACE1) degradation. In this study we tested the hypothesis that NR treatment in an AD mouse model could attenuate Aβ toxicity through the activation of PGC-1α-mediated BACE1 degradation. Using the Tg2576 AD mouse model, using in vivo behavioral analyses, biochemistry assays, small hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene silencing and electrophysiological recording, we found (1) dietary treatment of Tg2576 mice with 250 mg/kg/day of NR for 3 months significantly attenuates cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice and coincides with an increase in the steady-state levels of NAD(+) in the cerebral cortex; (2) application of NR to hippocampal slices (10 μM) for 4 hours abolishes the deficits in long-term potentiation recorded in the CA1 region of Tg2576 mice; (3) NR treatment promotes PGC-1α expression in the brain coinciding with enhanced degradation of BACE1 and the reduction of Aβ production in Tg2576 mice. Further in vitro studies confirmed that BACE1 protein content is decreased by NR treatment in primary neuronal cultures derived from Tg2576 embryos, in which BACE1 degradation was prevented by PGC-1α-shRNA gene silencing; and (4) NR treatment and PGC-1α overexpression enhance BACE1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Our studies suggest that dietary treatment with NR might benefit AD cognitive function and synaptic plasticity, in part by promoting PGC-1α-mediated BACE1

  7. Genomic organization of the mouse dystrobrevin gene: Comparative analysis with the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, H.J.; Blake, D.J.; Nawrotzki, R.A.; Davies, K.E.

    1997-02-01

    Dystrobrevin, the mammalian orthologue of the Torpedo 87-kDa postsynaptic protein, is a member of the dystrophin gene family with homology to the cysteine-rich carboxy-terminal domain of dystrophin. Torpedo dystrobrevin copurifies with the acetylcholine receptors and is thought to form a complex with dystrophin and syntrophin. This complex is also found at the sarcolemma in vertebrates and defines the cytoplasmic component of the dystrophin-associated protein complex. Previously we have cloned several dystrobrevin isoforms from mouse brain and muscle. Here we show that these transcripts are the products of a single gene located on proximal mouse chromosome 18. To investigate the diversity of dystrobrevin transcripts we have determined that the mouse dystrobrevin gene is organized into 24 coding exons that span between 130 and 170 kb at the genomic level. The gene encodes at least three distinct protein isoforms that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Interestingly, although there is only 27% amino acid identity between the homologous regions of dystrobrevin and dystrophin, the positions of 8 of the 15 exon-intron junctions are identical. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  9. Mouse intragastric infusion (iG) model

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul; Wang, Ping-Yen; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Direct intragastric delivery of a diet, nutrient or test substance can be achieved in rodents (mice and rats) on a long-term (2–3 months) basis using a chronically implanted gastrostomy catheter and a flow-through swivel system. This rodent intragastric infusion (iG) model has broad applications in research on food intake, gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, GI neuroendocrinology, drug metabolism and toxicity, obesity and liver disease. It achieves maximal control over the rate and pattern of delivery and it can be combined with normal ad libitum feeding of solid diet if so desired. It may be adopted to achieve infusion at other sites of the GI system to test the role of a bypassed GI segment in neuroendocrine physiology, and its use in genetic mouse models facilitates the genetic analysis of a central question under investigation. PMID:22461066

  10. Mouse histone H2A and H2B genes: four functional genes and a pseudogene undergoing gene conversion with a closely linked functional gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Liu, L; Marzluff, W F

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of five mouse histone genes, two H2a and three H2b genes on chromosome 13 has been determined. The three H2b genes all code for different proteins, each differing in two amino acids from the others. The H2b specific elements present 5' to H2b genes from other species are present in all three mouse H2b genes. All three H2b genes are expressed in the same relative amounts in three different mouse cell lines and fetal mice. The H2b gene with the H2b specific sequence closest to the TATAA sequence is expressed in the highest amount. One of the H2a genes lacks the first 9 amino acids, the promoter region, the last 3 amino acids and contains an altered 3' end sequence. Despite these multiple defects, there is only one nucleotide change between the two H2a genes from codon 9 to 126. This indicates that a recent gene conversion has occurred between these two genes. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences in the coding regions of mouse histone genes is probably due to gene conversion events targeted precisely at the coding region. Images PMID:3562244

  11. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-02-06

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp{sup -/-} females. Fertility of Lpp{sup -/-} males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp{sup -/-} x Lpp{sup -/-} crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp{sup -/-} mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  12. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Kislinger, Thomas; Wigle, Dennis A; Kannan, Anitha; Brown, Kevin; Okubo, Tadashi; Hogan, Brigid; Jurisica, Igor; Frey, Brendan; Rossant, Janet; Emili, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Although microarray analysis has provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung, no extensive correlations have been made to the levels of corresponding protein products. Here, we present a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until adulthood using gel-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT). Mathematical modeling of the proteomic profiles with parallel DNA microarray data identified large groups of gene products with statistically significant correlation or divergence in coregulation of protein and transcript levels during lung development. We also present an integrative analysis of mRNA and protein expression in Nmyc loss- and gain-of-function mutants. This revealed a set of 90 positively and negatively regulated putative target genes. These targets are evidence that Nmyc is a regulator of genes involved in mRNA processing and a repressor of the imprinted gene Igf2r in the developing lung. PMID:17486137

  13. Assignment of the lactotransferrin gene to human chromosome 3 and to mouse chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T; Pentecost, B T; Marshall, A; Solomon, A; Bowman, B H; Lalley, P A; Naylor, S L

    1987-11-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family of genes, is the major iron-binding protein in milk and body secretions. The amino acid sequence of LTF consists of two homologous domains homologous to proteins in the transferrin family. Recent isolation of cDNA encoding mouse LTF has expedited the mapping of both mouse and human LTF genes. Southern blot analysis of DNA from mouse-Chinese hamster and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids maps the LTF gene to mouse chromosome 9 and to human chromosome 3, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of cell hybrids containing defined segments of human chromosome 3 demonstrates that the gene is located in the 3q21-qter region. These results suggest that LTF and associated genes of the transferrin family have existed together on the same chromosomal region for 300-500 million years. PMID:3478818

  14. cDNA sequence and mapping of the mouse Copb gene encoding the beta subunit of the COPI coatomer complex.

    PubMed

    LI, W; Elliott, R W; Novak, E K; Swank, R T

    1999-05-01

    COPI-coated vesicles are involved in retrograde-directed selective transport of proteins from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as mediate anterograde transport of cargo proteins within the Golgi or in endosomal trafficking. The COPI protein complex contains an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF1) and seven coatamer subunits (alpha, beta, beta', gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta-COP). The localization and function of human beta subunit of coatamer (COPB) suggests it is likely a candidate gene of ruby-eye-2 (ru2), which is a mouse model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome characterized by the dysfunction of several subcellular organelles. In this study, we determined the entire coding sequence of mouse (Copb) cDNA by combining an overlapping mouse EST contig with EST walking. beta-COP was found highly conserved in mouse, rat, and human, and it is ubiquitously expressed in mouse. The Copb gene was mapped to mouse Chr 7 at a position of 53.3 cM by radiation hybrid mapping. Our RH mapping data, sequencing of RT-PCR products, and Western blotting exclude the Copb gene as a candidate for ru2.

  15. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus A; Chopra, Vikramjit; Varhol, Richard; Xie, Yuan-Yun; Bohacec, Slavita; Zhao, Yongjun; Lee, Lisa LC; Bilenky, Mikhail; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; He, An; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Goldowitz, Daniel; Marra, Marco A; Holt, Robert A; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Jones, Steven JM

    2008-01-01

    Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters (< 4 kb) that drive gene expression in specific brain regions or cell-types of therapeutic interest. Our goal was to first identify genes displaying regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain so that promoters designed from orthologous human genes can then be tested to drive reporter expression in a similar pattern in the mouse brain. Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression. PMID:18625066

  16. Pathogenicity of swine influenza viruses possessing an avian or swine-origin PB2 polymerase gene evaluated in mouse and pig models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A viruses isolated from birds normally contain a PB2 polymerase gene with the avian-signature glutamic acid (E) at position 627, while those isolated from humans contain the mammalian-signature lysine (K) at this position. This residue has been shown to be a determinant of host range and c...

  17. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes. PMID:25109669

  18. A transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disorder.

    PubMed

    Greaves, D R; Fraser, P; Vidal, M A; Hedges, M J; Ropers, D; Luzzatto, L; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-11

    A single base-pair mutation (beta s) in codon 6 of the human beta-globin gene, causing a single amino-acid substitution, is the cause of sickle cell anaemia. The mutant haemoglobin molecule, HbS, polymerizes when deoxygenated and causes deformation of the erythrocytes to a characteristic 'sickled' shape. Sickling of cells in small vessels causes painful crises and other life-threatening complications. Although the molecular basis for sickle cell anaemia has been known for 30 years, no definitive treatment is available. An animal model of sickle cell anaemia would not only allow a detailed analysis of the factors that initiate erythrocyte sickling in vivo and of the pathophysiology of the disease, but would also permit the development of novel approaches to the treatment of the disease. By using the dominant control region sequences from the human beta-globin locus, together with human alpha- and beta s-globin genes, we have obtained three transgenic mice with HbS levels ranging from 10 to 80% of total haemoglobin in their red cells. As observed in homozygous and heterozygous Hbs patients, the erythrocytes of this mouse sickle readily on deoxygenation. Irreversibly sickled cells, which are characteristic of sickle-cell patients homozygous for beta s, are also observed in the peripheral blood of the mouse with high levels of HbS. PMID:2296310

  19. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes.

  20. A transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disorder.

    PubMed

    Greaves, D R; Fraser, P; Vidal, M A; Hedges, M J; Ropers, D; Luzzatto, L; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-11

    A single base-pair mutation (beta s) in codon 6 of the human beta-globin gene, causing a single amino-acid substitution, is the cause of sickle cell anaemia. The mutant haemoglobin molecule, HbS, polymerizes when deoxygenated and causes deformation of the erythrocytes to a characteristic 'sickled' shape. Sickling of cells in small vessels causes painful crises and other life-threatening complications. Although the molecular basis for sickle cell anaemia has been known for 30 years, no definitive treatment is available. An animal model of sickle cell anaemia would not only allow a detailed analysis of the factors that initiate erythrocyte sickling in vivo and of the pathophysiology of the disease, but would also permit the development of novel approaches to the treatment of the disease. By using the dominant control region sequences from the human beta-globin locus, together with human alpha- and beta s-globin genes, we have obtained three transgenic mice with HbS levels ranging from 10 to 80% of total haemoglobin in their red cells. As observed in homozygous and heterozygous Hbs patients, the erythrocytes of this mouse sickle readily on deoxygenation. Irreversibly sickled cells, which are characteristic of sickle-cell patients homozygous for beta s, are also observed in the peripheral blood of the mouse with high levels of HbS.

  1. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pmouse phenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD.

  2. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  3. A mouse model for testing remyelinating therapies.

    PubMed

    Bai, C Brian; Sun, Sunny; Roholt, Andrew; Benson, Emily; Edberg, Dale; Medicetty, Satish; Dutta, Ranjan; Kidd, Grahame; Macklin, Wendy B; Trapp, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Used in combination with immunomodulatory therapies, remyelinating therapies are a viable therapeutic approach for treating individuals with multiple sclerosis. Studies of postmortem MS brains identified greater remyelination in demyelinated cerebral cortex than in demyelinated brain white matter and implicated reactive astrocytes as an inhibitor of white matter remyelination. An animal model that recapitulates these phenotypes would benefit the development of remyelination therapeutics. We have used a modified cuprizone protocol that causes a consistent and robust demyelination of mouse white matter and cerebral cortex. Spontaneous remyelination occurred significantly faster in the cerebral cortex than in white matter and reactive astrocytes were more abundant in white matter lesions. Remyelination of white matter and cerebral cortex was therapeutically enhanced by daily injections of thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). In summary, we describe an in vivo demyelination/remyelination paradigm that can be powered to determine efficacy of therapies that enhance white matter and cortical remyelination. PMID:27384502

  4. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  5. The invA gene of Brucella melitensis is involved in intracellular invasion and is required to establish infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alva-Pérez, Jorge; Arellano-Reynoso, Beatriz; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2014-05-15

    Some of the mechanisms underlying the invasion and intracellular survival of B. melitensis are still unknown, including the role of a subfamily of NUDIX enzymes, which have been described in other bacterial species as invasins and are present in Brucella spp. We have generated a mutation in the coding gene of one of these proteins, the invA gene (BMEI0215) of B. melitensis strain 133, to understand its role in virulence. HeLa cell invasion results showed that mutant strain survival was decreased 5-fold compared with that of the parental strain at 2 h pi (P<0.001). In a goat macrophage infection assay, mutant strain replication was 8-fold less than in the parental strain at 24 h pi (P<0.001); yet, at 48 h pi, no significant differences in intracellular replication were observed. Additionally, colocalization of the invA mutant with calregulin was significantly lower at 24 h pi compared with that of the parental strain. Furthermore, the mutant strain exhibited a low level of colocalization with cathepsin D, which was similar to the parental strain colocalization at 24 h pi. In vivo infection results demonstrated that spleen colonization was significantly lower with the mutant than with the parental strain. The immune response, measured in terms of antibody switching and IFN-γ transcription, was similar for Rev1 and infection with the mutant, although it was lower than the immune response elicited by the parental strain. Consequently, these results indicate that the invA gene is important during invasion but not for intracellular replication. Additionally, mutation of the invA gene results in in vivo attenuation.

  6. A combined approach identifies a limited number of new thyroid hormone target genes in post-natal mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Quignodon, Laure; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Compe, Emmanuel; Guyot, Romain; Allioli, Nathalie; Laperrière, David; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul; Mader, Sylvie; Samarut, Jacques; Flamant, Frédéric

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid hormones act directly on gene transcription in the post-natal developing cerebellum, controlling neuronal, and glial cell differentiation. We have combined three experimental approaches to identify the target genes that are underlying this phenomenon: 1) a microarray analysis of gene expression to identify hormone responsive genes in the cerebellum of Pax8-/- mice, a transgenic mouse model of congenital hypothyroidism; 2) a similar microarray analysis on primary culture of cerebellum neurons; and 3) a bioinformatics screen of conserved putative-binding sites in the mouse genome. This identifies surprisingly a small set of target genes, which, for some of them, might be key regulators of cerebellum development and neuronal differentiation. PMID:17601882

  7. Dysregulated expression of death, stress and mitochondrion related genes in the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic SOD1G93A mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells are the main source of paracrine support to motor neurons. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been correlated to motor neuron death in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Despite the involvement of Schwann cells in early neuromuscular disruption in ALS, detailed molecular events of a dying-back triggering are unknown. Sciatic nerves of presymptomatic (60-day-old) SOD1G93A mice were submitted to a high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis. DAVID demonstrated the deregulated genes related to death, stress and mitochondrion, which allowed the identification of Cell cycle, ErbB signaling, Tryptophan metabolism and Rig-I-like receptor signaling as the most representative KEGG pathways. The protein-protein interaction networks based upon deregulated genes have identified the top hubs (TRAF2, H2AFX, E2F1, FOXO3, MSH2, NGFR, TGFBR1) and bottlenecks (TRAF2, E2F1, CDKN1B, TWIST1, FOXO3). Schwann cells were enriched from the sciatic nerve of presymptomatic mice using flow cytometry cell sorting. qPCR showed the up regulated (Ngfr, Cdnkn1b, E2f1, Traf2 and Erbb3, H2afx, Cdkn1a, Hspa1, Prdx, Mapk10) and down-regulated (Foxo3, Mtor) genes in the enriched Schwann cells. In conclusion, molecular analyses in the presymptomatic sciatic nerve demonstrated the involvement of death, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial pathways in the Schwann cell non-autonomous mechanisms in the early stages of ALS. PMID:26339226

  8. Absence of ALOX5 gene prevents stress-induced memory deficits, synaptic dysfunction and tauopathy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Giannopoulos, Phillip F.; Chu, Jin; Sperow, Margaret; Kirby, Lynn G.; Abood, Mary E.; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial events of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still not known, it is clear that the disease in its sporadic form results from the combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Among the latter, behavioral stress has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in the propagation of AD. However, the mechanisms underlying this modulation remain to be fully investigated. Since stress up-regulates the ALOX5 gene product, 5-lipoxygenase (5LO), herein we investigated its role in modulating stress-dependent development of the AD phenotype. To reach this goal, triple transgenic (3xTg) mice and 3xTg genetically deficient for 5LO were investigated after undergoing a restraint/isolation paradigm. In the present paper, we found that 28 days of restraint/isolation stress worsened tau phosphorylation and solubility, increased glycogen synthase kinase 3β activity, compromised long-term potentiation and impaired fear-conditioned memory recall in 3xTg animals, but not in 3xTg animals lacking 5LO (3xTg/5LO−/−). These results highlight the novel functional role that the ALOX5 gene plays in the development of the biochemical, electrophysiological and behavioral sequelae of stress in the AD context. They provide critical support that this gene and its expressed protein are viable therapeutic targets to prevent the onset or delay the progression of AD in individuals exposed to this risk factor. PMID:25122659

  9. Biochemical and Physiological Improvement in a Mouse Model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) Following Gene Transfer with AAV Vectors.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lee; Matabosch, Xavier; Serra, Montserrat; Watson, Berna; Shackleton, Cedric; Watson, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an inborn error of cholesterol synthesis resulting from a defect in 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), the enzyme that produces cholesterol from its immediate precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol. Current therapy employing dietary cholesterol is inadequate. As SLOS is caused by a defect in a single gene, restoring enzyme functionality through gene therapy may be a direct approach for treating this debilitating disorder. In the present study, we first packaged a human DHCR7 construct into adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors having either type-2 (AAV2) or type-8 (AAV2/8) capsid, and administered treatment to juvenile mice. While a positive response (assessed by increases in serum and liver cholesterol) was seen in both groups, the improvement was greater in the AAV2/8-DHCR7 treated mice. Newborn mice were then treated with AAV2/8-DHCR7 and these mice, compared to mice treated as juveniles, showed higher DHCR7 mRNA expression in liver and a greater improvement in serum and liver cholesterol levels. Systemic treatment did not affect brain cholesterol in any of the experimental groups. Both juvenile and newborn treatments with AAV2/8-DHCR7 resulted in increased rates of weight gain indicating that gene transfer had a positive physiological effect.

  10. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  11. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac. PMID:27075878

  12. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  13. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Mouse models of p53 functions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2010-04-01

    Studies in mice have yielded invaluable insight into our understanding of the p53 pathway. Mouse models with activated p53, no p53, and mutant p53 have queried the role of p53 in development and tumorigenesis. In these models, p53 is activated and stabilized via redundant posttranslational modifications. On activation, p53 initiates two major responses: inhibition of proliferation (via cell-cycle arrest, quiescence, senescence, and differentiation) and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, these responses are cell-type and tumor-type-specific. The analysis of mutant p53 alleles has established a gain-of-function role for p53 mutants in metastasis. The development of additional models that can precisely time the oncogenic events in single cells will provide further insight into the evolution of tumors, the importance of the stroma, and the cooperating events that lead to disruption of the p53 pathway. Ultimately, these models should serve to study the effects of novel drugs on tumor response as well as normal homeostasis.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  17. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  18. Relationship between Rgs2 gene expression level and anxiety and depression-like behaviour in a mutant mouse model: serotonergic involvement.

    PubMed

    Lifschytz, Tzuri; Broner, Esther Channah; Zozulinsky, Polina; Slonimsky, Alexandra; Eitan, Renana; Greenbaum, Lior; Lerer, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    RGS2 is a member of a family of proteins that negatively modulate G-protein coupled receptor transmission. Variations in the RGS2 gene were found to be associated in humans with anxious and depressive phenotypes. We sought to study the relationship of Rgs2 expression level to depression and anxiety-like behavioural features, sociability and brain 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor expression. We studied male mice carrying a mutation that causes lower Rgs2 gene expression, employing mice heterozygous (Het) or homozygous (Hom) for this mutation, or wild-type (WT). Mice were subjected to behavioural tests reflecting depressive-like behaviour [forced swim test (FST), novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT)], elevated plus maze (EPM) for evaluation of anxiety levels and the three-chamber sociability test. The possible involvement of raphe nucleus 5-HT1A receptors in these behavioural features was examined by 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia. Expression levels of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the cortex, raphe nucleus and hypothalamus were compared among mice of the different Rgs2 genotype groups. NSFT results demonstrated that Hom mice showed more depressive-like features than Rgs2 Het and WT mice. A trend for such a relationship was also suggested by the FST results. EPM and sociability test results showed Hom and Het mice to be more anxious and less sociable than WT mice. In addition Hom and Het mice were characterized by lower basal body temperature and demonstrated less 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia than WT mice. Finally, Hom and Het mice had significantly lower 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor expression levels in the raphe than WT mice. Our findings demonstrate a relationship between Rgs2 gene expression level and a propensity for anxious and depressive-like behaviour and reduced social interaction that may involve changes in serotonergic receptor expression.

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  20. Methylation-Associated Gene Silencing of RARB in Areca Carcinogens Induced Mouse Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Fan, Shin-Ru; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Nai-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Regarding oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) development, chewing areca is known to be a strong risk factor in many Asian cultures. Therefore, we established an OSCC induced mouse model by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or arecoline, or both treatments, respectively. These are the main two components of the areca nut that could increase the occurrence of OSCC. We examined the effects with the noncommercial MCGI (mouse CpG islands) microarray for genome-wide screening the DNA methylation aberrant in induced OSCC mice. The microarray results showed 34 hypermethylated genes in 4-NQO plus arecoline induced OSCC mice tongue tissues. The examinations also used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and bisulfite sequencing to realize the methylation pattern in collected mouse tongue tissues and human OSCC cell lines of different grades, respectively. These results showed that retinoic acid receptor β (RARB) was indicated in hypermethylation at the promoter region and the loss of expression during cancer development. According to the results of real-time PCR, it was shown that de novo DNA methyltransferases were involved in gene epigenetic alternations of OSCC. Collectively, our results showed that RARB hypermethylation was involved in the areca-associated oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25197641

  1. EHMT2 directs DNA methylation for efficient gene silencing in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Ghislain; Borgel, Julie; Sanz, Lionel A.; Vallet, Judith; Guibert, Sylvain; Dumas, Michael; Cavelier, Patricia; Girardot, Michael; Forné, Thierry; Feil, Robert; Weber, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which histone modifying enzymes contribute to DNA methylation in mammals remains unclear. Previous studies suggested a link between the lysine methyltransferase EHMT2 (also known as G9A and KMT1C) and DNA methylation in the mouse. Here, we used a model of knockout mice to explore the role of EHMT2 in DNA methylation during mouse embryogenesis. The Ehmt2 gene is expressed in epiblast cells but is dispensable for global DNA methylation in embryogenesis. In contrast, EHMT2 regulates DNA methylation at specific sequences that include CpG-rich promoters of germline-specific genes. These loci are bound by EHMT2 in embryonic cells, are marked by H3K9 dimethylation, and have strongly reduced DNA methylation in Ehmt2−/− embryos. EHMT2 also plays a role in the maintenance of germline-derived DNA methylation at one imprinted locus, the Slc38a4 gene. Finally, we show that DNA methylation is instrumental for EHMT2-mediated gene silencing in embryogenesis. Our findings identify EHMT2 as a critical factor that facilitates repressive DNA methylation at specific genomic loci during mammalian development. PMID:26576615

  2. Learning delays in a mouse model of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rendall, Amanda R; Truong, Dongnhu T; Fitch, R Holly

    2016-04-15

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder with core symptoms of atypical social interactions and repetitive behaviors. It has also been reported that individuals with ASD have difficulty with multisensory integration, and this may disrupt higher-order cognitive abilities such as learning and social communication. Impairments in the integration of sensory information could in turn reflect diminished cross-modal white matter connectivity. Moreover, the genetic contribution in ASD appears to be strong, with heritability estimates as high as 90%. However, no single gene has been identified, and over 1000 risk genes have been reported. One of these genes - contactin-associated-like-protein 2 (CNTNAP2) - was first associated with Specific Language Impairment, and more recently has been linked to ASD. CNTNAP2 encodes a cell adhesion protein regulating synaptic signal transmission. To better understand the behavioral and biological underlying mechanisms of ASD, a transgenic mouse model was created with a genetic knockout (KO) of the rodent homolog Cntnap2. Initial studies on this mouse revealed poor social interactions, behavioral perseveration, and reduced vocalizations-all strongly resembling human ASD symptoms. Cntnap2 KO mice also show abnormalities in myelin formation, consistent with a hypo-connectivity model of ASD. The current study was designed to further assess the behavioral phenotype of this mouse model, with a focus on learning and memory. Cntnap2 KO and wild-type mice were tested on a 4/8 radial arm water maze for 14 consecutive days. Error scores (total, working memory, reference memory, initial and repeated reference memory), latency and average turn angle were independently assessed using a 2×14 repeated measures ANOVA. Results showed that Cntnap2 KO mice exhibited significant deficits in working and reference memory during the acquisition period of the task. During the retention period (i.e., after asymptote in errors

  3. DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BALB/c mouse Ld transplantation antigen.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Sher, B T; Sun, Y H; Eakle, K A; Hood, L

    1982-02-01

    The sequence of a gene, denoted 27.5, encoding a transplantation antigen for the BALB/c mouse has been determined. Gene transfer studies and comparison of the translated sequence with the partial amino acid sequence of the Ld transplantation antigen establish that gene 27.5 encodes an Ld polypeptide. A comparison of the gene 27.5 sequence with several complementary DNA sequences suggests that the BALB/c mouse may contain a number of closely related L-like genes. Gene 27.5 has eight exons that correlate with the structural domains of the transplantation antigen. PMID:7058332

  4. Mouse model for sublethal Leptospira interrogans infection.

    PubMed

    Richer, Luciana; Potula, Hari-Hara; Melo, Rita; Vieira, Ana; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although Leptospira can infect a wide range of mammalian species, most studies have been conducted in golden Syrian hamsters, a species particularly sensitive to acute disease. Chronic disease has been well characterized in the rat, one of the natural reservoir hosts. Studies in another asymptomatic reservoir host, the mouse, have occasionally been done and have limited infection to mice younger than 6 weeks of age. We analyzed the outcome of sublethal infection of C3H/HeJ mice older than age 10 weeks with Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Infection led to bloodstream dissemination of Leptospira, which was followed by urinary shedding, body weight loss, hypothermia, and colonization of the kidney by live spirochetes 2 weeks after infection. In addition, Leptospira dissemination triggered inflammation in the kidney but not in the liver or lung, as determined by increased levels of mRNA transcripts for the keratinocyte-derived chemokine, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon in kidney tissue. The acquired humoral response to Leptospira infection led to the production of IgG mainly of the IgG1 subtype. Flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes from infected mice revealed that cellular expansion was primarily due to an increase in the levels of CD4(+) and double-negative T cells (not CD8(+) cells) and that CD4(+) T cells acquired a CD44(high) CD62L(low) effector phenotype not accompanied by increases in memory T cells. A mouse model for sublethal Leptospira infection allows understanding of the bacterial and host factors that lead to immune evasion, which can result in acute or chronic disease or resistance to infection (protection).

  5. Mouse model for sublethal Leptospira interrogans infection.

    PubMed

    Richer, Luciana; Potula, Hari-Hara; Melo, Rita; Vieira, Ana; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although Leptospira can infect a wide range of mammalian species, most studies have been conducted in golden Syrian hamsters, a species particularly sensitive to acute disease. Chronic disease has been well characterized in the rat, one of the natural reservoir hosts. Studies in another asymptomatic reservoir host, the mouse, have occasionally been done and have limited infection to mice younger than 6 weeks of age. We analyzed the outcome of sublethal infection of C3H/HeJ mice older than age 10 weeks with Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Infection led to bloodstream dissemination of Leptospira, which was followed by urinary shedding, body weight loss, hypothermia, and colonization of the kidney by live spirochetes 2 weeks after infection. In addition, Leptospira dissemination triggered inflammation in the kidney but not in the liver or lung, as determined by increased levels of mRNA transcripts for the keratinocyte-derived chemokine, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon in kidney tissue. The acquired humoral response to Leptospira infection led to the production of IgG mainly of the IgG1 subtype. Flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes from infected mice revealed that cellular expansion was primarily due to an increase in the levels of CD4(+) and double-negative T cells (not CD8(+) cells) and that CD4(+) T cells acquired a CD44(high) CD62L(low) effector phenotype not accompanied by increases in memory T cells. A mouse model for sublethal Leptospira infection allows understanding of the bacterial and host factors that lead to immune evasion, which can result in acute or chronic disease or resistance to infection (protection). PMID:26416909

  6. Cerebellar associative sensory learning defects in five mouse autism models

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Alexander D; Badura, Aleksandra; Li, Amy; Cherskov, Adriana; Connolly, Sara G; Giovannucci, Andrea; Bangash, M Ali; Grasselli, Giorgio; Peñagarikano, Olga; Piochon, Claire; Tsai, Peter T; Geschwind, Daniel H; Hansel, Christian; Sahin, Mustafa; Takumi, Toru; Worley, Paul F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2015-01-01

    Sensory integration difficulties have been reported in autism, but their underlying brain-circuit mechanisms are underexplored. Using five autism-related mouse models, Shank3+/ΔC, Mecp2R308/Y, Cntnap2−/−, L7-Tsc1 (L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+), and patDp(15q11-13)/+, we report specific perturbations in delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative sensory learning requiring cerebellar plasticity. By distinguishing perturbations in the probability and characteristics of learned responses, we found that probability was reduced in Cntnap2−/−, patDp(15q11-13)/+, and L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+, which are associated with Purkinje-cell/deep-nuclear gene expression, along with Shank3+/ΔC. Amplitudes were smaller in L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+ as well as Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y, which are associated with granule cell pathway expression. Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y also showed aberrant response timing and reduced Purkinje-cell dendritic spine density. Overall, our observations are potentially accounted for by defects in instructed learning in the olivocerebellar loop and response representation in the granule cell pathway. Our findings indicate that defects in associative temporal binding of sensory events are widespread in autism mouse models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06085.001 PMID:26158416

  7. Apoptotic photoreceptor cell death in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Portera-Cailliau, C; Sung, C H; Nathans, J; Adler, R

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited human diseases in which photoreceptor degeneration leads to visual loss and eventually to blindness. Although mutations in the rhodopsin, peripherin, and cGMP phosphodiesterase genes have been identified in some forms of RP, it remains to be determined whether these mutations lead to photoreceptor cell death through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that photoreceptor cell death occurs by an apoptotic mechanism in three mouse models of RP: retinal degeneration slow (rds) caused by a peripherin mutation, retinal degeneration (rd) caused by a defect in cGMP phosphodiesterase, and transgenic mice carrying a rhodopsin Q344ter mutation responsible for autosomal dominant RP. Two complementary techniques were used to detect apoptosis-specific internucleosomal DNA fragmentation: agarose gel electrophoresis and in situ labeling of apoptotic cells by terminal dUTP nick end labeling. Both methods showed extensive apoptosis of photoreceptors in all three mouse models of retinal degeneration. We also show that apoptotic death occurs in the retina during normal development, suggesting that different mechanisms can cause photoreceptor death by activating an intrinsic death program in these cells. These findings raise the possibility that retinal degenerations may be slowed by interfering with the apoptotic mechanism itself. Images PMID:8302876

  8. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. PMID:26589934

  9. Organization and evolution of D region class I genes in the mouse major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chromosome walking has been used to study the organization of the class I genes in the D and Qa regions of the MHC of the BALB/c mouse and in the D region of the AKR mouse. Five and eight class I genes are found in the D and Qa regions of the BALB/c mouse, respectively, while the AKR mouse contains only a single class I D region gene that has been identified by transfection as the Dk gene. Restriction map homologies and crosshybridization experiments suggest that the multiple class I genes in the D region of the BALB/c mouse have been generated by unequal crossing-over involving class I genes from the Qa region. The expanded D region of BALB/c and other H-2d haplotype mouse strains appears to be metastable, since evidence for gene contraction in the Dd region has been found in two mutant strains. Thus the D region and also the Qa region class I genes are in a dynamic state, evolving by gene expansion and contraction. PMID:3701254

  10. Mapping the mouse dactylaplasia mutation, Dac, and a gene that controls its expression, mdac

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Lane, P.W.; Ward-Bailey, P.; Davisson, M.T.

    1995-09-20

    Dactylaplasia is an inherited mouse limb malformation whose manifestation is clearly dependent on the interaction of two genes and thus represents an excellent model system for studying such gene interactions in vivo. The Dac mutation is inherited as a semidominant trait and may be a model for some forms of human ectrodactyly. Heterozygotes show absence of digits on each foot; the long bones are normal. On the SM/Ckc background on which the mutation occurred, Dac homozygotes die around birth. We mapped Dac to the distal end of Chr 19 by backcross segregation analysis. A closely linked marker was then used to distinguish -/+, Dac/+, and Dac/Dac genotypes of embryos and adults. When intercrossed with the NZB/BINJ strain, DAC homozygotes were shown to be viable and fertile, but had a more severe limb malformation (only a single remaining digit) than heterozygotes. Expression of the abnormal limb phenotypes of Dac/+ and Dac/Dac mice also depends on homozygosity for a recessive allele of another unlinked gene, mdac, that is polymorphic among inbred mouse strains. We mapped mdac to the middle Chr 13 by segregation analysis of both recombinant inbred strains and backcross progeny. 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rgnull) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of “next generation” humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  12. Control of mouse U1 snRNA gene expression during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Lund, E; Kahan, B W; Dahlberg, J E

    1997-01-01

    Early in mouse development, two classes of U1 RNAs, mU1a and mU1b, are synthesized, but as development proceeds, transcription of the embryo-specific mU1b genes is selectively down-regulated to a barely detectable level. We show here that during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, both exogenously introduced and endogenous U1b genes are subject to normal developmental regulation. Thus, ES cells represent a convenient isogenic system for studying the control of expression of developmentally regulated snRNA genes. Using this system, we have identified a region in the proximal 5'flanking region, located outside the PSE element, that is responsible for differential transcription of the mU1a and mU1b genes in both developing cells and transiently transfected NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:9153321

  13. High-resolution prediction of mouse brain connectivity using gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Ji, Shuiwang

    2015-02-01

    The brain is a multi-level system in which the high-level functions are generated by low-level genetic mechanisms. Thus, elucidating the relationship among multiple brain levels via correlative and predictive analytics is an important area in brain research. Currently, studies in multiple species have indicated that the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns are predictive of brain wiring. Specifically, results on the worm Caenorhabditis elegans have shown that the prediction of neuronal connectivity using gene expression signatures yielded statistically significant results. Recent studies on the mammalian brain produced similar results at the coarse regional level. In this study, we provide the first high-resolution, large-scale integrative analysis of the transcriptome and connectome in a single mammalian brain at a fine voxel level. By using the Allen Brain Atlas data, we predict voxel-level brain connectivity based on the gene expressions in the adult mouse brain. We employ regularized models to show that gene expression is predictive of connectivity at the voxel-level with an accuracy of 93%. We also identify a set of genes playing the most important role in connectivity prediction. We use only this small number of genes to predict the brain wiring with an accuracy over 80%. We discover that these important genes are enriched in neurons as compared to glia, and they perform connectivity-related functions. We perform several interesting correlative studies to further elucidate the transcriptome-connectome relationship.

  14. Bayesian modeling of differential gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Alex; Richardson, Sylvia; Marshall, Clare; Glazier, Anne; Aitman, Tim

    2006-03-01

    We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for detecting differentially expressing genes that includes simultaneous estimation of array effects, and show how to use the output for choosing lists of genes for further investigation. We give empirical evidence that expression-level dependent array effects are needed, and explore different nonlinear functions as part of our model-based approach to normalization. The model includes gene-specific variances but imposes some necessary shrinkage through a hierarchical structure. Model criticism via posterior predictive checks is discussed. Modeling the array effects (normalization) simultaneously with differential expression gives fewer false positive results. To choose a list of genes, we propose to combine various criteria (for instance, fold change and overall expression) into a single indicator variable for each gene. The posterior distribution of these variables is used to pick the list of genes, thereby taking into account uncertainty in parameter estimates. In an application to mouse knockout data, Gene Ontology annotations over- and underrepresented among the genes on the chosen list are consistent with biological expectations.

  15. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias; Putoczki, Tracy L

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late-stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new-targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre-clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  16. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias; Putoczki, Tracy L

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late-stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new-targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre-clinical development of new therapeutics.

  17. Multifactorial Gene Therapy Enhancing the Glutamate Uptake System and Reducing Oxidative Stress Delays Symptom Onset and Prolongs Survival in the SOD1-G93A ALS Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Benkler, Chen; Barhum, Yael; Ben-Zur, Tali; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The 150-year-long search for treatments of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is still fueled by frustration over the shortcomings of available therapeutics. Contributing to the therapeutic limitations might be the targeting of a single aspect of this multifactorial-multisystemic disease. In an attempt to overcome this, we devised a novel multifactorial-cocktail treatment, using lentiviruses encoding: EAAT2, GDH2, and NRF2, that act synergistically to address the band and width of the effected excito-oxidative axis, reducing extracellular-glutamate and glutamate availability while improving the metabolic state and the anti-oxidant response. This strategy yielded particularly impressive results, as all three genes together but not separately prolonged survival in ALS mice by an average of 19-22 days. This was accompanied by improvement in every parameter evaluated, including body-weight loss, reflex score, neurologic score, and motor performance. We hope to provide a novel strategy to slow down disease progression and alleviate symptoms of patients suffering from ALS.

  18. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions.

  19. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  1. Quantitative Evaluation and Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative RT-PCR in Mouse Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhaoping; Gao, Jinhang; Lv, Xiuhe; Yang, Wenjuan; Wen, Shilei; Tong, Huan; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of differences in gene expression is dependent on normalization using reference genes. However, the expression of many of these reference genes, as evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR, is upregulated in acute pancreatitis, so they cannot be used as the standard for gene expression in this condition. For this reason, we sought to identify a stable reference gene, or a suitable combination, for expression analysis in acute pancreatitis. The expression stability of 10 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18sRNA, TUBB, B2M, HPRT1, UBC, YWHAZ, EF-1α, and RPL-13A) was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software and evaluated according to variations in the raw Ct values. These reference genes were evaluated using a comprehensive method, which ranked the expression stability of these genes as follows (from most stable to least stable): RPL-13A, YWHAZ > HPRT1 > GAPDH > UBC > EF-1α > 18sRNA > B2M > TUBB > ACTB. RPL-13A was the most suitable reference gene, and the combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ was the most stable group of reference genes in our experiments. The expression levels of ACTB, TUBB, and B2M were found to be significantly upregulated during acute pancreatitis, whereas the expression level of 18sRNA was downregulated. Thus, we recommend the use of RPL-13A or a combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ for normalization in qRT-PCR analyses of gene expression in mouse models of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27069927

  2. Transgenic Mouse Models Enabling Photolabeling of Individual Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences. PMID:23626779

  3. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  4. Expression of the mouse corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in vivo and targeted inactivation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Muglia, L J; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Majzoub, J A

    1994-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), one of the primary regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, exhibits abnormal regulation in pathologic states such as depression and anorexia nervosa. Analysis of the role of CRH in regulation of the HPA axis would be facilitated by the creation of animal models in which CRH gene structure and function could be manipulated. We have determined the DNA sequence of the mouse CRH gene. Using a highly sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method, we have found expression of CRH mRNA in adrenal, ovary, testis, gut, heart, anterior pituitary, lung, and spleen, in addition to cerebral cortex and hypothalamus. Within the spleen, CRH mRNA is localized specifically to T-lymphocytes. We mapped the chromosomal location of mouse CRH via interspecific mouse backcrosses to chromosome 3, which is not the site of any naturally occurring mutations consistent with CRH deficiency. Because of this, we inactivated a CRH allele in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by homologous recombination with a mutant mouse CRH gene lacking the entire coding region of preproCRH. Mice chimeric for each of two ES clones with an inactivated CRH allele are being used to generate animals with complete CRH deficiency. Images PMID:8182138

  5. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse and Human Cardiac Maturation.

    PubMed

    Uosaki, Hideki; Taguchi, Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how human cardiomyocytes mature is crucial to realizing stem cell-based heart regeneration, modeling adult heart diseases, and facilitating drug discovery. However, it is not feasible to analyze human samples for maturation due to inaccessibility to samples while cardiomyocytes mature during fetal development and childhood, as well as difficulty in avoiding variations among individuals. Using model animals such as mice can be a useful strategy; nonetheless, it is not well-understood whether and to what degree gene expression profiles during maturation are shared between humans and mice. Therefore, we performed a comparative gene expression analysis of mice and human samples. First, we examined two distinct mice microarray platforms for shared gene expression profiles, aiming to increase reliability of the analysis. We identified a set of genes displaying progressive changes during maturation based on principal component analysis. Second, we demonstrated that the genes identified had a differential expression pattern between adult and earlier stages (e.g., fetus) common in mice and humans. Our findings provide a foundation for further genetic studies of cardiomyocyte maturation. PMID:27431744

  6. Hydrodynamic Transfection for Generation of Novel Mouse Models for Liver Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, are leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Recent large-scale genomic approaches have identified a wide number of genes whose deregulation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma development. Murine models are critical tools to determine the oncogenic potential of these genes. Conventionally, transgenic or knockout mouse models are used for this purpose. However, several limitations apply to the latter models. Herein, we review a novel approach for stable gene expression in mouse hepatocytes by hydrodynamic injection in combination with Sleeping Beauty–mediated somatic integration. This method represents a flexible, reliable, and cost-effective tool to generate preclinical murine models for liver cancer research. Furthermore, it can be used as an in vivo transfection method to study biochemical cross talks among multiple pathways along hepatocarcinogenesis and to test the therapeutic potential of drugs against liver cancer. PMID:24480331

  7. Growth plate abnormalities in a new dwarf mouse model: tich.

    PubMed

    Brown, R A; Bird, L; Blunn, G W; Archer, J R

    1994-03-01

    Growth plate cartilage calcification has been examined in a recently described mouse mutant, tich, which is co-isogenic with the A.TL strain. Long bones were studied from 1-day-old and 1-month-old mice which carried a homozygous recessive gene mutation making them short limbed and dumpy. Specimens were studied by routine histology, scanning electron microscopy and radiography. In 1-day-old tich mice the front of calcified cartilage was recessed behind the advancing periosteum and bone. No similar recess was seen in control mice. At 1 month of age, a number of the long bone growth plates were irregularly thickened, particularly in the central area. This produced a central tongue of non-calcified cartilage (particularly prominent in the proximal tibia) which gave rise to a corresponding pit in the calcified cartilage layer, in macerated specimens. This was accompanied by poor resorption of calcified cartilage. At both ages the presence of the respective defects was radiographically confirmed. At present it is not known whether this is primarily a defect of calcification or resorption but its presence, apparently from a single mutation in a genetically defined mouse strain, makes it a potentially valuable model.

  8. Sexual differentiation in the developing mouse brain: contributions of sex chromosome genes.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, J T; Rissman, E F; Bekiranov, S

    2013-03-01

    Neural sexual differentiation begins during embryogenesis and continues after birth for a variable amount of time depending on the species and brain region. Because gonadal hormones were the first factors identified in neural sexual differentiation, their role in this process has eclipsed investigation of other factors. Here, we use a mouse with a spontaneous translocation that produces four different unique sets of sex chromosomes. Each genotype has one normal X-chromosome and a unique second sex chromosome creating the following genotypes: XY(*x) , XX, XY(*) , XX(Y) (*) . This Y(*) mouse line is used by several laboratories to study two human aneuploid conditions: Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. As sex chromosome number affects behavior and brain morphology, we surveyed brain gene expression at embryonic days 11.5 and 18.5 to isolate X-chromosome dose effects in the developing brain as possible mechanistic changes underlying the phenotypes. We compared gene expression differences between gonadal males and females as well as individuals with one vs. two X-chromosomes. We present data showing, in addition to genes reported to escape X-inactivation, a number of autosomal genes are differentially expressed between the sexes and in mice with different numbers of X-chromosomes. Based on our results, we can now identify the genes present in the region around the chromosomal break point that produces the Y(*) model. Our results also indicate an interaction between gonadal development and sex chromosome number that could further elucidate the role of sex chromosome genes and hormones in the sexual differentiation of behavior.

  9. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Aso, Ester; Panayotis, Nicolas; Lott, Ira; Dierssen, Mara; Rabano, Alberto; Urdinguio, Rocio G; Fernandez, Agustin F; Astudillo, Aurora; Martin-Subero, Jose I; Balint, Balazs; Fraga, Mario F; Gomez, Antonio; Gurnot, Cecile; Roux, Jean-Christophe; Avila, Jesus; Hensch, Takao K; Ferrer, Isidre; Esteller, Manel

    2013-10-01

    The central nervous system has a pattern of gene expression that is closely regulated with respect to functional and anatomical regions. DNA methylation is a major regulator of transcriptional activity, and aberrations in the distribution of this epigenetic mark may be involved in many neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we have analysed 12 distinct mouse brain regions according to their CpG 5'-end gene methylation patterns and observed their unique epigenetic landscapes. The DNA methylomes obtained from the cerebral cortex were used to identify aberrant DNA methylation changes that occurred in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. We were able to translate these findings to patients with Alzheimer's disease, identifying DNA methylation-associated silencing of three targets genes: thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R), sorbin and SH3 domain containing 3 (SORBS3) and spectrin beta 4 (SPTBN4). These hypermethylation targets indicate that the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation pathway and the axon initial segment could contribute to the disease.

  10. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  11. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  12. Genomic structure and chromosomal assignment of the mouse Ku70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takiguchi, Yuichi |; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, Fanqing

    1996-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide subunits: Ku70, Ku80, and the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mammalian mutants deficient in either Ku80 or DNA-PKcs function have been shown to be lacking in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination, respectively. The precise role of the Ku70 gene in this process has not yet been determined, in part because no cell lines, animals, or human diseases involved with deficiencies in this gene have yet been identified. Both the human and the mouse Ku70 cDNAs have been cloned, and the human gene has been mapped to chromosome 22q13. The original mouse cDNA clones, however, lacked a complete 5{prime}-region, and none of the mammalian Ku70 genomic sequences have been characterized. This report contains an analysis of the 5{prime}-region of the mouse cDNA sequence, a characterization of the mouse Ku70 genomic structure, and fluorescence in situ hybridization data that map the mouse gene to chromosome 15. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse gene consists of 608 amino acids compared to 609 for the human gene. The genomic sequence is 24 kb and consists of 13 exons, including an untranslated first exon. Sequences form the upstream region of exon 1 revealed four consensus GC box sequences and a strong transcription initiation site at a reasonable location. The assignment of the mouse Ku70 gene to chromosome 15 is consistent with the syntenic relationship of this gene in human (chromosome 22q13) and mouse and adds to the comparative mapping data for the genes involved in the SCID phenotype. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Development of a novel mouse constipation model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Wang, Kai-Yue; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a novel mouse constipation model. METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into three groups, and intragastrically administered 0-4 °C saline (ice-cold group) or 15-20 °C saline (saline control group) daily for 14 d, or were left untreated (blank control group). Stools were collected 3-24 h after treatment to record the wet and dry weights and the stool form. Intestinal propulsion experiments were carried out and defecation time was measured for six days continuously after suspending treatments. The expressions of PGP9.5 were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Based on the percentage of stool weight changes compared with baseline (before irritation) in 9-14 d, stool weight changes were classified into three levels. Each level shows a different body state, which is state I (no change: plus or minus 5%), state II (slightly decreased: 5%-15%) and state III (decreased: 15%-25%). In state III, between day 9-14, the stool weights decreased by 15%-25% compared with the baseline, and changed at a rate > 10% compared with blank control values, and the stools became small and dry. Additionally, intestinal functions degenerated in these animals, and PGP9.5-positive expression markedly decreased in jejunum, ileum and proximal colon myenteric plexus. CONCLUSION: Irritation with ice-cold saline is a stable, repeatable method in building constipation model in mice for exploring the pathogenesis and treatment options of constipation, and the change of stool weight and size may serve as a useful tool to judge a constipation model success or not. PMID:26973418

  14. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Gene Deficiency Ameliorates Hepatic Injury in a Mouse Model of Chronic Binge Alcohol-Induced Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huilin; Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Ramsden, Christopher E.; Feldstein, Ariel E.; McClain, Craig J.; Kirpich, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental alcohol-induced liver injury is exacerbated by a high polyunsaturated fat diet rich in linoleic acid. We postulated that bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) play a critical role in the development/progression of alcohol-mediated hepatic inflammation and injury. OXLAMs are endogenous ligands for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Herein, we evaluated the role of signaling through TRPV1 in an experimental animal model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Chronic binge alcohol administration increased plasma OXLAM levels, specifically 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids. This effect was associated with up-regulation of hepatic TRPV1. Exposure of hepatocytes to these OXLAMs in vitro resulted in activation of TRPV1 signal transduction with increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. Genetic depletion of TRPV1 did not blunt hepatic steatosis caused by ethanol, but prevented hepatic injury. TRPV1 deficiency protected from hepatocyte death and prevented the increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. TRPV1 depletion markedly blunted ethanol-mediated induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, an important alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation mediator, via fibrin accumulation. This study indicates, for the first time, that TRPV1 receptor pathway may be involved in hepatic inflammatory response in an experimental animal model of ALD. TRPV1-OXLAM interactions appear to play a significant role in hepatic inflammation/injury, further supporting an important role for dietary lipids in ALD. PMID:25447051

  15. Identification of mouse retinal genes differentially regulated by dim and bright cyclic light rearing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hu; Frank, Mark Barton; Dozmorov, Igor; Cao, Wei; Cadwell, Craig; Knowlton, Nick; Centola, Michael; Anderson, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Bright cyclic light rearing protects BALB/c mice from light-induced photoreceptor apoptosis compared to dim cyclic light rearing. We used a microarray approach to search for putative neuroprotection genes that were up- or down-regulated under these environmental conditions. Retinal protection by bright cyclic rearing was determined by quantitative histology and DNA fragmentation analysis. Total RNA was isolated from 5-week-old mice raised in bright (400 lux) or dim (5 lux) cyclic light and prepared for analysis on microarrays produced using a 70-mer oligonucleotide library that represented 16,463 mouse genes. Genes of interest were identified using statistically robust bioinformatics analysis methods that were developed in-house. Changes in some genes were confirmed with quantitative real time PCR. We found that 952 genes were up- or down-regulated by bright cyclic light rearing compared to dim cyclic light rearing. One hundred and eighty-four of them, having >/=2-fold differences, were grouped into 13 categories, and selected for further consideration. Eleven up-regulated and two down-regulated genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR. Five neuroprotection-associated genes were up-regulated by bright cyclic light rearing as confirmed by real-time PCR. The human orthologue chromosomal location of 22 differentially expressed genes map to known retinal degeneration loci. Using PathwayAssist software, we modeled the pathway networks of up- and down-regulated genes that are functionally related to the retina. We identified retinal genes that are differentially regulated by environmental light history. Those that directly affect cell processes such as survival, apoptosis, and transcription are likely play a pivotal role in the regulation of retinal neuroprotection against light-induced photoreceptor apoptosis.

  16. Identification and Applications of Repetitive Probes for Gene Mapping in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, L. D.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    Interspecific mouse hybrids that are viable and fertile provide a wealth of genetic variation that is useful for gene mapping. We are using this genetic variation to develop multilocus linkage maps of the mouse genome. As an outgrowth of this work, we have identified three repetitive probes that collectively identify 28 loci dispersed on 16 of the 19 mouse autosomes and the X chromosome. These loci establish a skeleton linkage map that can be used to detect linkage over much of the mouse genome. The molecular probes are derived from the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope gene, the ornithine decarboxylase gene, and the triose phosphate isomerase gene. The ability to scan the mouse genome quickly and efficiently in an interspecific cross using these three repetitive probes makes this system a powerful tool for identifying the chromosomal location of mutations that have yet to be cloned, mapping multigenic traits, and identifying recessive protooncogene loci associated with murine neoplastic disease. Ultimately, interspecific hybrids in conjunction with repetitive and single-copy probes will provide a rapid means to access virtually any gene of interest in the mouse genome at the molecular level. PMID:1673105

  17. Neuroinformatics for genome-wide 3D gene expression mapping in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Pathak, Sayan D; Kuan, Chihchau; Lau, Chris; Dong, Hongwei; Sodt, Andrew; Dang, Chinh; Avants, Brian; Yushkevich, Paul; Gee, James C; Haynor, David; Lein, Ed; Jones, Allan; Hawrylycz, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit genome-wide searches to discover genes that are uniquely expressed in brain circuits and regions that control behavior. Previous gene expression mapping studies in model organisms have employed situ hybridization (ISH), a technique that uses labeled nucleic acid probes to bind to specific mRNA transcripts in tissue sections. A key requirement for this effort is the development of fast and robust algorithms for anatomically mapping and quantifying gene expression for ISH. We describe a neuroinformatics pipeline for automatically mapping expression profiles of ISH data and its use to produce the first genomic scale 3-D mapping of gene expression in a mammalian brain. The pipeline is fully automated and adaptable to other organisms and tissues. Our automated study of over 20,000 genes indicates that at least 78.8 percent are expressed at some level in the adult C56BL/6J mouse brain. In addition to providing a platform for genomic scale search, high-resolution images and visualization tools for expression analysis are available at the Allen Brain Atlas web site (http://www.brain-map.org).

  18. Differential expression of calcium-activated chloride channels (CLCA) gene family members in the small intestine of cystic fibrosis mouse models.

    PubMed

    Leverkoehne, Ina; Holle, Hannah; Anton, Friederike; Gruber, Achim D

    2006-08-01

    Members of the family of calcium-activated chloride channels (CLCA) have been implicated as modulators of the phenotype in cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, the expression levels of the murine mCLCA1, mCLCA2, mCLCA3 and mCLCA4 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR in the small intestines of CF (cftr (tm1Cam), cftr (TgH(neoim)1Hgu)) and wild type C57BL/6, BALB/c, DBA/2 and NMRI mice. Markedly different expression levels of all four CLCA homologs were observed between the different wild type strains. Expression of mCLCA1 and mCLCA4 was similar in CF versus wild type. In contrast, mCLCA3 mRNA copy numbers were increased up to threefold in all CF models. Immunohistochemical detection of mCLCA3 and PAS reactions on consecutive tissue sections identified a similar increase in mCLCA3 expressing goblet cells, suggesting that elevated mRNA copy numbers of mCLCA3 are due to goblet cell hyperplasia rather than transcriptional regulatory events. Increased mCLCA2 mRNA copy numbers, however, were considered more likely to be due to transcriptional upregulation. Changes in mRNA copy numbers were not associated with altered cell kinetics as determined by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to phospho-histone 3 and activated caspase-3. The results suggest that both mCLCA2 and mCLCA3 may act as modifiers of the intestinal phenotype in CF.

  19. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4-induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis. PMID:26011625

  20. Gene Expression Data to Mouse Atlas Registration Using a Nonlinear Elasticity Smoother and Landmark Points Constraints.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tungyou; Guyader, Carole Le; Dinov, Ivo; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur; Vese, Luminita

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a numerical algorithm for image registration using energy minimization and nonlinear elasticity regularization. Application to the registration of gene expression data to a neuroanatomical mouse atlas in two dimensions is shown. We apply a nonlinear elasticity regularization to allow larger and smoother deformations, and further enforce optimality constraints on the landmark points distance for better feature matching. To overcome the difficulty of minimizing the nonlinear elasticity functional due to the nonlinearity in the derivatives of the displacement vector field, we introduce a matrix variable to approximate the Jacobian matrix and solve for the simplified Euler-Lagrange equations. By comparison with image registration using linear regularization, experimental results show that the proposed nonlinear elasticity model also needs fewer numerical corrections such as regridding steps for binary image registration, it renders better ground truth, and produces larger mutual information; most importantly, the landmark points distance and L (2) dissimilarity measure between the gene expression data and corresponding mouse atlas are smaller compared with the registration model with biharmonic regularization. PMID:24273381

  1. Effects of gene regulatory reprogramming on gene expression in human and mouse developing hearts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lineage-specific regulatory elements underlie adaptation of species and play a role in disease susceptibility. We compared functionally conserved and lineage-specific enhancers by cross-mapping 5042 human and 6564 mouse heart enhancers. Of these, 79 per cent are lineage-specific, lacking a functional orthologue. Heart enhancers tend to cluster and, commonly, there are multiple heart enhancers in a heart locus providing a regulatory stability to the locus. We observed little cross-clustering, however, between lineage-specific and functionally conserved heart enhancers suggesting regulatory function acquisition and development in loci previously lacking heart activity. We also identified 862 human-specific heart enhancers: 417 featuring sequence conservation with mouse (class II) and 445 with neither sequence nor function conservation (class III). Ninety-eight per cent of class III enhancers were deleted from the mouse genome, and we estimated a similar-sized enhancer gain in the human lineage. Human-specific enhancers display no detectable decrease in the negative selection pressure and are strongly associated with genes partaking in the heart regulatory programmes. The loss of a heart enhancer could be compensated by activity of a redundant heart enhancer; however, we observed redundancy in only 15 per cent of class II and III enhancer loci indicating a large-scale reprogramming of the heart regulatory programme in mammals.

  2. Directed neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells and their gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesong; Gu, Qi; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Qingwen; Tang, Huixiang; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Xinbing; Yan, Hao; Hao, Jie; Zeng, Fanyi

    2013-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) may be useful as a therapeutic source of cells for the production of healthy tissue; however, they are associated with certain challenges including immunorejection as well as ethical issues. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising substitute since a patient's own adult cells would serve as tissue precursors. Ethical concerns prevent a full evaluation of the developmental potency of human ESCs and iPSCs, therefore, mouse iPSC models are required for protocol development and safety assessments. We used a modified culturing protocol to differentiate pluripotent cells from a mouse iPS cell line and two mouse ES cell lines into neurons. Our results indicated that all three pluripotent stem cell lines underwent nearly the same differentiation process when induced to form neurons in vitro. Genomic expression microarray profiling and single-cell RT-qPCR were used to analyze the neural lineage differentiation process, and more than one thousand differentially expressed genes involved in multiple molecular processes relevant to neural development were identified.

  3. Mouse model of Timothy syndrome recapitulates triad of autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Bader, Patrick L; Faizi, Mehrdad; Kim, Leo H; Owen, Scott F; Tadross, Michael R; Alfa, Ronald W; Bett, Glenna C L; Tsien, Richard W; Rasmusson, Randall L; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2011-09-13

    Autism and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) typically arise from a mixture of environmental influences and multiple genetic alterations. In some rare cases, such as Timothy syndrome (TS), a specific mutation in a single gene can be sufficient to generate autism or ASD in most patients, potentially offering insights into the etiology of autism in general. Both variants of TS (the milder TS1 and the more severe TS2) arise from missense mutations in alternatively spliced exons that cause the same G406R replacement in the Ca(V)1.2 L-type calcium channel. We generated a TS2-like mouse but found that heterozygous (and homozygous) animals were not viable. However, heterozygous TS2 mice that were allowed to keep an inverted neomycin cassette (TS2-neo) survived through adulthood. We attribute the survival to lowering of expression of the G406R L-type channel via transcriptional interference, blunting deleterious effects of mutant L-type channel overactivity, and addressed potential effects of altered gene dosage by studying Ca(V)1.2 knockout heterozygotes. Here we present a thorough behavioral phenotyping of the TS2-neo mouse, capitalizing on this unique opportunity to use the TS mutation to model ASD in mice. Along with normal general health, activity, and anxiety level, TS2-neo mice showed markedly restricted, repetitive, and perseverative behavior, altered social behavior, altered ultrasonic vocalization, and enhanced tone-cued and contextual memory following fear conditioning. Our results suggest that when TS mutant channels are expressed at levels low enough to avoid fatality, they are sufficient to cause multiple, distinct behavioral abnormalities, in line with the core aspects of ASD.

  4. Interrogation of in vivo protein-protein interactions using transgenic mouse models and stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anwesha; Wu, Jiansheng; Kirkpatrick, Donald S

    2014-01-01

    Methods in mass spectrometry have evolved in recent years, facilitating proteomic analyses that were previously beyond the limits of the technology. Transgenic mouse models, coupled with mass spectrometry proteomics, have served as valuable platform for elucidating the in vivo function of individual genes and proteins. Here we discuss the methods we have recently employed to characterize protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications in tagged knock-in mouse models. These methods can be broadly applied to other systems for various applications in both basic and translational science.

  5. Transgenic Mouse Models Transferred into the Test Tube: New Perspectives for Developmental Toxicity Testing In Vitro?

    PubMed

    Kugler, Josephine; Luch, Andreas; Oelgeschläger, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Despite our increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling embryogenesis, the identification and characterization of teratogenic substances still heavily relies on animal testing. Embryonic development depends on cell-autonomous and non-autonomous processes including spatiotemporally regulated extracellular signaling activities. These have been elucidated in transgenic mouse models harboring easily detectable reporter genes under the control of evolutionarily conserved signaling cascades. We propose combining these transgenic mouse models and cells derived thereof with existing alternative toxicological testing strategies. This would enable the plausibility of in vitro data to be verified in light of in vivo data and, ultimately, facilitate regulatory acceptance of in vitro test methods.

  6. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  8. Dissecting the heterogeneity of gene expressions in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Thomson, Matt; Liu, S. John; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2011-03-01

    A population of genetically identical cells, of the same nominal cell type, and cultured in the same petri dish, will nevertheless often exhibit varying patterns of gene expression. Taking mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system, we use immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to examine in detail the distribution of expression levels for various transcription factors key to the maintenance of the ES cell identity. We find the population-level distribution of many proteins, once rescaled by the average expression level, have very similar shapes. This suggest the largest component of observed heterogeneity comes from a single source. More subtly, we find the expression many of genes appears to modulate with the cell cycle. This may suggest that the program for maintaining ES cell identity is tightly coupled to the cell cycle machinery. This work is supported by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research.

  9. Mouse Palmitoyl Protein Thioesterase: Gene Structure and Expression of cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, Tarja; Hellsten, Elina; Horelli-Kuitunen, Nina; Peltonen, Leena; Jalanko, Anu

    1998-01-01

    Palmitoyl protein thioesterase (PPT) is the defective enzyme in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), which is a recessively inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. We present here the cloning, chromosomal mapping, genomic structure, and the expression of the cDNA of mouse PPT. The mouse PPT gene spans >21 kb of genomic DNA and contains nine exons with a coding sequence of 918 bp. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes localized the mouse PPT gene to the chromosome 4 conserved syntenic region with human chromosome 1p32 where the human PPT is located. PPT is expressed widely in a variety of mouse tissues. The mouse PPT cDNA is conserved highly with the human and rat PPT both at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence level. Transient expression of mouse PPT in COS-1 cells yielded a 38/36-kD differentially glycosylated polypeptide that was also secreted into culture media. Immunofluorescence analysis of transiently transfected HeLa cells indicated lysosomal localization of mouse PPT. Based on the high conservation of the gene and polypeptide structure as well as similar processing and intracellular localization, the function of PPT in mouse and human are likely to be very similar. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to GenBank under accession no. AF071O25.] PMID:9685319

  10. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Synteny conservation of the Huntington's disease gene and surrounding loci on mouse Chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Grosson, C L; MacDonald, M E; Duyao, M P; Ambrose, C M; Roffler-Tarlov, S; Gusella, J F

    1994-07-01

    The mouse homologs of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene and 17 other human Chromosome (Chr) 4 loci (including six previously unmapped) were localized by use of an interspecific cross. All loci mapped in a continuous linkage group on mouse Chr 5, distal to En2 and I16, whose human counterparts are located on Chr 7. The relative order of the loci on human Chr 4 and mouse Chr 5 was maintained, except for a break between D5H4S115E and Idua/rd, with relocation of the latter to the opposite end of the map. The mouse HD homolog (Hdh) mapped within a cluster of seven genes that were completely linked in our data set. In human these loci span a approximately 1.8 Mb stretch of human 4p16.3 that has been entirely cloned. To date, there is no phenotypic correspondence between human and mouse mutations mapping to this region of synteny conservation.

  12. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  13. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the β-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  14. Lgn1, a gene that determines susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila, maps to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.F.; Damron, D.M.; Lander, E.S.

    1995-04-10

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is unable to replicate in macrophages derived from most inbred mouse strains. Here, we report the mapping of a gene, called Lgn1, that determines whether mouse macrophages are permissive for the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. Although Lgn1 has been previously reported to map to mouse chromosome 15, we show here that it actually maps to chromosome 13, between D13Mit128 and D13Mit70. In the absence of any regional candidates for Lgn1, this map position will facilitate positional cloning attempts directed at this gene. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Excavating the Genome: Large Scale Mutagenesis Screening for the Discovery of New Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Dadras, Soheil S.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Kennedy, Victoria E.; Murray, Stephen A.; Denegre, James; Schofield, Paul N.; King, Lloyd E.; Wiles, Michael; Pratt, C. Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Technology now exists for rapid screening of mutated laboratory mice to identify phenotypes associated with specific genetic mutations. Large repositories exist for spontaneous mutants and those induced by chemical mutagenesis, many of which have never been studied or comprehensively evaluated. To supplement these resources, a variety of techniques have been consolidated in an international effort to create mutations in all known protein coding genes in the mouse. With targeted embryonic stem cell lines now available for almost all protein coding genes and more recently CRISPR/Cas9 technology, large-scale efforts are underway to create novel mutant mouse strains and to characterize their phenotypes. However, accurate diagnosis of skin, hair, and nail diseases still relies on careful gross and histological analysis. While not automated to the level of the physiological phenotyping, histopathology provides the most direct and accurate diagnosis and correlation with human diseases. As a result of these efforts, many new mouse dermatological disease models are being developed. PMID:26551941

  16. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-02-12

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation.

  17. A humanized mouse model for the reduced folate carrier.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David; Graham, Christine; Cherian, Christina; Matherly, Larry H

    2008-02-01

    The ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier (RFC) or SLC19A1 is recognized to be an essential transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. In addition to its generalized role as a folate transporter, RFC provides specialized tissue functions including absorption across intestinal/colonic epithelia, transport across the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubules, transplacental transport of folates, and folate transport across the blood-brain barrier. The human RFC (hRFC) gene is regulated by five major upstream non-coding regions (designated A1/A2, A, B, C, and D), each transcribed from a unique promoter. Altogether, at least 14 distinct hRFC transcripts can be envisaged in which different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) are fused to a common splice acceptor region (positions -1 to -49) within the first coding exon with a common 1776bp coding sequence. The 5' non-coding regions are characterized by alternate transcription start sites, multiple splice forms, and selective tissue distributions. Alternate 5' UTRs impact mRNA stabilities and translation efficiencies, and result in synthesis of modified hRFC proteins translated from upstream AUGs. In this report, we describe production and characterization of transgenic mice (TghRFC1) containing a functional hRFC gene and of humanized mice in which the mRFC gene is inactivated and an active hRFC gene has been introduced. The mice appear to be healthy and to breed well. Analysis of tissue specificity of expression in both the TghRFC1 and humanized hRFC mice by real-time RT-PCR demonstrates that the hRFC gene is expressed with a specificity closely resembling that seen in human tissues. For the humanized hRFC mice, levels of B and A1/A2 5' UTRs predominated in all mice/tissues, thus resembling results in normal human tissues. Lower levels of A and C 5' UTRs were also detected. The availability of humanized mouse models for hRFC will permit investigators to address critical unanswered questions

  18. Humanized Mouse Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Because of the limited tropism of HIV, in vivo modeling of this virus has been almost exclusively limited to other lentiviruses such as SIV that reproduce many important characteristics of HIV infection. However, there are significant genetic and biological differences among lentiviruses and some HIV-specific interventions are not effective against other lentiviruses in non-human hosts. For these reasons much emphasis has recently been placed on developing alternative animal models that support HIV replication and recapitulate key aspects of HIV infection and pathogenesis in humans. Humanized mice, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell transplanted immunodeficient mice and in particular mice also implanted with human thymic/liver tissue (BLT mice) that develop a functional human immune system, have been the focus of a great deal of attention as possible models to study virtually all aspects of HIV biology and pathogenesis. Humanized mice are systemically reconstituted with human lymphoid cells offering rapid, reliable and reproducible experimental systems for HIV research. Peripheral blood of humanized mice can be readily sampled longitudinally to assess reconstitution with human cells and to monitor HIV replication permitting the evaluation of multiple parameters of HIV infection such as viral load levels, CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation, as well as the effects of therapeutic interventions. Of high relevance to HIV transmission is the extensive characterization and validation of the reconstitution with human lymphoid cells of the female reproductive tract and of the gastrointestinal tract of humanized BLT mice that renders them susceptible to both vaginal and rectal HIV infection. Other important attributes of all types of humanized mice include: 1) their small size and cost that make them broadly accessible; 2) multiple cohorts of humanized mice can be made from multiple human donors and each cohort has identical human cells, permitting control of

  19. Characterization, expression, and evolution of the mouse embryonic zeta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Leder, A; Weir, L; Leder, P

    1985-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the embryonic alpha-like, zeta (zeta)-globin gene of the BALB/c mouse. The structure of this gene establishes the amino acid sequence of the mouse embryonic zeta-globin polypeptide chain and allows us to identify sequences within the gene that may be important for its expression. One of these is a 300-base segment that is tightly conserved between mice and humans and is located at the 5' end of the zeta-globin gene. By introducing the cloned gene into permanently transfected mouse erythroleukemic cell lines and comparing its transcript with that of zeta-globin mRNA derived from embryonic yolk sac erythrocytes, we are able to show that the cloned gene is transcriptionally active and that its transcript is correctly initiated and processed. Interestingly, the zeta-globin gene is also active when permanently transfected into an immunoglobulin-producing B-cell, a cell that presumably has tissue-specific requirements for gene expression. Further, a comparison of the amino acid coding sequence of the mouse zeta-globin gene to that of zeta-like globin genes of other species supports a revised evolutionary lineage in which goats and humans are closely related, whereas mice are further removed. Images PMID:4000117

  20. Distribution of the mammalian Stat gene family in mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-09-01

    Studies of transcriptional activation by interferons and a variety of cytokines have led to the identification of a family of proteins that serve as signal transducers and activators of transcription, Stats. Here, we report that the seven mouse Stat loci map in three clusters, with each cluster located on a different mouse autosome. The data suggest that the family has arisen via a tandem duplication of the ancestral locus, followed by dispersion of the linked loci to different mouse chromosomes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Novel mouse models for understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Aviva; Sango, Kaori; Goldstein, Harris

    2009-01-01

    Small animal models in which in vivo HIV-1 infection, pathogenesis, and immune responses can be studied would permit both basic research on the biology of the disease, as well as a system to rapidly screen developmental therapeutics and/or va